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Sample records for aeruginosa strains pao1

  1. Proteomic profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AES-1R, PAO1 and PA14 reveals potential virulence determinants associated with a transmissible cystic fibrosis-associated strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While most CF patients are thought to acquire P. aeruginosa from the environment, person-person transmissible strains have been identified in CF clinics worldwide. The molecular basis for transmissibility and colonization of the CF lung remains poorly understood. Results A dual proteomics approach consisting of gel-based and gel-free comparisons were undertaken to analyse protein profiles in a transmissible, early (acute) isolate of the Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1R), the virulent burns/wound isolate PA14, and the poorly virulent, laboratory-associated strain PAO1. Over 1700 P. aeruginosa proteins were confidently identified. AES-1R protein profiles revealed elevated abundance of proteins associated with virulence and siderophore biosynthesis and acquisition, antibiotic resistance and lipopolysaccharide and fatty acid biosynthesis. The most abundant protein in AES-1R was confirmed as a previously hypothetical protein with sequence similarity to carbohydrate-binding proteins and database search revealed this gene is only found in the CF-associated strain PA2192. The link with CF infection may suggest that transmissible strains have acquired an ability to rapidly interact with host mucosal glycoproteins. Conclusions Our data suggest that AES-1R expresses higher levels of proteins, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance, iron acquisition and virulence that may provide a competitive advantage during early infection in the CF lung. Identification of novel proteins associated with transmissibility and acute infection may aid in deciphering new strategies for intervention to limit P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients. PMID:22264352

  2. Fructooligosacharides Reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Pathogenicity through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed. PMID:24465697

  3. Genetic determinants involved in the biodegradation of naphthalene and phenanthrene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Wang, Bobo; Li, Jing; Ning, Huanhuan; Wang, Yingjuan; Kong, Weina; Shen, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Pseudomonas sp. are predominant isolates of degradation-competent strains while very few studies have explored the degradation-related genes and pathways in most of the degrading strains. P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found capable of degrading naphthalene and phenanthrene efficiently. In order to investigate the degradation-related genes of naphthalene and phenanthrene in P. aeruginosa PAO1, a random promoter library of about 5760 strains was constructed. Thirty-two clones for differentially expressed promoters were obtained by screening in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentration of naphthalene and phenanthrene. Among them, 13 genes were up-regulated and 15 were down-regulated in the presence of naphthalene as well as phenanthrene. The four remaining genes have different regulation tendencies by naphthalene or phenanthrene. By comparing the growth between the wild type and mutants as well as the complementations, the roles of seven selected up-regulated genes on naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation were investigated. Five of the seven selected up-regulated genes, like PA2666 and PA4780, were found playing key roles on the degradation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Also, the results imply that these genes participate in the overlapping part of naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation pathways in PAO1. Results in the article offer the convenience quick method and platform for searching degradation-related genes. It also laid a foundation for understanding of the role of the regulated genes.

  4. Triclosan-induced modification of unsaturated fatty acid metabolism and growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Bullard, James W; Champlin, Franklin R; Burkus, Janna; Millar, Sarah Y; Conrad, Robert S

    2011-03-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent having low toxicity which facilitates its incorporation into numerous personal and health care products. Although triclosan acts against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by affecting fatty acid biosynthesis, it is ineffective against the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wild-type strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 was used as a model system to determine the effects of triclosan on fatty acid metabolism in resistant microorganisms. This was accomplished by cultivating P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures in the presence of different concentrations of triclosan, monitoring growth rates turbidimetrically, and harvesting in stationary phase. Readily extractable lipids (RELs) were obtained from freeze-dried cells after washing and analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Resultant data demonstrated that triclosan caused dose-dependent increases in the amounts of trans-C(16:1) and trans-C(18:1) fatty acids, with concomitant decreases in their respective cyclopropyl analogs. Triclosan did not affect the relative concentrations of saturated, cis unsaturated, or the overall ratios of combined C(16) to C(18) fatty acid species. The readily extractable lipid fractions contained triclosan proportional to triclosan concentrations in the growth media. The presence or absence of triclosan in either liquid or solid media did not affect the antimicrobial susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to a battery of unrelated antimicrobials. Triclosan decreased growth rate in a dose-dependent manner at soluble concentrations. Incorporation of triclosan into the REL fraction was accompanied by increased levels of trans unsaturated fatty acids, decreased levels of cyclopropyl fatty acids, and decrease in growth rate. These alterations may contribute to triclosan resistance in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance to Zinc pyrithione: phenotypic changes suggest the involvement of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, Suzanne M; Al-Adham, Ibrahim S; Matalka, Khalid Z; Collier, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of an efflux pump in the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to zinc pyrithione (ZnPT). In the presence of efflux inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP), the minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnPT for P. aeruginosa resistant cells is reduced significantly (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of ZnPT excluded by the resistant bacteria was reduced significantly (p < 0.01). However, the above reductions did not reach the levels measured for P. aeruginosa PAO1 sensitive strain. Furthermore, such changes in P. aeruginosa resistant cells were correlated with the overexpression of outer membrane proteins, reduced sensitivity toward imipenem (p < 0.01) and increased sensitivity toward sulphatriad and chloramphenicol (p < 0.05). In a continuation to a previous study, we conclude that P. aeruginosa resistance to ZnPT is multifactorial and involves induced efflux systems.

  6. Quorum quenching by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone acylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Sio, Charles F; Otten, Linda G; Cool, Robbert H; Diggle, Stephen P; Braun, Peter G; Bos, Rein; Daykin, Mavis; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Quax, Wim J

    2006-03-01

    The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is controlled by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system. During functional analysis of putative acylase genes in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, the PA2385 gene was found to encode an acylase that removes the fatty acid side chain from the homoserine lactone (HSL) nucleus of AHL-dependent quorum-sensing signal molecules. Analysis showed that the posttranslational processing of the acylase and the hydrolysis reaction type are similar to those of the beta-lactam acylases, strongly suggesting that the PA2385 protein is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. In a bioassay, the purified acylase was shown to degrade AHLs with side chains ranging in length from 11 to 14 carbons at physiologically relevant low concentrations. The substituent at the 3' position of the side chain did not affect activity, indicating broad-range AHL quorum-quenching activity. Of the two main AHL signal molecules of P. aeruginosa PAO1, N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL), only 3-oxo-C12-HSL is degraded by the enzyme. Addition of the purified protein to P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures completely inhibited accumulation of 3-oxo-C12-HSL and production of the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and reduced production of the virulence factors elastase and pyocyanin. Similar results were obtained when the PA2385 gene was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa. These results demonstrate that the protein has in situ quorum-quenching activity. The quorum-quenching AHL acylase may enable P. aeruginosa PAO1 to modulate its own quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenic potential and, moreover, offers possibilities for novel antipseudomonal therapies.

  7. Quorum Quenching by an N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Acylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Charles F.; Otten, Linda G.; Cool, Robbert H.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Braun, Peter G.; Bos, Rein; Daykin, Mavis; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Quax, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is controlled by an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system. During functional analysis of putative acylase genes in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, the PA2385 gene was found to encode an acylase that removes the fatty acid side chain from the homoserine lactone (HSL) nucleus of AHL-dependent quorum-sensing signal molecules. Analysis showed that the posttranslational processing of the acylase and the hydrolysis reaction type are similar to those of the beta-lactam acylases, strongly suggesting that the PA2385 protein is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. In a bioassay, the purified acylase was shown to degrade AHLs with side chains ranging in length from 11 to 14 carbons at physiologically relevant low concentrations. The substituent at the 3′ position of the side chain did not affect activity, indicating broad-range AHL quorum-quenching activity. Of the two main AHL signal molecules of P. aeruginosa PAO1, N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL), only 3-oxo-C12-HSL is degraded by the enzyme. Addition of the purified protein to P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures completely inhibited accumulation of 3-oxo-C12-HSL and production of the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and reduced production of the virulence factors elastase and pyocyanin. Similar results were obtained when the PA2385 gene was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa. These results demonstrate that the protein has in situ quorum-quenching activity. The quorum-quenching AHL acylase may enable P. aeruginosa PAO1 to modulate its own quorum-sensing-dependent pathogenic potential and, moreover, offers possibilities for novel antipseudomonal therapies. PMID:16495538

  8. Comparative Molecular docking analysis of DNA Gyrase subunit A in Pseudomonas aeruginosaPAO1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aman; Sharma, Vanashika; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Surenderkumar, Vipul; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Mathur, Ashwani; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium known for causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Recently, several drug targets in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 have been reported using network biology approaches on the basis of essentiality and topology and further ranked on network measures viz. degree and centrality. Till date no drug/ligand molecule has been reported against this targets.In our work we have identified the ligand /drug molecules, through Orthologous gene mapping against Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168 and performed modelling and docking analysis. From the predicted drug targets in PA PAO1, we selected those drug targets which show statistically significant orthology with a model organism and whose orthologs are present in all the selected drug targets of PA PAO1.Modeling of their structure has been done using I-Tasser web server. Orthologous gene mapping has been performed using Cluster of Orthologs (COGs) and based on orthology; drugs available for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA PAO1 protein drug targets using MoleGro virtual docker version 4.0.2.Orthologous gene for PA3168 gyrA is BS gyrAfound in Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168. The drugs cited for Bacillus sp. have been docked with PA genes and energy analyses have been made. Based on Orthologous gene mapping andin-silico studies, Nalidixic acid is reported as an effective drug against PA3168 gyrA for the treatment of CF and COPD.

  9. Extracts of Cordia gilletii de wild (Boraginaceae) quench the quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Okusa, Philippe N.; Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier; Stévigny, Caroline; Jaziri, Mondher El; Duez, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The fight against infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistances needs the exploration of new active compounds with new proprieties like disrupting quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which is a cell-to-cell communication that regulates bacterial virulence factors. In this work, leaves and root barks extracts of a Congolese medicinal plant, Cordia gilletii, were investigated for their effect on the production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa major virulence factors regulated by QS. Materials and Methods: The effect of C. gilletii extracts on virulence factors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was studied by the evaluation of the production of pyocyanine, elastase and biofilm; and by the measurement of the expression of QS-related genes. Results: The dichloromethane extract from root barks was found to quench the production of pyocyanin, a QS-dependent virulence factor in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Moreover, this extract specifically inhibits the expression of several QS-regulated genes (i.e. lasB, rhlA, lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR) and reduces biofilm formation by PAO1. Conclusion: This study contributes to explain the efficacy of C. gilletii in the traditional treatment of infectious diseases caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26401363

  10. Homogenization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms visualized by freeze-substitution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guélon, T; Hunter, R C; Mathias, J D; Deffuant, G

    2013-05-01

    A knowledge of the mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms is required to more fully understand the processes of biofilm formation such as initial adhesion or detachment. The main contribution of this article is to demonstrate the use of homogenization techniques to compute mechanical parameters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. For this purpose, homogenization techniques are used to analyze freeze substitution electron micrographs of the biofilm cross-sections. The concept of a representative volume element and the study about his representativeness allows us to determine the optimal size in order to analyze these biofilm images. Results demonstrate significant heterogeneities with respect to stiffness and these can be explained by varying cell density distribution throughout the bacterial biofilms. These stiffness variations lead to different mechanical properties along the height of the biofilm. Moreover, a numerical shear stress test shows the impact of these heterogeneities on the detachment process. Several modes of detachment are highlighted according to the local strain energy in the different parts of the biofilm. Knowing where, and how, a biofilm may detach will allow better prediction of accumulation and biomass detachment.

  11. Identification of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 DNA Methyltransferase, Its Targets, and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Doberenz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Reichert, Olga; Jensen, Vanessa; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Kordes, Adrian; Frangipani, Emanuela; Luong, Khai; Korlach, Jonas; Heeb, Stephan; Overmann, Jörg; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA methylation is widespread among prokaryotes, and most DNA methylation reactions are catalyzed by adenine DNA methyltransferases, which are part of restriction-modification (R-M) systems. R-M systems are known for their role in the defense against foreign DNA; however, DNA methyltransferases also play functional roles in gene regulation. In this study, we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to uncover the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We identified a conserved sequence motif targeted by an adenine methyltransferase of a type I R-M system and quantified the presence of N6-methyladenine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Changes in the PAO1 methylation status were dependent on growth conditions and affected P. aeruginosa pathogenicity in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Furthermore, we found that methylated motifs in promoter regions led to shifts in sense and antisense gene expression, emphasizing the role of enzymatic DNA methylation as an epigenetic control of phenotypic traits in P. aeruginosa. Since the DNA methylation enzymes are not encoded in the core genome, our findings illustrate how the acquisition of accessory genes can shape the global P. aeruginosa transcriptome and thus may facilitate adaptation to new and challenging habitats. PMID:28223461

  12. Red death in Caenorhabditis elegans caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Zaborin, Alexander; Romanowski, Kathleen; Gerdes, Svetlana; Holbrook, Christopher; Lepine, Francois; Long, Jason; Poroyko, Valeriy; Diggle, Stephen P; Wilke, Andreas; Righetti, Karima; Morozova, Irina; Babrowski, Trissa; Liu, Donald C; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2009-04-14

    During host injury, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be cued to express a lethal phenotype within the intestinal tract reservoir-a hostile, nutrient scarce environment depleted of inorganic phosphate. Here we determined if phosphate depletion activates a lethal phenotype in P. aeruginosa during intestinal colonization. To test this, we allowed Caenorhabditis elegans to feed on lawns of P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown on high and low phosphate media. Phosphate depletion caused PAO1 to kill 60% of nematodes whereas no worms died on high phosphate media. Unexpectedly, intense redness was observed in digestive tubes of worms before death. Using a combination of transcriptome analyses, mutants, and reporter constructs, we identified 3 global virulence systems that were involved in the "red death" response of P. aeruginosa during phosphate depletion; they included phosphate signaling (PhoB), the MvfR-PQS pathway of quorum sensing, and the pyoverdin iron acquisition system. Activation of all 3 systems was required to form a red colored PQS+Fe(3+) complex which conferred a lethal phenotype in this model. When pyoverdin production was inhibited in P. aeruginosa by providing excess iron, red death was attenuated in C. elegans and mortality was decreased in mice intestinally inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Introduction of the red colored PQS+Fe(3+) complex into the digestive tube of C. elegans or mouse intestine caused mortality associated with epithelial disruption and apoptosis. In summary, red death in C. elegans reveals a triangulated response between PhoB, MvfR-PQS, and pyoverdin in response to phosphate depletion that activates a lethal phenotype in P. aeruginosa.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 grown at both body and elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Kumutha; Chang, Chien-Yi; Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Yamin; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Functional genomics research can give us valuable insights into bacterial gene function. RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq) can generate information on transcript abundance in bacteria following abiotic stress treatments. In this study, we used the RNA-seq technique to study the transcriptomes of the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 following heat shock. Samples were grown at both the human body temperature (37 °C) and an arbitrarily-selected temperature of 46 °C. In this work using RNA-seq, we identified 133 genes that are differentially expressed at 46 °C compared to the human body temperature. Our work identifies some key P. aeruginosa PAO1 genes whose products have importance in both environmental adaptation as well as in vivo infection in febrile hosts. More importantly, our transcriptomic results show that many genes are only expressed when subjected to heat shock. Because the RNA-seq can generate high throughput gene expression profiles, our work reveals many unanticipated genes with further work to be done exploring such genes products. PMID:27547539

  14. Piper betle leaf extract affects the quorum sensing and hence virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Datta, Siraj; Jana, Debanjan; Maity, Tilak Raj; Samanta, Aveek; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, blocking of QS ability are viewed as viable antimicrobial chemotherapy and which may prove to be a safe anti-virulent drug. Bioactive components from Piper betle have been reported to possess antimicrobial ability. This study envisages on the anti-QS properties of ethanolic extract of P. betle leaf (PbLE) using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model organism. A marked reduction in swarming, swimming, and twitching ability of the bacteria is demonstrated in presence of PbLE. The biofilm and pyocyanin production also shows a marked reduction in presence of PbLE, though it does not affect the bacterial growth. Thus, the studies hint on the possible effect of the bioactive components of PbLE on reducing the virulent ability of the bacteria; identification of bioactive compounds should be investigated further.

  15. Nanomechanical Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Bacterial Cells to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Walters, Grant; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    We have used an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based creep deformation technique to study changes to the viscoelastic properties of individual Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 cells as a function of time of exposure to two cationic peptides: polymyxin B (PMB), a cyclic antimicrobial peptide, and the structurally-related compound, polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN). The measurements provide a direct measure of the mechanical integrity of the bacterial cell envelope, and the results can be understood in terms of simple viscoelastic models of arrangements of springs and dashpots, which can be ascribed to different components within the bacterial cell. Time-resolved creep deformation experiments reveal abrupt changes to the viscoelastic properties of P. aeruginosa bacterial cells after exposure to both PMB and PMBN, with quantitatively different changes for the two cationic peptides. These measurements provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides on bacterial cells.

  16. Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to low shear modelled microgravity involves AlgU regulation.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Pycke, Benny; Van Houdt, Rob; Monsieurs, Pieter; Nickerson, Cheryl; Leys, Natalie; Cornelis, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    As a ubiquitous environmental organism that is occasionally part of the human flora, Pseudomonas aeruginosa could pose a health hazard for the immunocompromised astronauts during long-term missions. Therefore, insights into the behaviour of P. aeruginosa under spaceflight conditions were gained using two spaceflight-analogue culture systems: the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and the random position machine (RPM). Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in the low shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) environment of the RWV, compared with the normal gravity control (NG), revealed an apparent regulatory role for the alternative sigma factor AlgU (RpoE-like). Accordingly, P. aeruginosa cultured in LSMMG exhibited increased alginate production and upregulation of AlgU-controlled transcripts, including those encoding stress-related proteins. The LSMMG increased heat and oxidative stress resistance and caused a decrease in the oxygen transfer rate of the culture. This study also showed the involvement of the RNA-binding protein Hfq in the LSMMG response, consistent with its previously identified role in the Salmonella LSMMG and spaceflight response. The global transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa grown in the RPM was highly similar to that in NG. Fluid mixing was assessed in both systems and is believed to be a pivotal factor contributing to transcriptional differences between RWV- and RPM-grown P. aeruginosa. This study represents the first step towards the identification of virulence mechanisms of P. aeruginosa activated in response to spaceflight-analogue conditions, and could direct future research regarding the risk assessment and prevention of Pseudomonas infections during spaceflight and in immunocompromised patients.

  17. Effect of nitrofurans and NO generators on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Julia; Granik, Vladimir; Belik, Alexandr; Koksharova, Olga; Khmel, Inessa

    2009-06-01

    Antibacterial drugs in the nitrofuran series, such as nitrofurazone, furazidin, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, as well as the nitric oxide generators sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth, were shown to increase the capacity of pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370 to form biofilms. At 25-100microg/ml, nitrofurans 2-2.5-fold enhanced biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and NO donors 3-6-fold. For B. cenocepacia 370, the enhancement was 2-5-fold (nitrofurans) and 4.5-fold (sodium nitroprusside), respectively.

  18. Identification of Novel Genes Responsible for Overexpression of ampC in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Yuko; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins mediated by the chromosomal ampC gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of clinical importance. We isolated piperacillin-resistant mutants derived from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and analyzed two mutants that had an insertion in mpl and nuoN. One mutant, YT1677, was resistant to piperacillin and ceftazidime and had an insertion in mpl, which encodes UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanyl-γ-d-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate ligase. The other mutant, YT7988, showed increased MICs of piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefoperazone, and the insertion was mapped to nuoN, which encodes NADH dehydrogenase I chain N. Complementation experiments demonstrated that these mutations resulted in higher levels of resistance to β-lactams. The expression of genes reported to be involved in β-lactam resistance was examined by real-time PCR in YT1677 and YT7988 mutants. Overexpression was observed for only ampC, and other genes were expressed normally. Deletion of the ampR gene in YT1677 and YT7988 resulted in decreased expression of ampC, indicating that the mutations in YT1677 and YT7988 affected the expression of ampC through the function of AmpR. PMID:24041903

  19. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 lipid A changes during the interaction with model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Vigneshkumar, Balasubramanian; Radhakrishnan, Srinivasan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main surface constituent of Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A, the hydrophobic moiety, outer monolayer of the outer cell membrane forms the major component of LPS. Immunogenic Lipid A is recognized by the innate immune system through the TLR 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a Gram-negative bacterium is known to cause nosocomial infection and known for its adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can infect a broad host spectrum including Caenorhabditis elegans, a simple free living soil nematode. Here, we reveal that PAO1 modifies its Lipid A during the host interaction with C. elegans. The penta-acylated form of Lipid A was identified by using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis and the β-(1,6)-linked disaccharide of glucosamine with phosphate groups, 2 and 2' amide linked fatty acid chain and 3 and 3' ester linked fatty acids were investigated for the modification using the non destructive (1)H NMR, spin-lattice (T₁) relaxation measurement, differential scanning calorimetry. T₁ relaxation measurements showed that the 2 and 2' amide linked fatty acid chain, -CH in the glucosamine disaccharide of PAO1 lipid A, in an exposed host had a different spin lattice relaxation time compared to an unexposed host and the findings were reconfirmed using in vitro human corneal epithelial cells cell lines. Furthermore, scanning electron microscope and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation was disturbed in the exposed host condition. The daf-12, daf-16, tol-1, pmk-1, ins-7 and ilys3 immune genes of C. elegans were examined with live bacterial and isolated lipid moiety infection and the expression was found to be highly specific. Overall, the present study revealed that PAO1 modified its 2 and 2' amide linked fatty acid chain in the lipid A of PAO1 LPS during the exposed host condition.

  1. The icmF3 locus is involved in multiple adaptation- and virulence-related characteristics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinshui; Cheng, Juanli; Chen, Keqi; Guo, Chenghao; Zhang, Weipeng; Yang, Xu; Ding, Wei; Ma, Li; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria. Three separate T6SSs called H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS have been discovered in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Recent studies suggest that, in contrast to the H1-T6SS that targets prokaryotic cells, H2- and H3-T6SS are involved in interactions with both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. However, the detailed functions of T6SS components are still uncharacterized. The intracellular multiplication factor (IcmF) protein is conserved in type VI secretion systems (T6SS) of all different bacterial pathogens. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that IcmF3 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 is different from other IcmF homologs and may represent a new branch of these proteins with distinct functions. Herein, we have investigated the function of IcmF3 in this strain. We have shown that deletion of the icmF3 gene in P. aeruginosa PAO1 is associated with pleiotropic phenotypes. The icmF3 mutant has variant colony morphology and an hypergrowth phenotype in iron-limiting medium. Surprisingly, this mutant is also defective for the production of pyoverdine, as well as defects in swimming motility and virulence in a C. elegans worm model. The icmF3 mutant exhibits higher conjugation frequency than the wild type and increased biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. Additionally, expression of two phenazine biosynthetic loci is increased in the icmF3 mutant, leading to the overproduction of pyocyanin. Finally, the mutant exhibits decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides such as tobramycin and gentamicin. And the detected phenotypes can be restored completely or partially by trans complementation of wild type icmF3 gene. The pleiotropic effects observed upon icmF3 deletion demonstrate that icmF3 plays critical roles in both pathogenesis and environmental adaptation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:26484316

  2. DdaR (PA1196) regulates expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase for the metabolism of methylarginines in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Bailey, Frank J; Moley, Gabriella; Nomura, Christopher T

    2017-02-06

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases or DDAHs catalyze the hydrolysis of methylarginines to yield L-citrulline and methylamines as products. DDAHs and their central roles in methylarginine metabolism have been characterized for eukaryotic cells. While DDAHs are known to exist in some bacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the physiological importance and genetic regulation of bacterial DDAHs remain poorly understood. To provide some insight into bacterial methylarginine metabolism, this study focused on identifying the key elements or factors regulating DDAH expression in P. aeruginosa PAO1. First, results revealed that P. aeruginosa can utilize N(G),N(G)-dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA) as a sole source of nitrogen but not carbon. Second, expression of the ddaH gene was observed to be induced in the presence of methylarginines, including N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and ADMA. Third, induction of the ddaH gene was shown to be achieved through a mechanism consisting of the putative enhancer-binding protein PA1196 and the alternative sigma factor RpoN. Both PA1196 and RpoN were essential for the expression of the ddaH gene in response to methylarginines. Based on the results of this study, PA1196 was given the name DdaR for [underln]d[/underln]imethylarginine [underln]d[/underln]imethyl[underln]a[/underln]minohydrolase [underln]r[/underln]egulator. Interestingly, DdaR and its target ddaH gene are only conserved among P. aeruginosa strains, suggesting that this particular Pseudomonas sp. has evolved to utilize methylarginines from its environment.

  3. Defense mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 against quantum dots and their released heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Mathieu, Jacques M; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Miller, Jeffrey T; Wu, Tianpin; Shibata, Tomohiro; Guo, Wenhua; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2012-07-24

    The growing use of quantum dots (QDs) in numerous applications increases the possibility of their release to the environment. Bacteria provide critical ecosystem services, and understanding their response to QDs is important to assess the potential environmental impacts of such releases. Here, we analyze the microbial response to sublethal exposure to commercial QDs, and investigate potential defense and adaptation mechanisms in the model bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Both intact and weathered QDs, as well as dissolved metal constituents, up-regulated czcABC metal efflux transporters. Weathered QDs also induced superoxide dismutase gene sodM, which likely served as a defense against oxidative stress. Interestingly, QDs also induced antibiotic resistance (ABR) genes and increased antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentrations by 50 to 100%, which suggests up-regulation of global stress defense mechanisms. Extracellular synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) was observed after exposure to dissolved Cd(NO(3))(2) and SeO(2). With extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we discerned biogenic NPs such as CdO, CdS, CdSe, and selenium sulfides. These results show that bacteria can mitigate QD toxicity by turning on energy-dependent heavy-metal ion efflux systems and by mediating the precipitation of dissolved metal ions as less toxic and less bioavailable insoluble NPs.

  4. Endemic malagasy Dalbergia species inhibit quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Jedrzejowski, Anaïs; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Rajaonson, Sanda; Randriamampionona, Denis; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher; Vandeputte, Olivier M

    2013-05-01

    Various species of the plant genus Dalbergia are traditionally used as medicine for sundry ailments and some of them have been shown recently to quench the virulence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Cell-to-cell communication mechanisms, quorum sensing (QS) in particular, are key regulators of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria. Screening n-hexane extracts of leaves, roots and bark of endemic Malagasy Dalbergia species for their capacity to antagonize QS mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 showed that many reduced the expression of the QS-regulated genes lasB and rhlA. However, only the extract of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark (DTB) showed a significant reduction of QS gene expression without any effect on the aceA gene encoding a QS-independent isocitrate lyase. Further characterization of DTB impact on QS revealed that the QS systems las and rhl are inhibited and that swarming, twitching, biofilm formation and the production of pyocyanin, elastase and proteases are also hampered in the presence of the DTB extract. Importantly, compared with the known QS inhibitor naringenin, the DTB extract showed a stronger negative effect on twitching, biofilm formation and tobramycin resistance. Preliminary structural characterization of these potent biofilm disrupters suggests that they belong to the phytosterols. The strong inhibition of motility and biofilm formation suggests that the DTB extract contains agents disrupting biofilm architecture, which is an important observation in the context of the design of new drugs targeting biofilm-encapsulated pathogens.

  5. Discovery of a novel L-lyxonate degradation pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Ghasempur, Salehe; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Hillerich, Brandan S; Seidel, Ronald D; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-05-27

    The l-lyxonate dehydratase (LyxD) in vitro enzymatic activity and in vivo metabolic function were assigned to members of an isofunctional family within the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the enolase superfamily. This study combined in vitro and in vivo data to confirm that the dehydration of l-lyxonate is the biological role of the members of this family. In vitro kinetic experiments revealed catalytic efficiencies of ∼10(4) M(-1) s(-1) as previously observed for members of other families in the MR subgroup. Growth studies revealed that l-lyxonate is a carbon source for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1; transcriptomics using qRT-PCR established that the gene encoding LyxD as well as several other conserved proximal genes were upregulated in cells grown on l-lyxonate. The proximal genes were shown to be involved in a pathway for the degradation of l-lyxonate, in which the first step is dehydration by LyxD followed by dehydration of the 2-keto-3-deoxy-l-lyxonate product by 2-keto-3-deoxy-l-lyxonate dehydratase to yield α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde. In the final step, α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde is oxidized by a dehydrogenase to α-ketoglutarate, an intermediate in the citric acid cycle. An X-ray structure for the LyxD from Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614 with Mg(2+) in the active site was determined that confirmed the expectation based on sequence alignments that LyxDs possess a conserved catalytic His-Asp dyad at the end of seventh and sixth β-strands of the (β/α)7β-barrel domain as well as a conserved KxR motif at the end of second β-strand; substitutions for His 316 or Arg 179 inactivated the enzyme. This is the first example of both the LyxD function in the enolase superfamily and a pathway for the catabolism of l-lyxonate.

  6. Identification of CtpL as a Chromosomally Encoded Chemoreceptor for 4-Chloroaniline and Catechol in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Kazuki; Oku, Shota; Kataoka, Naoya; Nitisakulkan, Tisana; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis influences the ability of bacteria to survive and thrive in most environments, including polluted ones. Despite numerous reports of the phenotypic characterization of chemotactic bacteria, only a few molecular details of chemoreceptors for aromatic pollutants have been described. In this study, the molecular basis of chemotaxis toward an environmentally toxic chlorinated aromatic pollutant, 4-chloroaniline (4CA), was evaluated. Among the three Pseudomonas spp. tested, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exhibited positive chemotaxis both to the nonmetabolizable 4CA, where 4-chloroacetanilide was formed as a dead-end transformation product, and to the metabolizable catechol. Molecular analysis of all 26 mutants with a disrupted methyl-accepting chemotaxis gene revealed that CtpL, a chromosomally encoded chemoreceptor, was responsible for the positive chemotactic response toward 4CA. Since CtpL has previously been described to be a major chemoreceptor for inorganic phosphate at low concentrations in PAO1, this report describes a fortuitous ability of CtpL to function toward aromatic pollutants. In addition, its regulation not only was dependent on the presence of the chemoattractant inducer but also was regulated by conditions of phosphate starvation. These results expand the range of known chemotactic transducers and their function in the environmental bacterium PAO1. PMID:24038698

  7. Influence of O polysaccharides on biofilm development and outer membrane vesicle biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathleen; Park, Amber J; Hao, Youai; Brewer, Dyanne; Lam, Joseph S; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic human pathogen known for its ability to adapt to changes in its environment during the course of infection. These adaptations include changes in the expression of cell surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), biofilm development, and the production of a protective extracellular exopolysaccharide matrix. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified as an important component of the extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms and are thought to contribute to the development and fitness of these bacterial communities. The goal of this study was to examine the relationships between changes in the cell surface expression of LPS O polysaccharides, biofilm development, and OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We compared wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 with three chromosomal knockouts. These knockouts have deletions in the rmd, wbpM, and wbpL genes that produce changes in the expression of common polysaccharide antigen (CPA), O-specific antigen (OSA), or both. Our results demonstrate that changes in O polysaccharide expression do not significantly influence OMV production but do affect the size and protein content of OMVs derived from both CPA(-) and OSA(-) cells; these mutant cells also exhibited different physical properties from wild-type cells. We further examined biofilm growth of the mutants and determined that CPA(-) cells could not develop into robust biofilms and exhibit changes in cell morphology and biofilm matrix production. Together these results demonstrate the importance of O polysaccharide expression on P. aeruginosa OMV composition and highlight the significance of CPA expression in biofilm development.

  8. Flagellin FliC Phosphorylation Affects Type 2 Protease Secretion and Biofilm Dispersal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Suriyanarayanan, Tanujaa; Periasamy, Saravanan; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Ishihama, Yasushi; Swarup, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has a major role in controlling the life-cycle and infection stages of bacteria. Proteome-wide occurrence of S/T/Y phosphorylation has been reported for many prokaryotic systems. Previously, we reported the phosphoproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. In this study, we show the role of S/T phosphorylation of one motility protein, FliC, in regulating multiple surface-associated phenomena of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This is the first report of occurrence of phosphorylation in the flagellar protein, flagellin FliC in its highly conserved N-terminal NDO domain across several Gram negative bacteria. This phosphorylation is likely a well-regulated phenomenon as it is growth phase dependent in planktonic cells. The absence of phosphorylation in the conserved T27 and S28 residues of FliC, interestingly, did not affect swimming motility, but affected the secretome of type 2 secretion system (T2SS) and biofilm formation of PAO1. FliC phosphomutants had increased levels and activities of type 2 secretome proteins. The secretion efficiency of T2SS machinery is associated with flagellin phosphorylation. FliC phosphomutants also formed reduced biofilms at 24 h under static conditions and had delayed biofilm dispersal under dynamic flow conditions, respectively. The levels of type 2 secretome and biofilm formation under static conditions had an inverse correlation. Hence, increase in type 2 secretome levels was accompanied by reduced biofilm formation in the FliC phosphomutants. As T2SS is involved in nutrient acquisition and biofilm dispersal during survival and spread of P. aeruginosa, we propose that FliC phosphorylation has a role in ecological adaptation of this opportunistic environmental pathogen. Altogether, we found a system of phosphorylation that affects key surface related processes such as proteases secretion by T2SS, biofilm formation and dispersal. PMID:27701473

  9. A Temporal Examination of the Planktonic and Biofilm Proteome of Whole Cell Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Using Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Amber J.; Murphy, Kathleen; Krieger, Jonathan R.; Brewer, Dyanne; Taylor, Paul; Habash, Marc; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic polymicrobial lung infections are the chief complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. The dominant pathogen in late-stage disease is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms recalcitrant, structured communities known as biofilms. Many aspects of biofilm biology are poorly understood; consequently, effective treatment of these infections is limited, and cystic fibrosis remains fatal. Here we combined in-solution protein digestion of triplicate growth-matched samples with a high-performance mass spectrometry platform to provide the most comprehensive proteomic dataset known to date for whole cell P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in biofilm cultures. Our analysis included protein–protein interaction networks and PseudoCAP functional information for unique and significantly modulated proteins at three different time points. Secondary analysis of a subgroup of proteins using extracted ion currents validated the spectral counting data of 1884 high-confidence proteins. In this paper we demonstrate a greater representation of proteins related to metabolism, DNA stability, and molecular activity in planktonically grown P. aeruginosa PAO1. In addition, several virulence-related proteins were increased during planktonic growth, including multiple proteins encoded by the pyoverdine locus, uncharacterized proteins with sequence similarity to mammalian cell entry protein, and a member of the hemagglutinin family of adhesins, HecA. Conversely, biofilm samples contained an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to an adhesion protein with self-association characteristics (AidA). Increased levels of several phenazine biosynthetic proteins, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to a metallo-beta-lactamase, and lower levels of the drug target gyrA support the putative characteristics of in situ P. aeruginosa infections, including competitive fitness and antibiotic resistance. This quantitative whole cell approach advances the existing P. aeruginosa

  10. Anti-quorum sensing activity of Psidium guajava L. flavonoids against Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Vasavi, Halkare Suryanarayana; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha Bhagwath; Rekha, Punchapady-Devasya

    2014-05-01

    Psidium guajava L., which has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant, was explored for anti-quorum sensing (QS) activity. The anti-QS activity of the flavonoid (FL) fraction of P. guajava leaves was determined using a biosensor bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Detailed investigation of the effects of the FL-fraction on QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum ATCC12472 and pyocyanin production, proteolytic, elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was performed using standard methods. Possible mechanisms of QS-inhibition were studied by assessing violacein production in response to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthesis in the presence of the FL-fraction in C. violaceum ATCC31532 and by evaluating the induction of violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026 by AHL extracted from the culture supernatants of C. violaceum 31532. Active compounds in the FL-fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Inhibition of violacein production by the FL-fraction in a C. violaceum CV026 biosensor bioassay indicated possible anti-QS activity. The FL-fraction showed concentration-dependent decreases in violacein production in C. violaceum 12472 and inhibited pyocyanin production, proteolytic and elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, the FL-fraction did not inhibit AHL synthesis; AHL extracted from cultures of C. violaceum 31532 grown in the presence of the FL-fraction induced violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026. LC-MS analysis revealed the presence of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside in the FL-fraction. Both quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside inhibited violacein production in C. violaceum 12472, at 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Results of this study provide scope for further research to exploit these active molecules as anti-QS agents.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 preferentially grows as aggregates in liquid batch cultures and disperses upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Schleheck, David; Barraud, Nicolas; Klebensberger, Janosch; Webb, Jeremy S; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    In both natural and artificial environments, bacteria predominantly grow in biofilms, and bacteria often disperse from biofilms as freely suspended single-cells. In the present study, the formation and dispersal of planktonic cellular aggregates, or 'suspended biofilms', by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in liquid batch cultures were closely examined, and compared to biofilm formation on a matrix of polyester (PE) fibers as solid surface in batch cultures. Plankton samples were analyzed by laser-diffraction particle-size scanning (LDA) and microscopy of aggregates. Interestingly, LDA indicated that up to 90% of the total planktonic biomass consisted of cellular aggregates in the size range of 10-400 microm in diameter during the growth phase, as opposed to individual cells. In cultures with PE surfaces, P. aeruginosa preferred to grow in biofilms, as opposed to planktonicly. However, upon carbon, nitrogen or oxygen limitation, the planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms dispersed into single cells, resulting in an increase in optical density (OD) independent of cellular growth. During growth, planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms contained densely packed viable cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA), and starvation resulted in a loss of viable cells, and an increase in dead cells and eDNA. Furthermore, a release of metabolites and infective bacteriophage into the culture supernatant, and a marked decrease in intracellular concentration of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP, was observed in dispersing cultures. Thus, what traditionally has been described as planktonic, individual cell cultures of P. aeruginosa, are in fact suspended biofilms, and such aggregates have behaviors and responses (e.g. dispersal) similar to surface associated biofilms. In addition, we suggest that this planktonic biofilm model system can provide the basis for a detailed analysis of the synchronized biofilm life cycle of P. aeruginosa.

  12. Bioproduction of D-Tagatose from D-Galactose Using Phosphoglucose Isomerase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha J; Patel, Arti T; Akhani, Rekha; Dedania, Samir; Patel, Darshan H

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 phosphoglucose isomerase was purified as an active soluble form by a single-step purification using Ni-NTA chromatography that showed homogeneity on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass ∼62 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for the maximum isomerization activity with D-galactose were 60 °C and 7.0, respectively. Generally, sugar phosphate isomerases show metal-independent activity but PA-PGI exhibited metal-dependent isomerization activity with aldosugars and optimally catalyzed the D-galactose isomerization in the presence of 1.0 mM MnCl2. The apparent Km and Vmax for D-galactose under standardized conditions were calculated to be 1029 mM (±31.30 with S.E.) and 5.95 U/mg (±0.9 with S.E.), respectively. Equilibrium reached after 180 min with production of 567.51 μM D-tagatose from 1000 mM of D-galactose. Though, the bioconversion ratio is low but it can be increased by immobilization and enzyme engineering. Although various L-arabinose isomerases have been characterized for bioproduction of D-tagatose, P. aeruginosa glucose phosphate isomerase is distinguished from the other L-arabinose isomerases by its optimal temperature (60 °C) for D-tagatose production being mesophilic bacteria, making it an alternate choice for bulk production.

  13. Extensive reduction of cell viability and enhanced matrix production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flow biofilms treated with a D-amino acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Zoe; Tani, Akio; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flow biofilms with a D-amino acid mixture caused significant reductions in cell biomass by 75% and cell viability by 71%. No biofilm disassembly occurred, and matrix production increased by 30%, thereby providing a thick protective cover for remaining viable or persister cells.

  14. Characterization of a Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Enzyme, PoxB, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Zincke, Diansy; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Silver, Lynn L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen often associated with severe and life-threatening infections that are highly impervious to treatment. This microbe readily exhibits intrinsic and acquired resistance to varied antimicrobial drugs. Resistance to penicillin-like compounds is commonplace and provided by the chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase. A second, chromosomally encoded β-lactamase, PoxB, has previously been reported in P. aeruginosa. In the present work, the contribution of this class D enzyme was investigated using a series of clean in-frame ampC, poxB, and oprD deletions, as well as complementation by expression under the control of an inducible promoter. While poxB deletions failed to alter β-lactam sensitivities, expression of poxB in ampC-deficient backgrounds decreased susceptibility to both meropenem and doripenem but had no effect on imipenem, penicillin, and cephalosporin MICs. However, when expressed in an ampCpoxB-deficient background, that additionally lacked the outer membrane porin-encoding gene oprD, PoxB significantly increased the imipenem as well as the meropenem and doripenem MICs. Like other class D carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamases, PoxB was only poorly inhibited by class A enzyme inhibitors, but a novel non-β-lactam compound, avibactam, was a slightly better inhibitor of PoxB activity. In vitro susceptibility testing with a clinical concentration of avibactam, however, failed to reduce PoxB activity against the carbapenems. In addition, poxB was found to be cotranscribed with an upstream open reading frame, poxA, which itself was shown to encode a 32-kDa protein of yet unknown function. PMID:26621621

  15. Structural Analysis of WbpE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: A Nucleotide Sugar Aminotransferase Involved in O-Antigen Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A.; Olivier, N; Imperiali, B

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a major source of hospital-acquired infections. Effective treatment has proven increasingly difficult due to the spread of multidrug resistant strains and thus requires a deeper understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of pathogenicity. The central carbohydrate of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 (O5) B-band O-antigen, ManNAc(3NAc)A, has been shown to be critical for virulence and is produced in a stepwise manner by five enzymes in the Wbp pathway (WbpA, WbpB, WbpE, WbpD, and WbpI). Herein, we present the crystal structure of the aminotransferase WbpE from P. aeruginosa PAO1 in complex with the cofactor pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP) and product UDP-GlcNAc(3NH{sub 2})A as the external aldimine at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We also report the structures of WbpE in complex with PMP alone as well as the PLP internal aldimine and show that the dimeric structure of WbpE observed in the crystal structure is confirmed by analytical ultracentrifugation. Analysis of these structures reveals that the active site of the enzyme is composed of residues from both subunits. In particular, we show that a key residue (Arg229), which has previously been implicated in direct interactions with the {alpha}-carboxylate moiety of {alpha}-ketoglutarate, is also uniquely positioned to bestow specificity for the 6{double_prime}-carboxyl group of GlcNAc(3NH2)A through a salt bridge. This finding is intriguing because while an analogous basic residue is present in WbpE homologues that do not process 6{double_prime}-carboxyl-modified saccharides, recent structural studies reveal that this side chain is retracted to accommodate a neutral C6{double_prime} atom. This work represents the first structural analysis of a nucleotide sugar aminotransferase with a bound product modified at the C2{double_prime}, C3{double_prime}, and C6{double_prime} positions and provides insight into a novel target for treatment of P

  16. Flagella but not type IV pili are involved in the initial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bruzaud, Jérôme; Tarrade, Jeanne; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Canette, Alexis; Herry, Jean-Marie; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Darmanin, Thierry; Guittard, Frédéric; Guilbaud, Morgan; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle

    2015-07-01

    Over the last decades, surface biocontamination has become a major concern in food industries and medical environments where its outcomes could vary from financial losses to public health issues. Understanding adhesion mechanisms of involved microorganisms is essential to develop new strategies of prevention and control. Adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a nosocomial pathogenic bacterium, relies on several bacterial features, among which are bacterial appendages such as flagella and type IV pili. Here, we examine the role of P. aeruginosa PAO1 flagella and type IV pili in the adhesion to abiotic surfaces with various hydrophobicities. Adhesion kinetics showed, that after 60min, flagella increased the adhesion of the strain to surfaces with high hydrophobicity while no effect was observed on hydrophilic surfaces. Flagella of adherent bacteria exhibited specific and conserved pattern on the surfaces that suggested a higher affinity of flagella for hydrophobic surfaces. Based on these results and on previous studies in the literature, we proposed a model of flagella-mediated adhesion onto hydrophobic surfaces where these appendages induce the first contact and promote the adhesion of the bacterial body. These findings suggest that anti-bioadhesive surface design should take into consideration the presence of bacterial appendages.

  17. Influence of ferric iron on gene expression and rhamnolipid synthesis during batch cultivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Anke; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf; Schwartz, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Bioprocesses based on sustainable resources and rhamnolipids in particular have become increasingly attractive in recent years. These surface-active glycolipids with various chemical and biological properties have diverse biotechnological applications and are naturally produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Their production, however, is tightly governed by a complex growth-dependent regulatory network, one of the major obstacles in the way to upscale production. P. aeruginosa PAO1 was grown in shake flask cultures using varying concentrations of ferric iron. Gene expression was assessed using quantitative PCR. A strong increase in relative expression of the genes for rhamnolipid synthesis, rhlA and rhlC, as well as the genes of the pqs quorum sensing regulon was observed under iron-limiting conditions. Iron repletion on the other hand caused a down-regulation of those genes. Furthermore, gene expression of different iron regulation-related factors, i.e. pvdS, fur and bqsS, was increased in response to iron limitation. Ensuing from these results, a batch cultivation using production medium without any addition of iron was conducted. Both biomass formation and specific growth rates were not impaired compared to normal cultivation conditions. Expression of rhlA, rhlC and pvdS, as well as the gene for the 3-oxo-C12-HSL synthetase, lasI, increased until late stationary growth phase. After this time point, their expression steadily decreased. Expression of the C4-HSL synthetase gene, rhlI, on the other hand, was found to be highly increased during the entire process.

  18. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  19. Bioproduction of L-Aspartic Acid and Cinnamic Acid by L-Aspartate Ammonia Lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Arti T; Akhani, Rekha C; Patel, Manisha J; Dedania, Samir R; Patel, Darshan H

    2016-12-17

    Aspartase (L-aspartate ammonia lyase, EC 4.3.1.1) catalyses the reversible amination and deamination of L-aspartic acid to fumaric acid which can be used to produce important biochemical. In this study, we have explored the characteristics of aspartase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PA-AspA). To overproduce PA-AspA, the 1425-bp gene was introduced in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified. A 51.0-kDa protein was observed as a homogenous purified protein on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 35 °C. PA-AspA has retained 56% activity after 7 days of incubation at 35 °C, which displays the hyperthermostablility characteristics of the enzyme. PA-AspA is activated in the presence of metal ions and Mg2+ is found to be most effective. Among the substrates tested for specificity of PA-AspA, L-phenylalanine (38.35 ± 2.68) showed the highest specific activity followed by L-aspartic acid (31.21 ± 3.31) and fumarate (5.42 ± 2.94). K m values for L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid and fumarate were 1.71 mM, 0.346 μM and 2 M, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) for L-aspartic acid (14.18 s(-1) mM(-1)) was higher than that for L-phenylalanine (4.65 s(-1) mM(-1)). For bioconversion, from an initial concentration of 1000 mM of fumarate and 30 mM of L-phenylalanine, PA-AspA was found to convert 395.31 μM L-aspartic acid and 3.47 mM cinnamic acid, respectively.

  20. PqsR-dependent and PqsR-independent regulation of motility and biofilm formation by PQS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiao; Kong, Weina; Jin, Sheng; Chen, Lin; Xu, Yangyang; Duan, Kangmin

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of group behaviors including swarming motility and biofilm formation. Swarming motility plays an important role in the bacterium's spread to new environments, attachment to surfaces, and biofilm formation. Bacterial biofilm is associated with many persistent infections and increased resistance to antibiotics. In this study, we tested the effect of a 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone (AHQ) signal, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) on P. aeruginosa swarming and biofilm formation. Our results show that PQS repressed the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Such repression was independent of its cognate receptor PqsR and was not related to changes in the flagellae, type IV pili or the production of the surface-wetting agent rhamnolipid surfactant. While PQS did not affect twitching motility in PAO1, a pqsR deletion abolished twitching motility, indicating that pqsR is required for twitching motility. Our results also indicate that the enhancement of biofilm formation by PQS is at least partially dependent on the GacAS-Rsm regulatory pathway but does not involve the las or rhl QS systems.

  1. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of Tyrosine Phosphatase Related to Biofilm Formation A (TpbA) from the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Wen; Li, Kan; Bai, Yuwei; Xu, Yueyang; Jin, Jin; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are important for cell communication and growth in most bacteria, and are responsible for a number of human clinical infections and diseases. TpbA (PA3885) is a dual specific tyrosine phosphatase (DUSP) that negatively regulates biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by converting extracellular quorum sensing signals into internal gene cascade reactions that result in reduced biofilm formation. We have determined the three-dimensional crystal structure of wild-type TpbA from P. aeruginosa PAO1 in the phosphate-bound state and a TpbA (C132S) mutant with phosphotyrosine. Comparison between the phosphate-bound structure and the previously reported ligand-free TpbA structure reveals the extent of conformational changes that occur upon substrate binding. The largest changes occur in the functional loops that define the substrate binding site, including the PTP, general acid and α4-α5 loops. We further show that TpbA efficiently catalyzes the hydrolysis of two phosphotyrosine peptides derived from the periplasmic domain of TpbB (YfiN, PA1120), with a strong preference for dephosphorylating Tyr48 over Tyr62. This work adds to the small repertoire of DUSP structures in both the ligand-free and ligand-bound states, and provides a starting point for further study of the role of TpbA in biofilm formation.

  2. Ethanolamine Catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Regulated by the Enhancer-Binding Protein EatR (PA4021) and the Alternative Sigma Factor RpoN

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Sarwar, Zaara; Pinto, Atahualpa; Ganley, Jack G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although genes encoding enzymes and proteins related to ethanolamine catabolism are widely distributed in the genomes of Pseudomonas spp., ethanolamine catabolism has received little attention among this metabolically versatile group of bacteria. In an attempt to shed light on this subject, this study focused on defining the key regulatory factors that govern the expression of the central ethanolamine catabolic pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. This pathway is encoded by the PA4022-eat-eutBC operon and consists of a transport protein (Eat), an ethanolamine-ammonia lyase (EutBC), and an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PA4022). EutBC is an essential enzyme in ethanolamine catabolism because it hydrolyzes this amino alcohol into ammonia and acetaldehyde. The acetaldehyde intermediate is then converted into acetate in a reaction catalyzed by acetaldehyde dehydrogenase. Using a combination of growth analyses and β-galactosidase fusions, the enhancer-binding protein PA4021 and the sigma factor RpoN were shown to be positive regulators of the PA4022-eat-eutBC operon in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PA4021 and RpoN were required for growth on ethanolamine, and both of these regulatory proteins were essential for induction of the PA4022-eat-eutBC operon. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that acetaldehyde (and not ethanolamine) serves as the inducer molecule that is sensed by PA4021 and leads to the transcriptional activation of the PA4022-eat-eutBC operon. Due to its regulatory role in ethanolamine catabolism, PA4021 was given the name EatR. Both EatR and its target genes are conserved in several other Pseudomonas spp., suggesting that these bacteria share a mechanism for regulating ethanolamine catabolism. IMPORTANCE The results of this study provide a basis for understanding ethanolamine catabolism and its regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, expression of the ethanolamine-catabolic genes in this bacterium was found to be under the control of a

  3. Cross-Regulation between the phz1 and phz2 Operons Maintain a Balanced Level of Phenazine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bei; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Linde; Ge, Yihe; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication often provides selective advantages for the survival of microorganisms in adapting to varying environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa PAO1 possesses two seven-gene operons [phz1 (phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1) and phz2 (phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2)] that are involved in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its derivatives. Although the two operons are highly homologous and their functions are well known, it is unclear how the two phz operons coordinate their expressions to maintain the phenazine biosynthesis. By constructing single and double deletion mutants of the two phz operons, we found that the phz1-deletion mutant produced the same or less amount of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin in GA medium than the phz2-knockout mutant while the phz1-phz2 double knockout mutant did not produce any phenazines. By generating phzA1 and phzA2 translational and transcriptional fusions with a truncated lacZ reporter, we found that the expression of the phz1 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and did not alter at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz2 operon. Surprisingly, the expression the phz2 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and only moderately at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz1 operon. Our findings suggested that a complex cross-regulation existed between the phz1 and phz2 operons. By mediating the upregulation of one phz operon expression while the other was deleted, this crosstalk would maintain the homeostatic balance of phenazine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:26735915

  4. GcsR, a TyrR-Like Enhancer-Binding Protein, Regulates Expression of the Glycine Cleavage System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Zaara; Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Grassa, Michael T.; Wang, Michael X.; Gribble, Megan; Moffat, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycine serves as a major source of single carbon units for biochemical reactions within bacterial cells. Utilization of glycine is tightly regulated and revolves around a key group of proteins known as the glycine cleavage system (GCS). Our lab previously identified the transcriptional regulator GcsR (PA2449) as being required for catabolism of glycine in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. In an effort to clarify and have an overall better understanding of the role of GcsR in glycine metabolism, a combination of transcriptome sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays was used to identify target genes of this transcriptional regulator. It was found that GcsR binds to an 18-bp consensus sequence (TGTAACG-N4-CGTTCCG) upstream of the gcs2 operon, consisting of the gcvH2, gcvP2, glyA2, sdaA, and gcvT2 genes. The proteins encoded by these genes, namely, the GCS (GcvH2-GcvP2-GcvT2), serine hydroxymethyltransferase (GlyA2), and serine dehydratase (SdaA), form a metabolic pathway for the conversion of glycine into pyruvate, which can enter the central metabolism. GcsR activates transcription of the gcs2 operon in response to glycine. Interestingly, GcsR belongs to a family of transcriptional regulators known as TyrR-like enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs). Until this study, TyrR-like EBPs were only known to function in regulating aromatic amino acid metabolism. GcsR is the founding member of a new class of TyrR-like EBPs that function in the regulation of glycine metabolism. Indeed, homologs of GcsR and its target genes are present in almost all sequenced genomes of the Pseudomonadales order, suggesting that this genetic regulatory mechanism is a common theme for pseudomonads. IMPORTANCE Glycine is required for various cellular functions, including cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis, and the biosynthesis of several important metabolites. Regulating levels of glycine metabolism allows P. aeruginosa to maintain the metabolic flux

  5. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Two-Component Regulator CarSR Regulates Calcium Homeostasis and Calcium-Induced Virulence Factor Production through Its Regulatory Targets CarO and CarP

    PubMed Central

    Guragain, Manita; King, Michelle M.; Williamson, Kerry S.; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khanam, Sharmily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes severe, life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), endocarditis, wounds, or artificial implants. During CF pulmonary infections, P. aeruginosa often encounters environments where the levels of calcium (Ca2+) are elevated. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa responds to externally added Ca2+ through enhanced biofilm formation, increased production of several secreted virulence factors, and by developing a transient increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, followed by its removal to the basal submicromolar level. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating Ca2+-induced virulence factor production and Ca2+ homeostasis are not known. Here, we characterized the genome-wide transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa to elevated [Ca2+] in both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Among the genes induced by CaCl2 in strain PAO1 was an operon containing the two-component regulator PA2656-PA2657 (here called carS and carR), while the closely related two-component regulators phoPQ and pmrAB were repressed by CaCl2 addition. To identify the regulatory targets of CarSR, we constructed a deletion mutant of carR and performed transcriptome analysis of the mutant strain at low and high [Ca2+]. Among the genes regulated by CarSR in response to CaCl2 are the predicted periplasmic OB-fold protein, PA0320 (here called carO), and the inner membrane-anchored five-bladed β-propeller protein, PA0327 (here called carP). Mutations in both carO and carP affected Ca2+ homeostasis, reducing the ability of P. aeruginosa to export excess Ca2+. In addition, a mutation in carP had a pleotropic effect in a Ca2+-dependent manner, altering swarming motility, pyocyanin production, and tobramycin sensitivity. Overall, the results indicate that the two-component system CarSR is responsible for sensing high levels of external Ca2+ and responding through its regulatory targets that

  6. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  7. Conserved-residue mutations in Wzy affect O-antigen polymerization and Wzz-mediated chain-length regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Salim T.; Huszczynski, Steven M.; Nugent, Timothy; Gold, Alexander C.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2013-12-01

    O antigen (O-Ag) in many bacteria is synthesized via the Wzx/Wzy-dependent pathway in which Wzy polymerizes lipid-linked O-Ag subunits to modal lengths regulated by Wzz. Characterization of 83 site-directed mutants of Wzy from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (WzyPa) in topologically-mapped periplasmic (PL) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) verified the functional importance of PL3 and PL5, with the former shown to require overall cationic properties. Essential Arg residues in the RX10G motifs of PL3 and PL5 were found to be conserved in putative homologues of WzyPa, as was the overall sequence homology between these two periplasmic loops in each protein. Amino acid substitutions in CL6 were found to alter Wzz-mediated O-antigen modality, with evidence suggesting that these changes may perturb the C-terminal WzyPa tertiary structure. Together, these data suggest that the catch-and-release mechanism of O-Ag polymerization is widespread among bacteria and that regulation of polymer length is affected by interaction of Wzz with Wzy.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the phosphatase domain (PA3346PD) of the response regulator PA3346 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Ying; Wu, Pei Hsun; Guan, Hong Hsiang; Fun, Hoong Kun; Chang, Hwan You; Chen, Chun Jung

    2015-04-01

    The phosphatase domain (PA3346PD) of the response regulator PA3346 modulates the downstream anti-anti-σ factor PA3347 to regulate swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. PA3346PD, which comprises the protein phosphatase 2C domain (PP2C), is classified as a Ser/Thr phosphatase of the Mg(2+)- or Mn(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase (PPM) family. The recombinant PA3346PD, with molecular mass 26 kDa, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified on an Ni(2+)-NTA agarose column and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from PA3346PD crystals to a resolution of 2.58 Å and the crystals belonged to space group I4₁32 or I4₃32, with unit-cell parameter a = 157.61 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates the presence of a monomer of PA3346PD in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 58.4%.

  9. Accurate mass analysis of N-acyl-homoserine-lactones and cognate lactone-opened compounds in bacterial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by LC-ESI-LTQ-FTICR-MS.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore

    2009-02-01

    N-acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHSLs) are widely conserved signal molecules present in quorum sensing systems of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here the results obtained with a hybrid linear trap/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (LTQ-FTICR) mass spectrometer used to investigate the occurrence of AHSLs and cognate N-acyl-homoserines (AHSs) in bacterial isolates of P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1). Two hydrolysed AHSs were found in significant amounts, most likely formed through the lactone opening of N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC10-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC12-HSL). Structure elucidation of these ring-opened molecules, i.e. N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC10-HS), and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC12-HS), which are not detected by bacterial biosensors, was performed by high-resolution and accurate mass measurements upon liquid chromatography (LC) and confirmed by tandem MS in the LTQ analyser. Assignment of chemical formula, with mass spectra in the form of [M+H]+, was significantly expedited by extracted ion chromatograms (XICs) because the number of potentially plausible formulae for each protonated signalling molecule was considerably reduced a priori by the LC behaviour, the high mass measurement accuracy available in FTICR mass spectra and the isotopic patterns. At least two concentration levels were observed in spent culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa: compounds at a relatively high content (5-15 microM) that is C4-HSL, 3OC10-HS, and 3OC12-HS and those occurring at a lower content (<0.2 microM) that is C6-HSL and C8-HSL. The implications of this work extend to a great variety of Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. The Combined Structural and Kinetic Characterization of a Bacterial Nitronate Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Establishes NMO Class I and II*

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Francesca; Agniswamy, Johnson; Yuan, Hongling; Vercammen, Ken; Pelicaen, Rudy; Cornelis, Pierre; Spain, Jim C.; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Nitronate monooxygenase (NMO) oxidizes the mitochondrial toxin propionate 3-nitronate (P3N) to malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme has been previously characterized biochemically in fungi, but no structural information is available. Based on amino acid similarity 4,985 genes are annotated in the GenBankTM as NMO. Of these, 4,424 (i.e. 89%) are bacterial genes, including several Pseudomonads that have been shown to use P3N as growth substrate. Here, we have cloned and expressed the gene pa4202 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, purified the resulting protein, and characterized it. The enzyme is active on P3N and other alkyl nitronates, but cannot oxidize nitroalkanes. P3N is the best substrate at pH 7.5 and atmospheric oxygen with kcatapp/Kmapp of 12 × 106 m−1 s−1, kcatapp of 1300 s−1, and Kmapp of 110 μm. Anerobic reduction of the enzyme with P3N yields a flavosemiquinone, which is formed within 7.5 ms, consistent with this species being a catalytic intermediate. Absorption spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography demonstrate a tightly, non-covalently bound FMN in the active site of the enzyme. Thus, PA4202 is the first NMO identified and characterized in bacteria. The x-ray crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 1.44 Å, showing a TIM barrel-fold. Four motifs in common with the biochemically characterized NMO from Cyberlindnera saturnus are identified in the structure of bacterial NMO, defining Class I NMO, which includes bacterial, fungal, and two animal NMOs. Notably, the only other NMO from Neurospora crassa for which biochemical evidence is available lacks the four motifs, defining Class II NMO. PMID:25002579

  11. Transport of industrial PVP-stabilized silver nanoparticles in saturated quartz sand coated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm of variable age.

    PubMed

    Mitzel, Michael R; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the environmental fate and transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is of paramount importance for the formation and validation of regulatory guidelines regarding these new and increasingly prevalent materials. The present study assessed the transport of an industrial formulation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-stabilized silver nanoparticle (PVP-nAg) in columns packed with water-saturated quartz sand and the same sand coated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm of variable age (i.e., growth period). Physicochemical characterization studies indicate that the PVP-nAg is stable in suspension and exhibits little change in size or electrophoretic mobility with changing ionic strength (IS) in either NaNO3 or Ca(NO3)2. The collector surface had a relatively homogeneous biofilm coating, as determined by CLSM, and a near uniform distribution of biomass and biofilm thickness following column equilibration. Transport experiments in clean sand revealed changes in the particle deposition behavior only at and above 10 mM IS Ca(NO3)2 and showed no discernible change in PVP-nAg transport behavior in the presence of 1 to 100 mM NaNO3. Transport experiments in P. aeruginosa-coated sand indicated significantly reduced retention of PVP-nAg at low IS compared to clean sand, irrespective of biofilm age. Nanoparticle retention was also generally reduced in the biofilm-coated sand at the higher IS, but to a lesser extent. The decreased retention of PVP-nAg in biofilm-coated sand compared to clean sand is likely due to repulsive electrosteric forces between the PVP coatings and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the biofilm. Additionally, the slope of the rising portion of the PVP-nAg breakthrough curve was noticeably steeper in biofilm conditions than in clean sand. More mature biofilm coating also resulted in earlier breakthrough of PVP-nAg compared to younger biofilm coatings, or to the clean sand, which may be an indication of the effect of repulsive surface

  12. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner-core phosphates are required for complete LPS synthesis and transport to the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Delucia, Angela M; Six, David A; Caughlan, Ruth E; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S; Dean, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg(2+) cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane (OM) comprised of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer leaflet. The OM protects cells from toxic molecules and is important for survival during infection. The LPS core kinase gene waaP can be deleted in several Gram-negative bacteria but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used a controlled-expression system to deplete WaaP directly in P. aeruginosa cells, which halted growth. WaaP depletion

  13. Involvement of NarK1 and NarK2 Proteins in Transport of Nitrate and Nitrite in the Denitrifying Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Noriega, Chris E.; Rowe, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Two transmembrane proteins were tentatively classified as NarK1 and NarK2 in the Pseudomonas genome project and hypothesized to play an important physiological role in nitrate/nitrite transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The narK1 and narK2 genes are located in a cluster along with the structural genes for the nitrate reductase complex. Our studies indicate that the transcription of all these genes is initiated from a single promoter and that the gene complex narK1K2GHJI constitutes an operon. Utilizing an isogenic narK1 mutant, a narK2 mutant, and a narK1K2 double mutant, we explored their effect on growth under denitrifying conditions. While the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant was only slightly affected in its ability to grow under denitrification conditions, both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants were found to be severely restricted in nitrate-dependent, anaerobic growth. All three strains demonstrated wild-type levels of nitrate reductase activity. Nitrate uptake by whole-cell suspensions demonstrated both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants to have very low yet different nitrate uptake rates, while the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant exhibited wild-type levels of nitrate uptake. Finally, Escherichia coli narK rescued both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants with respect to anaerobic respiratory growth. Our results indicate that only the NarK2 protein is required as a nitrate/nitrite transporter by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under denitrifying conditions. PMID:16391109

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 is a non-virulent strain suitable for mono-rhamnolipids production.

    PubMed

    Grosso-Becerra, María-Victoria; González-Valdez, Abigail; Granados-Martínez, María-Jessica; Morales, Estefanía; Servín-González, Luis; Méndez, José-Luis; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Ponce-Soto, Gabriel-Yaxal; Cocotl-Yañez, Miguel; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2016-12-01

    Rhamnolipids produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are biosurfactants with a high biotechnological potential, but their extensive commercialization is limited by the potential virulence of P. aeruginosa and by restrictions in producing these surfactants in heterologous hosts. In this work, we report the characterization of P. aeruginosa strain ATCC 9027 in terms of its genome-sequence, virulence, antibiotic resistance, and its ability to produce mono-rhamnolipids when carrying plasmids with different cloned genes from the type strain PAO1. The genes that were expressed from the plasmids are those coding for enzymes involved in the synthesis of this biosurfactant (rhlA and rhlB), as well as the gene that codes for the RhlR transcriptional regulator. We confirm that strain ATCC 9027 forms part of the PA7 clade, but contrary to strain PA7, it is sensitive to antibiotics and is completely avirulent in a mouse model. We also report that strain ATCC 9027 mono-rhamnolipid synthesis is limited by the expression of the rhlAB-R operon. Thus, this strain carrying the rhlAB-R operon produces similar rhamnolipids levels as PAO1 strain. We determined that strain ATCC 9027 with rhlAB-R operon was not virulent to mice. These results show that strain ATCC 9027, expressing PAO1 rhlAB-R operon, has a high biotechnological potential for industrial mono-rhamnolipid production.

  15. The metabolism of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate is regulated by the enhancer-binding protein PA2005 and the alternative sigma factor RpoN in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Benjamin R; Harris, Joshua R; Sarwar, Zaara; Scheel, Ryan A; Nomura, Christopher T

    2015-11-01

    A variety of soil-dwelling bacteria produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), which serves as a source of energy and carbon under nutrient deprivation. Bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas do not generally produce PHB but are capable of using the PHB degradation product (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate [(R)-3-HB] as a growth substrate. Essential to this utilization is the NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase BdhA that converts (R)-3-HB into acetoacetate, a molecule that readily enters central metabolism. Apart from the numerous studies that had focused on the biochemical characterization of BdhA, there was nothing known about the assimilation of (R)-3-HB in Pseudomonas, including the genetic regulation of bdhA expression. This study aimed to define the regulatory factors that govern or dictate the expression of the bdhA gene and (R)-3-HB assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Importantly, expression of the bdhA gene was found to be specifically induced by (R)-3-HB in a manner dependent on the alternative sigma factor RpoN and the enhancer-binding protein PA2005.This mode of regulation was essential for the utilization of (R)-3-HB as a sole source of energy and carbon. However, non-induced levels of bdhA expression were sufficient for P. aeruginosa PAO1 to grow on ( ± )-1,3-butanediol, which is catabolized through an (R)-3-HB intermediate. Because this is, we believe, the first report of an enhancer-binding protein that responds to (R)-3-HB, PA2005 was named HbcR for (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate catabolism regulator.

  16. The metabolism of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate is regulated by the enhancer-binding protein PA2005 and the alternative sigma factor RpoN in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Harris, Joshua R.; Sarwar, Zaara; Scheel, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of soil-dwelling bacteria produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), which serves as a source of energy and carbon under nutrient deprivation. Bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas do not generally produce PHB but are capable of using the PHB degradation product (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate [(R)-3-HB] as a growth substrate. Essential to this utilization is the NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase BdhA that converts (R)-3-HB into acetoacetate, a molecule that readily enters central metabolism. Apart from the numerous studies that had focused on the biochemical characterization of BdhA, there was nothing known about the assimilation of (R)-3-HB in Pseudomonas, including the genetic regulation of bdhA expression. This study aimed to define the regulatory factors that govern or dictate the expression of the bdhA gene and (R)-3-HB assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Importantly, expression of the bdhA gene was found to be specifically induced by (R)-3-HB in a manner dependent on the alternative sigma factor RpoN and the enhancer-binding protein PA2005.This mode of regulation was essential for the utilization of (R)-3-HB as a sole source of energy and carbon. However, non-induced levels of bdhA expression were sufficient for P. aeruginosa PAO1 to grow on ( ± )-1,3-butanediol, which is catabolized through an (R)-3-HB intermediate. Because this is, we believe, the first report of an enhancer-binding protein that responds to (R)-3-HB, PA2005 was named HbcR for (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate catabolism regulator. PMID:26311173

  17. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to Spaceflight Conditions Involve Hfq Regulation and Reveal a Role for Oxygen▿

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Schurr, Michael J.; Monsieurs, Pieter; Morici, Lisa; Schurr, Jill; Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Tsaprailis, George; Pierson, Duane L.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidi; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing bacterial behavior in microgravity is important for risk assessment and prevention of infectious diseases during spaceflight missions. Furthermore, this research field allows the unveiling of novel connections between low-fluid-shear regions encountered by pathogens during their natural infection process and bacterial virulence. This study is the first to characterize the spaceflight-induced global transcriptional and proteomic responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that is present in the space habitat. P. aeruginosa responded to spaceflight conditions through differential regulation of 167 genes and 28 proteins, with Hfq as a global transcriptional regulator. Since Hfq was also differentially regulated in spaceflight-grown Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Hfq represents the first spaceflight-induced regulator acting across bacterial species. The major P. aeruginosa virulence-related genes induced in spaceflight were the lecA and lecB lectin genes and the gene for rhamnosyltransferase (rhlA), which is involved in rhamnolipid production. The transcriptional response of spaceflight-grown P. aeruginosa was compared with our previous data for this organism grown in microgravity analogue conditions using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Interesting similarities were observed, including, among others, similarities with regard to Hfq regulation and oxygen metabolism. While RWV-grown P. aeruginosa mainly induced genes involved in microaerophilic metabolism, P. aeruginosa cultured in spaceflight presumably adopted an anaerobic mode of growth, in which denitrification was most prominent. Whether the observed changes in pathogenesis-related gene expression in response to spaceflight culture could lead to an alteration of virulence in P. aeruginosa remains to be determined and will be important for infectious disease risk assessment and prevention, both during spaceflight missions and for the general public. PMID:21169425

  18. Transcriptional and proteomic responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to spaceflight conditions involve Hfq regulation and reveal a role for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Schurr, Michael J; Monsieurs, Pieter; Morici, Lisa; Schurr, Jill; Wilson, James W; Ott, C Mark; Tsaprailis, George; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidi; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2011-02-01

    Assessing bacterial behavior in microgravity is important for risk assessment and prevention of infectious diseases during spaceflight missions. Furthermore, this research field allows the unveiling of novel connections between low-fluid-shear regions encountered by pathogens during their natural infection process and bacterial virulence. This study is the first to characterize the spaceflight-induced global transcriptional and proteomic responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that is present in the space habitat. P. aeruginosa responded to spaceflight conditions through differential regulation of 167 genes and 28 proteins, with Hfq as a global transcriptional regulator. Since Hfq was also differentially regulated in spaceflight-grown Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Hfq represents the first spaceflight-induced regulator acting across bacterial species. The major P. aeruginosa virulence-related genes induced in spaceflight were the lecA and lecB lectin genes and the gene for rhamnosyltransferase (rhlA), which is involved in rhamnolipid production. The transcriptional response of spaceflight-grown P. aeruginosa was compared with our previous data for this organism grown in microgravity analogue conditions using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Interesting similarities were observed, including, among others, similarities with regard to Hfq regulation and oxygen metabolism. While RWV-grown P. aeruginosa mainly induced genes involved in microaerophilic metabolism, P. aeruginosa cultured in spaceflight presumably adopted an anaerobic mode of growth, in which denitrification was most prominent. Whether the observed changes in pathogenesis-related gene expression in response to spaceflight culture could lead to an alteration of virulence in P. aeruginosa remains to be determined and will be important for infectious disease risk assessment and prevention, both during spaceflight missions and for the general public.

  19. Positive Control of Swarming, Rhamnolipid Synthesis, and Lipase Production by the Posttranscriptional RsmA/RsmZ System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Heurlier, Karin; Williams, Faye; Heeb, Stephan; Dormond, Corinne; Pessi, Gabriella; Singer, Dustin; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Haas, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the small RNA-binding, regulatory protein RsmA is a negative control element in the formation of several extracellular products (e.g., pyocyanin, hydrogen cyanide, PA-IL lectin) as well as in the production of N-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal molecules. RsmA was found to control positively the ability to swarm and to produce extracellular rhamnolipids and lipase, i.e., functions contributing to niche colonization by P. aeruginosa. An rsmA null mutant was entirely devoid of swarming but produced detectable amounts of rhamnolipids, suggesting that factors in addition to rhamnolipids influence the swarming ability of P. aeruginosa. A small regulatory RNA, rsmZ, which antagonized the effects of RsmA, was identified in P. aeruginosa. Expression of the rsmZ gene was dependent on both the global regulator GacA and RsmA, increased with cell density, and was subject to negative autoregulation. Overexpression of rsmZ and a null mutation in rsmA resulted in quantitatively similar, negative or positive effects on target genes, in agreement with a model that postulates titration of RsmA protein by RsmZ RNA. PMID:15126453

  20. Wound healing in skin promoted by inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: The critical role of tumor necrosis factor-α secreted from infiltrating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Emi; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Ishii, Keiko; Tanno, Hiromasa; Toriyabe, Sohachi; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing is promoted by the presence of replicating microorganisms adhering to the wounded tissue, but the precise mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, using a rat model with full-thickness dermal wounds, we examined the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculation on wound healing and the role of neutrophils infiltrating the wound site. Within 3 days, inoculation with this bacterium had accelerated re-epithelialization, epidermal cell proliferation, and neo-vascularization, as well as the local infiltration of neutrophils, which reached a peak at 24 hours. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was detected in the wound tissues on the mRNA and protein levels within 24 hours. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analyses detected higher levels of TNF-α in the infiltrating neutrophils in rats inoculated with P. aeruginosa than in uninoculated rats. Neutropenic rats treated with anti-neutrophil mAb or cyclophosphamide exhibited significant attenuation in re-epithelialization, epidermal cell proliferation, neo-vascularization, and TNF-α synthesis compared with control; administration of TNF-α reversed these attenuations. These wound-healing responses were decelerated in rats treated with anti-TNF-α mAb, as was the infiltration of neutrophils. These results indicate that inoculation with P. aeruginosa promotes wound healing by inducing the infiltration of neutrophils, which play a critical role as a major source of TNF-α.

  1. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled virulence factor production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Ayurveda spice clove (Syzygium aromaticum) bud extract.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Thiba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing controls the virulence determinants in most proteobacteria. In this work, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of an Ayurveda spice, namely clove (Syzygium aromaticum), shown anti-quorum sensing activity. Hexane and methanol extracts of clove inhibited the response of C. violaceum CV026 to exogenously supplied N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone, in turn preventing violacein production. Chloroform and methanol extracts of clove significantly reduced bioluminescence production by E. coli [pSB1075] grown in the presence of N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone. We demonstrated that clove extract inhibited quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, including expression of lecA::lux (by hexane extract), swarming (maximum inhibition by methanol extract), pyocyanin (maximum inhibition by hexane extract). This study shows that the presence of natural compounds that exhibit anti-quorum sensing activity in the clove extracts may be useful as the lead of anti-infective drugs.

  2. Identification of catechin as one of the flavonoids from Combretum albiflorum bark extract that reduces the production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Olivier M; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Rajaonson, Sanda; Diallo, Billo; Mol, Adeline; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) regulates the production of key virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other important pathogenic bacteria. In this report, extracts of leaves and bark of Combretum albiflorum (Tul.) Jongkind (Combretaceae) were found to quench the production of QS-dependent factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Chromatographic fractionation of the crude active extract generated several active fractions containing flavonoids, as shown by their typical spectral features. Purification and structural characterization of one of the active compounds led to the identification of the flavan-3-ol catechin [(2R,3S)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-benzopyran-3,5,7-triol]. The identity of catechin as one of the active molecules was confirmed by comparing the high-pressure liquid chromatography profiles and the mass spectrometry spectra obtained for a catechin standard and for the active C. albiflorum fraction. Moreover, standard catechin had a significant negative effect on pyocyanin and elastase productions and biofilm formation, as well as on the expression of the QS-regulated genes lasB and rhlA and of the key QS regulatory genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR. The use of RhlR- and LasR-based biosensors indicated that catechin might interfere with the perception of the QS signal N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone by RhlR, thereby leading to a reduction of the production of QS factors. Hence, catechin, along with other flavonoids produced by higher plants, might constitute a first line of defense against pathogenic attacks by affecting QS mechanisms and thereby virulence factor production.

  3. Identification of Catechin as One of the Flavonoids from Combretum albiflorum Bark Extract That Reduces the Production of Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Rajaonson, Sanda; Diallo, Billo; Mol, Adeline; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) regulates the production of key virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other important pathogenic bacteria. In this report, extracts of leaves and bark of Combretum albiflorum (Tul.) Jongkind (Combretaceae) were found to quench the production of QS-dependent factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Chromatographic fractionation of the crude active extract generated several active fractions containing flavonoids, as shown by their typical spectral features. Purification and structural characterization of one of the active compounds led to the identification of the flavan-3-ol catechin [(2R,3S)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-benzopyran-3,5,7-triol]. The identity of catechin as one of the active molecules was confirmed by comparing the high-pressure liquid chromatography profiles and the mass spectrometry spectra obtained for a catechin standard and for the active C. albiflorum fraction. Moreover, standard catechin had a significant negative effect on pyocyanin and elastase productions and biofilm formation, as well as on the expression of the QS-regulated genes lasB and rhlA and of the key QS regulatory genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR. The use of RhlR- and LasR-based biosensors indicated that catechin might interfere with the perception of the QS signal N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone by RhlR, thereby leading to a reduction of the production of QS factors. Hence, catechin, along with other flavonoids produced by higher plants, might constitute a first line of defense against pathogenic attacks by affecting QS mechanisms and thereby virulence factor production. PMID:19854927

  4. Osmoregulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under hyperosmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Burgoa, R; Flores, E; Hernández, E; Villa, A; Vaca, S

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain was found to be able to tolerate 700 mM NaCl. 0.5 mM of the osmoprotectant betaine restablished the growth of this strain in 1200 mM NaCl. Intracellular K+ and glutamate concentrations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 after an hyperosmotic shock (400 mM NaCl) showed a permanent increase. Adition of betaine (0.5 mM) to the medium with NaCl had an inhibitory effect on the intracellular accumulation of glutamate. The results indicate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 resists high NaCl concentrations, K+ accumulation and glutamate synthesis probably being the first mechanisms involved in adaptation to osmotic stress. Also is is demonstrated that betaine modulates intracellular glutamate levels in osmotically stressed P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  5. Molecular characterization of lysR-lysXE, gcdR-gcdHG and amaR-amaAB operons for lysine export and catabolism: a comprehensive lysine catabolic network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Madhuri Indurthi, Sai; Chou, Han-Ting; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-05-01

    Among multiple interconnected pathways for l-Lysine catabolism in pseudomonads, it has been reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 employs the decarboxylase and the transaminase pathways. However, up until now, knowledge of several genes involved in operation and regulation of these pathways was still missing. Transcriptome analyses coupled with promoter activity measurements and growth phenotype analyses led us to identify new members in l-Lys and d-Lys catabolism and regulation, including gcdR-gcdHG for glutarate utilization, dpkA, amaR-amaAB and PA2035 for d-Lys catabolism, lysR-lysXE for putative l-Lys efflux and lysP for putative l-Lys uptake. The gcdHG operon encodes an acyl-CoA transferase (gcdG) and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (gcdH) and is under the control of the transcriptional activator GcdR. Growth on l-Lys was enhanced in the mutants of lysX and lysE, supporting the operation of l-Lys efflux. The transcriptional activator LysR is responsible for l-Lys specific induction of lysXE and the PA4181-82 operon of unknown function. The putative operator sites of GcdR and LysR were deduced from serial deletions and comparative genomic sequence analyses, and the formation of nucleoprotein complexes was demonstrated with purified His-tagged GcdR and LysR. The amaAB operon encodes two enzymes to convert pipecolate to 2-aminoadipate. Induction of the amaAB operon by l-Lys, d-Lys and pipecolate requires a functional AmaR, supporting convergence of Lys catabolic pathways to pipecolate. Growth on pipecolate was retarded in the gcdG and gcdH mutants, suggesting the importance of glutarate in pipecolate and 2-aminoadipate utilization. Furthermore, this study indicated links in the control of interconnected networks of lysine and arginine catabolism in P. aeruginosa.

  6. Isolation of the Autoinducer-Quenching Strain that Inhibits LasR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lixing; Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Yuxiang; Wang, Lianhui

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as a general phenomenon in microorganisms and plays an important role in many pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor strain NT1 to rapidly screen for autoinducer-quenching inhibitors from bacteria. After initial screening 5389 isolates obtained from land and beach soil, 53 putative positive strains were identified. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive culture supernatant, and 22 strains were confirmed to have anti-LasR activity. Finally, we determined the strain JM2, which could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, belonged to the genus Pseudomonas by analysis of 16S rDNA. Partially purified inhibitor factor(s) F5 derived from culture supernatants specifically inhibited LasR-controlled elastase and protease in wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1 by 68% and 73%, respectively, without significantly affecting growth; the rhl-controlled pyocyanin and rhamnolipids were inhibited by 54% and 52% in the presence of 100 μg/mL of F5. The swarming motility and biofilm of PAO1 were also inhibited by F5. Real time RT-PCR on samples from 100 μg/mL F5-treated P. aeruginosa showed downregulation of autoinducer synthase (LasRI and rhlI) and cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR) genes by 50%, 28%, 48%, and 29%, respectively. These results provide compelling evidence that the F5 inhibitor(s) interferes with the las system and significantly inhibits biofilm formation. PMID:24736783

  7. Transcriptomic Analyses Elucidate Adaptive Differences of Closely-Related Strains of P. aeruginosa in Fuel.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Bowen, Loryn L; Zhou, Carol E; Howard-Byerly, Susan C; Foley, William S; Striebich, Richard C; Dugan, Larry C; Ruiz, Oscar N

    2017-03-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize hydrocarbons, but different strains have varying degrees of adaptation despite their highly conserved genome. P. aeruginosa ATCC 33988 is highly adapted to hydrocarbons while strain PAO1, a human pathogen, is less-adapted and degrades jet fuel at a slower rate than does ATCC 33988. We investigated fuel specific transcriptomic differences between these strains in order to ascertain the underling mechanisms utilized by the adapted strain to proliferate in fuel. During growth in fuel, the genes related to alkane degradation, heat-shock response, membrane proteins, efflux pumps and several novel genes were upregulated in ATCC 33988. Overexpression of alk genes in PAO1 provided some improvement in growth, but not as robust as that of ATCC 33988, suggesting the role of other genes in adaptation. Expression of the function unknown gene PA5359 from ATCC 33988 in PAO1 increased the growth in fuel. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that PA5359 is a predicted lipoprotein with a conserved 'Yx(FWY)xxD' motif, which is shared among bacterial adhesins. Overexpression of the putative RND-efflux pump PA3521-PA3523 increased the growth of ATCC 33988 strain suggesting a possible role in fuel tolerance. Interestingly the PAO1 strain cannot utilize nC8 and nC10. Expression of GFP under the control of alkB promoters confirmed that alk gene promoter polymorphism affects the expression of alk genes. Promoter fusion assays further confirmed that regulation of alk genes was different in the two strains. Protein sequence analysis showed low amino acid differences for many of the upregulated genes, further supporting transcriptional control as the main mechanism for enhanced adaptation.IMPORTANCE These results support that specific signal transduction, gene regulation and coordination of multiple biological responses are required to improve survival, growth and metabolism of fuel in adapted strains. This study provides new insight into the mechanistic

  8. Strain- and Substrate-Dependent Redox Mediator and Electricity Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bosire, Erick M.; Blank, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important, thriving member of microbial communities of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) through the production of versatile phenazine redox mediators. Pure culture experiments with a model strain revealed synergistic interactions of P. aeruginosa with fermenting microorganisms whereby the synergism was mediated through the shared fermentation product 2,3-butanediol. Our work here shows that the behavior and efficiency of P. aeruginosa in mediated current production is strongly dependent on the strain of P. aeruginosa. We compared levels of phenazine production by the previously investigated model strain P. aeruginosa PA14, the alternative model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1, and the BES isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain KRP1 with glucose and the fermentation products 2,3-butanediol and ethanol as carbon substrates. We found significant differences in substrate-dependent phenazine production and resulting anodic current generation for the three strains, with the BES isolate KRP1 being overall the best current producer and showing the highest electrochemical activity with glucose as a substrate (19 μA cm−2 with ∼150 μg ml−1 phenazine carboxylic acid as a redox mediator). Surprisingly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed very low phenazine production and electrochemical activity under all tested conditions. IMPORTANCE Microbial fuel cells and other microbial bioelectrochemical systems hold great promise for environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment and bioremediation. While there is much emphasis on the development of materials and devices to realize such systems, the investigation and a deeper understanding of the underlying microbiology and ecology are lagging behind. Physiological investigations focus on microorganisms exhibiting direct electron transfer in pure culture systems. Meanwhile, mediated electron transfer with natural redox compounds produced by, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa might enable an

  9. The impact of anaerobiosis on strain-dependent phenotypic variations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hao; Toyofuku, Masanori; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ichihashi, Akihiro; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria participate in social behaviors by communicating with each other and forming surface-associated biofilms. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, such social behaviors are affected greatly by the environment. Although P. aeruginosa survive under anaerobic conditions, previous studies indicate that quorum sensing is attenuated under such conditions, and that this leads to decreased activity of extracellular virulence factors as compared to aerobic conditions. Hence it has come into question whether P. aeruginosa are virulent under anaerobic conditions. Here, we compared various phenotypes between PAO1 and clinical isolates under anaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that when grown anaerobically, growth and cell morphology greatly differed among the strains. One of the clinical isolates produced comparable amounts of quorum-sensing signaling molecules and extracellular virulence factors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, while the other strains showed low production under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation also exhibited strain-dependent variations, suggesting that there are several mechanisms that lead to biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that the impact of anaerobiosis on the social interactions of P. aeruginosa is strain dependent, and suggest that multiple regulatory mechanisms are involved in the regulation of quorum sensing and biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Insights into Mechanisms and Proteomic Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adaptation to a Novel Antimicrobial Substance

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Peter; Jübner, Martin; Müller, Stefan; Bender, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been reported since the introduction of synthetic antibiotics. Bacteria, such as one of the most common nosocomial pathogens P. aeruginosa, adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions, due to their short generation time. Thus microevolutional changes can be monitored in situ. In this study, the microevolutional process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance against a recently developed novel antibacterial zinc Schiff-base (ZSB) was investigated at the proteome level. After extended exposure to ZSB the passaged strain differed in tolerance against ZSB, with the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 exhibiting 1.6 times higher minimal inhibitory concentration. Using Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis, the changes in the proteome of ZSB adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 were examined by comparison with the non-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1. The proteome of the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain differed significantly from the non-adapted in the abundance of two proteins when both strains were grown under stressing conditions. One protein could be identified as the outer membrane protein D that plays a role in uptake of basic amino acids as well as in carbapeneme resistance. The second protein has been identified as alkyl peroxide reductase subunit F. Our data indicated a slight increase in abundance of alkyl peroxide reductase F (AhpF) in the case of ZSB passaged P. aeruginosa PAO1. Higher abundance of Ahp has been discussed in the literature as a promoter of accelerated detoxification of benzene derivatives. The observed up-regulated AhpF thus appears to be connected to an increased tolerance against ZSB. Changes in the abundance of proteins connected to oxidative stress were also found after short-time exposure of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the ZSB. Furthermore, adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed increased tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and, in addition, showed accelerated degradation of ZSB, as determined by HPLC measurements. PMID:23869205

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Increased Mutation Frequency Due to Inactivation of the DNA Oxidative Repair System▿

    PubMed Central

    Mandsberg, L. F.; Ciofu, O.; Kirkby, N.; Christiansen, L. E.; Poulsen, H. E.; Høiby, N.

    2009-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:19332676

  12. MrkD1P from Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain IA565 Allows for Coexistence with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Protection from Protease-Mediated Biofilm Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Childers, Brandon M.; Van Laar, Tricia A.; You, Tao; Clegg, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation and persistence are essential components for the continued survival of pathogens inside the host and constitute a major contributor to the development of chronic wounds with resistance to antimicrobial compounds. Understanding these processes is crucial for control of biofilm-mediated disease. Though chronic wound infections are often polymicrobial in nature, much of the research on chronic wound-related microbes has focused on single-species models. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are microbes that are often found together in wound isolates and are able to form stable in vitro biofilms, despite the antagonistic nature of P. aeruginosa with other organisms. Mutants of the K. pneumoniae strain IA565 lacking the plasmid-borne mrkD1P gene were less competitive than the wild type in an in vitro dual-species biofilm model with P. aeruginosa (PAO1). PAO1 spent medium inhibited the formation of biofilm of mrkD1P-deficient mutants and disrupted preestablished biofilms, with no effect on IA565 and no effect on the growth of the wild type or mutants. A screen using a two-allele PAO1 transposon library identified the LasB elastase as the secreted effector involved in biofilm disruption, and a purified version of the protein produced results similar to those with PAO1 spent medium. Various other proteases had a similar effect, suggesting that the disruption of the mrkD1P gene causes sensitivity to general proteolytic effects and indicating a role for MrkD1P in protection against host antibiofilm effectors. Our results suggest that MrkD1P allows for competition of K. pneumoniae with P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm and provides defense against microbial and host-derived proteases. PMID:23980108

  13. Comparative Profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Reveals Differential Expression of Novel Unique and Conserved Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Silvia; Brugnoli, Margherita; De Bonis, Angela; Righetti, Francesco; Delvillani, Francesco; Dehò, Gianni; Horner, David; Briani, Federica; Bertoni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly adaptable bacterium that thrives in a broad range of ecological niches and can infect multiple hosts as diverse as plants, nematodes and mammals. In humans, it is an important opportunistic pathogen. This wide adaptability correlates with its broad genetic diversity. In this study, we used a deep-sequencing approach to explore the complement of small RNAs (sRNAs) in P. aeruginosa as the number of such regulatory molecules previously identified in this organism is relatively low, considering its genome size, phenotypic diversity and adaptability. We have performed a comparative analysis of PAO1 and PA14 strains which share the same host range but differ in virulence, PA14 being considerably more virulent in several model organisms. Altogether, we have identified more than 150 novel candidate sRNAs and validated a third of them by Northern blotting. Interestingly, a number of these novel sRNAs are strain-specific or showed strain-specific expression, strongly suggesting that they could be involved in determining specific phenotypic traits. PMID:22590564

  14. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S.; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M.; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H.; Molloy, Mark P.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of “ready-made” nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  15. Optimization and comparative characterization of neuraminidase activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Klebsiella pneumoniae, Hep-2 cell, sheep kidney and rat liver lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaei, C; Ahmadi, M; Hosseini Jazani, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The properties of neuraminidase produced by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 during growth in a defined medium (BHI) was examined and compared with some neuraminidase features of K. pneumoniae in this investigation. Materials and Methods The enzyme was isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa which was used in a sensitive fluorometric assay by using 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl) α-D-N acetylneuraminic acid as substrate. Results Neuraminidase production in P. aeruginosa PAO1 paralleled bacterial growth in defined medium (BHI) and was maximal in the late logarithmic phase of growth but decreased during the stationary phase, probably owing to protease production or thermal instability. Highest production of P. aeruginosa PAO1 neuraminidase was in BHI culture media. The neuraminidase of P. aeruginosa PAO1 possessed an optimum temperature of activity at 56°C and the activity was maximal at pH 5. Heating the enzyme to 56°C for 45 min., in the presence of bovine serum albumin destroyed 33.1% of it's activity and addition of Ca+2, EDTA and NANA also decreased activity markedly. Conclusion The results revealed that the highest specific activity is for p. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:22347548

  16. The role of quorum sensing system in antimicrobial induced ampC expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingming; Jiang, Handong; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Jinxiang; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Liang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of quorum sensing (QS) systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on the expression of ampC gene induced by antibiotics. An in vitro dynamic model of P. aeruginosa biofilms was established in a silicon tube in once-flowthrough system at 37 °C. Biofilm generation was identified by argentation. Biofilm morphology of standard P. aeruginosa strain (PAO-1) and QS systems deficient strains (PDO100, rhlI deficient strain; PAO-JP1, lasI deficient strain; and PAO-MW1, rhlI and lasI deficient strain) were observed by optical microscope. The expression of ampC in PAO1, PAO1 with QS inhibitor (furanone C-30) and the QS deficient strains before and after induced by antibiotics were quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. The biofilms of PAO-1 and PDO100 were much thicker and denser than that of PAO-JP1 and PAO-MW1. Being induced by antibiotics, the expression of ampC in PAO1 and PDO100 was significantly higher than that in PAO-MW1 and PAO-JP1. With the effect of furanone C-30, the expression of ampC in PAO1 induced by antibiotics was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. QS system, especially the las system, plays an important role in both biofilm formation and antimicrobials induced ampC expression and furanone C-30 is a potent inhibitor for P. aeruginosa QS system.

  17. A Geobacter sulfurreducens strain expressing pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili localizes OmcS on pili but is deficient in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-02-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity.

  18. A Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain Expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili Localizes OmcS on Pili but Is Deficient in Fe(III) Oxide Reduction and Current Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity. PMID:24296506

  19. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  20. Cells of Escherichia coli are protected against severe chemical stress by co-habiting cell aggregates formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Henke, Sebastian Franz; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial cells within biofilms and cell aggregates show increased resistance against chemical stress compared with suspended cells. It is not known whether bacteria that co-habit biofilms formed by other bacteria also acquire such resistance. This scenario was investigated in a proof-of-principle experiment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as cell aggregate-forming bacterium and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 as potential co-habiting bacterium equipped with an inducible bioluminescence system. Cell aggregation of strain PAO1 can be induced by the toxic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In single cultures of strain MG1655, bioluminescence was inhibited by the protonophor carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but the cells were still viable. By applying CCCP and SDS together, cells of strain MG1655 lost their bioluminescence and viability indicating the importance of energy-dependent resistance mechanisms against SDS. In co-suspensions with strain PAO1, bioluminescence of strain MG1655 was sustained in the presence of SDS and CCCP. Image analysis showed that bioluminescent cells were located in cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1. Thus, cells of strain MG1655 that co-habited cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1 were protected against a severe chemical stress that was lethal to them in single cultures. Co-habiting could lead to increased survival of pathogens in clinical settings and could be employed in biotechnological applications involving toxic milieus.

  1. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  2. Non-apoptotic toxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward murine cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sanhita; Bonfield, Tracey; Tartakoff, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Although P. aeruginosa is especially dangerous in cystic fibrosis (CF), there is no consensus as to how it kills representative cell types that are of key importance in the lung. This study concerns the acute toxicity of the sequenced strain, PAO1, toward a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Toxicity requires brief contact with the target cell, but is then delayed for more than 12 h. None of the classical toxic effectors of this organism is required and cell death occurs without phagocytosis or acute perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton. Apoptosis is not required for toxicity toward either RAW 264.7 cells or for alveolar macrophages. Transcriptional profiling shows that encounter between PAO1 and RAW 264.7 cells elicits an early inflammatory response, followed by growth arrest. As an independent strategy to understand the mechanism of toxicity, we selected variant RAW 264.7 cells that resist PAO1. Upon exposure to P. aeruginosa, they are hyper-responsive with regard to classical inflammatory cytokine production and show transient downregulation of transcripts that are required for cell growth. They do not show obvious morphologic changes. Although they do not increase interferon transcripts, when exposed to PAO1 they dramatically upregulate a subset of the responses that are characteristic of exposure to g-interferon, including several guanylate-binding proteins. The present observations provide a novel foundation for learning how to equip cells with resistance to a complex challenge.

  3. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  4. Anaerobic activation of the entire denitrification pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires Anr, an analog of Fnr.

    PubMed

    Ye, R W; Haas, D; Ka, J O; Krishnapillai, V; Zimmermann, A; Baird, C; Tiedje, J M

    1995-06-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene anr, which encodes a structural and functional analog of the anaerobic regulator Fnr in Escherichia coli, was mapped to the SpeI fragment R, which is at about 59 min on the genomic map of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 grew under anaerobic conditions with nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as alternative electron acceptors. An anr deletion mutant, PAO6261, was constructed. It was unable to grow with these alternative electron acceptors; however, its ability to denitrify was restored upon the introduction of the wild-type anr gene. In addition, the activities of two enzymes in the denitrification pathway, nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase, were not detectable under oxygen-limiting conditions in strain PAO6261 but were restored when complemented with the anr+ gene. These results indicate that the anr gene product plays a key role in anaerobically activating the entire denitrification pathway.

  5. Genes involved in copper resistance influence survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on copper surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elguindi, Jutta; Wagner, Janine; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 on copper cast alloys and the influence of genes on survival on copper containing medium and surfaces. Methods and Results Different strains of P. aeruginosa were inoculated on copper containing medium or different copper cast alloys and the survival rate determined. The survival rates were compared to rates on copper-free medium and stainless steel as control. In addition, the effect of temperature on survival was examined. Conclusions Copper cast alloys had previously shown to be bactericidal to various bacteria but the mechanism of copper-mediated killing is still not known. In this report we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 is rapidly killed on different copper cast alloys and that genes involved in conferring copper resistance in copper-containing medium also influenced survival on copper cast alloys. We also show that the rate of killing is influenced by temperature. PMID:19239551

  6. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Wynn, Matthew; Pinto, Rachel; Cordwell, Stuart; Rose, Barbara R; Harbour, Colin; Triccas, James A; Manos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01) cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic) and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic). Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R) against its chronic isogen (AES-1M), isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA); an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001), sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals High Intrinsic Resistance to Penem Antibiotics: Penem Resistance Mechanisms and Their Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kiyomi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC β-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC β-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC β-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC β-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems. PMID:11408209

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics: penem resistance mechanisms and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Gotoh, N; Nishino, T

    2001-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC beta-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC beta-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC beta-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC beta-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems.

  10. COMPARATIVE TAXONOMY OF CRYSTALLOGENIC STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND PSEUDOMONAS CHLORORAPHIS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William C.; Rhodes, Lenora J.

    1962-01-01

    Haynes, William C. (Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, Peoria, Ill.) and Lenora J. Rhodes. Comparative taxonomy of crystallogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas chlororaphis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1080–1084. 1962.—Only 11 of 39 strains received in the Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection under the designation Pseudonomas chlororaphis proved to be authentic; 28 were typical, pyocyanogenic strains of P. aeruginosa. The reason for this disproportionately high rate of misidentification apparently arises from an erroneous belief that the ability to produce green and yellow crystals of chlororaphin and oxychlororaphin is confined to P. chlororaphis. The ability of many strains of P. aeruginosa to do likewise is not well known. Inasmuch as the characteristic is not unique to P. chlororaphis, other criteria are required to distinguish crystallogenic strains of these species. After a taxonomic comparison of 18 strains of P. chlororaphis and 47 crystallogenic strains of P. aeruginosa, it was determined that there are three main distinctions: (i) P. aeruginosa grows well at 42 C but fails to grow upon serial transfer at 5 C, whereas P. chlororaphis fails to grow at 42 C, but grows well at 5 C: (ii) most strains of P. aeruginosa produce pyocyanin, whereas P. chlororaphis strains do not; (iii) P. aeruginosa cells possess only one or two polar flagella, whereas P. chlororaphis usually has at least four, sometimes as many as eight, polar flagella. PMID:13963593

  11. Drosophila melanogaster as an Animal Model for the Study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Heidi; Sibley, Christopher D.; Surette, Michael G.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3) demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo. PMID:21998591

  12. A Novel Insight into Dehydroleucodine Mediated Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, S.; Veisaga, M. L.; López, L. A.; Barbieri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) to conventional treatments demands the search for novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene lactone obtained from Artemisia (A.) douglasiana, was screened against several pathogenic virulence effectors of P. aeruginosa. In vitro, minimum inhibitory concentration of DhL was determined against P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA103, PA14, and multidrug resistant clinical strain, CDN118. Results showed that DhL was active against each strain where PAO1 and PA103 showed higher susceptibility (MIC 0.48 mg/mL) as compared to PA14 (MIC 0.96 mg/mL) and CDN118 (MIC 0.98 mg/mL). Also, when PAO1 strain was grown in the presence of DhL (MIC50, 0.12 mg/mL), a delay in the generation time was noticed along with significant inhibition of secretory protease and elastase activities, interruption in biofilm attachment phase in a stationary culture, and a significant decline in Type III effector ExoS. At MIC50, DhL treatment increased the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa towards potent antibiotics. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa with DhL prevented toxin-induced apoptosis in macrophages. These observations suggest that DhL activity was at the bacterial transcriptional level. Hence, antimicrobial activity of DhL may serve as leads in the development of new anti-Pseudomonas pharmaceuticals. PMID:26640783

  13. Diverse effects of Galleria mellonella infection with entomopathogenic and clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Andrejko, Mariola; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    In numerous studies, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited as an alternative model host for investigating virulence factors of different pathogenic bacteria. In the present paper, we provide evidence that G. mellonella constitutes a useful and convenient model for analysis of the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains. In this in vivo study on the G. mellonella–P. aeruginosa interaction, a bidirectional analysis comprising evaluation of humoral immune response of the bacteria-infected larvae and determination of P. aeruginosa proteinases synthesized during the infection was performed. The effects of G. mellonella infection by two clinical strains (PA C124/9 and PA 02/18) and one entomopathogenic strain (ATCC 27853) cultured in a rich LB and minimal M9 medium, known to induce synthesis of different sets of extracellular proteinases, were evaluated. Both clinical isolates were able to establish infection in G. mellonella caterpillars after intrahemocelic injection. However, although the final effect of the larvae infection by each P. aeruginosa strain was their death within ca. 48 h, considerable strain and medium-dependent differences in the immune response of the insects were detected. The results indicated that G. mellonella larvae distinguished between the three P. aeruginosa strains, which was well reflected by the diverse humoral immune response. The significant differences concerned, among others, the level of phenoloxidase, lysozyme, and antibacterial activity in the hemolymph of the infected insects. An analysis of proteinases performed using specific activity tests, zymography and immunoblotting, revealed that elastase B and alkaline protease were synthesized by each P. aeruginosa strain during the infection. In contrast, a high level of elastase A activity was detected only in the larvae infected by the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain. It can be postulated that the three P. aeruginosa strains exploit different

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope.

  15. [TL, the new bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its application for the search of halo-producing bacteriophages].

    PubMed

    Pleteneva, E A; Burkal'tseva, M V; Shaburova, O V; Krylov, S V; Pechnikova, E V; Sokolova, O S; Krylov, V N

    2011-01-01

    The properties of new virulent bacteriophage TL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belonging to the family Podoviridae (genome size of 46 kb) were investigated. This bacteriophage is capable of lysogenizing the bacterial lawn in halo zones around negative colonies (NC) of other bacteriophages. TL forms large NC, that are hardly distinguishable on the lawn of P. aeruginisa PAO1. At the same time, on the lawns of some phage-resistant PAO1 mutants, as well as on those produced by a number of clinical isolates, TL forms more transparent NC. It is suggested that more effective growth of the bacteriophage TL NC is associated with the differences in outer lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer of the cell walls of different bacterial strains, as well as of the bacteria inside and outside of the halos. This TL property was used to optimize selection of bacteriophages producing halos around NC on the lawn of P. aeruginosa PAO1. As a result, a group of bacteriophages differing in the patterns of interaction between their halos and TL bacteriophage, as well as in some characters was identified. Taking into consideration the importance of cell-surfaced structures of P. aeruginosa in manifestation of virulence and pathogenicity, possible utilization of specific phage enzymes, polysacchadide depolymerases, for more effective treatment of P. aeruginosa infections is discussed.

  16. Quorum-Quenching Acylase Reduces the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Wahjudi, Mariana; Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Setroikromo, Rita; Quax, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 gene pvdQ encodes an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) acylase capable of degrading N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone by cleaving the AHL amide. PvdQ has been proven to function as a quorum quencher in vitro in a number of phenotypic assays. To address the question of whether PvdQ also shows quorum-quenching properties in vivo, an infection model based on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was explored. In a fast-acting paralysis assay, strain PAO1(pMEpvdQ), which overproduces PvdQ, was shown to be less virulent than the wild-type strain. More than 75% of the nematodes exposed to PAO1(pMEpvdQ) survived and continued to grow when using this strain as a food source. Interestingly, in a slow-killing assay monitoring the survival of the nematodes throughout a 4-day course, strain PAO1-ΔpvdQ was shown to be more virulent than the wild-type strain, confirming the role of PvdQ as a virulence-reducing agent. It was observed that larval stage 1 (L1) to L3-stage larvae benefit much more from protection by PvdQ than L4 worms. Finally, purified PvdQ protein was added to C. elegans worms infected with wild-type PAO1, and this resulted in reduced pathogenicity and increased the life span of the nematodes. From our observations we can conclude that PvdQ might be a strong candidate for antibacterial therapy against Pseudomonas infections. PMID:19721066

  17. Marine-Derived Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activities Enhance the Antibacterial Efficacy of Tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P.; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (−63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (−33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (−89%) and a 2-log reduction (−99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  18. Contribution of cell elongation to the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Young; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO(2) (-)) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process.

  19. The transcriptional regulator Np20 is the zinc uptake regulator in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Matthew L; Farrow, John M; Farrow, John Matthew; Parrish, Whitney; Danell, Allison S; Pesci, Everett C

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is essential for all bacteria, but excess amounts of the metal can have toxic effects. To address this, bacteria have developed tightly regulated zinc uptake systems, such as the ZnuABC zinc transporter which is regulated by the Fur-like zinc uptake regulator (Zur). In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Zur protein has yet to be identified experimentally, however, sequence alignment revealed that the zinc-responsive transcriptional regulator Np20, encoded by np20 (PA5499), shares high sequence identity with Zur found in other bacteria. In this study, we set out to determine whether Np20 was functioning as Zur in P. aeruginosa. Using RT-PCR, we determined that np20 (hereafter known as zur) formed a polycistronic operon with znuC and znuB. Mutant strains, lacking the putative znuA, znuB, or znuC genes were found to grow poorly in zinc deplete conditions as compared to wild-type strain PAO1. Intracellular zinc concentrations in strain PAO-Zur (Δzur) were found to be higher than those for strain PAO1, further implicating the zur as the zinc uptake regulator. Reporter gene fusions and real time RT-PCR revealed that transcription of znuA was repressed in a zinc-dependent manner in strain PAO1, however zinc-dependent transcriptional repression was alleviated in strain PAO-Zur, suggesting that the P. aeruginosa Zur homolog (ZurPA) directly regulates expression of znuA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays also revealed that recombinant ZurPA specifically binds to the promoter region of znuA and does not bind in the presence of the zinc chelator N,N',N-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN). Taken together, these data support the notion that Np20 is the P. aeruginosa Zur, which regulates the transcription of the genes encoding the high affinity ZnuABC zinc transport system.

  20. Co-incubation of Acanthamoeba castellanii with strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alters the survival of amoeba.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A M; Harmis, N; Stapleton, F

    2000-06-01

    Enhanced survival of Acanthamoeba castellanii has previously been reported following co-incubation with a single strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different strains of P. aeruginosa on amoebae survival. Four contact lens solutions were challenged with A. castellanii for between 6 and 24 h, and survival rates of amoeba were calculated. Subsequently, A. castellanii was co-incubated with different strains of P. aeruginosa (strain 6294, an invasive isolate; 6206, a cytotoxic isolate; and Paer 001, a null isolate). Differences in amoeba survival over time between solutions for each bacterial strain were analysed. Non-neutralized hydrogen peroxide was the most effective system against A. castellani at all time points (P<0.05). Survival rates were not different between multipurpose solutions and neutralized hydrogen peroxide. Co-incubation with P. aeruginosa altered amoeba survival, and maximum survival occurred in the presence of the invasive strain of P. aeruginosa. Enhanced amoeba survival may occur in the presence of certain strains of Gram-negative bacteria, and with certain types of contact lens disinfection systems.

  1. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  4. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutant non-derepressible for orthophosphate-regulated proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G L; Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1981-01-01

    Using a rapid screening assay based on the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine, we isolated several mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in the production of phospholipase C. One, designated strain A50N, was also markedly deficient in the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase and several unidentified extracellular proteins. Because strain A50N produces these proteins under conditions of derepression at levels equal to those produced by the parental strain PAO1 grown in medium containing excess phosphate, it appears to have a mutation in a genetic element involved in the derepression of phosphate-repressible proteins. Images PMID:6790519

  5. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as “genomic islands (GIs).” To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, “GEMINI.” GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  6. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-01-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ΔsprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  7. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms.

  8. [Effects of different iron concentrations on the growths of a unicellular strain and a colonial strain of Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-wen; Li, Jian-hong; Fu, Lu; Wu, Min; Weng, Yong-ping; Zhou, Yao-ming

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the growth, photosynthetic efficiency, siderophore production and iron accumulation of two strains of M. aeruginosa, a unicellular strain M. aeruginosa PCC7806 and a colonial strain M. aeruginosa XW01, under iron-limited and iron-replete conditions. The identities of ITS and fur gene sequences of two strains were 95% and 98% respectively.That implied the two strains should be close relatives. Results showed the growths of two strains were severely inhibited under an iron-limited condition. The unicellular strain died in 6 days,whereas the colonial strain could maintain a weak growth in 10 days under the iron-limited condition. PSII maximum light energy transformation (Fv/Fm) of the colonial strain and the unicellular strain were 0.182 +/- 0.014 and 0.160 +/- 0.017, respectively. The colonial strain displayed a higher photosynthetic oxygen evolution than the unicellular strain. Two strains could produce siderophores, which were hydroxamate type. The colonial strain produced more siderophores than unicellular strain under the iron-limited condition.Iron contents of two strains were less than 1/3 cultured in the iron-limited condition than in iron-replete condition, but no obvious difference appeared between the two strains. Our result demonstrated that the colonial strain have a stronger endurance than unicellular strain under the iron-limited condition. As two strains had almost same abilities of iron accumulation, the other physiological mechanisms in the unicellular strain should be more sensitive to lower iron level.

  9. R-type pyocin is required for competitive growth advantage between Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yun-Jeong; Chung, In-Young; Choi, Kelly B; Cho, You-Hee

    2007-01-01

    R-type pyocin is a bacteriophage tail-shaped bacteriocin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its physiological roles are relatively unknown. Here we describe a role of R-type pyocin in the competitive growth advantages between P. aeruginosa strains. Partial purification and gene disruption revealed that the major killing activity from the culture supernatant of PA14 is attributed to R-type pyocin, neither F-type nor S-type pyocins. These findings may provide insight into the forces governing P. aeruginosa population dynamics to promote and maintain its biodiversity.

  10. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  11. The susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients to bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Loukou, Guillaume; Cablanmian, Arsher; Lathro, Serge; Kutter, Elizabeth; Thien, Hoang Vu; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Phage therapy may become a complement to antibiotics in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. To design efficient therapeutic cocktails, the genetic diversity of the species and the spectrum of susceptibility to bacteriophages must be investigated. Bacterial strains showing high levels of phage resistance need to be identified in order to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Here we have selected genetically diverse P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and tested their susceptibility to a large collection of phages. Based on plaque morphology and restriction profiles, six different phages were purified from "pyophage", a commercial cocktail directed against five different bacterial species, including P. aeruginosa. Characterization of these phages by electron microscopy and sequencing of genome fragments showed that they belong to 4 different genera. Among 47 P. aeruginosa strains, 13 were not lysed by any of the isolated phages individually or by pyophage. We isolated two new phages that could lyse some of these strains, and their genomes were sequenced. The presence/absence of a CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Crisper associated genes) was investigated to evaluate the role of the system in phage resistance. Altogether, the results show that some P. aeruginosa strains cannot support the growth of any of the tested phages belonging to 5 different genera, and suggest that the CRISPR-Cas system is not a major defence mechanism against these lytic phages.

  12. Induction of the MexXY efflux pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is dependent on drug-ribosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Sobel, Mara L; El Garch, Farid; Poole, Keith; Plésiat, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    MexXY is an inducible efflux system that contributes to the natural resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics. Experiments involving real-time PCR after reverse transcription in reference strain PAO1 showed concentration-dependent induction of gene mexY by various ribosome inhibitors (e.g., chloramphenicol, tetracycline, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) but not by antibiotics acting on other cellular targets (e.g., beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones). Confirming a functional link between the efflux system and the translational machinery, ribosome protection by plasmid-encoded proteins TetO and ErmBP increased the resistance of a DeltamexAB-oprM mutant of PAO1 to tetracycline and erythromycin, respectively, as well as the concentrations of both drugs required to induce mexY. Furthermore, spontaneous mutations resulting in specific resistance to dihydrostreptomycin or spectinomycin also raised the minimal drug concentration for mexXY induction in strain PAO1. While strongly upregulated in a PAO1 mutant defective in gene mexZ (which codes for a putative repressor of operon mexXY), gene mexY remained inducible by agents such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and spectinomycin, suggesting additional regulatory loci for mexXY. Altogether, these data demonstrate physiological interplays between MexXY and the ribosome and are suggestive of an alternative function for MexXY beyond antibiotic efflux.

  13. Influence of clove oil on certain quorum-sensing-regulated functions and biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmad, Iqbal; Asif, Mohammad; Tahseen, Qudsia

    2013-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This signalling pathway is considered as novel and promising target for anti-infective agents. In the present investigation, effect of the Sub-MICs of clove oil on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF-38 strain. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of the clove oil demonstrated statistically significant reduction of las- and rhl-regulated virulence factors such as LasB, total protease, chitinase and pyocyanin production, swimming motility and exopolysaccharide production. The biofilm forming capability of PAO1 and A. hydrophila WAF-38 was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at all tested sub-MIC values. Further, the PAO1-preinfected Caenorhabditis elegans displayed an enhanced survival when treated with 1.6 percent v/v of clove oil. The above findings highlight the promising anti-QS-dependent therapeutic function of clove oil against P. aeruginosa.

  14. ISOLATION AND PRELIMINARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE BACTERIOPHAGES ASSOCIATED WITH A LYSOGENIC STRAIN OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, 12

    PubMed Central

    Feary, Thomas W.; Fisher, Earl; Fisher, Thelma N.

    1964-01-01

    Feary, Thomas W. (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La.), Earl Fisher, Jr., and Thelma N. Fisher. Isolation and preliminary characteristics of three bacteriophages associated with a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 87:196–208. 1964.—Three bacteriophages designated 7v, 7m, and 7s were isolated from a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa designated Ps-7. The three viruses were found to be completely unrelated on the basis of plaque morphology, host range, serology, ultraviolet induction, sensitivity to heat, and particle morphology as revealed by electron microscopy. In addition, it was shown that the three phages were incapable of plaque formation on bacteria other than various strains of P. aeruginosa. Of the three phages, only phage 7v was capable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7. The growth of phage 7v on strain Ps-7 exhibited properties which suggest that this virus arises as the result of mutation in a temperate phage for which strain Ps-7 is lysogenic. Phages 7m and 7s are incapable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7, but are adsorbed at characteristic rates to cell suspensions of strain Ps-7. The relationship between phage 7m and strain Ps-7 was shown to meet the classical criteria for lysogeny. Because phage 7s contains ribonucleic acid as its nucleic acid component, it was concluded that its production by strain Ps-7 and the demonstration of immunity of strain Ps-7 to infection by phage 7s were not sufficient evidence to define the nature of the relationship between phage 7s and P. aeruginosa strain Ps-7. It was observed that under certain conditions the infectious titer of phage 7s preparations are markedly reduced in the presence of ribonuclease. Images PMID:14102854

  15. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cotar, Ani-Ioana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Dinu, Sorin; Bucur, Marcela; Iordache, Carmen; Banu, Otilia; Dracea, Olguta; Larion, Cristina; Lazar, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections. PMID:21614207

  16. High β-Lactamase Levels Change the Pharmacodynamics of β-Lactam Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ciofu, Oana; Yang, Liang; Wu, Hong; Song, Zhijun; Oliver, Antonio; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is a frequent problem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This resistance is mainly due to the hyperproduction of chromosomally encoded β-lactamase and biofilm formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of β-lactamase in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of ceftazidime and imipenem on P. aeruginosa biofilms. P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its corresponding β-lactamase-overproducing mutant, PAΔDDh2Dh3, were used in this study. Biofilms of these two strains in flow chambers, microtiter plates, and on alginate beads were treated with different concentrations of ceftazidime and imipenem. The kinetics of antibiotics on the biofilms was investigated in vitro by time-kill methods. Time-dependent killing of ceftazidime was observed in PAO1 biofilms, but concentration-dependent killing activity of ceftazidime was observed for β-lactamase-overproducing biofilms of P. aeruginosa in all three models. Ceftazidime showed time-dependent killing on planktonic PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3. This difference is probably due to the special distribution and accumulation in the biofilm matrix of β-lactamase, which can hydrolyze the β-lactam antibiotics. The PK/PD indices of the AUC/MBIC and Cmax/MBIC (AUC is the area under concentration-time curve, MBIC is the minimal biofilm-inhibitory concentration, and Cmax is the maximum concentration of drug in serum) are probably the best parameters to describe the effect of ceftazidime in β-lactamase-overproducing P. aeruginosa biofilms. Meanwhile, imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both PAO1 and PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms. An inoculum effect of β-lactams was found for both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells. The inoculum effect of ceftazidime for the β-lactamase-overproducing mutant PAΔDDh2Dh3 biofilms was more obvious than for PAO1 biofilms, with a requirement of higher antibiotic concentration and a longer period of treatment

  17. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hong; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development.

  18. Trigonella foenum-graceum (Seed) Extract Interferes with Quorum Sensing Regulated Traits and Biofilm Formation in the Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmad, Iqbal; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Al-Shabib, Nasser Abdulatif

    2015-01-01

    Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Fenugreek) is an important plant of the Leguminosae family known to have medicinal properties. However, fraction based antiquorum sensing and antibiofilm activities have not been reported from this plant. In the present study T. foenum-graecum seed extract was sequentially fractionated and sub-MICs were tested for above activities. The methanol fraction of the extract demonstrated significant inhibition of AHL regulated virulence factors: protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin production, chitinase, EPS, and swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAF79. Further, QS dependent virulence factor in the aquatic pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was also reduced. Application of T. foenum-graecum seed extract to PAO1, PAF79, and WAF38 decreased the biofilm forming abilities of the pathogens by significant levels. The extract also exhibited reduced AHL levels and subsequent downregulation of lasB gene. In vivo study showed an enhanced survival of PAO1-preinfected C. elegans after treatment with extract at 1 mg/mL. Further, the major compound detected by GC-MS, caffeine, reduced the production of QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm at 200 µg/mL concentration indicating its role in the activity of the methanol extract. The results of the present study reveal the potential anti-QS and antibiofilm property of T. foenum-graceum extract and caffeine. PMID:26000026

  19. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  20. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  1. Transcriptional regulation of nitrate assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs via transcriptional antitermination within the nirBD-PA1779-cobA operon.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Alessandra; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Sorger-Domenigg, Theresa; Nakano, Masayuki; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Bläsi, Udo

    2012-06-01

    Bioinformatic approaches employed to analyse intergenic regions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O1 (PAO1) for small RNAs (sRNAs) revealed a putative RNA gene encoded upstream of the nitrate assimilation operon nirBD-PA1779-cobA. Here, we show that this RNA, termed nitrogen assimilation leader A (NalA), represents the leader RNA of the nirBD-PA1779-cobA operon, and that nalA transcription is σ(54)- and NtrC-dependent. A PAO1 nalA deletion strain and a strain bearing a deletion in ORF PA1785 failed to grow on nitrate. PA1785 was identified as a homologue of the Azotobacter vinelandii nasT gene, the product of which is required for transcription of the A. vinelandii nitrite/nitrate reductase operon. Collectively, these studies reveal that transcriptional antitermination of the leader RNA NalA is required for expression of the PAO1 nitrate assimilation operon, and that this process is governed by conserved functions in PAO1 and A. vinelandii.

  2. Exploring the In Vitro Thrombolytic Activity of Nattokinase From a New Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Subathra Devi; Vaithilingam, Mohanasrinivasan; Shanker, Ravi; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thiyur, Swathi; Babu, Vaishnavi; Selvakumar, Jemimah Naine; Prakash, Suyash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thrombolytic therapy has become a conventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet currently, clinically prescribed thrombolytic drugs have problems such as delayed action and other side effects. Fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted interest as thrombolytic agents because of their efficiency in the fibrinolytic process, including plasmin activation. Nattokinase (NK) is a potent fibrinolytic agent for thrombosis therapy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to enhance the production of NK from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS by media optimization and strain improvement. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a potent NK-producing strain was isolated from cow milk and identified. To enhance the yield of NK, effect of various parameters such as pH, temperature, carbon source, nitrogen source and inoculum size were optimized. Strain improvement of P. aeruginosa CMSS was done by random UV-mutagenesis. Nattokinase was partially purified and the activity was determined by the casein digestion method, blood clot lysis and fibrin degradation assay. Results: Based on morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization, the strain was confirmed as P. aeruginosa (GenBank accession number: JX112657), designated as P. aeruginosa CMSS. The optimum condition at pH 7 and temperature at 25˚C showed activity of NK as 1514 U mL-1 and 1532 U mL-1, respectively. Sucrose as the carbon source and shrimp shell powder (SSP) as the nitrogen source expressed NK activity of 1721 U mL-1 and 2524 U mL-1, respectively. At 1% inoculum size, the maximum rate of enzyme production was achieved with 2581 U mL-1. The NK activity of the mutant strain UV60 was 4263 U mL-1, indicating a two-fold increase in activity compared to the wild strain (2581 UmL-1). Nattokinase produced from mutant strain P. aeruginosa CMSS UV60 showed 94% blood clot lysis at ten minutes. The degradation of fibrin clot by the produced NK was observed after two hours of incubation. Sodium

  3. Genome Sequences of Three Strains of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA7 Clade

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Romain; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Draft genome sequences of three P. aeruginosa strains from the PA7 clade are presented here. Their lengths are 6.36 (EML528), 6.44 (EML545), and 6.33 Mb (EML548). Comparisons with the PA7 genome showed 5,113 conserved coding sequences (CDSs), and significant numbers of strain-specific CDSs. Their analysis will improve our understanding of this highly divergent clade. PMID:26586898

  4. Introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutator phage D3112 into Alcaligenes eutrophus strain CH34.

    PubMed

    Krylov, V; Merlin, C; Toussaint, A

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of growing mutator phages from Pseudomonas aeruginosa on various isolates of Alcaligenes eutrophus. Although none out of 10 A. eutrophus strains were susceptible to infection with any of the phages tested, phage D3112 could be readily transferred in our model strain CH34 by means of an RP4::D3112 plasmid. CH34/RP4::D3112 lysogens were stable and produced phages. However, neither mitomycin C nor UV treatment increased the phage yield.

  5. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps.

  6. Rapid Classification and Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Strains Using MALDI–TOF MS and Polygenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Wei; Jiang, Wen-Jing; Sato, Hiroaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Lu, Xi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF MS) was used to establish a rapid, simple, and accurate method to differentiate among strains of Microcystis aeruginosa, one of the most prevalent types of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. M. aeruginosa NIES-843, for which a complete genome has been sequenced, was used to characterize ribosomal proteins as biomarkers and to optimize conditions for observing ribosomal proteins as major peaks in a given mass spectrum. Thirty-one of 52 ribosomal subunit proteins were detected and identified along the mass spectrum. Fifty-five strains of M. aeruginosa from different habitats were analyzed using MALDI–TOF MS; among these samples, different ribosomal protein types were observed. A polygenetic analysis was performed using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means and different ribosomal protein types to classify the strains into five major clades. Two clades primarily contained toxic strains, and the other three clades contained exclusively non-toxic strains. This is the first study to differentiate cyanobacterial strains using MALDI–TOF MS. PMID:27227555

  7. Comparative protein expression in different strains of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alexova, Ralitza; Haynes, Paul A; Ferrari, Belinda C; Neilan, Brett A

    2011-09-01

    Toxin production in algal blooms presents a significant problem for the water industry. Of particular concern is microcystin, a potent hepatotoxin produced by the unicellular freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa. In this study, the proteomes of six toxic and nontoxic strains of M. aeruginosa were analyzed to gain further knowledge in elucidating the role of microcystin production in this microorganism. This represents the first comparative proteomic study in a cyanobacterial species. A large diversity in the protein expression profiles of each strain was observed, with a significant proportion of the identified proteins appearing to be strain-specific. In total, 475 proteins were identified reproducibly and of these, 82 comprised the core proteome of M. aeruginosa. The expression of several hypothetical and unknown proteins, including four possible operons was confirmed. Surprisingly, no proteins were found to be produced only by toxic or nontoxic strains. Quantitative proteome analysis using the label-free normalized spectrum abundance factor approach revealed nine proteins that were differentially expressed between toxic and nontoxic strains. These proteins participate in carbon-nitrogen metabolism and redox balance maintenance and point to an involvement of the global nitrogen regulator NtcA in toxicity. In addition, the switching of a previously inactive toxin-producing strain to microcystin synthesis is reported.

  8. Evaluating synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Ákos; Pásztiné-Gere, Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to marbofloxacin and gentamicin, and investigate the possible synergistic, additive, indifferent or antagonistic effects between the two agents. P. aeruginosa strains can develop resistance quickly against certain antibiotics if used alone, thus the need emerges to find synergistic combinations. A total of 68 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs were examined. In order to describe interactions between marbofloxacin and gentamicin the checkerboard microdilution method was utilized. The MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for marbofloxacin and gentamicin were in the range 0.25-64 mg/L and 0.25-32 mg/L, respectively. The combination of marbofloxacin and gentamicin was more effective with a MIC range of 0.031-8 mg/L and a MIC90 of 1 mg/L, compared to 16 mg/L for marbofloxacin alone and 8 mg/L for gentamicin alone. The FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices ranged from 0.0945 (pronounced synergy) to 1.0625 (indifference). Synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin was found in 33 isolates. The mean FIC index is 0.546, which represents a partial synergistic/additive effect close to the full synergy threshold. In vitro results indicate that marbofloxacin and gentamicin as partially synergistic agents may prove clinically useful in combination therapy against P. aeruginosa infections. Although marbofloxacin is not used in the human practice, the interactions between fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides may have importance outside the veterinary field.

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Toffoli, D. J.; Prates, R. A.; Courrol, Lilia C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    Burns are frequently contamined by pathogenic microorganisms and the widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitals is a matter of growing concern. Hypocrellin B (HB) is a new generation photosensitizer extracted from the fungus Hypocrella bambusae with absorption bands at 460, 546 and 584 nm. Lanthanide ions change the HB molecular structure and a red shift in the absorption band is observed as well as an increase in the singlet oxygen quantum yield. In this study, we report the use of HB:La+3 to kill resistant strain of P. aeruginosa infected burns. Burns were produced on the back of mice and wounds were infected subcutaneously with 1x109 cfu/mL of P. aeruginosa. Three-hours after inoculation, the animals were divided into 4 groups: control, HB:La+3, blue LED and HB:La+3+blue LED. PDT was performed using 10μM HB:La+3 and 500mW light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=470nm+/-20nm during 120s. The animals of all groups were killed and the infected skin was removed for bacterial counting. Mice with photosensitizer alone, light alone or untreated infected wounds presented 1x108 cfu/g while mice PDT-treated showed a reduction of 2 logs compared to untreated control. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED is effective in diminishing antibiotic resistant strain P. aeruginosa in infected burns.

  10. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic investigation of imipenem-susceptible and -resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Sockalingum, G D; Bouhedja, W; Pina, P; Allouch, P; Mandray, C; Labia, R; Millot, J M; Manfait, M

    1997-03-06

    The primary mechanism of imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been ascribed to an outer membrane impermeability owing to a loss of expression of protein D2. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with statistical methods has been used as a new approach to rapidly discriminate four isogenic strains of P. aeruginosa--susceptible, less susceptible, and highly resistant to imipenem-- and to follow the structural modifications related to this low permeability. Decomposition of the broad protein and carbohydrate contours into underlying Gaussians and comparison of the susceptible and highly resistant strain provided quantitative and ultrastructural information on these strains. This methodology allows for discrimination not of the mutation itself but of its consequences observed in the protein and carbohydrate absorption regions. Its association with other existing biochemical methods may be envisaged since it may allow for rapid orientation of investigations in the field of bacterial resistance diagnosis.

  11. Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, Monika; Maciąg, Joanna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2015-11-01

    Due to the clinical threat posed by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and importance of virulence factors produced in infection, 21 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were analyzed. 42.8% metallo-beta-lactamases-positive strains were identified. 85.7% of strains were meropenem resistant. 14.2% of strains were MDR; 38%, extensively drug-resistant (XDR). ExoY was present in all strains; exoT, in 95.2%; exoS, in 90.5%; exoU, in 47.6%. Eight XDR strains were typed using multilocus sequence typing: 4 as ST235, 2 as ST260, 2 as ST654 and ST234. MDR P. aeruginosa were isolated from hospitalized patients and among those from the community. Our study demonstrates the serious clinical issues posed by MDR P. aeruginosa and underscores the need for new treatment.

  12. Increased morbidity associated with chronic infection by an epidemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in CF patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aloul, M; Crawley, J; Winstanley, C; Hart, C; Ledson, M; Walshaw, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary infection with transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been reported, raising issues of cross infection and patient segregation. The first such strain to be described (the Liverpool epidemic strain, LES) is now widespread in many UK CF centres. However, whether such infection carries a worse prognosis is unknown. To address this, the clinical course of a group of CF patients chronically infected by LES was compared with that in patients harbouring unique strains. Methods: Using P aeruginosa strain genotyping, two cohorts of CF patients attending the Liverpool CF service were identified who were LES positive or negative in 1998 and remained so until 2002. From these, two groups of 12 patients were matched in 1998 for age, spirometric parameters, and nutritional state and their clinical course was followed for 5 years. Patients chronically infected with Burkholderia cepacia were excluded. Results: Patients chronically infected with LES had a greater annual loss of lung function than those not chronically infected by LES (mean difference between groups -4.4% (95% CI -8.1 to -0.9; p<0.02)), and by 2002 their percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was worse (mean 65.0% v 82.6%, p<0.03). Their nutritional state also deteriorated over the study period (mean difference between groups in body mass index -0.7 (95% CI -1.2 to -0.2; p<0.01)), such that by 2002 they were malnourished compared with LES negative patients (mean BMI 19.4 v 22.7, p<0.02). Conclusions: Chronic infection with the Liverpool epidemic P aeruginosa strain in CF patients confers a worse prognosis than infection with unique strains alone, confirming the need for patient segregation. Since this strain is common in many CF units, strain identification in all CF centres is essential. This can only be carried out using genomic typing methods. PMID:15047956

  13. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    PubMed

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress.

  14. Strain-dependent diversity in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing regulon.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Kim, Byoung Sik; Phattarasukol, Somsak; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Choi, Sang Ho; Harwood, Caroline S; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-10-09

    Quorum sensing allows bacteria to sense and respond to changes in population density. Acyl-homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing signals for many Proteobacteria, and acyl-homoserine lactone signaling is known to control cooperative activities. Quorum-controlled activities vary from one species to another. Quorum-sensing controls a constellation of genes in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which thrives in a number of habitats ranging from soil and water to animal hosts. We hypothesized that there would be significant variation in quorum-sensing regulons among strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from different habitats and that differences in the quorum-sensing regulons might reveal insights about the ecology of P. aeruginosa. As a test of our hypothesis we used RNA-seq to identify quorum-controlled genes in seven P. aeruginosa isolates of diverse origins. Although our approach certainly overlooks some quorum-sensing-regulated genes we found a shared set of genes, i.e., a core quorum-controlled gene set, and we identified distinct, strain-variable sets of quorum-controlled genes, i.e., accessory genes. Some quorum-controlled genes in some strains were not present in the genomes of other strains. We detected a correlation between traits encoded by some genes in the strain-variable subsets of the quorum regulons and the ecology of the isolates. These findings indicate a role for quorum sensing in extension of the range of habitats in which a species can thrive. This study also provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which quorum-sensing systems operate, the evolutionary pressures by which they are maintained, and their importance in disparate ecological contexts.

  15. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain LCT-PA220, Which Was Selected after Space Flight by Using Biolog's Powerful Carbon Source Utilization Technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; Hu, Juan; Fang, Xiangqun; Zhang, Xuelin; Wang, Junfeng; Guo, Yinghua; Li, Tianzhi; Chen, Zhenghong; Dai, Wenkui; Liu, Changting

    2014-03-13

    To explore the changes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in space flight, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain LCT-PA220, which originated from a P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC 27853, that traveled on the Shenzhou-VIII spacecraft.

  16. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  17. Anticandidal activity of medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Bora, Limpon

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro anticandidal activity of some medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against Candida species. The antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of five medicinal plants, namely, Cinnamomum porrectum, Lippia nudiflora, Cestrum nocturnum, Trachyspermum ammi, and Sida carpinifolia were studied. The medicinal characteristics of these plants were compared with commercially used antibiotics. The antimicrobial assay was done by agar well diffusion and the broth dilution method. Among the plants used, T. ammi and C. nocturnum were found to be more potent than the others. Twenty P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from various clinical specimens. The total inhibitions obtained were found to be 47%, 38%, and 36% in blood agar, whereas in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) the inhibitions were 57%, 48%, and 37%, respectively.

  18. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  19. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Niewerth, Heiko; Fetzner, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule.

  20. Bactericidal activities of cathelicidin LL-37 and select cationic lipids against the hypervirulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain LESB58.

    PubMed

    Wnorowska, Urszula; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Myint, Melissa; Diamond, Scott L; Wróblewska, Marta; Savage, Paul B; Janmey, Paul A; Bucki, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are associated with transmissibility and increased patient morbidity. This study was designed to assess the in vitro activities of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide (LL-37) and select cationic lipids against Pseudomonas aeruginosa LESB58 in CF sputum and in a setting mimicking the CF airway. We found that LL-37 naturally present in airway surface fluid and some nonpeptide cationic lipid molecules such as CSA-13, CSA-90, CSA-131, and D2S have significant, but broadly differing, bactericidal activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58. We observed strong inhibition of LL-37 bactericidal activity in the presence of purified bacteriophage Pf1, which is highly expressed by P. aeruginosa LES, but the activities of the cationic lipids CSA-13 and CSA-131 were not affected by this polyanionic virus. Additionally, CSA-13 and CSA-131 effectively prevent LESB58 biofilm formation, which is stimulated by Pf1 bacteriophage, DNA, or F-actin. CSA-13 and CSA-131 display strong antibacterial activities against different clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, and their activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58 and Xen5 strains were maintained in CF sputum. These data indicate that synthetic cationic lipids (mimics of natural antimicrobial peptides) are suitable for developing an effective treatment against CF lung P. aeruginosa infections, including those caused by LES strains.

  1. Bactericidal Activities of Cathelicidin LL-37 and Select Cationic Lipids against the Hypervirulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain LESB58

    PubMed Central

    Wnorowska, Urszula; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Myint, Melissa; Diamond, Scott L.; Wróblewska, Marta; Savage, Paul B.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are associated with transmissibility and increased patient morbidity. This study was designed to assess the in vitro activities of cathelicidin LL-37 peptide (LL-37) and select cationic lipids against Pseudomonas aeruginosa LESB58 in CF sputum and in a setting mimicking the CF airway. We found that LL-37 naturally present in airway surface fluid and some nonpeptide cationic lipid molecules such as CSA-13, CSA-90, CSA-131, and D2S have significant, but broadly differing, bactericidal activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58. We observed strong inhibition of LL-37 bactericidal activity in the presence of purified bacteriophage Pf1, which is highly expressed by P. aeruginosa LES, but the activities of the cationic lipids CSA-13 and CSA-131 were not affected by this polyanionic virus. Additionally, CSA-13 and CSA-131 effectively prevent LESB58 biofilm formation, which is stimulated by Pf1 bacteriophage, DNA, or F-actin. CSA-13 and CSA-131 display strong antibacterial activities against different clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, and their activities against P. aeruginosa LESB58 and Xen5 strains were maintained in CF sputum. These data indicate that synthetic cationic lipids (mimics of natural antimicrobial peptides) are suitable for developing an effective treatment against CF lung P. aeruginosa infections, including those caused by LES strains. PMID:25870055

  2. Mechanisms of plant growth promotion and disease suppression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 2apa.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, P; Chandrashekar, S; Singh, S Brijesh; Niranjana, S R

    2014-08-01

    A new Pseudomonas strain, designated as 2apa was isolated from tomato rhizosphere and identified as a member of species Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on its morphology, conventional, biochemical, cell wall fatty acid methyl ester analysis, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The strain 2apa was positive for root colonization, indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and siderophore production and inhibited the growth of wide range of microorganisms. Antimicrobial substances produced by this strain with further purification and structure elucidation proved to be phenazine. Under laboratory and greenhouse conditions the strain promoted plant growth and suppressed a wide range of foliar and root pathogens in tomato. The protection offered by strain 2apa to foliar pathogens is considered as induced systemic resistance and was further confirmed by enhanced accumulation of phenolics, elicitation of lipoxygenas activity, and jasmonic acid levels. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial and induced systemic resistance exhibiting strain P. aeruginosa 2apa can be used as an effective biological control candidate against devastating fungal and bacterial pathogens, which attack both root and foliar portions of tomato plant. Production of other functional traits such as IAA and siderophore may enhance its potential as biofertilizer.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function. PMID:28046014

  5. (1)H NMR-Based Global Metabolic Studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa upon Exposure of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tongtong; Sheng, Jiyang; Fu, Yonghong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Junsong; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2017-02-03

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial communication that has been a novel target for drug discovery. Pyocyanin quantification assay confirmed that resveratrol was an effective quorum sensing inhibitor (QSI) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. In this study, the global metabolite changes of P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to QSI resveratrol were investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. A total of 40 metabolites containing amino acids, organic acid, organic amine, and energy storage compounds were identified. The changed metabolic profile indicated that resveratrol influenced pathways including oxidative stress, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism. Oxidative stress could upregulate the expression of genes related to QS in P. aeruginosa. It suggested that resveratrol could inhibit the QS systems in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by relieving oxidative stress due to its antioxidant activity. On the other hand, resveratrol could attenuate the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by disturbing the TCA cycle so that anaerobic respiration could suppress the virulence because anaerobiosis could induce the loss of cytotoxicity regulated by QS in P. aeruginosa. These findings deepened our comprehending of the metabolic responses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to resveratrol and pinpointed the possible underlying mechanism of resveratrol's inhibition effect on QS in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolysaccharide Psl promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Zegans, Michael E; Wozniak, Daniel; Griffin, Edward; Toutain-Kidd, Christine M; Hammond, John H; Garfoot, Andrew; Lam, Joseph S

    2012-08-01

    Polysorbate 80 (PS80) is a nonionic surfactant and detergent that inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.001% and is well tolerated in human tissues. However, certain clinical and laboratory strains (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa are able to form biofilms in the presence of PS80. To better understand this resistance, we performed transposon mutagenesis with a PS80-resistant clinical isolate, PA738. This revealed that mutation of algC rendered PA738 sensitive to PS80 biofilm inhibition. AlgC contributes to the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Psl and alginate, as well as lipopolysaccharide and rhamnolipid. Analysis of mutations downstream of AlgC in these biosynthetic pathways established that disruption of the psl operon was sufficient to render the PA738 and PAO1 strains sensitive to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. Increased levels of Psl production in the presence of arabinose in a strain with an arabinose-inducible psl promoter were correlated with increased biofilm formation in PS80. In P. aeruginosa strains MJK8 and ZK2870, known to produce both Pel and Psl, disruption of genes in the psl but not the pel operon conferred susceptibility to PS80-mediated biofilm inhibition. The laboratory strain PA14 does not produce Psl and does not form biofilms in PS80. However, when PA14 was transformed with a cosmid containing the psl operon, it formed biofilms in the presence of PS80. Taken together, these data suggest that production of the exopolysaccharide Psl by P. aeruginosa promotes resistance to the biofilm inhibitor PS80.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasR gene, a transcriptional activator of elastase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gambello, M J; Iglewski, B H

    1991-01-01

    We report the discovery of the lasR gene, which positively regulates elastase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The lasR gene was cloned by its ability to restore a positive elastase phenotype in strain PA103, a strain which possesses the elastase structural gene (lasB) but fails to synthesize the enzyme. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 716 nucleotides encoding a protein of approximately 27 kDa. A labeled LasR protein of 27 kDa was detected in Escherichia coli by using a T7 RNA polymerase expression system. A chromosomal deletion mutant of the lasR gene was constructed in PAO1 by gene replacement. This mutant (PAO-R1) is devoid of elastolytic activity and elastase antigen. The deduced amino acid sequence of LasR is 27% homologous to the positive activator LuxR of Vibrio fischeri and the suspected activator 28K-UvrC of E. coli. Northern (RNA) analysis of total cellular RNA from PAO1, PAO-R1, and PAO-R1 containing the lasR gene on a multicopy plasmid (pMG1.7) revealed that a functional lasR gene is required for transcription of the elastase structural gene (lasB). Images PMID:1902216

  8. First Report of OXA-4, an ESBL Isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a South Indian Strain.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, S A Jemima; Verghese, Susan

    2013-09-01

    The OXA-type β-lactamases are so named because of their oxacillin-hydrolyzing abilities. In this study we characterize an extended spectrum β-lactamase, designated OXA-4, produced by a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ESBL production was detected by double disk synergy test. The P. aeruginosa isolate was obtained from endotracheal suction tip of 84 years old male patient diagnosed with CVA and hypertension. ESBL producing OXA β-lactamases was detected by PCR with primers specific to the conserved regions of the coding genes. Iso electric focusing was done to confirm the significance, sequencing the amplified product was also done. In the phenotypic identification, the strain was highly resistant to third generation cephalosporins and also to imipenem. The PCR amplified product for OXA β-lactamase was viewed at 919 bp. The pI point for the same was identified at 7.2. With the help of sequencing the amplified OXA β-lactamase was identified as OXA-4 gene. Here we report P. aeruginosa producing OXA-4 ESBL for the first time in the Indian subcontinent.

  9. Biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility and RAPD genotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains isolated from single centre intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Vaněrková, Martina; Mališová, Barbora; Kotásková, Iva; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse genotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and serotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains, including the clonal dissemination of particular strains throughout various intensive care units in one medical centre. Using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) and P. aeruginosa antisera, 22 different genotypes and 8 serotypes were defined among 103 isolates from 48 patients. No direct association between P. aeruginosa strain genotypes and serotypes was observed. RAPD typing in strains with the same serotype revealed different genotypes and, on the contrary, most strains with a different serotype displayed the same amplification pattern. The resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients. A higher degree of antibiotic resistance and stronger biofilm production in common genotypes compared to rare ones and genetic homogeneity of the most resistant strains indicated the role of antibiotic pressure in acquiring resistant and more virulent strains in our hospital. In conclusion, genetic characterisation of P. aeruginosa strains using RAPD method was shown to be more accurate in epidemiological analyses than phenotyping.

  10. Production of biosurfactant from a new and promising strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Santa Anna, L M; Sebastian, G V; Pereira, N; Alves, T L; Menezes, E P; Freire, D M

    2001-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 strain, isolated from the water of oil production in Sergipe, Northeast Brazil, was evaluated as a potential rhamnolipid type of biosurfactant producer. The production of biosurfactants was investigated using different carbon sources (n-hexadecane, paraffin oil, glycerol, and babassu oil) and inoculum concentrations (0.0016-0.008 g/L). The best results were obtained with glycerol as the substrate and an initial cell concentration of 0.004 g/L. A C:N ratio of 22.8 led to the greatest production of rhamnolipids (1700 mg/L) and efficiency (1.18 g of rhamnolipid/g of dry wt).

  11. A medicinal herb Cassia alata attenuates quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rekha, P D; Vasavi, H S; Vipin, C; Saptami, K; Arun, A B

    2017-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis in many bacteria, and attenuation of QS is one of the targets of antimicrobial therapy with particular interest in combating drug resistance. This study reports the QS inhibitory activity of metabolites from Cassia alata L. (Ca. alata), an important medicinal herb widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. For investigating the QS inhibition (QSI), the potential of Ca. alata L., initially, metabolites of the leaves extracted using ethanol was tested against biosensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and C. violaceum wild-type strains. Furthermore, a purified fraction rich in flavonoids (F-AF) was used for establishing QSI activity by studying the inhibition of violacein production in C. violaceum, and QS controlled virulence and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The study results showed 50% inhibition of violacein production in C. violaceum at 0·05 mg ml(-1) concentration of F-AF. In P. aeruginosa PAO1, it inhibited the tested virulence factors and biofilm formation significantly. The F-AF contained major flavonoids namely, quercetin, quercetrin and kaempferol displaying QSI activity individually against the test organisms.

  12. Exopolysaccharide-repressing small molecules with antibiofilm and antivirulence activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    van Tilburg Bernardes, Erik; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Reading, David J; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L; Lewenza, Shawn

    2017-02-21

    Biofilm formation is a universal virulence strategy in which bacteria grow in dense microbial communities enmeshed within a polymeric extracellular matrix that protects them from antibiotic exposure and the immune system. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an archetypal biofilm-forming organism that utilizes a biofilm growth strategy to cause chronic lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms is comprised mainly of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and DNA. Both mucoid and non-mucoid isolates of P. aeruginosa produces the Pel and Psl EPS, each of which have important roles in antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and immune evasion. Given the central importance of the EPS for biofilms, they are attractive targets for novel anti-infective compounds. In this study we used a high throughput gene expression screen to identify compounds that repress expression of the pel genes. The pel repressors demonstrated antibiofilm activity against microplate and flow chamber biofilms formed by wild type and hyperbiofilm forming strains. To determine the potential role of EPS in virulence, mutants in pel/psl were shown to have reduced virulence in the feeding behavior and slow killing virulence assays in Caenorhabditis elegans The antibiofilm molecules also reduced P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence in the nematode slow killing model. Importantly, the combination of antibiotics and antibiofilm compounds increased killing of P. aeruginosa biofilms. These small molecules represent a novel anti-infective strategy for the possible treatment of chronic P. aeruginosa infections.

  13. Microcyclamide Biosynthesis in Two Strains of Microcystis aeruginosa: from Structure to Genes and Vice Versa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ziemert, Nadine; Ishida, Keishi; Quillardet, Philippe; Bouchier, Christiane; Hertweck, Christian; de Marsac, Nicole Tandeau; Dittmann, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Comparative analysis of related biosynthetic gene clusters can provide new insights into the versatility of these pathways and allow the discovery of new natural products. The freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES298 produces the cytotoxic peptide microcyclamide. Here, we provide evidence that the cyclic hexapeptide is formed by a ribosomal pathway through the activity of a set of processing enzymes closely resembling those recently shown to be involved in patellamide biosynthesis in cyanobacterial symbionts of ascidians. Besides two subtilisin-type proteases and a heterocyclization enzyme, the gene cluster discovered in strain NIES298 encodes six further open reading frames, two of them without similarity to enzymes encoded by the patellamide gene cluster. Analyses of genomic data of a second cyanobacterial strain, M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, guided the discovery and structural elucidation of two novel peptides of the microcyclamide family. The identification of the microcyclamide biosynthetic genes provided an avenue by which to study the regulation of peptide synthesis at the transcriptional level. The precursor genes were strongly and constitutively expressed throughout the growth phase, excluding the autoinduction of these peptides, as has been observed for several peptide pheromone families in bacteria. PMID:18245249

  14. Microcyclamide biosynthesis in two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa: from structure to genes and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Ziemert, Nadine; Ishida, Keishi; Quillardet, Philippe; Bouchier, Christiane; Hertweck, Christian; de Marsac, Nicole Tandeau; Dittmann, Elke

    2008-03-01

    Comparative analysis of related biosynthetic gene clusters can provide new insights into the versatility of these pathways and allow the discovery of new natural products. The freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES298 produces the cytotoxic peptide microcyclamide. Here, we provide evidence that the cyclic hexapeptide is formed by a ribosomal pathway through the activity of a set of processing enzymes closely resembling those recently shown to be involved in patellamide biosynthesis in cyanobacterial symbionts of ascidians. Besides two subtilisin-type proteases and a heterocyclization enzyme, the gene cluster discovered in strain NIES298 encodes six further open reading frames, two of them without similarity to enzymes encoded by the patellamide gene cluster. Analyses of genomic data of a second cyanobacterial strain, M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, guided the discovery and structural elucidation of two novel peptides of the microcyclamide family. The identification of the microcyclamide biosynthetic genes provided an avenue by which to study the regulation of peptide synthesis at the transcriptional level. The precursor genes were strongly and constitutively expressed throughout the growth phase, excluding the autoinduction of these peptides, as has been observed for several peptide pheromone families in bacteria.

  15. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

    PubMed Central

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Shankar, Manoharan; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases) achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified. PMID:25184130

  16. Disruption of the endothelial barrier by proteases from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa: implication of matrilysis and receptor cleavage.

    PubMed

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Corvazier, Elisabeth; Mlanaoindrou, Saouda; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Pidard, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Within the vasculature, uncontrolled pericellular proteolysis can lead to disruption of cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions and subsequent detachment-induced cell apoptosis, or anoikis, contributing to inflammatory vascular diseases, with the endothelium as the major target. Most studies so far have focused on endogenous proteinases. However, during bloodstream infections, bacterial proteinases may also trigger endothelial anoikis. We thus investigated the potential apoptotic activity of the proteinases secreted by the haematotropic opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and particularly its predominant metalloproteinase, LasB. For this, we used the secretome of the LasB-expressing pseudomonal strain, PAO1, and compared it with that from the isogenic, LasB-deficient strain (PAO1∆lasB), as well as with purified LasB. Secretomes were tested for apoptotic activity on cultured human endothelial cells derived from the umbilical vein or from the cerebral microvasculature. We found that the PAO1 secretome readily induced endothelial cell anoikis, as did secretomes of LasB-positive clinical pseudomonal isolates, while the PAO1∆lasB secretome had only a limited impact on endothelial adherence and viability. Notably, purified LasB reproduced most of the effects of the LasB-containing secretomes, and these were drastically reduced in the presence of the LasB-selective inhibitor, phosphoramidon. A precocious and extensive LasB-dependent degradation of several proteins associated with the endothelial extracellular matrix, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor, was observed by immunofluorescence and/or immunoblotting analysis of cell cultures. Moreover, the PAO1 secretome, but not that from PAO1∆lasB, specifically induced rapid endoproteolysis of two major interendothelial junction components, VE-cadherin and occludin, as well as of the anti-anoikis, integrin-associated urokinase receptor, uPAR. Taken as a prototype for exogenous haemorrhagic proteinases

  17. Cloning, expression and purification of penicillin-binding protein 3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

    PubMed

    An, Yan Dong; Du, Qi Zhen; Tong, Li Yan; Yu, Zhao Wu; Gong, Xing Wen

    2015-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary target of β-lactams used to treat pseudomonas infections. Meanwhile, structure change and overproduction of PBP3 play important roles in the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, studies on the gene and structure of PBP3 are urgently needed. P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104 is a type culture strain common used in China. However, there is no report on its genomic and proteomic profiles. In this study, based on ftsI of P. aeruginosa PAO1, the gene encoding PBP3 was cloned from CMCC 10104. A truncated version of the ftsI gene, omitting the bases encoding the hydrophobic leader peptide (amino acids 1-34), was amplified by PCR. The cloned DNA shared 99.76% identity with ftsI from PAO1. Only four bases were different (66 C-A, 1020 T-C, 1233 T-C, and 1527 T-C). However, there were no differences between their deduced amino acid sequences. The recombinant PBP3 (rPBP3), containing a 6-histidine tag, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose was used for its purification. The purified rPBP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and showed a single band at about 60kDa with purity higher than 95%. The penicillin-binding assay indicated that the obtained rPBP3 was functional and not hindered by the presence of the C-terminal His-tag. The protocol described in this study offers a method for obtaining purified recombinant PBP3 from P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

  18. A novel cyanide-inducible gene cluster helps protect Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cyanide.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Williams, Huw D; Cherbuin, Gaëtan; Haas, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces the toxic secondary metabolite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) at high cell population densities and low aeration. Here, we investigated the impact of HCN as a signal in cell-cell communication by comparing the transcriptome of the wild-type strain PAO1 to that of an HCN-negative mutant under cyanogenic conditions. HCN repressed four genes and induced 12 genes. While the individual functions of these genes are unknown, with one exception (i.e. a ferredoxin-dependent reductase), a highly inducible six-gene cluster (PA4129-PA4134) was found to be crucial for protection of P. aeruginosa from external HCN intoxication. A double mutant deleted for PA4129-PA4134 and cioAB (encoding cyanide-insensitive oxidase) did not grow with 100 μM KCN, whereas the corresponding single mutants were essentially unaffected, suggesting a synergistic action of the PA4129-PA4134 gene products and cyanide-insensitive oxidase.

  19. Serum influences the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing genes and QS-controlled virulence genes during early and late stages of growth

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Qaisar, Uzma; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2014-01-01

    In response to diverse environmental stimuli at different infection sites, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a serious nosocomial pathogen, coordinates the production of different virulence factors through a complicated network of the hierarchical quorum-sensing (QS) systems including the las, rhl, and the 2-alkyl-4-quinolone-related QS systems. We recently showed that at early stages of growth serum alters the expression of numerous P. aeruginosa genes. In this study, we utilized transcriptional analysis and enzyme assays to examine the effect of serum on the QS and QS-controlled virulence factors during early and late phases of growth of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. At early phase, serum repressed the transcription of lasI, rhlI, and pqsA but not lasR or rhlR. However, at late phase, serum enhanced the expression of all QS genes. Serum produced a similar effect on the synthesis of the autoinducers 3OC12-HSL, C4-HSL, and HHQ/PQS. Additionally, serum repressed the expression of several QS-controlled genes in the early phase, but enhanced them in the late phase. Furthermore, serum influenced the expression of different QS-positive (vqsR, gacA, and vfr) as well as QS-negative (rpoN, qscR, mvaT, and rsmA) regulatory genes at either early or late phases of growth. However, with the exception of PAOΔvfr, we detected comparable levels of lasI/lasR expression in PAO1 and PAO1 mutants defective in these regulatory genes. At late stationary phase, serum failed to enhance lasI/lasR expression in PAOΔvfr. These results suggest that depending on the phase of growth, serum differentially influenced the expression of P. aeruginosa QS and QS-controlled virulence genes. In late phase, serum enhanced the expression of las genes through vfr. PMID:24436158

  20. Silver(I) complexes with phthalazine and quinazoline as effective agents against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Glišić, Biljana Đ; Senerovic, Lidija; Comba, Peter; Wadepohl, Hubert; Veselinovic, Aleksandar; Milivojevic, Dusan R; Djuran, Miloš I; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-02-01

    Five silver(I) complexes with aromatic nitrogen-containing heterocycles, phthalazine (phtz) and quinazoline (qz), were synthesized, characterized and analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Although different AgX salts reacted with phtz, only dinuclear silver(I) complexes of the general formula {[Ag(X-O)(phtz-N)]2(μ-phtz-N,N')2} were formed, X=NO3(-) (1), CF3SO3(-) (2) and ClO4(-) (3). However, reactions of qz with an equimolar amount of AgCF3SO3 and AgBF4 resulted in the formation of polynuclear complexes, {[Ag(CF3SO3-O)(qz-N)]2}n (4) and {[Ag(qz-N)][BF4]}n (5). Complexes 1-5 were evaluated by in vitro antimicrobial studies against a panel of microbial strains that lead to many skin and soft tissue, respiratory, wound and nosocomial infections. The obtained results indicate that all tested silver(I) complexes have good antibacterial activity with MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values in the range from 2.9 to 48.0μM against the investigated strains. Among the investigated strains, these complexes were particularly efficient against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC=2.9-29μM) and had a marked ability to disrupt clinically relevant biofilms of strains with high inherent resistance to antibiotics. On the other hand, their activity against the fungus Candida albicans was moderate. In order to determine the therapeutic potential of silver(I) complexes 1-5, their antiproliferative effect on the human lung fibroblastic cell line MRC5, has been also evaluated. The binding of complexes 1-5 to the genomic DNA of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis techniques and well supported by molecular docking into the DNA minor groove. All investigated complexes showed an improved cytotoxicity profile in comparison to the clinically used AgNO3.

  1. Protective role of extracellular catalase (KatA) against UVA radiation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2014-02-05

    One of the more stressful factors that Pseudomonas aeruginosa must face in nature is solar UVA radiation. In this study, the protective role of KatA catalase in both planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa against UVA radiation was determined by using the wild-type (PAO1) and an isogenic catalase deficient strain (katA). The katA strain was more sensitive than the wild-type, especially in the case of biofilms. Moreover, the wild-type biofilm was more resistant than its planktonic counterpart, but this was not observed in the katA strain. Striking KatA activity was detected in the matrix of katA(+) strains, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of this activity in the matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Provision of bovine catalase or KatA to the matrix of a katA biofilm significantly increased its UVA tolerance, demonstrating that extracellular KatA is essential to optimal defense against UVA in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Efficiency of photocatalytic treatments using TiO2 and UVA was lower in biofilms than in planktonic cells, but KatA and KatB catalases seem not to be responsible for the higher resistance of the sessile cells to this treatment.

  2. Expression of Interleukin-6 in the Cornea in Response to Infection with Different Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Nerida; Bao, Shisan; Willcox, Mark; Husband, Alan J.

    1999-01-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing keratitis can be either cytotoxic (6206) or invasive (6294), while a strain (Paer1) causing contact lens-induced acute red eye has been shown to be neither. In situ hybridization was used to examine the location and identity of cells expressing interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA in the murine cornea and changes in expression in response to infection with different strains of P. aeruginosa. The number of IL-6-positive cells was determined by image analysis. IL-6 protein levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. BALB/c mice were challenged by use of the wounded-cornea model with P. aeruginosa 6294, 6206, or Paer1 (2 × 106 CFU). At time intervals up to 24 h, postchallenge corneal tissue was probed for IL-6 mRNA. IL-6 mRNA expression was rapidly elevated in the epithelium in response to strains 6294 and 6206. At the conclusion of the experiments, infiltrating inflammatory cells also stained positively for IL-6 mRNA. In contrast, corneas challenged with strain Paer1 showed significant upregulation of IL-6 mRNA only at 4 h postchallenge. Three distinct patterns of IL-6 mRNA expression in the mouse cornea occur in response to these three ocular isolates of P. aeruginosa. The data obtained for mRNA expression in the cornea for all three strains of P. aeruginosa correlated well with IL-6 protein analysis of whole-eye homogenates. Differences in the cytokine responses to these strains correlate with differences in the pathology associated with each strain and may offer an opportunity to develop strategies for the improved management of ocular inflammation. PMID:10225913

  3. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by mucA mutations result in activation of TLR2 in addition to TLR5 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Lafayette, Shantelle; Nguyen, Dao; Rousseau, Simon

    2012-11-09

    The presence of the mucoid phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a marker of poor survival in cystic fibrosis. As CF lung disease results from chronic infection leading to airway inflammation, we determined whether the switch to a mucoid phenotype by P. aeruginosa has an impact on the inflammatory response of airway epithelial cells. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to non-mucoid and mucoid P. aeruginosa-derived material leads to p38α MAPK activation, a key protein kinase involved in transmitting inflammatory signals. However, while the non-mucoid strain PAO1 activates p38α MAPK pathway solely via TLR5, the mucoid strain PACF508 activates p38α MAPK via both TLR5 and TLR2. Inactivation of mucA (the gene responsible for the mucoid phenotype) in PAO1 leads to p38α MAPK activation by both TLR2 and TLR5, as observed in the clinical mucoid isolate PACF508. Therefore, the switch to mucoid phenotype may contribute to more inflammation via TLR2 activation in addition to TLR5. Our findings highlight an important and under recognized role for TLR2 in the response of airway epithelial cells to infection.

  4. Epidemiological characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing infection in an Italian general hospital. A one-year surveillance.

    PubMed

    Grigis, A; Farina, C; Moioli, F; Parea, M; Cirillo, D M; Goglio, A; Marchiaro, G

    1995-06-01

    During the 1989 calendar year, P. aeruginosa caused clinical infections in 0.46% of patients admitted to Ospedali Riuniti (a general hospital), Bergamo, Italy. Strains (n = 267) of P. aeruginosa were collected during this period, and epidemiological characteristics were studied. The mean prevalence of P. aeruginosa infection in inpatients was 1.1% (range 0.06-7.3), whereas outpatients showed a significantly lower prevalence of infection (0.05%). Strains were recovered from inpatients of surgical wards (n = 126; 47.2%), and outpatients (n = 15; 5.6%). Males were more often affected than females (2.7:1). Infection of the urinary tract was the most common (34.1%). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also involved in lower respiratory tract infections (18.7%) and septicaemia (17.6%). Four typing methods were performed, i.e. serotyping, antibiotyping, pyocin typing, and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA). Serotypes O:11 and O:6 were endemic in the hospital. Some serotypes correlated with specific clinical wards. Pyocin typing was an unreliable epidemiological tool. However, antibiotyping showed the presence of some epidemic clusters, probably related to the antibiotic consumption of the patients. REA suggested the circulation of edemic P. aeruginosa strains in both the obstetrics and neurosurgery wards.

  5. D‐amino acids do not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Mitchell; Gagnon, Patricia; Vogel, Joseph P.; Chole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a known biofilm‐forming organism, is an opportunistic pathogen that plays an important role in chronic otitis media, tracheitis, cholesteatoma, chronic wounds, and implant infections. Eradication of biofilm infections has been a challenge because the biofilm phenotype provides bacteria with a protective environment from the immune system and antibiotics; thus, there has been great interest in adjunctive molecules that may inhibit biofilm formation or cause biofilm dispersal. There are reports that D‐amino acids may inhibit biofilms. In this study, we test the ability of various D‐amino acids to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in vitro. Study Design We evaluated the effect of D‐alanine (10 mM), D‐leucine (10 mM), D‐methionine (10 mM), D‐tryptophan (10 mM), and D‐tyrosine (10 uM and 1 mM) on biofilm formation in two commonly studied laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa: PAO1 and PA14. Methods Biofilms were grown in 24‐well and 96‐well tissue culture plates, documented photographically and stained with 0.1% crystal violet and solubilized in 33% glacial acetic acid for quantification. Results In strains PAO1 and PA14, the addition of D‐amino acids did not result in an inhibitory effect on biofilm growth in 24‐well plates. Repeating the study in 96‐well plates confirmed our findings that D‐amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion We conclude that D‐amino acids only slow the production of biofilms rather than completely prevent biofilm formation; therefore, D‐amino acids represent a poor option for potential clinically therapeutic interventions. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:28286870

  6. Streptomycin Accumulation in Susceptible and Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L. E.; Elzen, H. M. Van Den

    1976-01-01

    Streptomycin accumulation by susceptible strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to be prevented or inhibited by inhibitors of electron transport, sulfhydryl groups and protein synthesis, and agents that uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Streptomycin is recovered from cells in an unchanged form and is intracellularly concentrated above extracellular concentrations. Accumulation kinetics are multiphasic; an initial phase which cannot be prevented by the above inhibitors is unable to cause inhibition of cell growth or loss of cell viability. Prevention of further phases of uptake does prevent these events. Inhibitor-susceptible accumulation is time dependent and begins almost immediately upon exposure of cells to streptomycin. Streptomycin accumulation remains energy dependent even when cells are losing acid-soluble [3H]adenine, presumably through loss of permeability control. These results demonstrate that streptomycin accumulation necessary for inhibition of cell growth or cell death requires energy and is not a process of diffusion or secondary to membrane leakage. Streptomycin accumulation in ribosomally resistant mutants of E. coli and P. aeruginosa is similar in that both energy-independent and energy-dependent accumulation can be demonstrated. The total energy-dependent accumulation is, however, significantly lower than that in streptomycin-susceptible cells due to the absence of an additional energy-dependent phase of accumulation, which seems dependent on ribosomal binding of streptomycin. Ribosomally resistant strains can be shown to concentrate streptomycin accumulated by the energy-dependent process above the external concentration in nutrient broth but not in Trypticase soy broth. The energy-dependent accumulation can be saturated in the Strr strain of E. coli in nutrient broth, implying limited accumulation sites. PMID:820248

  7. Reduction and Acetylation of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain.

    PubMed

    Noguera, D R; Freedman, D L

    1996-07-01

    Aerobic and anoxic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was examined by using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a plant treating propellant manufacturing wastewater. DNT biotransformation in the presence and absence of oxygen was mostly reductive and was representative of the type of cometabolic transformations that occur when a high concentration of an easily degradable carbon source is present. P. aeruginosa reduced both nitro groups on DNT, with the formation of mainly 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene and 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and small quantities of 2,4-diaminotoluene. Acetylation of the arylamines was a significant reaction. 4-Acetamide-2-nitrotoluene and the novel compounds 2-acetamide-4-nitrotoluene, 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene, and 2,4-diacetamidetoluene were identified as DNT metabolites. The biotransformation of 2,4-diaminotoluene to 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene was 24 times faster than abiotic transformation. 2-Nitrotoluene and 4-nitrotoluene were also reduced to their corresponding toluidines and then acetylated. However, the yield of 4-acetamidetoluene was much higher than that of 2-acetamidetoluene, demonstrating that acetylation at the position para to the methyl group was favored.

  8. Reduction and Acetylation of 2,4-Dinitrotoluene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, D. R.; Freedman, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Aerobic and anoxic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was examined by using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a plant treating propellant manufacturing wastewater. DNT biotransformation in the presence and absence of oxygen was mostly reductive and was representative of the type of cometabolic transformations that occur when a high concentration of an easily degradable carbon source is present. P. aeruginosa reduced both nitro groups on DNT, with the formation of mainly 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene and 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and small quantities of 2,4-diaminotoluene. Acetylation of the arylamines was a significant reaction. 4-Acetamide-2-nitrotoluene and the novel compounds 2-acetamide-4-nitrotoluene, 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene, and 2,4-diacetamidetoluene were identified as DNT metabolites. The biotransformation of 2,4-diaminotoluene to 4-acetamide-2-aminotoluene was 24 times faster than abiotic transformation. 2-Nitrotoluene and 4-nitrotoluene were also reduced to their corresponding toluidines and then acetylated. However, the yield of 4-acetamidetoluene was much higher than that of 2-acetamidetoluene, demonstrating that acetylation at the position para to the methyl group was favored. PMID:16535348

  9. Antagonistic interactions peak at intermediate genetic distance in clinical and laboratory strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria excrete costly toxins to defend their ecological niche. The evolution of such antagonistic interactions between individuals is expected to depend on both the social environment and the strength of resource competition. Antagonism is expected to be weak among highly similar genotypes because most individuals are immune to antagonistic agents and among dissimilar genotypes because these are unlikely to be competing for the same resources and antagonism should not yield much benefit. The strength of antagonism is therefore expected to peak at intermediate genetic distance. Results We studied the ability of laboratory strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to prevent growth of 55 different clinical P. aeruginosa isolates derived from cystic fibrosis patients. Genetic distance was determined using genetic fingerprints. We found that the strength of antagonism was maximal among genotypes of intermediate genetic distance and we show that genetic distance and resource use are linked. Conclusions Our results suggest that the importance of social interactions like antagonism may be modulated by the strength of resource competition. PMID:22439760

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain N002, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from Geleky, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhjit Sarma; Baruah, Reshita; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Maina

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of crude oil-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N002, isolated from a crude oil-polluted soil sample from Geleky, Assam, India. Multiple genes potentially involved in crude oil degradation were identified. PMID:23405324

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Hex1T Isolated from Soils Contaminated with Used Lubricating Oil in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Feliziani, Sofía

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hex1T was isolated from soils contaminated with used lubricating oil from a garage in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain is capable of utilizing this pollutant as the sole carbon and energy source. Here, we present the 6.9-Mb draft genome sequence of Hex1T, which contains many heavy metal-resistance genes. PMID:28082504

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  13. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration. PMID:28184354

  14. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration.

  15. Isolation and characterization of an alginase from mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Linker, A; Evans, L R

    1984-09-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which produce an alginate-like slime polysaccharide were shown to also synthesize an intracellular enzyme which can degrade these polysaccharides and the seaweed alginic acids. The enzyme acts as an eliminase introducing delta 4,5 unsaturation into the uronic acid moiety. It appears to be a polymannuronide lyase which degrades the polysaccharides, depending on their uronic acid composition, to a series of oligosaccharides, the smallest of which is a disaccharide. L-Guluronic acid linkages are not split. The Pseudomonas alginase resembles other bacterial alginases and enzymes from molluscs but differs in some important properties, such as extent of degradation and linkage preference. Nonmucoid forms of the organism produce detectable but much lower amounts of enzyme.

  16. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    PubMed Central

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Hossein Khademi, Seyed Mohammad; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Ingmer, Hanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology at the P. aeruginosa–S. aureus interface. In addition, we found an HAQ-mediated protection of S. aureus by DK2-P2M24-2003 from the killing effect of tobramycin. Our findings suggest a model where the metabolic divergence manifested in human host-adapted P. aeruginosa is further modulated during interaction with S. aureus and facilitate a proto-cooperative P. aeruginosa–S. aureus relationship. PMID:26684729

  17. Assessment of the Effects of Light Availability on Growth and Competition Between Strains of Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Torres, Camila de Araujo; Lürling, Miquel; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Planktothrix agardhii strains isolated from a tropical water body were better competitors for light than Microcystis aeruginosa strains. These cyanobacteria are common in eutrophic systems, where light is one of the main drivers of phytoplankton, and Planktothrix is considered more shade-adapted and Microcystis more high-light tolerant. First, the effect of light intensities on growth was studied in batch cultures. Next, the minimum requirement of light (I*) and the effect of light limitation on the outcome of competition was investigated in chemostats. All strains showed similar growth at 10 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), demonstrating the ability of the two species to grow in low light. The optimum light intensity was lower for P. agardhii, but at the highest light intensity, Microcystis strains reached higher biovolume, confirming that P. agardhii has higher sensitivity to high light. Nonetheless, P. agardhii grew in light intensities considered high (500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) for this species. M. aeruginosa showed a higher carrying capacity in light-limited condition, but I* was similar between all the strains. Under light competition, Microcystis strains displaced P. agardhii and dominated. In two cases, there was competitive exclusion and in the other two P. agardhii managed to remain in the system with a low biovolume (≈15%). Our findings not only show that strains of P. agardhii can grow under higher light intensities than generally assumed but also that strains of M. aeruginosa are better competitors for light than supposed. These results help to understand the co-occurrence of these species in tropical environments and the dominance of M. aeruginosa even in low-light conditions.

  18. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tayabali, Azam F; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications.

  19. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Tayabali, Azam F.; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications. PMID:26619347

  20. Restriction endonuclease analysis of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: useful epidemiologic data from a simple and rapid method.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, W E; Kobe, M; Fass, R J

    1993-01-01

    Newer genetic techniques have replaced phenotypic methods of subtyping Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Widespread application of newer methodologies, however, may be limited by technologic complexity and the cost of equipment. We conducted restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of sheared genomic DNAs from 48 clinical P. aeruginosa strains using the enzyme SalI and electrophoresis in horizontal, low-concentration (0.3 to 0.6%) agarose gels. Each REA profile consisted of a smear of lower-molecular-mass bands as well as a countable number of well-resolved bands in the 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range which could easily be compared when isolates were run side-by-side on the same gel. In general, the REA patterns of strains recovered from different patients differed by at least seven bands, and those of serial isolates from individual patients were identical or differed by, at most, two bands over this 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range. REA of strains already subtyped by field inversion gel electrophoresis revealed that the two techniques generally paralleled each other. Overall, some unrelated strains had similar REA profiles, but the relative simplicity and low cost of the approach coupled with the ability to demonstrate differences between most unrelated strains should make this type of REA an attractive first step in the investigation of institutional P. aeruginosa problems. Images PMID:8391021

  1. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kolpen, Mette; Appeldorff, Cecilie F.; Brandt, Sarah; Mousavi, Nabi; Kragh, Kasper N.; Aydogan, Sevtap; Uppal, Haleema A.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance towards antibiotics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is recognized as a major cause of therapeutic failure of chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This lung infection is characterized by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in mucus with zones of O2 depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and the production of detectable levels of OH ˙ on several strains of planktonic P. aeruginosa. Therefore, we propose that production of OH ˙ may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wild-type PAO1, a catalase-deficient mutant (ΔkatA) and a colistin-resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates in normoxic- or anoxic atmosphere with 1 mM nitrate. The killing of bacteria during colistin treatment was measured by CFU counts, and the OH⋅ formation was measured by 3′-(p-hydroxylphenyl fluorescein) fluorescein (HPF) fluorescence. Validation of the assay was done by hydrogen peroxide treatment. OH⋅ formation was undetectable in aerobic PAO1 biofilms during 3 h of colistin treatment. Interestingly, we demonstrate increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa biofilms towards colistin during anaerobic conditions. In fact, the maximum enhancement of killing by anaerobic conditions exceeded 2 logs using 4 mg L−1 of colistin compared to killing at aerobic conditions. PMID:26458402

  2. Intraclonal Genome Stability of the Metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST277, an Endemic Clone Disseminated in Brazilian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Ana P. B.; Ortiz, Mauro F.; Martins, Willames M. B. S.; Morais, Guilherme L.; Fehlberg, Lorena C. C.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Ciapina, Luciane P.; Gales, Ana C.; Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems represent the mainstay therapy for the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has jeopardized the clinical use of this important class of compounds. The production of SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase has been the most common mechanism of carbapenem resistance identified in P. aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian medical centers. Interestingly, a single SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa clone belonging to the ST277 has been widely spread within the Brazilian territory. In the current study, we performed a next-generation sequencing of six SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 isolates. The core genome contains 5899 coding genes relative to the reference strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. A total of 26 genomic islands were detected in these isolates. We identified remarkable elements inside these genomic islands, such as copies of the blaSPM−1 gene conferring resistance to carbapenems and a type I-C CRISPR-Cas system, which is involved in protection of the chromosome against foreign DNA. In addition, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms causing amino acid changes in antimicrobial resistance and virulence-related genes. Together, these factors could contribute to the marked resistance and persistence of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 clone. A comparison of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 genomes showed that their core genome has a high level nucleotide similarity and synteny conservation. The variability observed was mainly due to acquisition of genomic islands carrying several antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27994579

  3. Intraclonal Genome Stability of the Metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST277, an Endemic Clone Disseminated in Brazilian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana P B; Ortiz, Mauro F; Martins, Willames M B S; Morais, Guilherme L; Fehlberg, Lorena C C; Almeida, Luiz G P; Ciapina, Luciane P; Gales, Ana C; Vasconcelos, Ana T R

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems represent the mainstay therapy for the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has jeopardized the clinical use of this important class of compounds. The production of SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase has been the most common mechanism of carbapenem resistance identified in P. aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian medical centers. Interestingly, a single SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa clone belonging to the ST277 has been widely spread within the Brazilian territory. In the current study, we performed a next-generation sequencing of six SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 isolates. The core genome contains 5899 coding genes relative to the reference strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. A total of 26 genomic islands were detected in these isolates. We identified remarkable elements inside these genomic islands, such as copies of the blaSPM-1 gene conferring resistance to carbapenems and a type I-C CRISPR-Cas system, which is involved in protection of the chromosome against foreign DNA. In addition, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms causing amino acid changes in antimicrobial resistance and virulence-related genes. Together, these factors could contribute to the marked resistance and persistence of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 clone. A comparison of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 genomes showed that their core genome has a high level nucleotide similarity and synteny conservation. The variability observed was mainly due to acquisition of genomic islands carrying several antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Structure and fate of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population originating from a combined sewer and colonizing a wastewater treatment lagoon.

    PubMed

    Lavenir, Raphaël; Petit, Stéphanie M-C; Alliot, Nolwenn; Ribun, Sébastien; Loiseau, Laurence; Marjolet, Laurence; Briolay, Jérôme; Nazaret, Sylvie; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of a wastewater treatment lagoon (WWTL) at preventing the spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into natural aquatic habitats was investigated. A WWTL and its connected combined sewer and brook were exhaustively sampled. Physico-chemical analyses showed a stratification of the first pond according to pH, temperature and oxygen content. The P. aeruginosa counts partially matched this stratification with higher values among the bottom anaerobic waters of the first half of this pond. Genotyping of 494 WWTL P. aeruginosa strains was performed and led to the definition of 85 lineages. Dominant lineages were observed, with some being found all over the WWTL including the connected brook. IS5 was used as an indicator of genomic changes, and 1 to 12 elements were detected among 16 % of the strains. IS-driven lasR (genetic regulator) disruptions were detected among nine strains that were not part of the dominant lineages. These insertional mutants did not show significant elastase activities but showed better growth than the PAO1 reference strain in WWTL waters. Differences in growth patterns were related to a better survival of these mutants at an alkaline pH and a better ability at using some C-sources such as alanine. The opportunistic colonization of a WWTL by P. aeruginosa can involve several metabolic strategies which appeared lineage specific. Some clones appeared more successful than others at disseminating from a combined sewer toward the overflow of a WWTL.

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Chitinase Antigen from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain 385

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Suzanne E.; Smith, Mark; Wilkinson, Mark C.; Peek, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A chitinase antigen has been identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 385 using sera from animals immunized with a whole-cell vaccine. The majority of the activity was shown to be in the cytoplasm, with some activity in the membrane fraction. The chitinase was not secreted into the culture medium. Purification of the enzyme was achieved by exploiting its binding to crab shell chitin. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of 58 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a pI of 5.2. NH2-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed two sequences of M(I/L)RID and (Q/M/V)AREDAAAAM that gave an exact match to sequences in a translated putative open reading frame from the P. aeruginosa genome. The chitinase was active against chitin azure, ethylene glycol chitin, and colloidal chitin. It did not display any lysozyme activity. Using synthetic 4-methylumbelliferyl chitin substrates, it was shown to be an endochitinase. The Km and kcat for 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-N,N′-diacetylchitobiose were 4.28 mM and 1.7 s−1 respectively, and for 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-N,N′,N′′-triacetylchitotriose, they were 0.48 mM and 0.16 s−1 respectively. The pH optimum was determined to be pH 6.75, and 90% activity was maintained over the pH range 6.5 to 7.1. The enzyme was stable over the pH range 5 to 10 for 3 h and to temperatures up to 50°C for 30 min. The chitinase bound strongly to chitin, chitin azure, colloidal chitin, lichenan, and cellulose but poorly to chitosan, xylan, and heparin. It is suggested that the chitinase functions primarily as a chitobiosidase, removing chitobiose from the nonreducing ends of chitin and chitin oligosaccharides. PMID:11525997

  6. Label-free molecular imaging of bacterial communities of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Nameera; Polisetti, Sneha; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Dunham, Sage J. B.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shrout, Joshua D.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms, such as those formed by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are complex, matrix enclosed, and surface-associated communities of cells. Bacteria that are part of a biofilm community are much more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than their free-floating counterparts. P. aeruginosa biofilms are associated with persistent and chronic infections in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and HIV-AIDS. P. aeruginosa synthesizes and secretes signaling molecules such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which are implicated in quorum sensing (QS), where bacteria regulate gene expression based on population density. Processes such as biofilms formation and virulence are regulated by QS. This manuscript describes the powerful molecular imaging capabilities of confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in conjunction with multivariate statistical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of signaling molecules, secondary metabolites and virulence factors in biofilm communities of P. aeruginosa. Our observations reveal that the laboratory strain PAO1C synthesizes and secretes 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxides and 2-alkyl-4-hydroxyquinolones in high abundance, while the isogenic acyl homoserine lactone QS-deficient mutant (ΔlasIΔrhlI) strain produces predominantly 2-alkyl-quinolones during biofilm formation. This study underscores the use of CRM, along with traditional biological tools such as genetics, for studying the behavior of microbial communities at the molecular level.

  7. Characterization of colony morphology variants isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Prost, Lynne; Starkey, Melissa; Parsek, Matthew R

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of small, rough, strongly cohesive colony morphology variants from aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Similar to many of the P. aeruginosa colony morphology variants previously described in the literature, these variants autoaggregate in liquid culture and hyperadhere to solid surfaces. They also exhibit increased hydrophobicity and reduced motility compared to the wild-type parent strain. Despite the similarities in appearance of our colony morphology variant isolates on solid medium, the isolates showed a range of responses in various phenotypic assays. These variants form biofilms with significant three-dimensional structure and more biomass than the wild-type parent. To further explore the nature of the variants, their transcriptional profiles were evaluated. The variants generally showed increased expression of the psl and pel loci, which have been previously implicated in the adherence of P. aeruginosa to solid surfaces. When a mutation in the psl locus was introduced into a colony morphology variant, the colony morphology was only partially affected, but hyperadherence and autoaggregation were lost. Finally, similar colony morphology variants were found in isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. These variants displayed many of the same characteristics as the laboratory variants, suggesting a link between laboratory and cystic fibrosis biofilms.

  8. Indole and 7‐hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L. G.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7‐hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)‐regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI‐opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS‐regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2‐heptyl‐3‐hydroxy‐4(1H)‐quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole‐related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  9. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  10. Engineered biosealant strains producing inorganic and organic biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Bergdale, Terran E; Pinkelman, Rebecca J; Hughes, Stephen R; Zambelli, Barbara; Ciurli, Stefano; Bang, Sookie S

    2012-10-31

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has shown its potential in remediation of a wide range of structural damages including concrete cracks. In this study, genetically engineered microorganisms, capable of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) as well as inducing MICCP, were developed based on the assumption that the complex of inorganic CaCO(3) and organic EPS would provide a stronger matrix than MICCP alone as biosealant. In order to develop a recombinant biosealant microorganism, the entire Sporosarcina pasteurii urease gene sequences including ureA, ureB, ureC, ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG from plasmid pBU11 were sub-cloned into the shuttle vector, pUCP18. The newly constructed plasmid, pUBU1, was transformed into two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, 8821 and PAO1, to develop recombinants capable of inducing calcite precipitation in addition to their own ability to produce EPS. Nickel-dependent urease activities were expressed from the recombinant P. aeruginosa 8821 (pUBU1) and P. aeruginosa PAO1 (pUBU1), at 99.4% and 60.9% of the S. pasteurii urease activity, respectively, in a medium containing 2mM NiCl(2). No urease activities were detected from the wild type P. aeruginosa 8821 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 under the same growth conditions. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains induced CaCO(3) precipitation at a comparable rate as S. pasteurii and scanning electron microscopy evidenced the complex of CaCO(3) crystals and EPS layers surrounding the cells. The engineered strains produced in this study are expected to serve as a valuable reference to future biosealants that could be applied in the environment. However, the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa, used here only as a model system to show the proof of principle, prevents the use of this recombinant organism as a biosealant. In practical applications, other recombinant organisms should be used.

  11. Structure-Function Analysis of the Transmembrane Protein AmpG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peizhen; Ying, Jun; Yang, Guangjian; Li, Aifang; Wang, Jian; Lu, Junwan; Wang, Junrong; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Kewei; Jin, Shouguang; Bao, Qiyu; Zhang, Kaibo

    2016-01-01

    AmpG is a transmembrane protein with permease activity that transports meuropeptide from the periplasm to the cytoplasm, which is essential for the induction of the ampC encoding β-lactamase. To obtain new insights into the relationship between AmpG structure and function, comparative genomics analysis, secondary and tertiary structure modeling, site-directed mutational analyses and genetic complementation experiments were performed in this study. AmpGs from different genera of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Acinetobacter baumannii) could complement AmpG function in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to ampicillin is 512 μg/ml for wild type strain PAO1, while it is 32 μg/ml for an ampG deletion mutant strain (PAO1ΔampG) with a corresponding decrease in the activity of the ampC-encoded β-lactamase. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved AmpG residues (G29, A129, Q131 and A197) resulted in a loss of function, resulting in a loss of resistance to ampicillin in PAO1ΔampG. The G29A, G29V, A129T, A129V, A129D, A197S and A197D mutants had lower resistance to ampicillin and significantly decreased activity of the AmpC β-lactamase. The G29A, G29V, A129V, A197S and A197D mutants had decreased ampG mRNA transcript levels. The A129T and A129D mutants had normal ampG mRNA transcript levels, but the function of the protein was drastically reduced. Our experimental results demonstrate that the conserved amino acids played essential roles in maintaining the function of AmpG. Combined with the AmpG structural information, these critical amino acids can be targeted for the development of new anti-bacterial agents. PMID:27959942

  12. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  13. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  14. Genomic analyses of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 resequenced by single-molecule real-time sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Lu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    As a third-generation sequencing (TGS) method, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology provides long read length, and it is well suited for resequencing projects and de novo assembly. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 was characterized and resequenced using SMRT technology. PA1 was also subjected to genomic, comparative and pan-genomic analyses. The multidrug resistant strain PA1 possesses a 6,498,072 bp genome and a sequence type of ST-782. The genome of PA1 was also visualized, and the results revealed the details of general genome annotations, virulence factors, regulatory proteins (RPs), secretion system proteins, type II toxin–antitoxin (T–A) pairs and genomic islands. Whole genome comparison analysis suggested that PA1 exhibits similarity to other P. aeruginosa strains but differs in terms of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) regions, such as prophages and genomic islands. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that PA1 is closely related to PAO1, and P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into two main groups. The pan-genome of P. aeruginosa consists of a core genome of approximately 4,000 genes and an accessory genome of at least 6,600 genes. The present study presented a detailed, visualized and comparative analysis of the PA1 genome, to enhance our understanding of this notorious pathogen. PMID:27765811

  15. Optimization of Polymyxin B in Combination with Doripenem To Combat Mutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bulman, Zackery P.; Bulitta, Jürgen B.; Baron, Christopher; Rao, Gauri G.; Holden, Patricia N.; Li, Jian; Sutton, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Development of spontaneous mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been associated with antibiotic failure, leading to high rates of morbidity and mortality. Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of polymyxin B combinations against rapidly evolving P. aeruginosa mutator strains and to characterize the time course of bacterial killing and resistance via mechanism-based mathematical models. Polymyxin B or doripenem alone and in combination were evaluated against six P. aeruginosa strains: wild-type PAO1, mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (mutS and mutL) strains, and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine system (GO) base excision repair (BER)-deficient (mutM, mutT, and mutY) strains over 48 h. Pharmacodynamic modeling was performed using S-ADAPT and facilitated by SADAPT-TRAN. Mutator strains displayed higher mutation frequencies than the wild type (>600-fold). Exposure to monotherapy was followed by regrowth, even at high polymyxin B concentrations of up to 16 mg/liter. Polymyxin B and doripenem combinations displayed enhanced killing activity against all strains where complete eradication was achieved for polymyxin B concentrations of >4 mg/liter and doripenem concentrations of 8 mg/liter. Modeling suggested that the proportion of preexisting polymyxin B-resistant subpopulations influenced the pharmacodynamic profiles for each strain uniquely (fraction of resistance values are −8.81 log10 for the wild type, −4.71 for the mutS mutant, and −7.40 log10 for the mutM mutant). Our findings provide insight into the optimization of polymyxin B and doripenem combinations against P. aeruginosa mutator strains. PMID:26926641

  16. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) was a multicenter, international study of bacterial keratitis in which 101 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were treated. Twenty-two of 101 P. aeruginosa isolates collected had a colony morphology characteristic of a loss-of-function mutation in lasR, the gene encoding a quorum-sensing master regulator. Ulcers caused by these 22 strains were associated with larger areas of corneal opacification, worse vision, and a lower rate of vision recovery in response to treatment than ulcers caused by the other isolates. The lasR sequences from these isolates each contained one of three nonsynonymous substitutions, and these strains were deficient in production of LasR-regulated protease and rhamnolipids. Replacement of lasR with either of the two most common lasR alleles from the SCUT isolates was sufficient to decrease protease and rhamnolipid production in PA14. Loss of LasR function is associated with increased production of CupA fimbriae, and the LasR-defective isolates exhibited higher production of CupA fimbriae than LasR-intact isolates. Strains with the same lasR mutation were of the same multilocus sequence type, suggesting that LasR-deficient, environmental P. aeruginosa strains were endemic to the area, and infections caused by these strains were associated with worse patient outcomes in the SCUT study. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00324168.) IMPORTANCE The LasR transcription factor is an important regulator of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa and positively controls multiple virulence-associated pathways. The emergence of strains with lasR loss-of-function alleles in chronic disease is well described and is thought to represent a specific adaptation to the host environment. However, the prevalence and virulence of these strains in acute infections remain unclear. This report describes observations revealing that lasR mutants were common among isolates from

  17. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  18. Enhancement of Rhamnolipid Production in Residual Soybean Oil by an Isolated Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, C. J. B.; França, F. P.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.; Resende, M. M.; Cardoso, V. L.

    In the present work, the production of rhamnolipid from residual soybean oil (RSO) from food frying facilities was studied using a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of contaminated lagoon, isolated from a hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The optimization of RSO, amonium nitrate, and brewery residual yeast concentrations was accomplished by a central composite experimental design and surface response analysis. The experiments were performed in 500-mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50mL of mineral medium, at 170 rpm and 30±1°C, for a 48-h fermentation period. Rhamnolipid production has been monitored by measurements of surface tension, rhamnose concentration, and emulsifying activity. The best-planned results, located on the central point, have corresponded to 22g/L of RSO, 5.625 g/ L of NH4NO3' and 11.5 g/L of brewery yeast. At the maximum point the values for rhamnose and emulsifying index were 2.2g/L and 100%, respectively.

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by oleophilic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of an indigenous strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514, isolated from petroleum-polluted soil, for the biodegradation of crude petroleum oil. The isolate completely decolorized 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol in 120h when grown at (37±1°C), indicating its hydrocarbon utilizing nature. Ex situ biodegradation study was performed to find out quantitative utilization and biodegradation of paraffin(s) present in crude oil. When the culture was grown in Bushnell-Hass medium containing crude oil (3%,v/v) at 37°C, 180rpm for 60days, the viscosity of the oil was reduced from 1883cp to 1002cp. Gravimetric and gas chromatographic analysis showed 61.03% and 60.63% of biodegradation of C8-C36+ hydrocarbons, respectively. These results indicated that the isolate has potential to be used for ex-situ and in-situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants and could have promising applications in petrochemical industry.

  20. Computerized restriction endonuclease analysis compared with O-serotype and phage type in the epidemiologic fingerprinting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Javier; Latorre, Mikel; López-Molina, Nuria; Laconcha, Idoia; Alberdi, Leire; Rementeria, Aitor; Audicana, Ana; Uliarte, Rosario; Cisterna, Ramón

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of chromosomal DNA using SalI enzyme, low-concentration (0.4%) agarose gels and digitalized data management of the REA patterns obtained for the typing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. METHODS: A group of 67 clinical unrelated isolates from 10 Spanish hospitals was used to study the discriminatory power, reproducibility and typeability of REA typing. RESULTS: A SalI REA pattern consisted of a variety (1--10) of restriction bands in the range between 12.2 and 48.5 kb and an unresolvable smear of low-molecular-weight bands. Forty different SalI REA patterns with an index of discrimination of 0.979 were obtained. Low typeability (91.04%) was the major limitation of REA typing. Analysis of blinded subcultures of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed the reproducibility of REA typing to be 87.5%. Combined phenotypic typing (O-serotyping and phage typing) performed on the same group of strains showed comparable discrimination but much lower reproducibility. Isolates selected from five clusters of nosocomial infections in hospitals in the UK were typed by REA typing, and the results show high agreement when compared with conventional phenotypic typing methods in distinguishing between strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data underline the usefulness of REA typing enhanced with digitalized data management for the epidemiologic subtyping of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

  1. Silver Nanoparticles: Biosynthesis Using an ATCC Reference Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Activity as Broad Spectrum Clinical Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Quinteros, Melisa A.; Aiassa Martínez, Ivana M.; Dalmasso, Pablo R.; Páez, Paulina L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the biosynthesis of silver-based nanomaterials attracts enormous attention owing to the documented antimicrobial properties of these ones. This study reports the extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from a reference culture collection. A greenish culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa incubated at 37°C with a silver nitrate solution for 24 h changed to a yellowish brown color, indicating the formation of Ag-NPs, which was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. TEM analysis showed spherical and pseudospherical nanoparticles with a distributed size mainly between 25 and 45 nm, and the XRD pattern revealed the crystalline nature of Ag-NPs. Also it provides an evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized Ag-NPs against human pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia. Ag-NPs were found to be bioactive at picomolar concentration levels showing bactericidal effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. This work demonstrates the first helpful use of biosynthesized Ag-NPs as broad spectrum bactericidal agents for clinical strains of pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, A. baumannii, and E. coli. In addition, these Ag-NPs showed negligible cytotoxic effect in human neutrophils suggesting low toxicity to the host. PMID:27340405

  2. Biotechnological potential of a rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain producing phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Hai-Xia; Sun, Shuang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Jin, Kai-Ming; Zhang, Wei; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial phenazine metabolites belong to a group of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds with antimicrobial activities. In this study, a rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 was isolated and identified through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and fatty acid profiling. PA1201 inhibited the growth of various pathogenic microorganisms, including Rhizotonia solani, Magnaporthe grisea, Fusarium graminearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Staphylococcus aureus. High Performance Liquid Chromatography showed that PA1201 produced high levels of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), a registered green fungicide 'Shenqinmycin' with the fermentation titers of 81.7 mg/L in pigment producing medium (PPM) and 926.9 mg/L in SCG medium containing soybean meal, corn steep liquor and glucose. In addition, PA1201 produced another antifungal metabolite, phenazine-1-carboxaminde (PCN), a derivative of PCA, with the fermentation titers of 18.1 and 489.5 mg/L in PPM and SCG medium respectively. To the best of our knowledge, PA1201 is a rhizosphere originating P. aeruginosa strain that congenitally produces the highest levels of PCA and PCN among currently reported P. aeruginosa isolates, which endows it great biotechnological potential to be transformed to a biopesticide-producing engineering strain.

  3. Cholesterol oxidase with high catalytic activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Screening, molecular genetic analysis, expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Doukyu, Noriyuki; Nihei, Shyou

    2015-07-01

    An extracellular cholesterol oxidase producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA157, was isolated by a screening method to detect 6β-hydroperoxycholest-4-en-3-one-forming cholesterol oxidase. On the basis of a putative cholesterol oxidase gene sequence in the genome sequence data of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1, the cholesterol oxidase gene from strain PA157 was cloned. The mature form of the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The overexpressed enzyme formed inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli cells grown at 20 °C and 30 °C. A soluble and active PA157 enzyme was obtained when the recombinant cells were grown at 10 °C. The purified enzyme was stable at pH 5.5 to 10 and was most active at pH 7.5-8.0, showing optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 70 °C. The enzyme retained about 90% of its activity after incubation for 30 min at 70 °C. The enzyme oxidized 3β-hydroxysteroids such as cholesterol, β-cholestanol, and β-sitosterol at high rates. The Km value and Vmax value for the cholesterol were 92.6 μM and 15.9 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. The Vmax value of the enzyme was higher than those of commercially available cholesterol oxidases. This is the first report to characterize a cholesterol oxidase from P. aeruginosa.

  4. Autolysis and autoaggregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa colony morphology mutants.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, David A; Calfee, M Worth; Rainey, Paul B; Pesci, Everett C

    2002-12-01

    Two distinctive colony morphologies were noted in a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposon insertion mutants. One set of mutants formed wrinkled colonies of autoaggregating cells. Suppressor analysis of a subset of these mutants showed that this was due to the action of the regulator WspR and linked this regulator (and the chemosensory pathway to which it belongs) to genes that encode a putative fimbrial adhesin required for biofilm formation. WspR homologs, related in part by a shared GGDEF domain, regulate cell surface factors, including aggregative fimbriae and exopolysaccharides, in diverse bacteria. The second set of distinctive insertion mutants formed colonies that lysed at their center. Strains with the most pronounced lysis overproduced the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), an extracellular signal that interacts with quorum sensing. Autolysis was suppressed by mutation of genes required for PQS biosynthesis, and in one suppressed mutant, autolysis was restored by addition of synthetic PQS. The mechanism of autolysis may involve activation of the endogenous prophage and phage-related pyocins in the genome of strain PAO1. The fact that PQS levels correlated with autolysis suggests a fine balance in natural populations of P. aeruginosa between survival of the many and persistence of the few.

  5. Sensitivity to Antimicrobial Drugs of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Extreme-Resistant Strains Isolated in the Major Hospitals of Central Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Azizov, Ilya S.; Lavrinenko, Alyona V.; Belyaev, Ilya A.; Babenko, Dmitry B.; Shambilova, Natalya A.; Bissenova, Nelya M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The article presents the current data on the sensitivity of the main 37 strains of eXtremaly Drugs Resistance (XDR) category to anti-pseudomonas drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The strains were collected during the prospective multicenter study in large multidisciplinary hospitals of Central Kazakhstan. Susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was carried out by disk method and the serial dilution method with the interpretation of the results according to EUCAST criteria. Detection of carbapenemases gene of VIM, IMP, NDM and GES classes was carried out by PCR method using the commercial kits. RESULTS: All identified carbapenemases were sorted to VIM class and accounted for 63.64%. Resistance to aminoglycoside drugs exceeded 80%. All the strains were susceptible to polymyxin. CONCLUSION: Thus, at the present stage the circulation of P. aeruginosa strains of XDR category continues in major hospitals in Kazakhstan. The strains remain sensitiveness only to polymyxin. PMID:28293307

  6. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28299285

  7. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  8. Computational discovery of putative quorum sensing inhibitors against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Umamageswaran, Venugopal; Parameswari, Radhakrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-09-01

    Drugs have been discovered in the past mainly either by identification of active components from traditional remedies or by unpredicted discovery. A key motivation for the study of structure based virtual screening is the exploitation of such information to design targeted drugs. In this study, structure based virtual screening was used in search for putative quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virtual screening programme Glide version 5.5 was applied to screen 1,920 natural compounds/drugs against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of P. aeruginosa. Based on the results of in silico docking analysis, five top ranking compounds namely rosmarinic acid, naringin, chlorogenic acid, morin and mangiferin were subjected to in vitro bioassays against laboratory strain PAO1 and two more antibiotic resistant clinical isolates, P. aeruginosa AS1 (GU447237) and P. aeruginosa AS2 (GU447238). Among the five compounds studied, except mangiferin other four compounds showed significant inhibition in the production of protease, elastase and hemolysin. Further, all the five compounds potentially inhibited the biofilm related behaviours. This interaction study provided promising ligands to inhibit the quorum sensing (QS) mediated virulence factors production in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Resistance Emergence Mechanism and Mechanism of Resistance Suppression by Tobramycin for Cefepime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Robert A.; Bahniuk, Nadzeya; Bulitta, Juergen B.; VanScoy, Brian; DeFiglio, Holland; Fikes, Steven; Brown, David; Drawz, Sarah M.; Kulawy, Robert; Louie, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    The panoply of resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes resistance suppression difficult. Defining optimal regimens is critical. Cefepime is a cephalosporin whose 3′ side chain provides some stability against AmpC β-lactamases. We examined the activity of cefepime against P. aeruginosa wild-type strain PAO1 and its isogenic AmpC stably derepressed mutant in our hollow-fiber infection model. Dose-ranging studies demonstrated complete failure with resistance emergence (both isolates). Inoculum range studies demonstrated ultimate failure for all inocula. Lower inocula failed last (10 days to 2 weeks). Addition of a β-lactamase inhibitor suppressed resistance even with the stably derepressed isolate. Tobramycin combination studies demonstrated resistance suppression in both the wild-type and the stably derepressed isolates. Quantitating the RNA message by quantitative PCR demonstrated that tobramycin decreased the message relative to that in cefepime-alone experiments. Western blotting with AmpC-specific antibody for P. aeruginosa demonstrated decreased expression. We concluded that suppression of β-lactamase expression by tobramycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was at least part of the mechanism behind resistance suppression. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that a regimen of 2 g of cefepime every 8 h plus 7 mg/kg of body weight of tobramycin daily would provide robust resistance suppression for Pseudomonas isolates with cefepime MIC values up to 8 mg/liter and tobramycin MIC values up to 1 mg/liter. For P. aeruginosa resistance suppression, combination therapy is critical. PMID:22005996

  10. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    PubMed

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Moser, Claus; Kühl, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-02-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients. It is characterised by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in the endobronchial mucus with zones of oxygen (O2) depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leucocyte activity. Whilst the exact mechanisms affecting antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms remain unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of several bactericidal antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin is enhanced by stimulation of the aerobic respiration of pathogens, and that lack of O2 increases their tolerance. Reoxygenation of O2-depleted biofilms may thus improve susceptibility to ciprofloxacin possibly by restoring aerobic respiration. We tested such a strategy using reoxygenation of O2-depleted P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 agarose-embedded biofilms by hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) (100% O2, 2.8bar), enhancing the diffusive supply for aerobic respiration during ciprofloxacin treatment. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates that biofilm reoxygenation by HBOT can significantly enhance the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa. Combining ciprofloxacin treatment with HBOT thus clearly has potential to improve the treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections.

  11. Quorum-Sensing-Negative (lasR) Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Avoid Cell Lysis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haenni, Marisa; Guy, Lionel; Krishnapillai, Viji; Haas, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acylhomoserine lactone signals regulate the expression of several hundreds of genes, via the transcriptional regulator LasR and, in part, also via the subordinate regulator RhlR. This regulatory network termed quorum sensing contributes to the virulence of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. The fact that two supposed PAO1 wild-type strains from strain collections were found to be defective for LasR function because of independent point mutations in the lasR gene led to the hypothesis that loss of quorum sensing might confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa under certain environmental conditions. A convenient plate assay for LasR function was devised, based on the observation that lasR mutants did not grow on adenosine as the sole carbon source because a key degradative enzyme, nucleoside hydrolase (Nuh), is positively controlled by LasR. The wild-type PAO1 and lasR mutants showed similar growth rates when incubated in nutrient yeast broth at pH 6.8 and 37°C with good aeration. However, after termination of growth during 30 to 54 h of incubation, when the pH rose to ≥ 9, the lasR mutants were significantly more resistant to cell lysis and death than was the wild type. As a consequence, the lasR mutant-to-wild-type ratio increased about 10-fold in mixed cultures incubated for 54 h. In a PAO1 culture, five consecutive cycles of 48 h of incubation sufficed to enrich for about 10% of spontaneous mutants with a Nuh− phenotype, and five of these mutants, which were functionally complemented by lasR+, had mutations in lasR. The observation that, in buffered nutrient yeast broth, the wild type and lasR mutants exhibited similar low tendencies to undergo cell lysis and death suggests that alkaline stress may be a critical factor providing a selective survival advantage to lasR mutants. PMID:15995202

  12. Novel rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3.

    PubMed

    Nie, Maiqian; Yin, Xihou; Ren, Chunyan; Wang, Yang; Xu, Feng; Shen, Qirong

    2010-01-01

    A novel rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil samples. Strain NY3 was characterized by its extraordinary capacity to produce structurally diverse rhamnolipids. A total of 25 rhamnolipid components and 37 different parent molecular ions, representing various metal ion adducts (Na(+), 2Na(+) and K(+)), were detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among these compounds are ten new rhamnolipids. In addition to its biosurfactant production, strain NY3 was shown to be capable of efficient degradation of PAHs as well as synergistic improvement in the degradation of high molecular weight PAHs by its biosurfactant. These findings have added novel members to the rhamnolipid group and expanded current knowledge regarding the diversity and productive capability of rhamnolipid biosurfactants from a single specific strain with variation of only one carbon source. Additionally, this paper lays the foundation for improvement in the yield of NY3BS and study of the degradation pathway(s) of PAHs in P. aeruginosa strain NY3.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage specific for the lipopolysaccharide of rough derivatives of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, K F; Kropinski, A M

    1981-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-defective (rough) mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was isolated by selection for resistance to the LPS-specific phage E79. The LPS of this mutant, AK-1012, lacked the O-antigenic side chain-specific amino sugar fucosamine as well as the core-specific sugars glucose and rhamnose. Using this strain, we isolated and characterized a phage, phi PLS27, which is specifically inactivated upon incubation with LPS extracted from rough mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO. phi PLS27 was found to be a Bradley type C phage and was very similar to coliphage T7 in a number of properties, including size, buoyant density, mass, and the number of structural proteins. Images PMID:6787214

  14. [Introduction of mutator phage D3112 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into Alcaligenes eutrophus var. metallotollerans (Strain CH34)].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V N

    1996-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the intact genome of a D3112 tranposable phage (TP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, integrated into a recombinant plasmid RP4 :: D3112, can be transferred by means of conjugation from P. putida PpG1 (RP4npt :: D3112) donor cells into Alcaligenes eutrophus var. metallotollerans cells. P. aeruginosa strains are unacceptable as donors because they have a bactericidal effect on A. eutrophus. RP4npt :: D3112 plasmid is stably inherited by A. eutrophus with D3112 being expressed and successfully reproduced. However, TP loses the induction ability after UV irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. It is suggested that D3112 TP and its miniderivatives could be used in manipulations with A. eutrophus var. metallotolerans.

  15. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Boukerb, Amine M.; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great variations

  16. Surface characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in a chamber implant model in mice and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N M; Bell, A; Hancock, R E

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was grown in vivo in chambers implanted into the peritoneums of mice and rats. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts of bacterial cells taken from the chambers and washed to remove loosely bound host proteins revealed the presence of the major outer membrane proteins D2, E, F, G, and H2. Western immunoblotting with specific antisera confirmed the presence of porin protein F and lipoprotein H2. However, there was no apparent induction of the phosphate starvation-inducible porin P or the divalent cation starvation-inducible protein H1. Small amounts of proteins with molecular weights similar to those of the iron-regulated outer membrane proteins were found in cells grown in vivo; however, their presence could not be confirmed immunologically. The presence of pili and flagella on the cells grown in vivo was demonstrated by electron microscopy and Western immunoblotting. A consistent alteration in the lipopolysaccharide banding pattern was observed after growth in vivo. Compared with cells of strain PAO1 grown in vitro, cells grown in vivo appeared to lack a series of high-molecular-weight O-antigen-containing lipopolysaccharide bands and gained a new series of lower-molecular-weight lipopolysaccharide bands. This alteration in the lipopolysaccharide after growth in vivo did not affect the O-antigen serotype or the resistance of the bacteria to serum. Images PMID:2492257

  17. Chromate Efflux by Means of the ChrA Chromate Resistance Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Cervantes, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Everted membrane vesicles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 harboring plasmid pCRO616, expressing the ChrA chromate resistance protein, accumulated four times more 51CrO42− than vesicles from plasmidless cells, indicating that a chromate efflux system functions in the resistant strain. Chromate uptake showed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.12 mM chromate and a Vmax of 0.5 nmol of chromate/min per mg of protein. Uptake of chromate by vesicles was dependent on NADH oxidation and was abolished by energy inhibitors and by the chromate analog sulfate. The mechanism of resistance to chromate determined by ChrA appears to be based on the active efflux of chromate driven by the membrane potential. PMID:10572148

  18. Biodegradation of isoproturon using a novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11 as a multi-functional bioinoculant of environmental significance.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Singh, Braj Raj; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2011-01-30

    Biodegradation of phenylurea herbicide isoproturon was studied in soil microcosm bioaugmented with a novel bacterial strain JS-11 isolated from wheat rhizosphere. The molecular characterization based on 16SrDNA sequence homology confirmed its identity as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11. The herbicide was completely degraded within 20 days at ambient temperature with the rate constant of 0.08 day(-1), following the first-order rate kinetics. In stationary phase, at a cell density of 6.5 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1), the bacteria produced substantially increased amounts of indole acetic acid (IAA) in the presence of tryptophan as compared with the control. Also, the bacteria exhibited a time-dependent increase in the amount of tri-calcium phosphate solubilization in Pikovskaya's medium. Further screening of the strain JS-11 for auxiliary activities revealed its remarkable capability of producing the siderophores and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), besides antifungal activity against a common phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Thus, the versatile P. aeruginosa strain JS-11 with innate potential for multifarious biological activities is envisaged as a super-bioinoculant for exploitation in the integrated bioremediation, plant growth and disease management (IBPDM) in contaminated agricultural soils.

  19. Multiple roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 PilY1 in motility, transport and infection

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Yu-Sing Tammy; Brandes, Gudrun; Rakhimova, Elza; Horatzek, Sonja; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Munder, Antje; van Barneveld, Andrea; Jordan, Doris; Bredenbruch, Florian; Häußler, Susanne; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Hoiby, Niels; Tümmler, Burkhard; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the most important mammalian host defence cells against infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Screening of a signature tagged mutagenesis library of the non-piliated P. aeruginosa strain TBCF10839 uncovered that transposon inactivation of its pilY1 gene rendered the bacterium more resistant against killing by neutrophils than the wild type and any other of the more than 3000 tested mutants. Inactivation of pilY1 led to the loss of twitching motility in twitching-proficient wild-type PA14 and PAO1 strains, predisposed to autolysis and impaired the secretion of quinolones and pyocyanin, but on the other hand promoted growth in stationary phase and bacterial survival in murine airway infection models. The PilY1 population consisted of a major full-length and a minor shorter PilY1* isoform. PilY1* was detectable in small extracellular quinolone-positive aggregates, but not in the pilus. P. aeruginosa PilY1 is not an adhesin on the pilus tip, but assists in pilus biogenesis, twitching motility, secretion of secondary metabolites and in the control of cell density in the bacterial population. PMID:19054330

  20. Evaluation of Synergistic Interactions Between Cell-Free Supernatant of Lactobacillus Strains and Amikacin and Genetamicin Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Aminnezhad, Sargol; Kermanshahi, Rouha Kasra; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The indiscriminate use of antibiotics in the treatment of infectious diseases can increase the development of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, there is a big demand for new sources of antimicrobial agents and alternative treatments for reduction of antibiotic dosage required to decrease the associated side effects. Objectives: In this study, the synergistic action of aminoglycoside antibiotics and cell-free supernatant (CFS) of probiotic (Lactobacillus rahmnosus and L. casei) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PTCC 1430 was evaluated. Materials and Methods: A growth medium for culturing of probiotic bacteria was separated by centrifugation. The antimicrobial effects of CFS of probiotic bacteria were evaluated using the agar well diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were evaluated using the micro dilution method. Finally, an interaction between CFS and amikacin or gentamicin against P. aeruginosa PTCC 1430 was examined through the checkerboard method and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC). Furthermore, CFSs from Lactobacillus strains were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) for antimicrobial compounds. Results: The results showed a significant effect of CFS on the growth of P. aeruginosa. The MIC and MBC of CFS from L. casei were 62.5 µL⁄mL while the MIC and MBC of CFS from L. rhamnosus were 62.5 μL⁄mL and 125 μL⁄mL, respectively. Using the FIC indices, synergistic interactions were observed in combination of CFS and antibiotics. Fractional Inhibitory Concentration indices of CFS from L. casei and aminoglycoside antibiotics were 0.124 and 0.312 while FIC indices of CFS from L. rhamnosus and aminoglycoside antibiotics were 0.124 and 0.56, respectively showing a synergism effect. The results of RP-HPLC showed that CFS of Lactobacillus strains contained acetic acid, lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that probiotic bacterial

  1. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  3. Divergence of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during an outbreak of ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Elli A; Di Lorenzo, Valeria; Trappetti, Claudia; Liciardi, Manuele; Orru, Germano; Viti, Carlo; Bronowski, Christina; Hall, Amanda J; Darby, Alistair C; Oggioni, Marco R; Winstanley, Craig

    2015-01-30

    Bacterial infections causing mastitis in sheep can result in severe economic losses for farmers. A large survey of milk samples from ewes with mastitis in Sardinia, Italy, indicated an increasing prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. It has been shown previously that during chronic, biofilm-associated infections P. aeruginosa populations diversify. We report the phenotypic and genomic characterisation of two clonal P. aeruginosa isolates (PSE305 and PSE306) from a mastitis infection outbreak, representing distinct colony morphology variants. In addition to pigment production, PSE305 and PSE306 differed in phenotypic characteristics including biofilm formation, utilisation of various carbon and nitrogen sources, twitching motility. We found higher levels of expression of genes associated with biofilm formation (pelB) and twitching motility (flgD) in PSE305, compared to the biofilm and twitching-defective PSE306. Comparative genomics analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and minor insertion/deletion variations between PSE305 and PSE306, including a SNP mutation in the pilP gene of PSE306. By introducing a wild-type pilP gene we were able to partially complement the defective twitching motility of PSE306. There were also three larger regions of difference between the two genomes, indicating genomic instability. Hence, we have demonstrated that P. aeruginosa population divergence can occur during an outbreak of mastitis, leading to significant variations in phenotype and genotype, and resembling the behaviour of P. aeruginosa during chronic biofilm-associated infections.

  4. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these

  5. pAO1 of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans and the spread of catabolic traits by horizontal gene transfer in gram-positive soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihasan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich

    2013-08-01

    The 165-kb megaplasmid pAO1 of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans carries two large gene clusters, one involved in nicotine catabolism (nic-gene cluster) and one in carbohydrate utilization (ch-gene cluster). Here, we propose that both gene clusters were acquired by A. nicotinovorans by horizontal gene transfer mediated by pAO1. Protein-protein blast search showed that none of the published Arthrobacter genomes contains nic-genes, but Rhodococcus opacus carries on its chromosome a nic-gene cluster highly similar to that of pAO1. Analysis of the nic-genes in the two species suggested a recombination event between their nic-gene clusters. Apparently, there was a gene exchange between pAO1, or a precursor plasmid, and a nic-gene cluster of an as yet unidentified Arthrobacter specie or other soil bacterium, possibly related to Rhodococcus, leading to the transfer by pAO1 of this catabolic trait to A. nicotinovorans. Analysis of the pAO1 ch-gene cluster revealed a virtually identical counterpart on the chromosome of Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans. Moreover, the sequence analysis of the genes flanking the ch-gene cluster suggested that it was acquired by pAO1 by Xer-related site directed recombination and transferred via the plasmid to A. nicotinovorans. The G+C content, the level of sequence identity, gene co-linearity of nic- and ch-gene clusters as well as the signs of recombination events clearly supports the notion of pAO1 and its precursor plasmids as vehicles in HGT among Gram + soil bacteria.

  6. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Peter Ø; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke P; Wang, Hengzhuang; Kragh, Kasper N; Kolpen, Mette; Hempel, Casper; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-tolerant, biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa has long been recognized as a major cause of chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The mechanisms involved in the activity of antibiotics on biofilm are not completely clear. We have investigated whether the proposed induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyrA), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH˙ is produced by P. aeruginosa biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin, which may contribute to the killing of biofilm subpopulations.

  7. Nanoscale analysis of the effects of antibiotics and CX1 on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug-resistant strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, C.; Grare, M.; Jauvert, E.; Coutable, A.; Regnouf-de-Vains, J. B.; Mourer, M.; Duval, R. E.; Dague, E.

    2012-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge that can be addressed using nanotechnology. We focused on the resistance of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and investigated, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the behavior of a reference strain and of a multidrug resistant clinical strain, submitted to two antibiotics and to an innovative antibacterial drug (CX1). We measured the morphology, surface roughness and elasticity of the bacteria under physiological conditions and exposed to the antibacterial molecules. To go further in the molecules action mechanism, we explored the bacterial cell wall nanoscale organization using functionalized AFM tips. We have demonstrated that affected cells have a molecularly disorganized cell wall; surprisingly long molecules being pulled off from the cell wall by a lectin probe. Finally, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of CX1: it destroys the outer membrane of the bacteria as demonstrated by the results on artificial phospholipidic membranes and on the resistant strain.

  8. Genetic variability associated with photosynthetic pigment concentration, and photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching, in strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo; Salgado, Concepción; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2007-06-01

    Although populations of cyanobacteria are usually considered to be clonal, their capacity to survive environmental changes suggests intrapopulation genetic variation. We therefore estimated the genetic variability on the basis of two processes important for any photoautotroph - photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching - as well as photosynthetic pigment concentrations. For this purpose, two parameters related to photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching were measured using specific experimental and statistical procedures, in 25 strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, along with their contents of chlorophyll a, total carotenoids and phycocyanin. The experimental procedure allowed discrimination between genetic and nongenetic (or residual) variability among strains. The high genetic variability found in photosynthetic pigments and both photosynthetic parameters denotes large differences even among strains isolated from the same community. The high genetic diversity within a population could be important for the evolutionary success of cyanobacteria.

  9. Identification of extensive drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: New clone ST1725 and high-risk clone ST233.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodea, Pamela; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Olivares Cervantes, Alma Lidia; Gamiño Arroyo, Ana Estela; Moreno-Espinosa, Sarbelio; de la Rosa Zamboni, Daniela; López Martínez, Briceida; Castellanos-Cruz, María Del Carmen; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Jiménez Rojas, Verónica Leticia; Vigueras Galindo, Juan Carlos; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Several microorganisms produce nosocomial infections (NIs), among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa stands out as an opportunist pathogen with the capacity to develop multiresistance to first-choice antibiotics. From 2007 to 2013, forty-six NIs produced by P. aeruginosa were detected at a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Mexico with a significant mortality rate (17.39%). All isolates (n = 58/46 patients) were characterized by evaluating their response to several antibiotics as panresistant (PDR), extensively resistant (XDR), multiresistant (MDR) or sensitive (S). In addition, all isolates were typified through multilocus sequencing of seven genes: acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE. Furthermore, to establish the genetic relationships among these isolates, we carried out a phylogenetic inference analysis using maximum likelihood to construct a phylogenetic network. To assess evolutionary parameters, recombination was evaluated using the PHI test, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions was determined. Two of the strains were PDR (ST1725); 42 were XDR; four were MDR; and ten were S. Twenty-one new sequence types were detected. Thirty-three strains exhibited novel sequence type ST1725. The ratio of nonsynonym to synonym substitutions was 1:1 considering all genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic relationship of the PDR, XDR and MDR strains was mainly clonal; however, the PHI test and the phylogenetic network suggest that recombination events occurred to produce a non-clonal population. This study aimed not only to determine the genetic diversity of clinical P. aeruginosa but also to provide a warning regarding the identification and spreading of clone ST1725, its ability to cause outbreaks with high mortality rates, and to remain in the hospital environment for over seven years. These characteristics highlight the need to identify clonal outbreaks, especially where high resistance to most antibiotics is observed, and control

  10. [Shall we report the carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains detected by BD Phoenix system?].

    PubMed

    Oğünç, Dilara; Ongüt, Gözde; Ozen, Nevgün Sepin; Baysan, Betil Ozhak; Günseren, Filiz; Dağlar, Duygu; Demirbakan, Hadiye; Gültekin, Meral

    2010-04-01

    Imipenem and meropenem are broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that are especially useful in the treatment of nosocomially acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. infections. Previous reports have noted that susceptibility tests could show false resistance to imipenem. For this reason, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all carbapenem resistant or intermediate resistant isolates should be tested with an additional method to verify the results. This study was aimed to evaluate the imipenem and meropenem susceptibilities by disk diffusion, E-test and broth microdilution in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains found to be resistant or intermediate to imipenem-meropenem by BD Phoenix automated susceptibility testing system. Between January 2006-January 2007, 85 non-duplicate isolates of A. baumannii and 51 non-duplicate isolates of P. aeruginosa which were determined as resistant or intermediate resistant to imipenem and/or meropenem by BD Phoenix automated identification and susceptibility system (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD, USA) were collected in Akdeniz University Hospital Central Laboratory. All strains were tested by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden), disk diffusion and reference broth microdilution (BMD) method following CLSI recommendations. All 51 isolates of P. aeruginosa determined as imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by BD Phoenix, were found to be imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by the reference BMD method. Minor error rates were same for all testing systems (1.9%) except for the meropenem results of BD Phoenix system (5.9%). No major errors were produced by any system. For A. baumannii, only one very major error was detected for meropenem by BD Phoenix system. Number of minor errors determined for meropenem by all testing systems compared to the reference test, ranged from 2 (2.4%) to 3 (3.5%). It was concluded that carbapenem susceptibility test

  11. X-ray Irradiated Vaccine Confers protection against Pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wang, Zhenling; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Jianying; Peng, Bin; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infection worldwide, however, no effective vaccine is currently available in the market. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the bacteria by X-ray irradiation inhibits its replication capability but retained antigenic expression functionally thus allowing its use as a potential vaccine. Mice immunized by this vaccine were challenged by the parental strain, the O-antigen-homologous strain PAO-1 (O2/O5) and heterologous strain PAO-6 (O6) in an acute pneumonia model. We further measured the protective effect of the vaccine, as well as host innate and cellular immunity responses. We found immunized mice could protect against both strains. Notably, the antiserum only had significant protective role against similar bacteria, while adoptive transfer of lymphocytes significantly controlled the spread of the virulent heterologous serogroup PAO-6 infection, and the protective role could be reversed by CD4 rather than CD8 antibody. We further revealed that vaccinated mice could rapidly recruit neutrophils to the airways early after intranasal challenge by PAO-6, and the irradiated vaccine was proved to be protective by the generated CD4+ IL-17+ Th17 cells. In conclusion, the generation of inactivated but metabolically active microbes is a promising strategy for safely vaccinating against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26879055

  12. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  13. Effects of aqueous polymeric surfactants on silicone-hydrogel soft- contact-lens wettability and bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tran, Victoria B; Sung, Ye Suel; Copley, Kendra; Radke, C J

    2012-08-01

    Prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa binding to soft-contact lenses (SCLs) may curtail sight-threatening microbial keratitis. Substrate surface wettability is known to modulate adhesion of P. aeruginosa. This study investigates the use of aqueous alkoxylate block co-polymer surfactants for enhanced wettability and antibacterial adhesion of SCLs under leaching conditions. Specifically, Pluronic(®) F127 (PF) and three ethylene oxide-butylene oxide (EOBO) surfactants were studied with four commercially available silicone-hydrogel contact lenses: Pure Vision™, Acuvue Advance™, Acuvue Oasys™ and O(2)Optix™. Dilute aqueous PF and EOBO surfactants impregnated all four soft-contact lenses, as demonstrated by surface-tension decline for leached surfactant. For PF surfactant, significant surface-wettability improvement upon rinsing occurred only after overnight leaching. EOBO surfactant showed a similar pattern with O(2)Optix™ lenses. EOBO-pretreated Pure Vision™ lenses, however, showed fast leaching and a significant change in surface energy towards improved wettability. Adhesion assays of P. aeruginosa displayed a small decrease in the binding rate of PAK bacteria for EOBO-pretreated Pure Vision™ lenses, but not for EOBO-pretreated O(2)Optix™ lenses. P. aeruginosa strain-PAO1 bacteria adhesion to all lenses was independent of surface wettability. Despite the ability of polymeric surfactants to lower advancing contact angles under leaching conditions, increased lens wettability is not a universal panacea for antifouling of soft-contact lenses.

  14. Preparation, characterization and in vitro antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; Bento, Etiene Barbosa; Almeida, Larissa da Cunha; de Sá, Luisa Zaiden Carvalho Martins; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism with the ability to respond to a wide variety of environmental changes, exhibiting a high intrinsic resistance to a number of antimicrobial agents. This low susceptibility to antimicrobial substances is primarily due to the low permeability of its outer membrane, efflux mechanisms and the synthesis of enzymes that promote the degradation of these drugs. Cephalosporins, particularty ceftazidime and cefepime are effective against P. aeruginosa, however, its increasing resistance has limited the usage of these antibiotics. Encapsulating antimicrobial drugs into unilamellar liposomes is an approach that has been investigated in order to overcome microorganism resistance. In this study, antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and P. aeruginosa SPM-1 was compared to that of the free drugs. Liposomal characterization included diameter, encapsulation efficiency and stability. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined for free and liposomal forms of both drugs. Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was determined at concentrations 1, 2 and 4 times MIC. Average diameter of liposomes was 131.88 nm and encapsulation efficiency for cefepime and ceftazidime were 2.29% end 5.77%, respectively. Improved stability was obtained when liposome formulations were prepared with a 50% molar ratio for cholesterol in relation to the phospholipid. MIC for liposomal antibiotics for both drugs were 50% lower than that of the free drug, demonstrating that liposomal drug delivery systems may contribute to increase the antibacterial activity of these drugs. PMID:24031917

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Able To Decompose N,N-Dimethyl Formamide

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Xu, Lin; Wei, Li; Zhang, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium, which uses a variety of organic chemicals as carbon sources. Here, we report the genome sequence of the Cu1510 isolate from wastewater containing a high concentration of N,N-dimethyl formamide. PMID:26847883

  16. The importance of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system in epithelium traversal depends upon conditions of host susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Aaron B; Tam, K P Connie; Metruccio, Matteo M E; Evans, David J; Fleiszig, Suzanne M J

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is invasive or cytotoxic to host cells, depending on the type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors encoded. While the T3SS is known to be involved in disease in vivo, how it participates remains to be clarified. Here, mouse models of superficial epithelial injury (tissue paper blotting with EGTA treatment) and immunocompromise (MyD88 deficiency) were used to study the contribution of the T3SS transcriptional activator ExsA to epithelial traversal. Corneas of excised eyeballs were inoculated with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing PAO1 or isogenic exsA mutants for 6 h ex vivo before bacterial traversal and epithelial thickness were quantified by using imaging. In the blotting-EGTA model, exsA mutants were defective in capacity for traversal. Accordingly, an ∼16-fold variability in exsA expression among PAO1 isolates from three sources correlated with epithelial loss. In contrast, MyD88-/- epithelia remained susceptible to P. aeruginosa traversal despite exsA mutation. Epithelial lysates from MyD88-/- mice had reduced antimicrobial activity compared to those from wild-type mice with and without prior antigen challenge, particularly 30- to 100-kDa fractions, for which mass spectrometry revealed multiple differences, including (i) lower baseline levels of histones, tubulin, and lumican and (ii) reduced glutathione S-transferase, annexin, and dermatopontin, after antigen challenge. Thus, the importance of ExsA in epithelial traversal by invasive P. aeruginosa depends on the compromise enabling susceptibility, suggesting that strategies for preventing infection will need to extend beyond targeting the T3SS. The data also highlight the importance of mimicking conditions allowing susceptibility in animal models and the need to monitor variability among bacterial isolates from different sources, even for the same strain.

  17. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  18. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, DA-Qiang; Cheng, Huijuan; Duan, Qiangjun; Huang, Weifeng

    2015-08-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P.aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Characterization of carbapenem resistance mechanisms and integrons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from blood samples in a French hospital.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Cavalié, Laurent; Dubois, Damien; Oswald, Eric; Torres, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), porin OprD, integrons, virulence factors and the clonal relationships were characterized in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) isolates. Fifty-six IRPA strains were recovered from blood samples of different patients at a Toulouse teaching hospital from 2011 to 2013. Susceptibility testing of 14 antibiotics was performed by the disc diffusion method. Detection and characterization of MBLs, the oprD gene and integrons were studied by PCR and sequencing. Thirteen genes involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa were analysed. Molecular typing of IRPA strains was performed by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing. In this study, 61 % of the IRPA isolates showed a multi-resistance phenotype. The MBL phenotype, detected in three isolates (5.4 %), was linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The oprD gene was amplified in 55 (98.2 %) IRPA strains, and variations were observed in 54 of them. Insertion sequences (IS) truncating oprD were detected in eight IRPA strains, with the novel ISPa56 identified in two strains. Class 1 integrons were detected in 24 (42.9 %) IRPA strains. The blaVIM-2 gene was found inside the class 1 integron arrangements. The new integrons In1054 (intI1-aacA56-qacEΔ1-sul1) and In1160 (intI1-aacA4-aacC1d-ISKpn4-gcuE-qacEΔ1-sul1) have been described for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this study. A high clonal diversity was found in our strains. Among the variety of sequence types (STs) found, ST175, ST233, ST235, ST244 and ST654 were noteworthy as epidemic clones. In conclusion, 5.4 % of IRPA strains showed an MBL phenotype linked to the blaVIM-2 gene. The identified oprD high polymorphism could be implicated in the variable resistance to carbapenems in IRPA strains. The dissemination of high-risk clones is a cause of concern.

  20. Genotypic characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis after initial and subsequent colonization.

    PubMed

    Munck, A; Bonacorsi, S; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Lebourgeois, M; Gérardin, M; Brahimi, N; Navarro, J; Bingen, E

    2001-10-01

    Chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is preceded by a period of colonization and acute infection. Early aggressive antibiotic treatment of initial colonisation may prevent or at least delay chronic pulmonary infection. We initiated treatment with a combination of IV beta-lactam tobramycin, followed by nebulized colistin when PA was first isolated from patients with CF. Subsequent serial PA isolates obtained from these colonized CF patients were characterized by means of molecular methods to determine whether they were genetically related to the initial strain. Initial colonization was eradicated in all 19 patients. All patients reacquired PA within 3-25 months during the 3 years of follow-up. Fourteen patients acquired a new PA strain with a distinct genotypic profile, suggesting a new source of contamination. Five patients had two PA isolates with identical genotypes, suggesting either previous undetected respiratory tract colonization or a persistent environmental source of contamination.

  1. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2012-02-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed {beta}-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs.

  2. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  3. Characterization of five newly isolated bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Magdalena; Mizak, Lidia; Parasion, Sylwia; Gryko, Romuald; Olender, Alina; Niemcewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, especially in patients with immunodeficiency. It exhibits multiple mechanisms of resistance, including efflux pumps, antibiotic modifying enzymes and limited membrane permeability. The primary reason for the development of novel therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections is the declining efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy. These clinical problems caused a revitalization of interest in bacteriophages, which are highly specific and have very effective antibacterial activity as well as several other advantages over traditional antimicrobial agents. Above all, so far, no serious or irreversible side effects of phage therapy have been described. Five newly purified P. aeruginosa phages named vB_PaeM_WP1, vB_PaeM_WP2, vB_PaeM_WP3, vB_PaeM_WP4 and vB_PaeP_WP5 have been characterized as potential candidates for use in phage therapy. They are representatives of the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Their host range, genome size, structural proteins and stability in various physical and chemical conditions were tested. The results of these preliminary investigations indicate that the newly isolated bacteriophages may be considered for use in phagotherapy.

  4. Low concentrations of ethanol stimulate biofilm and pellicle formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Inagaki, Aya; Ono, Kaori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Yawata, Yutaka; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of surface-attached microbial cells that resist environmental stresses. In this study, we found that low concentrations of ethanol increase biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 but not in a mutant of it lacking both Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides. Low concentrations of ethanol also increased pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface.

  5. Identification of extensive drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: New clone ST1725 and high-risk clone ST233

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Rodea, Pamela; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Olivares Cervantes, Alma Lidia; Gamiño Arroyo, Ana Estela; Moreno-Espinosa, Sarbelio; de la Rosa Zamboni, Daniela; López Martínez, Briceida; Castellanos-Cruz, María del Carmen; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Jiménez Rojas, Verónica Leticia; Vigueras Galindo, Juan Carlos; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Several microorganisms produce nosocomial infections (NIs), among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa stands out as an opportunist pathogen with the capacity to develop multiresistance to first-choice antibiotics. From 2007 to 2013, forty-six NIs produced by P. aeruginosa were detected at a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Mexico with a significant mortality rate (17.39%). All isolates (n = 58/46 patients) were characterized by evaluating their response to several antibiotics as panresistant (PDR), extensively resistant (XDR), multiresistant (MDR) or sensitive (S). In addition, all isolates were typified through multilocus sequencing of seven genes: acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE. Furthermore, to establish the genetic relationships among these isolates, we carried out a phylogenetic inference analysis using maximum likelihood to construct a phylogenetic network. To assess evolutionary parameters, recombination was evaluated using the PHI test, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions was determined. Two of the strains were PDR (ST1725); 42 were XDR; four were MDR; and ten were S. Twenty-one new sequence types were detected. Thirty-three strains exhibited novel sequence type ST1725. The ratio of nonsynonym to synonym substitutions was 1:1 considering all genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic relationship of the PDR, XDR and MDR strains was mainly clonal; however, the PHI test and the phylogenetic network suggest that recombination events occurred to produce a non-clonal population. This study aimed not only to determine the genetic diversity of clinical P. aeruginosa but also to provide a warning regarding the identification and spreading of clone ST1725, its ability to cause outbreaks with high mortality rates, and to remain in the hospital environment for over seven years. These characteristics highlight the need to identify clonal outbreaks, especially where high resistance to most antibiotics is observed, and control

  6. Art-175 is a highly efficient antibacterial against multidrug-resistant strains and persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Walmagh, Maarten; Grymonprez, Barbara; Biebl, Manfred; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Defraine, Valerie; Michiels, Jan; Cenens, William; Aertsen, Abram; Miller, Stefan; Lavigne, Rob

    2014-07-01

    Artilysins constitute a novel class of efficient enzyme-based antibacterials. Specifically, they covalently combine a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, which degrades the peptidoglycan, with a targeting peptide that transports the endolysin through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Art-085, as well as Art-175, its optimized homolog with increased thermostability, are each composed of the sheep myeloid 29-amino acid (SMAP-29) peptide fused to the KZ144 endolysin. In contrast to KZ144, Art-085 and Art-175 pass the outer membrane and kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains, in a rapid and efficient (∼ 5 log units) manner. Time-lapse microscopy confirms that Art-175 punctures the peptidoglycan layer within 1 min, inducing a bulging membrane and complete lysis. Art-175 is highly refractory to resistance development by naturally occurring mutations. In addition, the resistance mechanisms against 21 therapeutically used antibiotics do not show cross-resistance to Art-175. Since Art-175 does not require an active metabolism for its activity, it has a superior bactericidal effect against P. aeruginosa persisters (up to >4 log units compared to that of the untreated controls). In summary, Art-175 is a novel antibacterial that is well suited for a broad range of applications in hygiene and veterinary and human medicine, with a unique potential to target persister-driven chronic infections.

  7. A Galleria mellonella infection model reveals double and triple antibiotic combination therapies with enhanced efficacy versus a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Krezdorn, Jessica; Adams, Sophie; Coote, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effect of antibiotic combinations in vitro with efficacy in Galleria mellonella larvae in vivo to identify efficacious combinations that target Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa NCTC 13437, a multidrug-resistant strain resistant to β-lactams and aminoglycosides, was used. Susceptibility to cefotaxime, piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin and colistin alone, or in dual or triple combinations, was measured in vitro via a 24 h time-kill assay. In vitro results were then compared with the efficacy of the same dual or triple antibiotic combinations versus G. mellonella larvae infected with P. aeruginosa. G. mellonella haemolymph burden of P. aeruginosa was determined over 96 h post-infection and treatment with the most potent combination therapies. Many dual and triple combinations of antibiotics displayed synergistic inhibition of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in vitro. There was little correlation between combinations that were synergistic in vitro and those that showed enhanced efficacy in vivo versus infected G. mellonella larvae. The most potent dual and triple combinations in vivo were cefotaxime plus piperacillin, and meropenem plus piperacillin and amikacin, respectively. Fewer combinations were found to offer enhanced therapeutic benefit in vivo compared with in vitro. The therapeutic benefit arising from treatment with antibiotic combinations in vivo correlated with reduced larval burden of P. aeruginosa. This study has identified antibiotic combinations that merit further investigation for their clinical potential and has demonstrated the utility of using G. mellonella to screen for novel antibiotic treatments that demonstrate efficacy in vivo.

  8. The exopolysaccharide alginate protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from IFN-gamma-mediated macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Leid, Jeff G; Willson, Carey J; Shirtliff, Mark E; Hassett, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Jeffers, Alyssa K

    2005-12-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilms and cause chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is well documented. Numerous studies have revealed that P. aeruginosa biofilms are highly refractory to antibiotics. However, dramatically fewer studies have addressed P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance to the host's immune system. In planktonic, unattached (nonbiofilm) P. aeruginosa, the exopolysaccharide alginate provides protection against a variety of host factors yet the role of alginate in protection of biofilm bacteria is unclear. To address this issue, we tested wild-type strains PAO1, PA14, the mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate, FRD1 (mucA22+), and the respective isogenic mutants which lacked the ability to produce alginate, for their susceptibility to human leukocytes in the presence and absence of IFN-gamma. Human leukocytes, in the presence of recombinant human IFN-gamma, killed biofilm bacteria lacking alginate after a 4-h challenge at 37 degrees C. Bacterial killing was dependent on the presence of IFN-gamma. Killing of the alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was mediated through mononuclear cell phagocytosis since treatment with cytochalasin B, which prevents actin polymerization, inhibited leukocyte-specific bacterial killing. By direct microscopic observation, phagocytosis of alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was significantly increased in the presence of IFN-gamma vs all other treatments. Addition of exogenous, purified alginate to the alginate-negative biofilms restored resistance to human leukocyte killing. Our results suggest that although alginate may not play a significant role in bacterial attachment, biofilm development, and formation, it may play an important role in protecting mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from the human immune system.

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF MICROCYSTIN TOXINS FROM A STRAIN OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY INTRODUCTION INTO A HYBRID LINEAR ION TRAP-FOURIER TRANSFORM ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cyclic heptapeptide microcystin toxins produced by a strain of Microcystis aeruginosa that has not been investigated previously were separated by liquid chromatography and identified by high-accuracy m/z measurements of their [M + H]+ ions and the fragment i...

  10. [The biological kinetics of biofilms of clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa separated from patients with bronchopulmonary complications under traumatic disease of spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Ul'ianov, V Iu; Opredelentseva, S V; Shvidenko, I G; Norkin, I A; Korshunov, G V; Gladkova, E V

    2014-08-01

    The capacity and intensity of formation of microbial biofilms was analyzed in 24 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in static conditions of cultivation during 24, 48, 72 and 96 yours. The microorganisms were separated from patients with bronchopulmonary infectious complications in acute and early periods of traumatic disease of spinal cord.

  11. Unusual non-fluorescent broad spectrum siderophore activity (SID EGYII) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 and a new insight towards simple siderophore bioassay.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Present study highlights an unusual non-fluorescent hydroxamate broad spectrum siderophore (SID EGYII) activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801, a soil bacterial isolate, along with simple low cost effective siderophore bioassay. Detection of SID EGYII activity qualitatively was proved by masking this activity against Erwinia amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800, an indicator strain, in well-cut diffusion assay containing 100 µM FeCl3. SID EGYII activity was expressed quantitatively as arbitrary units [Siderophore arbitrary units (SAU)] 380 SAU/mL against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. Maximal SID EGYII activity was achieved upon growing P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 in PYB broth at 180 rpm for 24 h. SID EGYII displayed a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against some human pathogens (i.e., Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts) and a fireblight plant pathogen. Interestingly, transformants of Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3)pSID/EGYII harboring P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 plasmid demonstrated a perceivable antimicrobial activity against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. The broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the unusual non-fluorescent SID EGYII would underpin its high potential in targeting bacterial pathogens posing probable threats to human health and agricultural economy. The present simple low cost effective bioassay is a new insight towards an alternative to the expensive cumbersome siderophore Chrome Azurol S assay.

  12. Emerging and existing mechanisms co-operate in generating diverse β-lactam resistance phenotypes in geographically dispersed and genetically disparate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena; Pérez, Javier Escobar; Márquez, Carolina; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Centrón, Daniela; Leal, Aura L; Saavedra, Carlos; Saavedra, Sandra Y; Tovar, Catalina; Vanegas, Natasha; Stokes, H W

    2013-09-01

    β-Lactam resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates is driven by a number of mechanisms. Whilst several are understood, how they act co-operatively in pathogenic strains is less clear. In some isolates, resistance profiles cannot always be explained by identifying the common resistance-determining pathways, suggesting that other mechanisms may be important. Pathogenic P. aeruginosa isolates from four countries were characterised by PCR. Quantitative expression analysis was also assessed for the activity of several pathways that influence antibiotic resistance, and culture experiments were conducted to test how random transposition of the insertion sequence IS26 during growth may influence resistance to some antibiotics. In most strains, antibiotic resistance was being driven by changes in multiple pathways and by the presence or absence of genes acquired by lateral gene transfer. Multiple mechanisms of resistance were prevalent in strains from all of the countries examined, although regional differences in the type of interacting mechanisms were apparent. Changes in chromosomal pathways included overexpression of AmpC and two efflux pumps. Also, gain or loss of IS26 at some chromosomal locations, most notably oprD, could influence resistance to carbapenems. IS26-related resistance was found in strains from Argentina and geographically linked Uruguay, but not in strains from either Colombia or Australia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenic strains are evolving to become multidrug-resistant in more complex ways. This is being influenced by single strains acquiring changes in numerous known pathways as well as by newly emerging resistance mechanisms in this species.

  13. [Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, N G; Marengo, J M; Rentería, F; Gatti, B; Segal, E; Semorile, L

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quistica functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La Plata, cares almost 220 patients aged two months to 45 years. The life expectancy depends of factors like the early diagnosis of the disease and the later acquisition of the chronic lung infection. The purpose of this work was the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to evaluate the genomic relationship among them. The study was carried out using RAPD-PCR. The analysis showed a great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates. The separation of the patients in groups in accordance with its bacteriology, that implies the attendance in different days and the implementation of isolation (or segregation) measures had demonstrated to be, in addition to other strategies, effective in the reduction of cross infections.

  14. Reconstruction of the metabolic network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to interrogate virulence factor synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartell, Jennifer A.; Blazier, Anna S.; Yen, Phillip; Thøgersen, Juliane C.; Jelsbak, Lars; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence-linked pathways in opportunistic pathogens are putative therapeutic targets that may be associated with less potential for resistance than targets in growth-essential pathways. However, efficacy of virulence-linked targets may be affected by the contribution of virulence-related genes to metabolism. We evaluate the complex interrelationships between growth and virulence-linked pathways using a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 and an updated, expanded reconstruction of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The PA14 reconstruction accounts for the activity of 112 virulence-linked genes and virulence factor synthesis pathways that produce 17 unique compounds. We integrate eight published genome-scale mutant screens to validate gene essentiality predictions in rich media, contextualize intra-screen discrepancies and evaluate virulence-linked gene distribution across essentiality datasets. Computational screening further elucidates interconnectivity between inhibition of virulence factor synthesis and growth. Successful validation of selected gene perturbations using PA14 transposon mutants demonstrates the utility of model-driven screening of therapeutic targets. PMID:28266498

  15. Reconstruction of the metabolic network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to interrogate virulence factor synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartell, Jennifer A.; Blazier, Anna S.; Yen, Phillip; Thøgersen, Juliane C.; Jelsbak, Lars; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2017-03-01

    Virulence-linked pathways in opportunistic pathogens are putative therapeutic targets that may be associated with less potential for resistance than targets in growth-essential pathways. However, efficacy of virulence-linked targets may be affected by the contribution of virulence-related genes to metabolism. We evaluate the complex interrelationships between growth and virulence-linked pathways using a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 and an updated, expanded reconstruction of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The PA14 reconstruction accounts for the activity of 112 virulence-linked genes and virulence factor synthesis pathways that produce 17 unique compounds. We integrate eight published genome-scale mutant screens to validate gene essentiality predictions in rich media, contextualize intra-screen discrepancies and evaluate virulence-linked gene distribution across essentiality datasets. Computational screening further elucidates interconnectivity between inhibition of virulence factor synthesis and growth. Successful validation of selected gene perturbations using PA14 transposon mutants demonstrates the utility of model-driven screening of therapeutic targets.

  16. Sensitive and specific modified Hodge test for KPC and metallo-beta- lactamase detection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by use of a novel indicator strain, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 700603.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Veliz, Omar; Rapoport, Melina; Guerriero, Leonor; Corso, Alejandra

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated the ability of the modified Hodge test to discriminate between KPC- and metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and carbapenemase nonproducers. With Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 as the indicator strain, the MHT resulted in low sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability. Replacing the indicator strain with Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 700603 led to an improved performance (100%, 97%, 0%, and 100% sensitivity, specificity, indeterminate results and repeatability, respectively).

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain WI-1 from Mandovi estuary possesses metallothionein to alleviate lead toxicity and promotes plant growth.

    PubMed

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Pandey, Anju; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2012-05-01

    A bacterial isolate from Mandovi estuary Goa, India, which can resist 0.6mM lead nitrate in Tris-buffered minimal medium was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and designated as strain WI-1. PCR amplification clearly revealed presence of bmtA gene encoding bacterial metallothionein responsible for metal sequestration and AAS analysis proved intracellular bioaccumulation of 26.5mg lead/gram dry weight of cells. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed lead induced bacterial metallothionein with molecular weight 11 kDa, which corresponds to the predicted bmtA gene. Significant growth inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum NCIM 1008 by siderophore-rich culture supernatant was also observed. Pot experiment with Pisum sativum L inoculated with this strain revealed higher seed germination percentage and significant growth promotion than uninoculated seeds in a soil amended with 7.704 g/kg lead, which indicates amelioration of lead toxicity. This lead resistant strain showed cross tolerance to cadmium, mercury and Tributyltin chloride (TBTC) along with resistance to multiple antibiotics.

  18. Quorum Sensing N-acyl Homoserine Lactones-SdiA Suppresses Escherichia coli-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Conjugation through Inhibiting traI Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Zeng, Jianming; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Wang, Lina; Cai, Renxin; Zhang, Ni; Li, Youqiang; Huang, Xianzhang; Huang, Bin; Chen, Cha

    2017-01-01

    Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer and plays an important role in bacterial evolution, especially with respect to antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about the role of donor and recipient cells in regulation of conjugation. Here, using an Escherichia coli (SM10λπ)-Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) conjugation model, we demonstrated that deficiency of lasI/rhlI, genes associated with generation of the quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in PAO1, or deletion of the AHLs receptor SdiA in the donor SM10λπ both facilitated conjugation. When using another AHLs-non-producing E. coli strain EC600 as recipient cells, deficiency of sdiA in donor SM10λπ hardly affect the conjugation. More importantly, in the presence of exogenous AHLs, the conjugation efficiency between SM10λπ and EC600 was dramatically decreased, while deficiency of sdiA in SM10λπ attenuated AHLs-inhibited conjugation. These data suggest the conjugation suppression function of AHLs-SdiA chemical signaling. Further bioinformatics analysis, β-galactosidase reporter system and electrophoretic mobility shift assays characterized the binding site of SdiA on the promoter region of traI gene. Furthermore, deletion of lasI/rhlI or sdiA promoted traI mRNA expression in SM10λπ and PAO1 co-culture system, which was abrogated by AHLs. Collectively, our results provide new insight into an important contribution of quorum sensing system AHLs-SdiA to the networks that regulate conjugation. PMID:28164039

  19. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Claudia; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Stella, Ariel Eurides; Rigobelo, Everlon Cid; Marin, José Moacir; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains) and water system (71 strains), were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted. PMID:24031269

  20. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  1. Development and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro coupled transcription-translation assay system for evaluation of translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Corey; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.; Grossman, Trudy H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription and translation have proven to be effective targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapies owing to the critical role they play in bacterial propagation and the overall conservation of the associated machinery involved. Escherichia coli is the most common source of S30 extract used in bacterial in vitro coupled transcription-translation assays, however, transcription-translation assays in other important pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae have been described (Murray et al., 2001; Dandliker et al., 2003). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important and difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogen. In a drug discovery program, to de-risk any potential species specificity of novel inhibitors, we developed and optimized a robust method for the preparation of S30 extract from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. Further, a P. aeruginosa transcription-translation assay using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid was validated and compared to an E. coli S30-based system using a wide range of antibiotics encompassing multiple classes of translation inhibitors. Results showed a similar ranking of the activities of known inhibitors, illustrative of the high degree of conservation between the transcription-translation pathways in both organisms. PMID:22677604

  2. Evaluation of the in vitro colistin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains at a tertiary care centre in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ece, Gulfem; Samlioglu, Pinar; Atalay, Sabri; Kose, Sukran

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria are an important issue in intensive care units worldwide. Colistin, one of the earliest polymyxin antibiotics, was once widely used for the treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. However, its use is now limited due to concerns over nephrotoxicity. The appearance of multidrug-resistant species, including A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, has led to the re-emergence of this class of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to colistin and other antibiotics. The antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to colistin and other antibiotics was evaluated between January 2011 and October 2012 at Tepecik Education and Research Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Clinical isolates were identified using an automatized Vitek 2.0 system. Colistin susceptibility was measured by E-test; the susceptibility profiles of other antibiotics were evaluated using the Kirby Bauer disk-diffusion method. A total of 149 isolates were included in the study, consisting of 98 A. baumannii and 51 P. aeruginosa isolates. The MICs of colistin against A. baumannii were 0.125-2.0 mcg/mL, and 0.25-2.0 mcg/mL against P. aeruginosa; all multidrug-resistant strains examined in this study were susceptible to colistin. Recently, colistin has re-emerged as an effective treatment for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All isolates examined in this study were susceptible to colistin, suggesting it could be a viable alternative for the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant strains.

  3. Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Development: Designing Dual Epitopes into a Single Pilin Peptide Immunogen Generates Antibody Cross-reactivity between Two Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, Clifton; Hodges, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main challenges of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccine development is the design of an antigen that elicits cross-reactive antibodies against multiple virulent strains. Using a rational design approach, we have developed a single 17-residue peptide immunogen that generates antibodies that target the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of more than one strain of P. aeruginosa. Using the RBD sequence, of native strain PAO as a template, we have systematically changed up to five residues in the PAO sequence of the peptide immunogen, into that of the PAK sequence. We show by indirect and competitive ELISA, that the mutant peptide immunogens elicit the development of polyclonal sera that is cross-reactive to both native strain PAO and PAK pilin. We further show that there are at least two separate antibody populations in the polyclonal sera that possess closely-related epitopes but which are each strain specific. Moreover, part of the epitope for the PAO specific antibodies consists of several residues outside the disulfide loop of the receptor binding domain. This allows us to create two unique epitopes within the same receptor binding domain sequence. PMID:20807222

  4. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  5. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Bryan A.; Ramsay, Kay A.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Whiley, David M.; Beatson, Scott A.; Bell, Scott C.

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment. PMID:28273168

  6. Within-host whole genome analysis of an antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain sub-type in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tai, Anna S; Wee, Bryan A; Ramsay, Kay A; Kidd, Timothy J; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Whiley, David M; Beatson, Scott A; Bell, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa AUST-02 strain sub-type (M3L7) has been identified in Australia, infects the lungs of some people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with antibiotic resistance. Multiple clonal lineages may emerge during treatment with mutations in chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes commonly observed. Here we describe the within-host diversity and antibiotic resistance of M3L7 during and after antibiotic treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation using whole genome sequencing and show both variation and shared mutations in important genes. Eleven isolates from an M3L7 population (n = 134) isolated over 3 months from an individual with cystic fibrosis underwent whole genome sequencing. A phylogeny based on core genome SNPs identified three distinct phylogenetic groups comprising two groups with higher rates of mutation (hypermutators) and one non-hypermutator group. Genomes were screened for acquired antibiotic resistance genes with the result suggesting that M3L7 resistance is principally driven by chromosomal mutations as no acquired mechanisms were detected. Small genetic variations, shared by all 11 isolates, were found in 49 genes associated with antibiotic resistance including frame-shift mutations (mexA, mexT), premature stop codons (oprD, mexB) and mutations in quinolone-resistance determining regions (gyrA, parE). However, whole genome sequencing also revealed mutations in 21 genes that were acquired following divergence of groups, which may also impact the activity of antibiotics and multi-drug efflux pumps. Comparison of mutations with minimum inhibitory concentrations of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics could not easily explain all resistance profiles observed. These data further demonstrate the complexity of chronic and antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa infection where a multitude of co-existing genotypically diverse sub-lineages might co-exist during and after intravenous antibiotic treatment.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain MA01 aerobically metabolizes the aminodinitrotoluenes produced by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene nitro group reduction.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M A; Kitts, C L; Botsford, J L; Unkefer, P J

    1995-11-01

    Many microbes reduce the nitro substituents of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), producing aminodinitrotoluenes (ADNTs). These compounds are recalcitrant to further breakdown and are acutely toxic. In a search for organisms capable of metabolizing ADNTs, a bacterial strain was isolated for the ability to use 2-aminobenzoate (anthranilate) as sole C-source. This isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01, metabolized TNT by first reducing one nitro group to form either 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT) or 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT). However, strain MA01 was distinct from other TNT-reducing organisms in that it transformed these compounds into highly polar metabolites through an O2-dependent process. Strain MA01 was able to cometabolize TNT, 2ADNT, and 4ADNT in the presence of a variety of carbon and energy sources. During aerobic cometabolism with succinate, 45% of uniformly ring-labeled [14C]TNT was transformed to highly polar compounds. Aerobic cometabolism of purified [14C]2ADNT and [14C]4ADNT with succinate as C-source produced similar amounts of these polar metabolites. During O2-limited cometabolism with succinate as C-source and nitrate as electron acceptor, less than 8% of the [14C]TNT was transformed to polar metabolites. Purified 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene was not metabolized, and while 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was acetylated, the product (N-acetyl-2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene) was not further metabolized. Therefore, strain MA01 metabolized TNT by oxidation of the ADNTs and not by reduction the remaining nitro groups on the ADNTs.

  8. Antibacterial compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40, an endophytic bacterium isolated from Neesia altissima.

    PubMed

    Pratiwi, Rina Hidayati; Hidayat, Iman; Hanafi, Muhammad; Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo

    2017-04-01

    This study's aim was to determine the identity of antibacterial compounds produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40 and describe the antibacterial compounds' mechanisms of action for damaging pathogenic bacteria cells. Isolation and identification of the compounds were carried out using thin layer chromatography (TLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. Antibacterial activity was assayed via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the antibacterial compound mechanism was observed morphologically through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study successfully identified the (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate antibacterial compound (molecular weight 300 g/mol), composed of a phenolic ester, fatty acid and long chain of aliphatic group structures. MIC values for this compound were determined at 62.5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus strain ATCC 25923. The mechanism of the compound involved breaking down the bacterial cell walls through the lysis process. The (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate compound exhibited inhibitory activity on the growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Conjugal transfer of R68.45 and FP5 between Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a freshwater environment.

    PubMed Central

    O'Morchoe, S B; Ogunseitan, O; Sayler, G S; Miller, R V

    1988-01-01

    Recent concern over the release of genetically engineered organisms has resulted in a need for information about the potential for gene transfer in the environment. In this study, the conjugal transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa of the plasmids R68.45 and FP5 was demonstrated in the freshwater environment of Fort Loudoun Resevoir, Knoxville, Tenn. When genetically well defined plasmid donor and recipient strains were introduced into test chambers suspended in Fort Loudoun Lake, transfer of both plasmids was observed. Conjugation occurred in both the presence and absence of the natural microbial community. The number of transconjugants recovered was lower when the natural community was present. Transfer of the broad-host-range plasmid R68.45 to organisms other than the introduced recipient was not observed in these chambers but was observed in laboratory simulations when an organism isolated from lakewater was used as the recipient strain. Although the plasmids transferred in laboratory studies were genetically and physically stable, a significant number of transconjugants recovered from the field trials contained deletions and other genetic rearrangements, suggesting that factors which increase gene instability are operating in the environment. The potential for conjugal transfer of genetic material must be considered in evaluating the release of any genetically engineered microorganism into a freshwater environment. Images PMID:3140724

  10. Effects of culture conditions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB on the synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) was synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB in a culture containing lactic acid as a carbon source, 1 mM selenite, and 1 mM cadmium under various conditions. High purity (1.02-1.16 of the atomic ratio of Se to Cd) and efficient synthesis of biogenic CdSe nanoparticles were observed at 25-30°C, 0.05-10 g L(-1) NaCl, and neutral pH conditions compared with other tested conditions. However, the size and shape of synthesized CdSe nanoparticles were not changed by changing culture conditions. The contents of S and Se in the particles respectively increased under alkaline and weak acidic conditions. Furthermore, high temperature (>37°C), high salinity (>10 g L(-1) NaCl), and alkaline pH affected the CdSe-synthesizing rate by strain RB. This report is the first optimizing the culture conditions for synthesizing biogenic CdSe nanoparticles in a batch processing.

  11. Large Preferred Region for Packaging of Bacterial DNA by phiC725A, a Novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa F116-Like Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Pourcel, Christine; Midoux, Cédric; Hauck, Yolande; Vergnaud, Gilles; Latino, Libera

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage vB_PaeP_PAO1_phiC725A (short name phiC725A) was isolated following mitomycin C induction of C7-25, a clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain carrying phiC725A as a prophage. The phiC725A genome sequence shows similarity to F116, a P. aeruginosa podovirus capable of generalized transduction. Likewise, phiC725A is a podovirus with long tail fibers. PhiC725A was able to lysogenize two additional P. aeruginosa strains in which it was maintained both as a prophage and in an episomal state. Investigation by deep sequencing showed that bacterial DNA carried inside phage particles originated predominantly from a 700-800kb region, immediately flanking the attL prophage insertion site, whether the phages were induced from a lysogen or recovered after infection. This indicates that during productive replication, recombination of phage genomes with the bacterial chromosome at the att site occurs occasionally, allowing packaging of adjacent bacterial DNA. PMID:28060939

  12. Contribution of the platelet activating factor signaling pathway to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction during experimental sepsis by ExoU producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, Maria Cristina; Estato, Vanessa; Santos, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Mauricio Costa Alves; Miranda, Aline Silva; de Miranda, Pedro Elias; Pinho, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Morandi, Verônica; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Vianna, Albanita; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy was used to assess the involvement of ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, in dysfunction of cerebral microcirculation during experimental pneumosepsis. Cortical vessels from mice intratracheally infected with low density of the ExoU-producing PA103 P. aeruginosa strain exhibited increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venule endothelium, decreased capillar density and impaired arteriolar response to vasoactive acetylcholine. These phenomena were mediated by the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) pathway because they were reversed in mice treated with a PAFR antagonist prior to infection. Brains from PA103-infected animals exhibited a perivascular inflammatory infiltration that was not detected in animals infected with an exoU deficient mutant or in mice treated with the PAFR antagonist and infected with the wild type bacteria. No effect on brain capillary density was detected in mice infected with the PAO1 P. aeruginosa strain, which do not produce ExoU. Finally, after PA103 infection, mice with a targeted deletion of the PAFR gene exhibited higher brain capillary density and lower leukocyte adhesion to venule endothelium, as well as lower increase of systemic inflammatory cytokines, when compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, our results establish a role for PAFR in mediating ExoU-induced cerebral microvascular failure in a murine model of sepsis. PMID:26187894

  13. Assessing phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a Galleria mellonella infection model.

    PubMed

    Beeton, M L; Alves, D R; Enright, M C; Jenkins, A T A

    2015-08-01

    The Galleria mellonella infection model was used to assess the in vivo efficacy of phage therapy against laboratory and clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a first series of experiments, Galleria were infected with the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 and were treated with varying multiplicity of infection (MOI) of phages either 2h post-infection (treatment) or 2h pre-infection (prevention) via injection into the haemolymph. To address the kinetics of infection, larvae were bled over a period of 24h for quantification of bacteria and phages. Survival rates at 24h when infected with 10 cells/larvae were greater in the prevention versus treatment model (47% vs. 40%, MOI=10; 47% vs. 20%, MOI=1; and 33% vs. 7%, MOI=0.1). This pattern held true when 100 cells/larvae were used (87% vs. 20%, MOI=10; 53% vs. 13%, MOI=1; 67% vs. 7%, MOI=0.1). By 24h post-infection, phages kept bacterial cell numbers in the haemolymph 1000-fold lower than in the non-treated group. In a second series of experiments using clinical strains to further validate the prevention model, phages protected Galleria when infected with both a bacteraemia (0% vs. 85%) and a cystic fibrosis (80% vs. 100%) isolate. Therefore, this study validates the use of G. mellonella as a simple, robust and cost-effective model for initial in vivo examination of P. aeruginosa-targeted phage therapy, which may be applied to other pathogens with similarly low infective doses.

  14. Quality Control for β-Lactam Susceptibility Testing with a Well-Defined Collection of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Rafael; Loza, Elena; Del Carmen Conejo, María; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, 16 of them with well-defined β-lactam re sistance mechanisms, were sent to 52 Spanish microbiology laboratories. Interpretative categories for 8 extended-spectrum β-lactams were collected. Participating laboratories used their own routine susceptibility testing procedures (88% automatic systems, 10% disk diffusion, and 2% agar dilution). Control results were established by two independent reference laboratories by applying the NCCLS microdilution method and interpretative criteria. Interpretative discrepancies were observed in 16% of the results (4.4% for cefepime, 3.0% for aztreonam, 2.8% for piperacillin-tazobactam, 1.7% for cefotaxime [CTX] and ceftazidime, 1.1% for ceftriaxone, 0.9% for meropenem, and 0.3% for imipenem). High consistency with reference values (<5% of major plus very major errors) was observed with (i) American Type Culture Collection quality control strains; (ii) strains with low-efficiency mechanisms inactivating extended-spectrum β-lactams, such as OXA-1-producing Escherichiacoli or SHV-1-hyperproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae; (iii) strains with highly efficient mechanisms, such as SHV-5 porin-deficient K. pneumoniae, CTX-M-10 in Enterobacter cloacae hyperproducing AmpC, and P. aeruginosa with the MexAB OprM efflux phenotype or hyperproducing AmpC. Low consistency (>30% major plus very major errors) was detected in K1-producing Klebsiella oxytoca, CTX-M-9-producing E. coli, and in OprD− P. aeruginosa strains. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains accounted for 86% of very major errors. Recognition of the ESBL phenotype was particularly low in Enterobacter cloacae strains (<35%), due to the lack of NCCLS-specific rules in this genus. A K1-producing K. oxytoca was misidentified by 10% of laboratories as an ESBL producer. The use of well-defined resistant strains is useful for improving proficiency in susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories. PMID

  15. Surface-active potential of biosurfactants produced in curd whey by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain-PP2 and Kocuria turfanesis strain-J at extreme environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kirti V; Charde, Pravin N; Meshram, Sudhir U; Shendre, Latika P; Dubey, Vijay S; Juwarkar, Asha A

    2012-12-01

    Surface-active potential of biosurfactants produced cost-effectively in curd whey by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain-PP2 and Kocuria turfanesis strain-J were tested using parameters viz. surface tension (ST) reduction, F(CMC) (highest dilution factor to reach critical micelle concentration) and emulsification index (EI-24) of pesticides; monocrotophos and imidacloprid at extreme environmental conditions. Results have shown that ST reduction of biosurfactants was stable at pH 2-11. High F(CMC) of the biosurfactant in the fermented whey at low pH improved emulsification of pesticides. ST marginally increased at 5% and 15% NaCl, resulting in high EI-24 and F(CMC). Over a range of temperatures 30-121 °C, ST remained low with a higher F(CMC) and EI-24 at 60 °C than at 121 and 30 °C. The biosurfactants have shown differences in their surface-active property and have marked specificity to emulsify pesticides in extreme environmental conditions.

  16. Role of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) in sensitising Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Meichtry, Martín; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2015-01-01

    One of the main stress factors that bacteria face in the environment is solar ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation, which leads to lethal effects through oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxi-4-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal or PQS) in the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation. PQS is an intercellular quorum sensing signal associated to membrane vesicles which, among other functions, regulates genes related to iron acquisition, forms stable complexes with iron and participates in oxidative phenomena. UVA exposure of the wild-type PAO1 strain and a pqsA mutant unable to produce PQS revealed a sensitising role for this signal. Research into the mechanism involved in this phenomenon revealed that catalase, an essential factor in the UVA defence, is not related to PQS-mediated UVA sensitivity. Absorption of UVA by PQS produced its own photo-degradation, oxidation of the probe 2',7'- dichlorodihydrofluorescein and generation of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion, suggesting that this signal could be acting as an endogenous photosensitiser. The results presented in this study could explain the high sensitivity to UVA of P. aeruginosa when compared to enteric bacteria.

  17. Pel promotes symmetric, short-ranged surface attachment in P. aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, B. J.; Thatcher, Travis; Hashmi, Sara; L'Her, Guillaume; Touhami, Ahmed; Provenzano, Daniele; Gordon, Vernita

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are surface mounted, multicellular communities of interacting bacteria that are often associated with chronic infections that resist antibiotics and damage host tissue. Bacteria in a biofilm are bound in a matrix of polymeric materials that adhere the bacteria to the surface, give the system spatial structure, and cluster the bacteria near each other. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is widely studied as a model biofilm-forming organism. The polymeric matrix of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 biofilms is dominated by two bacteria-produced extracellular polymers, Pel and Psl. We use both optical and atomic force microscopy to examine the roles of these polymers in very early biofilm development, in the hours after initial surface attachment. In agreement with other researchers, we find that Psl mediates strong attachment to a glass surface. Unexpectedly, we find that Pel promotes symmetric attachment, in the form of the rod-shaped bacteria lying flat on the surface, independently of permanent attachment to the surface. Further, the presence of Pel makes adhesion forces more short-ranged than they are with Psl alone. We suggest that these effects may result through synergistic interactions of Pel and Psl in the polymeric matrix.

  18. Synthetic analogs of rhamnolipids modulate structured biofilms formed by rhamnolipid-nonproducing mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hewen; Singh, Nischal; Shetye, Gauri S; Jin, Yucheng; Li, Diana; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2017-03-15

    Rhamnolipids secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are required for the bacteria to form biofilm efficiently and form biofilm with internal structures including pores and channels. In this work, we explore the effect of a class of synthetic analogs of rhamnolipids at controlling (promoting and inhibiting) the biofilm formation activities of a non-rhamnolipid-producing strain - rhlA - of P. aeruginosa. This class of rhamnolipid analogs is known to modulate the swarming motilities of wild-type PAO1 and rhlA mutant, but its effect on biofilm formation of rhlA mutant is unknown. We show that small structural details of these molecules are important for the bioactivities, but do not affect the general physical properties of the molecules. The bioactive synthetic analogs of rhamnolipids promote biofilm formation by rhlA mutant at low concentrations, but inhibit the biofilm formation at high concentrations. To explore the internal structures formed by the biofilms, we first demonstrate that wild-type biofilms are formed with substantial topography (hills and valleys) when the sample is under shaking conditions. Using this observation as a comparison, we found that synthetic analogs of rhamnolipids promoted structured (porous) biofilm of rhlA mutant, at intermediate concentrations between the low ones that promoted biofilm formation and the high ones that inhibited biofilm formation. This study suggests a potential chemical signaling approach to control multiple bacterial activities.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  20. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  1. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Metallo-β-Lactamase IMP-1 and VIM-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains From Different Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abiri, Ramin; Mohammadi, Pantea; Shavani, Navid; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosais a frequent nosocomial pathogen that causes severe diseases in many settings. Carbapenems, including meropenem and imipenem, are effective antibiotics against this organism. However, the use of carbapenems has been hampered by the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenemsvia different mechanisms such as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), which hydrolyze all carbapenems. Several kinds of MBLs have been reported, among them VIM and IMP types being the most clinically significant carbapenemases. Objectives: We aimed to determine the distribution of blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 transferable genes encoding MBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from three academic hospitals in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: From 22nd June to 22nd September 2012, 225 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected. These isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility with the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method, and the MBLs were assessed using the imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. The isolates were investigated for blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 genes using polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 225 isolates, 33.7% (76/225) and 18.1% (41/225) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Of the 76 imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, 45 (59.2%) were positive for MBLs, 34 (75%) strains carried the blaIMP-1 gene, and 1 (2.2%) strain carried the blaVIM-2 gene. Conclusions: Our results showed that there was a high frequency of IMP-1 positive P. aeruginosa in the different wards of the hospitals. PMID:26495110

  2. Comparative study on the in vitro effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and seaweed alginates on human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shaofeng; Chen, Huahai; Zhu, Liying; Liu, Wei; Yu, Hongwei D; Wang, Xin; Yin, Yeshi

    2017-01-01

    Alginates pertain to organic polysaccharides that have been extensively used in food- and medicine-related industries. The present study obtained alginates from an alginate overproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutant by screening transposon mutagenesis libraries. The interaction between bacterial and seaweed alginates and gut microbiota were further studied by using an in vitro batch fermentation system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis indicated that both bacterial and seaweed alginates can be completely degraded by fecal bacteria isolated from study volunteers, indicating that a minor structural difference between bacterial and seaweed alginates (O-acetylation and lack of G-G blocks) didn't affect the digestion of alginates by human microbiota. Although, the digestion of bacterial and seaweed alginates was attributed to different Bacteroides xylanisolvens strains, they harbored similar alginate lyase genes. Genus Bacteroides with alginate-degrading capability were enriched in growth medium containing bacterial or seaweed alginates after in vitro fermentation. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in both bacterial and seaweed alginates was also comparable, but was significantly higher than the same medium using starch. In summary, the present study has isolated an alginate-overproducing P. aeruginosa mutant strain. Both seaweed and bacterial alginates were degraded by human gut microbiota, and their regulatory function on gut microbiota was similar.

  3. Comparative study on the in vitro effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and seaweed alginates on human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shaofeng; Chen, Huahai; Zhu, Liying; Liu, Wei; Yu, Hongwei D.; Wang, Xin; Yin, Yeshi

    2017-01-01

    Alginates pertain to organic polysaccharides that have been extensively used in food- and medicine-related industries. The present study obtained alginates from an alginate overproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutant by screening transposon mutagenesis libraries. The interaction between bacterial and seaweed alginates and gut microbiota were further studied by using an in vitro batch fermentation system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis indicated that both bacterial and seaweed alginates can be completely degraded by fecal bacteria isolated from study volunteers, indicating that a minor structural difference between bacterial and seaweed alginates (O-acetylation and lack of G-G blocks) didn’t affect the digestion of alginates by human microbiota. Although, the digestion of bacterial and seaweed alginates was attributed to different Bacteroides xylanisolvens strains, they harbored similar alginate lyase genes. Genus Bacteroides with alginate-degrading capability were enriched in growth medium containing bacterial or seaweed alginates after in vitro fermentation. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in both bacterial and seaweed alginates was also comparable, but was significantly higher than the same medium using starch. In summary, the present study has isolated an alginate-overproducing P. aeruginosa mutant strain. Both seaweed and bacterial alginates were degraded by human gut microbiota, and their regulatory function on gut microbiota was similar. PMID:28170428

  4. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats.

  5. Changes in secondary metabolic profiles of Microcystis aeruginosa strains in response to intraspecific interactions

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Enora; Bormans, Myriam; Gugger, Muriel; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cyanobacteria Microcystis proliferate in freshwater ecosystems and produce bioactive compounds including the harmful toxins microcystins (MC). These secondary metabolites play an important role in shaping community composition through biotic interactions although their role and mode of regulation are poorly understood. As natural cyanobacterial populations include producing and non-producing strains, we tested if the production of a range of peptides by coexisting cells could be regulated through intraspecific interactions. With an innovative co-culturing chamber together with advanced mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, we monitored the growth and compared the metabolic profiles of a MC-producing as well as two non-MC-producing Microcystis strains under mono- and co-culture conditions. In monocultures, these strains grew comparably; however, the non-MC-producing mutant produced higher concentrations of cyanopeptolins, aerucyclamides and aeruginosins than the wild type. Physiological responses to co-culturing were reflected in a quantitative change in the production of the major peptides. Using a MS/MS-based molecular networking approach, we identified new analogues of known classes of peptides as well as new compounds. This work provides new insights into the factors that regulate the production of MC and other secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria, and suggests interchangeable or complementary functions allowing bloom-forming cyanobacteria to efficiently colonize and dominate in fluctuating aquatic environments. PMID:25980449

  6. Biochemical Characterization of Inducible 'Reductase' Component of Benzoate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Isomer Dioxygenases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Rohini; Badri, Abinaya; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-09-01

    The first step involved in the degradation of phthalate isomers (phthalate, isophthalate and terephthalate) is the double hydroxylation by respective aromatic-ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. These are two component enzymes consisting of 'oxygenase' and 'reductase' components. Soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 degrades phthalate isomers via protocatechuate and benzoate via catechol 'ortho' ring cleavage pathway. Metabolic studies suggest that strain PP4 has carbon source-specific inducible phthalate isomer dioxygenase and benzoate dioxygenase. Thus, it was of interest to study the properties of reductase components of these enzymes. Reductase activity from phthalate isomer-grown cells was 3-5-folds higher than benzoate grown cells. In-gel activity staining profile showed a reductase activity band of R f 0.56 for phthalate isomer-grown cells as compared to R f 0.73 from benzoate-grown cells. Partially purified reductase components from phthalate isomer grown cells showed K m in the range of 30-40 μM and V max = 34-48 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, reductase from benzoate grown cells showed K m = 49 μM and V max = 10 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). Strikingly similar molecular and kinetic properties of reductase component from phthalate isomer-grown cells suggest that probably the same reductase component is employed in three phthalate isomer dioxygenases. However, reductase component is different, with respect to kinetic properties and zymogram analysis, from benzoate-grown cells when compared to that from phthalate isomer grown cells of PP4.

  7. Characterization of lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from serotypes O3, O5, and O6.

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, T; de Kievit, T R; Masoud, H; Altman, E; Richards, J C; Sadovskaya, I; Speert, D P; Lam, J S

    1994-01-01

    Well-characterized rough mutants are important for the understanding of structures, functions, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in gram-negative organisms. In this study, three series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-deficient mutants, namely PAC strains derived from serotype O3, AK strains derived from strain PAO1 (serotype O5), and serotype O6-derived mutants were subjected to biochemical analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining as well as immunochemical characterization using LPS-specific monoclonal antibodies. The O-side-chain deficiency among the O6-derived mutants was also examined, and three mutants, A28, R5, and H4, were subsequently chosen for the elucidation of component sugars of the core structure of serotype O6 LPS. LPS of strain A28 has L-rhamnose and proportionally higher amounts of D-glucose, a feature shared by the O5-derived mutant, strain AK1401 (previously demonstrated as a mutant with a core-plus-one O repeat). In contrast strains R5 and H4 were shown to be devoid of L-rhamnose and have low and undetectable amounts of D-glucose, respectively, which indicated their core deficiency. The LPS-deficient or -sufficient characteristics of the P. aeruginosa strains examined correlated will with serum sensitivity data. This report represents a comprehensive analysis of rough mutants derived from O3 and O5 strains that have been used by others in many studies and a first look at the core oligosaccharide region of serotype O6 LPS obtained with the O6-derived mutants generated in this study. Images PMID:8112851

  8. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F.; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L.; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene. PMID:28298909

  9. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Faldu, P R; Kothari, V V; Kothari, C R; Rawal, C M; Domadia, K K; Patel, P A; Bhimani, H D; Raval, V H; Parmar, N R; Nathani, N M; Koringa, P G; Joshi, C G; Kothari, R K

    2014-02-06

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Faldu, P. R.; Kothari, V. V.; Kothari, C. R.; Rawal, C. M.; Domadia, K. K.; Patel, P. A.; Bhimani, H. D.; Raval, V. H.; Parmar, N. R.; Nathani, N. M.; Koringa, P. G.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye. PMID:24503984

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a high-affinity phosphate-binding protein endowed with phosphatase activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Djeghader, Ahmed; Gotthard, Guillaume; Suh, Andrew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    In prokaryotes, phosphate starvation induces the expression of numerous phosphate-responsive genes, such as the pst operon including the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP or pstS) and alkaline phosphatases such as PhoA. This response increases the cellular inorganic phosphate import efficiency. Notably, some Pseudomonas species secrete, via a type-2 secretion system, a phosphate-binding protein dubbed LapA endowed with phosphatase activity. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray data collection at 0.87 Å resolution of LapA are described. Combined with biochemical and enzymatic characterization, the structure of this intriguing phosphate-binding protein will help to elucidate the molecular origin of its phosphatase activity and to decipher its putative role in phosphate uptake.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanism is affected by capsular extracellular polymeric substances reactivity with chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Hessler, Christopher M; Panmanee, Warunya; Hassett, Daniel J; Seo, Youngwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to chlorine and monochloramine was assessed and compared in this study. The impact of capsular EPS on Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanisms was investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively using a combination of batch experiments, viability tests with LIVE/DEAD staining, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both wild-type and isogenic mutant strains with different alginate EPS production capabilities were used to evaluate their susceptibility to chlorine and monochloramine. The mucA22 mutant strain, which overproduces the EPS composed largely of acidic polysaccharide alginate, exhibited high resistance and prolonged inactivation time to both chlorine and monochloramine relative to PAO1 (wild-type) and algT(U) mutant strains (alginate EPS deficient). Multiple analyses were combined to better understand the mechanistic role of EPS against chlorine-based disinfectants. The extracted EPS exhibited high reactivity with chlorine and very low reactivity with monochloramine, suggesting different mechanism of protection against disinfectants. Moreover, capsular EPS on cell membrane appeared to reduce membrane permeabilization by disinfectants as suggested by deformation of key functional groups in EPS and cell membrane (the C-O-C stretching of carbohydrate and the C=O stretching of ester group). The combined results supported that capsular EPS, acting either as a disinfectant consumer (for chlorine inactivation) or limiting access to reactive sites on cell membrane (for monochloramine inactivation), provide a protective role for bacterial cells against regulatory residual disinfectants by reducing membrane permeabilization.

  14. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  15. MIC score, a new tool to compare bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics application to the comparison of susceptibility to different penems of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Maitte, Adeline; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Boutoille, David; Jacqueline, Cédric; Guitton, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the susceptibility to carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem and doripenem) of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It also studied whether susceptibility to imipenem or meropenem could predict, reliably, susceptibility to doripenem. Pseudomonal strains were collected from respiratory specimens, half of them from cystic fibrosis patients. MICs were determined according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing recommendations. Carbapenems were compared according to the susceptible, intermediate or resistant categories. A new approach also allowed comparing these carbapenems in a 'MIC score' taking into account the differences in breakpoints between drugs. One hundred thirty-nine strains were studied. They were found to be statistically more susceptible to meropenem than to the two other drugs. However, this difference was small: less than one dilution between the agents. This study also highlighted a significant correlation between susceptibility to penems taken in pairs. However, susceptibility to imipenem or meropenem did not reliably predict susceptibility to doripenem. Despite potential differences in resistance mechanisms, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed close susceptibility to three carbapenems. This was true for both cystic fibrosis patients and others. However, there were variations between strains. That justifies MICs to be determined for each of the three penems. This might be useful in case of elevated MICs and/or for potentially difficult-to-treat infections such as pneumonia in patients with cystic fibrosis patients.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Thiol Peroxidase Protects against Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity and Displays Atypical Patterns of Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Somprasong, Nawarat; Jittawuttipoka, Thichakorn; Duang-nkern, Jintana; Romsang, Adisak; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 thiol peroxidase homolog (Tpx) belongs to a family of enzymes implicated in the removal of toxic peroxides. We have shown the expression of tpx to be highly inducible with redox cycling/superoxide generators and diamide and weakly inducible with organic hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The PAO1 tpx pattern is unlike the patterns for other peroxide-scavenging genes in P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the tpx promoter reveals the presence of a putative IscR binding site located near the promoter. The tpx expression profiles in PAO1 and the iscR mutant, together with results from gel mobility shift assays showing that purified IscR specifically binds the tpx promoter, support the role of IscR as a transcriptional repressor of tpx that also regulates the oxidant-inducible expression of the gene. Recombinant Tpx has been purified and biochemically characterized. The enzyme catalyzes thioredoxin-dependent peroxidation and can utilize organic hydroperoxides and H2O2 as substrates. The Δtpx mutant demonstrates differential sensitivity to H2O2 only at moderate concentrations (0.5 mM) and not at high (20 mM) concentrations, suggesting a novel protective role of tpx against H2O2 in P. aeruginosa. Altogether, P. aeruginosa tpx is a novel member of the IscR regulon and plays a primary role in protecting the bacteria from submillimolar concentrations of H2O2. PMID:22609922

  17. First detection in Europe of the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-15 in clinical strains of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, R; Juan, C; Castillo-Vera, J; Chamizo, F J; Artiles, F; Álamo, I; Oliver, A

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study (2009-2011) in healthcare institutions from the Canary Islands (Spain), 6 out of 298 carbapenem non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates produced a metallo-β-lactamase: four IMP-15, two VIM-2 (including one IMP-15-positive isolate) and one VIM-1. Multilocus sequence typing identified the single VIM-1-producing isolate as clone ST111 and two IMP-15-producing isolates as ST606, but, strikingly, bacterial re-identification revealed that the other three isolates (producing IMP-15 and/or VIM-2) were actually Pseudomonas putida. Further retrospective analysis revealed a very high prevalence (close to 50%) of carbapenem resistance in this environmental species. Hence, we report the simultaneous emergence in hospitals on the Canary Islands of P. putida and P. aeruginosa strains producing IMP-15, a metallo-β-lactamase not previously detected in Europe, and suggest an underestimated role of P. putida as a nosocomial reservoir of worrying transferable resistance determinants.

  18. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  19. Identification, cloning, and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Massimelli, María J; Beassoni, Paola R; Forrellad, Marina A; Barra, José L; Garrido, Mónica N; Domenech, Carlos E; Lisa, Angela T

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP) is a periplasmic enzyme produced simultaneously with the hemolytic phospholipase C (PLc-H) when the bacteria are grown in the presence of choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. Molecular analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutant JUF8-00, after Tn5-751 mutagenesis, revealed that the PA5292 gene in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome was responsible for the synthesis of PChP. The enzyme expressed in E. coli, rPChP-Ec, purified by a chitin-binding column (IMPACT-CN system, New England BioLabs) was homogeneous after SDS-PAGE analysis. PChP was also expressed in P. aeruginosa PAO1-LAC, rPChP-Pa. Both recombinant enzymes exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa, as expected for the size of the PA5292 gene, and catalyzed the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. The saturation curve of rPChP-Ec and rPChP-Pa by phosphorylcholine revealed that these recombinant enzymes, like the purified native PChP, also contained the high- and low-affinity sites for phosphorylcholine and that the enzyme activity was inhibited by high substrate concentration.

  20. Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Pulmonary Delivery of Colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Mouse Lung Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Qi Tony; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Zhao, Jinxin; Chen, Ke; Wang, Jiping; Chan, Hak-Kim; Li, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Colistin is often administered by inhalation and/or the parenteral route for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa However, limited pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data are available to guide the optimization of dosage regimens of inhaled colistin. In the present study, PK of colistin in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and plasma was determined following intratracheal delivery of a single dose of colistin solution in neutropenic lung-infected mice. The antimicrobial efficacy of intratracheal delivery of colistin against three P. aeruginosa strains (ATCC 27853, PAO1, and FADDI-PA022; MIC of 1 mg/liter for all strains) was examined in a neutropenic mouse lung infection model. Dose fractionation studies were conducted over 2.64 to 23.8 mg/kg of body weight/day. The inhibitory sigmoid model was employed to determine the PK/PD index that best described the antimicrobial efficacy of pulmonary delivery of colistin. In both ELF and plasma, the ratio of the area under the unbound concentration-time profile to MIC (fAUC/MIC) was the PK/PD index that best described the antimicrobial effect in mouse lung infection (R(2) = 0.60 to 0.84 for ELF and 0.64 to 0.83 for plasma). The fAUC/MIC targets required to achieve stasis against the three strains were 684 to 1,050 in ELF and 2.15 to 3.29 in plasma. The histopathological data showed that pulmonary delivery of colistin reduced infection-caused pulmonary inflammation and preserved the integrity of the lung epithelium, although colistin introduced mild pulmonary inflammation in healthy mice. This study showed pulmonary delivery of colistin provides antimicrobial effects against MDR P. aeruginosa lung infections superior to those of parenteral administrations. For the first time, our results provide important preclinical PK/PD information for optimization of inhaled colistin therapy.

  1. Modular Approach to Select Bacteriophages Targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Their Application to Children Suffering With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Pleteneva, Elena; Bourkaltseva, Maria; Krylov, Sergey; Kaplan, Alla; Chesnokova, Elena; Kulakov, Leonid; Magill, Damian; Polygach, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the potential application of bacterial viruses (phage therapy) toward the eradication of antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this regard, several potential relationships between bacteria and their bacteriophages are considered. The most important aspect that must be addressed with respect to phage therapy of bacterial infections in the lungs of CF patients is in ensuring the continuity of treatment in light of the continual occurrence of resistant bacteria. This depends on the ability to rapidly select phages exhibiting an enhanced spectrum of lytic activity among several well-studied phage groups of proven safety. We propose a modular based approach, utilizing both mono-species and hetero-species phage mixtures. With an approach involving the visual recognition of characteristics exhibited by phages of well-studied phage groups on lawns of the standard P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, the simple and rapid enhancement of the lytic spectrum of cocktails is permitted, allowing the development of tailored preparations for patients capable of circumventing problems associated with phage resistant bacterial mutants. PMID:27790211

  2. Enzymatic quorum quenching increases antibiotic susceptibility of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, S; Sharma, P; Harjai, K; Capalash, N

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing emergence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) strains and drug resistance is positively-correlated with biofilm-forming ability. Since about 10% of P. aeruginosa genome is controlled by quorum sensing (QS), alteration in its antibiotic susceptibility by targeting QS was the focus of the present study. Materials and Methods One day biofilms of PAO1 and three urinary tract infection MDRPA isolates (PA2, PA8 and PA18) were formed in 96-well microtiter plate. Biofilms were exposed to concentration gradient of ciprofloxacin and gentamicin to obtain Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) by direct enumeration method. Susceptibility of 24 h biofilms was evaluated by treatment with ciprofloxacin and gentamicin per se and in combination with lactonase. The effect was also examined on 72 h biofilms by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results Lactonase treatment did not have any effect on growth of the selected strains but 73.42, 69.1, 77.34 and 72.5% reduction of biofilm was observed after lactonase (1 unit) treatment, respectively. Antibiotics in combination with lactonase (0.3 units) resulted in an increased susceptibility of the biofilm forms by>3.3, 4, 5 and 1.5 folds of MBEC, for ciprofloxacin and>6.67, 12.5, 6 and>2.5 folds, for gentamicin respectively, which could be due to the disruption of biofilm by lactonase treatment as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Also there was significant reduction (p<0.001) in virulence factor production by the strains. Conclusion Lactonase treatment increased antibiotic susceptibility of the biofilms of MDRPA isolates underscoring the potential of quorum quenching in antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:22347576

  3. Adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to untreated and oxygen-plasma treated poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) from endotracheal intubation devices.

    PubMed

    Triandafillu, K; Balazs, D J; Aronsson, B-O; Descouts, P; Tu Quoc, P; van Delden, C; Mathieu, H J; Harms, H

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia is a life threatening complication in mechanically ventilated patients that requires the ability of the bacteria to adhere to, and colonize the endotracheal intubation device. New strategies to prevent or reduce these nosocomial infections are greatly needed. We report here the study of a set of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, together with specific mutants, regarding their adhesion on native and chemically modified poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) surfaces from endotracheal intubation devices. The adhesion of the different strains to untreated PVC varied widely, correlating with several physico-chemical characteristics known to influence the attachment of bacteria to inert surfaces. The adhesion patterns were compared to the calculations obtained with the DLVO theory of colloidal stability. These results illustrate the importance of testing different clinical isolates when investigating bacterial adhesion. Oxygen plasma treatment of the PVC pieces yielded a hydrophilic surface and reduced the number of adhering bacteria by as much as 70%. This reduction is however unlikely to be sufficient to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization of endotracheal intubation devices.

  4. Synergistic algicidal effect and mechanism of two diketopiperazines produced by Chryseobacterium sp. strain GLY-1106 on the harmful bloom-forming Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingliang; Liu, Xianglong; Pan, Jianliang; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A potent algicidal bacterium isolated from Lake Taihu, Chryseobacterium sp. strain GLY-1106, produces two algicidal compounds: 1106-A (cyclo(4-OH-Pro-Leu)) and 1106-B (cyclo(Pro-Leu)). Both diketopiperazines showed strong algicidal activities against Microcystis aeruginosa, the dominant bloom-forming cyanobacterium in Lake Taihu. Interestingly, these two algicidal compounds functioned synergistically. Compared with individual treatment, combined treatment with cyclo(4-OH-Pro-Leu) and cyclo(Pro-Leu) significantly enhanced algicidal activity, accelerated the increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in M. aeruginosa, and further decreased the activities of antioxidases, effective quantum yield and maximal electron transport rate of M. aeruginosa. The results also showed that the algicidal characteristics of cyclo(4-OH-Pro-Leu) are distinct from those of cyclo(Pro-Leu). Cyclo(4-OH-Pro-Leu) mainly interrupted the flux of electron transport in the cyanobacterial photosynthetic system, whereas cyclo(Pro-Leu) mainly inhibited the activity of cyanobacterial intracellular antioxidases. A possible algicidal mechanism for the synergism between cyclo(4-OH-Pro-Leu) and cyclo(Pro-Leu) is proposed, which is in accordance with their distinct algicidal characteristics in individual and combined treatment. These findings suggest that synergism between algicidal compounds might be used as an effective strategy for the future control of Microcystis blooms. PMID:26423356

  5. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 inhibits bacterial infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Nana; Wang, Qin; Zhou, Jian; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoxing; Chen, Shujing; Zhu, Zhenhua; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin; Li, Huayin

    2016-01-01

    To determine protective effects of concurrent administration of Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) inoculation on the induced pneumonia. KGF-2 (5 mg/kg) was concurrently administered into the left lobe of 55 mice with P. aeruginosa PAO1 (5 × 10(6) CFU, half-lethal dose); 55 mice in the control group were concurrently administered PBS with the PAO1. We detected and analyzed: body temperature; amount of P. aeruginosa in homogenates; count of total number of nucleated cells and of mononuclear macrophages; protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung wet-to-dry weight ratio; cytokines in BALF and blood; and lung morphology. To study survival rate, concurrent administration of KGF-2 (experimental group) versus PBS (control) with a lethal dose of PAO1 (1 × 10(7) CFU was performed, and survivorship was documented for 7 days post-inoculation. The bacterial CFU in lung homogenates was significantly decreased in the KGF-2 group compared to the control group. There were significantly more mononuclear macrophages in the BALF from the KGF-2 group than from the control group (p < 0.05). KGF-2 increased the surfactant protein and GM-CSF mRNA in lung at 6 h and 72 h after inoculation. Significant reduction of lung injury scores, protein concentrations, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, and IL-6 and TNF-α levels was noted in the KGF-2 treated rats at 72 h after inoculation (p < 0.05). The 7-day survival rate of the KGF-2 group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05). Concurrent administration of KGF-2 facilitates the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs, attenuates P. aeruginosa-induced lung injury, and extends the 7-day survival rate in mice model with P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  6. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation.

  7. Quorum-Sensing Mechanisms and Bacterial Response to Antibiotics in P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2016-11-01

    Emergence and worldwide spreading of resistant bacteria to antibiotic have raised the importance for finding therapeutic alternative to compensate antibiotic drawbacks. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication involved in the development of various common bacterial behaviors including virulence factors expression, and targeting QS seems to be relevant to the struggle against bacterial infection. In this report, relevant literature on intrication of QS system and antimicrobial sensitivity mechanisms in P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reviewed.

  8. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Berrazeg, M.; Jeannot, K.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I.; Loeffert, S.; Fournier, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. PMID:26248364

  9. Superhydrophobic, nanotextured polyvinyl chloride films for delaying Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment to intubation tubes and medical plastics.

    PubMed

    Loo, Ching-Yee; Young, Paul M; Lee, Wing-Hin; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial attachment onto the surface of polymers in medical devices such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the polymer, including its surface hydrophobicity and roughness. In this study, to prevent biofilm formation onto PVC devices, the PVC surface was modified using a combination of solvent (tetrahydrofuran) and non-solvents (i.e. ethanol and methanol). The surface of unmodified PVC was smooth and relatively hydrophobic (water contact angle (CA)=80°). Ethanol-treated PVCs revealed the presence of micron-sized particulates and porous structures as the concentration of ethanol was increased. Surface hydrophobicity (measured in terms of CA) increased from 73° to 150° as the ethanol concentration increased from 15% to 35% (v/v). In general, methanol-treated PVCs were more hydrophilic compared to those treated with ethanol. The colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 onto unmodified PVC surface was rapid, and individual bacterial cells could be seen after 6h incubation. On the surface of treated PVC, the secretion of extracellular matrix layers was evident at 18 h and P. aeruginosa PAO1 start to form microcolonies at 24h of incubation. The initial attachment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was delayed to 18 and 24h, respectively in the PVCs treated with 25% (v/v) and 35% (v/v) ethanol. It can be concluded that the treatment used in this study to prepare superhydrophobic PVC surface prevented the colonization of bacteria up to 24h after culture.

  10. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  11. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus Is Capable of Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signals.

    PubMed

    Birmes, Franziska S; Wolf, Timo; Kohl, Thomas A; Rüger, Kai; Bange, Franz; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS) and 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) as quorum sensing signal molecules, which contribute to a sophisticated regulatory network controlling the production of virulence factors and antimicrobials. We demonstrate that Mycobacterium abscessus(T) and clinical M. abscessus isolates are capable of degrading these alkylquinolone signals. Genome sequences of 50 clinical M. abscessus isolates indicated the presence of aqdRABC genes, contributing to fast degradation of HHQ and PQS, in M. abscessus subsp. abscessus strains, but not in M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense isolates. A subset of 18 M. a. subsp. abscessus isolates contained the same five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) compared to the aqd region of the type strain. Interestingly, representatives of these isolates showed faster PQS degradation kinetics than the M. abscessus type strain. One of the SNPs is located in the predicted promoter region of the aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, and two others lead to a variant of the AqdC protein termed AqdC(II), which differs in two amino acids from AqdC(I) of the type strain. AqdC, the key enzyme of the degradation pathway, is a PQS dioxygenase catalyzing quinolone ring cleavage. While transcription of aqdR and aqdC is induced by PQS, transcript levels in a representative of the subset of 18 isolates were not significantly altered despite the detected SNP in the promoter region. However, purified recombinant AqdC(II) and AqdC(I) exhibit different kinetic properties, with approximate apparent Km values for PQS of 14 μM and 37 μM, and kcat values of 61 s(-1) and 98 s(-1), respectively, which may (at least in part) account for the observed differences in PQS degradation rates of the strains. In co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and M. abscessus, strains harboring the aqd genes reduced the PQS levels

  12. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus Is Capable of Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signals

    PubMed Central

    Birmes, Franziska S.; Wolf, Timo; Kohl, Thomas A.; Rüger, Kai; Bange, Franz; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS) and 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) as quorum sensing signal molecules, which contribute to a sophisticated regulatory network controlling the production of virulence factors and antimicrobials. We demonstrate that Mycobacterium abscessusT and clinical M. abscessus isolates are capable of degrading these alkylquinolone signals. Genome sequences of 50 clinical M. abscessus isolates indicated the presence of aqdRABC genes, contributing to fast degradation of HHQ and PQS, in M. abscessus subsp. abscessus strains, but not in M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense isolates. A subset of 18 M. a. subsp. abscessus isolates contained the same five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) compared to the aqd region of the type strain. Interestingly, representatives of these isolates showed faster PQS degradation kinetics than the M. abscessus type strain. One of the SNPs is located in the predicted promoter region of the aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, and two others lead to a variant of the AqdC protein termed AqdCII, which differs in two amino acids from AqdCI of the type strain. AqdC, the key enzyme of the degradation pathway, is a PQS dioxygenase catalyzing quinolone ring cleavage. While transcription of aqdR and aqdC is induced by PQS, transcript levels in a representative of the subset of 18 isolates were not significantly altered despite the detected SNP in the promoter region. However, purified recombinant AqdCII and AqdCI exhibit different kinetic properties, with approximate apparent Km values for PQS of 14 μM and 37 μM, and kcat values of 61 s-1 and 98 s-1, respectively, which may (at least in part) account for the observed differences in PQS degradation rates of the strains. In co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and M. abscessus, strains harboring the aqd genes reduced the PQS levels, whereas

  13. Pleiotropic effects of temperature-regulated 2-OH-lauroytransferase (PA0011) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, virulence and type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bobo; Li, Bo; Liang, Ying; Li, Jing; Gao, Lang; Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin; Shen, Lixin

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen which adapts to changing environment, such as temperature variations and entering host by regulating their gene expression. Here, we report that gene PA0011 in P. aeruginosa PAO1, which encodes a 2-OH-lauroytransferase participating in lipid A biosynthesis, is involved in carbapenem resistance and virulence in a temperature-regulated manner in PAO1. The expression of PA0011 was higher at an environment temperature (21 °C) than that at a body temperature (37 °C). The inactivation of PA0011 rendered increased antibiotic susceptibility and decreased virulence both in vivo and in vitro. The impaired integrity and the decreased stability of the outer membrane were the cause of the increased susceptibility of PAO1(Δ0011) to carbapenem and many other common antibiotics. The reduced endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contributed to the decreased virulence both at 21 °C and 37 °C in PAO1 (Δ0011). In addition, we have found that PA0011 repressed the expression of TTSS virulence factors both at transcriptional and translational levels, similar to the effect of O antigen of LPS but unlike any effect of its homologue reported in other bacteria. The effect of PA0011 on resistance to many antibiotics including carbapenem and virulence in P. aeruginosa makes it a target for novel antimicrobial therapies.

  14. Chemotaxis and Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Scratch-Wounded Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E.

    2016-01-01

    Confocal imaging was used to characterize interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA, expressing GFP or labeled with Syto 11) with CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o-, grown as confluent monolayers with unknown polarity on coverglasses) in control conditions and following scratch wounding. Epithelia and PAO1-GFP or PAK-GFP (2 MOI) were incubated with Ringer containing typical extracellular salts, pH and glucose and propidium iodide (PI, to identify dead cells). PAO1 and PAK swam randomly over and did not bind to nonwounded CFBE41o- cells. PA migrated rapidly (began within 20 sec, maximum by 5 mins) and massively (10–80 fold increase, termed “swarming”), but transiently (random swimming after 15 mins), to wounds, particularly near cells that took up PI. Some PA remained immobilized on cells near the wound. PA swam randomly over intact CFBE41o- monolayers and wounded monolayers that had been incubated with medium for 1 hr. Expression of CFTR and altered pH of the media did not affect PA interactions with CFBE41o- wounds. In contrast, PAO1 swarming and immobilization along wounds was abolished in PAO1 (PAO1ΔcheYZABW, no expression of chemotaxis regulatory components cheY, cheZ, cheA, cheB and cheW) and greatly reduced in PAO1 that did not express amino acid receptors pctA, B and C (PAO1ΔpctABC) and in PAO1 incubated in Ringer containing a high concentration of mixed amino acids. Non-piliated PAKΔpilA swarmed normally towards wounded areas but bound infrequently to CFBE41o- cells. In contrast, both swarming and binding of PA to CFBE41o- cells near wounds were prevented in non-flagellated PAKΔfliC. Data are consistent with the idea that (i) PA use amino acid sensor-driven chemotaxis and flagella-driven swimming to swarm to CF airway epithelial cells near wounds and (ii) PA use pili to bind to epithelial cells near wounds. PMID:27031335

  15. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  16. Prevalence of resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a University Hospital in Northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna Diana; Sacha, Pawel Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Anna; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among twenty-five Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between 2002 and 2009. In PCR, following genes were detected: ant(2″)-Ia in 9 (36.0%), aac(6')-Ib in 7 (28.0%), qnrB in 5 (20.0%), aph(3″)-Ib in 2 (8.0%) of isolates.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene involved in the negative regulation of phosphate taxis.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Sakai, Y; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1994-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exhibited a positive chemotactic response to P(i). The chemotactic response was induced by P(i) limitation. An alkaline phosphatase (AP) constitutive mutant showed a chemotactic response to P(i), regardless of whether the cells were starved for P(i). Sequence analysis and complementation studies showed that the P. aeruginosa phoU gene was involved both in the regulation of AP expression and in the induction of P(i) taxis. However, unlike AP expression, P(i) taxis was not regulated by the phoB gene product.

  18. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Haagensen, Janus A J; Klausen, Mikkel; Ernst, Robert K; Miller, Samuel I; Folkesson, Anders; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Molin, Søren

    2007-01-01

    During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom-shaped multicellular structures. The cap-forming subpopulation was found to develop tolerance to membrane-targeting antimicrobial agents, such as the cyclic cationic peptide colistin and the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The stalk-forming subpopulation, on the other hand, was sensitive to the membrane-targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell biofilms, and the development of tolerance to the antimicrobial agents was found to be affected as well. Mutations in genes interfering with lipopolysaccharide modification (pmr) eliminated the biofilm-associated colistin tolerance phenotype. Experiments with a PAO1 strain harboring a pmr-gfp fusion showed that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of biogenically produced spherical Se-nanomaterials embedded in organic material against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Elena; Presentato, Alessandro; Zonaro, Emanuele; Lemire, Joseph A; Demeter, Marc; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J; Lampis, Silvia

    2017-02-23

    In an effort to prevent the formation of pathogenic biofilms on hydroxyapatite (HA)-based clinical devices and surfaces, we present a study evaluating the antimicrobial efficacy of Spherical biogenic Se-Nanostructures Embedded in Organic material (Bio Se-NEMO-S) produced by Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 in comparison with two different chemical selenium nanoparticle (SeNP) classes. These nanomaterials have been studied as potential antimicrobials for eradication of established HA-grown biofilms, for preventing biofilm formation on HA-coated surfaces and for inhibition of planktonic cell growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 12934 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Bio Se-NEMO resulted more efficacious than those chemically produced in all tested scenarios. Bio Se-NEMO produced by B. mycoides SelTE01 after 6 or 24 h of Na2 SeO3 exposure show the same effective antibiofilm activity towards both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains at 0.078 mg ml(-1) (Bio Se-NEMO6 ) and 0.3125 mg ml(-1) (Bio Se-NEMO24 ). Meanwhile, chemically synthesized SeNPs at the highest tested concentration (2.5 mg ml(-1) ) have moderate antimicrobial activity. The confocal laser scanning micrographs demonstrate that the majority of the P. aeruginosa and S. aureus cells exposed to biogenic SeNPs within the biofilm are killed or eradicated. Bio Se-NEMO therefore displayed good antimicrobial activity towards HA-grown biofilms and planktonic cells, becoming possible candidates as new antimicrobials.

  20. Modulation of behaviour and virulence of a high alginate expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from cystic fibrosis by oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad R.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbour complex and dynamic polymicrobial communities that include many oral bacteria. Despite increased knowledge of CF airway microbiomes the interaction between established CF pathogens and other resident microbes and resulting impact on disease progression is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that oral commensal streptococci of the Anginosus group (AGS) can establish chronic pulmonary infections and become numerically dominant in CF sputa indicating that they play an important role in CF microbiome dynamics. In this study a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (DWW2) of the mucoid alginate overproducing phenotype associated with chronic CF airway infection and a strain of the oral commensal AGS species Streptococcus anginosus (3a) from CF sputum were investigated for their ability to co-exist and their responses to biofilm co-culture. Bacteria in biofilms were quantified, pyocyanin expression by DWW2 was measured and the effect of AGS strain 3a on reversion of DWW2 to a non-mucoidal phenotype investigated. The virulence of DWW2, 3a and colony variant phenotypes of DWW2 in mono- and co-culture were compared in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Co-culture biofilms were formed in normoxic, hypercapnic (10% CO2) and anoxic atmospheres with the streptococcus increasing in number in co-culture, indicating that these bacteria would be able to co-exist and thrive within the heterogeneous microenvironments of the CF airway. The streptococcus caused increased pyocyanin expression by DWW2 and colony variants by stimulating reversion of the mucoid phenotype to the high pyocyanin expressing non-mucoid phenotype. The latter was highly virulent in the infection model with greater virulence when in co-culture with the streptococcus. The results of this study demonstrate that the oral commensal S. anginosus benefits from interaction with P. aeruginosa of the CF associated mucoid phenotype and modulates the behaviour of the

  1. Use of Phage Display To Identify Potential Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Products Relevant to Early Cystic Fibrosis Airway Infections

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Christiane; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Ernst, Robert; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Miller, Samuel I.; Burns, Jane L.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Treatment of established infections is difficult, even with microbiologically active agents. Thus, prevention of infection is an important goal of management. Isolates from cystic fibrosis patients appear to originate from the environment but adapt to the milieu of the airway of the cystic fibrosis patient and evolve toward a common phenotype. Identification of the antigens expressed early in infection may lead to novel targets for vaccine development. Immunogenic peptides were identified in a J404 random nonapeptide phage display library with serum from cystic fibrosis patients obtained within the first year of P. aeruginosa infection. One hundred sixty-five reactive clones were verified by plaque lift assays, and their inserts were sequenced. The sequenced nonapeptides were compared with the published sequence of strain PAO1, identifying homologies to 76 genes encoding outer membrane and secreted proteins. The majority of these were proteins involved in small-molecule transport, membrane structural proteins, and secreted factors. An in silico analysis was performed that suggested that the occurrence of multiple matches to predominantly outer membrane and secreted proteins was not attributable to random chance. Finally, gene expression array data from early isolates of P. aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients was compared with the results from phage display analysis. Eleven outer membrane and secreted proteins were common between the two data sets. These included genes involved in iron acquisition, antibiotic efflux, fimbrial biogenesis, and pyocin synthesis. These results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of this novel approach and suggest potential targets for future development. PMID:15618183

  2. A Novel Metagenomic Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Virulence on Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bijtenhoorn, Patrick; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Müller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Utpatel, Christian; Schipper, Christina; Hornung, Claudia; Szesny, Matthias; Grond, Stephanie; Thürmer, Andrea; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Daniel, Rolf; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of a number of virulence factors, as well as biofilm formation, are controlled by quorum sensing (QS). N-Acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are an important class of signaling molecules involved in bacterial QS and in many pathogenic bacteria infection and host colonization are AHL-dependent. The AHL signaling molecules are subject to inactivation mainly by hydrolases (Enzyme Commission class number EC 3) (i.e. N-acyl-homoserine lactonases and N-acyl-homoserine-lactone acylases). Only little is known on quorum quenching mechanisms of oxidoreductases (EC 1). Here we report on the identification and structural characterization of the first NADP-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) involved in inactivation of N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and derived from a metagenome library. The corresponding gene was isolated from a soil metagenome and designated bpiB09. Heterologous expression and crystallographic studies established BpiB09 as an NADP-dependent reductase. Although AHLs are probably not the native substrate of this metagenome-derived enzyme, its expression in P. aeruginosa PAO1 resulted in significantly reduced pyocyanin production, decreased motility, poor biofilm formation and absent paralysis of Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, a genome-wide transcriptome study suggested that the level of lasI and rhlI transcription together with 36 well known QS regulated genes was significantly (≥10-fold) affected in P. aeruginosa strains expressing the bpiB09 gene in pBBR1MCS-5. Thus AHL oxidoreductases could be considered as potent tools for the development of quorum quenching strategies. PMID:22046268

  3. Influence of Melaleuca alternifolia oil nanoparticles on aspects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Comin, Vanessa M; Lopes, Leonardo Q S; Quatrin, Priscilla M; de Souza, Márcia E; Bonez, Pauline C; Pintos, Francieli G; Raffin, Renata P; Vaucher, Rodrigo de A; Martinez, Diego S T; Santos, Roberto C V

    2016-04-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus and frequent cause of infection. This microorganism is resistant intrinsically to various drugs. The P. aeruginosa is associated with the biofilm formation, which causes worsen the prognosis and difficulty the treatment. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia oil or "tree of tee" oil (TTO) and TTO nanoparticles on adhesion of P. aeruginosa in buccal epithelial cells was investigated. Also was determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against this microorganism. The TTO nanoparticles were produced by deposition of preformed polymer and the physic-chemical properties of nanoparticles were measured by electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The characterization of nanoparticle showed acceptable values for diameter and zeta potential. The evaluation of antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1 was performed by microdilution indicating the minimal inhibitory concentration, and the potential antibiofilm. It was verified the action on virulence factors such the motility, besides the influence on adhesion in buccal epithelial cells. Both oil and nanoparticles showed a decrease in adhesion of microorganisms to buccal cells, decrease of biofilm and interfering on P. aeruginosa PAO1 motility. The nanostructuration of TTO, shows be a viable alternative against formed biofilm microorganisms.

  4. Auxotrophic variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are selected from prototrophic wild-type strains in respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barth, A L; Pitt, T L

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four nutritionally dependent (auxotrophic) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were isolated from 20 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and tested for their amino acid requirements. Two different methods were necessary to identify the nutritional status of all isolates. Methionine was the most common single amino acid required (9 of 24 isolates), followed by leucine and arginine or ornithine. In total, a requirement for 12 different compounds or combination of compounds was demonstrated. Auxotrophic and prototrophic pairs of isolates from the same patient were compared by macrorestriction analysis of DNA in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirteen of 18 pairs analyzed presented identical restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles following digestion of DNA with XbaI. Three of the remaining pairs showed percentage similarities of 77, 91, and 98%, and the profiles of two pairs could not be compared because of the excessive degradation of their DNA. These results suggest that auxotrophic and prototrophic P. aeruginosa isolates colonizing the same CF patient constitute an isogenic group and raise the possibility that auxotrophs are selected from the prototrophic population during the course of pulmonary infection in CF patients. PMID:7699062

  5. Real-Time Monitoring of nfxB Mutant Occurrence and Dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Exposed to Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Zaborskyte, Greta; Andersen, Jens Bo; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Ciofu, Oana

    2017-03-01

    Biofilm infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are frequently treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP); however, resistance rapidly develops. One of the primary resistance mechanisms is the overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ pump due to a mutation in nfxB, encoding the transcriptional repressor of this pump. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of CIP on the occurrence of nfxB mutants in the wild-type PAO1 flow cell biofilm model. For this purpose, we constructed fluorescent reporter strains (PAO1 background) with an mCherry tag for constitutive red fluorescence and chromosomal transcriptional fusion between the P mexCD promoter and gfp leading to green fluorescence upon mutation of nfxB We observed a rapid development of nfxB mutants by live confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging of the flow cell biofilm (reaching 80 to 90% of the whole population) when treated with 1/10 minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration of CIP for 24 h and 96 h. Based on the observed developmental stages, we propose that nfxB mutants emerged de novo in the biofilm during CIP treatment from filamentous cells, which might have arisen due to the stress responses induced by CIP. Identical nfxB mutations were found in fluorescent colonies from the same flow cell biofilm, especially in 24-h biofilms, suggesting selection and clonal expansion of the mutants during biofilm growth. Our findings point at the significant role of high-enough antibiotic dosages or appropriate combination therapy to avoid the emergence of resistant mutants in biofilms.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Inactivation: Decreased Cell Culturability, Adhesiveness to Surfaces, and Biofilm Thickness Upon High-Pressure Nonthermal Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Anna J.; Stough, Gregory; Rad, Navid; Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are more resilient to standard killing methods than free-living bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms grown on borosilicate coupons were treated with gas-discharge plasma for various exposure times. Almost 100% of the cells were inactivated after a 5-min plasma exposure. Atomic force microscopy was used to image the biofilms and study their micromechanical properties. Results show that the adhesiveness to borosilicate and the thickness of the Pseudomonas biofilms are reduced upon plasma treatment. PMID:21544254

  7. Antimicrobial activity of honey of stingless bees, tiúba (Melipona fasciculata) and jandaira (Melipona subnitida) compared to the strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenório, Eleuza Gomes; de Jesus, Natália Rocha; Nascimento, Adenilde Ribeiro; Teles, Amanda Mara

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of honeys of stingless bees produced in Maranhão, tiúba (Melipona fasciculata) and jandaira (Melipona subnitida), opposite the strains of pathogenic bacteria, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The honey samples were collected from different regions of Maranhão. Of the 17 samples collected, twelve samples were honey M. fasciculata and five were honey M. subnitida. We used the Kirby-Bauer method, and the technique of agar disk diffusion through the extent of inhibition in milimetros. Results were negative for all samples from M. fasciculata. However, the tests for M. subnitida demonstrated bacteriostatic halos ranging from 12 to 32,6mm.

  8. Anr and its activation by PlcH activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa host colonization and virulence.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Angelyca A; Gross, Maegan J; Daniels, Emily F; Hampton, Thomas H; Hammond, John H; Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Dove, Simon L; Stanton, Bruce A; Hogan, Deborah A

    2013-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) degrades phosphatidylcholine (PC), an abundant lipid in cell membranes and lung surfactant. A ΔplcHR mutant, known to be defective in virulence in animal models, was less able to colonize epithelial cell monolayers and was defective in biofilm formation on plastic when grown in lung surfactant. Microarray analyses found that strains defective in PlcH production had lower levels of Anr-regulated transcripts than the wild type. PC degradation stimulated the Anr regulon in an Anr-dependent manner under conditions where Anr activity was submaximal because of the presence of oxygen. Two PC catabolites, choline and glycine betaine (GB), were sufficient to stimulate Anr activity, and their catabolism was required for Anr activation. The addition of choline or GB to glucose-containing medium did not alter Anr protein levels, growth rates, or respiratory activity, and Anr activation could not be attributed to the osmoprotectant functions of GB. The Δanr mutant was defective in virulence in a mouse pneumonia model. Several lines of evidence indicate that Anr is important for the colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces in both P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 and that increases in Anr activity resulted in enhanced biofilm formation. Our data suggest that PlcH activity promotes Anr activity in oxic environments and that Anr activity contributes to virulence, even in the acute infection phase, where low oxygen tensions are not expected. This finding highlights the relationships among in vivo bacterial metabolism, the activity of the oxygen-sensitive regulator Anr, and virulence.

  9. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases.

  10. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  11. Molecular cloning, characterisation and ligand-bound structure of an azoreductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chan-Ju; Hagemeier, Christoph; Rahman, Nawreen; Lowe, Edward; Noble, Martin; Coughtrie, Michael; Sim, Edith; Westwood, Isaac

    2007-11-09

    The gene PA0785 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, which is annotated as a probable acyl carrier protein phosphodiesterase (acpD), has been cloned and heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibits activity corresponding to that of azoreductase but not acpD. Each recombinant protein molecule has an estimated molecular mass of 23,050 Da and one non-covalently bound FMN as co-factor. This enzyme, now identified as azoreductase 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (paAzoR1), is a flavodoxin-like protein with an apparent molecular mass of 110 kDa as determined by gel-filtration chromatography, indicating that the protein is likely to be tetrameric in solution. The three-dimensional structure of paAzoR1, in complex with the substrate methyl red, was solved at a resolution of 2.18 A by X-ray crystallography. The protein exists as a dimer of dimers in the crystal lattice, with two spatially separated active sites per dimer, and the active site of paAzoR1 was shown to be a well-conserved hydrophobic pocket formed between two monomers. The paAzoR1 enzyme is able to reduce different classes of azo dyes and activate several azo pro-drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). During azo reduction, FMN serves as a redox centre in the electron-transferring system by mediating the electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the azo substrate. The spectral properties of paAzoR1 demonstrate the hydrophobic interaction between FMN and the active site in the protein. The structure of the ligand-bound protein also highlights the pi-stacking interactions between FMN and the azo substrate.

  12. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Finotti, Alessia; Nielsen, Peter E; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-02-03

    Discovery of novel antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to inhibit bacterial growth as well as the resulting inflammatory response is a key goal in cystic fibrosis research. We report in this paper that a peptide nucleic acid (PNA3969) targeting the translation initiation region of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits PAO1 induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably, no effect on PAO1 induction of VEGF, GM-CSF and IL-17 was observed. Analogous experiments using a two base mis-match control PNA did not show such inhibition. Furthermore, no significant effects of the PNAs were seen on cell growth, apoptosis or secretome profile in uninfected IB3-1 cells (with the exception of a PNA-mediated up-regulation of PDGF, IL-17 and GM-CSF). Thus, we conclude that in cell culture an antimicrobial PNA against Pseudomonas can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines otherwise induced by the infection. In particular, the effects of PNA-3969 on IL-8 gene expression are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection.

  13. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  14. Effect of Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine with Antiquorum Sensing Activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuxin; Jiang, Yan; Zhu, Wei; Zhuang, Xiyi; Fu, Jiangyan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal medicines (TCHMs) were tested for their ability of antiquorum sensing. Water extracts of Rhubarb, Fructus gardeniae, and Andrographis paniculata show antiquorumsensing activity when using Chromobacterium violaceum CV12472 as reporter; the sub-MIC concentrations of these TCHMs were tested against AHL-dependent phenotypic expressions of PAO1. Results showed significant reduction in pyocyanin pigment, protease, elastase production, and biofilm formation in PAO1 without inhibiting the bacterial growth, revealing that the QSI by the extracts is not related to static or killing effects on the bacteria. The results indicate a potential modulation of bacterial cell-cell communication, P. aeruginosa biofilm, and virulence factors by traditional Chinese herbal medicine. This study introduces not only a new mode of action for traditional Chinese herbal medicines, but also a potential new therapeutic direction for the treatment of bacterial infections, which have QSI activity and might be important in reducing virulence and pathogenicity of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24319480

  15. The regulatory repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-lactamase regulator AmpR includes virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  16. The Regulatory Repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-Lactamase Regulator AmpR Includes Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  17. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of growth and photosynthesis of Scenedesmus obliquus, Navicula pelliculosa and two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa to the herbicide atrazine.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, Annie; Juneau, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The temperature-dependent sensitivities of two algal species and two strains of cyanobacteria to the photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide atrazine were evaluated in order to understand how the interaction between acclimation temperature and herbicide will affect growth and photosynthesis of aquatic microorganisms. The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, the diatom Navicula pelliculosa and a toxic and non-toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa were acclimated to three different temperatures (10, 15 and 25°C) and exposed to five concentrations of the herbicide atrazine (0-0.15μM) for 72h. Growth, photosynthetic yields, energy fluxes within photosystem II and pigment content were then measured as potential responses to each treatment. With the exception of N. pelliculosa, the toxicity of atrazine was higher when microorganisms were acclimated to lower temperatures. N. pelliculosa was not only the most tolerant to atrazine, but also had a similar sensitivity to this herbicide at every temperature. The observed differences in growth sensitivity to atrazine at low temperature are associated with the ability of algae and cyanobacteria to cope with high excitation pressure, by increasing its protective carotenoid content and non-photochemical energy dissipation. Our results demonstrate that future guidelines for the protection of aquatic life should consider water temperature as an important factor influencing the toxicity of atrazine to aquatic microorganisms.

  18. Evaluation of Stress-Induced Microbial Siderophore from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain S1 as a Potential Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitor in Wound Healing Applications.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Sita Lakshmi; Kandhasamy, S; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli; Perumal, P T

    2016-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes capable of causing various inflammatory and various degenerative diseases if over-expressed. The active site of these enzymes is a zinc binding motif which binds to the specific site on the substrate and induce degradation. Hence an inhibitor is required to form a complex with zinc motif which hampers the binding ability of MMPs. To obtain novel MMPs inhibitor for wound healing, the chelating activity of siderophore from the microbial source was focused. During screening for siderophore production, strain S1 produced the highest amount of siderophore in the minimal salts medium. The isolate was confirmed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain S1 based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The activity of the siderophore was assayed using chrome azurol sulphonate and purified by the chromatographic techniques. The structural evidence through Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that the isolated siderophore is a catecholate type with the distinctive characters. The positive results of calcein and fluozin-3 assays indicate that siderophore could bind to divalent metal ions, namely Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). As the siderophore compound focused on wound healing property, the in vitro studies revealed the viability of NH3T3 fibroblast cells and its efficiency in matrix modulating was confirmed through gelatin zymogram.

  19. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Dueholm, Morten S; Søndergaard, Mads T; Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Stensballe, Allan; Overgaard, Michael T; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per H

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluorescens Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently resulted in highly aggregative phenotypes and in increased biofilm formation. Detailed biophysical investigations of purified fibrils confirmed FapC as the main fibril monomer and supported the role of FapB as a minor, nucleating constituent as also indicated by bioinformatic analysis. Bioinformatics analysis suggested FapF and FapD as a potential β-barrel membrane pore and protease, respectively. Manipulation of the fap operon showed that FapA affects monomer composition of the final amyloid fibril, and that FapB is an amyloid protein, probably a nucleator for FapC polymerization. Our study highlights the fap operon as a molecular machine for functional amyloid formation. PMID:23504942

  20. Sequential Treatment of Biofilms with Aztreonam and Tobramycin Is a Novel Strategy for Combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Macià, María D.; Rubio, Rosa; Moyà, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; López-Causapé, Carla; Pérez, José L.; Cantón, Rafael; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Traditional therapeutic strategies to control chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are based on the use of a single nebulized antibiotic. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and dynamics of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under sequential therapy with inhaled aztreonam (ATM) and tobramycin (TOB). Laboratory strains PAO1, PAOMS (hypermutable), PAOMA (mucoid), and PAOMSA (mucoid and hypermutable) and two hypermutable CF strains, 146-HSE (Liverpool epidemic strain [LES-1]) and 1089-HSE (ST1089), were used. Biofilms were developed using the flow cell system. Mature biofilms were challenged with peak and 1/10-peak concentrations of ATM (700 mg/liter and 70 mg/liter), TOB (1,000 mg/liter and 100 mg/liter), and their alternations (ATM/TOB/ATM and TOB/ATM/TOB) for 2 (t = 2), 4 (t = 4), and 6 days (t = 6). The numbers of viable cells (CFU) and resistant mutants were determined. Biofilm structural dynamics were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and processed with COMSTAT and IMARIS software programs. TOB monotherapy produced an intense decrease in CFU that was not always correlated with a reduction in biomass and/or a bactericidal effect on biofilms, particularly for the CF strains. The ATM monotherapy bactericidal effect was lower, but effects on biofilm biomass and/or structure, including intense filamentation, were documented. The alternation of TOB and ATM led to an enhancement of the antibiofilm activity against laboratory and CF strains compared to that with the individual regimens, potentiating the bactericidal effect and/or the reduction in biomass, particularly at peak concentrations. Resistant mutants were not documented in any of the regimens at the peak concentrations and only anecdotally at the 1/10-peak concentrations. These results support the clinical evaluation of sequential regimens with inhaled antibiotics in CF, as opposed to the current maintenance treatments with just one

  1. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Stevens, David A.; Clemons, Karl V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation. PMID:26930399

  2. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  3. Carbon spectrum utilization by an indigenous strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514: Production, characterization and surface active properties of biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2016-12-01

    The present research work was undertaken with a mandate to study carbon spectrum utilization and structural characterization of biosurfactant produced by indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514, which showed unique properties to utilize a large number of carbon sources effectively for production of biosurfactant, although glucose was the best carbon substrate. In Bushnell-Hass medium supplemented with glucose (1%, w/v), 3.178±0.071g/l biosurfactant was produced by this isolate in 96h. The biosurfactant produced showed surface tension and emulsification activity values from 29.14±0.05 to 62.29±0.13mN/m and 88.50±1.96 to 15.40±0.91%, respectively. Toluene showed highest emulsification activity followed by kerosene. However, kerosene exhibited emulsion stability for 30days. Biosurfactant was characterized as a mixture of di-rhamnolipid (Rha-Rha-C10-C14:1) and mono-rhamnolipid (Rha-C8-C10) by FTIR, ESI-MS and LC-MS techniques. High biosurfactant yield opens up doors for the isolate to find utility in various industries.

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Periplasmic Protease CtpA Can Affect Systems That Impact Its Ability To Mount Both Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some are exported to act on host targets and facilitate tissue destruction and bacterial dissemination. Others work within the bacterial cell to process virulence factors and regulate virulence gene expression. Relatively little is known about the role of one class of bacterial serine proteases known as the carboxyl-terminal processing proteases (CTPs). The P. aeruginosa genome encodes two CTPs annotated as PA3257/Prc and PA5134/CtpA in strain PAO1. Prc degrades mutant forms of the anti-sigma factor MucA to promote mucoidy in some cystic fibrosis lung isolates. However, nothing is known about the role or importance of CtpA. We have now found that endogenous CtpA is a soluble periplasmic protein and that a ctpA null mutant has specific phenotypes consistent with an altered cell envelope. Although a ctpA null mutation has no major effect on bacterial growth in the laboratory, CtpA is essential for the normal function of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS), for cytotoxicity toward host cells, and for virulence in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Conversely, increasing the amount of CtpA above its endogenous level induces an uncharacterized extracytoplasmic function sigma factor regulon, an event that has been reported to attenuate P. aeruginosa in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Therefore, a normal level of CtpA activity is critical for T3SS function and acute virulence, whereas too much activity can trigger an apparent stress response that is detrimental to chronic virulence. PMID:24082078

  5. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  6. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100). The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L−1; starch, 15.0 g.L−1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L−1; incubation temperature, 34.12 °C and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL−1). The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R2) value (0.9987). The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization. PMID:24159311

  7. Different tolerances to chemical contaminants between unicellular and colonial morph of Microcystis aeruginosa: excluding the differences among different strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nkrumah, Philip Nti; Peng, Qiang

    2015-03-21

    In order to ascertain the different tolerances to chemical contaminants in one strain of Microcystis with different morphology, unicellular and colonial Microcystis in one strain was obtained from different conditions of light intensity and temperature. The samples were divided into 8 groups including control (no chemical addition), CuSO4, chloromycetin, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonatelas (LAS) treatments. The cell density, cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malonaldehyde of Microcystis were analyzed. It was observed that cell density of both unicellular and colonial Microcystis increased from the beginning to day-5 in the control and the CuSO4 treatments. However, the growth of Microcystis was significantly inhibited in the culture with chloromycetin and LAS treatments. Notably, the inhibition rate was significantly high in unicellular Microcystis relative to the colonial Microcystis. The esterase activity in all the treatments decreased dramatically relating to the control. In addition, the esterase activity in colonial Microcystis was significantly higher than that of the unicellular Microcystis in all the treatments. Although there were no significant differences in activities of SOD between the two morphologies in the control treatments, in all the other treatments, significant differences were observed. The results proved that colony formation of Microcystis could be considered as a strategy in response to chemical stress.

  8. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease, and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and extracellular DNA (eDNA), which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to 2 weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling. PMID:26903981

  9. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease, and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and extracellular DNA (eDNA), which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to 2 weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling.

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Global Regulator VqsR Directly Inhibits QscR To Control Quorum-Sensing and Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Ji, Quanjiang; Sun, Fei; Shen, Tuo; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has at least three quorum-sensing (QS) systems, including the acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-mediated las and rhl systems, as well as the 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone (AHQ) signal-based system. A group of key regulators of these QS systems have been identified, such as qteE, vqsM, vqsR, and vfr. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms of these QS systems are not yet fully understood. Here, using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that VqsR indirectly regulates acyl-HSL systems but specifically binds to the qscR promoter region, which indicates that VqsR influences QS-controlled pathways through QscR. Through a dye-based DNase I footprint assay, we showed that VqsR interacts with an inverted repeat (IR) motif (TCGCCN8GGCGA, where N is any nucleotide) in the promoter region of qscR. A genome-wide search identified 50 other promoter regions carrying the same putative IR motif. The recombinant VqsR protein exists as a homodimer in solution. In addition, using a qscR-lux reporter assay and Northern blot hybridization, we found that the transcription level of qscR increased 4-fold in the vqsR deletion strain compared to the wild-type PAO1 strain, indicating vqsR as a negative regulator of qscR. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the complex regulation network of QS systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22505688

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier M; Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms. PMID:26186595

  13. Transcriptome profiling reveals links between ParS/ParR, MexEF-OprN, and quorum sensing in the regulation of adaptation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ParS/ParR two component regulatory system plays critical roles for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was demonstrated that in the presence of antimicrobials, ParR enhances bacterial survival by distinct mechanisms including activation of the mexXY efflux genes, enhancement of lipopolysaccharide modification through the arn operon, and reduction of the expression of oprD porin. Results In this study, we report on transcriptomic analyses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild type and parS and parR mutants growing in a defined minimal medium. Our transcriptomic analysis provides the first estimates of transcript abundance for the 5570 coding genes in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Comparative transcriptomics of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and par mutants identified a total of 464 genes regulated by ParS and ParR. Results also showed that mutations in the parS/parR system abolished expression of the mexEF-oprN operon by down-regulating the regulatory gene mexS. In addition to the known effects on drug resistance genes, transcript abundances of the quorum sensing genes (rhlIR and pqsABCDE-phnAB) were higher in both parS and parR mutants. In accordance with these results, a significant portion of the ParS/ParR regulated genes belonged to the MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing regulons. Deletion of the par genes also led to increased phenazine production and swarming motility, consistent with the up-regulation of the phenazine and rhamnolipid biosynthetic genes, respectively. Conclusion Our results link the ParS/ParR two component signal transduction system to MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing systems in P. aeruginosa. These results expand our understanding of the roles of the ParS/ParR system in the regulation of gene expression in P. aeruginosa, especially in the absence of antimicrobials. PMID:24034668

  14. Establishment and multi drug resistance evolution of ST235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in the intensive care unit of a Colombian hospital.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena; Pérez, Javier Escobar; Buelvas, Francisco; Tovar, Catalina; Vanegas, Natasha; Stokes, H W

    2014-12-01

    Drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a therapeutic challenge. To assess the diversity of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistant variants, isolates were recovered from hospital patients in Colombia. Thirty of 60 isolates contained class 1 integrons and five were of Sequence Type ST235 having appeared in a single intensive care unit. All five possessed an unusual integron but showed differences in gene cassette content and the presence/absence of insertion sequence IS26. This showed that differences can arise rapidly, even within a single ICU. Also, the emergence of IS26 in P. aeruginosa is contributing to the evolution of resistance in this bacterium.

  15. Quinazoline derivatives are efficient chemosensitizers of antibiotic activity in Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Jacqueline; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Baitiche, Milad; Adam, Elissavet; Viveiros, Miguel; Smarandache, Adriana; Militaru, Andra; Pascu, Mihail L; Amaral, Leonard; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    Amongst the three series of quinazoline derivatives synthesised and studied in this work, some molecules increase the antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria presenting multidrug-resistant phenotypes. N-alkyl compounds induced an increase in the activity of chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and sparfloxacin, which are substrates of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps in clinical isolates. These molecules are able to increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol in efflux pump-overproducing strains. Their activity depends on the antibiotic structure, suggesting that different sites may be involved for the recognition of substrates by a given efflux pump. Quinazoline molecules exhibiting a nitro functional group are more active, and structure-activity relationship studies may be undertaken to identify the pharmacophoric group involved in the AcrB and MexB affinity sites.

  16. Use of bacteriophage to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination and fouling in Jet A aviation fuel.

    PubMed

    Bojanowski, Caitlin L; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Robinson, Jayne B

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the use of bacteriophages to prevent growth and/or biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was investigated in microcosms containing Jet A aviation fuel as the carbon source. Bacteriophages were found to be effective at preventing biofilm formation but did not always prevent planktonic growth in the microcosms. This result was at odds with experiments conducted in nutrient-rich medium, demonstrating the necessity to test antimicrobial and antifouling strategies under conditions as near as possible to the 'real world'. The success of the bacteriophages at preventing biofilm formation makes them potential candidates as antifouling agents for fuel systems.

  17. Blood pressure and hepatocellular effects of the cyclic heptapeptide toxin produced by the freshwater cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Microcystis aeruginosa strain PCC-7820.

    PubMed

    Theiss, W C; Carmichael, W W; Wyman, J; Bruner, R

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory rats and mice were used to investigate the hepatotoxicity caused by the cyclic heptapeptide (mol. wt 994) termed microcystin-LR. Microcystin-LR (also known as cyanoginosin-LR) is produced by the freshwater cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) M. aeruginosa strain PCC-7820. In time course histopathology studies with mice significant liver damage, with an absence of pulmonary emboli, were observed after 15 min. Pulmonary emboli did not appear until 1 hr. In rats, significant liver damage and the presence of occasional emboli were observed at 20 min. Pulmonary emboli did not contain fibrin nor appear life-threatening in any case and resembled the globular eosinophilic debris found in the liver sinusoids and central veins. Measurements of rat femoral arterial, jugular venous and hepatic portal venous blood pressures during the course of toxicity revealed a slowly declining arterial pressure and stable, normal venous pressures. Blood lactic acid levels rose in parallel with the fall in arterial pressure, a pattern typical of hemorrhagic shock. There was no indication of venous congestion that would accompany right heart failure. Isolated, perfused rat livers dosed with toxin showed rapid changes in the liver, including cessation of bile flow within 10 min and complete obliteration of normal lobular architecture within 60 min. No effect of the toxin was observed in isolated perfused rat heart. We conclude that in the mouse and rat, microcystin-LR is a potent, rapid-acting, direct hepatotoxin, with the immediate cause of death in acute toxicities being hemorrhagic shock secondary to massive hepatocellular necrosis and collapse of hepatic parenchyma.

  18. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  19. Bio-Engineering High Performance Microbial Strains for MEOR

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Fang; Qinghong Wang; Patrick Shuler

    2007-12-30

    The main objectives of this three-year research project are: (1) to employ the latest advances in genetics and bioengineering, especially Directed Protein Evolution technology, to improve the effectiveness of the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. (2) to improve the surfactant activity and the thermal stability of bio-surfactant systems for MEOR; and (3) to develop improved laboratory methods and tools that screen quickly candidate bio-systems for EOR. Biosurfactants have been receiving increasing attention as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) agents because of their unique properties (i.e., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and higher biodegradability) compared to their synthetic chemical counterparts. Rhamnolipid as a potent natural biosurfactant has a wide range of potential applications, including EOR and bioremediation. During the three-year of the project period, we have successfully cloned the genes involved in the rhamnolipid bio-synthesis. And by using the Transposon containing Rhamnosyltransferase gene rhlAB, we engineered the new mutant strains P. aeruginosa PEER02 and E. coli TnERAB so they can produce rhamnolipid biosurfactans. We were able to produce rhamnolipds in both P. aeroginosa PAO1-RhlA- strain and P. fluorescens ATCC15453 strain, with the increase of 55 to 175 fold in rhamnolipid production comparing with wild type bacteria strain. We have also completed the first round direct evolution studies using Error-prone PCR technique and have constructed the library of RhlAB-containing Transposon to express mutant gene in heterologous hosts. Several methods, such as colorimetric agar plate assay, colorimetric spectrophotometer assay, bioactive assay and oil spreading assay have been established to detect and screen rhamnolipid production. Our engineered P. aeruginosa PEER02 strain can produce rhamnolipids with different carbon sources as substrate. Interfacial tension analysis (IFT) showed that different rhamnolipids from different

  20. AmiE, a novel N-acylhomoserine lactone acylase belonging to the amidase family, from the activated-sludge isolate Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Seiji; Yasumoto, Sera; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-11-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum-sensing signal molecules. We have reported that Acinetobacter strains isolated from activated sludge have AHL-degrading activity. In this study, we cloned the amiE gene as an AHL-degradative gene from the genomic library of Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that AmiE functions as an AHL acylase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond of AHL. AmiE showed a high level of degrading activity against AHLs with long acyl chains but no activity against AHLs with acyl chains shorter than eight carbons. AmiE showed homology with a member of the amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but not with any known AHL acylase enzymes. An amino acid sequence of AmiE from Ooi24 showed greater than 99% identities with uncharacterized proteins from Acinetobacter ursingii CIP 107286 and Acinetobacter sp. strain CIP 102129, but it was not found in the draft or complete genome sequences of other Acinetobacter strains. The presence of transposase-like genes around the amiE genes of these three Acinetobacter strains suggests that amiE is transferred by a putative transposon. Furthermore, the expression of AmiE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced AHL accumulation and elastase activity, which were regulated by AHL-mediated quorum sensing.

  1. Crystal structure of PvdO from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zenglin; Gao, Fei; Bai, Guohui; Xia, Hengchuan; Gu, Lichuan; Xu, Sujuan

    2017-02-26

    Pyoverdine I (PVDI) is a water-soluble fluorescein siderophore with strong iron chelating ability from the gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Compared to common siderophores, PVDI is a relatively large compound whose synthesis requires a group of enzymes with different catalytic activities. In addition to four nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) which are responsible for the production of the peptide backbone of PVDI, several additional enzymes are associated with the modification of the side chains. PvdO is one of these enzymes and participates in PVDI precursor maturation in the periplasm. We determined the crystal structure of PvdO at 1.24 Å resolution. The PvdO structure shares a common fold with some FGly-generating enzymes (FGE) and is stabilized by Ca(2+). However, the catalytic residues in FGE are not observed in PvdO, indicating PvdO adopts a unique catalytic mechanism.

  2. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  3. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Manmohit; Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Sharma, Deepmala; Pandey, Himanshu; Narvi, Shahid Suhail; Agarwal, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a system of stimuli and responses in bacterial cells governed by their population density, through which they regulate genes that control virulence factors and biofilm formation. Despite considerable research on QS and the discovery of new antibiotics, QS-controlled biofilm formation by microorganisms in clinical settings has remained a problem because of nascent drug resistance, which requires screening of diverse compounds for anti-QS activities. Cinnamon is a dietary phytochemical that is traditionally used to remedy digestive problems and assorted contagions, which suggests that cinnamon might contain chemicals that can hinder the QS process. To test this hypothesis, the anti-QS activity of cinnamon oil against P. aeruginosa was tested, measured by the inhibition of biofilm formation and other QS-associated phenomena, including virulence factors such as pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, protease, alginate production, and swarming activity. To this end, multiple microscopy analyses, including light, scanning electron and confocal microscopy, revealed the ability of cinnamon oil to inhibit P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms and their accompanying extracellular polymeric substances. This work is the first to demonstrate that cinnamon oil can influence various QS-based phenomena in P. aeruginosa PAO1, including biofilm formation.

  4. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Manmohit; Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Sharma, Deepmala; Pandey, Himanshu; Narvi, Shahid Suhail; Agarwal, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a system of stimuli and responses in bacterial cells governed by their population density, through which they regulate genes that control virulence factors and biofilm formation. Despite considerable research on QS and the discovery of new antibiotics, QS-controlled biofilm formation by microorganisms in clinical settings has remained a problem because of nascent drug resistance, which requires screening of diverse compounds for anti-QS activities. Cinnamon is a dietary phytochemical that is traditionally used to remedy digestive problems and assorted contagions, which suggests that cinnamon might contain chemicals that can hinder the QS process. To test this hypothesis, the anti-QS activity of cinnamon oil against P. aeruginosa was tested, measured by the inhibition of biofilm formation and other QS-associated phenomena, including virulence factors such as pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, protease, alginate production, and swarming activity. To this end, multiple microscopy analyses, including light, scanning electron and confocal microscopy, revealed the ability of cinnamon oil to inhibit P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms and their accompanying extracellular polymeric substances. This work is the first to demonstrate that cinnamon oil can influence various QS-based phenomena in P. aeruginosa PAO1, including biofilm formation. PMID:26263486

  5. Evaluating the influence of light intensity in mcyA gene expression and microcystin production in toxic strains of Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Daniel; Churro, Catarina; Valério, Elisabete

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are phytoplanktonic organisms widely occurring in freshwaters, being frequently associated with the production of toxins, namely microcystins (MCs). MCs are produced non-ribosomally by a multienzyme complex (mcy genes). It has been reported that environmental factors, such as light intensity, can influence toxin production. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of light intensity in the transcription of the mcyA gene and corresponding production of microcystins in toxic isolates of Planktothrix agardhii, where little is known, and compare them to Microcystis aeruginosa. For that purpose, cultures were exposed to three different light intensities (4, 20 and 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) for 18 days at 20 ± 1 °C. The growth was followed daily using absorbance readings. Samples were collected at each growth stage for cell counting, microcystins quantification and RNA extraction. The level of transcripts was quantified by RT-qPCR and the relative expression determined using 16S rDNA, gltA and rpoC1 as reference genes. The most stable reference genes in M. aeruginosa were rpoC1 and gltA, whereas in P. agardhii were 16S rDNA and gltA. There was a correspondence between the growth rate and light intensity in M. aeruginosa and P. agardhii. The growth rates for both species were lower at 4 and higher at 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Microcystin concentration per cell was similar between light intensities in M. aeruginosa and over time, while in P. agardhii it was higher in the stationary phase at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). There were differences in the expression of mcyA between the two species. In M. aeruginosa, the highest levels of expression occurred at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the adaptation phase, whereas for P. agardhii it was at 4μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the exponential growth phase. Our results indicate that the light intensities tested had distinct influences on the growth, microcystin production and mcyA expression levels

  6. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  7. Catalytic activity of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-02-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylases (HPAHs) of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase family are attractive enzymes that possess the catalytic potential to synthesize valuable ortho-diphenol compounds from simple monophenol compounds. In this study, we investigated the catalytic activity of HPAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 toward cinnamic acid derivatives. We prepared Escherichia coli cells expressing the hpaB gene encoding the monooxygenase component and the hpaC gene encoding the oxidoreductase component. E. coli cells expressing HpaBC exhibited no or very low oxidation activity toward cinnamic acid, o-coumaric acid, and m-coumaric acid, whereas they rapidly oxidized p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. Interestingly, after p-coumaric acid was almost completely consumed, the resulting caffeic acid was further oxidized to 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid. In addition, HpaBC exhibited oxidation activity toward 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferaldehyde to produce the corresponding ortho-diphenols. We also investigated a flask-scale production of caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid as the model reaction for HpaBC-catalyzed syntheses of hydroxycinnamic acids. Since the initial concentrations of the substrate p-coumaric acid higher than 40 mM markedly inhibited its HpaBC-catalyzed oxidation, the reaction was carried out by repeatedly adding 20 mM of this substrate to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, by using the HpaBC whole-cell catalyst in the presence of glycerol, our experimental setup achieved the high-yield production of caffeic acid, i.e., 56.6 mM (10.2 g/L) within 24 h. These catalytic activities of HpaBC will provide an easy and environment-friendly synthetic approach to hydroxycinnamic acids.

  8. Application of the multifactor dimensionality reduction method in evaluation of the roles of multiple genes/enzymes in multidrug-resistant acquisition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Peng, Y; Bi, J; Xie, C; Chen, X; Li, Y; Ye, X; Zhou, J

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) infections are major threats to healthcare-associated infection control and the intrinsic molecular mechanisms of MDRPA are also unclear. We examined 348 isolates of P. aeruginosa, including 188 MDRPA and 160 non-MDRPA, obtained from five tertiary-care hospitals in Guangzhou, China. Significant correlations were found between gene/enzyme carriage and increased rates of antimicrobial resistance (P < 0·01). gyrA mutation, OprD loss and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) presence were identified as crucial molecular risk factors for MDRPA acquisition by a combination of univariate logistic regression and a multifactor dimensionality reduction approach. The MDRPA rate was also elevated with the increase in positive numbers of those three determinants (P < 0·001). Thus, gyrA mutation, OprD loss and MBL presence may serve as predictors for early screening of MDRPA infections in clinical settings.

  9. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel.

    PubMed

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents.

  10. Disruption of Microbial Biofilms by an Extracellular Protein Isolated from Epibiotic Tropical Marine Strain of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Dusane, Devendra H.; Damare, Samir R.; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V.; Ramaiah, N.; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine epibiotic bacteria produce bioactive compounds effective against microbial biofilms. The study examines antibiofilm ability of a protein obtained from a tropical marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis D1. Methodology/Principal Findings B. licheniformis strain D1 isolated from the surface of green mussel, Perna viridis showed antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida albicans BH, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and biofouling Bacillus pumilus TiO1 cultures. The antimicrobial activity was lost after treatment with trypsin and proteinase K. The protein was purified by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed the antimicrobial agent to be a 14 kDa protein designated as BL-DZ1. The protein was stable at 75°C for 30 min and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. The sequence alignment of the MALDI-fingerprint showed homology with the NCBI entry for a hypothetical protein (BL00275) derived from B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 with the accession number gi52082584. The protein showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.6 µg/ml against C. albicans. Against both P. aeruginosa and B. pumilus the MIC was 3.12 µg/ml. The protein inhibited microbial growth, decreased biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed biofilms of the representative cultures in polystyrene microtiter plates and on glass surfaces. Conclusion/Significance We isolated a protein from a tropical marine strain of B. licheniformis, assigned a function to the hypothetical protein entry in the NCBI database and described its application as a potential antibiofilm agent. PMID:23691235

  11. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg2+ or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  12. Nitrite reductase is critical for Pseudomonas aeruginosa survival during co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica A; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major aetiological agent of chronic pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, recent evidence suggests that the polymicrobial community of the CF lung may also harbour oral streptococci, and colonization by these micro-organisms may have a negative impact on P. aeruginosa within the CF lung. Our previous studies demonstrated that nitrite abundance plays an important role in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with oral streptococci. Nitrite reductase is a key enzyme involved in nitrite metabolism. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role nitrite reductase (gene nirS) plays in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Inactivation of nirS in both the chronic CF isolate FRD1 and acute wound isolate PAO1 reduced the survival rate of P. aeruginosa when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis. Growth of both mutants was restored when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis that was defective for H2O2 production. Furthermore, the nitrite reductase mutant was unable to kill Drosophila melanogaster during co-infection with S. parasanguinis. Taken together, these results suggest that nitrite reductase plays an important role for survival of P. aeruginosa during co-infection with S. parasanguinis.

  13. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  14. Bioalteration of synthetic Fe(III)-, Fe(II)-bearing basaltic glasses and Fe-free glass in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Impact of siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Huguenot, David; Fourdrin, Chloé; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Guyot, François

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of micro-organisms and their siderophores in the first steps of the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in aqueous media. In this regard, three different types of glasses - with or without iron, in the reduced Fe(II) or oxidized Fe(III) states - were prepared on the basis of a simplified basaltic glass composition. Control and Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated experiments were performed in a buffered (pH 6.5) nutrient depleted medium to stimulate the production of the pyoverdine siderophore. Results show that the presence of P. aeruginosa has an effect on the dissolution kinetics of all glasses as most of the calculated elemental release rates are increased compared to sterile conditions. Reciprocally, the composition of the glass in contact with P. aeruginosa has an impact on the bacterial growth and siderophore production. As an essential nutrient for this microbial strain, Fe notably appears to play a central role during biotic experiments. Its presence in the glass stimulates the bacterial growth and minimizes the synthesis of pyoverdine. Moreover the initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the glasses modulates this synthesis, as pyoverdine is not detected at all in the system in contact with Fe(III)-bearing glass. Finally, the dissolution rates appear to be correlated to siderophore concentrations as they increase with respect to sterile experiments in the order Fe(III)-bearing glass < Fe(II)-bearing glass < Fe-free glass. This increase is attributed to complexation reactions between siderophores and Fe or Al for Fe(II)-bearing glass or Fe-free glass, respectively. The dissolution of an Fe-free glass is significantly improved in the presence of bacteria, as initial dissolution rates are increased by a factor of 3. This study attests to the essential role of siderophores in the P. aeruginosa-promoted dissolution processes of basaltic glasses as well as to the complex relationships between the nutritional potential of the glass and

  15. Wide Dispersion of ST175 Clone despite High Genetic Diversity of Carbapenem-Nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains in 16 Spanish Hospitals▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María Isabel; Riera, Elena; Cabot, Gabriel; Willems, Rob; van Mansfeld, Rosa; Oliver, Antonio; Cantón, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    During the COMParative Activity of Carbapenems Testing (COMPACT) surveillance study, 448 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates were obtained from 16 Spanish hospitals. Nonsusceptibility (EUCAST breakpoints) to imipenem (35%), meropenem (33%), and/or doripenem (33%) was observed with 175 isolates (39%). Simultaneous resistance to these three drugs was observed with 126 of the 175 isolates (72%). Except for colistin, high resistance rates were observed among noncarbapenem antibiotics. Clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SpeI, discriminating 68 patterns. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed on 84 isolates representing different PFGE types and all participating hospitals. Thirty-nine sequence types (STs) could be distinguished, and of these, ST175 (48 isolates, 10 hospitals), ST646 (16 isolates, 4 hospitals), ST532 (13 isolates, 3 hospitals), and ST111 (13 isolates, 7 hospitals) were the most frequently encountered. Minimum-spanning tree analysis confirmed a wide dissemination of different clones among participant hospitals, particularly ST175. PFGE pattern comparison within the four most frequent STs revealed that ST175 isolates were relatively uniform, while ST646, ST532, and ST111 isolates were highly diverse, with almost every isolate belonging to a unique pulsotype, even when originating from the same center. The population of carbapenem-nonsusceptible P. aeruginosa isolates from 16 hospitals is highly diverse, with one ST (ST175) representing a highly conserved clone disseminated in 10 of the 16 participant hospitals. This ST175 clone should be added to the list of P. aeruginosa clones at high risk for epidemic spread, such as the Liverpool, Manchester, and Melbourne clones previously found in cystic fibrosis patients and ST235 in the nosocomial setting. PMID:21697331

  16. Comparative studies on growth and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa to Acorus calamus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S-H; Chang, J-J; Cao, J-Y; Yang, C-L

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the growth inhibition and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa during coexistence with Acorus calamus, algal densities, chlorophyll a contents, exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, catalase (CAT) activities, and peroxidase (POD) activities of the two algae strains were analyzed. Although the unicellular and colonial strains of M. aeruginosa were both inhibited by A. calamus, unicellular algae were more sensitive than the colonial algae. The measurement results for EPS, MDA, CAT, and POD showed that unicellular M. aeruginosa had higher levels of stress related damage than colonial strains when they were exposed to the same density of A. calamus, and the cellular defense system of colonial M. aeruginosa was stronger than that of unicellular M. aeruginosa. Natural blooms of Microcystis are typically composed of colonial forms of M. aeruginosa, therefore future efforts to control such blooms, possibly through the development of new algicides, should focus on the unique characteristics of colonial M. aeruginosa strains.

  17. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Type IV Pili in P. Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Touhami, Ahmed; Scheurwater, Edie; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are thin flexible protein filaments that extend from the cell membrane of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The mechanical properties of Tfp are of great importance since they allow bacteria to interact with and colonize various surfaces. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for both imaging and pulling on Tfp from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) and from its PilA, PilT, and FliC mutants. A single pilus filament was mechanically stretched and the resulting force-extension profiles were fitted using the worm-like-chain (WLC) model. The statistical distributions obtained for contour length, persistence length, and number of pili per bacteria pole, were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single pilus and the biogenesis functions of different proteins (PilA, PilT) involved in its assembly and disassembly. Importantly, the persistence length value of ˜ 1 μm measured in the present study, which is consistent with the curvature of the pili observed in our AFM images, is significantly lower than the value of 5 μm reported earlier by Skerker et al. (1). Our results shed new light on the role of mechanical forces that mediate bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm formation. 1- J.M. Skerker and H.C. Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 98, 6901-6904 (2001).

  19. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J.; Audette, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  20. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H; Wiegmann, Daniel D; Sherman, David H; McKay, Robert M; LiPuma, John J; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains.

  1. Glucose starvation-induced dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is cAMP and energy dependent.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tran T; McDougald, Diane; Klebensberger, Janosch; Al Qarni, Budoor; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Schleheck, David

    2012-01-01

    Carbon starvation has been shown to induce a massive dispersal event in biofilms of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the molecular pathways controlling this dispersal response remain unknown. We quantified changes in the proteome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cells during glucose starvation by differential peptide-fingerprint mass-spectrometry (iTRAQ). In addition, we monitored dispersal photometrically, as a decrease in turbidity/opacity of biofilms pre-grown and starved in continuous flow-cells, in order to evaluate treatments (e.g. inhibitors CCCP, arsenate, chloramphenicol, L-serine hydroxamate) and key mutants altered in biofilm development and dispersal (e.g. nirS, vfr, bdlA, rpoS, lasRrhlR, Pf4-bacteriophage and cyaA). In wild-type biofilms, dispersal started within five minutes of glucose starvation, was maximal after 2 h, and up to 60% of the original biomass had dispersed after 24 h of starvation. The changes in protein synthesis were generally not more than two fold and indicated that more than 100 proteins belonging to various classes, including carbon and energy metabolism, stress adaptation, and motility, were differentially expressed. For the different treatments, only the proton-ionophore CCCP or arsenate, an inhibitor of ATP synthesis, prevented dispersal of the biofilms. For the different mutants tested, only cyaA, the synthase of the intracellular second messenger cAMP, failed to disperse; complementation of the cyaA mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. Hence, the pathway for carbon starvation-induced biofilm dispersal in P. aeruginosa PAO1 involves ATP production via direct ATP synthesis and proton-motive force dependent step(s) and is mediated through cAMP, which is likely to control the activity of proteins involved in remodeling biofilm cells in preparation for planktonic survival.

  2. The gdhB gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an arginine-inducible NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase which is subject to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Abdelal, A T

    2001-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was purified, and its amino-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. This sequence information was used in identifying and cloning the encoding gdhB gene and its flanking regions. The molecular mass predicted from the derived sequence for the encoded NAD-GDH was 182.6 kDa, in close agreement with that determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme (180 kDa). Cross-linking studies established that the native NAD-GDH is a tetramer of equal subunits. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of NAD-GDH from P. aeruginosa with the GenBank database showed the highest homology with hypothetical polypeptides from Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rickettsia prowazakii, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Caulobacter crescentus. A moderate degree of homology, primarily in the central domain, was observed with the smaller tetrameric NAD-GDH (protomeric mass of 110 kDa) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Neurospora crassa. Comparison with the yet smaller hexameric GDH (protomeric mass of 48 to 55 kDa) of other prokaryotes yielded a low degree of homology that was limited to residues important for binding of substrates and for catalytic function. NAD-GDH was induced 27-fold by exogenous arginine and only 3-fold by exogenous glutamate. Primer extension experiments established that transcription of gdhB is initiated from an arginine-inducible promoter and that this induction is dependent on the arginine regulatory protein, ArgR, a member of the AraC/XyIS family of regulatory proteins. NAD-GDH was purified to homogeneity from a recombinant strain of P. aeruginosa and characterized. The glutamate saturation curve was sigmoid, indicating positive cooperativity in the binding of glutamate. NAD-GDH activity was subject to allosteric control by arginine and citrate, which

  3. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  4. Role of Iron Uptake Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Visaggio, Daniela; Facchini, Marcella; Pasquali, Paolo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia and chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Iron is essential for bacterial growth, and P. aeruginosa expresses multiple iron uptake systems, whose role in lung infection deserves further investigation. P. aeruginosa Fe3+ uptake systems include the pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores and two systems for heme uptake, all of which are dependent on the TonB energy transducer. P. aeruginosa also has the FeoB transporter for Fe2+ acquisition. To assess the roles of individual iron uptake systems in P. aeruginosa lung infection, single and double deletion mutants were generated in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and characterized in vitro, using iron-poor media and human serum, and in vivo, using a mouse model of lung infection. The iron uptake-null mutant (tonB1 feoB) and the Fe3+ transport mutant (tonB1) did not grow aerobically under low-iron conditions and were avirulent in the mouse model. Conversely, the wild type and the feoB, hasR phuR (heme uptake), and pchD (pyochelin) mutants grew in vitro and caused 60 to 90% mortality in mice. The pyoverdine mutant (pvdA) and the siderophore-null mutant (pvdA pchD) grew aerobically in iron-poor media but not in human serum, and they caused low mortality in mice (10 to 20%). To differentiate the roles of pyoverdine in iron uptake and virulence regulation, a pvdA fpvR double mutant defective in pyoverdine production but expressing wild-type levels of pyoverdine-regulated virulence factors was generated. Deletion of fpvR in the pvdA background partially restored the lethal phenotype, indicating that pyoverdine contributes to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa lung infection by combining iron transport and virulence-inducing capabilities. PMID:27271740

  5. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence as a result of phage predation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; van de Ven, Theo G M; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    The rapid increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has attracted attention to bacteriophages for treating and preventing bacterial infections. Bacteriophages can drive the diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, giving rise to phage-resistant variants with different phenotypes from their ancestral hosts. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of phage resistance on cytotoxicity of host populations toward cultured mammalian cells. The library of phage-resistant P. aeruginosa PAO1 variants used was developed previously via experimental evolution of an isogenic host population using phages PP7 and E79. Our results presented herein indicate that the phage-resistant variants developed in a heterogeneous phage environment exhibit a greater ability to impede metabolic action of cultured human keratinocytes and have a greater tendency to cause membrane damage even though they cannot invade the cells in large numbers. They also show a heightened resistance to phagocytosis by model murine macrophages. Furthermore, all isolates produced higher levels of at least one of the secreted virulence factors, namely, total proteases, elastase, phospholipase C, and hemolysins. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed upregulation in the transcription of a number of genes associated with virulence of P. aeruginosa for the phage-resistant variants. The results of this study indicate a significant change in the in vitro virulence of P. aeruginosa following phage predation and highlight the need for caution in the selection and design of phages and phage cocktails for therapeutic use.

  6. Cryptic transposable phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.N.; Mit`kina, L.N.; Pleteneva, E.A.; Aleshin, V.V.

    1995-11-01

    Frequencies of nucleotide sequences homologous to phage transposons (PT) of two species, D3112 and B3, were assessed in genomes of natural Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains by the dot-blot hybridization method. These strains were incapable of liberating viable phages on a lawn of the PA01 standard indicator strain of P. aeruginosa. It was shown that the homologies detected belong to two groups, high and intermediate, with respect to homology level. Homology patterns were classified as high when they provided signals comparable to those for hybridization in a positive control; patterns were classified as intermediate when the hybridization level was higher than the background level, but lower than in the positive control. Homologous PT sequences were designated as cryptic PT. Intact cryptic PT prophages were shown to exist in genomes of particular natural strains manifesting a higher level of hybridization. However, the growth of these phages was limited by the restriction system of strain PA01. It is possible to isolate strains maintaining the growth of some cryptic PT. These strains differed from P. aeruginosa with respect to the specificity of the restriction and modification system. Nevertheless, in most cases, the attempt to identify a novel host capable of maintaining growth of a cryptic PT failed. Natural strains often carry cryptic PT related to both known PT species, D3112 and B3. The frequency of cryptic PT is extremely high, reaching 30% in strains with a high level of homology only and up to 50% in all strains exhibiting homology. This high PT frequency is assumed to be associated with the considerable variation of P. aeruginosa. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. An investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth on novel nanocellulose fibre dressings.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lydia C; Khan, Saira; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Wright, Chris J; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2016-02-10

    Nanocellulose from wood is a novel biomaterial, which is highly fibrillated at the nanoscale. This affords the material a number of advantages, including self-assembly, biodegradability and the ability to absorb and retain moisture, which highlights its potential usefulness in clinical wound-dressing applications. In these in vitro studies, the wound pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was used to assess the ability of two nanocellulose materials to impair bacterial growth (<48 h). The two nanocelluloses had a relatively small fraction of residual fibres (<4%) and thus a large fraction of nanofibrils (widths <20 nm). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging demonstrated impaired biofilm growth on the nanocellulose films and increased cell death when compared to a commercial control wound dressing, Aquacel(®). Nanocellulose suspensions inhibited bacterial growth, whilst UV-vis spectrophotometry and laser profilometry also revealed the ability of nanocellulose to form smooth, translucent films. Atomic force microscopy studies of the surface properties of nanocellulose demonstrated that PAO1 exhibited markedly contrasting morphology when grown on the nanocellulose film surfaces compared to an Aquacel(®) control dressing (p<0.05). This study highlights the potential utility of these biodegradable materials, from a renewable source, for wound dressing applications in the prevention and treatment of biofilm development.

  8. Agaricus blazei hot water extract shows anti quorum sensing activity in the nosocomial human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Soković, Marina; Ćirić, Ana; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Nikolić, Miloš; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2014-04-03

    The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria, including the Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is considered as a novel and promising target for anti-infectious agents. In this study, the effect of the sub-MICs of Agaricus blazei water extract on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Sub-MIC concentrations of the extract which did not kill P. aeruginosa nor inhibited its growth, demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa, such as pyocyanin production, twitching and swimming motility. The biofilm forming capability of P. aeruginosa was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at sub-MIC values. Water extract of A. blazei is a promising source of antiquorum sensing and antibacterial compounds.

  9. Identification of the putrescine biosynthetic genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and characterization of agmatine deiminase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase of the arginine decarboxylase pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2003-03-01

    Putrescine can be synthesized either directly from ornithine by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; the speC product) or indirectly from arginine via arginine decarboxylase (ADC; the speA product). The authors identified the speA and speC genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The activities of the two decarboxylases were similar and each enzyme alone appeared to direct sufficient formation of the polyamine for normal growth. A mutant defective in both speA and speC was a putrescine auxotroph. In this strain, agmatine deiminase (the aguA product) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (the aguB product), which were initially identified as the catabolic enzymes of agmatine, biosynthetically convert agmatine to putrescine in the ADC pathway: a double mutant of aguAB and speC was a putrescine auxotroph. AguA was purified as a homodimer of 43 kDa subunits and AguB as a homohexamer of 33 kDa subunits. AguA specifically deiminated agmatine with K(m) and K(cat) values of 0.6 mM and 4.2 s(-1), respectively. AguB was specific to N-carbamoylputrescine and the K(m) and K(cat) values of the enzyme for the substrate were 0.5 mM and 3.3 s(-1), respectively. Whereas AguA has no structural relationship to any known C-N hydrolases, AguB is a protein of the nitrilase family that performs thiol-assisted catalysis. Inhibition by SH reagents and the conserved cysteine residue in AguA and its homologues suggested that this enzyme is also involved in thiol-mediated catalysis.

  10. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-03-06

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  11. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  12. Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CupD Fimbrial Genes Is Antagonistically Controlled by RcsB and the EAL-Containing PvrR Response Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Helga; Ball, Geneviève; Giraud, Caroline; Filloux, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium with a high adaptive potential that allows proliferation in a broad range of hosts or niches. It is also the causative agent of both acute and chronic biofilm-related infections in humans. Three cup gene clusters (cupA-C), involved in the assembly of cell surface fimbriae, have been shown to be involved in biofilm formation by the P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 or PAK. In PA14 isolates, a fourth cluster, named cupD, was identified within a pathogenicity island, PAPI-I, and may contribute to the higher virulence of this strain. Expression of the cupA genes is controlled by the HNS-like protein MvaT, whereas the cupB and cupC genes are under the control of the RocS1A1R two-component system. In this study, we show that cupD gene expression is positively controlled by the response regulator RcsB. As a consequence, CupD fimbriae are assembled on the cell surface, which results in a number of phenotypes such as a small colony morphotype, increased biofilm formation and decreased motility. These behaviors are compatible with the sessile bacterial lifestyle. The balance between planktonic and sessile lifestyles is known to be linked to the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP with high levels favoring biofilm formation. We showed that the EAL domain-containing PvrR response regulator counteracts the activity of RcsB on cupD gene expression. The action of PvrR is likely to involve c-di-GMP degradation through phosphodiesterase activity, confirming the key role of this second messenger in the balance between bacterial lifestyles. The regulatory network between RcsB and PvrR remains to be elucidated, but it stands as a potential model system to study how the equilibrium between the two lifestyles could be influenced by therapeutic agents that favor the planktonic lifestyle. This would render the pathogen accessible for the immune system or conventional antibiotic treatment. PMID:19547710

  13. The FinR-regulated essential gene fprA, encoding ferredoxin NADP+ reductase: Roles in superoxide-mediated stress protection and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Boonma, Siriwan; Romsang, Adisak; Duang-nkern, Jintana; Atichartpongkul, Sopapan; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two genes encoding ferredoxin NADP(+) reductases, denoted fprA and fprB. We show here that P. aeruginosa fprA is an essential gene. However, the ΔfprA mutant could only be successfully constructed in PAO1 strains containing an extra copy of fprA on a mini-Tn7 vector integrated into the chromosome or carrying it on a temperature-sensitive plasmid. The strain containing an extra copy of the ferredoxin gene (fdx1) could suppress the essentiality of FprA. Other ferredoxin genes could not suppress the requirement for FprA, suggesting that Fdx1 mediates the essentiality of FprA. The expression of fprA was highly induced in response to treatments with a superoxide generator, paraquat, or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The induction of fprA by these treatments depended on FinR, a LysR-family transcription regulator. In vivo and in vitro analysis suggested that oxidized FinR acted as a transcriptional activator of fprA expression by binding to its regulatory box, located 20 bases upstream of the fprA -35 promoter motif. This location of the FinR box also placed it between the -35 and -10 motifs of the finR promoter, where the reduced regulator functions as a repressor. Under uninduced conditions, binding of FinR repressed its own transcription but had no effect on fprA expression. Exposure to paraquat or NaOCl converted FinR to a transcriptional activator, leading to the expression of both fprA and finR. The ΔfinR mutant showed an increased paraquat sensitivity phenotype and attenuated virulence in the Drosophila melanogaster host model. These phenotypes could be complemented by high expression of fprA, indicating that the observed phenotypes of the ΔfinR mutant arose from the inability to up-regulate fprA expression. In addition, increased expression of fprB was unable to rescue essentiality of fprA or the superoxide-sensitive phenotype of the ΔfinR mutant, suggesting distinct mechanisms of the FprA and FprB enzymes. PMID:28187184

  14. Characterization of the medium- and long-chain n-alkanes degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SJTD-1 and its alkane hydroxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12-C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18.

  15. Effect of bacterial inoculation of strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alcaligenes feacalis and Bacillus subtilis on germination, growth and heavy metal (Cd, Cr, and Ni) uptake of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Ndeddy Aka, Robinson Junior; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial inoculation may influence Brassica juncea growth and heavy metal (Ni, Cr, and Cd) accumulation. Three metal tolerant bacterial isolates (BCr3, BCd33, and BNi11) recovered from mine tailings, identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa KP717554, Alcaligenes feacalis KP717561, and Bacillus subtilis KP717559 were used. The isolates exhibited multiple plant growth beneficial characteristics including the production of indole-3-acetic acid, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, insoluble phosphate solubilization together with the potential to protect plants against fungal pathogens. Bacterial inoculation improved seeds germination of B. juncea plant in the presence of 0.1 mM Cr, Cd, and Ni, as compared to the control treatment. Compared with control treatment, soil inoculation with bacterial isolates significantly increased the amount of soluble heavy metals in soil by 51% (Cr), 50% (Cd), and 44% (Ni) respectively. Pot experiment of B. juncea grown in soil spiked with 100 mg kg(-1) of NiCl2, 100 mg kg(-1) of CdCl2, and 150 mg kg(-1) of K2Cr2O7, revealed that inoculation with metal tolerant bacteria not only protected plants against the toxic effects of heavy metals, but also increased growth and metal accumulation of plants significantly. These findings suggest that such metal tolerant, plant growth promoting bacteria are valuable tools which could be used to develop bio-inoculants for enhancing the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  16. From the Environment to the Host: Re-Wiring of the Transcriptome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 22°C to 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Piotr; Suárez-Diez, María; Puchałka, Jacek; Albertí, Sebastian; dos Santos, Vitor Martins; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly versatile opportunistic pathogen capable of colonizing multiple ecological niches. This bacterium is responsible for a wide range of both acute and chronic infections in a variety of hosts. The success of this microorganism relies on its ability to adapt to environmental changes and re-program its regulatory and metabolic networks. The study of P. aeruginosa adaptation to temperature is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis upon infection of its mammalian host. We examined the effects of growth temperature on the transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analysis of PAO1 grown in Lysogeny broth at mid-exponential phase at 22°C and 37°C revealed that temperature changes are responsible for the differential transcriptional regulation of 6.4% of the genome. Major alterations were observed in bacterial metabolism, replication, and nutrient acquisition. Quorum-sensing and exoproteins secreted by type I, II, and III secretion systems, involved in the adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the mammalian host during infection, were up-regulated at 37°C compared to 22°C. Genes encoding arginine degradation enzymes were highly up-regulated at 22°C, together with the genes involved in the synthesis of pyoverdine. However, genes involved in pyochelin biosynthesis were up-regulated at 37°C. We observed that the changes in expression of P. aeruginosa siderophores correlated to an overall increase in Fe2+ extracellular concentration at 37°C and a peak in Fe3+ extracellular concentration at 22°C. This suggests a distinct change in iron acquisition strategies when the bacterium switches from the external environment to the host. Our work identifies global changes in bacterial metabolism and nutrient acquisition induced by growth at different temperatures. Overall, this study identifies factors that are regulated in genome-wide adaptation processes and discusses how this life-threatening pathogen responds to temperature. PMID:24587139

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  18. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-08-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL.

  19. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL. Images PMID:2506813

  20. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C P; Huisman, Jef

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2.

  1. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2. PMID:26319871

  2. Calcium induces tobramycin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by regulating RND efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Sharmily; Guragain, Manita; Lenaburg, Dirk L; Kubat, Ryan; Patrauchan, Marianna A

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic multidrug resistant pathogen causing severe chronic infections. Our previous studies showed that elevated calcium (Ca(2+)) enhances production of several virulence factors and plant infectivity of the pathogen. Here we show that Ca(2+) increases resistance of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to tobramycin, antibiotic commonly used to treat Pseudomonas infections. LC-MS/MS-based comparative analysis of the membrane proteomes of P aeruginosa grown at elevated versus not added Ca(2+), determined that the abundances of two RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM and MexVW-OprM, were increased in the presence of elevated Ca(2+). Analysis of twelve transposon mutants with disrupted RND efflux pumps showed that six of them (mexB, muxC, mexY, mexJ, czcB, and mexE) contribute to Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance. Transcriptional analyses by promoter activity and RT-qPCR showed that the expression of mexAB, muxABC, mexXY, mexJK, czcCBA, and mexVW is increased by elevated Ca(2+). Disruption of mexJ, mexC, mexI, and triA significantly decreased Ca(2+)-induced plant infectivity of the pathogen. Earlier, our group showed that PAO1 maintains intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)in) homeostasis, which mediates Ca(2+) regulation of P. aeruginosa virulence, and identified four putative Ca(2+) transporters involved in this process (Guragain et al., 2013). Here we show that three of these transporters (PA2435, PA2092, PA4614) play role in Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance and one of them (PA2435) contributes to Ca(2+) regulation of mexAB-oprM promoter activity. Furthermore, mexJ, czcB, and mexE contribute to the maintenance of Ca(2+)in homeostasis. This provides the first evidence that Ca(2+)in homeostasis mediates Ca(2+) regulation of RND transport systems, which contribute to Ca(2+)-enhanced tobramycin resistance and plant infectivity in P. aeruginosa.

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgL

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Francis; Arora, Kritica; Robinson, Howard; Neculai, Ana Mirela; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The periplasmic alginate lyase AlgL is essential for the synthesis and export of the exopolysaccharide alginate in Pseudomonas sp. and also plays a role in its depolymerization. P. aeruginosa PAO1 AlgL has been overexpressed and purified and diffraction-quality crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals grew as thin plates, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.4, b = 59.6, c = 102.1 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The AlgL crystals exhibited the symmetry of space group P212121 and diffracted to a minimum d-­spacing of 1.64 Å. Based on the Matthews coefficient (V M = 2.20 Å3 Da−1), one molecule is estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:22691793

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Döring, G.; Hörz, M.; Ortelt, J.; Grupp, H.; Wolz, C.

    1993-01-01

    Genotyping was used to analyse Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from sink drains and 15 intubated patients as part of a 3-month prospective study of strain transmission in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. Ninety percent of all washbasin drains were persistently contaminated with several P. aeruginosa genotypes. In 60% (9/15) of the patients, P. aeruginosa colonization or infection was hospital-acquired: P. aeruginosa strains isolated from these patients were present in hospital sinks or in other patients before their admission. Since all patients were immobile, personnel were the probable route of transmission of P. aeruginosa in the hospital. The mechanism of strain transmission from sinks to hands during hand washing was investigated in a children's hospital. When P. aeruginosa was present at densities of > 10(5)/c.f.u. per ml in sink drains, hand washing resulted in hand contamination with P. aeruginosa via aerosol generation in the majority of experiments or P. aeruginosa was detected using an air sampler above the washing basin. High P. aeruginosa cfu were present at 4.30 h in the eight sinks (5.4 x 10(5)-7.0 x 10(10) c.f.u./ml), whereas at 13.00 h P. aeruginosa c.f.u. were significantly lower (3.1 x 10(2)-8.0 x 10(5) c.f.u./ml). These data reveal that the danger of bacterial contamination of hands during hand washing is highest in the morning. The identified transmission routes demand more effective hygienic measures in hospital settings particularly concerning personnel hands and sink drains. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8519308

  5. ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq Reveal an AmrZ-Mediated Mechanism for Cyclic di-GMP Synthesis and Biofilm Development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Newsom, David; Kelly, Benjamin; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jennings, Laura K.; Xu, Binjie; Limoli, Dominique H.; Harrison, Joe J.; Parsek, Matthew R.; White, Peter; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor AmrZ regulates genes important for P. aeruginosa virulence, including type IV pili, extracellular polysaccharides, and the flagellum; however, the global effect of AmrZ on gene expression remains unknown, and therefore, AmrZ may directly regulate many additional genes that are crucial for infection. Compared to the wild type strain, a ΔamrZ mutant exhibits a rugose colony phenotype, which is commonly observed in variants that accumulate the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). Cyclic di-GMP is produced by diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that AmrZ limits the intracellular accumulation of c-di-GMP through transcriptional repression of gene(s) encoding a DGC. In support of this, we observed elevated c-di-GMP in the ΔamrZ mutant compared to the wild type strain. Consistent with other strains that accumulate c-di-GMP, when grown as a biofilm, the ΔamrZ mutant formed larger microcolonies than the wild-type strain. This enhanced biofilm formation was abrogated by expression of a PDE. To identify potential target DGCs, a ChIP-Seq was performed and identified regions of the genome that are bound by AmrZ. RNA-Seq experiments revealed the entire AmrZ regulon, and characterized AmrZ as an activator or repressor at each binding site. We identified an AmrZ-repressed DGC-encoding gene (PA4843) from this cohort, which we named AmrZ dependent cyclase A (adcA). PAO1 overexpressing adcA accumulates 29-fold more c-di-GMP than the wild type strain, confirming the cyclase activity of AdcA. In biofilm reactors, a ΔamrZ ΔadcA double mutant formed smaller microcolonies than the single ΔamrZ mutant, indicating adcA is responsible for the hyper biofilm phenotype of the ΔamrZ mutant. This study combined the techniques of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to define the comprehensive regulon of a bifunctional transcriptional regulator. Moreover, we identified a c-di-GMP mediated mechanism for Amr

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V; Machen, Terry E

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum-sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (C12). C12 (10-100 µM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CF ΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψ(mito)) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca(2+) and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 min and were complete in 1-2 h. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψ(mito) and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψ(mito) and increases in Ca(cyto) like 10-50 µM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3. PMID:24994800

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H; Studholme, David J; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  9. Cloning of a Phosphate-Regulated Hemolysin Gene (Phospholipase C) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Vasil, Michael L.; Berka, Randy M.; Gray, Gregory L.; Nakai, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a phosphate (Pi)-regulated extracellular protein which may be a significant virulence factor of this organism. The gene for this hemolytic enzyme was cloned on a 4.1-megadalton (Mdal) fragment from a BamHI digest of P. aeruginosa PAO1 genomic DNA and was inserted into the BamHI sites of the multicopy Escherichia coli(pBR322) and P. aeruginosa(pMW79) vectors. The E. coli and P. aeruginosa recombinant plasmids were designated pGV26 and pVB81, respectively. A restriction map of the 4.1-Mdal fragment from pGV26 was constructed, using double and single digestions with BamHI and EcoRI and several different restriction enzymes. Based on information from this map, a 2.4-Mdal BamHI/BglII fragment containing the gene for phospholipase C was subcloned to pBR322. The hybrid plasmids pGV26 and pVB81 direct the synthesis of enzymatically active phospholipase C, which is also hemolytic. The plasmid-directed synthesis of phospholipase C in E. coli or P. aeruginosa is not repressible by Pi as is the chromosomally directed synthesis in P. aeruginosa. Data are presented which suggest that the synthesis of phospholipase C from pGV26 and pVB81 is directed from the tetracycline resistance gene promoter. The level of enzyme activity produced by E. coli(pGV26) is slightly higher than the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under repressed conditions. In contrast, the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pVB81) are at least 600-fold higher than the levels produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under repressed conditions and approximately 20-fold higher than those produced by P. aeruginosa(pMW79) under derepressed conditions. The majority (85%) of the enzyme produced by E. coli(pGV26) remained cell associated, whereas >95% of the enzyme produced by P. aeruginosa(pVB81) was extracellular. Analysis of extracellular proteins from cultures of P. aeruginosa(pMW79) and P. aeruginosa(pVB81) by high-performance liquid chromotography and

  10. Dioxygenase-mediated quenching of quinolone-dependent quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pustelny, Christian; Albers, Alexander; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Parschat, Katja; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Fetzner, Susanne

    2009-12-24

    2-Heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) is a quorum-sensing signal molecule used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structural similarity between 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone, the natural substrate for the 2,4-dioxygenase, Hod, and PQS prompted us to investigate whether Hod quenched PQS signaling. Hod is capable of catalyzing the conversion of PQS to N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide. In P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures, exogenously supplied Hod protein reduced expression of the PQS biosynthetic gene pqsA, expression of the PQS-regulated virulence determinants lectin A, pyocyanin, and rhamnolipids, and virulence in planta. However, the proteolytic cleavage of Hod by extracellular proteases, competitive inhibition by the PQS precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone, and PQS binding to rhamnolipids reduced the efficiency of Hod as a quorum-quenching agent. Nevertheless, these data indicate that enzyme-mediated PQS inactivation has potential as an antivirulence strategy against P. aeruginosa.

  11. PME-1, an extended-spectrum β-lactamase identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guo-Bao; Adams-Haduch, Jennifer M; Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Wang, Hong-Ning; Doi, Yohei

    2011-06-01

    A novel extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) was identified in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate obtained from a patient admitted to a hospital in Pennsylvania in 2008. The patient had a prolonged hospitalization in a hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, before being transferred to the United States. The novel ESBL, designated PME-1 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa ESBL 1), is a molecular class A, Bush-Jacoby-Medeiros group 2be enzyme and shared 50, 43, and 41% amino acid identity with the L2 β-lactamase of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, CTX-M-9, and KPC-2, respectively. PME-1 conferred clinically relevant resistance to ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, and aztreonam in P. aeruginosa PAO1 but not to carbapenems. Purified PME-1 showed good hydrolytic activity against ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and aztreonam, while activity against carbapenems and cefepime could not be measured. PME-1 was inhibited well by β-lactamase inhibitors, including clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam. The bla(PME-1) gene was carried by an approximately 9-kb plasmid and flanked by tandem ISCR24 elements.

  12. Identification of proteins associated with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Roschitzki, Bernd; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo

    2012-10-05

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacteria that are embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymeric substances (EPSs). The EPS is composed of nucleic acids, polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins. While polysaccharide components have been well studied, the protein content of the matrix is largely unknown. Here we conducted a comprehensive proteomic study to identify proteins associated with the biofilm matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (the matrix proteome). This analysis revealed that approximately 30% of the identified matrix proteins were outer membrane proteins, which are also typically found in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Electron microscopic inspection confirmed the presence of large amounts of OMVs within the biofilm matrix, supporting previous notions that OMVs are abundant constituents of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Our results demonstrate that while some proteins associated with the P. aeruginosa matrix are derived from secreted proteins and lysed cells, the large majority of the matrix proteins originate from OMVs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein content of planktonic and biofilm OMVs is surprisingly different and may reflect the different physiological states of planktonic and sessile cells.

  13. Structural Relationship of the Lipid A Acyl Groups to Activation of Murine Toll-Like Receptor 4 by Lipopolysaccharides from Pathogenic Strains of Burkholderia mallei, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Korneev, Kirill V.; Arbatsky, Nikolay P.; Molinaro, Antonio; Palmigiano, Angelo; Shaikhutdinova, Rima Z.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Pier, Gerald B.; Kondakova, Anna N.; Sviriaeva, Ekaterina N.; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is required for activation of innate immunity upon recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria. The ability of TLR4 to respond to a particular LPS species is important since insufficient activation may not prevent bacterial growth while excessive immune reaction may lead to immunopathology associated with sepsis. Here, we investigated the biological activity of LPS from Burkholderia mallei that causes glanders, and from the two well-known opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causative agents of nosocomial infections). For each bacterial strain, R-form LPS preparations were purified by hydrophobic chromatography and the chemical structure of lipid A, an LPS structural component, was elucidated by HR-MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The biological activity of LPS samples was evaluated by their ability to induce production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF, by bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our results demonstrate direct correlation between the biological activity of LPS from these pathogenic bacteria and the extent of their lipid A acylation. PMID:26635809

  14. Epinecidin-1 Has Immunomodulatory Effects, Facilitating Its Therapeutic Use in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Sheen, Jenn-Feng; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are garnering attention as possible alternatives to antibiotics. Here, we describe the antimicrobial properties of epinecidin-1 against a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa R) and a P. aeruginosa strain from ATCC (P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660) in vivo. The MICs of epinecidin-1 against P. aeruginosa R and P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 were determined and compared with those of imipenem. Epinecidin-1 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis infection caused by P. aeruginosa R or P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that epinecidin-1 enhances the rate of survival of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa through both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24820078

  15. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr.

  16. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  17. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  18. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H.; Wiegmann, Daniel D.; Sherman, David H.; McKay, Robert M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the pre