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Sample records for aesthetic breast surgery

  1. Review of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Rachel L; Stevens, Roger J G; Harris, Paul A; Rusby, Jennifer E

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging (3D-SI) is being marketed as a tool in aesthetic breast surgery. It has recently also been studied in the objective evaluation of cosmetic outcome of oncological procedures. The aim of this review is to summarise the use of 3D-SI in oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery. An extensive literature review was undertaken to identify published studies. Two reviewers independently screened all abstracts and selected relevant articles using specific inclusion criteria. Seventy two articles relating to 3D-SI for breast surgery were identified. These covered endpoints such as image acquisition, calculations and data obtainable, comparison of 3D and 2D imaging and clinical research applications of 3D-SI. The literature provides a favourable view of 3D-SI. However, evidence of its superiority over current methods of clinical decision making, surgical planning, communication and evaluation of outcome is required before it can be accepted into mainstream practice.

  2. [Ethics in aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    de Fontaine, S

    2013-09-01

    The use of aesthetic medicine and surgery is increasingly popular, and becomes a true phenomenon of society. Many women and men are asking for such treatments. A large proportion of the population carry the idea that this branch of medicine is a true consumer product. The acts of aesthetic medicine and surgery are not without consequences. They produce important changes in the human body, and carry risks of complications that must be taken into account. The overrated media interest of this subject produce commercial drifts that act against the general health of the patients. The invasive acts of medical aesthetics must be placed in a precise legal and ethical framework to protect the patients. A project of a new Belgian law is on the way, awaiting for publication in "Le Moniteur": this law (proposed by Senator Dominique Tilmans) clarifies the competences required for performing non-surgical aesthetic treatments and specific aesthetic invasive treatments. Other projects of law are being studied, and will concern publicity, information of the public, and rules of private clinics where aesthetic invasive acts are performed. Recent international news have shown, with the PIP breast prosthesis scandal, that surveillance of the medical aesthetic field is mandatory. To provide a better protection of patients, the legislator has decided legislate over the subject.

  3. Aesthetic Evaluation in Oncoplastic and Conservative Breast Surgery: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meszaros, Paolo; Baldelli, Ilaria; Bisso, Nadia; Franchelli, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Background: In conservative breast surgery, the achievement of a satisfactory cosmetic result could be challenging; oncoplastic techniques may be helpful in many cases. A comparative analysis was performed among 3 groups of patients undergoing oncoplastic techniques plus external radiation therapy or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and breast conservative surgery plus external radiation therapy; long-term oncologic results in terms of disease relapse and aesthetic outcomes were compared. Methods: Ninety-six patients were considered: 32 patients treated with oncoplastic surgery, 16 then subjected to radiotherapy (group 1) and another 16 treated with IORT (group 2); 64 patients treated by conservative surgery and radiotherapy formed the control group (group 3). Patients were asked to give a judgment on the cosmetic result considering the following parameters: breast symmetry, appearance of the residual scar, symmetry between the 2 nipple-areola complexes, global aesthetic judgment, and satisfaction about the result. Results: With respect to the oncological and aesthetic outcome, the statistical significance of the results obtained in the 3 groups was calculated using the chi-square test. The results, processed by the chi-square test, were not statistically significant; however, the overall judgments expressed by the patients of all 3 groups were more than satisfactory (scores greater than or equal to 6). Conclusions: In our experience, when the inclusion criteria are satisfied and the equipment is available, oncoplastic techniques associated with IORT should be considered the treatment of choice for breast cancer in early stage. The excellent cosmetic results and patient’s satisfaction encourage us to continue on this way. PMID:26034646

  4. A computational tool for preoperative breast augmentation planning in aesthetic plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Georgii, Joachim; Eder, Maximilian; Bürger, Kai; Klotz, Sebastian; Ferstl, Florian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Breast augmentation was the most commonly performed cosmetic surgery procedure in 2011 in the United States. Although aesthetically pleasing surgical results can only be achieved if the correct breast implant is selected from a large variety of different prosthesis sizes and shapes available on the market, surgeons still rely on visual assessment and other subjective approaches for operative planning because of lacking objective evaluation tools. In this paper, we present the development of a software prototype for augmentation mammaplasty simulation solely based on 3-D surface scans, from which patient-specific finite-element models are generated in a semiautomatic process. The finite-element model is used to preoperatively simulate the expected breast shapes using physical soft-tissue mechanics. Our approach uses a novel mechanism based on so-called displacement templates, which, for a specific implant shape and position, describe the respective internal body forces. Due to a highly efficient numerical solver we can provide immediate visual feedback of the simulation results, and thus, the software prototype can be integrated smoothly into the medical workflow. The clinical value of the developed 3-D computational tool for aesthetic breast augmentation surgery planning is demonstrated in patient-specific use cases. PMID:24132029

  5. Low-cost surface reconstruction for aesthetic results assessment and prediction in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Rene M; Hipwell, John H; Williams, Norman R; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S; Hawkes, David J; Stoyanov, Danail

    2015-08-01

    The high incidence and low mortality of breast cancer surgery has led to an increasing emphasis on the cosmetic outcome of surgical treatment. Advances in aesthetic evaluation, as well as surgical planning and outcome prediction, have been investigated by using geometrically precise 3D modelling of the breast surface prior to surgery and after the procedure. However, existing solutions are based on expensive site specific setups and remain weakly validated. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using low-cost RGBD cameras as an affordable and mobile system for breast surface reconstruction. The methodology relies on sensor calibration, uncertainty-driven point filtering, dense reconstruction and subsequent multi-view joint optimization to diffuse residual pose errors. Results from a phantom study, with ground truth obtained through commercially available scanners, indicate that the approach is promising with RMS errors in order of 2 mm. A clinical study shows the practical applicability of our method and compares favourably to high-end scanning solutions. PMID:26737627

  6. [Methods and importance of volume measurement in reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Kunos, Csaba; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Pesthy, Pál; Kovács, Eszter; Mátrai, Zoltán

    2014-03-16

    Volume measurement of the breast allows for better surgical planning and implant selection in breast reconstructive and symmetrization procedures. The safety and accuracy of tumor removal, in accordance with oncoplastic principles, may be improved by knowing the true breast- and breast tumor volume. The authors discuss the methods of volume measurement of the breast and describe the method based on magnetic resonance imaging digital volume measurement in details. The volume of the breast parenchyma and the tumor was determined by processing the diagnostic magnetic resonance scans, and the difference in the volume of the two breasts was measured. Surgery was planned and implant selection was made based on the measured volume details. The authors conclude that digital volume measurement proved to be a valuable tool in preoperative planning of volume reducing mammaplasty, replacement of unknown size implants and in cases when breast asymmetry is treated. PMID:24613775

  7. [Aesthetic surgery and public health].

    PubMed

    Fogli, A

    2003-10-01

    The increasing number of requests for aesthetic surgery legitimately leads to the question of whether it can be covered by Public Health. If we look at the definition of the World Health Organization, the answer is without any doubt an affirmative one. However, economic considerations show that there is no social system in the world that covers aesthetic surgery, except for some definite interventions. Requests for aesthetic surgery occur in all social classes. It is a personal choice and a voluntary decision. It is no longer society who assists a sick or ill patient but it is the person that assumes the responsibility for himself. PMID:14599901

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. The micropolyurethane foam-coated Diagon/Gel®4Two implant in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery – 3-year results of an ongoing study

    PubMed Central

    Brunnert, Klaus E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast implants are worldwide in use since 1962. Initially there were some problems with capsular contracture and the palpability of the rim of the implant. In 1968 this led to the introduction of the micropolyurethane foam-coating and then in 1970 to the first micropolyurethane foam-coated implant by F.A. Ashley. As a result of additional technical refinements in manufacturing this new implant design significantly reduced complications i.e. capsular contracture and implant rotation. Methods: This study reports a single surgeon’s experience with aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery, in primary and secondary cases with the sole use of micropolyurethane foam-coated Diagon/gel®4Two implants, partly in combination with the additional use of synthetic meshes, acellular dermal matrices and lipofilling. The trial is a prospective, single center cohort study designed to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the new implant design in primary and secondary aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery. The reported data provide an interim report of the implantations performed from November 2010 to December 2013. Results: 90 patients were admitted to the study with 152 implants. The majority of the implants (n=95, 62.5%) were used in reoperative cases for either oncological (n=52, 34.2%) or aesthetic reasons (n=43, 28.3%). The median age of the study cohort was 45 years; the median body mass index was 21; the median observation time is 41 months. There was a very low complication rate, both short term within 6 weeks after the implantation of the silicone gel implant and in the follow up in November 2015. There were no serious complications needing explantation, no capsular fibrosis or implant rotation or rupture so far. There were only 4 minor complications (1.97%). There was 1 local recurrence 4 years after skin and nipple sparing mastectomy. Conclusion: The micropolyurethane foam-coated Diagon/gel®4Two implant is a very reliable silicone gel

  10. The Laminated Nature of the Pectoralis Major Muscle and the Redefinition of the Inframammary Fold: Clinical Implications in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Maclin, Melvin M; Deigni, Olivier A; Bengtson, Bradley P

    2015-10-01

    The breast is appreciated aesthetically and clinically for its shape, projection, and volume. Surgical techniques have evolved to manipulate the breast skin envelope, soft tissues, and chest wall anatomy, with and without prosthetic devices. The pectoralis major specifically is altered for pocket dissection and implant coverage. Both the aesthetic and reconstructive surgeons are aware of its relationship to the chest wall and the breast soft tissues. Both are able to achieve outstanding outcomes; however, the authors present an alternative appreciation of the pectoralis and its relationship to the breast. PMID:26408437

  11. Shapes, Proportions, and Variations in Breast Aesthetic Ideals: The Definition of Breast Beauty, Analysis, and Surgical Practice.

    PubMed

    Mallucci, Patrick; Branford, Olivier Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    There are few objective analyses in the plastic surgical literature to define an aesthetically pleasing template for breast shape and proportion. The authors previously identified key objective parameters that define breast aesthetic ideals in 2 studies: an observational analysis of 100 models with natural breasts, and a population analysis with 1315 respondents. From these data a simple yet reproducible formula for surgical planning in breast augmentation has been developed to consistently achieve beautiful breasts, namely the ICE principle. This article proposes that this principle be used as the basis for design in aesthetic breast surgery.

  12. Shapes, Proportions, and Variations in Breast Aesthetic Ideals: The Definition of Breast Beauty, Analysis, and Surgical Practice.

    PubMed

    Mallucci, Patrick; Branford, Olivier Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    There are few objective analyses in the plastic surgical literature to define an aesthetically pleasing template for breast shape and proportion. The authors previously identified key objective parameters that define breast aesthetic ideals in 2 studies: an observational analysis of 100 models with natural breasts, and a population analysis with 1315 respondents. From these data a simple yet reproducible formula for surgical planning in breast augmentation has been developed to consistently achieve beautiful breasts, namely the ICE principle. This article proposes that this principle be used as the basis for design in aesthetic breast surgery. PMID:26408436

  13. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit

    2008-10-01

    When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered 'Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery'.

  14. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... a change in the shape of your breast, hardening of breast tissue, or some pain. Emotional risks ... starting 5 days after surgery. Massaging helps reduce hardening of the capsule that surrounds the implant. Ask ...

  15. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words. PMID:18820963

  16. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words.

  17. Aesthetic adjuncts with orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Waheed V; Perenack, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Traditional orthognathic surgery aligns the patient's bony jaws into a desired, more appropriate position but may leave other cosmetic issues unaddressed. Soft tissue deformities may be treated concomitantly with orthognathic surgery, including soft tissue augmentation (fillers), reduction (liposuction), hard tissue augmentation, cosmetic lip procedures, and rhinoplasty. Some cosmetic adjunctive procedures may be performed at a later date after soft tissue edema from orthognathic surgery has resolved to achieve a more predictable outcome. Undesired cosmetic changes may occur months to years after orthognathic surgery and may be addressed by adjunctive cosmetic procedures.

  18. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit

    2008-01-01

    When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ‘Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery’. PMID:20174541

  19. [Aesthetic reconstructive surgery of the lip].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, P; Arnaud, D; Huguier, V; Chemli, H; Dhouib, M; Bali, D; Darsonval, V

    2013-10-01

    Lip reconstruction can be performed with numerous surgical techniques. The aim was here to present these usual techniques and to focus on the details that can be used to obtain the most favourable results. The goal of this surgery, that represents a compromise between function and aesthetic, has to be kept in mind to prevent mistakes that decrease the quality of the result.

  20. The history of aesthetic medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Luebberding, Stefanie; Sattler, Gerhard; Hanke, C William; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sadick, Neil

    2013-07-01

    The history of beauty is as old as mankind itself--throughout history people have tried to improve their attractiveness and to enhance their beauty. The technical basis for many of nowadays procedures like lipoplasty, breast augmentation or rhinoplasty was thereby initiated more than a hundred years ago and evolved to the modern standards of today. The aim of this article is to recall the early days of aesthetic medicine and show the swift progress up to the highly specialized medical discipline of our modern time. Combining the past, present and future of aesthetic medicine, allows to incorporate this perspective and ultimately to delivery better patient care. PMID:23884484

  1. [Mammaplasty and the aesthetically correct: breast and medias].

    PubMed

    Le Louarn, S; Le Louarn, C

    2005-10-01

    This article discusses how the norms of the aesthetically correct breast, the physiological characteristics of the breast, the increase in life expectancy, and the possibility of cosmetic surgery all influence the demand of breast modification. It then reviews the various stances of the medias on the subject, looking at the print medias, women's magazines, TV documentaries and reality shows. There is a paradox between a social context of hardening of the norms, encouragement of well-being and self-realisation, tolerance ideal, and the reality of quite a denial of the women's rights to choose their mammary appearance. The article seeks to elucidate historical, philosophical, social, religious and ideological obstacles. Finally, a new analysis chart looking at stances on the issue of cosmetic breast surgery is proposed, according to two criteria: "Doing" and "Saying". This chart will help the surgeon to better decode the demand of each patient in order to better come up to her expectations. PMID:16165263

  2. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research. PMID:21655710

  3. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research.

  4. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  5. Aesthetic surgery of the orbits and eyelids.

    PubMed

    Broujerdi, Joseph A

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the relevant anatomy, the aging process of the eyelid with periorbital structure, and how to evaluate patients for a proper surgical approach. A description is given of how to achieve an aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface to provide the patient with a natural youthful appearance. The paradigm in oculoplastic surgery has shifted to more conservative eyelid skin, muscle, and fat resection as well as more periorbital soft tissue lift, suspension, and volumization. Recent innovations and developments are discussed as well as the most common complications in eyelid and periorbital surgery.

  6. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... after breast reconstruction surgery Preparing for breast reconstruction surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  7. The effect of increased consumer demand on fees for aesthetic surgery: an economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    1999-12-01

    Economic theory dictates that changes in consumer demand have predictable effects on prices. Demographics represents an important component of demand for aesthetic surgery. Between the years of 1997 and 2010, the U.S. population is projected to increase by 12 percent. The population increase will be skewed such that those groups undergoing the most aesthetic surgery will see the largest increase. Accounting for the age-specific frequencies of aesthetic surgery and the population increase yields an estimate that the overall market for aesthetic surgery will increase by 19 percent. Barring unforeseen changes in general economic conditions or consumer tastes, demand should increase by an analogous amount. An economic demonstration shows the effects of increasing demand for aesthetic surgery on its fees. Between the years of 1992 and 1997, there was an increase in demand for breast augmentation as fears of associated autoimmune disorders subsided. Similarly, there was increased male acceptance of aesthetic surgery. The number of breast augmentations and procedures to treat male pattern baldness, plastic surgeons, and fees for the procedures were tracked. During the study period, the supply of surgeons and consumer demand increased for both of these procedures. Volume of breast augmentation increased by 275 percent, whereas real fees remained stable. Volume of treatment for male pattern baldness increased by 107 percent, and the fees increased by 29 percent. Ordinarily, an increase in supply leads to a decrease in prices. This did not occur during the study period. Economic analysis demonstrates that the increased supply of surgeons performing breast augmentation was offset by increased consumer demand for the procedure. For this reason, fees were not lowered. Similarly, increased demand for treatment of male pattern baldness more than offset the increased supply of surgeons performing it. The result was higher fees. Emphasis should be placed on using these economic

  8. The effect of increased consumer demand on fees for aesthetic surgery: an economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    1999-12-01

    Economic theory dictates that changes in consumer demand have predictable effects on prices. Demographics represents an important component of demand for aesthetic surgery. Between the years of 1997 and 2010, the U.S. population is projected to increase by 12 percent. The population increase will be skewed such that those groups undergoing the most aesthetic surgery will see the largest increase. Accounting for the age-specific frequencies of aesthetic surgery and the population increase yields an estimate that the overall market for aesthetic surgery will increase by 19 percent. Barring unforeseen changes in general economic conditions or consumer tastes, demand should increase by an analogous amount. An economic demonstration shows the effects of increasing demand for aesthetic surgery on its fees. Between the years of 1992 and 1997, there was an increase in demand for breast augmentation as fears of associated autoimmune disorders subsided. Similarly, there was increased male acceptance of aesthetic surgery. The number of breast augmentations and procedures to treat male pattern baldness, plastic surgeons, and fees for the procedures were tracked. During the study period, the supply of surgeons and consumer demand increased for both of these procedures. Volume of breast augmentation increased by 275 percent, whereas real fees remained stable. Volume of treatment for male pattern baldness increased by 107 percent, and the fees increased by 29 percent. Ordinarily, an increase in supply leads to a decrease in prices. This did not occur during the study period. Economic analysis demonstrates that the increased supply of surgeons performing breast augmentation was offset by increased consumer demand for the procedure. For this reason, fees were not lowered. Similarly, increased demand for treatment of male pattern baldness more than offset the increased supply of surgeons performing it. The result was higher fees. Emphasis should be placed on using these economic

  9. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  10. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  11. Ethical and legal issues in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suresh

    2012-09-01

    Rapid growth and expansion of plastic surgery in general and aesthetic surgery in particular in the past decade has brought in its wake some confusions particularly raising questions for the surgeons conduct towards his colleagues and the patients in the light of ethical requirements. Some thoughts from eminent thinkers form a backdrop to consideration of theories of medical ethics. In this article raging and continuous debates on these subjects have been avoided to maintain the momentum. Apart from the western thoughts, directions from our old scriptures on ethical conduct have been included to accommodate prevelant Indian practices. The confusion created by specialists advertising their abilities directly to the lay public following removal of ethical bars by the American Courts as also latitudes allowed by the General Medical Council of Great Britain have been discussed. The medical fraternity however has its reservations. Unnecessary skirmishes with the law arose in cosmetic surgery from the freedom exercised by the police to file criminal proceedings against attending doctors in the event of a patient's death with or without any evidence of wrong doing. This has now been curtailed in the judgement of the Supreme Court of India[1] where norms have been laid down for such prosecution. This has helped doctors to function without fear of harassment. An effort has been made to state a simple day-to-day routine for an ethical doctor-patient relationship. PMID:23450235

  12. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a loss of sensation in your breast skin and nipples after surgery. Sensation may return over time. You may need help with your everyday activities for a few days until your pain and swelling decrease. Incision scars may take several months to over a year ...

  13. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  14. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  15. Tracking the aesthetic outcomes of prosthetic breast reconstructions that have complications

    PubMed Central

    Mioton, Lauren M; Seth, Akhil; Gaido, Jessica; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John YS

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aesthetic results following breast reconstruction have been shown to be a major contributor to patient satisfaction. While many presume that complications after reconstruction impact final aesthetic results, little data exist to substantiate this putative relationship. OBJECTIVE: To track and evaluate aesthetic outcomes following implant reconstructions with complications. METHODS: A chart review was conducted on a series of consecutive expander-implant breast reconstructions performed by the senior author between 2004 and 2012. Included patients completed their prosthetic reconstruction or converted to autologous methods and had a minimum follow-up period of 130 days. Four blinded members of the division of plastic surgery independently rated postoperative anterior photographs of patients’ breasts using a validated scoring scale with respect to five distinct aesthetic domains: breast mound volume, contour, placement, scarring and inframammary fold. RESULTS: Of the 172 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 36 experienced a complication. The tissue expander in one-half of these patients was salvaged and the remaining patients converted to autologous reconstruction. The average aesthetic scores for each domain did not differ significantly between patients who experienced a complication and retained their expander and those who did not experience a complication. Patients who converted to autologous tissue reconstruction after experiencing a complication had the highest aesthetic scores. DISCUSSION: The ability to obtain aesthetic results following a complication that were not statistically different from results in those without complications may reflect the surgeon’s refined attempt to salvage the initial implant reconstruction; in other circumstances, the improved cosmesis was achieved through conversion to an autologous tissue-based method. CONCLUSION: The present study quantitatively assessed the impact of complications on aesthetic outcomes

  16. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad.

  17. The Ethics of Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Alyssa; VanderWalde, Lindi; Brackett, Craig; Dominici, Laura; Eisenhauer, Thomas; Johnson, Nathalie; Kong, Amanda; Ludwig, Kandice; O'Neill, Jennifer; Pugliese, Matthew; Teller, Paige; Sarantou, Terry

    2015-10-01

    Breast surgery has evolved as a subspecialty of general surgery and requires a working knowledge of benign and malignant diseases, surgical techniques, shared decision-making with patients, collaboration with a multi-disciplinary team, and a basic foundation in surgical ethics. Ethics is defined as the practice of analyzing, evaluating, and promoting best conduct based upon available standards. As new information is obtained or as cultural values change, best conduct may be re-defined. In 2014, the Ethics Committee of the ASBrS acknowledged numerous ethical issues, specific to the practice of breast surgery. This independent review of ethical concerns was created by the Ethics Committee to provide a resource for ASBrS members as well as other surgeons who perform breast surgery. In this review, the professional, clinical, research and technology considerations that breast surgeons face are reviewed with guidelines for ethical physician behavior.

  18. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy is a standard therapy for early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, recent developments in oncoplastic surgery have improved cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, a breast surgeon’s current role in BCS is not only to perform a curative resection of cancerous lesions with adequate surgical margins, but also to preserve the shape and appearance of the treated breast. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery (EBCS), which has the advantage of a less noticeable scar, was developed more than ten years ago. Recently, some clinical studies have reported the feasibility, oncological outcomes, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction of EBCS. Herein, we will review the EBCS clinical studies that have been conducted so far and discuss current issues regarding this operative method. PMID:25083503

  19. The influence of aesthetic surgery on the profile of emotion.

    PubMed

    Rubesa, Gordana; Tic-Bacić, Tamara; Svesko-Visentin, Helena; Bacić, Giordano

    2011-09-01

    In the clinical practise it has been observed that the person changes physically, too, after aesthetic surgery. The aim of this work was to examine, by objective psychological measurements, what changes occur, and what personality features change. Forty six subjects that had an aesthetic surgery were examined; they were tested before, and eighteen month after the surgery by the Profile Index of Emotion (PIE). Before the re-testing the subjects were analyzed by "The Life Events Scale" to exclude the possibility of the influence of new life events on the results of the re-test. The control group of 29 volunteers was tested by the same psychological instruments. The control group never verbalized the wish for an aesthetic surgery; they were never in psychiatric treatment, and the corresponded to the experimental group in the age, sex and education level. Analysis of the data obtained from PIE test before and after the operation shows a statistical significant increase of the adaptability segments and an improvement of capacity for taking and giving. Emotional conflict does not disappear, but a new balance is established, satisfaction is higher, and the identity is more integrated. PMID:22220403

  20. Periorbital aesthetic surgery with the KTP laser.

    PubMed

    Ginsbach, G

    1995-01-01

    The eyes are regarded as the windows to the soul. Many expressions of mood may be derived from the appearance of the eyes--mad, sad, bad, criminal, sweet, friendly, mystic. In addition, love and flirtatiousness, self-consciousness, pride, modesty, anger, youth, and age are shown in the expression of our eyes. The eyes and the periorbital region therefore challenge our surgical skill to improve the patient's overall well-being to be looked at each day in the mirror. The potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser in many indications helps us to fulfill the patient's expectations concerning pain, oozing, bruising, swelling, outpatient surgery, and early return to work and normal social activities. With the cutting fiber device, an accurate removal of skin and fat or even tumors is possible in this region with practically no side effects. The frontal lift, eyebrow lift, direct or through coronal incision, as well as temporal lifting are easily accessible and carried out by this device. Glabellar frowns may also be removed endoscopically. Further, the KTP laser may be used for transconjunctival blepharoplasty.

  1. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step. PMID:27579270

  2. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J; Paletta, C; Hartrampf, C R

    1986-01-01

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A-C. FIGS. 2A-C. FIG. 3. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A-C. FIGS. 5A-C. FIG. 7. PMID:3010888

  3. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surgeries become linked to other medical procedures with perceived greater medical necessity, health and aesthetics become entangled. One consequence is that medical needs are magnified while perceptions of the risks of surgery are minimized. Drawing on ethnographic work on plastic surgery, as well as other studies of obstetrics and cosmetic surgery, I illustrate this entanglement of health and aesthetics within the field of women's reproductive health care in Brazil. I argue that while it would be difficult to wholly disentangle aesthetics and health, analysis of how risk-benefit calculations are made in clinical practice offers a useful critical strategy for illuminating ethical problems posed by aesthetic medicine.

  4. Hairline aesthetics and styling in hair replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T G; Fleming, R W

    1985-01-01

    Punch grafting and flap surgery are proven methods of correcting baldness. Using either method, the location and shape of a new hairline on the frontal and temporal scalp is one of the most important aspects of hair replacement surgery. If the hairline is not aesthetic, the results can be unacceptable or even devastating for the patient and surgeon alike. The principles of planning the frontal and temporal hairline are presented using punch grafts as well as flaps. Postoperative styling of the "new" hair will vary depending upon the method used to transfer the hair (flaps or grafts), the local factors involved (texture, direction, density, tufting, etc.), as well as the patient's preference. The various advantages and disadvantages of styling possibilities with each method are presented. These factors should be discussed with the patient preoperatively.

  5. Oncoplastic surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Dorr, Julio; Angrigiani, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Advances in reconstructive breast surgery with new materials and techniques now allow us to offer our patients the best possible cosmetic results without the risks associated with oncological control of the disease. These advances, in both oncological and plastic surgery, have led to a new specialisation, namely oncoplastic breast surgery, which enables us to undertake large resections and, with advance planning, to prevent subsequent deformities. This is particularly important when more than 30% of the breast volume is removed, as it allows us to obtain precise information for conservative surgery according to the site of the lesion, and also allows us to set the boundary between conservative surgery and mastectomy. Given the existence of new alloplastic materials and new reconstructive techniques, it is essential for our patients that surgeons involved in breast cancer treatment are trained in both the oncological as well as the reconstructive and aesthetic fields, to enable them to provide the best loco-regional treatment with the best cosmetic results. PMID:23441139

  6. [Post-treatment sequelae after breast cancer conservative surgery].

    PubMed

    Delay, E; Gosset, J; Toussoun, G; Delaporte, T; Delbaere, M

    2008-04-01

    Thanks to the earlier detection of breast cancer, the advent of neoadjuvant therapy and the development of more effective surgical procedures reducing treatment sequelae, conservative treatment has dramatically expanded over the past 15 years. Several factors have recognized negative aesthetic consequences for breast cancer patients: being overweight, having voluminous or on the contrary, very small breasts, having a tumor located in the lower quadrant, having high breast-tumor: breast-volume ratio. Tissue injuries induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, such as shrinking, fibrosis or induration, maximize the deleterious impact of surgery. The results of conservative treatment also deteriorate with time: weight gain is common and may result in increased breast asymmetry. Patients undergoing conservative treatment may experience sequelae including various degrees of the following dimorphisms, all possibly responsible for minor or even major breast deformity: breast asymmetry, loss of the nipple/areola complex, scar shrinkage and skin impairment, irregular shape and position of the nipple and areola. Various sensory symptoms have also been reported following conservative treatment, with patients complaining of hypo- or dysesthesia or even suffering actual pain. Breast lymphedema is also a common incapacitating after-effect that is believed to be largely underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Finally, like mastectomy, conservative breast surgery may induce serious psychological distress in patients who suffer the loss of physical integrity, womanhood or sexual arousal. Clinicians must be aware of the radiological changes indicative of late cancer recurrence. There are four types of modifications as follows: increased breast density, architectural distortion at the surgical site and formation of scar, mammary fat necrosis, and occurrence of microcalcifications. The management of sequelae of conservative breast treatment must therefore involve a multidisciplinary

  7. Differences in breast aesthetic outcomes due to radiation: A validated, quantitative analysis of expander-implant reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mioton, Lauren M; Gaido, Jessica; Small, William; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential ramifications of radiation use can be of particular concern in the breast reconstruction population, in which both surgical and aesthetic outcomes are important. Presently, there remains a paucity of data detailing the influence of radiation on specific reconstruction aesthetic outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a quantitative evaluation of aesthetic outcomes for expander-implant breast reconstruction in radiated and nonradiated patients using a validated scoring scale. METHODS: A series of consecutive expander-implant breast reconstruction operations performed by the senior author between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Four blinded members of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Northwestern University (Illinois, USA) independently rated postoperative photographs of patients’ breasts using a validated scoring scale with respect to five distinct aesthetic domains. RESULTS: Of the 206 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 69 received radiotherapy and 137 did not. The radiated cohort had lower scores in each aesthetic domain, with significant differences in contour (1.33 versus 1.51; P=0.041) and placement (1.45 versus 1.73; P<0.001). Linear regression analysis revealed a significant association between placement scores and radiation, and radiated patients had a significantly higher overall rate of complications. DISCUSSION: Variances in scores may represent the relative difficulty of expansions and proper implant placement in irradiated tissue, with possible skin fibrosis and decreased flexibility hindering prosthesis manipulation. CONCLUSION: Radiation adversely impacts breast contour and placement, with possible negative contributions to volume, scarring and inframammary fold definition, and results in higher rates of complications. Such detailed evaluation of the impact of radiation on aesthetics will enhance the management of patient expectations. PMID:24431945

  8. What to Expect After Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic References What to expect after breast reconstruction surgery It’s important to have an idea of what ... regular mammograms. Possible risks during and after reconstruction surgery There are certain risks from any type of ...

  9. Breast Conservation Surgery: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan; Achuthan, Raj; Turton, Philip; Lansdown, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Breast conservation surgery is available to the vast majority of women with breast cancer. The combination of neoadjuvant therapies and oncoplastic surgical techniques allows even large tumours to be managed with a breast-conserving approach. The relationship between breast size and the volume of tissue to be excised determines the need for volume displacement or replacement. Such an approach can also be used in the management of carefully selected cases of multifocal or multicentric breast cancer. The role of novel techniques, such as endoscopic breast surgery and radiofrequency ablation, is yet to be precisely defined. PMID:22295209

  10. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  11. A Social Evaluation of Perception on Body Contouring Surgery by Turkish Male Aesthetic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Bora; Sezgin, Billur; Guney, Kirdar; Latifoglu, Osman; Celebi, Cemallettin

    2015-02-01

    Although aesthetic procedures are known to have a higher impact on women, men are becoming more inclined toward such procedures since the last decade. To determine the reason behind the increase in demand for male aesthetic procedures and to learn about the expectations and inquietude related to body contouring surgery, a prospective questionnaire study was conducted on 200 Turkish males from January 1, 2011-May 31, 2012. Demographic information, previous aesthetic procedures and thoughts on body contouring procedures with given reasons were questioned. The results of the study showed that 53 % of all participants considered undergoing body contouring surgery with the given reason that they believed their current body structure required it. For those who did not consider contouring operations, 92.5 % said they felt that they did not need such a procedure. The results of the statistical analysis showed that BMI was a significant factor in the decision making process for wanting to undergo body contouring procedures. The results of the study showed that men's consideration for aesthetic operations depends mainly on necessity and that the most considered region was the abdominal zone in regard to contouring. We can conclude that men are becoming more interested in body contouring operations and therefore different surgical procedures should be refined and re-defined according to the expectations of this new patient group.

  12. A Social Evaluation of Perception on Body Contouring Surgery by Turkish Male Aesthetic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Bora; Sezgin, Billur; Guney, Kirdar; Latifoglu, Osman; Celebi, Cemallettin

    2015-02-01

    Although aesthetic procedures are known to have a higher impact on women, men are becoming more inclined toward such procedures since the last decade. To determine the reason behind the increase in demand for male aesthetic procedures and to learn about the expectations and inquietude related to body contouring surgery, a prospective questionnaire study was conducted on 200 Turkish males from January 1, 2011-May 31, 2012. Demographic information, previous aesthetic procedures and thoughts on body contouring procedures with given reasons were questioned. The results of the study showed that 53 % of all participants considered undergoing body contouring surgery with the given reason that they believed their current body structure required it. For those who did not consider contouring operations, 92.5 % said they felt that they did not need such a procedure. The results of the statistical analysis showed that BMI was a significant factor in the decision making process for wanting to undergo body contouring procedures. The results of the study showed that men's consideration for aesthetic operations depends mainly on necessity and that the most considered region was the abdominal zone in regard to contouring. We can conclude that men are becoming more interested in body contouring operations and therefore different surgical procedures should be refined and re-defined according to the expectations of this new patient group. PMID:25519035

  13. Quality of Life and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Carolina; Tenório, Juliana L.C.; Saltz, Renato; Ely, Pedro B.; Ferrão, Ygor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in plastic surgery. However, authors use different scales to address this subject, making it difficult to compare the outcomes. To address this discrepancy, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a random effect meta-analysis. Methods: The search was made in two electronic databases (LILACS and PUBMED) using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to aesthetic plastic surgery and QoL. We performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of the gathered data. We calculated a random effect meta-analysis with Der Simonian and Laird as variance estimator to compare pre- and postoperative QoL standardized mean difference. To check if there is difference between aesthetic surgeries, we compared reduction mammoplasty to other aesthetic surgeries. Results: Of 1,715 identified, 20 studies were included in the qualitative analysis and 16 went through quantitative analysis. The random effect of all aesthetic surgeries shows that QoL improved after surgery. Reduction mammoplasty has improved QoL more than other procedures in social functioning and physical functioning domains. Conclusions: Aesthetic plastic surgery increases QoL. Reduction mammoplasty seems to have better improvement compared with other aesthetic surgeries. PMID:27757327

  14. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Training in breast surgery in Spain.

    PubMed

    Miguelena, José M; Domínguez Cunchillos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Breast surgery is a key part of training and competency in general surgery in Spain and is a "frontier area" that can be efficiently managed by general surgeons and gynecologists. The main objective of the training process consists of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, including conservative surgery, oncoplastic and reconstructive techniques. This article analyses the current status of breast surgery training in Spain and schematically proposes potential targets of the different training programs, to improve access and training for surgeons and residents in this area, taking into account the RD 639/2014 and European regulation. The priority is to specify the level of training that should be achieved, in relation to the group of professionals involved, considering their area of competency: surgery resident, educational programs, and surgeons with special dedication to this area.

  16. Training in breast surgery in Spain.

    PubMed

    Miguelena, José M; Domínguez Cunchillos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Breast surgery is a key part of training and competency in general surgery in Spain and is a "frontier area" that can be efficiently managed by general surgeons and gynecologists. The main objective of the training process consists of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, including conservative surgery, oncoplastic and reconstructive techniques. This article analyses the current status of breast surgery training in Spain and schematically proposes potential targets of the different training programs, to improve access and training for surgeons and residents in this area, taking into account the RD 639/2014 and European regulation. The priority is to specify the level of training that should be achieved, in relation to the group of professionals involved, considering their area of competency: surgery resident, educational programs, and surgeons with special dedication to this area. PMID:27059252

  17. Junior plastic surgeon's confidence in aesthetic surgery practice: a comparison of two didactic systems.

    PubMed

    Sterodimas, Aris; Boriani, Filippo; Bogetti, Paolo; Radwanski, Henrique N; Bruschi, Stefano; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2010-08-01

    The importance of residents' training in aesthetic surgery and the need for acquiring confidence in performing cosmetic procedures is an established knowledge. A survey was done in two different training systems to evaluate the experience of junior plastic surgeons in performing four common aesthetic surgery procedures at the end of their residency. The first system guarantees a theoretical background and a certain number of aesthetic procedures to be performed by the trainee, in contrast to the second system where mainly theoretical knowledge in cosmetic surgery is warranted to residents. The residents' comfort in performing specific operations was quite varied between the two systems. The comparison showed that junior plastic surgeons reached a higher degree of self-confidence in aesthetic practice in system A when compared to system B. The similarities and differences between the two systems are analysed and discussed. The possibility of reforming residency programmes by following the structure and the philosophy of system A is proposed.

  18. Breast Surgery International--breast cancer in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sandelin, K; Apffelstaedt, J P; Abdullah, H; Murray, E M; Ajuluchuku, E U

    2002-01-01

    Breast Surgery International (BSI) was formed in 1999 as an integrated society within the International Surgical Society ISS/SIC. One goal is to promote breast surgery world wide and focus on the situation in the developing countries. An edited summary of a symposium on locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) and the current situation in two African countries and in Malaysia is reported. Diagnosis, management and treatment options differ from recommendations that prevail due to lack of resources, lack of access to facilities and cultural and socioeconomic barriers. Younger age at onset, more men are affected and locally advanced breast cancer dominates the clinical panorama. A rational treatment plan for LABC should have chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy as armaments. A unique opportunity exists for international interchange within a professional organization such as BSI, for providing training opportunities, for clinical and experimental studies of the world' s most common female malignancy. PMID:12449462

  19. [Surgery of the breast on transgender persons].

    PubMed

    Karhunen-Enckell, Ulla; Kolehmainen, Maija; Kääriäinen, Minna; Suominen, Sinikka

    2015-01-01

    For a female-to-male transgender person, mastectomy is the most important procedure making the social interaction easier. Along with the size of the breasts, the quantity and quality of skin will influence the selection of surgical technique. Although complications are rare, corrective surgery is performed for as many as 40% of the patients. Of male-to-female transsexual persons, 60 to 70% opt for breast enlargement. Breast enlargement can be carried out by using either silicone implants or fat transplantation. Since the surgical procedures on breasts are irreversible, their implementation requires confirmation of the diagnosis of transsexualism by a multidisciplinary team.

  20. Guided Gingival Growth: Improving Aesthetics During Second-Stage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby

    2016-01-01

    GGG is a conservative, efficient, and relatively straightforward treatment for mild soft-tissue deficits. When applied within its limitations, it may be a valuable tool for aesthetic refinement around dental implants. PMID:26846058

  1. [Alfred Adler and the psychology of aesthetic surgery in the United States].

    PubMed

    Gilman, S L

    2002-01-01

    The quest for a psychological theory to explain the effects of aesthetic surgery reached its high point in the 1920s with the adoption of Alfred Adler's theory of the inferiority complex. The basis for this theory was Adler's early work in the psychological response of the body to disease and "degeneration". Aesthetic surgeons sought out the Adlerian model rather than a Freudian one as purely psychological while its roots, and their own theories, were clearly somatic in origin.

  2. [Evaluation of asymmetric implants in breast augmentation surgery].

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A D; Couturaud, B

    2005-10-01

    Since more than 30 years, the quality of breast implants has continued to evolve in order to improve the aesthetic results of prosthetic augmentation. Shapes and materials of these implants have also evolved to obtain stronger and more reliable prostheses almost similar to the natural breast. Therefore it can be considered that the use of asymmetric implants is the last step in implant technology before using made to measure implants. Asymmetric implants allow obtaining different contours in harmony to the different breast shapes capable to reproduce faithfully, in all dimensions, the anatomy of the female breast, including the differences between each side which maximise the naturalness of the result. Such implants have an axis directed towards the exterior and lower part of the chest wall, are wider than high with a thinner part on their inner edge and a concave rear side moulding the curves of the chest wall. In our own experience, we placed between 2002 and 2004, asymmetric implants in 100 patients. Such implants were easy to place and no secondary rotation was observed. The control of secondary displacements even in case of prosthesis change seems to be linked to their concave rear side, roughness and asymmetry. When analysing retrospectively the medical records, no distinctive features were observed when compared to symmetric classic implants in easiness in the surgical procedure or in complications except a slightly higher rate of seroma formation. However asymmetric implants are less appropriate in case of major breast ptosis, patients being unsatisfied by the "too natural" breast shape. Moreover a high risk of secondary rotation seems to be real in such cases. In summary, for all these reasons, asymmetric implants, are gradually considered to be a first-rank choice for implants in breast augmentation cosmetic surgery. PMID:16198044

  3. Informed Consent as a Litigation Strategy in the Field of Aesthetic Surgery: An Analysis Based on Court Precedents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In an increasing number of lawsuits doctors lose, despite providing preoperative patient education, because of failure to prove informed consent. We analyzed judicial precedents associated with insufficient informed consent to identify judicial factors and trends related to aesthetic surgery medical litigation. Methods We collected data from civil trials between 1995 and 2015 that were related to aesthetic surgery and resulted in findings of insufficient informed consent. Based on these data, we analyzed the lawsuits, including the distribution of surgeries, dissatisfactions, litigation expenses, and relationship to informed consent. Results Cases were found involving the following types of surgery: facial rejuvenation (38 cases), facial contouring surgery (27 cases), mammoplasty (16 cases), blepharoplasty (29 cases), rhinoplasty (21 cases), body-contouring surgery (15 cases), and breast reconstruction (2 cases). Common reasons for postoperative dissatisfaction were deformities (22%), scars (17%), asymmetry (14%), and infections (6%). Most of the malpractice lawsuits occurred in Seoul (population 10 million people; 54% of total plastic surgeons) and in primary-level local clinics (113 cases, 82.5%). In cases in which only invalid informed consent was recognized, the average amount of consolation money was KRW 9,107,143 (USD 8438). In cases in which both violation of non-malfeasance and invalid informed consent were recognized, the average amount of consolation money was KRW 12,741,857 (USD 11,806), corresponding to 38.6% of the amount of the judgment. Conclusions Surgeons should pay special attention to obtaining informed consent, because it is a double-edged sword; it has clinical purposes for doctors and patients but may also be a litigation strategy for lawyers. PMID:27689046

  4. Informed Consent as a Litigation Strategy in the Field of Aesthetic Surgery: An Analysis Based on Court Precedents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In an increasing number of lawsuits doctors lose, despite providing preoperative patient education, because of failure to prove informed consent. We analyzed judicial precedents associated with insufficient informed consent to identify judicial factors and trends related to aesthetic surgery medical litigation. Methods We collected data from civil trials between 1995 and 2015 that were related to aesthetic surgery and resulted in findings of insufficient informed consent. Based on these data, we analyzed the lawsuits, including the distribution of surgeries, dissatisfactions, litigation expenses, and relationship to informed consent. Results Cases were found involving the following types of surgery: facial rejuvenation (38 cases), facial contouring surgery (27 cases), mammoplasty (16 cases), blepharoplasty (29 cases), rhinoplasty (21 cases), body-contouring surgery (15 cases), and breast reconstruction (2 cases). Common reasons for postoperative dissatisfaction were deformities (22%), scars (17%), asymmetry (14%), and infections (6%). Most of the malpractice lawsuits occurred in Seoul (population 10 million people; 54% of total plastic surgeons) and in primary-level local clinics (113 cases, 82.5%). In cases in which only invalid informed consent was recognized, the average amount of consolation money was KRW 9,107,143 (USD 8438). In cases in which both violation of non-malfeasance and invalid informed consent were recognized, the average amount of consolation money was KRW 12,741,857 (USD 11,806), corresponding to 38.6% of the amount of the judgment. Conclusions Surgeons should pay special attention to obtaining informed consent, because it is a double-edged sword; it has clinical purposes for doctors and patients but may also be a litigation strategy for lawyers.

  5. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery.

  6. The Role of Stem Cells in Aesthetic Surgery: Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Adrian; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Walmsley, Graham G.; Hu, Michael; Atashroo, David A.; Tevlin, Ruth; Zielins, Elizabeth; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Wan, Derrick C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are attractive candidates for the development of novel therapies, targeting indications that involve functional restoration of defective tissue. Although most stem cell therapies are new and highly experimental, there are clinics around the world that exploit vulnerable patients with the hope of offering supposed stem cell therapies, many of which operate without credible scientific merit, oversight, or other patient protection. We review the potential, as well as drawbacks, for incorporation of stem cells in cosmetic procedures. A review of FDA-approved indications and ongoing clinical trials with adipose stem cells is provided. Furthermore, a “snapshot” analysis of websites using the search terms “stem cell therapy” or “stem cell treatment” or “stem cell facelift” was performed. Despite the protective net cast by regulatory agencies such as the FDA and professional societies such as the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, we are witnessing worrying advertisements for procedures such as stem cell facelifts, stem cell breast augmentations, and even stem cell vaginal rejuvenation. The marketing and promotion of stem cell procedures in aesthetic surgery is not adequately supported by clinical evidence in the majority of cases. Stem cells offer tremendous potential, but the marketplace is saturated with unsubstantiated and sometimes fraudulent claims that may place patients at risk. With plastic surgeons at the forefront of stem cell-based regenerative medicine, it is critically important that we provide an example of a rigorous approach to research, data collection, and advertising of stem cell therapies. PMID:24732654

  7. [From the French Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery to the French Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2004-04-01

    (The) 3rd December 1952, 11 surgeons and other specialists found the French Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (SFCPR) which was officially published on (the) 28 September 1953. The first congress was during October 1953 and the first president as Maurice Aubry. The first secretary was Daniel Morel Fatio. The symposiums were after about three of four times each year and the thematic subjects were initially according the reconstructive surgery. The review "Annales de chirurgie plastique" was free in 1956. The members of the Society were about 30 initially, but their plastic surgery in the big hospitals at Paris and other big towns in France. The "specialty" of plastic surgery was created in 1971. On "syndicate", one French board of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, the increasing of departments of plastic surgery were the front of increasing of the plastic surgery in French and of the number of the French Society of Plastic Reconstructive surgery (580 in 2003). The French Society organized the International Congress of Plastic Surgery in 1975. The society SFCPR became the French Society of plastic reconstruction and Aesthetic Surgery (SFCPRE) in 1983 and the "logo" (front view) was in the 1994 SOF.CPRE.

  8. Effects of early discharge following breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A; Holcombe, C

    2001-02-01

    A small group of breast cancer surgery patients were discharged early with axillary drains in situ. The group was examined for wound infection, seroma formation and depression, and compared to a group who stayed in hospital. There was no indication that early discharge increased seroma formation or infection. Anxiety and depression appeared to be less in the early discharge group. PMID:12029907

  9. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Aesthetic rhinoplasty plus brow, eyelid and conchal surgery: pitfalls – complications – prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gubisch, Wolfgang; Dacho, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Within the last years aesthetic surgery enjoys greater popularity and acceptance. One of the most frequently asked operations has been the aesthetic rhinoplasty. Hardly any other field of surgery is exposed to such a critical analysis than aesthetic rhinoplasty because the results are so obvious. According to the “International Society of Aesthetic Surgery” (ISAPS) over 980,000 cosmetic rhinoplasties have been performed in 2010. This corresponds to 10.4% of all registered aesthetic procedures worldwide. Complications can not be eliminated in such a large number of nasal operations. Five to 15% of all patients re-consult a doctor for a revision because they are much dissatisfied with their final rhinoplasty result. Findings of the tip followed by functional problems and irregularities of the nasal dorsum are named most frequently. The responsible rhinosurgeon has to take into account all anatomical and physiological details and to consider ethical and psychological aspects in the pre-selection and postoperative care of the patient. Aesthetic surgeons should be acquainted with terms and definitions like body image, dysmorphophobia or Thersites complex. Acronyms, like “SIMON” or “SYLVIA”, support the physician additionally to analyze and assess the patient. The following article describes the most frequent faults, complications and pitfalls after aesthetic rhinoplasty listed by the anatomical structure. Results will be analyzed and strategies and techniques will be suggested to correct the faults and to prevent them in the future. Furthermore psychologic, social and psychiatric aspects will be discussed and handling with aesthetic patients explained. PMID:24403975

  11. Ultrasound guided nerve block for breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, P; Casas, P; López, S; Fajardo, M

    2016-03-01

    The breast surgery has undergone changes in recent years, encouraging new initiatives for the anaesthetic management of these patients in order to achieve maximum quality and rapid recovery. The fundamental tool that has allowed a significant improvement in the progress of regional anaesthesia for breast disease has been ultrasound, boosting the description and introduction into clinical practice of interfascial chest wall blocks, although the reference standard is still the paravertebral block. It is very likely that these blocks will change the protocols in the coming years. A review is presented of the anatomy of the breast region, description of nerve blocks and techniques, as well as their indications, all according to published articles and the opinion of the authors based on their experience.

  12. Ultrasound guided nerve block for breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, P; Casas, P; López, S; Fajardo, M

    2016-03-01

    The breast surgery has undergone changes in recent years, encouraging new initiatives for the anaesthetic management of these patients in order to achieve maximum quality and rapid recovery. The fundamental tool that has allowed a significant improvement in the progress of regional anaesthesia for breast disease has been ultrasound, boosting the description and introduction into clinical practice of interfascial chest wall blocks, although the reference standard is still the paravertebral block. It is very likely that these blocks will change the protocols in the coming years. A review is presented of the anatomy of the breast region, description of nerve blocks and techniques, as well as their indications, all according to published articles and the opinion of the authors based on their experience. PMID:26776926

  13. Breast volumetric analysis for aesthetic planning in breast reconstruction: a literature review of techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, Warren Matthew; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate volumetric analysis is an essential component of preoperative planning in both reconstructive and aesthetic breast procedures towards achieving symmetrization and patient-satisfactory outcome. Numerous comparative studies and reviews of individual techniques have been reported. However, a unifying review of all techniques comparing their accuracy, reliability, and practicality has been lacking. Methods A review of the published English literature dating from 1950 to 2015 using databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE, was undertaken. Results Since Bouman’s first description of water displacement method, a range of volumetric assessment techniques have been described: thermoplastic casting, direct anthropomorphic measurement, two-dimensional (2D) imaging, and computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. However, most have been unreliable, difficult to execute and demonstrate limited practicability. Introduction of 3D surface imaging has revolutionized the field due to its ease of use, fast speed, accuracy, and reliability. However, its widespread use has been limited by its high cost and lack of high level of evidence. Recent developments have unveiled the first web-based 3D surface imaging program, 4D imaging, and 3D printing. Conclusions Despite its importance, an accurate, reliable, and simple breast volumetric analysis tool has been elusive until the introduction of 3D surface imaging technology. However, its high cost has limited its wide usage. Novel adjunct technologies, such as web-based 3D surface imaging program, 4D imaging, and 3D printing, appear promising. PMID:27047788

  14. Objective Measures in Aesthetic and Functional Nasal Surgery – Perspectives on Nasal Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin S.; Garcia, Guilherme J.M.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The outcomes of aesthetic and functional nasal surgery are difficult to assess objectively due to the intricate balance between nasal form and function. Despite historical emphasis on patient-reported subjective measures, objective measures are gaining importance in both research and the current outcomes-driven healthcare environment. Objective measures presently available have several shortcomings which limit their routine clinical use. In particular, the low correlation between objective and subjective measures poses a major challenge. However, advances in computer, imaging, and bioengineering technology are now setting the stage for the development of innovative objective assessment tools for nasal surgery that can potentially address some of the current limitations. Assessment of nasal form following aesthetic surgery is evolving from two-dimensional analysis to more sophisticated three-dimensional analysis. Similarly, assessment of nasal function is evolving with the introduction of computational fluid dynamics techniques, which allow for a detailed description of the biophysics of nasal airflow. In this paper, we present an overview of objective measures in both aesthetic and functional nasal surgery and discuss future trends and applications that have the potential to change the way we assess nasal form and function. PMID:20665410

  15. Shoulder impairment before breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ann Marie; Dwyer, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare pre- and post-operative shoulder active range of motion (AROM) values from female breast cancer survivors to population norm values for shoulder AROM; and to compare shoulder AROM differences pre- and post-surgery between female African American and White breast cancer survivors (BCA). Study design This pilot study used a convenience sample and longitudinal design measuring participants 2 times (T0 = baseline, after biopsy but within 2 weeks before BCA surgery; T1 = 2nd postoperative week). Background The U.S. has the largest BCA survivor population in history and yet the mortality burden remains highest among AA BCA survivors. AAs may also have greater burden of physical and functional side effects compared to whites and the general population. Methods and Measures The data were collected from a convenience sample (n = 33; nAA = 9, nW = 24) and included data on shoulder AROM, medical chart review for pre- and co-morbid conditions, and self-reported demographics and medical history. We used t-tests to compare sample AROM means to population norms. We then compared our sample across 2 timepoints (T0 = pre-surgery; T1 = 2 weeks post-surgery) using independent samples t-tests and repeated measures analysis of variance (p < .05) to compare AA to White sub-samples AROM means. Results African Americans had significantly less shoulder abduction (at T0) and flexion (at T1) than whites. However, 100% had significantly reduced AROM for all movements at T0 (prior to surgery but after biopsy) when compared to population norms. Conclusions The significant reduction in shoulder AROM after biopsy but before surgery points to a possible unmet need for early physical therapy intervention. Further research using randomized controlled trial design is recommended. PMID:25593563

  16. New trends in breast cancer surgery: a therapeutic approach increasingly efficacy and respectful of the patient

    PubMed Central

    FRANCESCHINI, G.; SANCHEZ, A. MARTIN; DI LEONE, A.; MAGNO, S.; MOSCHELLA, F.; ACCETTA, C.; MASETTI, R.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has undergone continuous and profound changes over the last 40 years. The evolution from aggressive and mutilating treatment to conservative approach has been long, but constant, despite the controversies that appeared every time a new procedure came to light. Today, the aesthetic satisfaction of breast cancer patients coupled with the oncological safety is the goal of the modern breast surgeon. Breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the gold standard approach for patients with early stage breast cancer and the recent introduction of “oncoplastic techniques” has furtherly increased the use of breast-conserving procedures. Mastectomy remains a valid surgical alternative in selected cases and is usually associated with immediate reconstructive procedures. New surgical procedures called “conservative mastectomies” are emerging as techniques that combine oncological safety and cosmesis by entirely removing the breast parenchyma sparing the breast skin and nipple-areola complex. Staging of the axilla has also gradually evolved toward less aggressive approaches with the adoption of sentinel node biopsy and new therapeutic strategies are emerging in patients with a pathological positivity in sentinel lymph node biopsy. The present work will highlight the new surgical treatment options increasingly efficacy and respectful of breast cancer patients. PMID:26712068

  17. New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160426.html New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers 2 ... hope the guideline also translates into peace of mind for women who will know that future surgeries ...

  18. Observed outcomes on the use of oxidized and regenerated cellulose polymer for breast conserving surgery – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rassu, Pier Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidized regenerated cellulose polymer (ORCP) may be used for reshaping and filling lack of volume in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The study aimed to observe both the aesthetic and diagnostic outcomes in patients with different age, BMI, breast volume, and breast tissue composition over 36 months after BCS with ORCP. Patients and methods 18 patients with early breast cancer and with proliferative benign lesions underwent BCS with ORCP that was layered in three-dimensional wafer, and placed into the Chassaignac space between the mammary gland and the fascia of pectoralis major with no fixation. After surgery, patients started a clinical and instrumental 36-month follow-up with mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cytological examination with fine needle aspiration when seroma occurred. Results Below the median age of 66 years old no complications were observed even in case both of overweight, and large breasts with low density. Over the median age seromas occurred with either small or large skin retraction, with the exception of 1 patient having quite dense breasts and low BMI, which had no complications. In elderly patients, 1 case with quite dense breasts and high BMI showed severe seroma and skin retraction, while 1 case with low BMI and less dense breasts highlighted milder complications. Conclusion During 36 months after BCS with ORCP, a significant correlation between positive diagnostic and aesthetic outcomes and low age, dense breasts, and low BMI of patient was observed. Despite of the few number of cases, either low BMI, or high breast density improved the aesthetic outcomes and reduced the entity of complications even in the elderly patients. PMID:26865976

  19. Oncoplastic techniques in breast surgery for special therapeutic problems

    PubMed Central

    Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sukarayothin, Thongchai; Leesombatpaiboon, Monchai; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Kongdan, Youwanush

    2016-01-01

    Resection of large tumors can be challenging, from the view point of breast preservation. Oncoplastic techniques are a valuable component of breast surgery in patients with large breast tumors who desire breast preservation. These techniques have been shown to be oncologically safe, while maintaining acceptable breast cosmesis. For locally advanced or recurrent breast cancers, the goals of surgery include local disease control and palliation of clinical symptoms. Oncoplastic surgery is also effective and oncologically safe in these situations. The need to completely remove all foci of cancers with adequate surgical margins often requires the displacement of adjacent or distant skin and soft tissue to cover the resulting soft tissue defect. Sometimes doing so can be cosmetically pleasing as well. In this article we present three special therapeutic problems in three distinct conditions, all resolved with oncoplastic techniques: the benign breast condition, malignant breast condition, and the palliative setting. PMID:26855912

  20. Oncoplastic techniques in breast surgery for special therapeutic problems.

    PubMed

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sukarayothin, Thongchai; Leesombatpaiboon, Monchai; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Kongdan, Youwanush

    2016-02-01

    Resection of large tumors can be challenging, from the view point of breast preservation. Oncoplastic techniques are a valuable component of breast surgery in patients with large breast tumors who desire breast preservation. These techniques have been shown to be oncologically safe, while maintaining acceptable breast cosmesis. For locally advanced or recurrent breast cancers, the goals of surgery include local disease control and palliation of clinical symptoms. Oncoplastic surgery is also effective and oncologically safe in these situations. The need to completely remove all foci of cancers with adequate surgical margins often requires the displacement of adjacent or distant skin and soft tissue to cover the resulting soft tissue defect. Sometimes doing so can be cosmetically pleasing as well. In this article we present three special therapeutic problems in three distinct conditions, all resolved with oncoplastic techniques: the benign breast condition, malignant breast condition, and the palliative setting. PMID:26855912

  1. Subjective assessment of facial aesthetics after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiq; Aleem, Fahd; Ormiston, Ian W

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the subjective perception of facial appearance by patients after maxillofacial surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and explored the possible correlation between satisfaction and surgical outcome. A total of 26 patients, 24 men and 2 women (mean (SD) age 45 (7) years), subjectively assessed their facial appearance before and after operation using a visual analogue scale (VAS). To investigate a possible association between postoperative facial appearance and surgical outcome, we analysed postoperative scores for the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Postoperatively, 14 (54%) indicated that their facial appearance had improved, 4 (15%) recorded a neutral score, and 8 (31%) a lower score. The rating of facial appearance did not correlate with changes in the AHI or ESS following surgery. This study supports the view that most patients are satisfied with their appearance after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for OSA. The subjective perception of facial aesthetics was independent of the surgical outcome.

  2. Orthognathic surgery with or without autologous fat micrograft injection: preliminary report on aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, M; Pisani, C

    2015-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery leaves the intrinsic volume of the facial soft tissues untouched, sometimes resulting in unsatisfactory improvements in aesthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction following bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with or without simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures. The preoperative and postoperative facial appearances of 210 patients were compared through analysis of photographs and postoperative clinical evaluation. A patient questionnaire was used to assess the perceived improvement in aesthetics. One hundred and twenty patients (mean age 20.3 years) underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures (group I). The remaining 90 patients (mean age 19.8 years) underwent skeletal procedures only (group II). The overall aesthetic improvement was similar in the two groups (group I 92.5%, group II 91.1%). Greater higher-level aesthetic improvement scores were recorded for group I (group I 80%, group II 55.6%). The overall patient satisfaction was 98.3% for group I and 97.8% for group II. Greater higher-level satisfaction scores were recorded for group I (group I 14.2%, group II 6.7%). The simultaneous use of the autologous fat micrograft is a promising technique that may improve the aesthetic outcomes of orthognathic surgery, leading to greater patient satisfaction.

  3. Effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics: changes in facial content and frames.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-11-01

    Aesthetic units of the face can be divided into facial content (FC; eyes, nose, lips, and mouth), anterior facial frame (AFF; a contour line from the trichion, the temporal line of the frontal bone, the lateral orbital rim, the most lateral line of the anterior part of the zygomatic body, the anterior border of the masseter muscle, to the inferior border of the chin), and posterior facial frame (PFF; a contour line from the hairline, the zygomatic arch, to the ramus and gonial angle area of the mandible). The size and shape of each FC and the balance and proportion between FCs create a unique appearance for each person. The facial form can be determined through the combination of AFF and PFF. In the Asian population, clinicians frequently encounter problems of FC (eg, acute nasolabial angle, protrusive and everted lips, nonconsonant lip line, or lip canting), AFF (eg, midface hypoplasia, protrusive and asymmetric chin, vertical deficiency/excess of the anterior maxilla and symphysis, or prominent zygoma), and PFF (eg, square mandibular angle). These problems can be efficiently and effectively corrected through the combination of hard tissue surgery such as anterior segmental osteotomy, genioplasty, mandibular angle reduction, malarplasty, and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the purposes of this article were to introduce the concepts of FC, AFF, and PFF, and to explain the effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics.

  4. Controversies in the satisfaction of surgeons and orthodontists on facial aesthetics after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Faverani, Leonardo; Ramalho-Ferreira, Gabriel; Jardim, Ellen; Goiato, Marcelo; Pereira, Flavia; Pastori, Claudio; Junior, Idelmo Garcia

    2013-03-01

    Aim Acceptable facial aesthetics is a common desire among patients presenting with dentofacial deformities planning to undergo orthognathic surgeries. Thus, professionals must be alert to their patients' complaints as well as their desires regarding facial morphology, because this is quite subjective and personal. This research aimed at evaluating the different views of orthodontists and oral maxillofacial surgeons regarding the facial analysis of patients who undergo orthognathic surgery. Methods Thirty individuals were selected with a minimum postoperative period of 6 months and photographed in the frontal and profile norm. Facial morphology characteristics were recorded to observe the agreement of the assessments of four professionals (two orthodontists and two surgeons). Results A significant agreement was seen between the orthodontists regarding the nasolabial angle (80%). In the frontal analysis, the agreement percentage (60%) between orthodontists and surgeons was considerable regarding facial asymmetry assessment. Conclusions Professionals must keep alert to facial analysis, especially in terms of tegumental harmony, for the orthognathic surgery to reestablish, satisfactorily, the facial aesthetics in all parameters set.

  5. A comprehensive screening, education, and training tool for the psychological assessment of patients seeking aesthetic surgery: "DESIRABLE OP?".

    PubMed

    Rees, Leila S; Myers, Simon; Bradbury, Eileen

    2012-04-01

    Patients may seek aesthetic surgery for many reasons. They may present with expectations for both the surgical outcome and the impact that their changed appearance will have on their lives. The desire for an aesthetic procedure is usually driven by increased levels of self-consciousness. The surgeon must be able to identify those patients where the psychological outcome of aesthetic surgery is likely to be poor, and where the self-consciousness of the patient is abnormal. A mnemonic (DESIRABLE OP) is presented with the aim of providing surgeons with a screening tool that can lead them through the psychological assessment of any patient seeking an aesthetic procedure and enable them to determine whether its undertaking constitutes a desirable operation?

  6. Recent advances in microvascular autologous breast reconstruction after ablative tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pollhammer, Michael S; Duscher, Dominik; Schmidt, Manfred; Huemer, Georg M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a ubiquitous disease and one of the leading causes of death in women in western societies. With overall increasing survival rates, the number of patients who need post-mastectomy reconstruction is on the rise. Especially since its psychological benefits have been broadly recognized, breast reconstruction has become a key component of breast cancer treatment. Evolving from the early beginnings of breast reconstruction with synthetic implants in the 1960s, microsurgical tissue transfer is on the way to become the gold standard for post oncology restoration of the breast. Particularly since the advent of perforator based free flap surgery, free tissue transfer has become as safe option for breast reconstruction with low morbidity. The lower abdominal skin and subcutaneous fat tissue typically offer enough volume to create an aesthetically satisfying breast mound. Nowadays, the most commonly used flap from this donor site is the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. If the lower abdomen is not available as a donor site, the gluteal area and thigh provide a number of flaps suitable for breast reconstruction. If the required breast volume is small, and there is enough tissue available on the upper medial thigh, then a transverse upper gracilis flap may be a practicable method to reconstruct the breast. In case of a higher amount of required volume, a gluteal artery perforator flap is the best choice. However, what is crucial in addition to selecting the best flap option for the individual patient is the timing of the operation. In patients with confirmed post-mastectomy radiation therapy, it is advisable to perform microvascular breast reconstruction only in a delayed fashion. PMID:26862495

  7. Choices in Surgery for Older Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Vikram; Spiliopoulos, Markos K.; Audisio, Riccardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality worldwide. As the population ages and life expectancy increases, the burden of cancer on health services will increase. Older patients with breast cancer are becoming more suitable for surgery; tailored surgical techniques and increasing healthy life expectancy alongside improved assessment of patients are aiding this trend. Surgery is also becoming a favoured treatment of personal choice for older patient with breast cancer. Evidence shows that surgery is almost always feasible for the older patient with outcomes (survival, progression, and recurrence rates) comparable to younger groups and superior to non-surgical treatments. We aim to describe the current status of surgery for the older patient with breast cancer, showing it is an option that should not be denied. Surgery should always be considered regardless of age, after evaluation of co-morbidities. PMID:24715825

  8. Assessing cosmetic results after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria João; Oliveira, Helder; Cardoso, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    "Taking less treating better" has been one of the major improvements of breast cancer surgery in the last four decades. The application of this principle translates into equivalent survival of breast cancer conserving treatment (BCT) when compared to mastectomy, with a better cosmetic outcome. While it is relatively easy to evaluate the oncological results of BCT, the cosmetic outcome is more difficult to measure due to the lack of an effective and consensual procedure. The assessment of cosmetic outcome has been mainly subjective, undertaken by a panel of expert observers or/and by patient self-assessment. Unfortunately, the reproducibility of these methods is low. Objective methods have higher values of reproducibility but still lack the inclusion of several features considered by specialists in BCT to be fundamental for cosmetic outcome. The recent addition of volume information obtained with 3D images seems promising. Until now, unfortunately, no method is considered to be the standard of care. This paper revises the history of cosmetic evaluation and guides us into the future aiming at a method that can easily be used and accepted by all, caregivers and caretakers, allowing not only the comparison of results but the improvement of performance.

  9. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  10. Sensationalising the Female Pudenda: An Examination of Public Communication of Aesthetic Genital Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ashong, Ashong C.; Batta, Herbert E.

    2013-01-01

    We live in a society where beauty and sensations are important. Advances in medical technologies have brought on waves of new notions of beauty where commercial interests both in the media and the health industry spurred by fashion, advertising and celebrity promotion have tended to popularise body modifications and enhancements. In recent times, through offerings on cable television channels and glossy consumer magazines, medical procedures hitherto only in the precincts of medical schools, gyneacological clinics and medical journals have now pervaded the population. More seriously, on the Internet particularly, medical experts now offer services and graphic details of labiaplasty, clitoral hood reduction or enhancement, vaginal rejuvenation, etc. Here, we examine the public communication of the phenomenon of aesthetic genital surgery and interrogate thus; is it decent, honest, balanced and ethical? Relying on textual analysis, personal observation and literature review for data gathering, we observe that besides tending to commercialise and medicalise the female genitalia, a coalescence of medical, advertising and fashion interests as played out in the media sensationalises the benign science of plastic surgery and robs it of its truthfulness, genuineness, and purposefulness. The conclusion is that in Africa, where the effect of the development crises is telling, the hype surrounding cosmetic or aesthetic genital surgery is a damaging distraction particularly when the continent is waging a battle against female genital mutilation. The recommendations are that media and medical regulatory bodies should impress it upon media and medical industry operators that glaring commercial promotions of cosmetic genital surgery in the public media be checked, and that such communication should bear equal weight of facts related to risks, short comings, complications, and threats; in physical, social, and psychological terms. PMID:23445703

  11. Surgical treatment of early breast cancer in day surgery.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Casà, Luigi; Noto, Antonio; Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2007-01-01

    Quadrantectomy and associated sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is currently employed in most breast surgery centres as the gold standard in the treatment of early breast cancer. This approach has a modest morbidity and can usually be performed in a day-surgery regimen, leading to best acceptance by the patients. This reports outlines the experience of our Breast Unit with quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery for early breast cancer. One hundred patients presenting to our institution with primary invasive breast cancer measuring less than 3 cm and clinically negative axillary nodes underwent quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery. For 60 women with breast cancer the sentinel node was negative, so the only definitive surgical treatment was performed in the day-surgery regimen; 40 patients with positive sentinel nodes were hospitalised a second time for axillary dissection. In these patients that needed clearance of the axilla, SLNB was performed on the only positive node in 22 cases (55%). None of the patients admitted for quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery required re-hospitalisation after discharge. All patients proved to be fully satisfied with early discharge from hospital when questioned on the occasion of subsequent monitoring. Short-stay surgical programs in early invasive breast cancer treatment are feasible today owing to the availability of less invasive approaches such as quadrantectomy and SLNB. There are two main pointers to a distinct advantage for this kind of approach, i.e. recovery and psychological adjustment. Recovery from surgery is faster and the patient tends to play down the seriousness of the operation and to have a better mental attitude to neoplastic disease. Moreover, when performing quadrantectomy with SLNB in day surgery fewer than 50% of breast cancer patients (40% in our experience) require another surgical treatment, concluding the surgery in a single session. PMID:18019641

  12. Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget’s disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

  13. Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tattoo that looks like the areola (the dark area around your nipple). There are two main ... feeling in your breast, nipple, and areola (the dark area around your nipple). Maybe. After surgery, the ...

  14. Functional crown lengthening surgery in the aesthetic zone; periodontic and prosthodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajiv M; Baker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Crown lengthening surgery aims to increase the amount of supragingival tooth tissue by resection of the soft and/or hard tissues to enable otherwise unrestorable teeth to be restored by increasing the retention and resistance forms of the teeth. Restoration of the worn dentition may require significant prosthodontic knowledge and skill. A prosthodontist should be involved from the beginning of the management of the patient. A number of key stages should be considered for correct management. Although the periodontist may guide the prosthodontist with regards to what may or may not be possible surgically, the overall treatment plan should be prosthodontically driven. Clinical Relevance: Toothwear of the anterior dentition provides a unique challenge to restore not only function but also to manage the aesthetic demands of the patient. To ensure that the correct outcome is reached, clinicians should be familiar with the normal anatomical proportions and relationships to enable planning and treatment to take place.

  15. Functional crown lengthening surgery in the aesthetic zone; periodontic and prosthodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajiv M; Baker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Crown lengthening surgery aims to increase the amount of supragingival tooth tissue by resection of the soft and/or hard tissues to enable otherwise unrestorable teeth to be restored by increasing the retention and resistance forms of the teeth. Restoration of the worn dentition may require significant prosthodontic knowledge and skill. A prosthodontist should be involved from the beginning of the management of the patient. A number of key stages should be considered for correct management. Although the periodontist may guide the prosthodontist with regards to what may or may not be possible surgically, the overall treatment plan should be prosthodontically driven. Clinical Relevance: Toothwear of the anterior dentition provides a unique challenge to restore not only function but also to manage the aesthetic demands of the patient. To ensure that the correct outcome is reached, clinicians should be familiar with the normal anatomical proportions and relationships to enable planning and treatment to take place. PMID:26062277

  16. [Radioimmuno-guided surgery (RIGS) in breast disease].

    PubMed

    Gioffrè Florio, M A; Famà, F; Pillitteri, M; Pollicino, A; Giacobbe, G; Venuti, A

    2001-01-01

    Radioimmunoguided surgery is a new technology capable of detecting minimal neoplastic lesions using radiocolloids. We used this technique in two fields: to detect sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer and to remove non-palpable breast lesions. Radioimmunoguided surgery was employed in 135 women; in 32 for sentinel lymph nodes and in 103 for radioguided occult lesion localization using a radioactive tracer (Technetium Tc99m) injected subdermally for sentinel nodes, or near to the non-palpable lesions under US guidance. In our experience these two applications of radioimmunoguided surgery are useful and accurate for determining the nature of lesions and for providing definitive treatment in a single surgical intervention.

  17. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery.

  18. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery. PMID:27140865

  19. Pricing strategy for aesthetic surgery: economic analysis of a resident clinic's change in fees.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    1999-02-01

    The laws of microeconomics explain how prices affect consumer purchasing decisions and thus overall revenues and profits. These principles can easily be applied to the behavior aesthetic plastic surgery patients. The UCLA Division of Plastic Surgery resident aesthetics clinic recently offered a radical price change for its services. The effects of this change on demand for services and revenue were tracked. Economic analysis was applied to see if this price change resulted in the maximization of total revenues, or if additional price changes could further optimize them. Economic analysis of pricing involves several steps. The first step is to assess demand. The number of procedures performed by a given practice at different price levels can be plotted to create a demand curve. From this curve, price sensitivities of consumers can be calculated (price elasticity of demand). This information can then be used to determine the pricing level that creates demand for the exact number of procedures that yield optimal revenues. In economic parlance, revenues are maximized by pricing services such that elasticity is equal to 1 (the point of unit elasticity). At the UCLA resident clinic, average total fees per procedure were reduced by 40 percent. This resulted in a 250-percent increase in procedures performed for representative 4-month periods before and after the price change. Net revenues increased by 52 percent. Economic analysis showed that the price elasticity of demand before the price change was 6.2. After the price change it was 1. We conclude that the magnitude of the price change resulted in a fee schedule that yielded the highest possible revenues from the resident clinic. These results show that changes in price do affect total revenue and that the nature of these effects can be understood, predicted, and maximized using the tools of microeconomics. PMID:9950562

  20. Breast Augmentation after Conservation Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, James; Hsieh, Frank; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data regarding outcomes for patients undergoing breast augmentation with implants after breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. This retrospective study examined outcomes for patients with breast implant-only augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. Methods: Between June 1998 and December 2010, 671 women underwent prosthetic breast reconstruction. Nineteen patients (2.8%) underwent an augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. The mean age was 55.8 years (range, 40–69 years). Sixteen of these patients underwent one-stage implant-only breast augmentation, whereas 3 patients underwent two-stage expander and then implant augmentation. Results: All surgeries were successful. The average size of breast implant used was 258.7 g. Seven patients also received contralateral augmentation with an average implant size of 232.2 g. One patient received oral antibiotics for minor wound infection. Patients were judged to have an excellent (14/19; 73.7%), good (3/19; 15.8%), or fair (2/19; 10.5%) cosmetic result. Conclusion: The breasts of selected patients with breast cancer after BCS and radiotherapy. with asymmetry can be adequately augmented with breast implants alone. PMID:27536475

  1. [How can breast-conserving surgery be improved even more?].

    PubMed

    Rutgers, Emiel J T

    2012-01-01

    Due to population-wide screening and increased awareness of breast cancer by women, more early-stage diagnoses are being made. Breast-conserving surgery, performed according to well-established guidelines, results in the same level of local control and long-term survival as mastectomy for the same indication. The Dutch Cancer Registry has demonstrated an average local relapse rate at 5 years of about 3% in a follow-up study of breast-cancer patients. A study published in this issue show a high complete resection rate and less excised tissue volume as compared to other localisation techniques or excision by palpation only. There are two provisions: the tumour and its gross delineation must be visible by ultrasound, and the breast surgeon needs to learn the technique and apply it sensibly. Generally speaking, ultrasound-guided breast-conserving resection of invasive breast cancer may well lead to more initially complete resections and better cosmetic results.

  2. Numbers of Beauty: An Innovative Aesthetic Analysis for Orthognathic Surgery Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Gasparini, Giulio; Midulla, Giulia; Grippaudo, Cristina; Deli, Roberto; Cervelli, Daniele; Pelo, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new aesthetic analysis and establish the sagittal position of the maxilla on an ideal group of reference. We want to demonstrate the usefulness of these findings in the treatment planning of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. We took a reference group of 81 Italian women participating in a national beauty contest in 2011 on which we performed Arnett's soft tissues cephalometric analysis and our new “Vertical Planning Line” analysis. We used the ideal values to elaborate the surgical treatment planning of a second group of 60 consecutive female patients affected by skeletal class III malocclusion. Finally we compared both pre- and postoperative pictures with the reference values of the ideal group. The ideal group of reference does not perfectly fit in Arnett's proposed norms. From the descriptive statistical comparison of the patients' values before and after orthognathic surgery with the reference values we observed how all parameters considered got closer to the ideal population. We consider our “Vertical Planning Line” a useful help for orthodontist and surgeon in the treatment planning of patients with skeletal malocclusions, in combination with the clinical facial examination and the classical cephalometric analysis of bone structures. PMID:27110566

  3. Numbers of Beauty: An Innovative Aesthetic Analysis for Orthognathic Surgery Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Gasparini, Giulio; Midulla, Giulia; Grippaudo, Cristina; Deli, Roberto; Cervelli, Daniele; Pelo, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new aesthetic analysis and establish the sagittal position of the maxilla on an ideal group of reference. We want to demonstrate the usefulness of these findings in the treatment planning of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. We took a reference group of 81 Italian women participating in a national beauty contest in 2011 on which we performed Arnett's soft tissues cephalometric analysis and our new "Vertical Planning Line" analysis. We used the ideal values to elaborate the surgical treatment planning of a second group of 60 consecutive female patients affected by skeletal class III malocclusion. Finally we compared both pre- and postoperative pictures with the reference values of the ideal group. The ideal group of reference does not perfectly fit in Arnett's proposed norms. From the descriptive statistical comparison of the patients' values before and after orthognathic surgery with the reference values we observed how all parameters considered got closer to the ideal population. We consider our "Vertical Planning Line" a useful help for orthodontist and surgeon in the treatment planning of patients with skeletal malocclusions, in combination with the clinical facial examination and the classical cephalometric analysis of bone structures.

  4. Numbers of Beauty: An Innovative Aesthetic Analysis for Orthognathic Surgery Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Gasparini, Giulio; Midulla, Giulia; Grippaudo, Cristina; Deli, Roberto; Cervelli, Daniele; Pelo, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new aesthetic analysis and establish the sagittal position of the maxilla on an ideal group of reference. We want to demonstrate the usefulness of these findings in the treatment planning of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. We took a reference group of 81 Italian women participating in a national beauty contest in 2011 on which we performed Arnett's soft tissues cephalometric analysis and our new "Vertical Planning Line" analysis. We used the ideal values to elaborate the surgical treatment planning of a second group of 60 consecutive female patients affected by skeletal class III malocclusion. Finally we compared both pre- and postoperative pictures with the reference values of the ideal group. The ideal group of reference does not perfectly fit in Arnett's proposed norms. From the descriptive statistical comparison of the patients' values before and after orthognathic surgery with the reference values we observed how all parameters considered got closer to the ideal population. We consider our "Vertical Planning Line" a useful help for orthodontist and surgeon in the treatment planning of patients with skeletal malocclusions, in combination with the clinical facial examination and the classical cephalometric analysis of bone structures. PMID:27110566

  5. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. Methods and analysis All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case–control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about ‘fat grafting and breast reconstruction’ and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and

  6. Standards in breast surgeryBreast Units – future and necessity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignant neoplasm affecting women. In Poland there are nearly 15 500 new cases of the disease and over 5200 deaths due to it observed annually. As it was necessary to provide those suffering from breast cancer with combined highly specialist treatment, it was required that separate units specialising in breast surgery be established. In Europe they are referred to as Breast Units. The idea of forming such separate and fully profiled centres specialising in breast diseases, which was developed in 1998 by EORTC, EUSOMA as well as Europa Donna, gave foundations for the organisation of such centres. The situation of Breast Units in other European countries is different. Poland has failed so far to organise an effective system of Breast Units. Leading Polish authorities underline that formation of multi-disciplinary Breast Units is the organisational priority for the year 2013. PMID:25258578

  7. Innovative computer-based learning for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Karen Louise

    Discussions with student nurses when they have been on placement on the breast cancer surgery ward highlighted their lack of knowledge about breast cancer surgery. This lack of knowledge by student nurses necessitated the development of a computer-based learning tool. A distance-learning tool was found to be an effective way of providing education, due to lack of facilities and workload on the ward. The student nurses using this tool will have better understanding of the treatments their patients are undergoing, leading to improved patient care. PMID:17353818

  8. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cindy; Bentz, Michael L.; Redett, Richard J.; Shack, R. Bruce; David, Lisa R.; Taub, Peter J.; Janis, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Resident aesthetic clinics (RACs) have demonstrated good outcomes and acceptable patient satisfaction, but few studies have evaluated their educational, financial, or medicolegal components. We sought to determine RAC best practices. Methods: We surveyed American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeon members (n = 399), focusing on operational details, resident supervision, patient safety, medicolegal history, financial viability, and research opportunities. Of the 96 respondents, 63 reported having a RAC, and 56% of plastic surgery residency program directors responded. Results: RACs averaged 243 patient encounters and 53.9 procedures annually, having been in existence for 19.6 years (mean). Full-time faculty (73%) supervised chief residents (84%) in all aspects of care (65%). Of the 63 RACs, 45 were accredited, 40 had licensed procedural suites, 28 had inclusion/exclusion criteria, and 31 used anesthesiologists. Seventeen had overnight capability, and 17 had a Life Safety Plan. No cases of malignant hyperthermia occurred, but 1 facility death was reported. Sixteen RACs had been involved in a lawsuit, and 33 respondents reported financial viability of the RACs. Net revenue was transferred to both the residents’ educational fund (41%) and divisional/departmental overhead (37%). Quality measures included case logs (78%), morbidity/mortality conference (62%), resident surveys (52%), and patient satisfaction scores (46%). Of 63 respondents, 14 have presented or published RAC-specific research; 80 of 96 of those who were surveyed believed RACs enhanced education. Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care. PMID:26146599

  9. Autologous Bone-Marrow-Derived-Mononuclear-Cells-Enriched Fat Transplantation in Breast Augmentation: Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes and Aesthetic Results in a 30-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Vrabic, Erik; Hodzic, Enes

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer (lipofilling) is becoming an invaluable tool for breast augmentation as well as for breast reconstruction. Autologous lipofilling has several advantages, including biocompatibility, versatility, natural appearance, and low donor site morbidity. The main limitation is unpredictable fat graft resorption, which ranges from 25% to 80%, probably as a result of ischaemia and lack of neoangiogenesis. To obviate these disadvantages, several studies have searched for new ways of increasing the viability of the transplanted fat tissue. One promising approach is to enrich the fat graft with autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) before transplantation. BMMNCs produce many angiogenic and antiapoptotic growth factors, and their secretion is significantly enhanced by hypoxia. All of these mechanisms of actions could be beneficial for the stimulation of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues by BMMNCs administration. In our aesthetic surgery practice, we use fat transplantation enriched with BMMNCs, which caused a significant improvement in survival of fat grafts, compared with that of traditional lipofilling. Our experience with freshly isolated autologous fat enriched with BMMNCs for breast augmentation procedures is presented. The concept of this surgical and tissue handling technique is based on ability of BMMNCs to stimulate blood vessel growth. PMID:24024064

  10. PERSISTENT ARM PAIN IS DISTINCT FROM PERSISTENT BREAST PAIN FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Dale J.; Paul, Steven M.; West, Claudia; Abrams, Gary; Elboim, Charles; Levine, Jon D.; Hamolsky, Deborah; Luce, Judith A.; Kober, Kord M.; Neuhaus, John M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain following breast cancer surgery is well-documented. However, it is not well characterized in terms of the anatomic site effected (i.e., breast, arm). In two separate growth mixture modeling analyses, we identified subgroups of women (n=398) with distinct breast pain and arm pain trajectories. Based on the fact that these latent classes differed by anatomic site, types if tissue affected, and neural innervation patterns suggests the need for separate evaluations of these distinct persistent pain conditions. Purposes of this companion study were to identify demographic and clinical characteristics that differed between the two arm pain classes and determine if differences existed over time in sensitivity in the upper inner arm and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) sites, pain qualities, pain interference, and hand and arm function; as well as to compare findings with persistent breast pain. Higher occurrence rates for depression and lymphedema were found in the Moderate Arm pain class. Regardless of pain group membership, sensory loss was observed in the upper inner arm and ALND site. Arm pain was described similarly to neuropathic pain and interfered with daily functioning. Persistent arm pain was associated with sustained impairments in shoulder mobility. Perspective: For persistent breast and arm pain, changes in sensation following breast cancer surgery were notable. Persistent arm pain was associated with sustained interference with daily functioning and upper body mobility impairments. Long-term management of persistent pain following breast cancer surgery is warranted to improve the quality of survivorship for these women. PMID:25439319

  11. Breast Cancer Surgery and Financial Reimbursement in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Juergen; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2012-01-01

    The reimbursement for breast cancer-specific operative interventions in Germany is regulated by the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. The essential elements of the German DRG system, which was developed as a per-case lump-sum payment system, are presented, including the participating institutions. The actual treatment situation in breast cancer surgery is now aptly reflected in the introduction of the OPS (operation and treatment procedure classification) 2012. This is oriented on the classification model of Hoffmann and Wallwiener, with its complexity-based differentiation that reflects the basic idea of different resource usage. Despite the actual potential of the appropriately differentiated encryption of surgical procedures, which illustrates their differences in resource costs and consumption, appropriate reimbursement has still not been achieved. Hopefully, in the future the calculation of the DRGs in the field of breast cancer surgery will be based on data feedback from the hospitals and treatment institutions, and will be more suited to the main purpose of the DRG system, i.e. that reimbursement reflects resource expenditure. A necessary basic tool for differentiated, complexity-oriented encryption has been achieved with the OPS 2012, which mirrors our classification model for oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery. PMID:24647777

  12. Oncological Safety of Breast Conservation Surgery in Young Females.

    PubMed

    Muralee, Madhu; Mathew, Arun Peter; Cherian, Kurian; Chandramohan, K; Augustine, Paul; Prabhakar, Jem; Ahamed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    Breast conservation surgery (BCS) is the standard of care in early breast cancer. The oncological safety of this procedure has been proven beyond doubt in several randomised control trials. But there are concerns regarding the safety of this procedure in young females. The concern is regarding increased risk of local recurrence. This issue has not been addressed in any major trial. In this prospective study we intend to look into the oncological safety of BCS in young patients who are less than forty years of age. PMID:27651695

  13. Aesthetic comparison between synthetic glue and subcuticular sutures in thyroid and parathyroid surgery: a single-blinded randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Alicandri-Ciufelli, M; Piccinini, A; Grammatica, A; Molteni, G; Spaggiari, A; DI Matteo, S; Tassi, S; Ghidini, A; Izzo, L; Gioacchini, F M; Marchioni, D; DI Saverio, S; Presutti, L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our study was to compare, in terms of aesthetic results, the use of synthetic glue to intradermal absorbable sutures in postthyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy wound closure in a single blinded, randomised, per protocol equivalence study. From September 2008 to May 2010, patients undergoing thyroid or parathyroid surgery (with an external approach) at the Otolaryngology Department of the University Hospital of Modena were assessed for eligibility. In total, 42 patients who had had synthetic glue application on surgical incisions (A) and 47 patients who had subcuticular sutures on their surgical incisions (B) were enrolled. The mean of the endpoint (based on the Wound Registry Scale) of group A at 10 days was 1.4, while that in group B (based on the Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale) was 2.9. Statistically significant (p = 0.002) and clinically significant (difference of the means = 1.5) differences in the aesthetic results were found between groups A and B at 10 days, with better results in group B. On the other hand, at 3 months, the mean of the endpoint in group A was 3.1 while that in group B was 2.8; no statistically significant (p = 0.62) or clinically significant (difference in means = 0.3) differences were found between groups A and B. In conclusion, synthetic glue differs from subcuticular suture in post-thyroidectomy or post-parathyroidectomy incision for early aesthetic results, with better outcomes for subcuticular sutures. At 3 months, there were no differences in aesthetic outcomes between groups. Moreover, sex, incision length, age, cold/hot blade and correspondence of the incision with a wrinkle in the skin did not seem to influence aesthetic outcomes with this type of incision.

  14. Surgical resection margins after breast-conserving surgery: Senonetwork recommendations.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Taffurelli, Mario; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Aristei, Cynthia; Trentin, Chiara; Cassano, Enrico; Pietribiasi, Francesca; Corso, Giovanni; Munzone, Elisabetta; Tondini, Carlo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Cataliotti, Luigi; Santini, Donatella

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports findings of the "Focus on Controversial Areas" Working Party of the Italian Senonetwork, which was set up to improve the care of breast cancer patients. After reviewing articles in English on the MEDLINE system on breast conserving surgery for invasive carcinoma, the Working Party presents their recommendations for identifying risk factors for positive margins, suggests how to manage them so as to achieve the highest possible percentage of negative margins, and proposes standards for investigating resection margins and therapeutic approaches according to margin status. When margins are positive, approaches include re-excision, mastectomy, or, as second-line treatment, radiotherapy with a high boost dose. When margins are negative, boost administration and its dose depend on the risk of local recurrence, which is linked to biopathological tumor features and surgical margin width. Although margin status does not affect the choice of systemic therapy, it may delay the start of chemotherapy when further surgery is required. PMID:27103209

  15. Conservative surgery for multifocal/multicentric breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) breast cancer is regularly considered a relative contraindication for breast-conserving therapy (BCT). There are two reasons for this wide spread notion: However, we concur that if optimal 'cytoreductive surgery' is achieved this will result in good local control (i.e. in-breast relapse <10% at 10 years). This can only be achieved on the basis of the right imaging, image guidance for non-palpable foci, and tumor free (invasive as well as ductal carcinoma in situ) margins after adequate pathological assessment. Surgery must then be followed by whole breast irradiation and systemic treatments as indicated by primary cancer biology. Careful planning and adaptive application of oncoplastic techniques will result in an optimal cosmetic results. The meticulous work of Roland Holland and coworkers(1) in the early 1980's on whole breast specimen showed invasive foci at more then 2 cm distance from the invasive primary cancer in more then 40% of specimen. Although multiple tumor foci may occur in up to 60% of mastectomy specimens, equivalent survival outcomes were observed in prospective trials comparing BCT and mastectomy for clinically unifocal lesions, suggesting that the majority of these foci are not, or do not become, biologically relevant or clinically significant with appropriate treatment. As diagnostic tools advance, MF and MC tumors are more commonly diagnosed. Cancers that previously would have been classified as unifocal now can be detected as MF or MC. In addition, locoregional treatment modalities have improved significantly over the past decade. More recent studies reflect these advances in diagnosis and treatment. Studies evaluated staging MRI showed that up to 19% of woman with diagnosed breast cancer harbor a second malignant ipsilateral lesion. These findings should only have consequences when additional lesions are proven cancer. Multiple enhancing lesions on MRI are in itself not an indication for a mastectomy. The

  16. [Special aspects of breast cancer surgery in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Polgár, Csaba; Kovács, Eszter; Bartal, Alexandra; Rubovszky, Gábor; Gulyás, Gusztáv

    2014-06-15

    Due to the aging population of Western countries and the high-quality health care system, breast cancer in the elderly generally affects women of good or satisfactory performance status pursuing active lifestyle. Over the last decade, it became evident that, in contrast to previous dogmas, age alone cannot be the contraindication to standard oncological treatment, and adequate multidisciplinary therapy aiming full recovery rather than compromise treatment is required. A number of specific aspects needs to be taken into account regarding surgery, such as life expectancy, co-morbidities, individual mobility, mental and emotional status as well as family background, which may result in changes to the individual treatment plan. Objective evaluation of the above mentioned parameters necessitates a close co-operation of professions. Interestingly, the evidence-based protocols of modern oncology often originate from the generalizations of results from clinical trials representing younger population, due to the typical under representation of elderly patients in clinical studies. Clinical trials should be extended to elderly patients as well or should specifically aim this patient population. The authors of the present paper review the special oncological and reconstructive surgical aspects of breast cancer in the elderly, such as breast conserving surgery versus mastectomia, sentinel lymph node biopsy, axillary lymphadenectomy or the omission of surgery in axillary staging, and questions regarding implant based and autologous reconstructive techniques.

  17. [Special aspects of breast cancer surgery in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Polgár, Csaba; Kovács, Eszter; Bartal, Alexandra; Rubovszky, Gábor; Gulyás, Gusztáv

    2014-06-15

    Due to the aging population of Western countries and the high-quality health care system, breast cancer in the elderly generally affects women of good or satisfactory performance status pursuing active lifestyle. Over the last decade, it became evident that, in contrast to previous dogmas, age alone cannot be the contraindication to standard oncological treatment, and adequate multidisciplinary therapy aiming full recovery rather than compromise treatment is required. A number of specific aspects needs to be taken into account regarding surgery, such as life expectancy, co-morbidities, individual mobility, mental and emotional status as well as family background, which may result in changes to the individual treatment plan. Objective evaluation of the above mentioned parameters necessitates a close co-operation of professions. Interestingly, the evidence-based protocols of modern oncology often originate from the generalizations of results from clinical trials representing younger population, due to the typical under representation of elderly patients in clinical studies. Clinical trials should be extended to elderly patients as well or should specifically aim this patient population. The authors of the present paper review the special oncological and reconstructive surgical aspects of breast cancer in the elderly, such as breast conserving surgery versus mastectomia, sentinel lymph node biopsy, axillary lymphadenectomy or the omission of surgery in axillary staging, and questions regarding implant based and autologous reconstructive techniques. PMID:24918175

  18. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  19. Oncoplastic reduction mammoplasty for breast cancer in women with macromastia: long term aesthetic, functional and satisfaction outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karaali, Cem; Salimoglu, Semra; Sert, Ismail; Aydın, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite the increase in studies concerning oncoplastic reduction mammoplasty (ORM), data showing long-term aesthetic and patient satisfaction for ORM in patients with macromastia remain limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the long-term results of tumorectomy and concomitant bilateral ORM for early-stage breast cancer patients with macromastia in terms of cosmesis, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes. Material and methods Retrospective data of patients with macromastia undergoing ORM for breast cancer between 1996 and 2011 were examined and evaluated regarding the aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes. Results The median age of the 82 patients was 50 years. The median follow-up was 120 months (range: 28–212 months). The median breast volume was 1402 cm3, and the median weight of the excised breast material was 679 g. A good or excellent evaluation of the cosmetic outcome was as follows: self-evaluation: 84.1% at the early-stage, 80.3% at the later stage; panel evaluation: 75.4% at the late-stage. Median patient satisfaction rates were 9.1% for early-stage disease and 8.8% for late-stage disease. Reduced mobility and intertrigo improved by three-fold during the post-operative period. Conclusions ORM for early-stage breast cancer in women with macromastia results in good cosmesis in both the early-stage and long-term, and is quite acceptable for use in patients. Patients reacted favorably to the prospect of having their breast cancer and macromastia treated in a single session, and positive results continued over the long-term. PMID:27647991

  20. Barriers to rehabilitation following surgery for primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheville, Andrea L; Tchou, Julia

    2007-04-01

    Surgery is a mainstay of primary breast cancer therapy. Alterations in surgical technique have reduced normal tissue injury, yet pain and functional compromise continue to occur following treatment. A tenuous evidence base bolstered by considerable expert opinion suggests that early intervention with conventional rehabilitative modalities can reduce surgery-associated pain and dysfunction. Barriers to the timely rehabilitation of functionally morbid sequelae are discussed at length in this article. Barriers arise from a wide range of academic, human, logistic, and financial sources. Despite obstacles, expeditious and effective post-surgical rehabilitation is being regularly delivered to breast cancer patients at many institutions. This experience has given rise to anecdotal information on the management of common sequelae that may undermine function. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of these sequelae are outlined in this article with an emphasis on the caliber of supporting evidence. Myofascial dysfunction, axillary web syndrome, frozen shoulder, lymphostasis, post-mastectomy syndrome, and donor site morbidity following breast reconstruction are addressed. A critical need for more definitive evidence to guide patient management characterizes the current treatment algorithms for surgical sequelae. PMID:17457830

  1. Excellent Aesthetic and Functional Outcome After Fractionated Carbon Dioxide Laser Skin Graft Revision Surgery: Case Report and Review of Laser Skin Graft Revision Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-11-01

    Skin grafts are utilized in dermatology to reconstruct a defect secondary to surgery or trauma of the skin. Common indications for skin grafts include surgical removal of cutaneous malignancies, replacement of tissue after burns or lacerations, and hair transplantation in alopecia. Skin grafts may be cosmetically displeasing, functionally limiting, and significantly impact patient's quality-of-life. There is limited published data regarding skin graft revision to enhance aesthetics and function. Here, we present a case demonstrating excellent aesthetic and functional outcome after fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin graft revision surgery and review of the medical literature on laser skin graft revision techniques. PMID:26580878

  2. Increasing trends in the use of breast-conserving surgery in California.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C R; Cohen, R; Schlag, R; Wright, W E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends in breast-conserving surgery in California from 1988 through 1995. METHODS: Logistic regression was used to analyze data on 104,466 cases of early-stage breast cancer reported to the California Cancer Registry. RESULTS: A monotonically increasing trend in breast-conserving surgery was detected after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, stage at diagnosis, and neighborhood education level. Breast-conserving surgery increased at similar rates among all racial/ethnic groups. Older age, Asian or Hispanic race/ethnicity, late-stage diagnosis, and residence in an undereducated neighborhood were factors associated with lower use of breast-conserving surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Although disparities are evident, use of breast-conserving surgery increased steadily in all groups examined in this study. PMID:10667193

  3. Initial study of breast tissue retraction toward image guided breast surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Michael J.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Sun, Kay; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided surgery may reduce the re-excision rate in breast-conserving tumor-resection surgery, but image guidance is difficult since the breast undergoes significant deformation during the procedure. In addition, any imaging performed preoperatively is usually conducted in a very different presentation to that in surgery. Biomechanical models combined with low-cost ultrasound imaging and laser range scanning may provide an inexpensive way to provide intraoperative guidance information while also compensating for soft tissue deformations that occur during breast-conserving surgery. One major cause of deformation occurs after an incision into the tissue is made and the skin flap is pulled back with the use of retractors. Since the next step in the surgery would be to start building a surgical plane around the tumor to remove cancerous tissue, in an image-guidance environment, it would be necessary to have a model that corrects for the deformation caused by the surgeon to properly guide the application of resection tools. In this preliminary study, two anthropomorphic breast phantoms were made, and retractions were performed on both with improvised retractors. One phantom underwent a deeper retraction that the other. A laser range scanner (LRS) was used to monitor phantom tissue change before and after retraction. The surface data acquired with the LRS and retractors were then used to drive the solution of a finite element model. The results indicate an encouraging level of agreement between model predictions and data. The surface target error for the phantom with the deep retraction was 2.2 +/- 1.2 mm (n=47 targets) with the average deformation of the surface targets at 4.2 +/- 1.6mm. For the phantom with the shallow retraction, the surface target error was 2.1 +/- 1.0 mm (n=70 targets) with the average deformation of the surface targets at 4.0 +/- 2.0 mm.

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Breast Reconstruction Surgery and Therapeutic Mammoplasty: Prospective Evaluation 1 Year Post-Surgery with BREAST-Q Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Laxmi; Busheri, Laleh; Dixit, Santosh; Patel, Chaula; Dhar, Upendra; Koppiker, Chaitanyanand

    2015-12-01

    Breast Cancer (BC) treatment leads to mutilation and destruction of breast shape with negative effects on body image and self-esteem.One of the main goals of reconstructive and oncoplastic breast surgery is to satisfy patients and improve their quality of life (QoL).Therefore, it is important to assess the patient experience post-surgery by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that focus on the patient's perception of the surgery and surgical care, as well as psychosocial well-being and physical functioning. The objective of the current study was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction such as breast appearance including implant type in a selective sample of women who underwent breast reconstruction surgery using implants. Participants in this prospective study were women, (age 26-75 years) that were newly diagnosed with breast carcinoma. All consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction between January 2013 and October 2014 were asked to complete the BREAST-Q questionnaire 1 year after surgery. 120 patients underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using implant. While 38 patients underwent reconstruction with opposite breast reduction symmertization, 27 patients underwent therapeutic mammoplasty. The response rate for BREAST-Q questionnaire completion was 98 % with 147 out of 150 study participants completed the questionnaire. From the data collected from 147 patients, the responses could be distributed into 4 distinct groups based on the reconstruction outcomes namely "very much satisfied" (93 %) or "definitely and mostly satisfied" (94 %) or "satisfied" with the outcome (88 %) or "definitely agree on having reconstruction rather than the alternative of having no breast "(91 %).The results showed significant improvement in all four areas that were evaluated after surgery namely satisfaction with the appearance of the breasts, psychosocial, sexual and physical well-being. While the reconstruction surgery had an overall

  5. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings.

  6. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings. PMID:27698816

  7. Periodontal Plastic Surgery to Improve Aesthetics in Patients with Altered Passive Eruption/Gummy Smile: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Francesco; Graziani, Filippo; Franchi, Lorenzo; Defraia, Efisio; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Altered passive eruption/gummy smile is a common challenge in patients requiring aesthetic treatment. A specific surgical protocol was designed and tested in patients with altered passive eruption. Standardized preoperative X-rays were used to assess crown length at baseline and to place submarginal incisions. Osseous respective therapy was performed to achieve biological width. Clinical outcomes were recorded 6 months after surgery. Eleven patients with a total of 58 teeth were treated with flap surgery and osseous resective therapy at upper anterior natural teeth. At the last followup, a significant and stable improvement of crown length was obtained when compared to the baseline (P < 0.0001). All patients rated as satisfactory in the final outcomes (final VAS value = 86.6). In conclusion, this study showed that periodontal plastic surgery including osseous resection leads to predictable outcomes in the treatment of altered passive eruption/gummy smile: A careful preoperative planning avoids unpleasant complications and enhances postsurgical stability of the gingival margin. PMID:23056049

  8. Lymphaticovenular bypass surgery for lymphedema management in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, D W

    2012-12-01

    Historically, the reported incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in breast cancer survivors who have undergone axillary lymph node dissection has ranged from 9% to 41%. In the past 2 decades, sentinel lymph node biopsy has become popular as a way to minimize the morbidity associated with axillary dissection without compromising the cure rate for breast cancer patients. However, even with sentinel node biopsy, the postoperative incidence of upper limb lymphedema in breast cancer patients remains at 4-10%. Lymphedema occasionally emerges immediately after surgery but most often appears after a latent period. Obesity, postoperative seroma, and radiation therapy have been reported as major risk factors for upper extremity lymphedema, but the etiology of lymphedema is still not fully understood. Common symptoms of upper limb lymphedema are increased volume and weight of the affected limb and increased skin tension. The increased volume of the affected limb not only causes physical impairments in wearing clothes and in dexterity but also affects patients' emotional and mental status. Surgical management of lymphedema can be broadly categorized into physiologic methods and reductive techniques. Physiologic methods such as flap interposition, lymph node transfers, and lymphatic bypass procedures aim to decrease lymphedema by restoring lymphatic drainage. In contrast, reductive techniques such as direct excision or liposuction aim to remove fibrofatty tissue generated as a consequence of sustained lymphatic fluid stasis. Currently, microsurgical variations of lymphatic bypass, in which excess lymph trapped within the lymphedematous limb is redirected into other lymphatic basins or into the venous circulation, have gained popularity.

  9. Quality of Life in Patients with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema and Reconstructive Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Penha, Tiara R Lopez; Botter, Bente; Heuts, Esther M; Voogd, Adri C; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F; van der Hulst, René R

    2016-07-01

    Background To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors who have undergone breast reconstruction and have breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods Patients with a unilateral mastectomy with or without breast reconstruction were evaluated for BCRL and their QOL. Patients were divided into a non-BCRL and a BCRL group. Patients with subjective complaints of arm swelling and/or an interlimb volume difference of >200 mL, or undergoing treatment for arm lymphedema were defined as having BCRL. QOL was assessed using cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-B23) and disease specific (Lymph-ICF) questionnaires. Results In total, 253 patients with a mean follow-up time of 51.7 (standard deviation = 18.5) months since mastectomy completed the QOL questionnaires. Of these patients, 116 (46%) underwent mastectomy alone and 137 (54%) had additional breast reconstruction. A comparison of the QOL scores of 180 patients in the non-BCRL group showed a significantly better physical function (p = 0.004) for patients with reconstructive surgery compared with mastectomy patients. In the 73 patients with BCRL, a comparison of the QOL scores showed no significant differences between patients with mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate analysis showed a significant impact of BCRL on physical function (β =  - 7.46; p = 0.009), role function (β =  - 15.75; p = 0.003), cognitive function (β =  - 11.56; p = 0.005), body vision (β =  - 11.62; p = 0.007), arm symptoms (β = 20.78; p = 0.000), and all domains of the Lymph-ICF questionnaire. Conclusions This study implies that BCRL has a negative effect on the QOL of breast cancer survivors, potentially negating the positive effects on QOL reconstructive breast surgery has. PMID:26919383

  10. Effect of Interval to Definitive Breast Surgery on Clinical Presentation and Survival in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Hammond, A.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of clinical presentation and interval to breast surgery on local recurrence and survival in early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 397 patients with Stage T1-T2N0 breast carcinoma treated with conservative surgery and breast radiotherapy between 1985 and 1992 were reviewed at the London Regional Cancer Program. The clinical presentation consisted of a mammogram finding or a palpable lump. The intervals from clinical presentation to definitive breast surgery used for analysis were 0-4, >4-12, and >12 weeks. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival were determined for the three groups. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical presentation and interval to definitive surgery on survival. Results: The median follow-up was 11.2 years. No statistically significant difference was found in local recurrence as a function of the interval to definitive surgery (p = .424). A significant difference was noted in disease-free survival (p = .040) and cause-specific survival (p = .006) with an interval of >12 weeks to definitive breast surgery. However, the interval to definitive surgery was dependent on the presentation for cause-specific survival, with a substantial effect for patients with a mammographic presentation and a negligible effect for patients with a lump presentation (interaction p = .041). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that an interval of >12 weeks to breast surgery might be associated with decreased survival for patients with a mammographic presentation, but it appeared to have no effect on survival for patients presenting with a palpable breast lump.

  11. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. )

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  12. Medical image-guided surgery planning for breast reconstruction using deformable modeling and surface flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pengfei; Gu, Lixu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jingsi; Xu, Hua; Dong, Jiasheng; Chen, Weitao; Pei, Wei; Song, Jiasi; Li, Bowen; Xu, Jianrong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a virtual breast plastic surgery planning method is proposed, which reconstructs the breast after excision for certain diseases such as cancer. In order to achieve a rational result, we calculate shape, area, volume and depth of the skin and muscle for the reconstruction, based on the other healthy breast. The steps are as follows: 1) input breast's MRI data of patient; 2) get the healthy breast using balloon segmentation algorithm and get triangle mesh on breast surface; 3) flatten the triangulated skin of breast using deformable model to attain the shape and volume of the flap for breast reconstruction. Other methods such as mesh smoothing and cutting of triangulated surface are also introduced. The doctors validation and evaluation process are also provided to ensure the robust and stable result of virtual surgery planning.

  13. Oncological safety of prophylactic breast surgery: skin-sparing and nipple-sparing versus total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Maijers, Marike C.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Koppert, Linetta B.

    2015-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1/2 gene mutation and others with a high breast cancer risk may opt for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. To allow for immediate breast reconstruction the skin envelope is left in situ with or without the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Although possibly leading to a more natural aesthetic outcome than the conventional total mastectomy, so-called skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) may leave some breast glandular tissue in situ. The oncological risk associated with remaining breast glandular tissue is unclear. We present a case of primary breast cancer after prophylactic mastectomy followed by a review of the literature on remaining breast glandular tissue after various mastectomy techniques and oncological safety of prophylactic mastectomies. PMID:26645001

  14. Value systems and locus of control of people undergoing aesthetic surgery and their application in the work environment: a case study in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Pantazi, L; Zavrides, H

    2012-12-01

    With the growth in elective aesthetic plastic surgery in recent years researchers are becoming increasingly interested in the psychological aspects of the procedure. The aim of this research in Cyprus was to describe the value systems and the locus of control of employees who have undergone aesthetic plastic surgery. A questionnaire comprising the Schwartz human value scale, the Rotter scale for locus of control and questions about the reason for surgery was completed by 75 employees in a range of occupations. The values rated as very/supremely important by > 80% of respondents were: preserving public image (power domain), being capable (achievement), pleasure and self-indulgence (hedonism), freedom and independence (self-direction) and being honest, helpful and responsible (benevolence). They also scored highly on politeness and honouring parents and elders (conformity domain) and family security and being clean (security). A small majority (54.7%) was classified as internal or extreme internal locus of control. PMID:23301393

  15. Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, David E. W.

    2003-01-01

    The "raw data" that aesthetics is meant to explain is the aesthetic experience. People have experiences that they class off from other experiences and label, as a class, the aesthetic ones. Aesthetic experience is basic, and all other things aesthetic--aesthetic properties, aesthetic objects, aesthetic attitudes--are secondary in their importance…

  16. Patient-Physician Communication in Breast Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Rose C; Liu, Yihang; Kwong, Elaine; Thind, Amardeep; Diamant, Allison L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Breast reconstructive surgery (BRS) can improve mastectomy patients’ emotional relationships and social functioning, but it may be underutilized in low-income, medically underserved women. This study assessed the impact of patient-physician communication on rates of BRS in low-income breast cancer (BC) women receiving mastectomy. Methods A cross-sectional, California statewide survey was conducted of women with income less than 200% of the Federal Poverty Level and receiving BC treatment through the Medicaid Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program. A subset of 327 women with non-metastatic disease who underwent mastectomy was identified. Logistic regression was used for data analysis. The chief dependent variable was receipt of or planned BRS by patient report at 6 months after diagnosis; chief independent variables were physician interactive information-giving and patient perceived self-efficacy in interacting with physicians. Results Greater physician information-giving about BC and its treatment and greater patient perceived self-efficacy positively predicted BRS (OR=1.12, P=0.04; OR=1.03, P=0.01, respectively). The observed negative effects of language barriers and less acculturation among Latinas and lower education at the bivariate level were mitigated in multivariate modeling with the addition of the patient-physician communication and self-efficacy variables. Conclusion Empowering aspects of patient-physician communication and self-efficacy may overcome the negative effects of language barriers and less acculturation for Latinas, as well as of lower education generally, on receipt of or planned BRS among low-income women with BC. Intervening with these aspects of communication could result in BRS rates more consistent with the general population and in improved quality of life among this disadvantaged group. PMID:19626696

  17. Monitoring the gingival regeneration after aesthetic surgery with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luana O.; Graça, Natalia D. R. L.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Silva, Claudio H. V.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique working in spectral domain (Swept Source OCT at 1325 nm, Thorlabs, New Jersey, USA) to monitor the tissue repair in patients undergoing periodontal plastic surgery. The evaluations were done over a period of 60 days. It was observed that 15 days after periodontal surgery the gum was still in different healing process as compared to the observation after 60 days. Thus it is clear that, despite some technical limitations, the OCT is an efficient method in the evaluation of regeneration gingival.

  18. Subcutaneous Direct-to-Implant Breast Reconstruction: Surgical, Functional, and Aesthetic Results after Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Claudio; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Santi, Caterina; Gjondedaj, Ulpjana; Roselli, Jenny; Nori, Jacopo; Fausto, Alfonso; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Direct-to-implant breast reconstruction can be achieved more easily by means of soft-tissue replacement devices such as dermal matrices and synthetic meshes. The feasibility of a subcutaneous approach has been recently investigated by some studies with different devices functioning as implant support. Aim of this study is to analyze the long-term results, both objective and subjective, of a previous nonrandomized trial comparing prepectoral (subcutaneous) and retropectoral breast reconstructions. Methods: Patients enrolled in a nonrandomized prospective trial, comparing the standard retropectoral reconstruction and the prepectoral subcutaneous approach, using a titanium-coated mesh in both techniques, were followed up and evaluated for long-term results. Cases were compared in terms of the causes and rate of reinterventions, of the postoperative BREAST-Q questionnaire results, and of an objective surgical evaluation. Results: The subcutaneous group had a rate of implant failure and removal of 5.1% when compared with 0% in the retropectoral group. Aesthetic outcome was significantly better for the subcutaneous group both at a subjective and at an objective evaluation. Capsular contracture rate was 0% in the subcutaneous group. Conclusions: A higher rate of implant failure and removal, although not significant, always because of skin flaps and wound problems, should be taken into account for a careful patients selection. The subcutaneous breast reconstruction shows good long-term results. A coherent subjective and objective cosmetic advantage of this approach emerges. Moreover, no capsular contracture is evident, albeit in a relatively limited number of cases. PMID:26893999

  19. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  20. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  1. [Breast-reduction surgery--a long-term survey of indications and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Kneser, U; Jaeger, K; Bach, A D; Polykandriotis, E; Ohnolz, J; Kopp, J; Horch, R E

    2004-10-14

    Between 1986 and 2003, breast-reduction surgery was performed in a total of 814 women. The indication was established on the basis of physical complaints, chronic back pain, stiff neck or recurrent intertrigo in the foldbeneath the breasts. A proportion of the patients were interviewed postoperatively using a questionnaire, to determine the impact of the operation on their quality of life. 91% of those surveyed reported a postoperative improvement in the perception of their own body, and 80% were satisfied with the reduced size of their breasts. In conclusion, in the hands of an experienced breast surgeon, breast-reduction surgery for the proper indication results in a reliable and safe diminishment in breast size and tightening of slack tissue, leading to a significant enhancement in the patient's quality of life. PMID:15536703

  2. Bone quantitative ultrasound at hand phalanges of women following breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bolanowski, Marek; Chwałczyńska, Agnieszka; Pluskiewicz, Wojciech

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer surgery and its adjunctive therapy follow in lymphedema, decreased limb mobility and bone deterioration. The aim was to establish relation of postsurgical limb lymphedema with bone properties assessed by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of hand phalanges in postmenopausal women after breast cancer surgery. In all, 63 women aged 62.81 ± 8.83 years, after breast cancer surgery were compared with control group of 418 age-matched women. Their skeletal status was assessed by QUS measurements at proximal phalanges using DBM Sonic 1200. There were no statistically significant differences in QUS measurements (Ad-SoS) between groups of operated subjects and the controls, between limbs (operated vs. nonoperated side, with and without lymphedema), and regarding method of surgery. Ad-SoS was greater in estrogen-treated patients than in nontreated ones at the side with no breast surgery (1994.11 ± 67.83 vs. 1943.27 ± 58.34; P = 0.046). Ad-SoS was lower in patients with adjunctive antiestrogen therapy than without this therapy at the side of surgery (1937.35 ± 54.71 vs. 1966.78 ± 59.18; P = 0.0449), and nonbreast surgery side (1934.55 ± 52.06 vs. 1973.31 ± 57.17; P = 0.0066). Breast cancer surgery followed by concomitant therapies does not influence significantly QUS at hand phalanges. This was proven regarding method of surgery, side of surgery, and lymphedema. Additional hormonal treatment can influence phalangeal QUS in breast cancer survivors.

  3. Subcutaneous Venous Port Implantation in Patients with Bilateral Breast Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Arslan, E. Bengi; Cil, Barbaros E.; Geyik, Serdar; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Konan, Ali; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of subcutaneous venous ports implanted in patients with bilateral mastectomies. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital charts and the electronic database of 17 patients with bilateral mastectomies whom had venous port implantation in our interventional radiology suit. A total of 17 ports were implanted to the paramedian (n = 3) and anterolateral (standard; n = 12) chest wall, on the trapezius muscle (n = 1), and to the antecubital fossa (n = 1). The mean age was 48.29 years (range: 35-60 years). The mean time interval from time of surgery to port implantation was 34 months (range: 1-84 months). The mean follow-up time was 15 months (range: 7-39 months). Follow-up parameters and classification of the complications was defined according to the SIR guidelines. No procedure-related complication occurred. A single case of mild late infection was noted and the infection rate was 0.19/1000 catheter days. Infusion chemotherapy administration was still going on in eight patients. Two patients died during the follow-up and four patients were lost after 6 months. Port removal was performed in three patients at follow-up because of the end of treatment. One trapezius port and one paramedian port weres among the removed ports without any problem. Although we have a limited number of patients, port placement to the anterior chest wall, either paramedian or anterolateral, on the trapezius muscle or to the antecubital fossa depending on the extent of the bilateral breast surgeries that can be performed with low complication rates by a careful patient and anatomical location selection by involving the patients in the decision-making process. We believe that patient education and knowledge of possible complications have high importance in follow-up.

  4. Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation: new standard in early breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Su; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Noorie; Lee, Sea-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) has been proved effective and safe and even better for late or acute radiation toxicity for early breast cancer. Moreover, it improves patient convenience, quality of life and is expected to be advantageous in the medical care system by reducing overall cost. In this review, we examined key randomized trials of HF-WBI, focusing on adequate patient selection as suggested by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) guideline and the radiobiologic aspects of HF-WBI in relation to its adoption into clinical settings. Further investigation to identify the current practice pattern or cost effectiveness is warranted under the national health insurance service system in Korea. PMID:27306774

  5. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infection after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Denise

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review includes 11 randomized, controlled trials of mixed patient groups, including patients with or without breast cancer. Studies were included in the review only if data from patients with breast cancer could be separated from patients without breast cancer. The intervention included pre- or perioperative antibiotics used as prophylaxis for the surgery. A range of antibiotic regimens were assessed in the 11 studies, and 5 of the studies defined a similar antibiotic strategy. Five of the studies had similar choice of antibiotic, type of surgery, and length of follow-up. The reviewers excluded 27 studies because of design and data collection not matching the review requirements.

  6. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Massoome; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Kaviani, Ahmad; Hashemi, Esmat; Montazeri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS) and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P < 0.01). There were no associations between BCS practice and the other variables studied. The most frequent reasons for not performing BCS were uncertainty about conservative therapy results (46%), uncertainty about the quality of available radiotherapy services (32%), and the probability of patients' non-compliance in radiotherapy (32%). Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance). PMID:15811187

  7. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  8. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  9. Race of the clock: reducing delay to curative breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Loretta; Laronga, Christine; Coyne, Karen; Hildreth, Lynne

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of Moffitt Cancer Center data on time from breast biopsy to first definitive surgery showed an average of 6.9 weeks, which concerned the breast program faculty members. Delays in curative surgery may impact mortality, quality of life, and time to adjuvant therapy. The purpose of this study was to analyze steps from breast biopsy to definitive breast cancer surgery and to develop proposals and strategies for improvement. Data were collected from various sources, including the tumor registry, patient appointment system, tumor board lists, and the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database for Breast Cancer. Three phases of the surgical process were identified with regard to lead time: biopsy to first consult (BX-FC); first consult to tumor board (FC-TB); and tumor board to surgery (TB-SU). Other factors, including operating room capacity and schedules, were also evaluated. The greatest percentage of total lead time occurred in the TB-SU phase (52% vs 35% in BX-FC, and 13% in FC-TB phases). The longest average lead time, 3.6 weeks, was also in the TB-SU phase. The TB-SU time was greatest when surgery was scheduled after tumor board and if surgery required breast reconstruction. Limitation of physician capacity was a major factor in treatment delay. The Opportunity for Improvement project enabled institutional analysis of the need for quality improvement in time for curative surgery for breast cancer. A significant factor that created time delay was physician capacity. As a result, additional faculty and staff have been recruited. A new expanded facility is currently in progress that will provide more physical space and services.

  10. Contralateral axillary node metastasis from recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoko; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Junko; Koyama, Masamichi

    2014-02-01

    Sentinel lymph node detection (SLND) with radiocolloid has become widely used for evaluation of nodal metastasis in primary breast cancer. However, the procedure for recurrent breast cancer is not well established. Contralateral axillary node metastasis is uncommon. We report 2 cases of contralateral axillary node metastasis with recurrent breast cancer. In the first case, contralateral node metastasis was found by SLND. In the other case without SLND, contralateral node metastasis developed after resection of local recurrence. FDG-avid contralateral node was pathologically diagnosed as metastasis. The SLND might be useful in patients with local recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:24368539

  11. A Decade of Change: An Institutional Experience with Breast Surgery in 1995 and 2005

    PubMed Central

    Guth, Amber A.; Shanker, Beth Ann; Roses, Daniel F.; Axelrod, Deborah; Singh, Baljit; Toth, Hildegard; Shapiro, Richard L.; Hiotis, Karen; Diflo, Thomas; Cangiarella, Joan F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: With the adoption of routine screening mammography, breast cancers are being diagnosed at earlier stages, with DCIS now accouting for 22.5% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers. This has been attributed to both increased breast cancer awareness and improvements in breast imaging techniques. How have these changes, including the increased use of image-guided sampling techniques, influenced the clinical practice of breast surgery? Methods: The institutional pathology database was queried for all breast surgeries, including breast reconstruction, performed in 1995 and 2005. Cosmetic procedures were excluded. The results were analysed utilizing the Chi-square test. Results: Surgical indications changed during 10-year study period, with an increase in preoperatively diagnosed cancers undergoing definitive surgical management. ADH, and to a lesser extent, ALH, became indications for surgical excision. Fewer surgical biopsies were performed for indeterminate abnormalities on breast imaging, due to the introduction of stereotactic large core biopsy. While the rate of benign breast biopsies remained constant, there was a higher percentage of precancerous and DCIS cases in 2005. The overall rate of mastectomy decreased from 36.8% in 1995 to 14.5% in 2005. With the increase in sentinel node procedures, the rate of ALND dropped from 18.3% to 13.7%. Accompanying the increased recognition of early-stage cancers, the rate of positive ALND also decreased, from 43.3% to 25.0%. Conclusions: While the rate of benign breast biopsies has remained constant over a recent 10-year period, fewer diagnostic surgical image-guided biopsies were performed in 2005. A greater percentage of patients with breast cancer or preinvasive disease have these diagnoses determined before surgery. More preinvasive and Stage 0 cancers are undergoing surgical management. Earlier stage invasive cancers are being detected, reflected by the lower incidence of axillary nodal metastases. PMID

  12. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-08-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images 'spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research. PMID:25197263

  13. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-08-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images 'spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research.

  14. The aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive arts: Lifeworld communication among breast cancer survivors living with lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Thomas, Roanne; Ahmed, Shahid; Fichtner, Pam; McMullen, Linda; Block, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The use of popular expressive arts as antidotes to the pathologies of the parallel processes of lifeworld colonization and cultural impoverishment has been under-theorized. This article enters the void with a project in which breast cancer survivors used collages and installations of everyday objects to solicit their authentic expression of the psycho-social impacts of lymphedema. The article enlists Jurgen Habermas' communicative action theory to explore the potential of these expressive arts to expand participants' meaningful engagement with their lifeworlds. The findings point to the unique non-linguistic discursivity of these non-institutional artistic forms as their liberating power to disclose silenced human needs: the images ‘spoke' for themselves for group members to recognize shared subjectivities. The authenticity claims inherent in the art forms fostered collective reflexivity and spontaneous, affective responses and compelled the group to create new collective understandings of the experience of living with lymphedema. The article contributes theoretical insights regarding the emancipatory potential of aesthetic-expressive rationality, an under-developed area of Habermasian theory of communicative action, and to the burgeoning literature on arts-based methods in social scientific research. PMID:25197263

  15. [52th Commemoration of French Journal of Plastic Aesthetic Surgery (1956-2007). Fifty-four years of editorial; five Editors-in-chief].

    PubMed

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-08-01

    The french Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (SOF.CPRE) is born December 3th 1952. Initially without "aesthetic", this "key-word" is agreed in 1983 and the symbols are advanced since: SFCPR, SFCPRE, SOF.CPRE. Its official organ, formerly included in Annales de chirurgie (1954-1955), become Annales de chirurgie plastique in 1956, Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique in 1983 and finally Annales de chirurgie plastique esthétique (ACPE) in 1992. Since the origin, five Editors-in-chief succeded: Claude Dufourmentel, Raymond Vilain, Jean-Pierre Lalardrie, Claude Lê-Quang, Jean-Luc Cariou. Four of them are alive, Raymond Vilain is dead. The author relate here the natural story of these five editors who had all a triple route: personnal, surgical and editorial.

  16. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  17. Perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery in women with breast cancer: an anatomical study for breast-conservation surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Maeda, Hironori; Tanaka, Yousuke; Hamada, Norihiko; Nishioka, Akihito; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-05-01

    Breast reconstruction after breast-conservation surgery is an important issue for breast cancer patients. Various factors are associated with complications, of which blood flow is one of the more important. The perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery (ITA) are key contributors to blood flow in the anterior chest wall. The present study examined the distributions and depths of the perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery using a multi-detector row-computed tomography (MDCT) angiography. The subjects in this prospective study comprised of 38 women with suspected breast cancer who underwent MDCT angiography. The images were analyzed on computer using transverse MDCT source data and volume renderings. A total of 47 perforating branches were found, with 27 (57.4%) originating in the second, 6 (12.8%) in the third and fourth, 5 (10.6%) in the first and 2 branches (4.3%) originating in the fifth intercostal space, with one branch (2.1%) originating opposite the first intercostal space. A strong correlation was identified between the distance from the skin to the branch and adipose thickness at the shallowest and deepest points (P<0.001). The distributions and depths of the perforating branches of ITA identified in this study may be helpful in immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery.

  18. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  19. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27579720

  20. Absorbable or non-absorbable sutures? A prospective, randomised evaluation of aesthetic outcomes in patients undergoing elective day-case hand and wrist surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kundra, RK; Newman, S; Saithna, A; Lewis, AC; Srinivasan, S; Srinivasan, K

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We prospectively evaluated aesthetic outcomes in a group of randomised patients who underwent elective day-case hand and wrist surgery using either absorbable or non-absorbable sutures. PATIENTS AND METHODS A cohort of 100 adult patients were randomised using sealed envelopes to receive either absorbable or non-absorbable sutures for their wound closure. Clinical review was carried out at 6 weeks. A postal questionnaire was sent to all patients 3 months following surgery comprising a visual analogue scale (VAS) for wound satisfaction, a validated 6-point patient scar assessment tool and the shortened version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (QuickDASH). RESULTS From the postal questionnaire, 70 responses were received. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of VAS, patient scar assessment tool and quick DASH. CONCLUSIONS For elective day-case hand and wrist surgery, either suture material can be used confidently with respect to overall aesthetic appearance in such patients. PMID:20659358

  1. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  2. Selective elimination of breast cancer surgery in exceptional responders: historical perspective and current trials.

    PubMed

    van la Parra, Raquel F D; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-03-08

    With improvements in chemotherapy regimens, targeted therapies, and our fundamental understanding of the relationship of tumor subtype and pathologic complete response (pCR), there has been dramatic improvement in pCR rates in the past decade, especially among triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancers. Rates of pCR in these groups of patients can be in the 60 % range and thus question the paradigm for the necessity of breast and nodal surgery in all cases, particularly when the patient will be receiving adjuvant local therapy with radiotherapy. Current practice for patients who respond well to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is often to proceed with the same breast and axillary procedures as would have been offered women who had not received NCT, regardless of the apparent clinical response. Given these high response rates in defined subgroups among exceptional responders it is appropriate to question whether surgery is now a redundant procedure in their overall management. Further, definitive radiation without surgical resection with or without systemic therapy has been proven effective for several other malignant disease sites including some stages of esophageal, anal, laryngeal, prostate, cervical, and lung carcinoma. The main impediments for potential elimination of surgery have been the fact that prior and current standard and functional breast imaging methods are incapable of accurate prediction of residual disease and that integrating percutaneous biopsy of the breast primary and nodes following NCT may circumvent this issue. This article highlights historical attempts at omission of surgery following NCT in an earlier era, the current status of breast and nodal imaging to predict residual carcinoma, and ongoing and planned trials designed to identify appropriate patients who might be selected for clinical trials designed to test the safety of selected elimination of breast cancer surgery in percutaneous image

  3. Selective elimination of breast cancer surgery in exceptional responders: historical perspective and current trials.

    PubMed

    van la Parra, Raquel F D; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    With improvements in chemotherapy regimens, targeted therapies, and our fundamental understanding of the relationship of tumor subtype and pathologic complete response (pCR), there has been dramatic improvement in pCR rates in the past decade, especially among triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancers. Rates of pCR in these groups of patients can be in the 60 % range and thus question the paradigm for the necessity of breast and nodal surgery in all cases, particularly when the patient will be receiving adjuvant local therapy with radiotherapy. Current practice for patients who respond well to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is often to proceed with the same breast and axillary procedures as would have been offered women who had not received NCT, regardless of the apparent clinical response. Given these high response rates in defined subgroups among exceptional responders it is appropriate to question whether surgery is now a redundant procedure in their overall management. Further, definitive radiation without surgical resection with or without systemic therapy has been proven effective for several other malignant disease sites including some stages of esophageal, anal, laryngeal, prostate, cervical, and lung carcinoma. The main impediments for potential elimination of surgery have been the fact that prior and current standard and functional breast imaging methods are incapable of accurate prediction of residual disease and that integrating percutaneous biopsy of the breast primary and nodes following NCT may circumvent this issue. This article highlights historical attempts at omission of surgery following NCT in an earlier era, the current status of breast and nodal imaging to predict residual carcinoma, and ongoing and planned trials designed to identify appropriate patients who might be selected for clinical trials designed to test the safety of selected elimination of breast cancer surgery in percutaneous image

  4. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  5. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  7. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  8. Axillary web syndrome following secondary breast-conserving surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Axillary web syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity in the early postoperative period after axillary surgery. Case presentation A patient developed axillary web syndrome after secondary breast surgery and recovered in 3 weeks through physical therapy and using Aescuven Forte. Discussion The pathogenesis of axillary web syndrome is not clear. It is reported that axillary surgery is the main cause. The presented case indicates that tissue injury might be an important cause of axillary web syndrome. Though axillary web syndrome is self-limiting, special physical therapy and Aescuven Forte can shorten the natural duration. Conclusion Secondary breast surgery could cause axillary web syndrome. Physical therapy and Aescuven Forte could shorten the duration of the self-limited morbidity. PMID:23327341

  9. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  10. Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes: the NSABP Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 trial. JAMA 2006; 295(23):2727– ... and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing breast cancer. Cancer Prevention ...

  11. Pattern of local recurrence after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. . E-mail: G_Freedman@FCCC.edu; Anderson, Penny R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Nicolaou, Nicos

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Most recurrences in the breast after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation have been reported to occur within the same quadrant as the initial primary tumor. We analyzed the long-term risk of recurrence by area of the breast after whole-breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: In all, 1,990 women with Stage 0-II breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation from 1970-1998. Stage was ductal carcinoma in situ in 237, T1 in 1273, and T2 in 480 patients. Of 120 local recurrences, 71 were classified as true local (confined to the original quadrant) and 49 as elsewhere (involving outside the original quadrant). Kaplan-Meier methodology was used to calculate 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year rates of recurrence (95% confidence intervals in parentheses). The median follow-up is 80 months. Results: There was no apparent difference in the 15-year rate of true local vs. elsewhere recurrence, but the time to recurrence was different. The rate of true local recurrence was 2%, 5%, and 7% (5-9%) at 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. The recurrences elsewhere in the breast were rare at 5 (1%) and 10 (2%) years, but increased to 6 (3-9%) at 15 years. This 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers of 13% (10-16%). Conclusions: Recurrence elsewhere in the breast is rare for the first 10 years, but by 15 years is nearly equal to true local recurrence even after whole-breast irradiation. The 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers. This may indicate a therapeutic effect of whole-breast radiation for other areas of the breast. Very long follow-up will be needed for partial breast irradiation with or without tamoxifen to show that the risk of elsewhere recurrence is not significantly different than after whole-breast irradiation.

  12. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  13. Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojnar, Irena

    1978-01-01

    Includes 387 citations related to aesthetic education arranged as follows: leading thinkers on aesthetic education, role of the humanities in modeling aesthetic education, goals and theories, content at different educational levels, aesthetic education methods, creativity, out-of-school facilities, current trends and debates in cultural policy,…

  14. Circulating tumor cells before and during follow-up after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    van Dalum, Guus; van der Stam, Gert Jan; Tibbe, Arjan G J; Franken, Bas; Mastboom, Walter J B; Vermes, Ivan; de Groot, Marco R; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) is an independent prognostic factor for progression-free and overall survival for patients with metastatic and newly diagnosed breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to explore whether the presence of CTC before and during follow-up after surgery is associated with recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In a prospective single center study, CTC were enumerated with the CellSearch system in 30 ml of peripheral blood of 403 stage I-III patients before undergoing surgery for breast cancer (A) and if available 1 week after surgery (B), after adjuvant chemo- and/or radiotherapy or before start of long-term hormonal therapy (C), one (D), two (E) and three (F) years after surgery. Patients were stratified into unfavorable (CTC≥1) and favorable (CTC=0) prognostic groups. >1 CTC in 30 ml blood was detected in 75/403 (19%) at A, 66/367 (18%) at B, 40/263 (15%) at C, 30/235 (12%) at D, 18/144 (11%) at E and 11/83 (13%) at F. RFS and OS was significantly lower for unfavorable CTC as compared to favorable CTC before surgery (p=0.022 and p=0.006), after adjuvant therapy (p<0.001 and p=0.018) and one (p=0.006 and p=0.013) and two (p<0.001 and p=0.045) years after surgery, but not 1 week post-surgery. The presence of CTC in blood drawn pre and one and two years after surgery, but not post-surgery is associated with shorter RFS and OS for stage I-III breast cancer.

  15. Clinical analysis of intraoperative radiotherapy during breast-conserving surgery of early breast cancer in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Qinfu; Wang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) have been reported when used either as a boost at the time of surgery or as the sole radiation treatment, the clinical safety and cosmetic outcome of IORT in the Chinese Han population has not. This report reviews oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for Chinese Han breast cancer patients who received IORT either as a boost or as their sole radiation treatment at our hospital. Method From July 2008 to December 2012, 50 early-stage Chinese Han breast cancer patients received BCS and IORT, either as boost or as their sole radiation treatment. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, according to our institution's guidelines. Patients were followed to determine oncologic events, short-term toxicity and overall cosmesis. Results With a median follow-up of 51.8 months (range 22.6 months to 75.7 months), 2 patients (4.0%) developed local relapses and were salvaged by mastectomy. There were no metastases and no deaths. The average wound healing time was 17 days. Three patients (6.0%) developed postoperative infection, 5 patients (10.0%) had delayed wound healing, and 2 patients (4.0%) experienced wound edema. There were no lyponecrosis or hematomas observed. The evaluation of cosmetic outcome showed 44 patients (88.0%) graded as excellent or good while 6 patients (12.0%) were graded as fair or poor. No patients experienced radiotherapy related acute hematological toxicity, but 3 patients (6.0%), all IORT boost patients, developed skin pigmentation. Conclusion For early-stage breast cancer patients, intraoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery in the Chinese Han population is both safe and reliable and has resulted in very acceptable cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26517686

  16. Cosmetic outcome 1-5 years after breast conservative surgery, irradiation and systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Varga, Zoltán; Lázár, György; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    The late side-effects of the local therapy of early breast cancer depend on many patient- and therapy-related parameters. We aimed at investigating the factors that influence the cosmetic and functional outcomes among our breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and conformal radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant systemic therapy. A study was made of the association of the cosmetic outcome after a median follow-up time of 2.4 years and the clinical data on 198 patients extracted from a prospectively compiled database. Breast tenderness occurred more frequently among patients ≤50 years old (p < 0.05). Long-term side effects were related to radiotherapy-related factors the most, while no effect of the systemic therapy could be detected. The risk of hyperpigmentation, breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 18%, 23% and 7%, respectively for every 100 cm(3) increase in the irradiated breast volume, while that of breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 21% and 12%, respectively for every 10 cm(3) increase in the boost volume. Patients who received a photon boost were significantly more likely to develop breast edema and fibrosis than those who received electrons (p < 0.005). Dose inhomogeneity was related to the volume of the irradiated breast (p = 0.037). Dyspigmentation developed more often among patients older than 50 years, while smoking favoured both dyspigmentation and teleangiectasia. Breast edema was related to dyspigmentation (p = 0.003), fibrosis (p < 0.001) and breast asymmetry (p = 0.032), whereas none of these abnormalities were associated with teleangiectasia. Body image changes were more frequent at a younger age (p < 0.005), while the need to change clothing habits occurred more often at an older age (p < 0.05). Radiotherapy-related parameters appear to exert the greatest effect on the overall cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  17. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  18. Protocol for Autologous Fat Grafting for Immediate Reconstruction of Lumpectomy Defects Following Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background For women undergoing breast conservative surgery or lumpectomy for early stage breast carcinoma, there are limited options for reconstruction. Options include the use of flap surgery and/or implants, and have a significant associated morbidity and cost. Autologous fat grafting is a new alternative that can achieve a good cosmetic result, while reducing patient morbidity and cost by avoiding more extensive surgery. Objective The primary objectives are to assess patient satisfaction using the Breast-Q questionnaire and to evaluate fat graft volume. The secondary objectives are fat survival and assessment for complication (eg, fat necrosis, cysts), local recurrence, and the number of sessions needed for a satisfactory outcome. Methods This study is a case series of 100 patients, at a single-center institute spanning one year. The inclusion criteria include: female sex, age 18 to 75, early state breast cancer (confirmed on ultrasound/ positron emission tomography-computed tomography and cytology), amenable to breast conservative surgery, and at least 6 months post-completion of radiotherapy/ hormone/chemotherapy. Exclusion criteria include patients with more advanced stages of breast cancer necessitating total mastectomy, those unsuitable for surgical excision, and those in whom lumpectomy is not feasible. The patients will have follow-up data collected at 6 months, 12 months and 5 years post-operatively. Results This study will begin enrolment in January 2017. We anticipate that there will be good patient satisfaction with fat grafting. The risk for long-term breast cancer recurrence hasn’t been evaluated extensively in literature, however some clinical studies have shown no increased risk of breast cancer in appropriately selected patients at one year. Although some patients may develop complications from fat grafting (eg, necrosis/cysts) this should not confuse the radiological detection of breast cancer recurrence. Conclusions Fat grafting is proving

  19. Can Acute Pain Treatment Reduce Postsurgical Comorbidity after Breast Cancer Surgery? A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Hosokawa, Toyoshi; Okamoto, Akiko; Matsuda, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Yosuke; Yamakita, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Sawa, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Regional analgesia, opioids, and several oral analgesics are commonly used for the treatment of acute pain after breast cancer surgery. While all of these treatments can suppress the acute postsurgical pain, there is growing evidence that suggests that the postsurgical comorbidity will differ in accordance with the type of analgesic used during the surgery. Our current study reviewed the effect of analgesics used for acute pain treatments on the major comorbidities that occur after breast cancer surgery. A considerable number of clinical studies have been performed to investigate the relationship between the acute analgesic regimen and common comorbidities, including inadequate quality of recovery after the surgery, persistent postsurgical pain, and cancer recurrence. Previous studies have shown that the choice of the analgesic modality does affect the postsurgical comorbidity. In general, the use of regional analgesics has a beneficial effect on the occurrence of comorbidity. In order to determine the best analgesic choice after breast cancer surgery, prospective studies that are based on a clear definition of the comorbidity state will need to be undertaken in the future. PMID:26495309

  20. Postoperative hormonal therapy prevents recovery of neurological damage after surgery in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sato, Chiho; Matsudaira, Izumi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawai, Masaaki; Tada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takanori; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors are exposed to several risk factors for cognitive dysfunction, such as general anesthesia, surgical trauma, and adjuvant therapies. In our recent study we showed that thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction occurred shortly after surgery. Here, we examined the 6-month prognosis of the 20 patients with breast cancer who underwent surgery. Seven patients did not receive any adjuvant therapy after the surgery and 13 patients received a hormonal therapy after the surgery. We assessed their attentional functions, and thalamic volumes shortly after and 6 months after surgery. We found a significant group x time interaction in the attentional functions (p = 0.033) and the right thalamus (p <  0.05, small volume correction), suggesting the thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction recovered in patients without adjuvant therapy. Our findings provide a better understanding of the potential role of hormonal therapy in relation to the cognitive dysfunction of cancer survivors. PMID:27708377

  1. Impact of carpal tunnel syndrome surgery on women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Neetish; Ebelin, Michel; Arrault, Maria; Vignes, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in women with ipsilateral lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Surgery on the lymphedematous arm is classically feared. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age at cancer treatment 49 years, interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 43;56) with upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment, followed in a single lymphology unit, and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (electromyographically confirmed) requiring surgery were included. Lymphedema volume was calculated using the truncated cone formula, recorded before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery, and at each follow-up visit. Median time to lymphedema onset after cancer treatment was 19 (interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 5;73) months. Median lymphedema volume was 497 (Q1;Q3 355;793) mL before (median 4 months) and 582 (Q1;Q3 388;930) mL after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 5 months) (P = 0.004). At the last follow-up post-carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 33 months), lymphedema volume was 447 (Q1;Q3 260;733) mL (non-significant, compared to pre-surgery volume). Regular lymphedema treatment included elastic sleeve (n = 31), low-stretch bandage (n = 20), and/or manual lymph drainage (n = 20), with no change before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery. All carpal tunnel syndrome clinical manifestations disappeared after surgery and none of the patients experienced local complications. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated surgically in women with ipsilateral upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Although lymphedema volume increased transiently, it remained stable over long-term follow-up, with no local complications.

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Hyaluronic Acid Sponge with Zinc versus Placebo for Scar Reduction after Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mahedia, Monali; Shah, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scar formation is a major source of dissatisfaction among patients and surgeons. Individually, hyaluronan, or hyaluronic acid (HA), and zinc have been shown to reduce scarring. The authors evaluated the safety and efficacy of an HA sponge with zinc compared with placebo when applied to bilateral breast surgery scars; specifically, they evaluated whether the use of this product modulates inflammation and immediate scarring in treated patients after bilateral breast surgery. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, prospective study was approved by the local institutional review board. Bilateral breast surgery patients with right and left incision lines were randomly assigned to receive HA sponge with zinc or placebo within 2 to 4 days after their procedure. Participants were followed up at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year and evaluated at 12 weeks. Three blinded evaluators reviewed photographs of the incision lines and assessed the scars using a visual analog scale, new scale, and a patient satisfaction survey. Results: Nineteen bilateral breast surgery patients were enrolled in the study. Statistical analysis was performed on 14 patients who completed the follow-up. The mean visual analog scale score was lower for the side receiving the HA sponge with zinc (2.6) than for the side receiving placebo (3.0), indicating a better outcome (t test; P = 0.08). The HA sponge with zinc was found to have significant positive findings on a patient satisfaction survey (P = 0.01). Conclusions: This is a preliminary study that shows zinc hyaluronan was associated with high patient satisfaction in achieving a better scar after bilateral breast surgery, irrespective of skin color. It seems to be safe and effective for early scars. PMID:27536470

  3. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  4. Breast reduction surgery in Ontario: Changes in practice, 1992 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    AlShanawani, Bisher; ALArfaj, Nawarah; AlShomer, Feras; Mamdani, Muhammad; Gomes, Tara; Mahoney, James

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic mammary hypertrophy impacts physical function and patient quality of life. Breast reduction mammoplasty, a surgical procedure performed to reduce breast size, has been used for many years to reduce these symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate variations in the surgical practice of breast reduction mammoplasty among women ≥15 years of age (approximately 6.4 million population in 2008) over a 17-year period in Ontario. METHOD: A population-based, cross-sectional time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends in 87,049 breast reduction surgeries performed between January 1, 1992 and December 30, 2008. RESULTS: Breast reduction rates have been relatively stable over time, with 83 per 100,000 of the female population undergoing breast reduction surgery annually. However, a significant decrease in the rate of inpatient surgeries were observed over the study period (from 69.3 per 100,000 in 1992 to 25.7 per 100,000 in 2008). At the beginning of the study period, the highest annual rates of this procedure were observed among women 21 to 30 years of age (116.6 procedures per 100,000); however, by the end of the observation period, this shifted to women 31 to 50 years of age (109.9 procedures per 100,000). Furthermore, the annual procedure rate among women ≥51 years of age almost doubled, rising from 36.4 procedures per 100,000 in 1992 to 66.6 procedures per 100,000 in 2008. This was likely related to changing demographics and social factors. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that breast reduction mammoplasty will continue to be requested, with an increased proportion of patients who are older and desire improved quality of life and physical function. PMID:24431936

  5. [History of aesthetic rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Mazzola, R F

    2014-12-01

    One of the first surgical procedures described in the history of medicine is reconstructive surgery of the nose. Over the centuries, surgeons have developed techniques aimed at reconstructing noses amputated or traumatized by disease. The concept of aesthetic rhinoplasty was only introduced at the end of the 19th century. Since then, techniques have evolved toward constant ameliorations. Nowadays, this surgery is one of the most performed aesthetic procedures. Current technical sophistication is the result of over a century of history marked by many surgeons. All of these techniques derive from a detailed understanding of the anatomical nose from the surgical and artistic point of view.

  6. Tumor growth rate of invasive breast cancers during wait times for surgery assessed by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Young-Seon; Han, Wonshik; Ryu, Han Suk; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Several studies suggest that delay in the surgical treatment of breast cancer is significantly associated with lower survival. This study evaluated the tumor growth rate (TGR) of invasive breast cancers during wait times for surgery quantitatively using ultrasonography (US) and identified clinicopathologic factors associated with TGR.This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and the requirement for written informed consent was waived. Between August 2013 and September 2014, a total of 323 unifocal invasive breast cancers in 323 women with serial US images at the time of diagnosis and surgery were included. Tumor diameters and volumes were measured using 2-orthogonal US images. TGR during wait times for surgery was quantified as specific growth rates (SGR; %/day) and was compared with clinicopathologic variables using univariate and multivariate analyses.Median time from diagnosis to surgery was 31 days (range, 8-78 days). Maximum tumor diameters and volumes at the time of surgery (mean, 15.6 mm and 1.6 cm) were significantly larger than at diagnosis (14.7 mm and 1.3 cm) (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, surrogate molecular subtype was a significant independent factor of SGR (P = 0.001); triple negative cancers showed the highest SGR (1.003%/day) followed by HER2-positive (0.859 %/day) and luminal cancers (luminal B, 0.208 %/day; luminal A, 0.175%/day) (P < 0.001). Clinical T stage was more frequently upgraded in nonluminal (triple negative, 18% [12/67]; HER2-positive, 14% [3/22]) than luminal cancers (luminal B, 3% [1/30]; luminal A, 2% [4/204]) (P < 0.001).Invasive breast cancers with aggressive molecular subtypes showed faster TGR and more frequent upgrading of clinical T stage during wait times for surgery. PMID:27631256

  7. Predictive factors for the development of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Duriaud, Helle Molter; Jensen, Helle Elisabeth; Kroman, Niels; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that 15% to 25% of patients treated for breast cancer experience long-term moderate-to-severe pain in the area of surgery, potentially lasting for several years. Few prospective studies have included all potential risk factors for the development of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to comprehensively identify factors predicting PPBCS. Patients scheduled for primary breast cancer surgery were recruited. Assessments were conducted preoperatively, the first 3 days postoperatively, and 1 week, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. A comprehensive validated questionnaire was used. Handling of the intercostobrachial nerve was registered by the surgeon. Factors known by the first 3 weeks after surgery were modeled in ordinal logistic regression analyses. Five hundred thirty-seven patients with baseline data were included, and 475 (88%) were available for analysis at 1 year. At 1-year follow-up, the prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain at rest was 14% and during movement was 7%. Factors associated with pain at rest were age <65 years (odds ratio [OR]: 1.8, P = 0.02), breast conserving surgery (OR: 2.0, P = 0.006), axillary lymph node dissection with preservation of the intercostobrachial nerve (OR: 3.1, P = 0.0005), moderate-to-severe preoperative pain (OR: 5.7, P = 0.0002), acute postoperative pain (OR: 2.8, P = 0.0018), and signs of neuropathic pain at 1 week (OR: 2.1, P = 0.01). Higher preoperative diastolic blood pressure was associated with reduced risk of PPBCS (OR: 0.98 per mm Hg, P = 0.01). Both patient- and treatment-related risk factors predicted PPBCS. Identifying patients at risk may facilitate targeted intervention.

  8. Current Trends in and Indications for Endoscopy-Assisted Breast Surgery for Breast Cancer: Results from a Six-Year Study Conducted by the Taiwan Endoscopic Breast Surgery Cooperative Group

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Wen; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Chen, Shu-Ling; Chang, Tsai-Wang; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Hung, Chin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoscopy-assisted breast surgery (EABS) performed through minimal axillary and/or periareolar incisions is a possible alternative to open surgery for certain patients with breast cancer. In this study, we report the early results of an EABS program in Taiwan. Methods The medical records of patients who underwent EABS for breast cancer during the period May 2009 to December 2014 were collected from the Taiwan Endoscopic Breast Surgery Cooperative Group database. Data on clinicopathologic characteristics, type of surgery, method of breast reconstruction, complications and recurrence were analyzed to determine the effectiveness and oncologic safety of EABS in Taiwan. Results A total of 315 EABS procedures were performed in 292 patients with breast cancer, including 23 (7.8%) patients with bilateral disease. The number of breast cancer patients who underwent EABS increased initially from 2009 to 2012 and then stabilized during the period 2012–2014. The most commonly performed EABS was endoscopy-assisted total mastectomy (EATM) (85.4%) followed by endoscopy-assisted partial mastectomy (EAPM) (14.6%). Approximately 74% of the EATM procedures involved breast reconstruction, with the most common types of reconstruction being implant insertion and autologous pedicled TRAM flap surgery. During the six-year study period, there was an increasing trend in the performance of EABS for the management of breast cancer when total mastectomy was indicated. The positive surgical margin rate was 1.9%. Overall, the rate of complications associated with EABS was 15.2% and all were minor and wound-related. During a median follow-up of 26.8 (3.3–68.6) months, there were 3 (1%) cases of local recurrence, 1 (0.3%) case of distant metastasis and 1 (0.3%) death. Conclusion The preliminary results from the EABS program in Taiwan show that EABS is a safe procedure and results in acceptable cosmetic outcome. These findings could help to promote this under-used surgical technique

  9. Freeze Therapy: an Alternative to Breast Cancer Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Attai and her colleagues said. For the new study, the researchers performed the freezing technique on breast cancer patients in 19 centers across ... quarters of an inch) or smaller. Because the study was designed to ... technique's effectiveness in advance of government approval, the researchers ...

  10. Development of a 3D digitizer for breast surgery procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larena, Jorge; Canal Bienzobas, Fernando

    1999-03-01

    The planning of a breast reconstruction surgical operation has to resolve the problem of measuring directly on the patient meaningful anthropometric points from which distances, areas and volumes have to be calculated. In this paper, we propose using a 3D optical digitizer to perform this task.

  11. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  12. Impact of breast cancer surgery on angiogenesis circulating biomarkers: a prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Debate about the potential effects that surgery might have on cancer cells dormancy and angiogenesis prompted us to investigate the impact of breast surgery on circulating angiogenesis modulating gene transcripts and proteins. Methods Blood samples from 10 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer and 6 with fibroadenoma were collected before surgery and post-operatively on days 3 and 7 (breast cancer patients only). A set of 84 angiogenesis-associated transcripts were assessed using quantitative PCR arrays, and circulating protein levels (vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), IL8 and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) were measured using ELISA in the same samples. The results were investigated against clinicopathological data and patient outcome. Results Plasma levels of VEGFA and IL8 after surgery were significantly elevated in the breast cancer group compared to the control group (P = 0.038 and P = 0.021, respectively). In the cohort of breast cancer patients, VEGFA increased on day 3 (P = 0.038) and declined on day 7 (P= 0.017), while IL8 did not change on day 3 but showed a significant decline on day 7 (P = 0.02). FGF2 levels did not change significantly over time. Regarding gene transcripts, we detected upregulation of a significant number of angiogenesis-specific genes in patients with breast cancer versus controls: sphingosine kinase 1(SPHK1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC), neuropilin 1 (NRP1), fibroblast growth factor (FGF1), laminin alpha 5 (LAMA5), collagen type IV alpha 3 (COL4A3), IL8, ephrin B2 (EFNB2), ephrin A3 (EFNA3), tyrosine endothelial kinase (TEK), integrin beta 3 (ITGB3), AKT1, thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 11 (CCL11) and TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 3 (TIMP3). Surgery induced an altered expression in several keygenes in breast cancer patients. We identified an upregulation of COL4A3 and downregulation of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 (CXCL9

  13. Cloud-Based Service Information System for Evaluating Quality of Life after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hao-Yun; Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Liang, Tyng-Yeu; Lee, King-The; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although recent studies have improved understanding of quality of life (QOL) outcomes of breast conserving surgery, few have used longitudinal data for more than two time points, and few have examined predictors of QOL over two years. Additionally, the longitudinal data analyses in such studies rarely apply the appropriate statistical methodology to control for censoring and inter-correlations arising from repeated measures obtained from the same patient pool. This study evaluated an internet-based system for measuring longitudinal changes in QOL and developed a cloud-based system for managing patients after breast conserving surgery. Methods This prospective study analyzed 657 breast cancer patients treated at three tertiary academic hospitals. Related hospital personnel such as surgeons and other healthcare professionals were also interviewed to determine the requirements for an effective cloud-based system for surveying QOL in breast cancer patients. All patients completed the SF-36, Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and its supplementary breast cancer measure (QLQ-BR23) at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. The 95% confidence intervals for differences in responsiveness estimates were derived by bootstrap estimation. Scores derived by these instruments were interpreted by generalized estimating equation before and after surgery. Results All breast cancer surgery patients had significantly improved QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 subscale scores throughout the 2-year follow-up period (p<0.05). During the study period, QOL generally had a negative association with advanced age, high Charlson comorbidity index score, tumor stage III or IV, previous chemotherapy, and long post-operative LOS. Conversely, QOL was positively associated with previous radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Additionally, patients with high scores for preoperative QOL tended to have high scores for QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23 and SF-36 subscales. Based on the results of

  14. Altered lymphatic drainage after breast-conserving surgery and axillary node dissection: local recurrence with contralateral intramammary nodal metastases.

    PubMed

    Wellner, Rachel; Dave, Jasmine; Kim, Unsup; Menes, Tehillah S

    2007-02-01

    A review of the literature shows that lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node biopsy are feasible in patients with previous breast and axillary surgery and could be especially warranted because in these patients, lymphatic drainage might not include the axillary basin. We report a case of a woman with recurrent breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. The patient was found to have metastases in the contralateral intramammary lymph nodes. Demonstrating that such patterns do occur after previous treatment for breast cancer carries implications for the staging and management of these patients. PMID:17386126

  15. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dhakal, Sanjaya; Yamashiro, Gladys; Issell, Brian F

    2002-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS) in women with early stage breast cancer. Methods Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR) from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. Results The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. Conclusions In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy. PMID:11879527

  16. Risk-reducing Surgery in Women at Risk for Familial Breast or Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhiem, K.; Pfeifer, K.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Kiechle, M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated 5 % of breast cancers and 10 % of ovarian cancers may be due to inherited autosomal dominant breast and ovarian cancer alleles BRCA1 und BRCA2. According to population-based studies 1 or 2 women per 1000 carry such a risk allele. The cumulative cancer risk for healthy women with a BRCA-mutation is between 60 and 85 % for breast cancer and between 20 and 60 % for ovarian cancer. Recent studies have reported an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer in women after unilateral breast cancer. Since 1997 the German Cancer Aid has supported an interdisciplinary approach for high-risk women consisting of genetic testing, counselling and prevention in 12 specialised centres. Since 2005 this concept has received additional support from health insurance companies, and results have been assessed with regard to outcomes (e.g. reduced mortality due to more intensive early diagnosis). The number of centres has increased to 15 at various university hospitals. These interdisciplinary centres offer women the opportunity to participate in a structured screening programme for the early diagnosis of breast cancer and provide non-directive counselling on the options for risk-reducing surgery, e.g., prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer. Such surgical interventions can significantly reduce the risk of disease, the respective disease-specific mortality and – particularly prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy – total mortality in BRCA-mutation carriers. PMID:26640291

  17. Surgery Triggers Outgrowth of Latent Distant Disease in Breast Cancer: An Inconvenient Truth?

    PubMed Central

    Retsky, Michael; Demicheli, Romano; Hrushesky, William; Baum, Michael; Gukas, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    We review our work over the past 14 years that began when we were first confronted with bimodal relapse patterns in two breast cancer databases from different countries. These data were unexplainable with the accepted continuous tumor growth paradigm. To explain these data, we proposed that metastatic breast cancer growth commonly includes periods of temporary dormancy at both the single cell phase and the avascular micrometastasis phase. We also suggested that surgery to remove the primary tumor often terminates dormancy resulting in accelerated relapses. These iatrogenic events are apparently very common in that over half of all metastatic relapses progress in that manner. Assuming this is true, there should be ample and clear evidence in clinical data. We review here the breast cancer paradigm from a variety of historical, clinical, and scientific perspectives and consider how dormancy and surgery-driven escape from dormancy would be observed and what this would mean. Dormancy can be identified in these diverse data but most conspicuous is the sudden synchronized escape from dormancy following primary surgery. On the basis of our findings, we suggest a new paradigm for early stage breast cancer. We also suggest a new treatment that is meant to stabilize and preserve dormancy rather than attempt to kill all cancer cells as is the present strategy. PMID:24281072

  18. Psychosocial Adaptationand Cellular Immunity in Breast Cancer Patients in the Weeks After Surgery: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Alvarez, Juan P.; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria G.; Lechner, Suzanne; Carver, Charles S.; Holly, Heather; Antoni, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The period just after surgery for breast cancer requires psychosocial adaptation and is associated with elevated distress. Distress states have been associated with decreased cellular immune functioning in this population, which could have negative effects on physical recovery. However little is known about relations between psychological status (negative and positive mood states and overall quality of life) and cellular signaling cytokines that could account for these associations in women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Methods The present study examined associations between psychological adaptation indicators (mood, quality of life) and T-helper cell-type 1 (Th1) cytokine production from stimulated peripheral mononuclear cells in women who had recently undergone surgery for early-stage breast cancer but had not yet begun adjuvant therapy. These associations were evaluated while controlling for relevant disease/treatment, sociodemographic and health behavior covariates. Results Lower anxiety related to greater production of the Th1 cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) while greater positive mood (affection) related to greater production of the Th1 cytokines IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Better quality of life (QOL) related to greater production of the Th1 cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Conclusion Individual differences in psychosocial adaptation in women with breast cancer during the period after surgery relate to biological parameters that may be relevant for health and well-being as they move through treatment. PMID:19837199

  19. Cardiac Surgery is Safe in Female Patients with a History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Stefanie; Aleksić, Ivan; Schimmer, Christoph; Schmidt-Hengst, Elisa; Leyh, Rainer G.; Sommer, Sebastian-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In cardiac surgery candidates, a concomitant history of breast cancer suggests adverse outcomes. The possibility of internal mammary artery (IMA) utilization and its patency rate is frequently discussed. Secondary, blood loss and wound related infections might be important issues. However, publications focusing on these issues are limited. Methods: We analyzed 32 patients with previously treated breast cancer undergoing cardiac bypass (CABG) and combined CABG surgery matched to 99 control subjects in a retrospective cohort study. Patients were analyzed regarding IMA utilization, blood loss and substitution and frequent perioperative complications as well as long-term mortality. Results: No significant differences between groups were observed regarding duration of surgery, IMA-utilization, incidence of infections and postoperative complications or mortality. A pronounced decline of hemoglobin/hematocrit was evident within the first 6 postoperative hours (3.3 ± 1.8 vs. 2.5 ± 1.8 mg/dl; p = 0.03) in breast cancer patients not related to an increased drainage loss but associated with an increase of international normalized ratio (INR) (0.39 ± 0.16 vs. 0.29 ± 0.24; p <0.01). Conclusion: In breast cancer patients, CABG and combined CABG procedures can safely be performed with comparable short- and long-term results. PMID:27181390

  20. Feasibility of MR Metabolomics for Immediate Analysis of Resection Margins during Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sitter, Beathe; Fjøsne, Hans E.; Lundgren, Steinar; Buydens, Lutgarde M.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Postma, Geert; Giskeødegård, Guro F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of small tissue biopsies to distinguish between tumor and non-involved adjacent tissue was investigated. With the current methods, delineation of the tumor borders during breast cancer surgery is a challenging task for the surgeon, and a significant number of re-surgeries occur. We analyzed 328 tissue samples from 228 breast cancer patients using HR MAS MRS. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to discriminate between tumor and non-involved adjacent tissue. Using proper double cross validation, high sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 93%, respectively was achieved. Analysis of the loading profiles from both principal component analysis (PCA) and PLS-DA showed the choline-containing metabolites as main biomarkers for tumor content, with phosphocholine being especially high in tumor tissue. Other indicative metabolites include glycine, taurine and glucose. We conclude that metabolic profiling by HR MAS MRS may be a potential method for on-line analysis of resection margins during breast cancer surgery to reduce the number of re-surgeries and risk of local recurrence. PMID:23613877

  1. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant

  2. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast

  3. “Oriental anthropometry” in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senna-Fernandes, Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Background: According to Chinese medicine, the acupuncture-points' (acupoints) locations are proportionally and symmetrically distributed in well-defined compartment zones on the human body surface Oriental Anthropometry” (OA). Acupoints, if considered as aesthetic-loci, might be useful as reference guides in plastic surgery (PS). Aim: This study aimed to use aesthetic-loci as anatomical reference in surgical marking of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Method: This was an observational study based on aesthetic surgeries performed in private clinic. This study was based on 106 cases, comprising of 102 women and 4 men, with ages varying from 07 to 73 years, and with heights of between 1.34 m and 1.80 m. Patients were submitted to aesthetic surgical planning by relating aesthetic-loci to conventional surgical marking, including breast surgeries, abdominoplasty, rhytidoplasty, blepharoplasty, and hair implant. The aesthetic-surgical-outcome (ASO) of the patients was assessed by a team of plastic surgeons (who were not involved in the surgical procedures) over a follow-up period of one year by using a numeric-rating-scale in percentage (%) terms. A four-point-verbal-rating-scale was used to record the patients' opinion of therapeutic-satisfaction (TS). Results: ASO was 75.3 ± 9.4% and TS indicated that most patients (58.5%) obtained “good” results. Of the remainder, 38.7% found the results “excellent”, and 2.8% found them “fair”. Discussion and Conclusion: The data suggested that the use of aesthetic-loci may be a useful tool for PS as an anatomical reference for surgical marking. However, further investigation is required to assess the efficacy of the OA by providing the patients more reliable balance and harmony in facial and body contours surgeries. PMID:19753249

  4. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  5. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  7. Feeling like me again: a grounded theory of the role of breast reconstruction surgery in self-image.

    PubMed

    McKean, L N; Newman, E F; Adair, P

    2013-07-01

    The present study aimed to develop a theoretical understanding of the role of breast reconstruction in women's self-image. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women from breast cancer support groups who had undergone breast reconstruction surgery. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore their experiences. The study generated a model of 'breast cancer, breast reconstruction and self-image', with a core category entitled 'feeling like me again' and two principal categories of 'normal appearance' and 'normal life'. A further two main categories, 'moving on' and 'image of sick person' were generated. The results indicated a role of breast reconstruction in several aspects of self-image including the restoration of pre-surgery persona, which further promoted adjustment.

  8. Surgery or ablative radiotherapy for breast cancer oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Salama, Joseph K; Chmura, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Precisely focused radiation or surgical resection of limited metastases resulted in long-term disease control and survival in multiple studies of patients with oligometastatic breast cancer. The integration of these ablative techniques into standard systemic therapy regimens has the potential to be paradigm shifting, leaving many patients without evidence of disease. Although an attractive treatment option, the utility of these therapies have not been proven in controlled studies, and improved outcomes may be because of patient selection or favorable biology alone. Ongoing studies continue to refine radiation techniques and determine the role for ablative therapies in the management of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Additionally, patient selection for metastasis-directed therapies is based on clinical criteria, with many not benefiting from therapies that may have substantial toxicities. Recent reports are beginning to uncover the biology of oligometastatic cancer, but much work is needed. Current and developing trials that integrate both clinical and translational endpoints have the potential to transform management strategies in women with limited MBC.

  9. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  10. Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazal, S K; Fallowfield, L; Blamey, R W

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction). Psychosocial morbidity and satisfaction were studied retrospectively using self-evaluation questionnaires. The three different surgical groups were cross-matched into four different age group. Significant statistical differences existed between the three procedures regarding satisfaction and psychosocial morbidity (anxiety, depression, body image, sexuality and self-esteem) in favour of wide local excision followed by breast reconstruction. Greatest morbidity was seen in the mastectomy group. Patient satisfaction of cosmetic outcome and psychosocial aspects was greater with wide local excision than with breast reconstruction or mastectomy. However, since wide local excision is indicated in only a group of patients, breast reconstruction should be an option available to patients requiring mastectomy.

  11. Local regional effectiveness of surgery and radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, E.D.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1985-05-01

    Although gross tumor can be controlled with high doses of radiation therapy, control is achieved at the expense of severe radiation sequelae. In order to improve tumor control with minimum complications, the field of treatment should contain only subclinical disease. This article reviews the successful combination of surgery for the removal of gross cancer and radiation of moderate dose for the treatment of subclinical disease in patients with breast cancer. In patients with clinically favorable and operable disease, the combination of a radical or modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy of 5000 rad to the peripheral lymphatics and chest wall can secure 90% of the treated areas. For patients with locally and regionally advanced breast cancer, the combination of a simple mastectomy and dissection of the lateral axilla followed by postoperative irradiation of 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the chest wall, axilla, and peripheral lymphatic areas will control more than 85% of the patients treated as compared with approximately 70% control when surgery or radiotherapy alone is used, even with chemotherapy. Yet another clinical application of the subclinical disease concept is the successful combination of conservation surgery (whether segmental mastectomy, quadrantectomy, or wide excision) for gross tumor in the breast and axilla and irradiation for residual microscopic and multiple foci of tumor, yielding more than 90% control of locoregional disease with survival rates equal to those patients treated with radical or modified radical mastectomy. Results of multiple clinical trials and reported series are reviewed.

  12. Lymphatic mapping and lymphedema surgery in the breast cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Oscar; Sosin, Michael; Hashmi, Mahjabeen Aftab; Poysophon, Poysophon; Henderson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb lymphedema can be an unfortunate sequela following the oncologic treatment of breast cancer. The surgical treatment of lymphedema has had a recent renewed clinical interest paralleling innovative descriptions of surgical techniques and imaging modalities. In addition, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema has allowed improved translation to the clinical condition. Various surgical options exist to decrease the symptom-burden of upper limb lymphedema, including vascularized lymph node (VLN) transfer, lymphovenous bypass (LVB), liposuction, lymphatic grafting, and excisional procedures. Modern imaging techniques help to improve the consistency and accuracy of these surgical treatment options. A multi-modal treatment plan utilizing non-operative and surgical therapies has the potential to improve various factors related to overall patient quality of life. This review details all of the current operative treatment strategies and modern imaging modalities used in the treatment of lymphedema. PMID:26161309

  13. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  14. Reducing infection risk in implant-based breast-reconstruction surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Adrian SH; Song, David H

    2016-01-01

    Implant-based procedures are the most commonly performed method for postmastectomy breast reconstruction. While donor-site morbidity is low, these procedures are associated with a higher risk of reconstructive loss. Many of these are related to infection of the implant, which can lead to prolonged antibiotic treatment, undesired additional surgical procedures, and unsatisfactory results. This review combines a summary of the recent literature regarding implant-related breast-reconstruction infections and combines this with a practical approach to the patient and surgery aimed at reducing this risk. Prevention of infection begins with appropriate reconstructive choice based on an assessment and optimization of risk factors. These include patient and disease characteristics, such as smoking, obesity, large breast size, and immediate reconstructive procedures, as well as adjuvant therapy, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. For implant-based breast reconstruction, preoperative planning and organization is key to reducing infection. A logical and consistent intraoperative and postoperative surgical protocol, including appropriate antibiotic choice, mastectomy-pocket creation, implant handling, and considered acellular dermal matrix use contribute toward the reduction of breast-implant infections. PMID:27621667

  15. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery: an evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Thijs-Boer, F M; de Kruif, A T; van de Wiel, H B

    1999-04-01

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals that provide surgical treatment for these patients. Nursing care was defined to be optimal if it met the following criteria: (a) Specialized nursing support is provided to all patients during admission and in the outpatient departments both before and after surgery. (b) A protocol is in place outlining standard nursing procedures for breast cancer patients. (c) Formal communication about each breast cancer patient exists between the nurses involved. On the basis of this definition, it was found that optimal nursing care was provided in only 6% of the hospitals. Nursing care fell short mainly in the outpatient setting. This shortcoming also was recognized by most respondents, and many were already planning improvements. Nurses had varying opinions about their responsibility to provide the patient with information about the disease and its treatment, and consensus was lacking. In summary, nursing care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Dutch hospitals needs improvement, especially in the outpatient setting. PMID:10217034

  16. Reducing infection risk in implant-based breast-reconstruction surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Adrian SH; Song, David H

    2016-01-01

    Implant-based procedures are the most commonly performed method for postmastectomy breast reconstruction. While donor-site morbidity is low, these procedures are associated with a higher risk of reconstructive loss. Many of these are related to infection of the implant, which can lead to prolonged antibiotic treatment, undesired additional surgical procedures, and unsatisfactory results. This review combines a summary of the recent literature regarding implant-related breast-reconstruction infections and combines this with a practical approach to the patient and surgery aimed at reducing this risk. Prevention of infection begins with appropriate reconstructive choice based on an assessment and optimization of risk factors. These include patient and disease characteristics, such as smoking, obesity, large breast size, and immediate reconstructive procedures, as well as adjuvant therapy, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. For implant-based breast reconstruction, preoperative planning and organization is key to reducing infection. A logical and consistent intraoperative and postoperative surgical protocol, including appropriate antibiotic choice, mastectomy-pocket creation, implant handling, and considered acellular dermal matrix use contribute toward the reduction of breast-implant infections.

  17. Reducing infection risk in implant-based breast-reconstruction surgery: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Adrian Sh; Song, David H

    2016-01-01

    Implant-based procedures are the most commonly performed method for postmastectomy breast reconstruction. While donor-site morbidity is low, these procedures are associated with a higher risk of reconstructive loss. Many of these are related to infection of the implant, which can lead to prolonged antibiotic treatment, undesired additional surgical procedures, and unsatisfactory results. This review combines a summary of the recent literature regarding implant-related breast-reconstruction infections and combines this with a practical approach to the patient and surgery aimed at reducing this risk. Prevention of infection begins with appropriate reconstructive choice based on an assessment and optimization of risk factors. These include patient and disease characteristics, such as smoking, obesity, large breast size, and immediate reconstructive procedures, as well as adjuvant therapy, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. For implant-based breast reconstruction, preoperative planning and organization is key to reducing infection. A logical and consistent intraoperative and postoperative surgical protocol, including appropriate antibiotic choice, mastectomy-pocket creation, implant handling, and considered acellular dermal matrix use contribute toward the reduction of breast-implant infections. PMID:27621667

  18. Ideal female brow aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Garrett R; Kim, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the ideal female eyebrow has changed over time. Modern studies examining youthful brow aesthetics are reviewed. An analysis of ideal female brow characteristics as depicted in the Western print media between 1945 and 2011 was performed. This analysis provided objective evidence that the ideal youthful brow peak has migrated laterally over time to lie at the lateral canthus. There has been a nonstatistically significant trend toward lower and flatter brows. These findings are discussed in relation to current concepts of female brow aging, with repercussions regarding endoscopic brow lift and aesthetic forehead surgery.

  19. Immediate reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator flaps after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ken; Fujikawa, Masakazu; Tashima, Hiroki; Saito, Takuya; Sotsuka, Yohei; Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in perforator flap surgical techniques have allowed for safe and reliable autologous tissue transfer with minimal donor-site morbidity. Between April 2012 and January 2013, we performed immediate breast reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator (MCFAP) flaps in 15 patients after breast-conserving surgery. The flaps were harvested from patients in the lithotomy position, while a second surgical team simultaneously conducted tumour resection. Of the 15 procedures performed, three flaps were dissected as true perforator flaps, while 12 flaps were dissected as muscle-sparing perforator flaps. The mean flap weight was 138.5 g (range, 77-230 g) and the mean pedicle length was 5.7 cm (range, 3.0-9.0 cm). Recipient vessels for anastomosis were serratus branches in 10 patients, internal mammary vessels in three patients and thoracodorsal vessels in two patients. The mean duration of surgery was 6.74 h (range, 5.65-9.45 h). There were no major complications requiring surgical intervention. Researchers observed partial flap necrosis, which manifested as small firm lesions in two patients, as well as local wound infection and dehiscence in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. There were no instances of donor-site seroma formation or lymphoedema in any of the patients. An objective assessment of postoperative photographs showed that cosmetic results were mostly satisfactory. Donor-site scars along the medial groin crease were inconspicuous and readily concealed by clothing. Given its reliable vascularity and minimal donor-site morbidity, the free MCFAP flap can be a good alternative for partial breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery.

  20. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotheapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and periphereal lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (actuarial) is 83%. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder results from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications, 18 were mild and 3 were serious.These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned. The results also compared with the great majority of surgical series reported in the literature, allowing us to conclude that patients treated with radiation have nothing to lose and much to gain by preserving the breast.

  1. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotherapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and peripheral lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (acturarial) is 83%. There have been 10 failures: 8 distant, 1 local (in axilla, controlled by surgery, actually NED), and 1 local and distant (scar and brain). Both failures were found with 12 months after treatment, and 8/10 of the failures within 24 months. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder resulted from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications 18 were mild and 3 were serious. Of those 3 serious complications (3.6%), 2 were a result of radiotherapy, and one because an ill-advised axillary dissection prior to radiotherapy gave a negative axilla and a serious arm edema and painful shoulder. This was the worst complication in the total of 83 patients. These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned.

  2. Outcome After Conservative Surgery and Breast Irradiation in 5,717 Patients With Breast Cancer: Implications for Supraclavicular Nodal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Scotti, Vieri; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Detti, Beatrice; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Cardillo, Carla Deluca; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and predictive factors of patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy to the whole breast only, without supraclavicular nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 5,717 patients with pT1-T4 breast cancer were treated at the University of Florence. The median age of the patient population was 55 years (range, 30-80 years). All patients were followed for a median of 6.8 years (range, 1-27 years). Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended in 1,535 patients (26.9%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 2,951 patients (51.6%). The patients were split into three groups according to number of positive axillary nodes (PAN): P1, negative axillary lymph nodes; P2, one to three PAN; P3, more than three PAN. Results: The P3 patients had a higher incidence of supraclavicular fossa recurrence (SFR) compared with P2 and P1 patients. However, the incidence of SFR in P3 patients was low (only 5.5%), whereas the incidence of distant metastases (DM) was 27.2%. Distant metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor for breast cancer survival. Additionally, in the subgroup of patients who developed local recurrence, DM was the most important death predictor. Conclusion: Our series suggests that isolated SFR in patients who did not receive supraclavicular radiotherapy is infrequent, as well as in those patients who have more than three PAN, and SFR seems not to influence the outcome, which depends on DM occurrence.

  3. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  4. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P < .05). Compared to FP-FIF, IP-IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage

  5. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy.

  6. A methodological evaluation of volumetric measurement techniques including three-dimensional imaging in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoeffelin, H; Jacquemin, D; Defaweux, V; Nizet, J L

    2014-01-01

    Breast surgery currently remains very subjective and each intervention depends on the ability and experience of the operator. To date, no objective measurement of this anatomical region can codify surgery. In this light, we wanted to compare and validate a new technique for 3D scanning (LifeViz 3D) and its clinical application. We tested the use of the 3D LifeViz system (Quantificare) to perform volumetric calculations in various settings (in situ in cadaveric dissection, of control prostheses, and in clinical patients) and we compared this system to other techniques (CT scanning and Archimedes' principle) under the same conditions. We were able to identify the benefits (feasibility, safety, portability, and low patient stress) and limitations (underestimation of the in situ volume, subjectivity of contouring, and patient selection) of the LifeViz 3D system, concluding that the results are comparable with other measurement techniques. The prospects of this technology seem promising in numerous applications in clinical practice to limit the subjectivity of breast surgery. PMID:24511536

  7. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy: A population based study of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katik, S; Gort, M; Jobsen, J J; Maduro, J H; Struikmans, H; Siesling, S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel logistic regression. The study sample consisted of 15,961 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Registry at 79 hospitals and 19 (RTCs) with breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy directly followed by radiotherapy. The percentage of patients starting radiotherapy ≤42 days varied from 14% to 94%. Early year of incidence, higher age, higher stage, mastectomy, higher ASA category and no availability of radiotherapy facilities were significantly associated with a longer time interval between radiotherapy and surgery. More patients received radiotherapy ≤42 days in hospitals with on-site radiotherapy facilities (OR 1.36, p = 0.024). Among the remainder, significant variation was found at the RTC level (11.1%, σ(2) = 0.254, SE 0.054), and at the hospital level (6.4% σ2 = 0.443, SE 0.163) (ICC 0.064). The significant delay and unexplained variance remaining at the RCT and hospital level suggests delays caused by the patient referral pathway from hospital to RCT, and indicates potential for improvement at both levels.

  8. Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Siew Yim; Musa, Aisya Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Context Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer amongst women but it has the highest survival rates amongst all cancer. Rehabilitation therapy of post-treatment effects from cancer and its treatment is needed to improve functioning and quality of life. This review investigated the range of methods for improving physical, psychosocial, occupational, and social wellbeing in women with breast cancer after receiving breast cancer surgery. Method A search for articles published in English between the years 2009 and 2014 was carried out using The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. Search terms included: ‘breast cancer’, ‘breast carcinoma’, ‘surgery’, ‘mastectomy’, ‘lumpectomy’, ‘breast conservation’, ‘axillary lymph node dissection’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘therapy’, ‘physiotherapy’, ‘occupational therapy’, ‘psychological’, ‘psychosocial’, ‘psychotherapy’, ‘exercise’, ‘physical activity’, ‘cognitive’, ‘occupational’, ‘alternative’, ‘complementary’, and ‘systematic review’. Study selection Systematic reviews on the effectiveness of rehabilitation methods in improving post-operative physical, and psychological outcomes for breast cancer were selected. Sixteen articles met all the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Data extraction Included review year, study aim, total number of participants included, and results. Data synthesis Evidence for exercise rehabilitation is predominantly in the improvement of shoulder mobility and limb strength. Inconclusive results exist for a range of rehabilitation methods (physical, psycho-education, nutritional, alternative-complementary methods) for addressing the domains of psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. Conclusion There is good evidence for narrowly-focused exercise rehabilitation in improving physical outcome particularly for shoulder

  9. Cosmetic sequelae after oncoplastic surgery of the breast. Classification and factors for prevention.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Cereijo Garea, Carmen; García Novoa, Alejandra

    2015-02-01

    Oncoplastic surgery is an essential tool in the surgical approach to women with breast cancer. These techniques are not absolute guarantee for a good cosmetic result and therefore some patients will have cosmetic sequelae secondary to poor surgical planning, the effects of adjuvant treatments or the need for resection greater than originally planned. The high frequency of these cosmetic sequelae in oncology practice makes it necessary to classify them for optimal surgical planning. The aim of this paper is to present a classification of cosmetic sequelae after oncoplastic procedures to identify those factors that are crucial to its prevention. This classification contains 4 groups: breast contour deformities, asymmetries, alterations in nipple-aréola complex (NAC) and defects in the three dimensional structure of the breast. A significant group of these sequelae (asymmetries and deformities) are associated with breast irradiation and need an accurate information process with patients to set realistic expectations about cosmetic results. Finally, there is another group of sequelae (NAC disorders and three-dimensional structure) that are related to poor planning and deficiencies in surgical approach, therfore specific training is essential for learning these surgical techniques. PMID:25438776

  10. A review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ following breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Boxer, M M; Delaney, G P; Chua, B H

    2013-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous, pre-malignant disease accounting for 10-20% of all new breast tumours. Evidence shows a statistically significant local control benefit for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for all patients. The baseline recurrence risk of individual patients varies according to clinical-pathological criteria and in selected patients, omission of RT may be considered, following a discussion with the patient. The role of adjuvant endocrine therapy remains uncertain. Ongoing studies are attempting to define subgroups of patients who are at sufficiently low risk of recurrence that RT may be safely omitted; investigating RT techniques and dose fractionation schedules; and defining the role of endocrine therapy. Future directions in the management of patients with DCIS will include investigation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers to inform individualised therapy tailored to the risk of recurrence.

  11. Measurement of electromagnetic tracking error in a navigated breast surgery setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Vinyas; Baksh, Aidan; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Baum, Zachary; Gauvin, Gabrielle; Engel, Jay; Rudan, John; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: The measurement of tracking error is crucial to ensure the safety and feasibility of electromagnetically tracked, image-guided procedures. Measurement should occur in a clinical environment because electromagnetic field distortion depends on positioning relative to the field generator and metal objects. However, we could not find an accessible and open-source system for calibration, error measurement, and visualization. We developed such a system and tested it in a navigated breast surgery setup. METHODS: A pointer tool was designed for concurrent electromagnetic and optical tracking. Software modules were developed for automatic calibration of the measurement system, real-time error visualization, and analysis. The system was taken to an operating room to test for field distortion in a navigated breast surgery setup. Positional and rotational electromagnetic tracking errors were then calculated using optical tracking as a ground truth. RESULTS: Our system is quick to set up and can be rapidly deployed. The process from calibration to visualization also only takes a few minutes. Field distortion was measured in the presence of various surgical equipment. Positional and rotational error in a clean field was approximately 0.90 mm and 0.31°. The presence of a surgical table, an electrosurgical cautery, and anesthesia machine increased the error by up to a few tenths of a millimeter and tenth of a degree. CONCLUSION: In a navigated breast surgery setup, measurement and visualization of tracking error defines a safe working area in the presence of surgical equipment. Our system is available as an extension for the open-source 3D Slicer platform.

  12. Efficacy of an in-home nursing intervention following short-stay breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Gwen K; Donze, Laurie Friedman; Beckrow, Kathryn Christensen

    2004-10-01

    This randomized controlled trial (n = 240) was designed to test the efficacy of a sub-acute home nursing intervention following short-stay surgery for breast cancer. Intervention participants received the in-home nursing protocol, whereas non-intervention participants received agency nursing care or no nursing care. Data, collected via questionnaire, telephone interview, and chart audit, included surgical recovery/self-care knowledge, functional status, anxiety, quality of life (QOL), and health service utilization. There were no significant group differences on postoperative functional status, anxiety, QOL, further surgeries, or complications. Intervention participants were more likely to receive instruction on surgical self-care (p

  13. An atrophic plaque on the breast six years after breast reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Michele; Torbeck, Richard; Kauh, Young

    2016-01-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica (NL) is a cutaneous disease entity that typically manifests as atrophic yellow plaques with telangiectasias on the anterior tibial region. Although NL is commonly associated with diabetes mellitus, the role of trauma in disease development is less commonly emphasized. The relationship between NL and the Köbner phenomenon has been established, as a few cases of NL occurring in surgical scars have been reported in the literature. We report the first case of NL occurring in a mastectomy scar on the breast in a non-diabetic female, and explore the relationship between NL, diabetes mellitus, and trauma. PMID:27617606

  14. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  15. Immediate breast volume replacement using a free dermal fat graft after breast cancer surgery: multi-institutional joint research of short-term outcomes in 262 Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Fujii, Teruhiko; Hirokaga, Kouichi; Ishigure, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Tomoyo; Kayano, Shuji; Miyamoto, Sachio; Sagara, Yasuaki; Sakurai, Takashi; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Sotome, Keiichi; Ueo, Hiroaki; Wakita, Kazuyuki; Watatani, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediate volume replacement using a free dermal fat graft (FDFG) has been proven safe with early postoperative benefits. The aims of the present study were to clarify adequate indications and risk factors associated with operative morbidity. Patients and methods A multi-institutional analysis of partial mastectomy with immediate volume replacement with FDFG was undertaken in 14 hospitals specializing in breast cancer treatment. Clinical and oncological variables were analyzed to identify factors associated with postoperative complications. Results A total of 262 cases were analyzed. Considering the observation period and overlap of patients, 13 (5.4%) out of 242 patients had complications within 1 month of surgery while 7 (4.6%) out of 151 patients developed complications 1-12 months after surgery. Two hundred and eleven out of 242 patients were statistically examined using a multivariate analysis, which revealed that the weight of resected breast tissue, size of implanted FDFG (cranio-caudal length), and weight of implanted FDFG were associated with a higher likelihood of postoperative complications. Conclusions Immediate breast volume replacement using a FDFG after breast cancer surgery should be done for selected patients with breast cancer to avoid postoperative complications. The prospective and larger investigations are warranted for the establishment of appropriate guidelines. PMID:26005649

  16. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yong; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Wang Ruozheng

    2012-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

  18. Intrathoracic migration of a breast implant after minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Songcharoen, Somjade Jay; McClure, Michael; Aru, Roberto G; Songcharoen, Somprasong

    2015-03-01

    The aging population, in combination with the popularity of breast augmentation with implants, presents surgeons with a growing number of cases involving women undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) who have breast implants. We present an unusual complication involving the delayed migration of a subpectoral implant into the chest cavity through an iatrogenic defect after a minimally invasive mitral valve repair. This chest wall defect was ultimately repaired with a latissimus dorsi flap. Although MICS has been described in women with breast implants, the documented experience remains limited. Most authors classically recommend explantation of the prosthesis to provide access to the chest wall; however, some have later suggested preserving the implant capsule in situ while performing the cardiac procedure with gentle retraction. From our literature review and experience, we recommend that the posterior capsule should remain intact. If this is not possible, then the chest wall closure should be reinforced with either mesh, soft tissue, or both. Soft tissue options include the conversion from a subpectoral to a subglandular position to use the pectoralis major, or a latissimus dorsi muscle flap. With the increasing number of these cases along with the complexities of minimally invasive procedures, close communication and planning should be undertaken between both cardiothoracic and plastic surgeons when taking care of these patients. Above all, when faced with postoperative complications after MICS, the plastic surgeon must maintain a high index of clinical suspicion and consider the possibility of intrathoracic migration of an implant so that proper workup and planning may be initiated.

  19. Impact of intraoperative specimen mammography on margins in breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Tomoka; Sawaki, Masataka; Ishiguro, Junko; Adachi, Yayoi; Kotani, Haruru; Yoshimura, Akiyo; Hattori, Masaya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    A positive resection margin is one of the most significant risk factors for local breast cancer recurrence following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Intraoperative specimen mammography (SMMG) is routinely used to evaluate the surgical margin at our institution. The aim of the present study was to assess the adequacy of SMMG for margin assessment. The patient cohort included 174 women who underwent BCS in 2006. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG were assessed by comparing the margins assessed by histological and radiological methods. It was also examined whether the rate of positive histological margins was decreased by re-excision following SMMG evaluation. A total of 23 false-negatives and 6 false-positives were determined by SMMG. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG margin assessment for patients with primary breast cancer were 20.6 and 94.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 50% and the negative predictive value was 82.2%. A subgroup analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of SMMG in cases with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher compared with those in invasive ductal carcinoma. Furthermore, the positive histological margin rate was not affected by re-excision. Although the general usefulness of intraoperative SMMG was not proven, this procedure may be useful in specific cases, particularly those with DCIS and those diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy. A prospective study with exact criteria and a standard procedure is required. PMID:27588192

  20. Surgical Site Infections in Breast Surgery: The Use of Preoperative Antibiotics for Elective, Nonreconstructive Procedures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for surgical site infections (SSIs) for breast surgery is widespread, but the benefit in clean surgical cases is not well defined. Methods. A retrospective analysis of 855 patients undergoing elective, nonreconstructive breast operations was performed, with 401 patients receiving no antibiotics and 454 patients receiving a single dose of preoperative antibiotic. Results. Administration of a preoperative antibiotic did not decrease the SSI rate. In this community-based study, antibiotic use practices varied considerably by surgeon. In univariate analyses, SSI rates appeared to increase with prophylactic antibiotic use (12% SSI with antibiotics versus 4% without, p < 0.0001), likely because the use of underdosed antibiotics was associated with higher rates of SSI (13.2% SSI with cefazolin 1 gram, p < 0.0001, and 15.4% SSI with clindamycin 300 mg or less, p = 0.0269). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate from SSI cultures, 31.8% (7 of 22). In multivariable analyses, increased risk of SSI was associated with BMI > 25 kg/m2 (OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04–1.11, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. The administration of a single dose of preoperative antibiotic did not decrease the rate of SSI in this large series of patients undergoing clean breast operations. BMI >25 kg/m2 and the use of an inadequate dose of antibiotics for prophylaxis may increase risk of SSI. PMID:27800185

  1. Associations Between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Epidural Ropivacaine Consumption in Patients Undergoing Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Jiang, Yongdong; Pang, Da; Xi, Hongjie; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Up to date, few published studies indicated the associations between genetic polymorphisms and epidural local anesthetics consumption. In this study, we investigated the associations between seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epidural ropivacaine consumption during breast cancer surgery in women from northeastern China. These seven SNPs (rs3803662 and rs12443621 in TNCR9, rs889312 in MAP3K1, rs3817198 in LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35, rs13281615 at 8q24, and rs2046210 at 6q25.1) were identified by recent genome-wide association studies associated with tumor susceptibility. A total of 418 breast cancer women received thoracic epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine for elective mastectomy with axillary clearance. Their blood samples were genotyped for the seven SNPs using the SNaPshot method. For SNP rs13281615, the subjects with genotype AG and GG consumed a greater amount of the total epidural ropivacaine and the mean ropivacaine dose than the subjects with genotype AA (p=0.047 and p=0.003, respectively). Furthermore, no statistical differences were found in the total dose of ropivacaine, the mean consumption of ropivacaine, the onset of ropivacaine, or the initial dose of lidocaine among the three genotypic groups for the other six SNPs studied. Our study indicated that SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was associated with the consumption of epidural ropivacaine during breast cancer surgery in northeastern Chinese women. It might provide new insights into the mechanisms of ropivacaine action and metabolism and facilitate the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23577780

  2. Factors influencing the surgery intentions and choices of women with early breast cancer: the predictive utility of an extended theory of planned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women diagnosed with early breast cancer (stage I or II) can be offered the choice between mastectomy or breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy due to equivalence in survival rates. A wide variation in the surgical management of breast cancer and a lack of theoretically guided research on this issue highlight the need for further research into the factors influencing women’s choices. An extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) could provide a basis to understand and predict women’s surgery choices. The aims of this study were to understand and predict the surgery intentions and choices of women newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, examining the predictive utility of an extended TPB. Methods Sixty-two women recruited from three UK breast clinics participated in the study; 48 women, newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, completed online questionnaires both before their surgery and after accessing an online decision support intervention (BresDex). Questionnaires assessed views about breast cancer and the available treatment options using items designed to measure constructs of an extended TPB (i.e., attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and anticipated regret), and women’s intentions to choose mastectomy or BCS. Objective data were collected on women’s choice of surgery via the clinical breast teams. Multiple and logistic regression analyses examined predictors of surgery intentions and subsequent choice of surgery. Results The extended TPB accounted for 69.9% of the variance in intentions (p <.001); attitudes and subjective norms were significant predictors. Including additional variables revealed anticipated regret to be a more important predictor than subjective norms. Surgery intentions significantly predicted surgery choices (p <.01). Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of an extended TPB in predicting and understanding women’s surgery intentions and choices for early breast cancer

  3. Reoperation costs in attempted breast-conserving surgery: a decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, R.E.; Baliski, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery (bcs) is the preferred surgical approach for most patients with early-stage breast cancer. Frequently, concerns arise about the pathologic margin status, resulting in an average reoperation rate of 23% in Canada. No consensus has been reached about the ideal reoperation rate, although 10% has been suggested as a target. Upon undergoing reoperation, many patients choose mastectomy and breast reconstruction, which add to the morbidity and cost of patient care. We attempted to identify the cost of reoperation after bcs, and the effect that a reduction in the reoperation rate could have on the B.C. health care system. Methods A decision tree was constructed to estimate the average cost per patient undergoing initial bcs with two reoperation frequency scenarios: 23% and 10%. The model included the direct medical costs from the perspective of the B.C. health care system for the most common surgical treatment options, including breast reconstruction and postoperative radiation therapy. Results Costs ranged from a low of $8,225 per patient with definitive bcs [95% confidence interval (ci): $8,061 to $8,383] to a high of $26,026 for reoperation with mastectomy and delayed reconstruction (95% ci: $23,991 to $28,122). If the reoperation rate could be reduced to 10%, the average saving would be $1,055 per patient undergoing attempted bcs (95% ci: $959 to $1,156). If the lower rate were to be achieved in British Columbia, it would translate into a savings of $1.9 million annually. Summary The implementation of initiatives to reduce reoperation after bcs could result in significant savings to the health care system, while potentially improving the quality of patient care. PMID:27803595

  4. Patient preferences regarding intraoperative versus external beam radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael D; Conolly, Jay; Park, Catherine; Sakata, Theadora; Mohan, Aron J; Harrison, Brittany L; Hayes, Mitchell; Esserman, Laura J; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A Trial is an international randomized, prospective trial comparing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for equivalence to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in selected low-risk patients; early results suggest that outcomes are similar. In addition to effectiveness data and cost considerations, the preferences of patients should help inform practice. This study was undertaken to explore and quantify preference in choosing between IORT and the current standard, EBRT. Eligible subjects were current or past candidates for breast-conserving surgery and radiation being seen at the University of California, San Francisco Breast Care Center. A trade-off technique varying the risk of local recurrence for IORT was used to quantify any additional accepted risk that these patients would accept to receive either treatment. Patients were first presented with a slideshow comparing EBRT with the experimental IORT option before being asked their preferences given hypothetical 10-year local recurrence risks. Patients were then given a questionnaire on demographic, social and clinical factors. Data from 81 patients were analyzed. The median additional accepted risk to have IORT was 2.3 % (-9 to 39 %), mean 3.2 %. Only 7 patients chose to accept additional risk for EBRT; 22 accepted IORT at no additional risk; and the remaining 52 chose IORT with some additional risk. Patients weigh trade-offs of risks and benefits when presented with medical treatment choices. Our results show that the majority of breast cancer patients will accept a small increment of local risk for a simpler delivery of radiation. Further studies that incorporate outcome and side effect data from the TARGIT-A trial clarify the expected consequences of a local recurrence, and include an expanded range of radiation options that could help guide clinical decision making in this area. PMID:24292868

  5. Wait Time from Suspicion to Surgery for Breast Cancer in Manitoba

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter-Kellett, Tara; Lambert, Pascal; Musto, Grace; Turner, Donna; Cooke, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women. The pathway for its diagnosis and treatment is relatively standardized. Nevertheless, there can be significant delays affecting the journey. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the BC wait times (WT) from suspicion to first surgery in Manitoba and to examine factors associated with WT variability. Methods: The cohort is composed of patients with stages I-III breast cancer who were diagnosed between September 1, 2009, and August 31, 2010, and referred to a cancer center. Patients’ journeys were tracked and divided into three sequential intervals from suspicion to first diagnostic test, from first diagnostic test to diagnosis and from diagnosis to first surgery. Results: Four hundred and four patients were included of whom 134 presented through the screening program. There was no difference between the study cohort and population data from the provincial Cancer Registry concerning the distribution of age, stage of cancer or residence. The median WT from suspicion to surgery was 78 days. In the screen-detected group (SD), a difference in median WT from suspicion to first diagnostic test was found for distance. This finding was first to test location, where those who travel less had longer WT than those who have longer journeys. Patients who went to centers that offer both imaging and biopsy services, even if the required test is imaging only, had to wait longer than those who went to centers that provide imaging only. SD patients needing more than one diagnostic test had a longer WT from the first test to pathological diagnosis if the first test did not include a biopsy. Patients who were seen by surgeons before final pathological diagnosis had a shorter WT from diagnosis to first surgery than those who had the surgical consult after tissue diagnosis was made. A delay to surgery was observed in the whole cohort if a plastic surgeon is required in addition to the surgical oncologist

  6. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  7. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  9. The use of 3D laser imaging and a new breast replica cast as a method to optimize autologous breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Ahcan, Uros; Bracun, Drago; Zivec, Katarina; Pavlic, Rok; Butala, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Aesthetically pleasing and symmetrical breasts are the goal of reconstructive breast surgery. Sometimes, however, multiple procedures are needed to improve a reconstructed breast's symmetry and appearance. In order to avoid additional corrective procedures, we have developed a new method that uses a reverse engineering technique to produce what we call a new breast replica cast (NBRC). The NBRC is a mould of the contralateral healthy breast, designed according to preoperative laser 3D images. During surgery, the mould is used to help shape the new breast. With this method, we are able to achieve breast symmetry in terms of volume, projection, contour, and position on the chest wall more accurately, more quickly, and more safely than before.

  10. Mediators of a Brief Hypnosis Intervention to Control Side Effects in Breast Surgery Patients: Response Expectancies and Emotional Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Guy H.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that response expectancies and emotional distress mediate the effects of an empirically validated presurgical hypnosis intervention on postsurgical side effects (i.e., pain, nausea, and fatigue). Method: Women (n = 200) undergoing breast-conserving surgery (mean age = 48.50 years;…

  11. The use of sequential X-ray, CT and MRI in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyu; Tan, Hongna; Gao, Jianbo; Wei, Yan; Yu, Zhan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgeries. In total, 76 patients with indications for breast-conserving surgery due to complicated breast cancer participated in the study and were assigned to either control or observation group (n=38 per group). The patients in the control group were evaluated with two sets of random combinations of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT or MRI with ultrasound inspection, whereas the patients in the observation group were evaluated by sequential inspection methods of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI. A comparison of surgery outcomes, incidence of complications, rate of positive surgical margins, and recurrence and survival rates in the groups during a follow-up period of 24 months was made. Comparisons of the preoperative evaluation results for tumor number, average maximum diameter, number of lymphatic metastatic groups and number of metastatic lymph nodes in the observation group showed the numbers to be significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conversely, the comparisons of age, tumor distribution and T-staging yielded no significant differences, validating the analysis. The percentage of successful breast-conserving surgeries in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the incidence of complications in the observation group was lower (P<0.05). The rate of positive surgical margins and the recurrence rate of cancer in the observation group were lower than those in the control group, and the survival rate in the observation group was higher, with differences having statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, the sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI during the preoperative evaluation for breast-conserving surgery positively affects

  12. Tissue-simulating phantoms for assessing potential near-infrared fluorescence imaging applications in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Pleijhuis, Rick; Timmermans, Arwin; De Jong, Johannes; De Boer, Esther; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Van Dam, Gooitzen

    2014-01-01

    Inaccuracies in intraoperative tumor localization and evaluation of surgical margin status result in suboptimal outcome of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Optical imaging, in particular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, might reduce the frequency of positive surgical margins following BCS by providing the surgeon with a tool for pre- and intraoperative tumor localization in real-time. In the current study, the potential of NIRF-guided BCS is evaluated using tissue-simulating breast phantoms for reasons of standardization and training purposes. Breast phantoms with optical characteristics comparable to those of normal breast tissue were used to simulate breast conserving surgery. Tumor-simulating inclusions containing the fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) were incorporated in the phantoms at predefined locations and imaged for pre- and intraoperative tumor localization, real-time NIRF-guided tumor resection, NIRF-guided evaluation on the extent of surgery, and postoperative assessment of surgical margins. A customized NIRF camera was used as a clinical prototype for imaging purposes. Breast phantoms containing tumor-simulating inclusions offer a simple, inexpensive, and versatile tool to simulate and evaluate intraoperative tumor imaging. The gelatinous phantoms have elastic properties similar to human tissue and can be cut using conventional surgical instruments. Moreover, the phantoms contain hemoglobin and intralipid for mimicking absorption and scattering of photons, respectively, creating uniform optical properties similar to human breast tissue. The main drawback of NIRF imaging is the limited penetration depth of photons when propagating through tissue, which hinders (noninvasive) imaging of deep-seated tumors with epi-illumination strategies. PMID:25286185

  13. Tissue-simulating Phantoms for Assessing Potential Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging Applications in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pleijhuis, Rick; Timmermans, Arwin; De Jong, Johannes; De Boer, Esther; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Van Dam, Gooitzen

    2014-01-01

    Inaccuracies in intraoperative tumor localization and evaluation of surgical margin status result in suboptimal outcome of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Optical imaging, in particular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, might reduce the frequency of positive surgical margins following BCS by providing the surgeon with a tool for pre- and intraoperative tumor localization in real-time. In the current study, the potential of NIRF-guided BCS is evaluated using tissue-simulating breast phantoms for reasons of standardization and training purposes. Breast phantoms with optical characteristics comparable to those of normal breast tissue were used to simulate breast conserving surgery. Tumor-simulating inclusions containing the fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) were incorporated in the phantoms at predefined locations and imaged for pre- and intraoperative tumor localization, real-time NIRF-guided tumor resection, NIRF-guided evaluation on the extent of surgery, and postoperative assessment of surgical margins. A customized NIRF camera was used as a clinical prototype for imaging purposes. Breast phantoms containing tumor-simulating inclusions offer a simple, inexpensive, and versatile tool to simulate and evaluate intraoperative tumor imaging. The gelatinous phantoms have elastic properties similar to human tissue and can be cut using conventional surgical instruments. Moreover, the phantoms contain hemoglobin and intralipid for mimicking absorption and scattering of photons, respectively, creating uniform optical properties similar to human breast tissue. The main drawback of NIRF imaging is the limited penetration depth of photons when propagating through tissue, which hinders (noninvasive) imaging of deep-seated tumors with epi-illumination strategies. PMID:25286185

  14. Design and validation of two optical beacons for guidewire localization in breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca Anne; McAleavey, Stephen A; Schiffhauer, Linda M; Zavislan, James

    2013-06-10

    Stereotactically placed guidewires are used for indicating the location of a nonpalpable carcinoma in breast-conserving surgery. Pathologists use the end of the embedded guidewire to guide sectioning during intraoperative margin assessment, but they do not currently have a tool to indicate the location of the guidewire end for informed sectioning. We present analysis and experimental testing of two optical methods for localizing the end of an embedded fiber-optic guidewire: the first uses irradiance emitted from the fiber to indicate the location of the guidewire end, while the second system uses the fiber optic to create a photoacoustic pulse for localization. Both systems locate the end of the guidewire within ±5 mm, which ensures that the lesion of interest is bisected during sectioning. The accuracy of the irradiance-based beacon is influenced by standard margin paints, so the photoacoustic beacon proved more useful under current tissue-handling protocols.

  15. High-frequency ultrasound for intraoperative margin assessments in breast conservation surgery: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to breast imaging, ultrasound offers the potential for characterizing and distinguishing between benign and malignant breast tissues due to their different microstructures and material properties. The aim of this study was to determine if high-frequency ultrasound (20-80 MHz) can provide pathology sensitive measurements for the ex vivo detection of cancer in margins during breast conservation surgery. Methods Ultrasonic tests were performed on resected margins and other tissues obtained from 17 patients, resulting in 34 specimens that were classified into 15 pathology categories. Pulse-echo and through-transmission measurements were acquired from a total of 57 sites on the specimens using two single-element 50-MHz transducers. Ultrasonic attenuation and sound speed were obtained from time-domain waveforms. The waveforms were further processed with fast Fourier transforms to provide ultrasonic spectra and cepstra. The ultrasonic measurements and pathology types were analyzed for correlations. The specimens were additionally re-classified into five pathology types to determine specificity and sensitivity values. Results The density of peaks in the ultrasonic spectra, a measure of spectral structure, showed significantly higher values for carcinomas and precancerous pathologies such as atypical ductal hyperplasia than for normal tissue. The slopes of the cepstra for non-malignant pathologies displayed significantly greater values that differentiated them from the normal and malignant tissues. The attenuation coefficients were sensitive to fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, and invasive lobular carcinoma. Specificities and sensitivities for differentiating pathologies from normal tissue were 100% and 86% for lobular carcinomas, 100% and 74% for ductal carcinomas, 80% and 82% for benign pathologies, and 80% and 100% for fat necrosis and adenomas. Specificities and sensitivities were also determined for differentiating each pathology type from the other

  16. [Lasers and aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Stratigos, A J; Dover, J S; Arndt, K A

    2003-07-01

    The improved understanding of laser-tissue interaction along with the latest advances of laser technology have led to the development of sophisticated, safe, and user-friendly laser systems that provide effective treatment for a variety of aesthetic skin conditions. The use of lasers and their tissue-specific capabilities in the treatment of pigmented and vascular lesions has been greatly expanded to include rhytides, photoaged skin, atrophic scars, and unwanted hair. In addition, laser techniques have been employed in traditional "rejuvenating" procedures of aged skin, e.g., face-lifting, blepharoplasty, and hair transplantation, decreasing the intra-operative time and limiting the recovery period. These advances have led to a wide acceptance of cutaneous laser surgery by the dermatologic community and have created an increasing popularity among the public. The purpose of this article is to review the applications of lasers in aesthetic dermatology and discuss their limitations and potential side effects. PMID:12835862

  17. Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Electrosurgical Device for Over-the-Counter Aesthetic Use. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-06-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the electrosurgical device for over-the-counter aesthetic use into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the electrosurgical device for over-the-counter aesthetic use's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  18. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  19. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  20. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  1. Troiage Aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  2. Hypnosis in the Perioperative Management of Breast Cancer Surgery: Clinical Benefits and Potential Implications

    PubMed Central

    Roelants, Fabienne; Pospiech, Audrey; Momeni, Mona; Watremez, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize data published on the use of perioperative hypnosis in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (BCS). Indeed, the majority of BCS patients experience stress, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and pain. Correct management of the perioperative period and surgical removal of the primary tumor are clearly essential but can affect patients on different levels and hence have a negative impact on oncological outcomes. This review examines the effect of clinical hypnosis performed during the perioperative period. Thanks to its specific properties and techniques allowing it to be used as complementary treatment preoperatively, hypnosis has an impact most notably on distress and postoperative pain. During surgery, hypnosis may be applied to limit immunosuppression, while, in the postoperative period, it can reduce pain, anxiety, and fatigue and improve wound healing. Moreover, hypnosis is inexpensive, an important consideration given current financial concerns in healthcare. Of course, large randomized prospective studies are now needed to confirm the observed advantages of hypnosis in the field of oncology.

  3. Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; da Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20min after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial-like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU 2h after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye. PMID:27343798

  4. [Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report].

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral da; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20minutes after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial - like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU two hours after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye. PMID:25458838

  5. Hypnosis in the Perioperative Management of Breast Cancer Surgery: Clinical Benefits and Potential Implications

    PubMed Central

    Roelants, Fabienne; Pospiech, Audrey; Momeni, Mona; Watremez, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize data published on the use of perioperative hypnosis in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (BCS). Indeed, the majority of BCS patients experience stress, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and pain. Correct management of the perioperative period and surgical removal of the primary tumor are clearly essential but can affect patients on different levels and hence have a negative impact on oncological outcomes. This review examines the effect of clinical hypnosis performed during the perioperative period. Thanks to its specific properties and techniques allowing it to be used as complementary treatment preoperatively, hypnosis has an impact most notably on distress and postoperative pain. During surgery, hypnosis may be applied to limit immunosuppression, while, in the postoperative period, it can reduce pain, anxiety, and fatigue and improve wound healing. Moreover, hypnosis is inexpensive, an important consideration given current financial concerns in healthcare. Of course, large randomized prospective studies are now needed to confirm the observed advantages of hypnosis in the field of oncology. PMID:27635132

  6. Hypnosis in the Perioperative Management of Breast Cancer Surgery: Clinical Benefits and Potential Implications.

    PubMed

    Potié, Arnaud; Roelants, Fabienne; Pospiech, Audrey; Momeni, Mona; Watremez, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize data published on the use of perioperative hypnosis in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (BCS). Indeed, the majority of BCS patients experience stress, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and pain. Correct management of the perioperative period and surgical removal of the primary tumor are clearly essential but can affect patients on different levels and hence have a negative impact on oncological outcomes. This review examines the effect of clinical hypnosis performed during the perioperative period. Thanks to its specific properties and techniques allowing it to be used as complementary treatment preoperatively, hypnosis has an impact most notably on distress and postoperative pain. During surgery, hypnosis may be applied to limit immunosuppression, while, in the postoperative period, it can reduce pain, anxiety, and fatigue and improve wound healing. Moreover, hypnosis is inexpensive, an important consideration given current financial concerns in healthcare. Of course, large randomized prospective studies are now needed to confirm the observed advantages of hypnosis in the field of oncology. PMID:27635132

  7. Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; da Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20min after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial-like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU 2h after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye.

  8. [Allergic reaction to patent blue dye in breast surgery - case report].

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M; Nóbrega, Dyluzia Kelly Amaral da; Anunciação, Carlos Eduardo Caiado; Maia, Barbara de Alcântara Brito; Mariano, Paulo Virgílio Dantas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of allergic reaction to patent blue in a patient who underwent excision of sentinel lymph node associated with segmental breast resection. About 20minutes after the dye injection, the patient developed hypotension (BP=70×30mmHg) associated with increased heart frequency. The patient was treated successfully with decreased inspired fraction of inhaled anesthetic and fluid replacement. At the end of the procedure, she presented with bluish urticarial - like plaques on the head, neck, upper limbs, and trunk; hydrocortisone was then used. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged from the PACU two hours after the end of surgery without skin changes, and was discharged from hospital on the morning after surgery. The incidence of allergic reactions with the use of patent blue is far superior to the hypersensitivity reactions seen with anesthetic and adjuvant drugs. Therefore, the anesthesiologist must be aware of cardiovascular instability associated with skin changes during the use of patent blue, for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this hypersensitivity reaction to this dye.

  9. The rate of breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer is not influenced by the surgical strategy of excisional biopsy followed by the definitive procedure.

    PubMed

    Petrik, D W; McCready, D R; Goel, V; Pinfold, S P; Sawka, C A

    2001-01-01

    Increased emphasis on breast conservation and the primacy of the patient's preferences has led to the promotion and increased use of a two-step surgical strategy (definitive operation only after a final tissue diagnosis from a biopsy done on a previous visit) in the treatment of early breast cancer, with the assumption being that this is more conducive to the performance of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). We sought to test this by examining the effect of the surgical strategy (one-step versus two-step) on the operation performed (BCS versus mastectomy). A random sample of women with node-negative breast cancer diagnosed in 1991 in Ontario was drawn from the Ontario Cancer Registry database and matched to the Canadian Institute of Health Information and Ontario Health Insurance Plan databases (n = 643). This provided information on the timing and nature of all surgical procedures performed as well as patient, tumor, hospital, and surgeon characteristics. The surgical strategy was defined as either a one-step procedure (biopsy and definitive surgery performed at the same time) or a two-step procedure (surgical biopsy and pathologic diagnosis, followed by definitive surgery at a later date). The axillary lymph node dissection was used to define the definitive procedure. BCS was employed in 68% of patients, and this did not differ significantly between the one-step and two-step groups (66% versus 70%). Patients with palpable lesions had a significantly lower rate of breast conservation than those with nonpalpable lesions. Other variables associated with a lower rate of BCS were larger tumor size, presence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and central or multifocal tumors. The use of a one-step procedure was associated with a patient age of more than 50 years, a palpable mass, tumor size larger than 1 cm, previous fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, absence of extensive DCIS, and surgery in an academic setting. Breast conservation was not affected by the

  10. The Effect of Complete Decongestive Therapy on Edema Volume Reduction and Pain in Women With Post Breast Surgery Lymph Edema

    PubMed Central

    Angooti Oshnari, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Haghighat, Shahpar; Hossein Zadeh, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background Upper extremity lymph edema is the most common side effect of breast cancer treatment that may produce significant physical and psychological morbidity. Pain is the frequent symptom of lymph edema that causes impairment of activities in daily life. Objectives The aim of this study was assessment of the effect of complex decongestive therapy (CDT) on upper extremity lymph edema and pain in women with post breast surgery lymph edema. Patients and Methods In this quasi- experimental research with before- after design, 36 women with moderate lymph edema after breast surgery participated in the program. Edema volume was measured by water displacement method; pain values were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS). Data were recorded before intervention and 2 and 4 weeks after it. CDT included the first phase (intensive phase) and the second phase (maintenance phase). Each phase lasted 2 weeks. After use of Shapiro Wilk test for normality, analysis of variances with GEE and repeated measurements were used to analyze the data. Results After one month doing CDT program, significant decrease of edema was noticed (P < 0.0001), also pain decreased during 2 and 4 weeks after intervention (P < 0.0001). Conclusions This study indicated that CDT program is effective in reducing lymph edema volume and pain in women with moderate post breast surgery lymph edema. It seems that raising patients’ awareness and training healthcare professionals regarding lymph edema preventive strategies have an important role in earlier and better combating this complication. PMID:27482330

  11. A systematic review and meta-analysis of Harmonic technology compared with conventional techniques in mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery with lymphadenectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hang; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Ferko, Nicole C; Patel, Leena; Soleas, Ireena M; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background Mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) are important treatment options for breast cancer patients. A previous meta-analysis demonstrated that the risk of certain complications can be reduced with the Harmonic technology compared with conventional methods in mastectomy. However, the meta-analysis did not include studies of BCS patients and focused on a subset of surgical complications. The objective of this study was to compare Harmonic technology and conventional techniques for a range of clinical outcomes and complications in both mastectomy and BCS patients, including axillary lymph node dissection. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing Harmonic technology and conventional methods in breast cancer surgery. Outcome measures included blood loss, drainage volume, total complications, seroma, necrosis, wound infections, ecchymosis, hematoma, hospital length of stay, and operating time. Risk of bias was analyzed for all studies. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models for mean differences of continuous variables and a fixed-effects model for risk ratios of dichotomous variables. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Across surgery types, compared to conventional techniques, Harmonic technology reduced total complications by 52% (P=0.002), seroma by 46% (P<0.0001), necrosis by 49% (P=0.04), postoperative chest wall drainage by 46% (P=0.0005), blood loss by 38% (P=0.0005), and length of stay by 22% (P=0.007). Although benefits generally appeared greatest in mastectomy patients with lymph node dissection, Harmonic technology showed significant reductions in complications in the BCS study subgroup. Conclusion In this meta-analysis of both mastectomy and BCS procedures, the use of Harmonic technology reduced the risk of most complications by about half across breast cancer surgery patients. These benefits may be due to superior hemostatic capabilities of Harmonic

  12. Preventive Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam in Acute and Chronic Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Oh, Ah-Young; Koo, Bon-Wook; Lim, Dae-Jin; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Han, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer surgery is known to cause severe acute postoperative pain, which can persist for a long time. We administered nefopam preventively to patients undergoing lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy, and evaluated its efficacy on acute and chronic postoperative pain. Enrolled patients were assigned to the nefopam (n = 41) or the control (n = 42) group. Before initiating the operation, 20 mg of nefopam was given to the patients of the nefopam group, and normal saline was used in the control group. Ketorolac was given at the end of surgery, and meloxicam was prescribed in the postoperative period to all patients in both groups. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS), and the rescue analgesic drug was given when the NRS was >5. Implementation of postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT), or hormone therapy was evaluated. The NRS of postoperative pain was significantly lower in the nefopam than in the control group in the postanesthetic care unit (4.5 ± 2.2 vs 5.7 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01), at postoperative 6 h (3.0 ± 1.6 vs 4.5 ± 1.3, respectively; P < 0.001), and at postoperative 24 h (3.1 ± 1.1 vs 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01) with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs. Significantly fewer patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain in the nefopam than in the control group at postoperative 3 months (36.6% vs 59.5%, P = 0.04). Considering only the cohort without postoperative adjuvant RT, the difference in the proportion of patients reporting chronic pain increased (23.5% in the nefopam group vs 61.5% in the control group, P = 0.04). Preventive nefopam was helpful in reducing the acute postoperative pain, with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs, and it contributed to reduced occurrence of chronic pain at postoperative 3 months after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27196485

  13. Factors Associated with the Incidence of Local Recurrences of Breast Cancer in Women Who Underwent Conservative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Juliana Rodrigues; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery is considered the procedure of choice for women who are affected by early stage tumours. The local recurrence of cancer as a consequence of breast tissue conservation is a growing concern. This study aimed to describe the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of women who had local recurrences of breast cancer after conservative surgery and to examine the associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and the incidence of tumour recurrence in these women. The retrospective cohort included 880 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent conservative surgery between January 2000 and December 2010. Recurrences occurred in 60 patients, and the mean age of the women at diagnosis was 48.8 years. Predictive factors for local recurrence were young age (<39 years) (P = 0.028 and OR = 10.93), surgical margin involvement (P = 0.001 and OR = 3.66), and Her-2 overexpression (P = 0.045 and OR = 1.94). The establishment of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics might help to select optimum treatments, which is a crucial challenge for public health in Brazil, especially with regard to reductions of surgery and hospitalisation expenditures in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS). PMID:25530886

  14. Camouflage therapy in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Filinte, Gaye Taylan; Aköz, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    The use of makeup has been traced back to antiquity. Today, there are multiple reasons that makeup constitutes an important part of, and is a driving force in, almost every woman's life. The idea of using cosmetics for camouflage therapy, especially in the postoperative period, originates from the illusionary effect, which is thought to diminish the post-traumatic stress frequently seen after facial operations. The patients will feel better following cosmetic application, as they will see themselves better.

  15. Predictors of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Kennedy, Sean A.; Romerosa, Beatriz; Kwon, Henry Y.; Kaushal, Alka; Chang, Yaping; Craigie, Samantha; de Almeida, Carlos P.B.; Couban, Rachel J.; Parascandalo, Shawn R.; Izhar, Zain; Reid, Susan; Khan, James S.; McGillion, Michael; Busse, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery affects up to 60% of patients. Early identification of those at higher risk could help inform optimal management. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to explore factors associated with persistent pain among women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases from inception to Mar. 12, 2015, to identify cohort or case–control studies that explored the association between risk factors and persistent pain (lasting ≥ 2 mo) after breast cancer surgery. We pooled estimates of association using random-effects models, when possible, for all independent variables reported by more than 1 study. We reported relative measures of association as pooled odds ratios (ORs) and absolute measures of association as the absolute risk increase. Results: Thirty studies, involving a total of 19 813 patients, reported the association of 77 independent variables with persistent pain. High-quality evidence showed increased odds of persistent pain with younger age (OR for every 10-yr decrement 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24–1.48), radiotherapy (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.16–1.57), axillary lymph node dissection (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.73–3.35) and greater acute postoperative pain (OR for every 1 cm on a 10-cm visual analogue scale 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.30). Moderate-quality evidence suggested an association with the presence of preoperative pain (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.01–1.64). Given the 30% risk of pain in the absence of risk factors, the absolute risk increase corresponding to these ORs ranged from 3% (acute postoperative pain) to 21% (axillary lymph node dissection). High-quality evidence showed no association with body mass index, type of breast surgery, chemotherapy or endocrine therapy. Interpretation: Development of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery was associated with younger age, radiotherapy, axillary

  16. Combination Chemotherapy and Filgrastim Before Surgery in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  17. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    SciTech Connect

    Guinot, Jose Luis . E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org; Roldan, Susana; Maronas, Maria; Tortajada, Isabel; Carrascosa, Maria; Chust, Maria Luisa; Estornell, Marian; Mengual, Jose Luis; Arribas, Leoncio

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure.

  18. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Electrosurgical Device for Over-the-Counter Aesthetic Use. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-06-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the electrosurgical device for over-the-counter aesthetic use into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the electrosurgical device for over-the-counter aesthetic use's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27373015

  20. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  1. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  2. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast With Close or Focally Involved Margins Following Breast-Conserving Surgery: Treatment With Reexcision or Radiotherapy With Increased Dosage

    SciTech Connect

    Monteau, Amelie; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Kirova, Youlia M.; Fourchotte, Virginie; Bollet, Marc A.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Asselain, Bernard; Salmon, Remy J. M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Following breast-conserving surgery for DCIS, reexcision before radiotherapy is recommended when margins are close or involved. We investigated whether an additional radiation dose could replace reexcision. Methods: We selected 208 women with DCIS of the breast treated with breast-conserving surgery between 1992 and 2002 who had either close margins (< 2 mm) (89 pts) or focally (< 1 mm) or minimally (1-15 mm) involved margins (119 pts). Sixty-one patients (29%) underwent reexcision before irradiation and 147 patients (71%) received breast irradiation with boost, without reexcision. Results: Median follow-up was 89 months. Median age was 53 years with 7 patients less than 41. Involved margins were less frequent in the non reexcision group than in the reexcised group (50% vs. 74%, p = 0.0019). All other clinical and histological features were comparable. Median whole-breast radiation dose was 50 Gy. Median total doses to the tumour bed were 67 Gy (range, 45-77) and 60 Gy (range, 46-74), respectively (p < 0.0001). Of the 61 reexcised patients, 56% had residual DCIS and 6% had invasive cancer. Six underwent a mastectomy for persistent margin involvement. Seven-year locoregional failure rates were 9.3% without, and 9.6% with reexcision (ns). No differences were observed when adjusting for margin status. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with close (< 2 mm) or focally/minimally involved margins, reexcision may be avoided and satisfactory local control achieved by increasing the radiation dose to the tumour bed to at least 66 Gy. These results only apply to patients older than 40 and would need confirmation in independent series.

  3. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  4. A longitudinal analysis of chronic arm morbidity following breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Boquiren, Virginia M; Hack, Thomas F; Thomas, Roanne L; Towers, Anna; Kwan, Winkle B; Tilley, Andrea; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Miedema, Baukje

    2016-06-01

    Arm morbidity (AM) arising from breast cancer (BC) treatment can detrimentally impact quality of life; often limiting a survivor's ability to participate in valued activities. The present study explored (a) the developmental time course of AM [restricted range of motion (ROM), pain, and arm volume changes], negative affect, and perceived disability in the immediate years post-surgery, and (b) the mediating role of perceived disability on the relationship between AM and negative affect over time. In this 5-year longitudinal study, BC survivors from four Canadian oncology clinics (n = 431) completed five annual clinical assessments, where differences in ROM (shoulder abduction, external rotation) and arm volume between the affected and non-affected arm were measured. The profile of mood states (POMS), disability of arm, shoulder, hand, and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short form were completed. Results from general linear modeling showed that AM, negative affect, and perceived disability were greatest 1-year post-surgery, declined, and with the exception of arm volume changes, were significantly lower 5 years later. Negative affect was significantly associated with restrictions in shoulder abduction and external rotation (average r = -0.15; p < 0.05) and present arm pain (average r = 0.28, p < 0.01) at most assessments. The mediating role of perceived disability on the relationship between AM and negative affect was statistically significant in a majority of assessments. Perceived disability is the underlying factor driving the relationship between AM and mood disturbance over time. Rehabilitative therapy to improve survivors' functional well-being might mitigate the negative impacts of AM on emotional health. PMID:27194415

  5. Incidence and risk factors for axillary web syndrome after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Anke; Mendes, Valéria Vasconcellos; de Almeida Dias, Ricardo; do Amaral E Silva, Blenda; da Costa Leite Ferreira, Maria Giseli; Fabro, Erica Alves Nogueira

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the study is to estimate the incidence and risk factors of axillary web syndrome (AWS) in early postoperative period (45 days). From the prospective cohort of women undergoing breast cancer surgery, we collected the variables related to patient characteristics, treatment, tumor, and postoperative complications. We performed bivariate and logistic regression. A total of 193 patients are included with a mean age of 58.26 years, majority of which are women who are overweight or obese (72.3%). The incidence of AWS was 28.1%. The presence of pain in the ipsilateral upper-limb associated with AWS was reported in 5.4% of the patients, and the shoulder joint restriction was observed in 11.4%. When controlling for confounding between AWS and the factors that showed statistical significance in bivariate analysis, the variables that explain the occurrence of the AWS were the type of axillary surgery, where women who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy showed 68% less risk compared with those that underwent axillary lymphadenectomy (AL) (RR = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.13-0.79; P value = 0.014) and numbness in the arm after an injury of the intercostobrachial nerve, which is 3.19 times the risk of the AWS (RR = 3.19; 95% CI, 1.40-7.29, P value = 0.006). From the above findings, we concluded that the incidence of AWS was 28.1%, and it was associated with AL and numbness in the arm after injury of the intercostobrachial nerve. PMID:21987036

  6. A longitudinal analysis of chronic arm morbidity following breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Boquiren, Virginia M; Hack, Thomas F; Thomas, Roanne L; Towers, Anna; Kwan, Winkle B; Tilley, Andrea; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Miedema, Baukje

    2016-06-01

    Arm morbidity (AM) arising from breast cancer (BC) treatment can detrimentally impact quality of life; often limiting a survivor's ability to participate in valued activities. The present study explored (a) the developmental time course of AM [restricted range of motion (ROM), pain, and arm volume changes], negative affect, and perceived disability in the immediate years post-surgery, and (b) the mediating role of perceived disability on the relationship between AM and negative affect over time. In this 5-year longitudinal study, BC survivors from four Canadian oncology clinics (n = 431) completed five annual clinical assessments, where differences in ROM (shoulder abduction, external rotation) and arm volume between the affected and non-affected arm were measured. The profile of mood states (POMS), disability of arm, shoulder, hand, and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short form were completed. Results from general linear modeling showed that AM, negative affect, and perceived disability were greatest 1-year post-surgery, declined, and with the exception of arm volume changes, were significantly lower 5 years later. Negative affect was significantly associated with restrictions in shoulder abduction and external rotation (average r = -0.15; p < 0.05) and present arm pain (average r = 0.28, p < 0.01) at most assessments. The mediating role of perceived disability on the relationship between AM and negative affect was statistically significant in a majority of assessments. Perceived disability is the underlying factor driving the relationship between AM and mood disturbance over time. Rehabilitative therapy to improve survivors' functional well-being might mitigate the negative impacts of AM on emotional health.

  7. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  8. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  9. Preliminary Results of Electron Intraoperative Therapy Boost and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery in Premenopausal Women

    SciTech Connect

    Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Zerini, Dario M.D.; Morra, Anna; Galimberti, Viviana M.D.; Gatti, Giovanna M.D.; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Paolo; Ciocca, Mario M.Sc.; Sangalli, Claudia D.M.; Fodor, Cristiana D.M.; Veronesi, Umberto

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and preliminary data on late toxicity of a pilot study of boost with electron intraoperative therapy followed by hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (HEBRT) of the whole breast. Methods and Materials: Between June 2004 and March 2007, 211 women with a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery. During surgery, an electron intraoperative therapy boost of 12 Gy was administered to the tumor bed. Adjuvant local treatment was completed with HEBRT, consisting of a course of 13 daily fractions of 2.85 Gy to the whole breast to a total dose of 37.05 Gy. Acute toxicity of the breast was evaluated at the end of HEBRT and at 1 month of follow-up. Late toxicity was recorded at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Results: We report the data from 204 patients. The maximal acute skin toxicity was observed at the end of HEBRT (182 patients evaluable) with 7 (3.8%) Grade 3, 52 (28.6%) Grade 2, 123 (67.6%) Grade 1, and no Grade 0 or Grade 4 cases. A total of 108 patients were evaluated for late toxicity. The recorded late skin toxicity was Grade 4 in 1 patient (0.9%), Grade 3 in 1 patient, and Grade 2 or less in 106 patients (98.2%). Conclusions: The results of this study have shown that electron intraoperative therapy followed by HEBRT allows for the delivery of a high dose to the tumor bed and an adequate dose to the whole breast. This treatment is feasible, compliance is high, and the rate of acute toxicity and the preliminary data on chronic toxicity seem acceptable.

  10. The Story of Serratia Marcescens: Pathologic Risk Factors in Breast Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline A; Wang, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) emerged as an opportunist in the setting of immunodeficiency in the 1970s, when serious infections occurred in San Francisco hospitals after USA. Navy experiments had aerosolized the bacteria to study biologic warfare. We investigate the risks of S. marcescens in San Franciscans who undergo mastectomy with implant reconstruction. From 2007 to 2011, the senior author took breast capsule cultures for all patients at the time of tissue expander exchange/explant. Of the 142 women who had reconstruction, 23 had positive cultures. Only the two patients who were positive for S. marcescens developed clinical infections that required explantation. Both had postoperative chemotherapy with transient neutropenia, and both had close ties to San Francisco. Clinical signs of infection emerged for both patients months after initial surgery, despite having previously well healed incisions. Other patients were culture positive for Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterococcus and MRSA and did not develop require explant. While the link between San Francisco and S. marcescens is controversial, a patient's geography is a simple screening tool when considering postoperative risks, especially in the immunocompromised. Closer monitoring for neutropenia during chemotherapy, and a lower threshold to administer S. marcescens targeted antibiotics may be warranted in these patients. PMID:25075367

  11. Over Troubled Water: An Outbreak of Infection Due to a New Species of Mycobacterium following Implant-Based Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheflan, Michael; Wixtrom, Roger N

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterial infection is a rare complication associated with breast surgery using implants. Over the course of 5 months, one center experienced 12 such cases, 10 of which were linked to a single surgeon. Most presented 3 to 6 weeks postoperatively with clear serous drainage from the incision, minimal local redness, no fever or other systemic signs of infection, and negative standard bacterial cultures. Patients were given empiric broad-spectrum oral antibiotic therapy. In eight cases, implants were removed and exchanged for new devices after irrigation of the pocket with antibiotics; these patients nonetheless experienced recurrent infection, which led to explantation (without immediate exchange for new implants). The last two patients proceeded straight to explantation. Because mycobacteria grow in water, the water supply and air-conditioning system were initially suspected as the source, and both were disinfected. However, this did not stop the outbreak. Eventually, the source was traced to a new species of mycobacteria isolated from a garden hot tub. These bacteria had then been unwittingly transferred to patients during surgery. A Triclosan-containing shampoo effectively ended the outbreak. This series is unique in several respects: the novelty of the pathogen, the heavy colonization of the surgeon, and the mechanism of transmission (the first occurrence of human-to-human mycobacterial transfer published in the plastic surgery literature). Surgeons who perform breast surgery with implants should be aware of the possibility of mycobacterial infection. Proactive culturing of the organism, use of antibiotics, and reoperation are essential to good outcomes. PMID:26710012

  12. Factors Associated with Persistently Positive Margin Status after Breast-Conserving Surgery in Women with Breast Cancer: An Analysis of the National Cancer Database.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jonathan; Lannin, Donald; Killelea, Brigid; Horowitz, Nina; Chagpar, Anees B

    2016-08-01

    Margin status after definitive breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is a key predictor of local tumor recurrence. This study utilized the National Cancer Database, which captures 70 per cent of all cancer cases nationally, to determine factors associated with persistently positive margins status post-BCS. From 1998 to 2010, there were 1,170,284 patients with stage 0 to 3 breast cancer who underwent BCS. After final definitive surgery, 7.3 per cent of patients had positive margins. On bivariate analysis, persistently positive margin status post-BCS was correlated with patient age, race, ethnicity, comorbidities, facility type and location, tumor size, grade, presence of invasive disease, lymph node positivity, as well as receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, patients who were black, with multiple comorbidities, living in a Pacific state, who had larger, high-grade, node-positive invasive tumors, who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to have persistently positive margins (P < 0.05). Although the goal of BCS is the attainment of negative margins, 7.3 per cent of patients have persistently positive margins after definitive surgery. These patients tend to have more aggressive disease and greater comorbidities, and are less likely to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. PMID:27657593

  13. Aesthetic satisfaction scoring - introducing an aesthetic numeric analogue scale (ANA-scale).

    PubMed

    Funk, Wolfgang; Podmelle, Fred; Guiol, Claudia; Metelmann, Hans Robert

    2012-07-01

    To objectively and reproducibly assess the outcome of aesthetic procedures remains one of the major, unmet challenges in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery. Frequently employed scoring systems for the evaluation of aesthetic procedures are confounded by observer bias, be it that of the patient or of the surgeon. A new approach of pragmatic and simple scoring is the ANA [Aesthetic Numeric Analogue] scale, which facilitates the objective, reproducible, standardized and internationally uniform evaluation of aesthetic procedure outcome by converting all ratings for any kind of aesthetic procedures from a subjective value to an objective figure. The intention of the ANA-scale is to relate aesthetic satisfaction from wording to figures and by this create a rating system. The study is arranging matching pairs of verbal description and figures to finally queue up generating a scale. The clinical feasibility of this rating system is demonstrated in a surgical case. As a detail of the results the influence of the viewer's age to the aesthetic benefit assessment is obvious. In summary the ANA-scale looks to be a tool useful in individual treatment protocols as well as analysis of different techniques of aesthetic surgery for rating of the pure aesthetic satisfaction of the patients.

  14. Aesthetic satisfaction scoring - introducing an aesthetic numeric analogue scale (ANA-scale).

    PubMed

    Funk, Wolfgang; Podmelle, Fred; Guiol, Claudia; Metelmann, Hans Robert

    2012-07-01

    To objectively and reproducibly assess the outcome of aesthetic procedures remains one of the major, unmet challenges in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery. Frequently employed scoring systems for the evaluation of aesthetic procedures are confounded by observer bias, be it that of the patient or of the surgeon. A new approach of pragmatic and simple scoring is the ANA [Aesthetic Numeric Analogue] scale, which facilitates the objective, reproducible, standardized and internationally uniform evaluation of aesthetic procedure outcome by converting all ratings for any kind of aesthetic procedures from a subjective value to an objective figure. The intention of the ANA-scale is to relate aesthetic satisfaction from wording to figures and by this create a rating system. The study is arranging matching pairs of verbal description and figures to finally queue up generating a scale. The clinical feasibility of this rating system is demonstrated in a surgical case. As a detail of the results the influence of the viewer's age to the aesthetic benefit assessment is obvious. In summary the ANA-scale looks to be a tool useful in individual treatment protocols as well as analysis of different techniques of aesthetic surgery for rating of the pure aesthetic satisfaction of the patients. PMID:21872486

  15. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  16. The recurrence pattern following delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer suggests a systemic effect of surgery on occult dormant micrometastases.

    PubMed

    Dillekås, Hanna; Demicheli, Romano; Ardoino, Ilaria; Jensen, Svein A H; Biganzoli, Elia; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the recurrence dynamics in breast cancer patients after delayed reconstruction. We hypothesized that surgical reconstruction might stimulate dormant micrometastases and reduce time to recurrence. All mastectomy breast cancer patients with delayed surgical reconstruction at Haukeland University Hospital, between 1977 and 2007, n = 312, were studied. Our control group consisted of 1341 breast cancer patients without reconstruction. For each case, all patients in the control group with identical T and N stages and age ±2 years were considered. A paired control was randomly selected from this group. 10 years after primary surgery, 39 of the cases had relapsed, compared to 52 of the matched controls. The reconstructed group was analyzed for relapse dynamics after mastectomy; the first peak in relapses was similarly timed, but smaller than for the controls, while the second peak was similar in time and size. Second, the relapse pattern was analyzed with reconstruction as the starting point. A peak in recurrences was found after 18 months, and a lower peak at the 5th-6th year. The height of the peak correlated with the extent of surgery and initial T and N stages. Timing of the peak was not affected, neither was the cumulative effect. The relapse pattern, when time origin is placed both at mastectomy and at reconstruction, is bimodal with a peak position at the same time points, at 2 years and at 5-6 years. The timing of the transition from dormant micrometastases into clinically detectable macrometastases might be explained by an enhancing effect of surgery. PMID:27306422

  17. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors for Patients Undergoing Surgery for Spinal Metastases Secondary to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sciubba, Daniel M.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Yurter, Alp; Ju, Derek; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Fisher, Charles; Rhines, Laurence D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Mendel, Ehud; Laufer, Ilya; Bettegowda, Chetan; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Rampersaud, Y. Raja; Sahgal, Arjun; Reynolds, Jeremy; Chou, Dean; Weber, Michael H.; Clarke, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Review of the literature. Objective  Surgery and cement augmentation procedures are effective palliative treatment of symptomatic spinal metastases. Our objective is to systematically review the literature to describe the survival, prognostic factors, and clinical outcomes of surgery and cement augmentation procedures for breast cancer metastases to the spine. Methods  We performed a literature review using PubMed to identify articles that reported outcomes and/or prognostic factors of the breast cancer patient population with spinal metastases treated with any surgical technique since 1990. Results  The median postoperative survival for metastatic breast cancer was 21.7 months (8.2 to 36 months), the mean rate of any pain improvement was 92.9% (76 to 100%), the mean rate of neurologic improvement was 63.8% (53 to 100%), the mean rate of neurologic decline was 4.1% (0 to 8%), and the local tumor control rate was 92.6% (89 to 100%). Kyphoplasty studies reported a high rate of pain control in selected patients. Negative prognostic variables included hormonal (estrogen and progesterone) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor refractory tumor status, high degree of axillary lymph node involvement, and short disease-free interval (DFI). All other clinical or prognostic parameters were of low or insufficient strength. Conclusion  With respect to clinical outcomes, surgery consistently yielded neurologic improvements in patients presenting with a deficit with a minimal risk of worsening; however, negative prognostic factors associated with shorter survival following surgery include estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negativity, HER2 negativity, and a short DFI. PMID:27433433

  19. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    PubMed

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent. PMID:26035158

  20. Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... there can be a risk of complications, including infection, too much bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, or accidental injury. There is almost always some pain with surgery. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

  1. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K.; Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W.; Sause, William T.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  2. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  3. Role of tumor-associated antigen expression in radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, S; Percivale, P; Schenone, F; Peressini, A; Murolo, C; Badellino, F

    1998-12-01

    One hundred thirty-six patients with colorectal and breast cancer were enrolled in a retrospective study using radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with Iodine-125 (I125) radiolabeled B72.3 (Group A, 73 patients) and F023C5 (Group B, 63 patients) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The correlation between intraoperative tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) gamma-detecting probe (GDP) counts ratio and the expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 (GroupA patients) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; Group B patients) tumor-associated antigens (TAA) expression of 209 resected or biopsy tumor specimens was assessed. Ex vivo radioimmunolocalization index (R.I.) was carried out on the same specimens as a control of intraoperative GDP ratio values. RIGS positive definition of tumor occurred in 80/113 (70.8%) tumor sites of Group A patients and in 84/96 (87.5%) tumor sites of Group B patients. Mean percent B72.3 TAA expression of 113 tumor sites of Group A patients was 62.74 +/- 28.79% vs. 73.00 +/- 26.28% of 96 tumor sites of Group B patients (P < 0.05). The higher incidence of positive RIGS results was observed in tumor sites with the higher expression of the relative TAA. A statistically significant correlation between RIGS ratios and B72.3 and CEA expression was observed in the 113 tumor sites of Group A (P < 0.05) and in the 96 tumor sites of Group B (P < 0.01), respectively. The role of a preoperative evaluation of TAA expression in patients undergoing RIGS is discussed. Its assessment, whenever possible, may help to select those patients who will benefit more from this immunodiagnostic technique.

  4. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of different doses of propacetamol for postoperative pain control after breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo-Eun; Park, Sun-Kyung; Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous propacetamol has been shown to be effective for postoperative pain control. However, the recommendations regarding propacetamol doses for pain control are vague. The present study was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of propacetamol at a dose of 1 g or 2 g. After breast-conserving surgery, patients received 1 g or 2 g intravenous propacetamol. Treatment efficacy for pain control was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes and 4 hours after surgery, and global evaluation was assessed by a 4-point categorical scale at the end of the 4-hour study period. Safety was monitored through adverse event reporting. Patients were allowed rescue analgesia, and the timing of requests was recorded. A total of 111 patients were enrolled in the study. There were no differences in efficacy variables, including visual analog scale, the 4-point categorical scale, and requests for rescue analgesia, between propacetamol doses of 1 g and 2 g. Adverse events were similar in the two groups. Intravenous propacetamol at a dose of 2 g is not superior to the lower dose of 1 g with regard to postoperative analgesia or the incidence of side effects in breast-conserving surgery. PMID:26025796

  5. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Aidan T.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  6. [Legal Framework of Autologous Fat Usage in Point-of-Care Treatments in Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery - Risks of Criminal Prosecution and Infringement of Medical Law Due to Pharmaceutical Regulations].

    PubMed

    Faltus, T

    2016-08-01

    The use of autologous fat, especially for (stem) cell-assisted lipotransfer in plastic and aesthetic surgery, has regularly been regarded as the manufacture and application of so called Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP). However, the in-house production of such pharmaceuticals at the point-of-care (PoC) in the surgeon's practice is not permitted without an official manufacturing license. Therefore, before beginning such treatments, a pharmaceutical manufacturing license has to be granted to the surgeon to avoid criminal prosecution and negative consequences due to infringement of professional regulations. Because such a license is linked to compliance with GMP standard, in-house manufacturing of such pharmaceuticals also implies extra technical and personnel expenses. The surgeon is obliged to check that the available autologous fat based applications are in compliance with pharmaceutical legislation. Repeated infringements of pharmaceutical regulations are incompatible with medical reliability - a prerequisite for the license to practice medicine. PMID:27547930

  7. Educational Aesthetics and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author conceptualizes educational aesthetics in terms of two domains: educational aesthetics as arts education and educational aesthetics as a range of nonarts educational activities understood from artistic and aesthetic points of view. A lead is taken from Harry S. Broudy's midcentury essay "Some Duties of an Educational…

  8. Critical Aesthetic Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    A clear-cut concept of the aesthetic is elusive. Kant's "Critique of Judgment" presents one of the more comprehensive aesthetic theories from which one can extract a set of features, some of which pertain to aesthetic experience and others to the logical structure of aesthetic judgment. When considered together, however, these features present a…

  9. The Aesthetic in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David

    This paper examines the relationship between sport and the aesthetic. It traces the logical character of the concept of the aesthetic as it applies to sport. A salient characteristic of the concept of the aesthetic is revealed by examining the aesthetic in relation to works of art, and this is then applied to the consideration of sporting…

  10. Electromagnetic spectroscopy of normal breast tissue specimens obtained from reduction surgeries: comparison of optical and microwave properties.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Zhu, Changfang; Palmer, Gregory M; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Hagness, Susan C

    2008-10-01

    Techniques utilizing electromagnetic energy at microwave and optical frequencies have been shown to be promising for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Since different biophysical mechanisms are exploited at these frequencies to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue, combining these two modalities may result in a more powerful approach for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Toward this end, we performed microwave dielectric spectroscopy and optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements at the same sites on freshly excised normal breast tissues obtained from reduction surgeries at the University of Wisconsin Hospital, using microwave and optical probes with very similar sensing volumes. We found that the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity are correlated with tissue composition across the entire measurement frequency range (|r| approximately 0.5-0.6, p<0.01) and that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm and optical scattering coefficient are correlated with tissue composition (|r| approximately 0.4-0.6, p<0.02). Finally, we found that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm is correlated with the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity (r=-0.55, p<0.01). Our results suggest that combining optical and microwave modalities for analyzing breast tissue samples may serve as a crosscheck and provide complementary information about tissue composition.

  11. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  12. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  13. Income level and regional policies, underlying factors associated with unwarranted variations in conservative breast cancer surgery in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geographical variations in medical practice are expected to be small when the evidence about the effectiveness and safety of a particular technology is abundant. This would be the case of the prescription of conservative surgery in breast cancer patients. In these cases, when variation is larger than expected by need, socioeconomic factors have been argued as an explanation. Objectives: Using an ecologic design, our study aims at describing the variability in the use of surgical conservative versus non-conservative treatment. Additionally, it seeks to establish whether the socioeconomic status of the healthcare area influences the use of one or the other technique. Methods 81,868 mastectomies performed between 2002 and 2006 in 180 healthcare areas were studied. Standardized utilization rates of breast cancer conservative (CS) and non-conservative (NCS) procedures were estimated as well as the variation among areas, using small area statistics. Concentration curves and dominance tests were estimated to determine the impact of income and instruction levels in the healthcare area on surgery rates. Multilevel analyses were performed to determine the influence of regional policies. Results Variation in the use of CS was massive (4-fold factor between the highest and the lowest rate) and larger than in the case of NCS (2-fold), whichever the age group. Healthcare areas with higher economic and instruction levels showed highest rates of CS, regardless of the age group, while areas with lower economic and educational levels yielded higher rates of NCS interventions. Living in a particular Autonomous Community (AC), explained a substantial part of the CS residual variance (up to a 60.5% in women 50 to 70). Conclusion The place where a woman lives -income level and regional policies- explain the unexpectedly high variation found in utilization rates of conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:21504577

  14. Determining Which Patients Require Irradiation of the Supraclavicular Nodal Area After Surgery for N1 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Lim, Young Hyuk; Ahn, Jin Suk; Yang, Jung Hyun; Nam, Suk Jin

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: We designed this study to determine which patients have a high risk of supraclavicular node recurrence in N1 breast cancer previously treated with surgery but not having received supraclavicular radiation therapy (SCRT) and to identify which patients needed SCRT. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 448 pathologic N1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy or breast-conserving treatment, but without SCRT, between 1994 and 2003. Mastectomy was performed in 302 patients (67.4%). The median number of axillary nodes dissected was 17 (range, 5-53). Systemic chemotherapy was administered in 443 patients (98.9%), and 144 patients received radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The median follow-up was 88 months (range, 15-170 months). Results: At follow-up, the treatment failed in 101 patients (22.5%), and 39 patients (8.7%) had supraclavicular node recurrence. Prognostic factors in supraclavicular node recurrence included lymphovascular invasion (p < 0.0001), extracapsular extension (p < 0.0001), the number of involved axillary nodes (p = 0.0003), and the level of involved axillary nodes (p = 0.012) in univariate and multivariate analyses. The total number of prognostic factors correlated well with supraclavicular node recurrence. In the analysis of 5-year supraclavicular node recurrence-free survival, patients with two or more factors showed a significantly higher recurrence rate than did patients with fewer than two factors (96.8% and 72.9%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The prognostic factors associated with supraclavicular node recurrence were lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, and the number and level of involved axillary nodes. Patients with two or more prognostic factors might benefit from SCRT.

  15. Effect of a 10-week yoga programme on the quality of life of women after breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Merecz, Dorota; Wójcik, Aleksandra; Świątkowska, Beata; Sierocka, Kamilla; Najder, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The following research is aimed at determining the effect of yoga on the quality of life of women after breast cancer surgery. Material and methods A 10-week yoga programme included 90-minute yoga lessons once a week. To estimate the quality of life, questionnaires developed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23) were used. An experimental group consisted of 12 women who practised yoga, a control group – of 16 women who did not. Between groups there were no differences in age, time from operation and characteristics associated with disease, treatment and participation in rehabilitation. Results Our results revealed an improvement of general health and quality of life, physical and social functioning as well as a reduction of difficulties in daily activities among exercising women. Also their future prospects enhanced – they worried less about their health than they used to before participating in the programme. As compared to baseline, among exercising women, fatigue, dyspnoea and discomfort (pain, swelling, sensitivity) in the arm and breast on the operated side decreased. Conclusions Participation in the exercising programme resulted in an improvement of physical functioning, reduction of fatigue, dyspnoea, and discomfort in the area of the breast and arm on the operated side. Based on our results and those obtained in foreign studies, we conclude that rehabilitation with the use of yoga practice improves the quality of life of the patients after breast cancer surgery. However, we recommend further research on this issue in Poland. PMID:26327853

  16. 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after breast conserving surgery: Correlation with molecular markers of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozguven, Salih; Inanir, Sabahat; Turoglu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; Ugurlu, Mustafa Umit; Gulluoglu, Bahadir

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) early after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in patients with breast cancer (BC) and whether we can determine which molecular biomarkers of breast carcinoma put the patients at risk. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study involved 88 patients with histologically proven T1 or T2 BC, who were treated with BCS and underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT study. The correlation between biological markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2], and Ki-67) of the primary tumor and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings was analyzed. Results: 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated the presence of BC disease (locoregional disease [LRD], distant metastases, or contralateral BC) in 26 of 88 patients (29.5%). Regarding immunohistochemical profiles, BC expressing high levels of Ki-67 were associated with an increased percentage of LRD, which was the major recurrence pattern on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Although the BC disease was observed more commonly in patients with HER2 positivity compared to those of HER2 negative, the difference did not reach statistical significance. The patients with T2 tumor or a higher histopathological grade had a higher percentage of BC disease. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that patients with early stage BC treated with BCS have a remarkable risk of the presence of BC even early after surgery, and there was a clinically important relationship between 18F-FDG PET/CT findings and biological markers of BC. These findings suggest that high-risk molecular biomarkers (Ki-67, HER2) can be taken into account in the decision-making the process for both preoperative imaging and planning of the surgical approach. PMID:27385883

  17. RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Is preoperative physical activity related to post-surgery recovery? A cohort study of patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Hanna; Angerås, Ulf; Bock, David; Börjesson, Mats; Onerup, Aron; Fagevik Olsen, Monika; Gellerstedt, Martin; Haglind, Eva; Angenete, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study is to assess the association between preoperative level of activity and recovery after breast cancer surgery measured as hospital stay, length of sick leave and self-assessed physical and mental recovery. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Patients included were those scheduled to undergo breast cancer surgery, between February and November 2013, at two participating hospitals in the Western Region of Sweden. Participants Patients planned for breast cancer surgery filled out a questionnaire before, as well as at 3 and 6 weeks after the operation. The preoperative level of activity was self-assessed and categorised into four categories by the participants using the 4-level Saltin-Grimby Physical Activity Level Scale (SGPALS). Main outcome measure Our main outcome was postoperative recovery measured as length of sick leave, in-hospital stay and self-assessed physical and mental recovery. Results 220 patients were included. Preoperatively, 14% (31/220) of participants assessed themselves to be physically inactive, 61% (135/220) to exert some light physical activity (PA) and 20% (43/220) to be more active (level 3+4). Patients operated with mastectomy versus partial mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection versus sentinel node biopsy were less likely to have a short hospital stay, relative risk (RR) 0.88 (0.78 to 1.00) and 0.82 (0.70 to 0.96). More active participants (level 3 or 4) had an 85% increased chance of feeling physically recovered at 3 weeks after the operation, RR 1.85 (1.20 to 2.85). No difference was seen after 6 weeks. Conclusions The above study shows that a higher preoperative level of PA is associated with a faster physical recovery as reported by the patients 3 weeks post breast cancer surgery. After 6 weeks, most patients felt physically recovered, diminishing the association above. No difference was seen in length of sick leave or self-assessed mental recovery between inactive or more active

  19. Comparison of the Explantation Rate of Poly Implant Prothèse, Allergan, and Pérouse Silicone Breast Implants within the First Four Years after Reconstructive Surgery before the Poly Implant Prothèse Alert by the French Regulatory Authority

    PubMed Central

    Leduey, Alexandre; Mazouni, Chafika; Leymarie, Nicolas; Alkhashnam, Heba; Sarfati, Benjamin; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Gaudin, Amélie; Kolb, Frédéric; Rimareix, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Background. In March 2010, ANSM (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Medicament), the French Medical Regulatory Authority, withdrew Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants from the market due to the use of non-medical-grade silicone gel. The aim of this study was to compare the removal rate (and reasons thereof) of breast implants produced by different manufacturers before the ANSM alert. Materials and Methods. From October 2006 to January 2010, 652 women received 944 implants after breast cancer surgery at the Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paris (France). The complications and removal rates of the different implant brands used (PIP, Allergan, and Pérouse) were evaluated and compared. Results. PIP implants represented 50.6% of the used implants, Allergan 33.4%, and Pérouse 16%. The main reasons for implant removal were patient dissatisfaction due to aesthetic problems (43.2%), infection (22.2%), and capsular contracture (13.6%). Two years after implantation, 82% of Pérouse implants, 79% of PIP, and 79% of Allergan were still in situ. There was no difference in removal rate among implant brands. Conclusion. Before the ANSM alert concerning the higher rupture rate of PIP breast implants, our implant removal rate did not predict PIP implant failure related to the use of nonapproved silicone gel. PMID:26543648

  20. Comparison of the Explantation Rate of Poly Implant Prothèse, Allergan, and Pérouse Silicone Breast Implants within the First Four Years after Reconstructive Surgery before the Poly Implant Prothèse Alert by the French Regulatory Authority.

    PubMed

    Leduey, Alexandre; Mazouni, Chafika; Leymarie, Nicolas; Alkhashnam, Heba; Sarfati, Benjamin; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Gaudin, Amélie; Kolb, Frédéric; Rimareix, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Background. In March 2010, ANSM (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Medicament), the French Medical Regulatory Authority, withdrew Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants from the market due to the use of non-medical-grade silicone gel. The aim of this study was to compare the removal rate (and reasons thereof) of breast implants produced by different manufacturers before the ANSM alert. Materials and Methods. From October 2006 to January 2010, 652 women received 944 implants after breast cancer surgery at the Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paris (France). The complications and removal rates of the different implant brands used (PIP, Allergan, and Pérouse) were evaluated and compared. Results. PIP implants represented 50.6% of the used implants, Allergan 33.4%, and Pérouse 16%. The main reasons for implant removal were patient dissatisfaction due to aesthetic problems (43.2%), infection (22.2%), and capsular contracture (13.6%). Two years after implantation, 82% of Pérouse implants, 79% of PIP, and 79% of Allergan were still in situ. There was no difference in removal rate among implant brands. Conclusion. Before the ANSM alert concerning the higher rupture rate of PIP breast implants, our implant removal rate did not predict PIP implant failure related to the use of nonapproved silicone gel. PMID:26543648

  1. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Popovic, Dijana; McCartney, Leah; Watkins, Cynthia B.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ogilvie, Travis; Magliocco, Anthony; Breslin, Tara M.; Temple, Walley; Mew, Daphne; Booske, John H.; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C.

    2007-10-01

    The development of microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques has been driven by reports of substantial contrast in the dielectric properties of malignant and normal breast tissues. However, definitive knowledge of the dielectric properties of normal and diseased breast tissues at microwave frequencies has been limited by gaps and discrepancies across previously published studies. To address these issues, we conducted a large-scale study to experimentally determine the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of a variety of normal, malignant and benign breast tissues, measured from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. Previously, we reported the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue samples obtained from reduction surgeries. Here, we report the dielectric properties of normal (adipose, glandular and fibroconnective), malignant (invasive and non-invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas) and benign (fibroadenomas and cysts) breast tissue samples obtained from cancer surgeries. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set of each characterized sample. Our analyses show that the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissues in the breast is considerable, as large as 10:1, while the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal glandular/fibroconnective tissues in the breast is no more than about 10%.

  2. Aesthetics & Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcand, K. K.; Smith, L. F.; Smith, J.; Watzke, M.; Hove, K. H. T.; Smith, R.

    2010-08-01

    Astronomy is considered by many to be one of the most visual of the sciences. Most people have some experience with visually processing and reacting to astronomical information, beginning with gazing at the night sky. Today, modern astronomy and astrophysics extend far beyond what is detectable with the human eye. Researchers explore the Universe through a fleet of space-based telescopes, as well as major facilities on the ground, which cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The release of science results from these different types of light poses major questions about the dissemination and communication of that knowledge including: how do non-experts (i.e., the public) perceive these images? Recently the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory hosted a survey and focus group meetings to study the perception of multi-wavelength astronomical imagery and the effects of the scientific and artistic choices in processing astronomical data. The images in the study came from a variety of space and ground-based observatories, including the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, the Very Large Array, the Hinode satellite, and many others. This talk will provide an overview of the results of the preliminary Aesthetics and Astronomy study.

  3. The effect of pre-emptive analgesia on the level of postoperative pain in women undergoing surgery for breast neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Węgorowski, Paweł; Stanisławek, Andrzej; Sysiak, Justyna; Rząca, Marcin; Milanowska, Joanna; Janiszewska, Mariola; Dziubińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Dynamic development of research on pain has resulted in the formulation of the concept of pre-emptive analgesia, which involves administration of analgesics before the first pain-producing stimulus appears. It is meant to prevent increased sensitivity to pain in the postoperative period. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of modifying the intensity of postoperative pain evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS) in patients after surgical treatment for breast neoplasm offered by pre-emptive analgesia. Material and methods The intensity of postoperative pain was measured immediately after the surgery as well as 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours later in 100 women who had undergone surgery for breast tumour. The correlation between experienced pain and the type of analgesic administered pre-emptively, including metamizole, tramadol, ketoprofen, and placebo was examined. The effect of other correlates such as the extensiveness of surgery, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate on the level of experienced pain as well as the usefulness of physiological parameters for its assessment were also analysed. Results The conducted study demonstrated the effectiveness of tramadol (p = 0.004) and ketoprofen (p = 0.039) administered half an hour before the beginning of surgery, but there was no similar effect in the case of metamizole (p = 1.0). A positive correlation was observed between the level of experienced pain and blood pressure values (p < 0.001). Heart rate does not seem to be significantly linked with the intensity of experienced pain (p = 0.157). PMID:27358596

  4. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  5. Breast cancer: a 21 year experience with conservative surgery and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, R.M.; Wilkinson, R.H.; Mahoney, L.J.; Reid, J.G.; MacDonald, W.D.

    1982-06-01

    Evidence is presented from a study of 680 patients followed over a period of 21 years that conservative treatment of breast cancer by local excision of the primary tumor followed by breast irradiation yields results equivalent to the traditional radical approach, with the added benefit of an excellent cosmetic result and improved quality of life. The relative survivals were 83% at 5 years and 71% at 10 years. There was no difference in survival when radiation was given. Breast irradiation significantly reduced relapse in the breast, but axillary irradiation did not influence relapse at this site. Relapse in the breast alone was not detrimental to survival if treated appropriately. Axillary relapse indicated a much poorer prognosis as might be expected.

  6. The Effect of Prospective Monitoring and Early Physiotherapy Intervention on Arm Morbidity Following Surgery for Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chiara; De Vera, Mary

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Significant arm morbidity is reported following surgery for breast cancer, yet physiotherapy is not commonly part of usual care. This study compared the effect on arm morbidity after surgery for breast cancer of a clinical care pathway including preoperative education, prospective monitoring, and early physiotherapy (experimental group) to that of preoperative education alone (comparison group). Methods: A prospective quasi-experimental pretest–posttest, non-equivalent group design compared two clinical sites; Site A (n=41) received the experimental intervention, and Site B (n=31) received the comparison intervention. At baseline (preoperative) and 7 months postoperative, shoulder range of motion (ROM), upper-extremity (UE) strength, UE circumference, pain, UE function, and quality of life were assessed. Results: The experimental group maintained shoulder flexion ROM at 7 months, whereas the comparison group saw a decrease (mean 1° [SD 9°] vs. −6° [SD 15°], p=0.03). A lower incidence of arm morbidity and better quality of life were observed in the experimental group, but these findings were not statistically significant. Baseline characteristics and surgical approaches differed between the two sites, which may have had an impact on the findings. Conclusion: Initial results are promising and support the feasibility of integrating a surveillance approach into follow-up care. This pilot study provides the foundation for a larger, more definitive trial. PMID:24403683

  7. Thoracic Paravertebral Block, Multimodal Analgesia, and Monitored Anesthesia Care for Breast Cancer Surgery in Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare idiopathic neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons and characterized by spasticity, muscle weakness, and bulbar involvement. It can sometimes mimic early stage of more common and fatal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Surgical patients with a history of neurodegenerative disorders, including PLS, may be at increased risk for general anesthesia related ventilatory depression and postoperative respiratory complications, abnormal response to muscle relaxants, and sensitivity to opioids, sedatives, and local anesthetics. We present a case of a patient with PLS and recent diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent a simple mastectomy surgery uneventfully under an ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block, multimodal analgesia, and monitored anesthesia care. Patient reported minimal to no pain or discomfort in the postoperative period and received no opioids for pain management before being discharged home. In patients with PLS, thoracic paravertebral block and multimodal analgesia can provide reliable anesthesia and effective analgesia for breast surgery with avoidance of potential risks associated with general anesthesia, muscle paralysis, and opioid use. PMID:27200193

  8. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  9. Facial aesthetic surgical goals in patients of different cultures.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Jones, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of facial aesthetic surgery is to improve the patient's psychological well-being. To achieve this, the surgeon must understand the patient's body image and their aesthetic and psychological expectations. These factors must be judged in the context of their cultural background. The patient's cultural values must also be understood to optimize the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25049120

  10. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  11. [The importance of histological verification in the conservative surgery of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Marinova, L; Todorov, I; Terziev, I

    1996-01-01

    The place and significance of the histological verification in the team method of approach in case of conservative breast cancer treatment are discussed. An accent is made on the histological risk factors increasing the recurrence appearance probability that gathers such patients in a high risk group. On the basis of our own material representing breast cancer patients treated in the period 1987-1993 the significance of the histological verification in the treatment approach is estimated. Requirements for comprehensive histological verification being much needed for breast cancer patients are risen for the pathohistologists.

  12. Resection of giant pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: Expectant observation and avoidance of complex breast surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Stephanie G.; Powell, Angela T.; Murray, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign tumor of the breast that can achieve large, or even giant, dimensions. Resection of giant tumors can pose cosmetic challenges. Case presentation We report the prospective cosmetic outcome of a 31-year old female with a 21-cm PASH tumor of the right breast using simple excision through an inframammary approach. The patient was followed for 6 months before final cosmesis was established. Breast cosmesis was considered very good by both patient and physician. Mild external rotation of the nipple and mild contour changes involving the lateral aspect of the breast persisted at 6 months. Discussion Avoidance of more complex alternatives such as reduction mammoplasty and/or mastopexy was achieved by allowing the skin envelope to undergo natural involution over a period of six months. Conclusion Inframammary simple excision of a giant PASH tumor is appropriate in select patients. PMID:26301683

  13. Some Women May Not Need More Extensive Lymph Node Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial demonstrate that ALND provided no additional survival benefit when compared with SLNB in women with small breast tumors and minimal lymph node metastasis who followed a specific treatment regimen.

  14. Aesthetics and reconstruction--seeing before cutting.

    PubMed

    Clark, David P

    2003-12-01

    In order to restore a specific form during aesthetic surgery it is self-evident that the surgeon needs to know the form exists. But more than this simple form restoration, the development of aesthetic restoration suggests a specific restoration in the context of the whole form. Developing a disciplined method of visualizing the problem is the first step toward being able to start an aesthetic sense or eye. Careful study of master artists drawings often forces the surgeon to simplify and concentrate not on parts, but parts as they relate to the whole face. Often the artist, as with the successful surgeon, must continually alternate consideration of a specific part with consideration of the whole. This discussion is meant to provide a few relationships and constructs so that the surgeon may start on the journey to development of the aesthetic eye.

  15. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  16. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Reflections on Aesthetic Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how it is possible to use the aesthetic process to enrich teaching practices in preschool and elementary school education. What is under scrutiny is the aesthetic dimension of a core curricular subject, the ultimate goal being to achieve an understanding of curricular content through aesthetic learning processes. For this…

  18. Effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms and anxiety in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa V; Andersen, Lærke T; Madsen, Michael T; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars S; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are known problems in patients with breast cancer. The effect of melatonin as an antidepressant in humans with cancer has not been investigated. We investigated whether melatonin could lower the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer in a three-month period after surgery and assessed the effect of melatonin on subjective parameters: anxiety, sleep, general well-being, fatigue, pain and sleepiness. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial undertaken from July 2011 to December 2012 at a department of breast surgery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women, 30-75 years, undergoing surgery for breast cancer and without signs of depression on Major Depression Inventory (MDI) were included 1 week before surgery and received 6 mg oral melatonin or placebo for 3 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of depressive symptoms measured by MDI. The secondary outcomes were area under the curve (AUC) for the subjective parameters. 54 patients were randomized to melatonin (n = 28) or placebo (n = 26) and 11 withdrew from the study (10 placebo group and 1 melatonin group, P = 0.002). The risk of developing depressive symptoms was significantly lower with melatonin than with placebo (3 [11 %] of 27 vs. 9 [45 %] of 20; relative risk 0.25 [95 % CI 0.077-0.80]), giving a NNT of 3.0 [95 % CI 1.7-11.0]. No significant differences were found between AUC for the subjective parameters. No differences in side effects were found (P = 0.78). Melatonin significantly reduced the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer during a three-month period after surgery. PMID:24756186

  19. Monitoring recovery after laser surgery of the breast with optical tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hebden, Jeremy C; Yates, Tara D; Gibson, Adam; Everdell, Nicholas; Arridge, Simon R; Chicken, Dennis W; Douek, Michael; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S

    2005-04-01

    Results are presented of a study to monitor the changes in the optical properties of breast tissue over a 12-month period after interstitial laser photocoagulation treatment of a fibroadenoma. The study involved generating cross-sectional images of the breast with a multichannel time-resolved imaging system and a nonlinear image reconstruction algorithm. Images of the internal absorbing and scattering properties revealed the expected initial inflammatory response, followed by the development of low-scattering cysts consistent with corresponding ultrasound examinations. Although results indicate that purely qualitative images can potentially provide clinically valuable data, means of enhancing diagnostic information by overcoming present limitations of the approach are discussed.

  20. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  1. [Present status and tasks for genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery in patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Arai, Masami; Taki, Keiko; Iwase, Haruko; Takizawa, Ken; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-04-01

    In Japan, awareness of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has gradually increased among health care workers and the general population. We focus on two current topics: genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery for HBOC. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2, the genes responsible for HBOC, is performed to diagnose HBOC. PCR-direct sequencing is a standard method used for BRCA1/2 mutation analysis. Recently, genetic rearrangement of BRCA1 was reported in a Japanese patient with HBOC. Therefore, MLPA tests are also being included in routine genetic testing for the disease. The result of "uncertain significance, " which indicates unclear pathogenic significance, is obtained in about 3% of all patients who undergo BRCA1/2 genetic tests. Furthermore, novel candidate genes for HBOC, such as RAD51C, PALB2, and BRIP1, were recently identified. Prophylactic surgical intervention for HBOC includes procedures such as risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and risk-reducing mastectomy(RRM). In Japan, RRSO is performed in very few patients at present. Increasing evidence from overseas indicates that RRSO contributes to a decreased incidence of ovarian/breast cancers and lowers overall mortality. Therefore, a system for performing RRSO was established in our institute. RRSO was approved to be performed as a clinical examination by our Institutional Review Board. The clinical significance of ipsilateral complete mastectomy and RRM remains unclear. Based on the NCCN guidelines, conservative mastectomy with radiation therapy is relatively contraindicated in patients with HBOC. However, several studies have reported that conservative mastectomy with radiation the rapydoes not increase the incidence of recurrent or metachronous breast cancers in the ipsilateral breast of mutation-positive patients when compared to mutation-negative or control patients. However, more aggressive malignancies seem to be included in the mutation-positive group(especially BRCA1

  2. Indicators of breast cancer severity and appropriateness of surgery based on hospital administrative data in the Lazio Region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Patrizia; Papini, Paolo; Agabiti, Nera; Scarinci, Marina; Borgia, Piero; Perucci, Carlo A

    2006-01-01

    Background Administrative data can serve as an easily available source for epidemiological and evaluation studies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of hospital administrative data to determine breast cancer severity and the appropriateness of surgical treatment. Methods the study population consisted of 398 patients randomly selected from a cohort of women hospitalized for first-time breast cancer surgery in the Lazio Region, Italy. Tumor severity was defined in three different ways: 1) tumor size; 2) clinical stage (TNM); 3) severity indicator based on HIS data (SI). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of the severity indicator in evaluating appropriateness of surgery were calculated. The accuracy of HIS data was measured using Kappa statistic. Results Most of 387 cases were classified as T1 and T2 (tumor size), more than 70% were in stage I or II and the SI classified 60% of cases in medium-low category. Variation from guidelines indications identified under and over treatments. The accuracy of the SI to predict under-treatment was relatively good (58% of all procedures classified as under-treatment using pT where also classified as such using SI), and even greater predicting over-treatment (88.2% of all procedures classified as over treatment using pT where also classified as such using SI). Agreement between clinical chart and hospital discharge reports was K = 0.35. Conclusion Our findings suggest that administrative data need to be used with caution when evaluating surgical appropriateness, mainly because of the limited ability of SI to predict tumor size and the questionable quality of HIS data as observed in other studies. PMID:16464258

  3. Case management vocational rehabilitation for women with breast cancer after surgery: a feasibility study incorporating a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of methodologically robust vocational rehabilitation (VR) intervention trials. This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a VR trial of women with breast cancer to inform the development of a larger interventional study. Methods Women were recruited in Scotland and randomised to either a case management VR service or to usual care. Data were collected on eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates to assess trial feasibility, and interviews conducted to determine trial acceptability. Sick leave days (primary outcome) were self-reported via postal questionnaire every 4 weeks during the first 6 months post-surgery and at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were change in employment pattern, quality of life and fatigue. Results Of the 1,114 women assessed for eligibility, 163 (15%) were eligible. The main reason for ineligibility was age (>65 years, n = 637, 67%). Of those eligible, 111 (68%) received study information, of which 23 (21%) consented to participate in the study. Data for 18 (78%) women were analysed (intervention: n = 7; control: n = 11). Participants in the intervention group reported, on average, 53 fewer days of sick leave over the first 6 months post-surgery than those in the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.122; 95% confidence interval −15.8, 122.0). No statistically significant differences were found for secondary outcomes. Interviews with trial participants indicated that trial procedures, including recruitment, randomisation and research instruments, were acceptable. Conclusions Conducting a pragmatic trial of effectiveness of a VR intervention among cancer survivors is both feasible and acceptable, but more research about the exact components of a VR intervention and choice of outcomes to measure effectiveness is required. VR to assist breast cancer patients in the return to work process is an important component of cancer survivorship plans. Trial

  4. Replacement of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery with immediate latissimus dorsi mini-flap

    PubMed Central

    Alço, Gül; Igdem, Sefik; Okkan, Sait; Dincer, Maktav; Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Ahmet Serkan; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Ercan, Tulay; Selamoglu, Derya; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the geographic variability of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OP-BCS), and to assess its relevance for radiotherapy planning. In this prospective study, pre- and postoperative computerized tomography (CT) scans of 22 patients with early-stage breast cancer were fused. The preoperative gross tumor volume or excisional biopsy cavity were contoured under the guidance of preoperative radiological images. Postoperative lumpectomy cavities were contoured under the guidance of surgical clips. The conformity index (CI) was calculated and defined on a scale between 0 and 1, where 0 indicated no overlap and 1 indicated 100% concordance. Associations between CI and the number of clips, time interval between surgery and CT scans, pathological tumor size and age were assessed using independent sample testing. The median CI was 0.07 (in five cases, 1, and in eight cases, 0). The lumpectomy cavity shifted from the primary location in 36.4% of the cases. Median shifts between the isocenters of pre- and postoperative volumes were measured as 1.02 cm (range, 0.4–4.43 cm) in the x, 1.07 cm (range, 0.05–5.67 cm) in the y, and 1.12 cm (range, 0–3.75 cm) in the z directions. Only the clip number was determined to be significantly associated with CI (P=0.017). Pre- and postoperative tumor bed volumes were fully superposed in five of the 22 cases. The present study has shown that the tumor bed is markedly replaced following OP-BCS with latissimus dorsi mini-flap (LDMF) reconstruction. Special care should therefore be taken when defining the lumpectomy cavity following OP-BCS with LDMF reconstruction. PMID:27699027

  5. Replacement of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery with immediate latissimus dorsi mini-flap

    PubMed Central

    Alço, Gül; Igdem, Sefik; Okkan, Sait; Dincer, Maktav; Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Ahmet Serkan; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Ercan, Tulay; Selamoglu, Derya; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the geographic variability of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OP-BCS), and to assess its relevance for radiotherapy planning. In this prospective study, pre- and postoperative computerized tomography (CT) scans of 22 patients with early-stage breast cancer were fused. The preoperative gross tumor volume or excisional biopsy cavity were contoured under the guidance of preoperative radiological images. Postoperative lumpectomy cavities were contoured under the guidance of surgical clips. The conformity index (CI) was calculated and defined on a scale between 0 and 1, where 0 indicated no overlap and 1 indicated 100% concordance. Associations between CI and the number of clips, time interval between surgery and CT scans, pathological tumor size and age were assessed using independent sample testing. The median CI was 0.07 (in five cases, 1, and in eight cases, 0). The lumpectomy cavity shifted from the primary location in 36.4% of the cases. Median shifts between the isocenters of pre- and postoperative volumes were measured as 1.02 cm (range, 0.4–4.43 cm) in the x, 1.07 cm (range, 0.05–5.67 cm) in the y, and 1.12 cm (range, 0–3.75 cm) in the z directions. Only the clip number was determined to be significantly associated with CI (P=0.017). Pre- and postoperative tumor bed volumes were fully superposed in five of the 22 cases. The present study has shown that the tumor bed is markedly replaced following OP-BCS with latissimus dorsi mini-flap (LDMF) reconstruction. Special care should therefore be taken when defining the lumpectomy cavity following OP-BCS with LDMF reconstruction.

  6. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor in premenopausal women--indicator of the best time for breast cancer surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Heer, K.; Kumar, H.; Speirs, V.; Greenman, J.; Drew, P. J.; Fox, J. N.; Carleton, P. J.; Monson, J. R.; Kerin, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Timing of surgery in premenopausal patients with breast cancer remains controversial. Angiogenesis is essential for tumour growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most potent angiogenic cytokines. We aimed to determine whether the study of VEGF in relation to the menstrual cycle could help further the understanding of this issue of surgical intervention. Fourteen premenopausal women were recruited, along with three post-menopausal women, a woman on an oral contraceptive pill and a single male subject. Between eight and 11 samples were taken per person, over one menstrual cycle (over 1 month in the five controls) and analysed for sex hormones and VEGF165. Serum VEGF was significantly lower in the luteal phase and showed a significant negative correlation with progesterone in all 14 premenopausal women. No inter-sample variations of VEGF were noted in the controls. Serum from both phases of the cycle from one subject was added to MCF-7 breast cancer cells; VEGF expression in the supernatant was lower in the cells to which the luteal phase serum was added. The lowering of a potent angiogenic cytokine in the luteal phase suggests a possible decreased potential for micrometastasis establishment in that phase. This fall in VEGF may be an effect of progesterone and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:9820181

  8. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  9. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Pan, I-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Teressa; Liang, Ji-An; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  10. The Safety, Effectiveness, and Efficiency of Autologous Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Courtney N.; Leung, Braden K.; Gitlin, Matthew; Parekh, Mousam; Macarios, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: For years, the safety and effectiveness of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for breast reconstruction have been in question, with particular concern over fat necrosis, calcifications, cyst formation, and interfering with the detection of breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that the complication rates and clinical results are generally acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The emerging challenge is the numerous AFG techniques and systems, where there are limited knowledge and data. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review that focuses on the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of various AFG techniques as applied to the breast. Methods: A PubMed search using terms related to AFG was performed over a 5-year period (April 1, 2010–April 30, 2015). Original articles focused on AFG to the breast, with outcomes on safety, effectiveness, and efficiency, were included. Results: Five hundred ninety-eight articles were identified with 36 articles included (n = 4306 patients). Satisfaction rates were high although the prevalence of complications was low—similar to previous findings. Seven studies reported average operating room time with an overall mean of 125 minutes (range: 40–210). The mean volume of fat harvested was 558 mL (range: 120–1299), and fat injected was 145 mL (range: 20–607). A positive association between injection volume and operating time was observed. Conclusions: This review validates previous findings on the safety and effectiveness of AFG to the breast and highlights its efficiency. The efficiency data available, although limited, suggest that there is an opportunity to achieve time and cost savings while not sacrificing safety and effectiveness. PMID:27622095

  11. The Safety, Effectiveness, and Efficiency of Autologous Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Courtney N.; Leung, Braden K.; Gitlin, Matthew; Parekh, Mousam; Macarios, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: For years, the safety and effectiveness of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for breast reconstruction have been in question, with particular concern over fat necrosis, calcifications, cyst formation, and interfering with the detection of breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that the complication rates and clinical results are generally acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The emerging challenge is the numerous AFG techniques and systems, where there are limited knowledge and data. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review that focuses on the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of various AFG techniques as applied to the breast. Methods: A PubMed search using terms related to AFG was performed over a 5-year period (April 1, 2010–April 30, 2015). Original articles focused on AFG to the breast, with outcomes on safety, effectiveness, and efficiency, were included. Results: Five hundred ninety-eight articles were identified with 36 articles included (n = 4306 patients). Satisfaction rates were high although the prevalence of complications was low—similar to previous findings. Seven studies reported average operating room time with an overall mean of 125 minutes (range: 40–210). The mean volume of fat harvested was 558 mL (range: 120–1299), and fat injected was 145 mL (range: 20–607). A positive association between injection volume and operating time was observed. Conclusions: This review validates previous findings on the safety and effectiveness of AFG to the breast and highlights its efficiency. The efficiency data available, although limited, suggest that there is an opportunity to achieve time and cost savings while not sacrificing safety and effectiveness.

  12. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  13. Multiscale Mechano-Biological Finite Element Modelling of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery-Numerical Study towards Surgical Planning and Cosmetic Outcome Prediction.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, Vasileios; Eiben, Bjoern; Hipwell, John H; Williams, Norman R; Keshtgar, Mo; Hawkes, David J

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment for early-stage breast carcinoma primarily necessitates breast conserving therapy (BCT), where the tumour is removed while preserving the breast shape. To date, there have been very few attempts to develop accurate and efficient computational tools that could be used in the clinical environment for pre-operative planning and oncoplastic breast surgery assessment. Moreover, from the breast cancer research perspective, there has been very little effort to model complex mechano-biological processes involved in wound healing. We address this by providing an integrated numerical framework that can simulate the therapeutic effects of BCT over the extended period of treatment and recovery. A validated, three-dimensional, multiscale finite element procedure that simulates breast tissue deformations and physiological wound healing is presented. In the proposed methodology, a partitioned, continuum-based mathematical model for tissue recovery and angiogenesis, and breast tissue deformation is considered. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed numerical scheme is illustrated through patient-specific representative examples. Wound repair and contraction numerical analyses of real MRI-derived breast geometries are investigated, and the final predictions of the breast shape are validated against post-operative follow-up optical surface scans from four patients. Mean (standard deviation) breast surface distance errors in millimetres of 3.1 (±3.1), 3.2 (±2.4), 2.8 (±2.7) and 4.1 (±3.3) were obtained, demonstrating the ability of the surgical simulation tool to predict, pre-operatively, the outcome of BCT to clinically useful accuracy. PMID:27466815

  14. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  15. [Evaluation of asymetric implants in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Couturaud, B; Laki, F; Alran, S; Salmon, R J

    2005-10-01

    Since more than twenty years, methods of breast reconstruction using implants have continued to evolve in order to improve their aesthetic results. Shapes and materials of these implants have also evolved to obtain contours similar to that of the natural opposite breast. Therefore it can be considered that the use of asymmetric implants is the last step in implant technology before using made to measure implants. Asymmetric implants allow obtaining different contours in harmony to the different breast shapes according to the side, left or right, of the reconstructed breast which maximise the naturalness of the result. Such implants have an axis directed towards the exterior and lower part of the chest wall, are wider than high with a thinner part on their inner edge and a concave rear side moulding the curves of the chest wall. In our own experience, we placed more than 500 asymmetric implants. When analysing retrospectively the medical records of 156 patients, no distinctive features were observed when compared to symmetric classic implants in easiness in the surgical procedure or in complications except a slightly higher rate of seroma formation. When compared to usual implants the main benefits of asymmetric implants are: to offer a wider breadth, to slope down gently on their upper and inner sides according to their concave rear side, and therefore to better match subtle curves of a normal breast. Moreover such contours allow a distribution of the volume which fit better to the usual natural breast configuration of patients who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma. At last, such implants are easy to place and a very low rate of secondary rotation has been observed. In summary, for all these reasons, asymmetric implants, can be considered to be the class one in the choice of implants for breast reconstruction after breast surgery. PMID:16198040

  16. Mediators of a brief hypnosis intervention to control side effects in breast surgery patients: Response expectancies and emotional distress

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Guy H.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Hypnosis is widely recognized as an empirically supported intervention to improve postsurgical outcomes. However, to date, no research has examined mediators of hypnotic benefit among surgery patients. The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that response expectancies and emotional distress would mediate the effects of an empirically validated presurgical hypnosis intervention on postsurgical side effects (i.e., pain, nausea, and fatigue). In a sample of 200 women undergoing breast conserving surgery (mean age = 48.50 years), structural equation modeling revealed the following: 1) hypnotic effects on postsurgical pain were partially mediated by pain expectancy (p< .0001), but not by distress (p=.12); 2) hypnotic effects on postsurgical nausea were partially mediated by presurgical distress (p=.02), but not by nausea expectancy (p=.10); 3) hypnotic effects on postsurgical fatigue were partially mediated by both fatigue expectancy (p=.0001) and presurgical distress (p=.02). These results improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for hypnotic phenomena in the surgical setting, and suggest that future hypnotic interventions target patient expectancies and distress to improve postsurgical recovery. PMID:20099953

  17. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  18. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  19. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  20. DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AFTER BREAST CANCER SURGERY: RELATIONSHIPS WITH GLOBAL, CANCER-RELATED, AND LIFE EVENT STRESS

    PubMed Central

    GOLDEN-KREUTZ, DEANNA M.; ANDERSEN, BARBARA L.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY For women with breast cancer, rates of depression are the third highest of any cancer diagnostic group. Stress, defined as life events or perceptions of stress, is associated with depressive symptoms. However, little is known about the relationships between different types of stress and these symptoms in women with breast cancer. This relationship was tested in 210 women assessed after initial surgical treatment for regional breast cancer. Using Hierarchical Multiple Regression, three types of stress were examined: the occurrence of five stressful life events in the year prior to cancer diagnosis, perceptions of global stress, and perceptions of cancer-related traumatic stress. Other potentially relevant correlates of depressive symptoms were also examined, including the personality trait neuroticism, sociodemographics, and disease/treatment characteristics. Fifty-three percent of the variance in depressive symptoms was accounted for by three stress variables (perceptions of global and cancer-related traumatic stress and the life event-major financial difficulty) and two control variables (neuroticism and racial group). Specifically, global stress perceptions coupled with cancer-related intrusive thoughts and financial concerns along with the tendency towards negativity (neuroticism) may conspire to heighten a women’s risk for depressive symptoms. Assessing multiple sources of stress would improve our ability to identify women ‘at risk’ for depressive symptoms and provide appropriate intervention. PMID:15022156

  1. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  2. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age {<=} 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  3. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  4. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Atezolizumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Stage II-III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  7. Aesthetic considerations of the cleft lip operation.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, T; Keyama, A; Asada, K; Shinomiya, S; Aoyama, R

    1986-01-01

    The results of a cleft lip operation are checked from the anterior, the profile, and the caudal views and even if the deformities are minimal, for aesthetic reasons they should be repaired. Philtrum length, philtrum shape, philtrum depth, nasolabial triangular area, vermilion thickness, Cupid's bow peak, horizontal upper lip groove, vermilion border, alar size, depth of alar groove, nasal deviation, nostril shape, nasal tip, columella height, sill shape, columella width, and facial balance of the anterior, profile, and caudal views are used as aesthetic checkpoints for the results of a cleft lip operation. If deformities are found, the aesthetic plastic surgeon should repair them to achieve a more satisfactory result. In addition, augmentation rhinoplasty, augmentation mentoplasty, or other craniofacial surgery may be performed.

  8. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  9. Is there an Upgrading to Malignancy at Surgery of Mucocele-Like Lesions Diagnosed on Percutaneous Breast Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Provencher, Louise; Morin, Josée; Desbiens, Christine; Poirier, Brigitte; Poirier, Éric; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Jacob, Simon; Côté, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Management of pure mucocele-like lesion (MLL) diagnosed on percutaneous breast biopsy (PBB) is controversial. To assess surgical upgrade rate and clinical outcome of pure MLL obtained as sole diagnosis on PBB. Patients diagnosed with a MLL as the most advanced lesion on PBB from April 1997 to December 2010 were reviewed for radiologic presentation, biopsy technique, and pathologic and clinical outcomes. Of the 21,340 image-guided PBB performed during the study period, 50 women with 51 MLL (0.24%) were identified. Mean age was 53.1 ± 7.7 years. Radiologic findings were mostly microcalcifications (n = 47, 92.2%). Stereotactic PBB was performed for 49 lesions (96.1%). Surgery was performed shortly after biopsy in 35 women, with benign final pathology in 33, and upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in two patients (2/35, 5.7%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.5 years (3.7 ± 2.1 years for surgical patients; 5.9 ± 2.9 years for follow-up only patients); three women were lost to follow-up (3/50). Three invasive cancers (3/47, 6.4%) were diagnosed 1.2, 1.2, and 2.8 years after biopsy: two in surgical patients, and one in a follow-up only patient. No cancer occurred at the same site as the original MLL. Pure MLL lesion of the breast is a rare entity and is mostly associated with a benign outcome. We observed an upgrade to DCIS slightly superior to 5%, but no invasive cancer. It is therefore unclear if these lesions should be excised or clinically and radiologically followed up when such lesions are found at PBB. PMID:26662058

  10. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905

  11. Long-term outcomes of risk-reducing surgery in unaffected women at increased familial risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Louise; Butow, Phyllis N; Coll, Joseph; Bullen, Tracey; Wilson, Judy; Baylock, Brandi; Meiser, Bettina; Price, Melanie A

    2015-03-01

    This study prospectively investigated long-term psychosocial outcomes for women who opted for risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) and/or risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). Unaffected women from high-risk breast cancer families who had completed baseline questionnaires for an existing study and subsequently underwent RRM and/or RRSO, completed measures of perceived breast and ovarian cancer risk, anxiety, depression, cancer-related anxiety, body image, sexual functioning, menopausal symptoms, use of hormone replacement therapy and decision regret 3 years post-surgery. Outcomes were compared to age- and risk-matched controls. Participants (N = 233) were 17 women who had RRM (39 controls), 38 women who had RRSO (94 controls) and 15 women who had RRM + RRSO (30 controls). Women who underwent RRM and those who underwent RRM + RRSO reported reductions in perceived breast cancer risk and perceived breast and ovarian cancer risk respectively, compared to their respective controls. RRM women reported greater reductions in cancer-related anxiety compared with both controls and RRSO women. RRSO women reported more sexual discomfort than controls and more urogenital menopausal symptoms than controls and RRM only women. No differences in general anxiety, depression or body image were observed. Regret was associated with greater reductions in body image since surgery and more sexual discomfort, although overall regret levels were low. Women who undergo RRM experience psychological benefits associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Although women who undergo RRSO experience some deterioration in sexual and menopausal symptoms, they do not regret their surgery decision. It is vital that women considering these procedures receive detailed information about potential psychosocial consequences.

  12. Components of aesthetic experience: aesthetic fascination, aesthetic appraisal, and aesthetic emotion

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind. Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: fascination with an aesthetic object (high arousal and attention), appraisal of the symbolic reality of an object (high cognitive engagement), and a strong feeling of unity with the object of aesthetic fascination and aesthetic appraisal. In a proposed model, two parallel levels of aesthetic information processing are proposed. On the first level two sub-levels of narrative are processed, story (theme) and symbolism (deeper meanings). The second level includes two sub-levels, perceptual associations (implicit meanings of object's physical features) and detection of compositional regularities. Two sub-levels are defined as crucial for aesthetic experience, appraisal of symbolism and compositional regularities. These sub-levels require some specific cognitive and personality dispositions, such as expertise, creative thinking, and openness to experience. Finally, feedback of emotional processing is included in our model: appraisals of everyday emotions are specified as a matter of narrative content (eg, empathy with characters), whereas the aesthetic emotion is defined as an affective evaluation in the process of symbolism appraisal or the detection of compositional regularities. PMID:23145263

  13. Aesthetics and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, L. Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author talks about the aesthetic aspects of education with some special reference to movement in different senses. First, he discusses the aesthetic and its relation to education in a general way. He then explains the concepts of expression and embodiment in the appreciation of the arts. Lastly, the author talks about the…

  14. Toward Aesthetic Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFurio, Anthony G.

    1979-01-01

    The view of aesthetic responding presented herein has grown out of a theory of contextual aesthetics as explicated by John Dewey and Stephen Pepper and a phenomenological inquiry into art by John Anderson. The method for entry into the responsive domain has evolved from a direction elaborated by Kenneth Beittel. (Author)

  15. Aesthetics and Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carolyn E.

    The nine articles in this monograph deal with aesthetics from a broad-based approach appealing to an eclectic dance audience. The papers were written by dancers, dance philosophers, and physical educators. Two papers examine the role of the body as the dancers' aesthetic medium, including the use of yoga to increase body awareness. Other papers…

  16. Queering the Homeboy Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    The homeboy aesthetic is identifiable as an assemblage of key signifiers: clothing (baggy pants and undershirts are perhaps the most significant), hair (or, in the current moment of the aesthetic, lack of hair), bold stance, and distinct language (think "calo" mixed with hip-hop parlance), all combining to form a distinguishable cultural…

  17. Neuroscience of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-04-01

    Aesthetic evaluations are appraisals that influence choices in important domains of human activity, including mate selection, consumer behavior, art appreciation, and possibly even moral judgment. The nascent field of neuroaesthetics is advancing our understanding of the role of aesthetic evaluations by examining their biological bases. Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion-valuation, sensory-motor, and meaning-knowledge neural systems. This tripartite model can in turn be evoked to explain phenomena central to aesthetics, such as context effects on preferences. Indeed, context-dependent appraisals that focus on objects rather than on outcomes could be an important factor distinguishing aesthetic experiences from other kinds of evaluations.

  18. Neuroscience of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-04-01

    Aesthetic evaluations are appraisals that influence choices in important domains of human activity, including mate selection, consumer behavior, art appreciation, and possibly even moral judgment. The nascent field of neuroaesthetics is advancing our understanding of the role of aesthetic evaluations by examining their biological bases. Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion-valuation, sensory-motor, and meaning-knowledge neural systems. This tripartite model can in turn be evoked to explain phenomena central to aesthetics, such as context effects on preferences. Indeed, context-dependent appraisals that focus on objects rather than on outcomes could be an important factor distinguishing aesthetic experiences from other kinds of evaluations. PMID:27037898

  19. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  20. Reproducible Volume Restoration and Efficient Long-term Volume Retention after Point-of-care Standardized Cell-enhanced Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dos Anjos, Severiano; Matas-Palau, Aina; Mercader, Josep; Katz, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lipoaspirated fat grafts are used to reconstruct volume defects in breast surgery. Although intraoperative treatment decisions are influenced by volume changes observed immediately after grafting, clinical effect and patient satisfaction are dependent on volume retention over time. The study objectives were to determine how immediate breast volume changes correlate to implanted graft volumes, to understand long-term adipose graft volume changes, and to study the “dose” effect of adding autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to fat grafts on long-term volume retention. Methods: A total of 74 patients underwent 77 cell-enhanced fat grafting procedures to restore breast volume deficits associated with cosmetic and reconstructive indications. Although all procedures used standardized fat grafts, 21 of the fat grafts were enriched with a low dose of SVF cells and 56 were enriched with a high SVF cell dose. Three-dimensional imaging was used to quantify volume retention over time Results: For each milliliter of injected fat graft, immediate changes in breast volume were shown to be lower than the actual volume implanted for all methods and clinical indications treated. Long-term breast volume changes stabilize by 90–120 days after grafting. Final volume retention in the long-term was higher with high cell-enhanced fat grafts. Conclusions: Intraoperative immediate breast volume changes do not correspond with implanted fat graft volumes. In the early postoperative period (7–21 days), breast volume increases more than the implanted volume and then rapidly decreases in the subsequent 30–60 days. High-dose cell-enhanced fat grafts decrease early postsurgical breast edema and significantly improve long-term volume retention. PMID:26579353

  1. Long-term Outcomes of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lalani, Nafisha; Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Done, Susan J.; Miller, Naomi; Youngson, Bruce; Tuck, Alan; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Chang, Martin C.; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Whole-breast radiation therapy (XRT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may decrease the risk of local recurrence, but the optimal dose regimen remains unclear. Past studies administered 50 Gy in 25 fractions (conventional); however, treatment pattern studies report that hypofractionated (HF) regimens (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) are frequently used. We report the impact of HF (vs conventional) on the risk of local recurrence after BCS for DCIS. Methods and Materials: All women with DCIS treated with BCS and XRT in Ontario, Canada from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatment and outcomes were assessed through administrative databases and validated by chart review. Survival analyses were performed. To account for systematic differences between women treated with alternate regimens, we used a propensity score adjustment approach. Results: We identified 1609 women, of whom 971 (60%) received conventional regimens and 638 (40%) received HF. A total of 489 patients (30%) received a boost dose, of whom 143 (15%) received conventional radiation therapy and 346 (54%) received HF. The median follow-up time was 9.2 years. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-65 years). On univariate analyses, the 10-year actuarial local recurrence–free survival was 86% for conventional radiation therapy and 89% for HF (P=.03). On multivariable analyses, age <45 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4; P<.0001), high (HR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.3; P=.02) or intermediate nuclear grade (HR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.6; P=.04), and positive resection margins (HR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.1; P=.05) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. HF was not significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence compared with conventional radiation therapy on multivariate analysis (HR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2; P=.34). Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence among individuals treated with HF regimens

  2. Prosthetic breast reconstruction: indications and update

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Tam T.; Miller, George S.; Rostek, Marie; Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite 82% of patients reporting psychosocial improvement following breast reconstruction, only 33% patients choose to undergo surgery. Implant reconstruction outnumbers autologous reconstruction in many centres. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. Inclusion required: (I) Meta-analyses or review articles; (II) adult patients aged 18 years or over undergoing alloplastic breast reconstruction; (III) studies including outcome measures; (IV) case series with more than 10 patients; (V) English language; and (VI) publication after 1st January, 2000. Results After full text review, analysis and data extraction was conducted for a total of 63 articles. Definitive reconstruction with an implant can be immediate or delayed. Older patients have similar or even lower complication rates to younger patients. Complications include capsular contracture, hematoma and infection. Obesity, smoking, large breasts, diabetes and higher grade tumors are associated with increased risk of wound problems and reconstructive failure. Silicone implant patients have higher capsular contracture rates but have higher physical and psychosocial function. There were no associations made between silicone implants and cancer or systemic disease. There were no differences in outcomes or complications between round and shaped implants. Textured implants have a lower risk of capsular contracture than smooth implants. Smooth implants are more likely to be displaced as well as having higher rates of infection. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) gives the best aesthetic outcome if radiotherapy is not required but has a higher rate of capsular contracture and implant failure. Delayed-immediate reconstruction patients can achieve similar aesthetic results to IBR whilst preserving the breast skin if radiotherapy is required. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) patients have fewer complications than IBR patients. Conclusions Implant reconstruction is a safe and popular

  3. Locally advanced breast cancer made amenable to radical surgery after a combination of systemic therapy and Mohs paste: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy and other systemic therapies are the primary treatments for patients with unresectable, locally advanced breast cancer. The clinical application of supportive care using Mohs paste has become widespread for the purpose of improving patients’ quality of life. Here, we report two cases of locally advanced breast cancer, for which the patients underwent radical surgery after a combination of systemic therapy and Mohs chemosurgery. Case presentations Patient 1 was a 90-year-old Japanese woman with right breast cancer diagnosed as stage IIIB (T4bN1M0). The treatment included Mohs paste application and hormonal therapies. Patient 2 was a 60-year-old Japanese woman with right breast cancer diagnosed as stage IIIB (T4cN2aM0). Her treatment included Mohs paste application, together with chemotherapy (four cycles of 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide, and four cycles of docetaxel). In both cases, a reduction in the primary tumor volume was observed, and radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection were possible without relaxation incision or skin flap. Conclusion We report patients with no distant metastases who were able to undergo radical resection after a combination of systemic therapy and Mohs chemosurgery. For locally advanced breast cancer, Mohs chemosurgery, in addition to multidisciplinary treatment, is useful. PMID:23095125

  4. Consulting with a surgeon before breast cancer surgery: patient question asking and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Venetis, Maria K; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Kearney, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Research has found a negative association between patient question asking and aspects of their satisfaction. In the context of surgical oncology, the aim of this exploratory study was to test the association between patient question asking and 3 indices of their satisfaction. Participants included 51 women who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer engaged in presurgical consultations with a surgical oncologist from a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the Northeastern United States. Outcomes were patients' postconsultation reports of their satisfaction with the treatment plan, intentions to adhere to the treatment plan, and satisfaction with the surgeon. The main predictor was the frequency of patients' self-initiated questions coded from videotapes of consultations. The frequency of patients' self-initiated questions was negatively associated with their satisfaction with the treatment plan (p = .02), intentions to adhere to the treatment plan (p = .02), and satisfaction with the surgeon (p = .07). Results can be explained in terms of patients' perceptions that the surgeon's information was insufficient or inadequate. Future research needs to identify the specific content of patients' questions and how such content might be associated with satisfaction.

  5. Hormone Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Women Who Have Undergone Surgery for Node-Negative Breast Cancer (The TAILORx Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  6. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  8. The aesthetics of chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and philosophers have long reflected on the place of aesthetics in science. In this essay, I review these discussions, identifying work of relevance to chemistry and, in particular, to the field of chemical biology. Topics discussed include the role of aesthetics in scientific theory choice, the aesthetics of molecular images, the beauty-making features of molecules, and the relation between the aesthetics of chemical biology and the aesthetics of industrial design.

  9. [Accepting a mastectomy thanks to socio-aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Arquillière, Agnès; Blanc, Nathalie

    2012-12-01

    For women of all ages, a mastectomy can affect their body image and femininity. Poor management, both physical and emotional, of a breast removal, can have major consequences on a patient's intimate, family and social life. In the framework of the multi-disciplinary treatment of breast cancer, a team in Lyon carried out a study on the impact of including socio-aesthetic practices in the overall care.

  10. Personalized visual aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  11. Predictors of Recurrent Ductal Carcinoma In Situ after Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Yeon; Kang, Guhyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Gwak, Geumhee; Shin, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local recurrence is a major concern in patients who have undergone surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study assessed whether the expression levels of hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67, as well as resection margin status, tumor grade, age at diagnosis, and adjuvant hormonal therapy and radiotherapy (RT) are associated with recurrence in women with DCIS. Methods In total, 111 patients with DCIS were included in the present study. The invasive and noninvasive recurrence events were recorded. The clinicopathological features; resection margins; administration of hormonal therapy and RT; expression statuses of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2; Ki-67 expression; and molecular subtypes were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was noted in 27 of 111 cases (24.3%). Involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 expression, and RT were independently associated with an increase in the recurrence rate (p<0.05, Pearson chi-square test). The recurrence rate was not significantly associated with patient age; ER, PR, and HER2 statuses; molecular subtype; and hormonal therapy. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that the involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 index, and the absence of adjuvant RT were independently associated with increased recurrence in patients with DCIS. Future studies should be conducted in a larger cohort of patients to further improve the identification of patients at high-risk for DCIS recurrence. PMID:27382395

  12. Skeletal implants in aesthetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Wang, T D

    1999-01-01

    The features of the nose, mentum, and malar complex define a person's profile and give the essence of character to the visage. Whether profile deficiencies are due to congenital, traumatic, or aging factors, facial plastic surgeons are able to meet patients' and their own exacting demands more thoroughly with skeletal implants. Although the search for the perfect implant continues, today's armamentarium of implant materials is vast and, with appropriate selection and attention to technique, facial skeletal implants can be successful in creating change impossible to obtain with soft tissue techniques alone. This article reviews both the biomaterials used in mandibular and malar complex implants and the techniques.

  13. Radiofrequency Physics for Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Levy, Adam S; Grant, Robert T; Rothaus, Kenneth O

    2016-07-01

    Radiofrequency energy has a wide range of medical applications, including noninvasive treatment of wrinkles and body contouring. This technology works by differential heating of skin and soft tissue layers causing dermal remodeling or adipolysis, ultimately leading to observable effects. This article reviews the physics of radiofrequency as applied clinically.

  14. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  15. Patterns of nodal staging during breast conservation surgery in the medicare patient: will the ACOSOG Z0011 trial change the pattern of care?

    PubMed

    Loveland-Jones, Catherine E; Ruth, Karen; Sigurdson, Elin R; Egleston, Brian L; Boraas, Marcia; Bleicher, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    ACOSOG Z0011 spares axillary dissection (AD) in breast conservation surgery (BCS) patients with T1/T2 tumors and 1-2 positive nodes. Current patterns of care and the impact of Z0011 on AD versus additional surgery rates for Medicare patients undergoing BCS are unknown. SEER data linked to Medicare claims for 1999-2005 were reviewed for women with invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer who underwent nodal staging on the same day as BCS. There were 3,280 women with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes who underwent same-day nodal staging; 2,532 (77.2 %) of these women had 1-2 positive nodes. Assuming 25.7 % have extracapsular extension, 651 women would require AD. However, 1,881 women, or 57.4 % of those with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes, would be spared AD. Meanwhile, among the 748 women having ≥ 3 positive nodes, 579 underwent same-day AD, but under Z0011, would now wait for permanent section. A total of 160 of these women underwent re-excision or completion mastectomy at a later date anyway, when delayed AD could be performed. The remaining 419 women with ≥ 3 positive nodes would require an additional surgery date for the sole purpose of completion AD. The Z0011 paradigm would consequently necessitate an additional surgery date for 1,070 (651 + 419) women, or 32.6 % of those with T1/T2 tumors and positive nodes. The Z0011 paradigm appears to increase the number of Medicare patients undergoing BCS who require an additional surgery date but decrease the number requiring AD to a greater extent. Future changes in the use of AD or axillary irradiation may yet modify that impact substantially.

  16. Dynamic Angular Petrissage as Treatment for Axillary Web Syndrome Occurring after Surgery for Breast Cancer: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul A.; Cunningham, Joan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the context of breast cancer, axillary web syndrome (AWS), also called lymphatic cording, typically presents in the weeks after axillary surgery. This painful condition, likely lymphofibrotic in origin, restricts upper extremity range of motion (ROM). There is no established treatment, although physical therapy and other approaches have been used to variable effect. This report describes treatment of a female client with AWS, who had recently undergone a unilateral simple mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy plus axillary dissection. Methods The client presented with pain upon movement (self-reported as 5 on the 0–10 Oxford Pain Scale), visible cording and restricted use of the ipsilateral upper extremity. Clinical assessment included determining the extent of AWS cording (taut, from axilla to wrist) and measuring glenohumeral joint ROM (140° flexion by goniometer). A therapeutic massage with movement protocol, termed dynamic angular petrissage, was administered over two sessions: Swedish massage combined with dynamically taking the limb through all possible angles of movement (passive ROM), controlling stretch and tension while simultaneously and segmentally applying petrissage and non-petrissage techniques to the underlying soft tissue. Careful attention was taken to not break the cord. Home care consisted of prescribed exercises performed by the patient. Results After Session One, pain was reduced (to 0/10), ROM improved (to 170° flexion), and cording was visibly reduced. After Session Two the cord was residually apparent only on hyperextension, with no ROM restrictions in glenohumeral joint flexion. Follow-up at three months revealed absence of visual or palpable evidence of cording, unrestricted glenohumeral joint ROM, and absence of movement-associated pain. Conclusion The signs and symptoms of AWS were quickly and effectively eliminated, without causing any pain or discomfort to the client. We propose that dynamic angular petrissage may be

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery Using Low-Kilovoltage X-Rays: The First 5 Years of Experience With a Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, Frederik; Welzel, Grit; Blank, Elena; Hermann, Brigitte; Steil, Volker; Suetterlin, Marc; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been recently introduced using different devices. We report the first 5 years of a single-center experience after introduction of a novel approach to deliver IORT as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 breast cancers in 154 women (median age, 63 years; range, 30-83 years; T1/T2 = 100/55; N0/N+ = 108/47) were treated between February 2002 and December 2007 at the University Medical Center Mannheim, in whom IORT as tumor bed boost was applied using 50-kV X-rays (20 Gy) followed by 46-50 Gy whole-breast external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Chemotherapy, if indicated, was given before EBRT. The median interval between BCS plus IORT and EBRT was 40 days. Median follow-up was 34 months (maximum 80 months, 1 patient lost to follow-up). Overall survival and local relapse-free survival were calculated at 5 years using the Kaplan-Meier method. Seventy-nine patients were evaluated at 3-year follow-up for late toxicity according to the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic system. Results: Ten patients died, 2 had in-breast relapse, and 8 developed distant metastases (5-year overall survival = 87.0%; 5-year local relapse-free survival = 98.5%). Grade 3 fibroses of the tumor bed were detected in 5% of the patients after 3 years. Skin toxicity was mild (telangiectases and hyperpigmentations in approximately 6% each). Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer using low-kilovoltage X-rays followed by EBRT yields low recurrence and toxicity rates.

  18. [Metastasizing Leiomyoma of the Lung Detected on Chest X-ray after Surgery for Breast Cancer;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Hiroki; Omiya, Hideyasu; Takami, Koji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Mori, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-01

    A 60-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with a lung nodule, which was detected on a chest X-ray 2 years after surgery for breast cancer. Pulmonary metastasis from the breast cancer was suspected and surgical resection was performed. On histopathological examination, the lung nodule showed a smooth muscle cell tumor, and immunohistochemical staining was positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors. As a mass in the uterine was detected by computed tomography images before surgical resection, benign metastasizing leiomyoma of the lung was suspected. Subsequently, the patient underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The pathological findings revealed that the mass in the uterine was atypical leiomyoma, which was consistent with the primary lesion of the lung metastasis. Atypical leiomyoma is classified as a benign tumor, but in this case, careful follow-up is required because of its clinical course and histological features. PMID:26759955

  19. Sterile acellular dermal collagen as a treatment for rippling deformity of breast.

    PubMed

    Busse, Brittany; Orbay, Hakan; Sahar, David E

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic implants are frequently used for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction following mastectomy. Unfortunately, long-term aesthetic results of prosthetic breast restoration may be hindered by complications such as rippling, capsular contracture, and implant malposition. The advent of use of acellular dermal matrices has greatly improved the outcomes of prosthetic breast reconstruction. We describe a case of rippling deformity of breast that was treated using an acellular dermal matrix product, AlloMax. The patient presented with visible rippling of bilateral prosthetic breast implants as well as significant asymmetry of the breasts after multiple excisional biopsies for right breast ductal carcinoma in situ. A 6 × 10 cm piece of AlloMax was placed on the medial aspect of each breast between the implant and the skin flap. Follow-up was performed at 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year following the procedure. The patient recovered well from the surgery and there were no complications. At her first postoperative follow-up the patient was extremely satisfied with the result. At her 3-month and 1-year follow-up she had no recurrence of her previous deformity and no new deformity. PMID:25610697

  20. Oncoplastic breast surgery with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for large defect in patients with ptotic breasts: is it feasible when combined with local flaps?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (LDMCF) is frequently applied to breast cancer patients for breast reconstruction. However, the LDMCF is considered inappropriate for patients with ptotic breast. The authors investigated combining LDMCF and two local flaps for large defects of the breast after partial mastectomy in patients with ptosis. Methods Nineteen patients with breast cancer underwent a partial mastectomy with immediate reconstruction. Reconstruction methods consisted of LDMCF, thoraco-epigastric flap, and inferior pedicled rotational local flap, referred to as a combined pedicle flap. The cosmetic results were self-assessed after chemotherapy and radiotherapy by a four-point scoring system. Results Ptosis was graded as follows: two patients with grade 1, 10 patients with grade 2, and seven patients with grade 3. The mean tumor size was 2.7 cm and multifocality was identified in 11 patients (57.9%). The mean excised volume was 468.5 cm3 and the percentage of excised volume was 46.2%. The cosmetic results were excellent in five patients, good in seven patients, fair in six patients, and poor in one patient. Conclusion The combined pedicle flap, consisting of LDMCF, thoraco-epigastric flap, and inferior pedicled rotational local flap, allows good cosmesis in breast cancer patients with large breasts or ptosis despite a wide excision. PMID:24669908

  1. Ultrasound-Assisted Thoracic Paravertebral Block Reduces Intraoperative Opioid Requirement and Improves Analgesia after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Center Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gang; Mao, Feng; Yang, Dongsheng; Guan, Jinghong; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xuejing; Zhang, Yanna; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shen, Songjie; Xu, Zhonghuang; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The contribution of ultrasound-assisted thoracic paravertebral block to postoperative analgesia remains unclear. We compared the effect of a combination of ultrasound assisted-thoracic paravertebral block and propofol general anesthesia with opioid and sevoflurane general anesthesia on volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain in patients having breast cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block with propofol general anesthesia (PPA group, n = 121) or fentanyl with sevoflurane general anesthesia (GA group, n = 126). Volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain intensity were compared between the groups using noninferiority and superiority tests. Results Patients in the PPA group required less sevoflurane than those in the GA group (median [interquartile range] of 0 [0, 0] vs. 0.4 [0.3, 0.6] minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]-hours), less intraoperative fentanyl requirements (100 [50, 100] vs. 250 [200, 300]μg,), less intense postoperative pain (median visual analog scale score 2 [1, 3.5] vs. 3 [2, 4.5]), but more propofol (median 529 [424, 672] vs. 100 [100, 130] mg). Noninferiority was detected for all four outcomes; one-tailed superiority tests for each outcome were highly significant at P<0.001 in the expected directions. Conclusions The combination of propofol anesthesia with ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block reduces intraoperative volatile anesthetic and opioid requirements, and results in less post operative pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00418457 PMID:26588217

  2. The impact of surgical resident participation in breast reduction surgery--outcome analysis from the 2005-2011 ACS-NSQIP datasets.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Wes, Ari M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Breast reduction surgery is a common and effective surgical technique for treating symptomatic macromastia. There is limited data on the impact of resident involvement on outcomes. This study uses the ACS-NSQIP datasets to assess the impact of surgical resident participation in breast reduction surgery. This study reviewed the 2005-2011 ACS-NSQIP databases identifying primary encounters for reduction mammaplasty with CPT code "19318". It characterised surgical complications into three groups: any, major, and wound complications. Propensity scoring and matched analysis were used to account for non-randomised assignment. In total, 4328 patients underwent reduction mammoplasty during the study period. Resident participation was identified in 56.3% of cases. Logistic regression analysis determined the following factors independently associated with resident participation: class II obesity (OR = 0.73, p < 0.001), class III obesity (OR = 0.68, p < 0.001), dyspnea (OR = 1.59, p = 0.04), and ASA physical status of 3 (OR = 1.51, p < 0.001). A propensity score was assigned based on probability of resident involvement and matched cohorts were created and analyzed. A logistic regression analysis of the matched cohort data revealed that resident participation was independently associated with major surgical complications (OR = 2.18, p = 0.008). Prolonged operative (>2 SD) was associated with any (OR = 3.3, p = 0.039) and wound (OR = 10.2, p = 0.028) complications. A separate logistic regression analysis of the unmatched cohort using stratified PGY experience demonstrated that junior PGY was most highly associated with any (OR = 1.93, p = 0.013), major (OR = 2.4, p = 0.034), and wound (OR = 1.9, p = 0.04) complications. Resident participation was associated with added risk of surgical morbidity, and PGY experience was inversely related to risk of surgical complications in breast reduction surgery.

  3. Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab Followed by Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  4. The Extent of Axillary Surgery Is Associated With Breast Cancer-specific Survival in T1-2 Breast Cancer Patients With 1 or 2 Positive Lymph Nodes: A SEER-Population Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunrong; Liu, Fengtao; Chen, Kai; Rao, Nanyan; Xie, Yufen; Su, Fengxi; Zhu, Liling

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) of a nonclinical trial population of T1-2 breast cancer patients with 1 to 2 positive lymph nodes who received breast-conserving surgery and either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify 17,028 patients with a median follow-up of 7.1 years. We assigned the patients into a SLNB-cohort (≤5 nodes) and an ALND-cohort (>5 nodes) based on the number of removed lymph nodes. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to estimate the cumulative BCSS and used Cox-regression analysis to study the risk factors. We also performed subgroup analysis by the patients' age and hormonal receptor (HR) status.The cumulative BCSS and Overall Survival (OS) of the entire population were 94.4% and 91.4% at 5 years and 88.2% and 79.9% at 10 years, respectively. Axillary surgery (ALND vs SLNB) had no association with BCSS when adjusted for stage, HR status, tumor grade, or other factors. In subgroup analysis by age and HR status, ALND was associated with a significantly improved BCSS relative to SNLB (HR = 0.70, HR = 0.026, 95% confidence interval 0.51-0.96) only in patients younger than 50 years with HR- disease (N = 1281), but not in other subgroup of patients.In early-stage breast cancer patients with limited lymph node metastasis, ALND had better BCSS than SLNB only in patients younger than 50 years and with HR- disease. More studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27057872

  5. Riding Pontic--Aesthetic Journey Aesthetic Goal.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Byajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Manisha, Kukreja; Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Nafria, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The increasing concern for esthetics during the orthodontic treatment can be measured by the increasing popularity ofaesthetic brackets, lingual technique, smaller sized metal brackets, and clear alignment therapy. Many clients, especially adolescents, are self-conscious about their appearance in social and professional situations, and they refuse to tolerate the inevitable "black holes" of edentulous spaces during orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use, fabrication, modifications, and shortcomings of riding pontics; and illustrates how their use provides aesthetic, psychological and functional benefits. PMID:26720951

  6. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, Vratislav; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Bani, Mayada; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was < 3 cm, resection margins were clear by at least 2 mm, no lymph node metastases existed, age was >35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects {>=}Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  7. Maintaining standards of aesthetic practice in trainees subject to NHS restrictions.

    PubMed

    Paterson, P; Allison, K

    2006-01-01

    The Specialist Advisory Committee (SAC) in plastic surgery within the United Kingdom (UK) recommends a modular training programme to include aesthetic surgery. The intercollegiate board examinations test candidates on all aspects of aesthetic practice yet there is no formal, national aesthetic training in the UK. Closure of National Health Service (NHS) private patient facilities has reduced training opportunity [Nicolle FV. Sir Harold Gillies Memorial Lecture; Aesthetic plastic surgery and the future plastic surgeon. Br J Plast Surg 1998;51:419-24.] Calmanisation [Hospital doctors: training for the future. The Report of the Working Group on Specialist Medical Training (The Calman Report). London: HMSO; 1993.], the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) [; Phillips H, Fleet Z, Bowman K. The European Working time Directive-interim report and guidance from The Royal College of Surgeons of England working party chaired by Mr Hugh Phillips; 2003 []; Chesser S, Bowman K, Phillips H. The European Working Time Directive and the training of surgeons. BMJ Careers Focus 2002;s69-7.], and more importantly the implementation of "local" aesthetic guidelines have placed further pressures on training. Reductions of NHS case mix will ultimately lead to a reduction in trainee experience. With increasing regulatory pressure from the Commission for Healthcare Improvement, standards of aesthetic practice can only be maintained by increasing private/independent sector involvement. At present a disparity exists between the demand and provision of aesthetic surgery training in the UK. Aesthetic surgery forms part of the training curriculum for plastic surgery and as such remains a training issue. A review of aesthetic surgery training is needed in the UK through consultation with trainers and trainee representatives.

  8. Hepburn's Natural Aesthetic and Its Implications for Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The world is rich in natural beauty, and learning how to appreciate the beauty of nature is an important part of aesthetic education. Unfortunately, the teaching of aesthetics is usually restricted to art education, especially in Taiwan. Students' perceptual awareness of and sensitivity to the aesthetics of nature should be cultivated so that…

  9. Men's aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Cosmetic dermatology is continuing to see a dramatic increase in both procedures performed and technological advancements. Men's aesthetic dermatology is burgeoning with more men seeking cosmetic consultations and intervention. Whether it is targeted cosmeceuticals for men or male-specific procedures, dermatologists must be aware of this evolving demographic and understand the biological, anatomical, and psychological aspects that separate this cohort from their female counterparts. Cosmetic dermatology has moved beyond just applying the same techniques used for females onto males. The use of our cosmetic toolbox can differ for men in terms of technique and dosage. This article will review the state of men's aesthetic dermatology with. PMID:25830252

  10. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  11. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  12. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  13. Scientific aesthetics: three steps forward.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-11-01

    Leder and Nadal (2014, this issue) examine the current state of scientific aesthetics through the lens of a prescient psychological model proposed 10 years ago. These retrospective points to several future directions of which I touch on three: the nature of aesthetic emotions, the time course of emotions in aesthetic episodes, and the relationship of art and evolution.

  14. What's Wrong with "Aesthetic Education"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luca-Marshall, Judith B.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers definitions of "aesthetic," especially that offered by Woodrow Wilson in his essay on Adam Smith. Her major contention is that too much of aesthetic and other education is not very aesthetic, for it does not excite both senses and intellect nor develop the ability to generalize. (Author/SJL)

  15. Anterior dental aesthetics: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2005-06-25

    The purpose of this series is to convey the principles governing our aesthetic senses. Usually meaning visual perception, aesthetics is not merely limited to the ocular apparatus. The concept of aesthetics encompasses both the time - arts such as music, theatre, literature and film, as well as space - arts such as paintings, sculpture and architecture.

  16. Ideology and Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Landon E.

    The paper documents current theories that schools serve as agents of economic and/or cultural reproduction by examining the content and form of a unit in an aesthetic education program. The central argument of reproduction theorists is that schools serve as a means of social control by perpetuating those social and cultural patterns which ensure…

  17. [Aesthetic Response to Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, Helen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The "Bulletin of the Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education" is an annual publication, with each issue devoted to a unified theme. The theme of this issue is aesthetic response. The following papers focus on the audience and the persons responding to art: "Attitudes of Three Urban Appalachian Teenagers Toward Selected Early Modern American…

  18. The Aesthetics of Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, James Marston

    The basic concepts and several examples of the effects of the physical environment on man are discussed. Aesthetic judgments of the environment are related primarily to the physiological well-being of an individual and secondarily to his social experiences. Excessive loading of any one of the senses can prevent a balanced assessment of the…

  19. Risking Aesthetic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Patricia E.

    2005-01-01

    This reflective article explores a tension between private and public expression of deep aesthetic response to reading, with specific reference to the play of this tension in the public space of the classroom. Implications for teaching are included, most specifically the need to understand the sensitivities and emotional vulnerability of students,…

  20. Against Moderate Aesthetic Formalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Formalists believe that the aesthetic appreciation of an artwork generally involves an attentive awareness of its sensory or perceptual qualities and does not require knowledge about its nonperceptual properties. Criticisms of classical formalist views, such as that of Clive Bell, are well known. However, a number of philosophers have recently…

  1. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  2. Aesthetics in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    This article applies the principles and concepts of the aesthetics of movement to actual physical education teaching situations. It does so by discussing the author's one-day observations of several middle school physical education classes taught by three different teachers. During these classes, the teachers taught students how to calculate and…

  3. Association Between Histone Methyltransferase hSETD1A and Prognosis in Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, YanYan; Bai, Kai; Yu, JianPing; Guo, MeiYan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer, the most common cancer in women, is a serious public health issue. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which lacks expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, accounts for ∼15% of breast cancer cases. Treatment of TNBC patients has proven difficult because of the lack of expression of hormone receptors. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the prognostic impact of histone methyltransferase, hSETD1A, on overall survival in TNBC cases after surgery. In total, 159 TNBC cases were enrolled and clinicopathological characteristics were obtained from medical records. hSETD1A status of each subject was determined using immunohistochemistry. The chi-squared test was used to compare 5-year overall survival rates of all subjects according to clinical characteristics, and both univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage stage, larger tumor size, vascular invasion, metastasis in the initial diagnosis, and hSETD1A expression were correlated with worse outcome. Among all factors identified, metastasis in the initial diagnosis had the greatest impact on survival. The results indicated that hSETD1A positivity was correlated with shorter survival among TNBC cases, suggesting it may serve as a prognostic biomarker for patients with TNBC. PMID:27227949

  4. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  6. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  7. Effect of Melatonin on Sleep in the Perioperative Period after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Hansen, Melissa Voigt; Andersen, Lærke Toftegård; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether administration of an oral dose of 6 mg melatonin before bedtime perioperatively in breast cancer surgery could change sleep outcomes measured by actigraphy. Methods: This paper reports secondary outcomes from a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial where patients received 6 mg melatonin (n = 27) or placebo (n = 21) approximately 60 minutes before bedtime 3 nights preoperatively until at least one week postoperatively. Participants were monitored in the entire period with actigraphy, and were instructed to complete visual analogue scale (VAS) for sleep, and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) each morning. Results: Administration of 6 mg oral melatonin approximately 1 hour before bedtime resulted in significantly increased sleep efficiency and reduced wake after sleep onset for the entire 2-week postoperative period. No other significant differences for actigraphy determined sleep outcomes or subjective outcome parameters in the perioperative period were found between the groups. Overall, the patients sleep outcomes were within normal ranges and no participants had pathological sleep disturbances. Conclusions: Melatonin significantly changed sleep efficiency and wake after sleep onset after surgery, but had no effects on other objective sleep outcomes or on subjective sleep quality (VAS and KSS). Clinical Trial Registration: The trial was registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01355523) before inclusion of the first patient. Citation: Madsen MT, Hansen MV, Andersen LT, Hageman I, Rasmussen LS, Bokmand S, Rosenberg J, Gögenur I. Effect of melatonin on sleep in the perioperative period after breast cancer surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(2):225–233. PMID:26414973

  8. Effects of Music Therapy on Anesthesia Requirements and Anxiety in Women Undergoing Ambulatory Breast Surgery for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bradley Palmer, Jaclyn; Lane, Deforia; Mayo, Diane; Schluchter, Mark; Leeming, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of live and recorded perioperative music therapy on anesthesia requirements, anxiety levels, recovery time, and patient satisfaction in women experiencing surgery for diagnosis or treatment of breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between 2012 and 2014, 207 female patients undergoing surgery for potential or known breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either patient-selected live music (LM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 69), patient-selected recorded music (RM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 70), or usual care (UC) preoperatively with noise-blocking earmuffs intraoperatively (n = 68). Results The LM and the RM groups did not differ significantly from the UC group in the amount of propofol required to reach moderate sedation. Compared with the UC group, both the LM and the RM groups had greater reductions (P < .001) in anxiety scores preoperatively (mean changes [and standard deviation: −30.9 [36.3], −26.8 [29.3], and 0.0 [22.7]), respectively. The LM and RM groups did not differ from the UC group with respect to recovery time; however, the LM group had a shorter recovery time compared with the RM group (a difference of 12.4 minutes; 95% CI, 2.2 to 22.5; P = .018). Satisfaction scores for the LM and RM groups did not differ from those of the UC group. Conclusion Including music therapy as a complementary modality with cancer surgery may help manage preoperative anxiety in a way that is safe, effective, time-efficient, and enjoyable. PMID:26282640

  9. Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments : The aesthetic episode - Developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Leder, Helmut; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-11-01

    About a decade ago, psychology of the arts started to gain momentum owing to a number of drives: technological progress improved the conditions under which art could be studied in the laboratory, neuroscience discovered the arts as an area of interest, and new theories offered a more comprehensive look at aesthetic experiences. Ten years ago, Leder, Belke, Oeberst, and Augustin (2004) proposed a descriptive information-processing model of the components that integrate an aesthetic episode. This theory offered explanations for modern art's large number of individualized styles, innovativeness, and for the diverse aesthetic experiences it can stimulate. In addition, it described how information is processed over the time course of an aesthetic episode, within and over perceptual, cognitive and emotional components. Here, we review the current state of the model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics.

  10. Outcome analysis of 541 women undergoing breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David A; Wood, Benjamin C; Knoll, Gregory M; Chang, Shu C; Crantford, John C; Bharti, Gaurav D; Levine, Edward A; Thompson, James T

    2012-05-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) has evolved as a favorable approach to the management of early-stage breast cancer. Shortcomings of BCT include the potential need for re-excision in the event of positive tumor margins as well as the untoward sequelae of radiation therapy. Both of those factors have led to a substantial proportion of patients undergoing BCT who ultimately report suboptimal aesthetic outcomes. Application of plastic surgery principles to the management of this patient subset has been shown to be beneficial from both an oncologic and cosmetic perspective.The aim of this study was to identify factors that may predict which patients would benefit most from involvement of a plastic surgeon before BCT. A retrospective analysis was performed on 762 patients undergoing lumpectomy during a 10-year study period at a single institution. Younger women and patients with tumor size approaching 2 cm were noted to have a significantly higher likelihood of oncologic outcomes that ultimately required breast reconstruction. Integration of oncoplastic techniques in the surgical management of patients undergoing BCT would likely contribute to improvement in aesthetic outcomes and overall patient satisfaction.

  11. [Current clinical issues and recent trends in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Japan-genetic testing for HBOC and risk-reducing surgery].

    PubMed

    Arai, Masami; Iwase, Takuji; Takazawa, Yutaka; Takeshima, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The recognition of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) is gradually spreading in Japan after a famous American actress made it public that she underwent risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) based on mutation of BRCA1. HBOC is a cancer susceptibility syndrome involving breast, ovarian, or prostate cancers due to germline mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2. Although the frequency is low, genomic rearrangement is also found in Japan; therefore, in addition to PCR-direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) should be performed in genetic testing for HBOC. Recently, candidate genes other than BRCA1/2, such as RAD51C, PALB2, and BRIP1, have been identified for hereditary breast cancers. Variants of uncertain significance are seen in approximately 4-6% of all genetic testing reports for BRCA1/2. ACMG recommends the use of the term"variant"in addition to a modifier such as pathogenic, benign, and so on, instead of terms such as mutation or polymorphism. The incidence of ovarian cancer is not increased in women from breast cancer-only families that test negative for BRCA1/2 mutations. Therefore, intensive gynecological surveillance may not be needed for these clients. Basic data such as penetrance and cumulative risks of HBOC in Japanese populations are insufficient for risk assessment in genetic counseling. The Japanese HBOC consortium was established, and as one of the activities of the consortium, the registration project will start to provide essential genetic information in clinical practice. In Japan risk-reducing surgeries are, albeit gradually, increasingly being performed to potentially protect mutation carriers against HBOC. Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) is effective in the reduction of the incidence of breast cancer, as well as of ovarian cancer. Furthermore, RRSO is associated with improved overall survival in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. RRM also reduces the risk of breast cancer by more than 90%, but the survival benefit

  12. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored. PMID:25730537

  13. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored.

  14. Aesthetic lip splits.

    PubMed

    Hayter, J P; Vaughan, E D; Brown, J S

    1996-10-01

    Both upper and lower lip splits, usually with osteotomy of the underlying jaw, improve access to the deep structures of the head and neck. A simple modification to the midline lip split is to incorporate a chevron in both the peri-oral skin and vermilion margin. The advantages are: accurate wound closure, no straight line contracture and a broken line of the peri-oral scar. This improves the aesthetic result of the healed lip.

  15. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  16. Giant breast tumors: Surgical management of phyllodes tumors, potential for reconstructive surgery and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Margaret I; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Patterson, Cynthia C; McKelvey, Michael T; Gordillo, Gayle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Carson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Background Phyllodes tumors are biphasic fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast. While the surgical management of these relatively uncommon tumors has been addressed in the literature, few reports have commented on the surgical approach to tumors greater than ten centimeters in diameter – the giant phyllodes tumor. Case presentation We report two cases of giant breast tumors and discuss the techniques utilized for pre-operative diagnosis, tumor removal, and breast reconstruction. A review of the literature on the surgical management of phyllodes tumors was performed. Conclusion Management of the giant phyllodes tumor presents the surgeon with unique challenges. The majority of these tumors can be managed by simple mastectomy. Axillary lymph node metastasis is rare, and dissection should be limited to patients with pathologic evidence of tumor in the lymph nodes. PMID:19014438

  17. Randomized, prospective assessment of moisturizer efficacy for the treatment of radiation dermatitis following radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Ogita, Mami; Akahane, Keiko; Haga, Chiori; Ito, Ryoko; Arai, Satoru; Ishida, Yasushi; Tsukada, Yoichiro; Kawamori, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effect of heparinoid moisturizer use after acute skin damage for patients receiving whole-breast radiotherapy after lumpectomy is understudied. Methods A total of 30 patients were randomly assigned to receive heparinoid moisturizer (Group M), and 32 patients comprised the control group (Group C). Patients in Group M were instructed to apply heparinoid moisturizer from 2 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy, and to continue to use the moisturizer until 3 months after completion of whole-breast radiotherapy. Group C patients were instructed to not apply any topical moisturizer during the study period. The relative ratio of skin water content ratio (RWCR(t) = (It /Nt)/(I0/N0)) between irradiated and non-irradiated field was calculated. Signs and symptoms were also assessed. The primary endpoint was the difference in relative ratio of skin water content ratio between 2 and 4 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy. Results In Group C, relative ratio of skin water content ratio dropped to 0.80 ± 0.15 at 2 weeks and maintained the low level at 4 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy. Similarly, in Group M, relative ratio of skin water content ratio dropped to 0.81 ± 0.19 at 2 weeks (prior to application), however, it returned to baseline level (1.05 ± 0.23) at 4 weeks (2 weeks after application). The arithmetic difference of relative ratio of skin water content ratio in Group M was 0.24 ± 0.23 and was significantly larger than in Group C (0.06 ± 0.15; P < 0.01). Skin dryness and desquamation were less severe in Group M. Conclusions The application of heparinoid moisturizer for 2 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy significantly increased water content and helped improve skin dryness and desquamation compared with no use of moisturizer. PMID:26491204

  18. Discordance of Intraoperative Frozen Section Analysis with Definitive Histology of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer Surgery: Complementary Axillary Lymph Node Dissection is Irrelevant for Subsequent Systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, D.; Gobardhan, P. D.; Madsen, E. V. E.; Albregts, M.; van Gorp, J.; de Hooge, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background In breast cancer surgery, intraoperative frozen section (FS) analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) enables axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) during the same operative procedure. In case of discordance between a “negative” FS analysis and definitive histology, an ALND as a second operation is advocated since additional lymph node metastases may be present. The clinical implications of the subsequent ALND in these patients were evaluated. Materials and Methods Between November 2000 and May 2008, 879 consecutive breast cancer patients underwent surgery including sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) with intraoperative FS analysis of 2 central cuts from axillary SLNs. Following fixation and serial sectioning, SLNs were further examined postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical techniques. For patients with a discordant FS examination, the effect of the pathology findings of the subsequent ALND specimen on subsequent nonsurgical therapy were evaluated. Results FS analysis detected axillary metastases in the SLN(s) in 200 patients (23%), while the definitive pathology examination detected metastases in SLNs in another 151 patients (17%). A complementary ALND was performed in 108 of the 151 patients with discordant FS. Additional tumor positive axillary lymph nodes were found in 17 patients (16%), leading to “upstaging” in 7 (6%). Subsequent nonsurgical treatment was adjusted in 4 patients (4%): all 4 had more extensive locoregional radiotherapy; no patient received additional hormonal and/or chemotherapy. Conclusion Discordance between intraoperative FS analysis and definitive histology of SLNs is common. In this selection of patients, a substantial proportion had additional lymph node metastases, but postsurgical treatment was rarely adjusted based on the findings of the complementary ALND. PMID:20422461

  19. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scapula alata (SA) is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT). Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9%) had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009), 6.1 (P = 0.016), and 6.1 (P = 0.005), respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036) and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046) among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature. PMID:22591589

  20. Bilateral breast necrosis due to local injection of fish oil.

    PubMed

    Turk, Emin; Karagulle, Erdal; Koksal, Hande; Togan, Turhan; Erinanc, Ozgur Hilal; Dogru, Osman; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The breast is as aesthetically important as it is physiologically. Physicians and women have practiced various methods for breast aesthetics and augmentation. We report a female veterinarian who injected fish oil into her breast, which led to inflammation and necrosis of breast tissue. When all medical therapies failed, bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. We did not find a case in the literature where fish oil had been used for breast augmentation. However, we did find that many agents have been injected for breast augmentation, the results of which were tragic, just as the case presented herein.

  1. [Indications and counter-indications for non-mutilating treatment of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cosendey, B A

    1992-05-01

    Progress achieved in understanding the biology of breast cancer, as well as the desire of patients to avoid major mutilation, have resulted in ever increasing indications for breast-conserving surgery. Such indications depend on two considerations: the medical consideration which seeks to achieve the same rate of control of loco-regional disease as mutilating surgery and the aesthetic consideration, permitting a satisfactory result on a functional plane. Nevertheless, a case of breast cancer appearing unifocal under clinical examination and radiology is frequently accompanied by tumoral intramammal dissemination, the evaluation of which after histological examination varies according to the author. Should the coexistence of cancer in situ and invasive cancer radically modify the choice of therapy? It seems absurd to accept non-mutilating surgery for invasive cancer and to choose mutilating treatment for certain cases of cancer in situ. Although there appears to be only relative counter-indication for conservatory treatment in cases of advanced cancer (T3N1b and above), it is not recommended in the presence of several types of histology and in certain specific circumstances when associated with cancer in situ. A review of the literature will enable us to cover in detail other risk factors and to enumerate indications and counter-indications for non-mutilating treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Intraoperative frozen section analysis of margins in breast conserving surgery significantly decreases reoperative rates: one-year experience at an ambulatory surgical center.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Julie M; Visscher, Daniel; Sabel, Michael; Breslin, Tara; Healy, Patrick; Daignaut, Stephanie; Myers, Jeffrey L; Wu, Angela J

    2012-11-01

    Intraoperative frozen section (FS) margin evaluation is not common practice for patients undergoing breast conservation therapy (BCT), but offers a significant reduction in reoperation. In this study, a technique to allow for more effective freezing of breast tissue was developed to perform FS evaluation of lumpectomy margins (FSM) for all patients undergoing BCT at an ambulatory surgery center. FS evaluation of sentinel lymph node biopsy specimens was performed concurrently. One hundred eighty-one study and 188 control patients, with and without FS evaluation, were compared. Reexcision was reduced 34% (from 48.9% to 14.9%) and reoperation was reduced 36% (from 55.3% to 19.3%) with FS evaluation. Most of the decrease in reoperative rate was because of a decrease in the need for margin reexcision. The number of patients requiring 1, 2, or 3 operations to complete therapy was 84, 92, and 12, respectively, in the control group, and 146, 33, and 2, respectively, in the study group. Lobular subtype, multifocal disease, and larger tumor size (≥2 cm) were significantly associated with failure of FSM to prevent reoperation, but reoperation rates were still significantly decreased in this subgroup of patients (from 75.5% to 43.8%) with FSM. This study highlights an innovative yet simple and adaptable FS approach that resulted in a nearly 3-fold reduction in reoperation for patients undergoing BCT.

  3. What Can the Aesthetic Movement Tell Us about Aesthetic Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldsen, Jette

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the author presents two quotations from Walter Pater which suggest a provoking and demanding recipe by which to live one's aesthetic life and point out where all aesthetic education must begin. The author also exemplifies Walter Pater's ideas through two works by the painter James McNeill Whistler and the poet Algernon Swinburne…

  4. Ultrasonic aesthetic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Robiony, Massimo; Casadei, Matteo; Sbuelz, Massimo; Della Pietra, Lorenzo; Politi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    The management of frontal bone injury is an important issue, and inappropriate management of such injuries may give rise to serious complications. Piezosurgery is a technique used to perform safe and effective osteotomies using piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations. This instrument allows a safe method for osteotomy of the cranial vault in close proximity to extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as the brain. After a wide review of the literature, the authors present this technical report, introduce the use of piezosurgery to perform a safe "slim-osteotomies" for treatment of posttraumatic frontal bone deformities, and suggest the use of this instrument for aesthetic recontouring of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24914759

  5. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj; Choudhary, Rama Shankar Kashinath

    2014-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is defined as a break in the continuity of enamel with a reduction in the layers leading to depressions or grooves. Chronological hypoplasia is differentiated from other forms of hypoplasia due to its characteristic presentation (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement. Prevention of interaction of aetiological factors is not possible because multiple factors are required for enamel synthesis. This paper highlights how to diagnose, intercept and treat chronological hypoplasias. It also mentions reasons for treating a case and different modalities available. PMID:24907208

  6. Long-term outcomes in patients with radiation-associated angiosarcomas of the breast following surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Keila E.; Ravi, Vinod; Kin, Katherine; Yi, Min; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; May, Caitlin D.; Arun, Banu K.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Lam, Ryan; Lahat, Guy; Hoffman, Aviad; Cormier, Janice N.; Feig, Barry W.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiation-associated angiosarcoma (RAAS) is a devastating disease occasionally observed in breast cancer patients treated with radiation. Due to its rarity, our knowledge—of disease risk factors, epidemiology, treatment, and outcome—is extremely limited. Therefore, we sought to identify clinicopathologic factors associated with local and distant recurrence, and disease-specific survival (DSS). Methods Radiation-associated angiosarcoma was defined as pathologically confirmed breast or chest wall angiosarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. A comprehensive search of our institutional tumor registry (1/1/93 through 2/28/11) was used to identify patients (n=95 females); patient, original tumor, RAAS treatment, and outcome variables were retrospectively retrieved and assembled into a database. Results The median follow-up for all RAAS patients was 10.3 years (range, 2.4 – 31.8 years). The latency period following radiation exposure ranged from 1.4 to 26 years (median = 7 years). One- and five-year DSS rates were 93.5% and 62.6%, respectively. Reduced risk of local recurrence was observed in patients who received chemotherapy (P = 0.0003). In multivariable analysis, size was found to be an independent predictor of adverse outcome (P = 0.015). Discussion Our study demonstrates that RAAS exhibits high recurrence rates. It also highlights the need for well-designed multicenter clinical trials to inform the true utility of chemotherapy in this disease. PMID:23224828

  7. Pre-operative factors indicating risk of multiple operations versus a single operation in women undergoing surgery for screen detected breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, E A M; Currie, R J; Mohammed, K; Allen, S D; Michell, M J

    2013-02-01

    We aim to identify preoperative factors at diagnosis which could predict whether women undergoing wide local excision (WLE) would require further operations. 1593 screen-detected invasive and non-invasive breast cancers were reviewed. Age, presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer size on mammography, mammographic sign, tumour type, grade and confidence of the radiologist in malignancy were compared. 83%(1315/1593) of women had a WLE. Of these, 70%(919/1315) had a single operation, and 30%(396/1315) multiple operations. These included repeat WLE to clear margins (60%(238/396)), mastectomy (34%(133/396)) and axillary dissection (6%(25/396)). The presence of mammographic microcalcification, lobular carcinoma and grade 2 malignancy on core biopsy were independent risk factors for multiple operations on multivariate analysis. Women with mammographic DCIS >30 mm were 3.4 times more likely to undergo repeat surgery than those with smaller foci. The multidisciplinary team should pay particular attention to these factors when planning surgery.

  8. Celebrating the Fiftieth Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery: The Legacy of Thomas J. Baker, M.D.

    PubMed

    Stuzin, James M

    2016-02-01

    The Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery celebrates its fiftieth year. A review of its history mirrors the evolution of aesthetic surgery in terms of advancements in techniques, and the acceptance of cosmetic surgery as a credible subspecialty of plastic surgery. Beginning in 1967, the Baker Gordon Symposium was the first live surgery symposium that focused on aesthetic surgery, and set a precedent for aesthetic surgery education over the ensuing decades. Historically, the pioneers in aesthetic techniques first presented their innovations at the Baker Gordon Symposium, helping to educate and train their peers to perform cosmetic procedures. The legacy of Thomas Baker is intertwined with the history of the Baker Gordon Symposium, both in terms of his contributions to plastic surgery education, and to the acceptance of the subspecialty of aesthetic surgery.

  9. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  10. Molecular dyes used for surgical specimen margin orientation allow for intraoperative optical assessment during breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, David M; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Kanick, Stephen C; Elliott, Jonathan T; Wells, Wendy A; Barth, Richard J; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-04-01

    A variety of optical techniques utilizing near-infrared (NIR) light are being proposed for intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment. However, immediately following a lumpectomy excision, the margins are inked, which preserves the orientation of the specimen but prevents optical interrogation of the tissue margins. Here, a workflow is proposed that allows for both NIR optical assessment following full specimen marking using molecular dyes which have negligible absorption and scattering in the NIR. The effect of standard surgical inks in contrast to molecular dyes for an NIR signal is shown. Further, the proposed workflow is demonstrated with full specimen intraoperative imaging on all margins directly after the lumpectomy has been excised and completely marked. This work is an important step in the path to clinical feasibility of intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment using NIR optical methods without having to compromise on the current clinical practice of inking resected specimens for margin orientation.

  11. The JACS prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed women with breast cancer investigating joint and muscle pain, aches, and stiffness: pain and quality of life after primary surgery and before adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer affects one in eight UK women during their lifetime: many of these women now receive adjuvant chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Joint and muscle pains, aches, and stiffness are common but the natural history, aetiology and impact of these symptoms are unknown. A cohort study of newly diagnosed women with primary breast cancer was established to explore this. In this paper we present study methods and sample characteristics, describe participants’ experience of musculoskeletal pain at baseline interview, and explore its impact on quality of life. Methods Women with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited following primary surgery into a multi-centre cohort study. They received questionnaires by post five times (baseline, 3, 6 , 9 and 12 months) to investigate prevalence, severity, location and correlates of musculoskeletal pain, and impact on quality-of-life. Pain was measured by the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire, the Brief Pain Inventory, and MSK-specific questions, and quality of life by the SF-36 and FACIT scales. Results 543 women (mean age 57 years, range 28–87, 64% postmenopausal) were recruited following surgery for primary breast cancer from breast cancer clinics in eight hospitals. Fifteen per cent of the eligible cohort was missed; 28% declined to participate. Joint or muscle aches, pains or stiffness were reported by 69% women with 28% specifically reporting joint pain/aches/stiffness. Quality of life, as measured by the FACT-B and adjusted for age, depression, surgery and analgesic use, is significantly worse in all domains in those with musculoskeletal problems than those without. Conclusions Our findings highlights the importance of a better understanding of these symptoms and their impact on the lives of women with primary breast cancer so that healthcare professionals are better equipped to support patients and to provide accurate information to inform treatment decisions. Further papers from this study will

  12. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts.

  13. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts. PMID:20819476

  14. Towards an Aesthetics of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This article is an enquiry into the possible shape of "an aesthetics of care" drawn from the experience of looking after a Congolese colleague after he was injured in a massacre in the DR Congo. The mix of different professional and personal circumstances directs the writing towards concerns with the ethics and aesthetics of caring for…

  15. Aesthetic valence of visual illusions

    PubMed Central

    Stevanov, Jasmina; Marković, Slobodan; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Visual illusions constitute an interesting perceptual phenomenon, but they also have an aesthetic and affective dimension. We hypothesized that the illusive nature itself causes the increased aesthetic and affective valence of illusions compared with their non-illusory counterparts. We created pairs of stimuli. One qualified as a standard visual illusion whereas the other one did not, although they were matched in as many perceptual dimensions as possible. The phenomenal quality of being an illusion had significant effects on “Aesthetic Experience” (fascinating, irresistible, exceptional, etc), “Evaluation” (pleasant, cheerful, clear, bright, etc), “Arousal” (interesting, imaginative, complex, diverse, etc), and “Regularity” (balanced, coherent, clear, realistic, etc). A subsequent multiple regression analysis suggested that Arousal was a better predictor of Aesthetic Experience than Evaluation. The findings of this study demonstrate that illusion is a phenomenal quality of the percept which has measurable aesthetic and affective valence. PMID:23145272

  16. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  17. Small-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A new approach that is superior to fixed-field IMRT in optimizing dosimetric and treatment-relevant parameters for patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Hu, Tao; Chen, Yeshan

    2016-08-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is considered to deliver a better dose distribution and to shorten treatment time. There is a lack of research regarding breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using VMAT with prone positioning. We developed a new small-arc VMAT methodology and compared it to conventional (fixed-field) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the dosimetric and treatment relevant parameters for breast cancer patients in the prone position.Ten early-stage breast cancer patients were included in this exploratory study. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation scan in the prone position and for each patient, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated using the Monaco planning system. Two symmetrical partial arcs were applied in the VMAT plans. The angle ranges of the 2 arcs were set to approximately 60° to 100° and 220° to 260°, with small adjustments to maximize target coverage, while minimizing lung and heart exposure. The IMRT plans used 4 fixed fields. Prescribed doses were 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The target coverage, homogeneity, conformity, dose to organs at risk (OAR), treatment time, and monitor units (MU) were evaluated.Higher median conformal index (CI) and lower homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) were respectively observed in VMAT and plans group (CI, 95% vs 91%; HI, 0.09 vs 0.12; P < 0.001). The volumes of ipsilateral lung receiving 30, 20, 10, and 5 Gy were lower for VMAT (P < 0.01), being 10%, 14.9%, 25.9%, and 44.9%, respectively, compared to 11.79%, 17.32%, 30.27%, and 50.58% for the IMRT plans. The mean lung dose was also reduced from 10.6 ± 1.8 to 9.6 ± 1.4 Gy (P = 0.001). The volumes of the heart receiving 30 and 40 Gy were similar for the 2 methods. In addition, the median treatment time (161 vs 412 seconds; P < 0.001) and the mean MU (713 vs 878; P < 0.001) were lower for VMAT.Small-arc VMAT plan improved CI and HI for the

  18. IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana; Gubanova, Elena; Khrustaleva, Irina; Atamanov, Vasiliy; Saybel, Anastasiya; Parsagashvili, Elena; Dmitrieva, Irina; Sanchez, Elena; Lapatina, Natalia; Korolkova, Tatiana; Saromytskaya, Alena; Goltsova, Elena; Satardinova, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Background Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013), and Moscow, Russia (March 2014). The expert group reviewed and analyzed the existing evidence, consensus recommendations, and Russian experts’ extensive practical experience of incobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics to reach consensus on optimal doses, potential dose adjustments, and injection sites of incobotulinumtoxinA for facial aesthetics. Results All experts developed guidance on the optimal doses for incobotulinumtoxinA treatment of different regions of the upper and lower face. The expert panel agreed that there are no differences in the efficacy and duration of the effect between the four BoNT/As that are commercially available for facial aesthetic indications in Russia and that, when administered correctly, all BoNT/As can achieve optimal results. Experts also agreed that nonresponse to BoNT/A can be caused by neutralizing antibodies. Conclusion On the basis of the scientific and clinical evidence available for incobotulinumtoxinA, coupled with the extensive clinical experience of the consensus group, experts recommended the optimal doses of incobotulinumtoxinA effective for treatment of wrinkles of the upper and lower face to achieve the expected aesthetic outcome. These first Russian guidelines on the optimal use of incobotulinumtoxinA for

  19. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations.

  20. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations. PMID:26470580

  1. Breast Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    If you need a mastectomy, you have a choice about whether or not to have surgery to rebuild the shape of the breast. Instead of ... be done at the same time as the mastectomy, or it may be done later on. If ...

  2. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  3. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. PMID:27428582

  4. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed.

  5. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast: defining the role for skin-sparing mastectomy and autologous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Atalla, Mohamed Anwar; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Grinsell, Damien; Hyett, Anthony; Prakash, Saurabh; Cham, Alvin

    2011-05-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) are uncommon fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, noteworthy for their difficult excisions and high recurrence rates. In the setting of recurrence, there is no consensus in the literature as to the extent of excision or the impact on reconstructive options. Breast-conserving surgery and simple mastectomy have each been described with mixed reports. Despite a shift toward the selective use of skin-sparing mastectomy and nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomy in breast carcinoma, neither the role for these techniques nor the role for breast reconstruction in recurrent PT has been described. A case report is presented demonstrating the utility of skin-sparing mastectomy and autologous breast reconstruction for locally recurrent PT of the breast, with a literature review of management options in this setting presented. The case presented highlights an appropriate setting for autologous microsurgical reconstruction of the breast in recurrent PT. The literature review highlights a lack of any published management consensus, with only the role for mastectomy suggested for recurrent high-grade or malignant lesions. A potential management algorithm is thus presented. Skin-sparing mastectomy, particularly for intermediate-grade lesions, may allow wider resections while enabling aesthetically pleasing reconstructive options without affecting recurrence rates.

  8. Impact of relaxation training according to the Yoga In Daily Life® system on anxiety after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Tine; Zagoričnik, Miha; Kovačič, Miha

    2013-07-16

    The purpose of this pilot study was to gather information on the immediate and short-term effects of relaxation training according to the Yoga In Daily Life® (YIDL®) system on anxiety of breast cancer patients. The YIDL® system is a holistic system being practised and taught worldwide and has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. The system aims to establish physical, mental, spiritual, and social health. Thirty-two patients at the Institute for Oncology Ljubljana were randomized to the experimental (n=16) and to the control groups (n=16). Both groups received the same standard physiotherapy for 1 week, while the experimental group additionally received 1-hour group relaxation training session according to the YIDL® system per day. At discharge, the experimental group was issued with audiocassette recordings containing similar instructions for relaxation training to be practiced for 3 weeks individually at home. Anxiety measures were obtained by blinded assessors using standardized questionnaires. The results indicate that relaxation training according to the YIDL® system could be a useful clinical physiotherapy intervention for breast cancer patients experiencing anxiety.

  9. Predictive diagnosis of the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery by single-particle quantum dot imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Higuchi, Hideo; Tada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients (20–25%) has been dramatically improved by the clinical application of the anti-HER2 antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab. However, the clinical outcomes of HER2-negative cases with a poor prognosis have not improved, and novel therapeutic antibody drugs or diagnostic molecular markers of prognosis are urgently needed. Here, we targeted protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a new biomarker for HER2-negative patients. The developed anti-PAR1 antibody inhibited PAR1 activation by matrix metalloprotease 1 and thereby prevented cancer-cell migration and invasion. To estimate PAR1 expression levels in HER2-negative patient tissues using the antibody, user-friendly immunohistochemistry with fluorescence nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) was developed. Previously, immunohistochemistry with QDs was affected by tissue autofluorescence, making quantitative measurement extremely difficult. We significantly improved the quantitative sensitivity of immunohistochemistry with QDs by using an autofluorescence-subtracted image and single-QD imaging. The immunohistochemistry showed that PAR1 expression was strongly correlated with relapse-free survival time in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Therefore, the developed anti-PAR1 antibody is a strong candidate for use as an anticancer drug and a prognostic biomarker for HER2-negative patients. PMID:26392299

  10. Predictive diagnosis of the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery by single-particle quantum dot imaging.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Higuchi, Hideo; Tada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients (20-25%) has been dramatically improved by the clinical application of the anti-HER2 antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab. However, the clinical outcomes of HER2-negative cases with a poor prognosis have not improved, and novel therapeutic antibody drugs or diagnostic molecular markers of prognosis are urgently needed. Here, we targeted protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a new biomarker for HER2-negative patients. The developed anti-PAR1 antibody inhibited PAR1 activation by matrix metalloprotease 1 and thereby prevented cancer-cell migration and invasion. To estimate PAR1 expression levels in HER2-negative patient tissues using the antibody, user-friendly immunohistochemistry with fluorescence nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) was developed. Previously, immunohistochemistry with QDs was affected by tissue autofluorescence, making quantitative measurement extremely difficult. We significantly improved the quantitative sensitivity of immunohistochemistry with QDs by using an autofluorescence-subtracted image and single-QD imaging. The immunohistochemistry showed that PAR1 expression was strongly correlated with relapse-free survival time in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Therefore, the developed anti-PAR1 antibody is a strong candidate for use as an anticancer drug and a prognostic biomarker for HER2-negative patients. PMID:26392299

  11. Impact of relaxation training according to the Yoga In Daily Life® system on anxiety after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Tine; Zagoričnik, Miha; Kovačič, Miha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to gather information on the immediate and short-term effects of relaxation training according to the Yoga In Daily Life® (YIDL®) system on anxiety of breast cancer patients. The YIDL® system is a holistic system being practised and taught worldwide and has been proven to be highly effective in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. The system aims to establish physical, mental, spiritual, and social health. Thirty-two patients at the Institute for Oncology Ljubljana were randomized to the experimental (n=16) and to the control groups (n=16). Both groups received the same standard physiotherapy for 1 week, while the experimental group additionally received 1-hour group relaxation training session according to the YIDL® system per day. At discharge, the experimental group was issued with audiocassette recordings containing similar instructions for relaxation training to be practiced for 3 weeks individually at home. Anxiety measures were obtained by blinded assessors using standardized questionnaires. The results indicate that relaxation training according to the YIDL® system could be a useful clinical physiotherapy intervention for breast cancer patients experiencing anxiety. PMID:23934515

  12. After plastic surgery: adolescent-reported appearance ratings and appearance-related burdens in patient and general population groups.

    PubMed

    Simis, Kuni J; Hovius, Steven E R; de Beaufort, Inez D; Verhulst, Frank C; Koot, Hans M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of appearance-related surgery on psychosocial functioning during adolescence. To this end, changes in bodily attitudes and appearance-related burdens in adolescents undergoing corrective (for aesthetic deformities) and reconstructive (for congenital or acquired deformities) surgery were compared with those in a general population sample.A group of 184 adolescent plastic surgery patients (corrective, n = 100; reconstructive, n = 84), and a comparison group of 83 adolescents at random selected from three municipalities (corrective, n = 67; reconstructive, n = 16), aged 12 to 22 years, were studied at two time points with a 6-month interval. The plastic surgical patients were studied presurgically and postsurgically. Using fully structured telephone interviews and postal questionnaires, adolescents' ratings of their appearance, bodily satisfaction and attitudes, and appearance-related burdens were obtained. All patients reported a significant decrease in burdens after surgery compared with the comparison group, indicating a much more prominent improvement in the patient sample compared with the developmental changes that may be expected to occur in adolescence. The corrective patient group reported least burdens after the operation. More specifically, the "breasts" group benefited most from the operation, indicating that breast corrections are rewarding interventions. The findings of this study imply that adolescents can be regarded as good candidates for plastic surgery. They gain bodily satisfaction, and they are relieved of many appearance-related burdens. Physical, social, and psychological burdens related to appearance satisfaction improve considerably in both corrective and reconstructive adolescent patients.

  13. The impact of age on local control in women with pT1 breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, J J; van der Palen, J; Meerwaldt, J H

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of young age with regard to local control in a prospective cohort of 1085 women with pathological T1 tumours treated with breast conservative treatment (BCT). Patients were divided into two age groups: 40 years or younger, 7.8%, and older than 40 years, 92.2%. With a median follow-up of 71 months, the local recurrence rate was 10.6% in women < or =40 years, and 3.7% in older women. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was significantly different for the two age groups, respectively 89%, < or =40 years, and 97.6%, >40 years (P=0.0046). A separate analysis showed a significantly decreased LRFS for young women with a positive family history, 75.4% versus 98.4% 5-year LRFS for older women. A worse LRFS for young women with a negative lymph node status was also observed, respectively 84% versus 98% 5-year LRFS (both P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, taking into account the pre-treatment and treatment factors, age < or =40 years, was the only significant predictor of a decreased LRFS. Thus, young age is an important factor in relation to local control. In a subset analysis, this significant adverse effect of young age on outcome appears to be limited to the node-negative patients and those with a positive family history. To date, there is no evidence that young women with pT1 breast cancer, treated by mastectomy have an improved outcome when compared with those treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Taking into account results from a subset analysis suggests that giving systemic therapy to a subgroup of women who are < or =40 years, node-negative and/or have a positive family history might give a better local control. PMID:11576834

  14. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Tomatis, Stefano; Valli, Maria Carla; Guzzetti, Renata; Tonoli, Sandro; Bertoni, Filippo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Meregalli, Sofia; Asnaghi, Diego; Arienti, Virginia; Pradella, Renato; Cafaro, Ines

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors.

  15. The impact of age on local control in women with pT1 breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, J J; van der Palen, J; Meerwaldt, J H

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of young age with regard to local control in a prospective cohort of 1085 women with pathological T1 tumours treated with breast conservative treatment (BCT). Patients were divided into two age groups: 40 years or younger, 7.8%, and older than 40 years, 92.2%. With a median follow-up of 71 months, the local recurrence rate was 10.6% in women < or =40 years, and 3.7% in older women. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was significantly different for the two age groups, respectively 89%, < or =40 years, and 97.6%, >40 years (P=0.0046). A separate analysis showed a significantly decreased LRFS for young women with a positive family history, 75.4% versus 98.4% 5-year LRFS for older women. A worse LRFS for young women with a negative lymph node status was also observed, respectively 84% versus 98% 5-year LRFS (both P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, taking into account the pre-treatment and treatment factors, age < or =40 years, was the only significant predictor of a decreased LRFS. Thus, young age is an important factor in relation to local control. In a subset analysis, this significant adverse effect of young age on outcome appears to be limited to the node-negative patients and those with a positive family history. To date, there is no evidence that young women with pT1 breast cancer, treated by mastectomy have an improved outcome when compared with those treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Taking into account results from a subset analysis suggests that giving systemic therapy to a subgroup of women who are < or =40 years, node-negative and/or have a positive family history might give a better local control.

  16. Columellar Aesthetics in Open Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kridel, Russell W H; Kwak, Edward S; Watson, Jeffrey B

    2016-08-01

    Detailed descriptions of the ideals of columellar aesthetics and nostril shape are conspicuously lacking from the medical literature. Achieving an aesthetic nasal base is critical to an optimal rhinoplasty result. Deviations in the columella and variations in its width and height lead to distortion of nostril shape and frequently compromise function. Six types of columellar disproportion are presented with detailed explanations of how to treat each. By properly recognizing and addressing columellar deformities, the surgeon can optimize both the aesthetic and functional results that are achieved. PMID:27494576

  17. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Physician-Rated Toxicity and Cosmetic Outcome at 30 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Dolsma, Wil V.; Busz, Dianne M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Maduro, John H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome (CO) in breast cancer survivors treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost (3D-CRT-SIB) and to identify risk factors for toxicity, with special focus on the impact of age. Methods and Materials: Included were 940 consecutive disease-free patients treated for breast cancer (Stage 0-III) with 3D-CRT-SIB, after breast-conserving surgery, from 2005 to 2010. Physician-rated toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) and CO were prospectively assessed during yearly follow-up, up to 5 years after radiotherapy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses using a bootstrapping method were performed. Results: At 3 years, toxicity scores of 436 patients were available. Grade {>=}2 fibrosis in the boost area was observed in 8.5%, non-boost fibrosis in 49.4%, pain to the chest wall in 6.7%, and fair/poor CO in 39.7% of cases. Radiotherapy before chemotherapy was significantly associated with grade {>=}2 boost fibrosis at 3 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.0). Non-boost fibrosis was associated with re-resection (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0) and larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). At 1 year, chest wall pain was significantly associated with high boost dosage (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.7) and younger age (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7). A fair/poor CO was observed more often after re-resection (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.4-8.5), after regional radiotherapy (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2-7.1), and in larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). Conclusions: Toxicity and CO are not impaired after 3D-CRT-SIB. Fibrosis was not significantly associated with radiotherapy parameters. Independent risk factors for fibrosis were chemotherapy after radiotherapy, re-resection, and larger tumor size. Re-resection was most predictive for worse CO. Age had an impact on chest wall pain occurrence.

  18. Post–breast surgery pain syndrome: establishing a consensus for the definition of post-mastectomy pain syndrome to provide a standardized clinical and research approach — a review of the literature and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Waltho, Daniel; Rockwell, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-mastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) is a frequent complication of breast surgery. There is currently no standard definition for this chronic pain syndrome. The purpose of this review was to establish a consensus for defining PMPS by identifying the various elements included in the definitions and how they vary across the literature, determining how these definitions affect the methodological components therein, and proposing a definition that appropriately encompasses all of the appropriate elements. Methods We searched PubMed to retrieve all studies and case reports on PMPS, and we analyzed definitions of PMPS, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and methods of measuring PMPS. Results Twenty-three studies were included in this review. We identified 7 independent domains for defining PMPS: surgical breast procedure, neuropathic nature, pain of at least moderate intensity, protracted duration, frequent symptoms, appropriate location of the symptoms and exacerbation with movement. These domains were used with varying frequency. Inclusion/exclusion criteria and methods for assessing PMPS also varied markedly. Conclusion To prevent future discrepancies in both the clinical and research settings, we propose a new and complete definition based on the results of our review: PMPS is pain that occurs after any breast surgery; is of at least moderate severity; possesses neuropathic qualities; is located in the ipsilateral breast/chest wall, axilla, and/or arm; lasts at least 6 months; occurs at least 50% of the time; and may be exacerbated by movements of the shoulder girdle. PMID:27668333

  19. Impact of relaxation training according to Yoga In Daily Life® system on perceived stress after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Tine; Kovačič, Miha

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to gather information on the immediate and short-term effects of relaxation training according to Yoga In Daily Life(®) (YIDL) system on the psychological distress of breast cancer patients. 32 patients at the Institute for Oncology of Ljubljana were randomized to the experimental (N=16) and to the control group (N=16). Both groups received the same standard physiotherapy for 1 week, while the experimental group additionally received a group relaxation training sessions according to YIDL(®) system. At discharge the experimental group was issued with audiocassette recordings containing the similar instructions for relaxation training to be practiced individually at home (for further 3 weeks). An experimental repeated measures design was used to investigate the differences over 1 month period in stress levels, changes in mental health and psychological parameters. Measures were obtained at three time points during the study period: baseline, at 1 week, and at 4 weeks, by blinded investigators using standardized questionnaires General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL) psychological subscale, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Patients who received relaxation training reported feeling significantly less distressed during hospitalization and after discharge-period than did the controls that did not receive relaxation training. The results indicate that relaxation training according to Yoga in Daily Life(®) system could be useful clinical physiotherapy intervention for breast cancer patients experiencing psychological distress. Although this kind of relaxation training can be applied to clinical oncology in Slovenia, more studies need to be done.

  20. [Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Case report of an undiagnosed form, management and reconstruction (ALCL)].

    PubMed

    Alhamad, S; Guerid, S; El Fakir, E H; Biron, P; Tourasse, C; Delay, E

    2016-06-01

    Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an extremely rare disease. Is a new nosologic entity with a multifactorial origin and a wide occurrence delay after breast implantation. This article reports the case of a 60 years old patient with a progressive swelling of the right breast after aesthetic breast implants. Diagnostic was delayed because first surgeon was not familiar with the disease. Patient was then referred to us for management. We performed an implant removal and a complete capsulectomy. Pathologic report confirms the diagnostic. After one year and normal ultrasound evaluation, we reconstructed the breast with lipomodeling and mastopexy. Contralateral implant was also removed at time of reconstruction. Vast majority of breast implant-associated ALCL occurs at a time lapse of 11 to 15 years after implant augmentation, with a mean age of 63 years. Among the worldwide 173 cases reported in March 2015, smooth implants seem not to be at risk but 80% of cases were associated with macrotexturized implants. Clinical presentation and diagnostic tools are more and more published but there is to date no recommendation concerning reconstruction delay after implant removal for this pathology. We advise the realization of a breast ultrasound every three months during the first year and wait for a one-year period before reconstruction. In case of aesthetic surgery, mastopexia can be done to allow for glandular shaping. Lipomodeling is an excellent technique to correct the lack of volume due to implant removal. In case of reconstructive setting, implant can be replaced by flap procedure with lipomodeling if needed or lipomodeling alone if recipient site is favorable and patient has enough fat tissue. Contralateral implant should be removed during reconstruction time. PMID:27107559

  1. Comparison of aesthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1991-09-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased desire by the profession and the public for an aesthetic restoration that will restore a posterior tooth to its original form and function. The currently available aesthetic posterior restoration materials and techniques are porcelain, cast ceramic, direct composite, direct-indirect composite, indirect composite, and CAD-CAM fabrications. The indications and contraindications of these restorative materials and proper diagnosis and case selection are described.

  2. Revision Breast Augmentation at the Time of Cardiac Sarcoma Resection: The Importance of Pocket Control When Inframammary Approach Is Combined with Simultaneous Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jessica F.; Kim, Min P.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Sternotomy in patients with previous breast augmentation becomes an aesthetic challenge when an inframammary approach is utilized over the traditional midline skin incision. Although the inframammary fold approach offers a well-concealed scar when compared with the midline chest incision, patients with a history of previous breast augmentation are at risk for alteration of the anatomy leading to symmastia, implant malposition, and asymmetry. We present a case report of sternotomy and resection of a mediastinal perivascular epithelioid cell tumor with concomitant revision augmentation with silicone implants and SERI Scaffold. Our patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a good cosmetic result 1 year after concomitant revision augmentation in conjunction with cardiac tumor resection. In conclusion, the authors feel that despite the difficulties in performing breast augmentation in patients undergoing thoracic surgery, it is possible to obtain good results. It is necessary to reinforce the repair with a mesh to recreate support and proper anatomy. PMID:27257577

  3. Label-free DNA detection using two-dimensional periodic relief grating as a visualized platform for diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence after surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Zhou, Gang-Yan; Chang, Chi-Jung; Lee, Ai-Wei; Chang, Feng-Chih

    2014-04-15

    In this study we fabricated a nanopillar array of silicon oxide, involving very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and reactive ion etching (RIE), as two-dimensional periodic relief gratings (2DPRGs) on Si surfaces. Thiolated oligonucleotide was successively immobilized on the thiol functionalized surfaces of 2DPRGs by disulfide bond as an optical probe to detect a human genomic DNA (hgDNA584), related to breast cancer recurrence after surgery, from a biological specimen. The oligonucleotide-bound 2DPRG alone produces insignificant structure change, but upon hybridization with hgDNA584 leads to a dramatic change of the pillar scale due to hgDNA584 filling inside the 2DPRG layers. The performance of the sensor was evaluated by capturing hgDNA584 on the oligonucleotide-bound 2DPRGs and measuring the effective refractive index (neff), resulting of color change from pure blue to red, observed by naked eyes along an incident angle of 20-30°. The surface-bound 2DPRG based assay with the chemoresponsive diffraction grating signal transduction scheme results in an experimentally simple DNA detection protocol, displaying attributes of both detection methodologies: the high sensitivity and selectivity afforded by 2DPRG probes and the experimental simplicity, and miniaturization potential provided by the diffraction-based sensing technology.

  4. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  5. Development and Implementation of a Web-Enabled 3D Consultation Tool for Breast Augmentation Surgery Based on 3D-Image Reconstruction of 2D Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jaime; Olariu, Radu; Dindoyal, Irving; Le Huu, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Background Producing a rich, personalized Web-based consultation tool for plastic surgeons and patients is challenging. Objective (1) To develop a computer tool that allows individual reconstruction and simulation of 3-dimensional (3D) soft tissue from ordinary digital photos of breasts, (2) to implement a Web-based, worldwide-accessible preoperative surgical planning platform for plastic surgeons, and (3) to validate this tool through a quality control analysis by comparing 3D laser scans of the patients with the 3D reconstructions with this tool from original 2-dimensional (2D) pictures of the same patients. Methods The proposed system uses well-established 2D digital photos for reconstruction into a 3D torso, which is then available to the user for interactive planning. The simulation is performed on dedicated servers, accessible via Internet. It allows the surgeon, together with the patient, to previsualize the impact of the proposed breast augmentation directly during the consultation before a surgery is decided upon. We retrospectively conduced a quality control assessment of available anonymized pre- and postoperative 2D digital photographs of patients undergoing breast augmentation procedures. The method presented above was used to reconstruct 3D pictures from 2D digital pictures. We used a laser scanner capable of generating a highly accurate surface model of the patient’s anatomy to acquire ground truth data. The quality of the computed 3D reconstructions was compared with the ground truth data used to perform both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Results We evaluated the system on 11 clinical cases for surface reconstructions and 4 clinical cases of postoperative simulations, using laser surface scan technologies showing a mean reconstruction error between 2 and 4 mm and a maximum outlier error of 16 mm. Qualitative and quantitative analyses from plastic surgeons demonstrate the potential of these new emerging technologies. Conclusions We

  6. TGF-β1 Is Present at High Levels in Wound Fluid from Breast Cancer Patients Immediately Post-Surgery, and Is Not Increased by Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT).

    PubMed

    Scherer, Sandra D; Bauer, Jochen; Schmaus, Anja; Neumaier, Christian; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Wenz, Frederik; Sleeman, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    In patients with low-risk breast cancer, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery is a novel and convenient treatment option for delivering a single high dose of irradiation directly to the tumour bed. However, edema and fibrosis can develop after surgery and radiotherapy, which can subsequently impair quality of life. TGF- β is a strong inducer of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA). TGF-β expression and HA metabolism can be modulated by irradiation experimentally, and are involved in edema and fibrosis. We therefore hypothesized that IORT may regulate these factors.Wound fluid (WF) draining from breast lumpectomy sites was collected and levels of TGF-β1 and HA were determined by ELISA. Proliferation and marker expression was analyzed in primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) treated with recombinant TGF-β or WF. Our results show that IORT does not change TGF-β1 or HA levels in wound fluid draining from breast lumpectomy sites, and does not lead to accumulation of sHA oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, concentrations of TGF-β1 were high in WF from patients regardless of IORT, at concentrations well above those associated with fibrosis and the suppression of LEC identity. Consistently, we found that TGF-β in WF is active and inhibits LEC proliferation. Furthermore, all three TGF-β isoforms inhibited LEC proliferation and suppressed LEC marker expression at pathophysiologically relevant concentrations. Given that TGF-β contributes to edema and plays a role in the regulation of LEC identity, we suggest that inhibition of TGF-β directly after surgery might prevent the development of side effects such as edema and fibrosis. PMID:27589056

  7. TGF-β1 Is Present at High Levels in Wound Fluid from Breast Cancer Patients Immediately Post-Surgery, and Is Not Increased by Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT)

    PubMed Central

    Schmaus, Anja; Neumaier, Christian; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Wenz, Frederik; Sleeman, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with low-risk breast cancer, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery is a novel and convenient treatment option for delivering a single high dose of irradiation directly to the tumour bed. However, edema and fibrosis can develop after surgery and radiotherapy, which can subsequently impair quality of life. TGF- β is a strong inducer of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA). TGF-β expression and HA metabolism can be modulated by irradiation experimentally, and are involved in edema and fibrosis. We therefore hypothesized that IORT may regulate these factors.Wound fluid (WF) draining from breast lumpectomy sites was collected and levels of TGF-β1 and HA were determined by ELISA. Proliferation and marker expression was analyzed in primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) treated with recombinant TGF-β or WF. Our results show that IORT does not change TGF-β1 or HA levels in wound fluid draining from breast lumpectomy sites, and does not lead to accumulation of sHA oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, concentrations of TGF-β1 were high in WF from patients regardless of IORT, at concentrations well above those associated with fibrosis and the suppression of LEC identity. Consistently, we found that TGF-β in WF is active and inhibits LEC proliferation. Furthermore, all three TGF-β isoforms inhibited LEC proliferation and suppressed LEC marker expression at pathophysiologically relevant concentrations. Given that TGF-β contributes to edema and plays a role in the regulation of LEC identity, we suggest that inhibition of TGF-β directly after surgery might prevent the development of side effects such as edema and fibrosis. PMID:27589056

  8. Naturalizing aesthetics: brain areas for aesthetic appraisal across sensory modalities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Gao, Xiaoqing; Tisdelle, Loren; Eickhoff, Simon B; Liotti, Mario

    2011-09-01

    We present here the most comprehensive analysis to date of neuroaesthetic processing by reporting the results of voxel-based meta-analyses of 93 neuroimaging studies of positive-valence aesthetic appraisal across four sensory modalities. The results demonstrate that the most concordant area of activation across all four modalities is the right anterior insula, an area typically associated with visceral perception, especially of negative valence (disgust, pain, etc.). We argue that aesthetic processing is, at its core, the appraisal of the valence of perceived objects. This appraisal is in no way limited to artworks but is instead applicable to all types of perceived objects. Therefore, one way to naturalize aesthetics is to argue that such a system evolved first for the appraisal of objects of survival advantage, such as food sources, and was later co-opted in humans for the experience of artworks for the satisfaction of social needs.

  9. Expression of genes responsible for the repair of mispaired bases of the DNA (MLH1) in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Rudolf; Stanec, Sanda; Stanec, Mladen; Korusić, Andelko; Husedzinović, Ino; Razumović, Jasminka Jakić

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases determined and distinguished by cellular type, gene expression and clinical signs and symptoms. Identification of histological and biological markers is of great value in predicting the progression of tumor growth and anticipating the expected response to various treatment options. Due to a high degree of cell proliferation in breast tumors and high genetic instability of these tumors, as a consequence of defective DNA repair mechanisms, chemotherapy as a treatment option often renders very successful results. During our scientific research we wanted to determine the involvement of the genetic polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair system (MLH1 gene) and the subsequent development of breast carcinoma. This study included 108 patients who were surgically treated for invasive breast cancer at the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University Hospital "Dubrava". The expression of the MLH1 gene was determined by immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that 82.9% of tumor cells expressed the MLH1 gene. Analysis of survival rate for patients with invasive ductal breast cancer showed a statistically significant (p = 0.043) correlation with the expression of MLH1 genes. The overall five year survival rate of our patients was 78.7%. These results indicate that there is a possible involvement of MLH1 gene in the progression and development of breast cancer.