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Sample records for aesthetic improvement scale

  1. An Aesthetic Value Scale of the Rorschach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insua, Ana Maria

    1981-01-01

    An aesthetic value scale of the Rorschach cards was built by the successive interval method. This scale was compared with the ratings obtained by means of the Semantic Differential Scales and was found to successfully differentiate sexes in their judgment of card attractiveness. (Author)

  2. Aesthetic Leadership (AL): Development and Implementation of Aesthetic Leadership Scale (ALS) of the School Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Soner; Oztoprak-Kavak, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to develop a scale for measuring the aesthetic leadership (AL) characteristics of the school directors and to show that it can be applicable. The population of the study is composed of the teachers who are on duty in the elementary, secondary and high schools located in Izmit, Kocaeli. Sample of this descriptive study comprises 400…

  3. Development and Validation of the Expectations of Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale

    PubMed Central

    Naraghi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing concern in the field of aesthetic surgery about the need to measure patients' expectations preoperatively. The present study was designed to develop and validate the Expectations of Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale (EARS), and to compare expectations between rhinoplasty patients with and without body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Methods In total, 162 college students and 20 rhinoplasty candidates were recruited. The measures included the newly developed EARS, a measure of psychopathology, and demographics. The DSM-IV structured clinical interview for BDD was used to confirm the diagnosis in rhinoplasty patients. Results The EARS was constructed of six items based on their significant content validity. In the scale development phase, Cronbach's alpha was 0.87. The test-retest reliability coefficient of the scale was satisfactory (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–0.98) over a four-week period. Scores on the EARS were significantly positively correlated with psychopathological symptoms (r=0.16; P<0.05). Moreover, comparison of EARS scores between BDD (M=25.90, standard deviation [SD]=6.91) and non-BDD rhinoplastic patients (M=15.70, SD=5.27) suggested that BDD patients held significantly higher expectations (P<0.01). Conclusions The expectations of aesthetic rhinoplasty patients toward surgery may play a crucial role in their postoperative satisfaction. While the value of patients' expectations is clinically recognized, no empirical study has measured these expectations in a psychometrically sound manner. The current study developed and validated the EARS. It may be easily used as a valid and reliable instrument in clinical and research settings. PMID:27462570

  4. Male mastectomy: an oncoplastic solution to improve aesthetic appearance.

    PubMed

    Schaverien, M V; Scott, J R; Doughty, J C

    2013-12-01

    Mastectomy for breast cancer in men typically results in an unsatisfactory aesthetic appearance due to loss of the normal male chest contour. In this article we present two case studies and a new oncoplastic surgical technique that has given excellent aesthetic results for this challenging problem. PMID:23642792

  5. Guided Gingival Growth: Improving Aesthetics During Second-Stage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby

    2016-01-01

    GGG is a conservative, efficient, and relatively straightforward treatment for mild soft-tissue deficits. When applied within its limitations, it may be a valuable tool for aesthetic refinement around dental implants. PMID:26846058

  6. Aesthetic improvement of the forehead utilizing methylmethacrylate onlay implants.

    PubMed

    Ousterhout, D K; Zlotolow, I M

    1990-01-01

    Forehead augmentation occasionally is necessary for obtaining a desirable upper facial contour. The final contour must be sexually appropriate and must project beyond the cornea of the eyes an amount that makes the contour aesthetically pleasing. Methylmethacrylate onlay implants, preformed or sculpted at the time of surgery, lend themselves to obtaining a desirable contour which can be modified easily at surgery, which is completed in a one-stage procedure, has few complications, and yields an aesthetically pleasing result. The methods for fabricating and implanting the onlay prosthesis in a single step and the results of such procedures, which have been performed over a 12-year period without complications, are presented. PMID:2239518

  7. Improving Gingival Aesthetics Using Platelet Rich Fibrin and Synthetic Collagen Membrane: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Debasish; Kalapurakkal, Vijay Babu

    2015-01-01

    Covering the clinically exposed root surface of a tooth has now become a routine demand of patients to improve aesthetics and also to reduce the instances of hypersensitivity. The idea behind the treatment of gingival recession is to place the gingiva as close as possible to the cement-enamel junction so that the exposed root area is covered and a normal sulcus is created. Here we present a series of two cases of gingival recession treatment in young patients affecting the maxillary anterior region. The affected sites were treated by a periodontal flap with synthetic collagen membrane and patient derived platelet rich fibrin. It may be emphasized that platelet-rich fibrin can be used as a membrane for periodontal tissue regeneration and it has the ability to promote platelet aggregation, be chemotactic for fibroblast and enhance wound stability and proper healing. Hence, both the methods can be successfully used in place of a connective tissue graft for treating gingival recession. PMID:26557624

  8. Improving Gingival Aesthetics Using Platelet Rich Fibrin and Synthetic Collagen Membrane: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Debasish; Kalapurakkal, Vijay Babu; Misra, Satya Ranjan

    2015-10-01

    Covering the clinically exposed root surface of a tooth has now become a routine demand of patients to improve aesthetics and also to reduce the instances of hypersensitivity. The idea behind the treatment of gingival recession is to place the gingiva as close as possible to the cement-enamel junction so that the exposed root area is covered and a normal sulcus is created. Here we present a series of two cases of gingival recession treatment in young patients affecting the maxillary anterior region. The affected sites were treated by a periodontal flap with synthetic collagen membrane and patient derived platelet rich fibrin. It may be emphasized that platelet-rich fibrin can be used as a membrane for periodontal tissue regeneration and it has the ability to promote platelet aggregation, be chemotactic for fibroblast and enhance wound stability and proper healing. Hence, both the methods can be successfully used in place of a connective tissue graft for treating gingival recession. PMID:26557624

  9. Learning visual balance from large-scale datasets of aesthetically highly rated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanian, Ali; Vishwanathan, S. V. N.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-03-01

    The concept of visual balance is innate for humans, and influences how we perceive visual aesthetics and cognize harmony. Although visual balance is a vital principle of design and taught in schools of designs, it is barely quantified. On the other hand, with emergence of automantic/semi-automatic visual designs for self-publishing, learning visual balance and computationally modeling it, may escalate aesthetics of such designs. In this paper, we present how questing for understanding visual balance inspired us to revisit one of the well-known theories in visual arts, the so called theory of "visual rightness", elucidated by Arnheim. We define Arnheim's hypothesis as a design mining problem with the goal of learning visual balance from work of professionals. We collected a dataset of 120K images that are aesthetically highly rated, from a professional photography website. We then computed factors that contribute to visual balance based on the notion of visual saliency. We fitted a mixture of Gaussians to the saliency maps of the images, and obtained the hotspots of the images. Our inferred Gaussians align with Arnheim's hotspots, and confirm his theory. Moreover, the results support the viability of the center of mass, symmetry, as well as the Rule of Thirds in our dataset.

  10. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad. PMID:20462822

  11. Philosophical Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verene, Donald Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Is there an aesthetics of philosophy? Does philosophical discourse have a foundation in sense and sensibility? If the answer to these questions is affirmative and there is in some sense a philosophical aesthetics, what conclusions might be drawn for philosophical education? Put another way: Does philosophy require the power of the imagination…

  12. The Effects of Aesthetic Science Activities on Improving At-Risk Families Children's Anxiety About Learning Science and Positive Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of aesthetic science activities on improving elementary school at-risk families' children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and decreasing their anxiety about learning science. Thirty-six 4th-grade children from at-risk families volunteered to participate in a 12-week intervention and formed the experimental group; another 97 typical 4th graders were randomly selected to participant in the assessment and were used as the comparison group. The treatment for experimental group children emphasized scaffolding aesthetic science activities and inquiry strategies. The Elementary School Student Questionnaire was administered to assess all children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and anxiety about learning science. In addition, nine target children from the experimental group with the lowest scores on either positive thinking, or attitudes toward science, or with the highest scores on anxiety about learning science in the pre-test were recruited to be interviewed at the end of the intervention and observed weekly. Confirmatory factor analyses, analyses of covariance, and content theme analysis assessed the similarities and differences between groups. It was found that the at-risk families' children were motivated by the treatment and made significant progress on positive thinking and attitudes toward science, and also decreased their anxiety about learning science. The findings from interviews and classroom observations also revealed that the intervention made differences in children's affective perceptions of learning science. Implication and research recommendation are discussed.

  13. Adjunctive 830 nm light-emitting diode therapy can improve the results following aesthetic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Serk; Ohshiro, Toshio; Trelles, Mario A; Vasily, David B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aggressive, or even minimally aggressive, aesthetic interventions are almost inevitably followed by such events as discomfort, erythema, edema and hematoma formation which could lengthen patient downtime and represent a major problem to the surgeon. Recently, low level light therapy with light-emitting diodes (LED-LLLT) at 830 nm has attracted attention in wound healing indications for its anti-inflammatory effects and control of erythema, edema and bruising. Rationale: The wavelength of 830 nm offers deep penetration into living biological tissue, including bone. A new-generation of 830 nm LEDs, based on those developed in the NASA Space Medicine Laboratory, has enabled the construction of planar array-based LED-LLLT systems with clinically useful irradiances. Irradiation with 830 nm energy has been shown in vitro and in vivo to increase the action potential of epidermal and dermal cells significantly. The response of the inflammatory stage cells is enhanced both in terms of function and trophic factor release, and fibroblasts demonstrate superior collagenesis and elastinogenesis. Conclusions: A growing body of clinical evidence is showing that applying 830 nm LED-LLLT as soon as possible post-procedure, both invasive and noninvasive, successfully hastens the resolution of sequelae associated with patient downtime in addition to significantly speeding up frank wound healing. This article reviews that evidence, and attempts to show that 830 nm LED-LLLT delivers swift resolution of postoperative sequelae, minimizes downtime and enhances patient satisfaction. PMID:26877592

  14. The Effects of Aesthetic Science Activities on Improving At-Risk Families Children's Anxiety about Learning Science and Positive Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-Shyang; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of aesthetic science activities on improving elementary school at-risk families' children's positive thinking, attitudes toward science, and decreasing their anxiety about learning science. Thirty-six 4th-grade children from at-risk families volunteered to participate in a 12-week…

  15. Internet Aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Sean

    This article addresses the ephemeral nature of digital media, especially of artworks designed for the world wide web and other network devices. It traces debates over the nature of digital aesthetics, including discussions of software authoring, interaction and conviviality. It looks at low and high tech paths, suggesting that the fundamental dialectic in digital media lies between democratisation and expertise. It concludes with the suggestion that digital aesthetics are subject to change, because they are embedded in the broader social, political and economic histories, as well as the technological and regulatory environments, in which they evolve.

  16. Troiage Aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  17. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  18. Male aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Keaney, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Men are a fast growing segment of the aesthetic industry. A review was performed for publications on gender differences in facial anatomy, behavior, and the use of minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in men. There are substantial facial anatomical differences between genders with men having a larger but unique cranial shape, increased skeletal muscle mass, unique subcutaneous fat distribution, and more severe facial rhytides. Men also exhibit poor behavior that can accelerate aging including poor utilization of preventive health care services, higher rates of smoking, and increased ultraviolet light exposure. Despite gender differences in facial anatomy and behavior, few studies have examined the role of gender in cosmetic procedures. Men require a unique injection technique with botulinum toxin and dermal fillers due to differences in facial anatomy. PMID:25807336

  19. Periodontal Plastic Surgery to Improve Aesthetics in Patients with Altered Passive Eruption/Gummy Smile: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Francesco; Graziani, Filippo; Franchi, Lorenzo; Defraia, Efisio; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Altered passive eruption/gummy smile is a common challenge in patients requiring aesthetic treatment. A specific surgical protocol was designed and tested in patients with altered passive eruption. Standardized preoperative X-rays were used to assess crown length at baseline and to place submarginal incisions. Osseous respective therapy was performed to achieve biological width. Clinical outcomes were recorded 6 months after surgery. Eleven patients with a total of 58 teeth were treated with flap surgery and osseous resective therapy at upper anterior natural teeth. At the last followup, a significant and stable improvement of crown length was obtained when compared to the baseline (P < 0.0001). All patients rated as satisfactory in the final outcomes (final VAS value = 86.6). In conclusion, this study showed that periodontal plastic surgery including osseous resection leads to predictable outcomes in the treatment of altered passive eruption/gummy smile: A careful preoperative planning avoids unpleasant complications and enhances postsurgical stability of the gingival margin. PMID:23056049

  20. Environmental Objects as an Aesthetic Attitude Determinant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, A. D.

    This study explores the relationship between art object preferences and aesthetic attitudes of high school students. A corollary variable was socioeconomic status as determined by the National Opinion Research Center scale. A sample of 443 students, grades 8-12, in a Virginia high school, were studied. The 5-point Aesthetic Attitude Scale was used…

  1. Critical Aesthetic Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    A clear-cut concept of the aesthetic is elusive. Kant's "Critique of Judgment" presents one of the more comprehensive aesthetic theories from which one can extract a set of features, some of which pertain to aesthetic experience and others to the logical structure of aesthetic judgment. When considered together, however, these features present a…

  2. Educational Aesthetics and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author conceptualizes educational aesthetics in terms of two domains: educational aesthetics as arts education and educational aesthetics as a range of nonarts educational activities understood from artistic and aesthetic points of view. A lead is taken from Harry S. Broudy's midcentury essay "Some Duties of an Educational…

  3. Reflections on Aesthetic Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how it is possible to use the aesthetic process to enrich teaching practices in preschool and elementary school education. What is under scrutiny is the aesthetic dimension of a core curricular subject, the ultimate goal being to achieve an understanding of curricular content through aesthetic learning processes. For this…

  4. Aesthetics in implantology.

    PubMed

    Hoexter, D L

    1998-10-01

    A young man presented himself with a missing maxillary central incisor and a depressed defect due to a trauma. The trauma caused the loss of No. 8 and its surrounding supportive structure. The defective results were seen by the labial bone loss in the area and a depression. The depression became a food-and-plaque trap and an unaesthetic eyesore. Before the tooth loss, iatrogenic factors from a root canal or retrograde amalgam caused a permanent gingival tattoo. The bonded temporary pontic was larger mesio-distally than the adjacent teeth, and this was very noticeable. It was dull in its finish and poor aesthetically. The patient requested an implant to avoid excess drilling of natural teeth. A combined effort was used to achieve the pleasing final result. To correct the area and improve the physiology and aesthetics, several techniques had to be understood. These techniques also need to be mastered, recalled, and used almost instinctively, and done in a proper team-like sequence. In this case we performed an aesthetic ridge augmentation and tissue surgical manipulation to acquire the form, shape, and correct color background. Deciding upon which implant and material involved choosing the size, type, and shape for the area involved. The techniques used included implant insertion, surgical second stage abutment, mucosal periosteal flap design, various suturing and gingival grafting techniques, ridge buildup augmentation, and GTR. Other choices included which resorbable membrane to use, what bone graft materials, and what oral hygiene to recommend to maintain final health. The restorative technique included full crown coverage, laminate veneers, provisional pontic design and bonding, control of porcelain materials, computer imaging, occlusion, cementing, smile designs, and implant prosthodontics. PMID:10752437

  5. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  6. Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela M

    2013-02-01

    Jung's contribution to the understanding of the relevance of psychology to alchemy has become increasingly invalidated by the ahistorical nature of his approach, just as his tendency to ignore the importance of cognitive aesthetics for an improved comprehension of the functions of alchemical images has prevented Jungians from further extending Jung's insight of the importance of alchemy for psychology. This paper explores the history of the development of alchemical illustrations in Western Europe from the 14(th) to the 16(th) century, tracing the emergent processes over time. It is only when we take into consideration the historical dimension and the aesthetics of alchemical imagery that it becomes possible to demonstrate how the increasing use of certain aesthetic techniques such as the disjunction and recombination of separate metaphorical elements of previous illustrations, the use of compressive combinations and the use of framing devices worked to gradually increase the cognitive function and the symbolical power of the images. If alchemy is still relevant to psychotherapy it is exactly because it helps us to understand the importance of cognitive aesthetics in our approach to the images, metaphors and narratives of our patients. PMID:23350996

  7. Aesthetic Response and Cosmic Aesthetic Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madacsi, D.

    2013-04-01

    For Homo sapiens, the experience of a primal aesthetic response to nature was perhaps a necessary precursor to the arousal of an artistic impulse. Among the likely visual candidates for primal initiators of aesthetic response, arguments can be made in favor of the flower, the human face and form, and the sky and light itself as primordial aesthetic stimulants. Although visual perception of the sensory world of flowers and human faces and forms is mediated by light, it was most certainly in the sky that humans first could respond to the beauty of light per se. It is clear that as a species we do not yet identify and comprehend as nature, or part of nature, the entire universe beyond our terrestrial environs, the universe from which we remain inexorably separated by space and time. However, we now enjoy a technologically-enabled opportunity to probe the ultimate limits of visual aesthetic distance and the origins of human aesthetic response as we remotely explore deep space via the Hubble Space Telescope and its successors.

  8. Aesthetics and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, L. Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author talks about the aesthetic aspects of education with some special reference to movement in different senses. First, he discusses the aesthetic and its relation to education in a general way. He then explains the concepts of expression and embodiment in the appreciation of the arts. Lastly, the author talks about the…

  9. Toward Aesthetic Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFurio, Anthony G.

    1979-01-01

    The view of aesthetic responding presented herein has grown out of a theory of contextual aesthetics as explicated by John Dewey and Stephen Pepper and a phenomenological inquiry into art by John Anderson. The method for entry into the responsive domain has evolved from a direction elaborated by Kenneth Beittel. (Author)

  10. Queering the Homeboy Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    The homeboy aesthetic is identifiable as an assemblage of key signifiers: clothing (baggy pants and undershirts are perhaps the most significant), hair (or, in the current moment of the aesthetic, lack of hair), bold stance, and distinct language (think "calo" mixed with hip-hop parlance), all combining to form a distinguishable cultural…

  11. Components of aesthetic experience: aesthetic fascination, aesthetic appraisal, and aesthetic emotion

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind. Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: fascination with an aesthetic object (high arousal and attention), appraisal of the symbolic reality of an object (high cognitive engagement), and a strong feeling of unity with the object of aesthetic fascination and aesthetic appraisal. In a proposed model, two parallel levels of aesthetic information processing are proposed. On the first level two sub-levels of narrative are processed, story (theme) and symbolism (deeper meanings). The second level includes two sub-levels, perceptual associations (implicit meanings of object's physical features) and detection of compositional regularities. Two sub-levels are defined as crucial for aesthetic experience, appraisal of symbolism and compositional regularities. These sub-levels require some specific cognitive and personality dispositions, such as expertise, creative thinking, and openness to experience. Finally, feedback of emotional processing is included in our model: appraisals of everyday emotions are specified as a matter of narrative content (eg, empathy with characters), whereas the aesthetic emotion is defined as an affective evaluation in the process of symbolism appraisal or the detection of compositional regularities. PMID:23145263

  12. Aesthetics and Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carolyn E.

    The nine articles in this monograph deal with aesthetics from a broad-based approach appealing to an eclectic dance audience. The papers were written by dancers, dance philosophers, and physical educators. Two papers examine the role of the body as the dancers' aesthetic medium, including the use of yoga to increase body awareness. Other papers…

  13. Neuroscience of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-04-01

    Aesthetic evaluations are appraisals that influence choices in important domains of human activity, including mate selection, consumer behavior, art appreciation, and possibly even moral judgment. The nascent field of neuroaesthetics is advancing our understanding of the role of aesthetic evaluations by examining their biological bases. Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion-valuation, sensory-motor, and meaning-knowledge neural systems. This tripartite model can in turn be evoked to explain phenomena central to aesthetics, such as context effects on preferences. Indeed, context-dependent appraisals that focus on objects rather than on outcomes could be an important factor distinguishing aesthetic experiences from other kinds of evaluations. PMID:27037898

  14. Environmental Aesthetics and Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1990-01-01

    Explores the sensory, formal, and symbolic orientations for studying environmental aesthetics. Points out that environmental aesthetics are related to both the natural and built environments. Discusses implications for art education in developing aesthetically oriented individuals. Maintains that learning something in environmental aesthetics is…

  15. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  16. Personalized visual aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  17. The aesthetics of behavioral arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    With their origins in scientific validation, behavior-analytic applications have understandably been developed with an engineering rather than a crafting orientation. Nevertheless, traditions of craftsmanship can be instructive for devising aesthetically pleasing arrangements—arrangements that people will try, and having tried, will choose to continue living with. Pye (1968) provides suggestions for this, particularly through his distinctions between workmanship of risk versus workmanship of certainty, and the mating of functional precision with effective or otherwise pleasing variability. Close examination of woodworking tools as well as antique machines offers instructive analogues that show, for instance, that misplaced precision can be dysfunctional when precision is not essential to a design. Variability should be allowed or even encouraged. Thus, in the design of behavioral contingencies as well as of practical or purely aesthetic objects, “precise versus variable” is not necessarily a distinction between good and bad. More generally, behavior analysts would do well to look beyond their technical experience for ways to improve the aesthetics of contingency design while continuing to understand the resulting innovations in relation to behavior-analytic principles. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:22478437

  18. How to Solve Dilemmas Arising from the Idea of Improving Physical Accessibility in Relation to Aesthetics and Architectural Heritage.

    PubMed

    Asmervik, Sigmund

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian state has been working for more than fifteen years on various ways of improving accessibility for the general public. An important part of this work has been to develop new legislation and other forms of formal guidelines to reduce physical barriers. The new Anti-Discrimination and Accessibility Act, Obligation to ensure general accommodation (universal design), came into force January 2009, and introduces some complicated dilemmas, especially when it states: "When assessing whether the design or accommodation entails an undue burden, particular importance shall be attached to the effect of the accommodation on the dismantling of disabling barriers, the necessary costs associated with the accommodation, the undertaking's resources, whether the normal function of the undertaking is of a public nature, safety considerations and cultural heritage considerations." What is an "undue burden" in relation to architectural visual qualities and to the historical heritage expressed in buildings and townscapes? This paper will look into these dilemmas by discussing specific cases from some cities in different countries. What kinds of procedure are suitable and decisive when it comes to these complicated questions? Is this a task exclusively reserved for professionals, or should the voice of lay people be heard and taken into consideration? By presenting examples from architecture and landscape architecture, I will show how universal design even can be implemented in old buildings and environments. The paper will argue for more focus on procedures than just physical solutions. The procedures should be based on accepted principles for changing historical monuments, such as wholeness, readability, reversibility and sustainability. PMID:27534291

  19. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format, which replaces each response option in the Likert scale with a full sentence. We hypothesized that this format would result in a cleaner factor structure as compared with the Likert format. We tested this hypothesis on three popular psychological scales: the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, the Conscientiousness subscale of the Big Five Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory II. Scales in both formats showed comparable reliabilities. However, scales in the Expanded format had better (i.e., lower and more theoretically defensible) dimensionalities than scales in the Likert format, as assessed by both exploratory factor analyses and confirmatory factor analyses. We encourage further study and wider use of the Expanded format, particularly when a scale’s dimensionality is of theoretical interest. PMID:27182074

  20. Scaling tests of the improved Kogut-Susskind quark action

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Orginos, Kostas; Sugar, Bob; Toussaint, Doug

    2000-06-01

    Improved lattice actions for Kogut-Susskind quarks have been shown to improve rotational symmetry and flavor symmetry. In this work we find improved scaling behavior of the {rho} and nucleon masses expressed in units of a length scale obtained from the static quark potential, and better behavior of the Dirac operator in instanton backgrounds. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Riding Pontic--Aesthetic Journey Aesthetic Goal.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Byajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Manisha, Kukreja; Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Nafria, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The increasing concern for esthetics during the orthodontic treatment can be measured by the increasing popularity ofaesthetic brackets, lingual technique, smaller sized metal brackets, and clear alignment therapy. Many clients, especially adolescents, are self-conscious about their appearance in social and professional situations, and they refuse to tolerate the inevitable "black holes" of edentulous spaces during orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use, fabrication, modifications, and shortcomings of riding pontics; and illustrates how their use provides aesthetic, psychological and functional benefits. PMID:26720951

  2. Large-Scale Organizational Performance Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilotto, Rudy; Young, Jonathan O'Donnell

    1999-01-01

    Describes the steps involved in a performance improvement program in the context of a large multinational corporation. Highlights include a training program for managers that explained performance improvement; performance matrices; divisionwide implementation, including strategic planning; organizationwide training of all personnel; and the…

  3. Aesthetic quality inference for online fashion shopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Allebach, Jan

    2014-03-01

    On-line fashion communities in which participants post photos of personal fashion items for viewing and possible purchase by others are becoming increasingly popular. Generally, these photos are taken by individuals who have no training in photography with low-cost mobile phone cameras. It is desired that photos of the products have high aesthetic quality to improve the users' online shopping experience. In this work, we design features for aesthetic quality inference in the context of online fashion shopping. Psychophysical experiments are conducted to construct a database of the photos' aesthetic evaluation, specifically for photos from an online fashion shopping website. We then extract both generic low-level features and high-level image attributes to represent the aesthetic quality. Using a support vector machine framework, we train a predictor of the aesthetic quality rating based on the feature vector. Experimental results validate the efficacy of our approach. Metadata such as the product type are also used to further improve the result.

  4. Men's aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Cosmetic dermatology is continuing to see a dramatic increase in both procedures performed and technological advancements. Men's aesthetic dermatology is burgeoning with more men seeking cosmetic consultations and intervention. Whether it is targeted cosmeceuticals for men or male-specific procedures, dermatologists must be aware of this evolving demographic and understand the biological, anatomical, and psychological aspects that separate this cohort from their female counterparts. Cosmetic dermatology has moved beyond just applying the same techniques used for females onto males. The use of our cosmetic toolbox can differ for men in terms of technique and dosage. This article will review the state of men's aesthetic dermatology with. PMID:25830252

  5. Hepburn's Natural Aesthetic and Its Implications for Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The world is rich in natural beauty, and learning how to appreciate the beauty of nature is an important part of aesthetic education. Unfortunately, the teaching of aesthetics is usually restricted to art education, especially in Taiwan. Students' perceptual awareness of and sensitivity to the aesthetics of nature should be cultivated so that…

  6. Breast Augmentation and Breast Reconstruction Demonstrate Equivalent Aesthetic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Christopher R.; Nguyen, Dung H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a perception that cosmetic breast surgery has more favorable aesthetic outcomes than reconstructive breast surgery. We tested this hypothesis by comparing aesthetic outcomes after breast augmentation and reconstruction. Methods: Postoperative images of 10 patients (cosmetic, n = 4; reconstructive, n = 6; mean follow-up, 27 months) were presented anonymously to participants who were blinded to clinical details. Participants were asked if they believed cosmetic or reconstructive surgery had been performed. Aesthetic outcome measures were quantified: (1) natural appearance, (2) size, (3) contour, (4) symmetry, (5) position of breasts, (6) position of nipples, (7) scars (1 = poor and 4 = excellent). Images were ranked from 1 (most aesthetic) to 10 (least aesthetic). Analyses included two-tailed t tests, Mann–Whitney U tests, and χ2 tests. Results: One thousand eighty-five images were quantified from 110 surveys (99% response rate). The accuracy of identifying cosmetic or reconstructive surgery was 55% and 59%, respectively (P = 0.18). Significantly more of the top 3 aesthetic cases were reconstructive (51% vs 49%; P = 0.03). Despite this, cases perceived to be reconstructive were ranked significantly lower (5.9 vs 5.0; P < 0.0001). Mean aesthetic outcomes were equivalent regardless of surgery for 5 categories (P > 0.05), with the exception of breast position that improved after reconstruction (2.9 vs 2.7; P = 0.009) and scars that were more favorable after augmentation (2.9 vs 3.1; P < 0.0001). Age and nipple position (R2 = 0.04; P = 0.03) was the only association between a demographic factor and aesthetic outcome. Conclusions: Aesthetic outcomes after cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery are broadly equivalent, though preconceptions influence aesthetic opinion. Plastic surgeons' mutually inclusive–reconstructive and aesthetic skill set maximizes aesthetic outcomes. PMID:27536490

  7. Anterior dental aesthetics: facial perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this series is to convey the principles governing our aesthetic senses. Usually meaning visual perception, aesthetics is not merely limited to the ocular apparatus. The concept of aesthetics encompasses both the time-arts such as music, theatre, literature and film, as well as space-arts such as paintings, sculpture and architecture. PMID:16003415

  8. Anterior dental aesthetics: Dental perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2005-08-13

    The purpose of this series is to convey the principles governing our aesthetic senses. Usually meaning visual perception, aesthetics is not merely limited to the ocular apparatus. The concept of aesthetics encompasses both the time-arts such as music, theatre, literature and film, as well as space-arts such as paintings, sculpture and architecture. PMID:16192949

  9. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  10. What's Wrong with "Aesthetic Education"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luca-Marshall, Judith B.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers definitions of "aesthetic," especially that offered by Woodrow Wilson in his essay on Adam Smith. Her major contention is that too much of aesthetic and other education is not very aesthetic, for it does not excite both senses and intellect nor develop the ability to generalize. (Author/SJL)

  11. The Aesthetics of Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, James Marston

    The basic concepts and several examples of the effects of the physical environment on man are discussed. Aesthetic judgments of the environment are related primarily to the physiological well-being of an individual and secondarily to his social experiences. Excessive loading of any one of the senses can prevent a balanced assessment of the…

  12. Aesthetics for Arts' Sake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knieter, Gerard L.

    1983-01-01

    Music education should be conceived as aesthetic education which is devoted to the systematic development of musicality. Music education curricula should incorporate contemporary psychological methods which encourage creativity while focusing on the nature of music meaning and expression and the development of the capacity for musical response.…

  13. Aesthetics in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    This article applies the principles and concepts of the aesthetics of movement to actual physical education teaching situations. It does so by discussing the author's one-day observations of several middle school physical education classes taught by three different teachers. During these classes, the teachers taught students how to calculate and…

  14. [Aesthetic Response to Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, Helen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The "Bulletin of the Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education" is an annual publication, with each issue devoted to a unified theme. The theme of this issue is aesthetic response. The following papers focus on the audience and the persons responding to art: "Attitudes of Three Urban Appalachian Teenagers Toward Selected Early Modern American…

  15. The history of aesthetic medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Luebberding, Stefanie; Sattler, Gerhard; Hanke, C William; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sadick, Neil

    2013-07-01

    The history of beauty is as old as mankind itself--throughout history people have tried to improve their attractiveness and to enhance their beauty. The technical basis for many of nowadays procedures like lipoplasty, breast augmentation or rhinoplasty was thereby initiated more than a hundred years ago and evolved to the modern standards of today. The aim of this article is to recall the early days of aesthetic medicine and show the swift progress up to the highly specialized medical discipline of our modern time. Combining the past, present and future of aesthetic medicine, allows to incorporate this perspective and ultimately to delivery better patient care. PMID:23884484

  16. Aesthetic plastic correction of incomplete testicular feminization.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, U T

    1979-12-01

    Surgery was performed for feminization of ambiguous (male) external genitalia in 1973 on a patient with incomplete testicular feminization (familial male hermaphroditism of mixed variety). Rhinoplasty and augmentation of the chin, the malar region, the breasts were also performed not only to improve the patient's sexual role but to enhance the aesthetic appearance, as an aid in better phychosocial adaptation. PMID:24173991

  17. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored. PMID:25730537

  18. Aesthetics of anticipatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minai, Asghar T.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to draw a picture of the worldview of classical theories, then draw a modern or post quantum mechanic picture; then give an understanding of what anticipatory systems mean within each of these systems. Then we will give an account of the aesthetic experience associated with the two worldviews. The paper then refers to some changes in the implications from one perspective to the other. The problems associated with the classical worldview will be regarded as shortcomings of an Aristotelian orientation towards knowledge, which in principle are inherent in the classical physics, and its relevant philosophies. This shortcoming has dominated most of the Western view of knowledge and historical references. As is apparent the first category of systems (classical) does not have any room for "anticipation," rather the behavioral outcome of the system could well show what was expected. The intent of this paper then is to look at the second category of systems, and study their anticipatory feature. It will then be suggested that the undeterministic anticipatory characteristics of these systems not only enrich the complexity of such systems, but also enrich the aesthetic qualities that they represent. To further elaborate on these systems, we analyze two contemporary theories, namely self-organization and autopoiesis, in order to illustrate the nature of anticipatory behavior of these systems. That is, while we find the former theory to be a good representation of anticipatory systems and its aesthetic qualities, we find the opposite in the conceptual structure of the latter. We therefore adopt autopoiesis to mythopoietic communication. Due to the similarities of major philosophical outlook and qualities of these systems, as well as the proposed model with those associated with Eastern philosophies such as conceptions of space-time, and other orientation, occasionally comparison will be made with Eastern views of cosmic order and aesthetics.

  19. The Challenge of Large-Scale Literacy Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Ben

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenge of making large-scale improvements in literacy in schools across an entire education system. Despite growing interest and rhetoric, there are very few examples of sustained, large-scale change efforts around school-age literacy. The paper reviews 2 instances of such efforts, in England and Ontario. After…

  20. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G

    2016-07-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N(3) where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary "bottlenecks" to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N(1/2). Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed. PMID:27394097

  1. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G.

    2016-07-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N3 where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary "bottlenecks" to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N1/2. Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  2. Rhinoplasty and the aesthetic of the smile.

    PubMed

    de Benito, J; Fernandez Sanza, I

    1995-01-01

    The resection of the columella and nasal depressor muscles is a simple operation to perform and one which allows an improvement in the facial physiognomy of many patients. This operation can be done alone or in conjunction with the classic rhinoplasty, thus achieving an improvement in the aesthetics of the smile. It has also been proved, contrary to common belief, that the action of these muscles has no connection with physiological breathing mechanisms. PMID:7900560

  3. Standardization Study of Internet Addiction Improvement Motivation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Woo; Park, Kee Hwan; Lee, In Jae; Kwon, Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure motivation to improve Internet addiction. Motivation is known to be important to treat Internet addiction successfully. The reliability of the scale was assessed, and its concurrent validity was evaluated. Methods Ninety-two adolescents participated in this study. The basic demographic characteristics were recorded and the Korean version of the Stages of Readiness for Change and Eagerness for Treatment Scale for Internet Addiction (K-SOCRATES-I) was administered. Subsequently, the Internet Addiction Improvement Motivation Scale was developed using 10 questions based on the theory of motivation enhancement therapy and its precursor version designed for smoking cessation. Results The motivation scale was composed of three subscales through factor analysis; each subscale had an adequate degree of reliability. In addition, the motivation scale had a high degree of validity based on its significant correlation with the K-SOCRATES-I. A cut-off score, which can be used to screen out individuals with low motivation, was suggested. Conclusion The Internet Addiction Improvement Motivation Scale, composed of 10 questions developed in this study, was deemed a highly reliable and valid scale to measure a respondent's motivation to be treated for Internet addiction. PMID:23251202

  4. Emerging technologies in aesthetic medicine.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bobby Y; Hantash, Basil M

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in technology have drastically improved aesthetic treatment for skin. Of particular interest is the emergence of laser- and lightbased technologies, which have offered great promise among skin-rejuvenation therapies. New laser resurfacing techniques for skin rejuvenation offer significant advantages over conventional ablative lasers, such as the CO(2) and erbiumYAG laser systems. Nonablative and fractional lasers, although not as efficacious as ablative therapies, are associated with significantly diminished complication rates and shortened recovery times. Novel devices combining ablative and fractional technologies have also surfaced, demonstrating noteworthy results. In this review, the authors will discuss the implications of current developments in research and technology for skin rejuvenation. Furthermore, the authors will address emerging therapies for acne vulgaris, lipolysis, and cellulite. PMID:19850201

  5. Ultrasonic aesthetic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Robiony, Massimo; Casadei, Matteo; Sbuelz, Massimo; Della Pietra, Lorenzo; Politi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    The management of frontal bone injury is an important issue, and inappropriate management of such injuries may give rise to serious complications. Piezosurgery is a technique used to perform safe and effective osteotomies using piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations. This instrument allows a safe method for osteotomy of the cranial vault in close proximity to extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as the brain. After a wide review of the literature, the authors present this technical report, introduce the use of piezosurgery to perform a safe "slim-osteotomies" for treatment of posttraumatic frontal bone deformities, and suggest the use of this instrument for aesthetic recontouring of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24914759

  6. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj; Choudhary, Rama Shankar Kashinath

    2014-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is defined as a break in the continuity of enamel with a reduction in the layers leading to depressions or grooves. Chronological hypoplasia is differentiated from other forms of hypoplasia due to its characteristic presentation (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement. Prevention of interaction of aetiological factors is not possible because multiple factors are required for enamel synthesis. This paper highlights how to diagnose, intercept and treat chronological hypoplasias. It also mentions reasons for treating a case and different modalities available. PMID:24907208

  7. Assembling an aesthetic.

    PubMed

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. PMID:23176974

  8. [Promoting aesthetics to enhance nursing services].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

    2011-10-01

    Nursing is a client-oriented profession dedicated to helping people. Nurses are responsible to both help relieve client physical and psychological symptoms and assist clients as necessary to die with dignity. As such, nursing schools should strengthen not only science and professional skills, but also student aesthetics. Today, fast changing medical technology is improving the treatment of diseases and extending average life spans. The National Health Insurance System in Taiwan, however, is increasingly restricting nursing manpower and raising staff workloads. Nurses are increasingly required to sacrifice ethical principles and conduct technical operations in medical settings defined by stringent cost controls. Nursing aesthetics cannot provide appropriate levels of care dignity and quality to clients under severe time and emotional distress constraints. Burnout, dissatisfaction, strained doctor-nurse relationships and lower quality care are all-too-frequent results. Under the circumstances, nursing functions are negatively influenced and fine nursing service is difficult to achieve. This article reviewed the literature to discuss the definition and meaning of aesthetics and relative factors that are difficult to define in clinical settings. This article may assist nurses to present aesthetics, upgrade care quality and further enhance nursing services. PMID:22024801

  9. Aesthetic Experience: Its Revival and Its Relevance to Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Marcia Muelder; Moore, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Oddly enough, in the last half century the most battered and beaten notion in the lexicon of philosophical aesthetics has been its own central concept, aesthetic experience. On the one hand, there is something simple, obvious, and perfectly familiar about this notion. Any fair poll would surely show that citizens of the Western world in general…

  10. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts. PMID:20819476

  11. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  12. Towards an Aesthetics of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This article is an enquiry into the possible shape of "an aesthetics of care" drawn from the experience of looking after a Congolese colleague after he was injured in a massacre in the DR Congo. The mix of different professional and personal circumstances directs the writing towards concerns with the ethics and aesthetics of caring for…

  13. Aesthetic valence of visual illusions

    PubMed Central

    Stevanov, Jasmina; Marković, Slobodan; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Visual illusions constitute an interesting perceptual phenomenon, but they also have an aesthetic and affective dimension. We hypothesized that the illusive nature itself causes the increased aesthetic and affective valence of illusions compared with their non-illusory counterparts. We created pairs of stimuli. One qualified as a standard visual illusion whereas the other one did not, although they were matched in as many perceptual dimensions as possible. The phenomenal quality of being an illusion had significant effects on “Aesthetic Experience” (fascinating, irresistible, exceptional, etc), “Evaluation” (pleasant, cheerful, clear, bright, etc), “Arousal” (interesting, imaginative, complex, diverse, etc), and “Regularity” (balanced, coherent, clear, realistic, etc). A subsequent multiple regression analysis suggested that Arousal was a better predictor of Aesthetic Experience than Evaluation. The findings of this study demonstrate that illusion is a phenomenal quality of the percept which has measurable aesthetic and affective valence. PMID:23145272

  14. Combining aesthetic with ecological values for landscape sustainability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. water body and forest) contributed positively more to both aesthetic and ecological values than semi-natural and human-dominated landscapes (i.e. farmland and non-ecological land). The distribution maps of landscape values indicated that the aesthetic, ecological and integrated landscape values were significantly associated with landscape attributes and human activity intensity. To combine aesthetic preferences with ecological services, the methods (i.e. field survey, landscape value coefficients, normalized method, a two-dimensional coordinate system, and landscape value distribution maps) were employed in landscape assessment. Our results could facilitate to identify the underlying structure-function-value chain, and also improve the understanding of multiple functions in landscape planning. The situation context could also be emphasized to bring ecological and aesthetic goals into better alignment. PMID:25050886

  15. Combining Aesthetic with Ecological Values for Landscape Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. water body and forest) contributed positively more to both aesthetic and ecological values than semi-natural and human-dominated landscapes (i.e. farmland and non-ecological land). The distribution maps of landscape values indicated that the aesthetic, ecological and integrated landscape values were significantly associated with landscape attributes and human activity intensity. To combine aesthetic preferences with ecological services, the methods (i.e. field survey, landscape value coefficients, normalized method, a two-dimensional coordinate system, and landscape value distribution maps) were employed in landscape assessment. Our results could facilitate to identify the underlying structure-function-value chain, and also improve the understanding of multiple functions in landscape planning. The situation context could also be emphasized to bring ecological and aesthetic goals into better alignment. PMID:25050886

  16. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  17. Improved actions, redundant operators and scaling in lattice SU(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Apoorva; Gupta, Rajan

    1987-01-01

    Schwinger-Dyson equations are used to systematically calculate redundant operators in lattice QCD and their role in perturbatively improved actions is analyzed. The criteria for improved actions in Monte Carlo simulations are discussed and their usefulness also. In particular the renormalized trajectory is estimated for the b = sqrt(3) renormalization group transformation in a four-parameter space and its scaling behavior is studied for future use in spectrum calculations. J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellow.

  18. Aesthetic canthal suspension.

    PubMed

    De Silva, D Julian; Prasad, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    Support of the lower eyelid with canthal suspension is a useful tool in the prevention of complications of lower blepharoplasty with particular relevance to eyelids with increased lower lid laxity, relatively prominent globes, and negative vector configuration of the eyelid-cheek junction. Caution is required in surgical management of this highly delicate anatomic area, as relatively small adjustments can result in relatively large changes that can alter the shape and appearance of the lower eyelids. Management options include canthopexy, orbicularis sling, and modified canthoplasty. The most conservative surgical management option is canthopexy, which supports the lower eyelid over either the short or long term. The use of the orbicularis sling technique avoids surgery around the relatively complex lateral canthus, but may not be suitable for cases without a need for a skin incision or a history of dry eye. Canthoplasty is generally reserved for more marked laxity, which is less common in the group of patients seeking aesthetic blepharoplasty. PMID:25440744

  19. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. PMID:27428582

  20. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  1. Improvement of modal scaling factors using mass additive technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Allemang, Randall J.; Wei, Max L.; Brown, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A general investigation into the improvement of modal scaling factors of an experimental modal model using additive technique is discussed. Data base required by the proposed method consists of an experimental modal model (a set of complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors) of the original structure and a corresponding set of complex eigenvalues of the mass-added structure. Three analytical methods,i.e., first order and second order perturbation methods, and local eigenvalue modification technique, are proposed to predict the improved modal scaling factors. Difficulties encountered in scaling closely spaced modes are discussed. Methods to compute the necessary rotational modal vectors at the mass additive points are also proposed to increase the accuracy of the analytical prediction.

  2. PHOG analysis of self-similarity in aesthetic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirshahi, Seyed Ali; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there have been efforts in defining the statistical properties of aesthetic photographs and artworks using computer vision techniques. However, it is still an open question how to distinguish aesthetic from non-aesthetic images with a high recognition rate. This is possibly because aesthetic perception is influenced also by a large number of cultural variables. Nevertheless, the search for statistical properties of aesthetic images has not been futile. For example, we have shown that the radially averaged power spectrum of monochrome artworks of Western and Eastern provenance falls off according to a power law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f2 characteristics). This finding implies that this particular subset of artworks possesses a Fourier power spectrum that is self-similar across different scales of spatial resolution. Other types of aesthetic images, such as cartoons, comics and mangas also display this type of self-similarity, as do photographs of complex natural scenes. Since the human visual system is adapted to encode images of natural scenes in a particular efficient way, we have argued that artists imitate these statistics in their artworks. In support of this notion, we presented results that artists portrait human faces with the self-similar Fourier statistics of complex natural scenes although real-world photographs of faces are not self-similar. In view of these previous findings, we investigated other statistical measures of self-similarity to characterize aesthetic and non-aesthetic images. In the present work, we propose a novel measure of self-similarity that is based on the Pyramid Histogram of Oriented Gradients (PHOG). For every image, we first calculate PHOG up to pyramid level 3. The similarity between the histograms of each section at a particular level is then calculated to the parent section at the previous level (or to the histogram at the ground level). The proposed approach is tested on datasets of aesthetic and

  3. Aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong Tai

    2015-01-01

    Cranioplasty for only aesthetic reasons has not been commonly performed to date. However, recently there has been a new focus by the public on a more aesthetically pleasing head shape with frequent patient requests for purely aesthetic contouring of the occiput, an important definer of cosmetic head shape. For example, in Asia, where the normal cranial shape is mesocephalic or brachycephalic and often with a planar occiput, requests for its aesthetic correction are increasingly common. Accordingly, the author developed a minimally invasive occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate. In this study, the indications for aesthetic occiput contouring were planar occiput, left-right asymmetric occiput, and grooved occiput. Under local anesthesia, soft methylmethacrylate is subperiosteally inserted through a small incision (about 5-cm length), manually and precisely contoured in situ through the scalp to the desired occipital shape. All is performed as an outpatient procedure, and a quick recovery is the case. Between March 2007 and October 2013, 959 patients received such aesthetic occiput augmentation. The mean follow-up period was 49 months (range, 3-84 months). Nearly all patients were satisfied with the outcome, and complications were very rare. Only 5 patients (0.5%) needed additional corrective procedures. The author has concluded that aesthetic occiput augmentation using methylmethacrylate yields consistent, predictable, and satisfactory results. Additional long-term follow-up is required for a final conclusion, however. PMID:25569386

  4. Aesthetic and Functional Outcomes of the Innervated and Thinned Anterolateral Thigh Flap in Reconstruction of Upper Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ortíz Zermeño, Carlos Alberto; López Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been widely described in reconstruction of the upper extremity. However, some details require refinement to improve both functional and aesthetic results. Methods. After reconstruction of upper extremity defects using thinned and innervated ALT flaps, functional and aesthetic outcomes were evaluated with the QuickDASH scale and a Likert scale for aesthetic assessment of free flaps, respectively. Results. Seven patients with a mean follow-up of 11.57 months and average flap thickness of 5 mm underwent innervation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The average percentage of disability (QuickDASH) was 21.88% with tenderness, pain, temperature, and two-point discrimination present in 100% of cases, and the aesthetic result gave an overall result of 15.40 (good) with the best scores in color and texture. Conclusions. Simultaneous thinning and innervation of the ALT flap lead to a good cosmetic result and functional outcome with a low percentage of disability, which could result in minor surgical procedures and better recovery of motor and sensory function. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:25478219

  5. Columellar Aesthetics in Open Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kridel, Russell W H; Kwak, Edward S; Watson, Jeffrey B

    2016-08-01

    Detailed descriptions of the ideals of columellar aesthetics and nostril shape are conspicuously lacking from the medical literature. Achieving an aesthetic nasal base is critical to an optimal rhinoplasty result. Deviations in the columella and variations in its width and height lead to distortion of nostril shape and frequently compromise function. Six types of columellar disproportion are presented with detailed explanations of how to treat each. By properly recognizing and addressing columellar deformities, the surgeon can optimize both the aesthetic and functional results that are achieved. PMID:27494576

  6. [Aesthetic surgery and public health].

    PubMed

    Fogli, A

    2003-10-01

    The increasing number of requests for aesthetic surgery legitimately leads to the question of whether it can be covered by Public Health. If we look at the definition of the World Health Organization, the answer is without any doubt an affirmative one. However, economic considerations show that there is no social system in the world that covers aesthetic surgery, except for some definite interventions. Requests for aesthetic surgery occur in all social classes. It is a personal choice and a voluntary decision. It is no longer society who assists a sick or ill patient but it is the person that assumes the responsibility for himself. PMID:14599901

  7. Applying Computational Aesthetics to a Video Game Application Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ali Naci; Halici, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    The authors have developed a novel approach to evaluating the aesthetic quality of the camera direction in video game scenes rendered in real time while the game is being played. Their goal was to improve the visual aesthetic quality of computer-generated images using a computational aesthetics approach via a regression machine learning model. Considering the challenges and limitations involved, the proposed approach yielded promising prediction performance. The results show that near-real-time aesthetic analysis and visual improvement is possible using a virtual camera director. PMID:27244720

  8. Improving the Performance of the Extreme-scale Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Christian; Naughton III, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the performance of parallel applications at scale on future high-performance computing (HPC) architectures and the performance impact of different architecture choices is an important component of HPC hardware/software co-design. The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a simulation-based toolkit for investigating the performance of parallel applications at scale. xSim scales to millions of simulated Message Passing Interface (MPI) processes. The overhead introduced by a simulation tool is an important performance and productivity aspect. This paper documents two improvements to xSim: (1) a new deadlock resolution protocol to reduce the parallel discrete event simulation management overhead and (2) a new simulated MPI message matching algorithm to reduce the oversubscription management overhead. The results clearly show a significant performance improvement, such as by reducing the simulation overhead for running the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite inside the simulator from 1,020\\% to 238% for the conjugate gradient (CG) benchmark and from 102% to 0% for the embarrassingly parallel (EP) and benchmark, as well as, from 37,511% to 13,808% for CG and from 3,332% to 204% for EP with accurate process failure simulation.

  9. Functional and aesthetic results in hypospadias repair with Hinderer's techniques.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, U T

    2000-01-01

    In his editorial to the first issue of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery in 1976, the Managing Editor, Dr. Blair Rogers lays special emphasis on the publication of papers and reports dealing with the increasing role of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery as the final step in the overall rehabilitation of Reconstructive Surgery patients. In genitourinary malformations-hypospadias and epispadias-without any doubt a satisfactory sexual and urinary functional result is essential. However, also a normal aesthetic appearance, resembling a circumcised penis, and with the meatus at the tip of the glans, is becoming increasingly important, notably since the second half of the last century. An abnormal aesthetic appearance affects the patient's body image and has a negative influence on his self-esteem and sexual behaviour. Psychological stress is brought on from genital comparison with school-mates, in adulthood in gym changing rooms and, specifically, in sexual relations. In these days of greater sexual freedom, the knowledge of male genital anatomy and aesthetic appearance has considerably improved. Penile hypoplasia creates a psychological impact perhaps only comparable with that of female mammary hypoplasia. It is therefore unsurprising that not only normal aesthetic appearance after hypospadias surgery is essential, but also the demand for penile lengthening and girth augmentation has progressively increased over these past recent years. PMID:11084694

  10. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy

  11. Improving Design Efficiency for Large-Scale Heterogeneous Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Anthony

    Despite increases in logic density, many Big Data applications must still be partitioned across multiple computing devices in order to meet their strict performance requirements. Among the most demanding of these applications is high-energy physics (HEP), which uses complex computing systems consisting of thousands of FPGAs and ASICs to process the sensor data created by experiments at particles accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Designing such computing systems is challenging due to the scale of the systems, the exceptionally high-throughput and low-latency performance constraints that necessitate application-specific hardware implementations, the requirement that algorithms are efficiently partitioned across many devices, and the possible need to update the implemented algorithms during the lifetime of the system. In this work, we describe our research to develop flexible architectures for implementing such large-scale circuits on FPGAs. In particular, this work is motivated by (but not limited in scope to) high-energy physics algorithms for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC. To make efficient use of logic resources in multi-FPGA systems, we introduce Multi-Personality Partitioning, a novel form of the graph partitioning problem, and present partitioning algorithms that can significantly improve resource utilization on heterogeneous devices while also reducing inter-chip connections. To reduce the high communication costs of Big Data applications, we also introduce Information-Aware Partitioning, a partitioning method that analyzes the data content of application-specific circuits, characterizes their entropy, and selects circuit partitions that enable efficient compression of data between chips. We employ our information-aware partitioning method to improve the performance of the hardware validation platform for evaluating new algorithms for the CMS experiment. Together, these research efforts help to improve the efficiency

  12. Development of Prototype Outcomes-Based Training Modules for Aesthetic Dentistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Maricar Joy T.; Borabo, Milagros L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to know the essential components of Aesthetic Dentistry that will be a basis for prototype Outcomes-based training modules. Using a 5-point Likert scale, the researcher-made questionnaire assessed the different elements of Aesthetic Dentistry which are needed in the designing of the training module, the manner of…

  13. Workplace aesthetics: impact of environments upon employee health as compared to ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Schell, Elisabet; Theorell, Tores; Saraste, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Associations between self-reported needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were studied to analyse a possible impact of aesthetic needs on job performance as compared to ergonomic needs in 11 occupational groups. Employees at Swedish broadcasting company were invited to participate in a cross sectional study. 74% (n=1961/2641) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Demographic data from company files and a pre-validated questionnaire were used. 'High rank' and 'low rank' aesthetic and ergonomic needs were compared. The perceived needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements showed significantly different distributions (p<0.001). Aesthetic needs were more frequently reported. No gender related differences were observed. Differences between occupational groups were shown (p=0.006, 0.003).'High rank' needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were similarly associated to psychological demands, stress, pain and age. 16/24 factors showed significant differences between 'high and low rank' aesthetic needs, whereas 21/24 between ergonomic needs. Sick leave was stronger related to ergonomics. The study results show a relation between not only work place ergonomics but also work place aesthetics to health and well-being. Future work health promotion and prevention may benefit from the inclusion of workplace aesthetics. PMID:22316918

  14. Dynamical decoupling leads to improved scaling in noisy quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekatski, Pavel; Skotiniotis, Michalis; Dür, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We consider the usage of dynamical decoupling in quantum metrology, where the joint evolution of system plus environment is described by a Hamiltonian. We show that by ultra-fast unitary control operations acting locally only on system qubits, noise can be eliminated while the desired evolution is only reduced by at most a constant factor, leading to Heisenberg scaling. We identify all kinds of noise where such an approach is applicable. Only noise that is generated by the Hamiltonian to be estimated itself cannot be altered. However, even for such parallel noise, one can achieve an improved scaling as compared to the standard quantum limit for any local noise by means of symmetrization. Our results are also applicable in other schemes based on dynamical decoupling, e.g. the generation of high-fidelity entangling gates.

  15. A Visual Aesthetic Prediction Method for Use in Benefit-Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1980-08-01

    This report discusses the development of a method to predict landscape visual aesthetic changes caused by the siting of nuclear power plants. The methodology uses public perceptions as a measure of visual aesthetics. Individuals scored landscape photographs on a 0 to 50 visual aesthetic scale. The visual aesthetic scores were explained statistically by landscape characteristics, percent of the scene in clear, still water, and characteristics of the individuals scoring the photographs. Three visual aesthetic relationships were empirically estimated. The first is the relationship among group mean visual aesthetic scores and landscape characteristics. The second is the relationship among individual visual aesthetic scores, landscape characteristics, and the characteristics of the individuals who ranked the landscapes. These relationships were estimated using data from two regions in the U.S. and a diverse set of landscape photographs. The third relationship is among group mean visual aesthetic scores for landscapes with a visible nuclear power plant, landscape characteristics, and mean individual characteristics of the groups who scored the landscapes. This relationship was estimated using data from six regions in the U.S. and landscapes showing nuclear plants with a closed cycle cooling system. The statistical results are highly significant. Prediction validity test results indicate that the estimated relationships can predict visual aesthetic scores for groups of individuals outside the samples used to estimate the visual aesthetic relationships. This prediction method is not intended to determine social welfare impact. The social welfare impact of visible change is a measure of how consumers value changes in visual aesthetics relative to all other goods and services. The prediction methodology only provides an estimate of the impact of visible change on the perceived aesthetics associated with that landscape relative to other landscapes. It does not provide a

  16. Overview of Botulinum Toxins for Aesthetic Uses.

    PubMed

    Gart, Michael S; Gutowski, Karol A

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) can be used for facial aesthetics. The 3 currently available BTA types include onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Botox Cosmetic, Allergan, Irvine, CA), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport; Ipsen, Ltd, Berkshire, UK), and incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin; Merz Pharmaceuticals, Frankfurt, Germany). The mechanism of action and clinical uses for treatment of dynamic lines of the forehead, brow, glabella, lateral orbit, nose, and lips are presented, as well as treatment of masseter hypertrophy, platysmal bands, and improvements of the perioral region. Specific BTA injection sites and suggested doses are presented. PMID:27363760

  17. [Aesthetic surgeons and mediatic field].

    PubMed

    Volte, Ray

    2003-10-01

    Media alter our image; aesthetic surgery has become a good thing for journalists wanting a better TV audience. The standard plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgeon does not recognize himself in most of the TV shows: operate prepuberic children, enhance buttocks and pectoralis muscles, struggle with transsexuals em leader What is become whim mammoplasties, abdominoplasties, face lifts? We are partially responsible for this mediatic lynchage because we do not occupy the mediatic field. The journalists, without any professional ethical code, make an object out of us. So now is the time of our uprising. PMID:14599902

  18. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  19. Teaching Aesthetics and Aesthetic Teaching: Toward a Deweyan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David A.

    2006-01-01

    According to John Dewey, author of "Art as Experience," science and other forms of knowledge are properly "handmaidens" to art, intellectual tools for enhancing the overall quality and value of human life and activity. Recently, scholars in education have began to examine the possible significance of Dewey's aesthetics for the practices of…

  20. "Aesthetic Emotion": An Ambiguous Concept in John Dewey's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohr, H.

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of "aesthetic emotion" in John Dewey's "Art as experience". The analysis shows that Dewey's line of investigation offers valuable insights as to the role of emotion in experience: it shows emotion as an integral part and structuring force, as a cultural and historical category. However, the notion of aesthetic…

  1. North Korean Aesthetic Theory: Aesthetics, Beauty, and "Man"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David-West, Alzo

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetics is not a subject usually associated with North Korea in Western scholarship, the usual tropes being autocracy, counterfeiting, drugs, human-rights abuse, famine, nuclear weapons, party-military dictatorship, Stalinism, and totalitarianism. Where the arts are concerned, they are typically seen as crude political propaganda. One British…

  2. Demographics and macroeconomic effects in aesthetic surgery in the UK.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C O; Ho-Asjoe, M; Hittinger, R; Nishikawa, H; Waterhouse, N; Coghlan, B; Jones, B

    2004-09-01

    Media interest in aesthetic surgery is substantial and suggestions of demographic changes such as reductions in age or an increase in the number of male patients are common. In spite of this, there is no peer reviewed literature reporting demographics of a contemporary large patient cohort or of the effect of macroeconomic indicators on aesthetic surgery in the UK. In this study, computer records 13006 patients presenting between 1998 and the first quarter of 2003 at a significant aesthetic surgery centre were analysed for procedures undergone, patient age and sex. Male to female ratios for each procedure were calculated and a comparison was made between unit activity and macroeconomic indicators. The results showed that there has been no significant demographic change in the procedures studied with patient age and male to female ratio remaining constant throughout the period studied for each procedure. Comparison with macroeconomic indicators suggested increasing demand for aesthetic surgery in spite of a global recession. In conclusion, media reports of large scale demographic shifts in aesthetic surgery patients are exaggerated. The stability of unit activity in spite of falling national economic indicators suggested that some units in the UK might be relatively immune to economic vagaries. The implications for training are discussed. PMID:15308405

  3. Improving predictions of large scale soil carbon dynamics: Integration of fine-scale hydrological and biogeochemical processes, scaling, and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Dwivedi, D.; Ghimire, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; Pau, G. S. H.; Randerson, J. T.; Shen, C.; Tang, J.; Zhu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical model representations of decadal- to centennial-scale soil-carbon dynamics are a dominant cause of uncertainty in climate change predictions. Recent attempts by some Earth System Model (ESM) teams to integrate previously unrepresented soil processes (e.g., explicit microbial processes, abiotic interactions with mineral surfaces, vertical transport), poor performance of many ESM land models against large-scale and experimental manipulation observations, and complexities associated with spatial heterogeneity highlight the nascent nature of our community's ability to accurately predict future soil carbon dynamics. I will present recent work from our group to develop a modeling framework to integrate pore-, column-, watershed-, and global-scale soil process representations into an ESM (ACME), and apply the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) package for evaluation. At the column scale and across a wide range of sites, observed depth-resolved carbon stocks and their 14C derived turnover times can be explained by a model with explicit representation of two microbial populations, a simple representation of mineralogy, and vertical transport. Integrating soil and plant dynamics requires a 'process-scaling' approach, since all aspects of the multi-nutrient system cannot be explicitly resolved at ESM scales. I will show that one approach, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, improves predictions of forest nitrogen and phosphorus experimental manipulations and leads to very different global soil carbon predictions. Translating model representations from the site- to ESM-scale requires a spatial scaling approach that either explicitly resolves the relevant processes, or more practically, accounts for fine-resolution dynamics at coarser scales. To that end, I will present recent watershed-scale modeling work that applies reduced order model methods to accurately scale fine-resolution soil carbon dynamics to coarse-resolution simulations. Finally, we

  4. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion. PMID:21673871

  5. Aesthetics and the Middle School Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Marsha M.; Bryan, Sandra L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of aesthetic education in middle schools. Imagines a school as an aesthetic environment. Describes how several content area teachers have enhanced the learning of traditional content through aesthetic projects and activities. Notes students' enthusiastic response. Outlines a five-step approach to incorporate aesthetics…

  6. Holding Aesthetics and Ideology in Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Studying imagery, irrespective of the kind, must focus equally upon its aesthetic attractiveness, its sensory lures, and its oftentimes dubious social ideology. The terms "aesthetic" and "ideology" are addressed as problematic and are defined in current, ordinary language terms: aesthetics as visual appearances and their effects and ideology as a…

  7. It's Catch-up Time for Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, John

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to refocus aesthetic education for art teachers and argues the need to see aesthetics in society. Discusses the ideas of T. Irene Sanders, Bernd Schmitt, and Alex Simonson to demonstrate real-world support for aesthetic education. Uses two examples: eye glasses and bathrooms. (CMK)

  8. Coevolutionary aesthetics in human and biotic artworlds.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a coevolutionary theory of aesthetics that encompasses both biotic and human arts. Anthropocentric perspectives in aesthetics prevent the recognition of the ontological complexity of the aesthetics of nature, and the aesthetic agency of many non-human organisms. The process of evaluative coevolution is shared by all biotic advertisements. I propose that art consists of a form of communication that coevolves with its own evaluation. Art and art history are population phenomena. I expand Arthur Danto's Artworld concept to any aesthetic population of producers and evaluators. Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art. Coevolutionary aesthetic theory provides a heuristic account of aesthetic change in both human and biotic artworlds, including the coevolutionary origin of aesthetic properties and aesthetic value within artworlds. Restructuring aesthetics, art criticism, and art history without human beings at the organizing centers of these disciplines stimulate new progress in our understanding of art, and the unique human contributions to aesthetics and aesthetic diversity. PMID:23970809

  9. Aesthetics, Popular Visual Culture, and Designer Capitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    2007-01-01

    While rejecting modernist philosophical aesthetics, the author argues for the use in art education of a current, ordinary-language definition of aesthetics as visual appearance and effect, and its widespread use in many diverse cultural sites is demonstrated. Employing such a site-specific use of aesthetics enables art education to more clearly…

  10. Applied Television Aesthetics in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    Television aesthetics is the study of the compositional principles pertinent to the television medium in which basic elements of the television picture such as light, color, framing, space, time, motion, editing, sound, etc. are examined in relation to the finished product, the television program. The major areas covered by television aesthetics…

  11. The Aesthetics of Behavioral Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    With their origins in scientific validation, behavior-analytic applications have understandably been developed with an engineering rather than a crafting orientation. Nevertheless, traditions of craftsmanship can be instructive for devising aesthetically pleasing arrangements--arrangements that people will try, and having tried, will choose to…

  12. The Ethics of Aesthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, SR

    2010-01-01

    Advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery have revolutionized the management of patients suffering from disfiguring congenital abnormalities, burns and skin cancers. The demand for aesthetic surgery has increased in recent years, as our culture has become more concerned with image and appearance. Several ethical considerations such as patient's right for informed counseling, beneficience and maleficience need to be given careful consideration. PMID:20606994

  13. Aesthetic Education: Questions and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2005-01-01

    An aesthetically educated person may be understood to subscribe to values and possess dispositions that in important respects are distinctive. The respects in which such values and dispositions are unique and the methods by which they might be developed are, however, subject to interpretation. This article provides brief summaries of three…

  14. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  15. Aesthetic Experience in Constructivist Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankford, E. Louis

    2002-01-01

    Constructivist theories of learning and recent research into aesthetic experience suggest that most people actually benefit by instruction in various means of engagement with art, and that engagement is most fulfilling when it actively challenges, builds on, and extends the knowledge, aptitudes, and abilities of the museum visitor. This in turn…

  16. Magnifying the Scale of Visual Biofeedback Improves Posture.

    PubMed

    Jehu, Deborah A; Thibault, Jérémie; Lajoie, Yves

    2016-06-01

    Biofeedback has been shown to minimize body sway during quiet standing. However, limited research has reported the optimal sensitivity parameters of visual biofeedback related to the center of pressure (COP) sway. Accordingly, 19 young adults (6 males; 13 females; aged 21.3 ± 2.5) stood with feet together and performed three visual biofeedback intensities [unmodified biofeedback (UMBF), BF magnified by 5 (BF5), BF magnified by 10 (BF10)], along with control trials with no biofeedback (NBF). The participants were instructed to stand as still as possible while minimizing the movements of the visual target. The findings revealed that UMBF produced significantly greater COP displacement in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral directions, as well as greater standard deviation of the COP in the AP direction (p < 0.05). Additionally, NBF showed significantly greater 95 % area ellipse than the UMBF, BF5, and BF10 intensities (p < 0.001). Therefore, the most sensitive COP scales generated the least amount of postural sway. However, there were no significant differences on any of the COP measures between BF5 and BF10. This research provides insight with respect to the proper scale on which biofeedback should be given in order to improve postural control (i.e., BF5 or BF10). PMID:26678916

  17. New Communication Media Technologies: Perceptual, Cognitive and Aesthetic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    Visual communication media technologies, particularly television, hinder rather than enhance viewer perceptual processes, understanding, and aesthetic appreciation of visual messages transmitted by means of such technologies. Emerging technologies, including high-definition, interactive, and holographic television, will not necessarily improve or…

  18. Improved Scales for Metal Ion Softness and Toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten scales relating to chemical hardness or softness were compiled. These included eight published scales such as those of Pearson, Ahrland, Klopman, and Misono. Another scale consisted of the -logs of the solubility products of metal sulfides, and yet another was a consensus scale constructed fro...

  19. Ethnic considerations in buttock aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward I; Roberts, Thomas L; Bruner, Terrence W

    2009-08-01

    There has been increased interest in buttock contouring and augmentation in recent years, which has translated into increased demand for these procedures. In addition, we are witnessing a growing number of patients from all ethnic groups requesting cosmetic surgery in the United States. Buttock aesthetic surgery today consists of either augmentation or recontouring of the gluteal region by one of three methods: (1) liposuction (if only reductive shaping is required); (2) liposuction and augmentation by micro fat grafting; and (3) gluteal implants. Whereas there certainly exists a "universal ideal" of beauty in buttock augmentation, there are fundamental ethnic differences that must be recognized to achieve a desirable surgical outcome. We present an article reviewing current trends in buttock aesthetic procedures and discuss issues relevant to the ethnic populations. PMID:20676318

  20. Infrastructure for Large-Scale Quality-Improvement Projects: Early Lessons from North Carolina Improving Performance in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Warren P.; Lefebvre, Ann; Donahue, Katrina E.; Bacon, Thomas; Dobson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known regarding how to accomplish large-scale health care improvement. Our goal is to improve the quality of chronic disease care in all primary care practices throughout North Carolina. Methods: Methods for improvement include (1) common quality measures and shared data system; (2) rapid cycle improvement principles; (3)…

  1. On the electrophysiology of aesthetic processing.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    One important method that can be applied for gaining an understanding of the underpinning of aesthetics in the brain is that of electrophysiology. Cognitive electrophysiology, in particular, allows the identification of components in a mental processing architecture. The present chapter reviews findings in the neurocognitive psychology of aesthetics, or neuroaesthetics, that have been obtained with the method of event-related brain potentials, as derived from the human electroencephalogram. The cognitive-perceptual bases as well as affective substages of aesthetic processing have been investigated and those are described here. The event-related potential method allows for the identification of mental processing modes in cognitive and aesthetic processing. It also provides an assessment of the mental chronometry of cognitive and affective stages in aesthetic appreciation. As the work described here shows, distinct processes in the brain are engaged in aesthetic judgments. PMID:24041323

  2. Leadership and Management in Aesthetic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The aesthetic provider is obligated to leverage their leadership, management, and teamwork skills on a daily basis in order to deliver optimum aesthetic outcomes for their clients. This article discusses leadership and motivational theories, leadership and management traits, complexity theory, Gardner's tasks of leadership, and the role of emotional intelligence in leading, managing, and following, so the aesthetic provider can identify and align with a particular leadership and management style that suits their practice philosophy. PMID:26933982

  3. Analysis of risks and aesthetics in a consecutive series of tissue expansion breast reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B E; Casso, D; Whetstone, M

    1992-05-01

    A consecutive series of 73 patients underwent tissue expansion for breast reconstruction between 1980 and 1986. The cases were reviewed, and preoperative risk factors, postoperative complications, and aesthetic results were assessed. Cigarette smoking correlated with a higher incidence of complications and unfavorable results. Similar correlations were found among patients with histories of significant medical disorders or alcohol abuse, although patient numbers were small in these categories. Subpectoral and suprapectoral placement of expanders yielded similar complication rates and aesthetic results. Surgical techniques contributing to improved aesthetic results are described. PMID:1561255

  4. Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. "The Colloquium on Large…

  5. Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Swen; Elwasif, Wael R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R

    2014-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  7. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  8. Preparation and Risk in Teaching Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankford, E. Louis

    1990-01-01

    Outlines an issue-centered approach to teaching aesthetics, where students identify and analyze possible solutions before learning an aesthetician's viewpoint. Suggests that teachers acquire basic aesthetic knowledge but also be willing to accept planned uncertainty as an educational principle. Presents a fictional art forgery scenario to…

  9. Aesthetic Education and the Third Domain: Synaesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Richard S.

    The author states that art and the aesthetic have historically become inseparable. For art education this raises the question: is the role of art in education functioning in the same capacity as art in society? It is conceivable that overreliance on past orientation, or even that any reference whatever to that limited vision of the art-aesthetic,…

  10. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  11. Beardsley's Aesthetics, Musical Analysis, and Musical Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winking, John T.

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a brief discussion of the uses of aesthetic theory in aesthetic education, followed by the explication of one subsidiary aspect (regional qualities) of Monroe Beardsley's theory, and by a demonstration of how that aspect can be applied in musical analysis and in teaching for perceptive music listening. (Author/SJL)

  12. Introducing Aesthetic Features in Gymnastic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollatou, Elisana; Savrami, Katia; Karadimou, Konstanding

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on an aesthetic approach that takes the simplest functional skill, such as walking, and develops it into an artistic skill. The aim then is to identify aesthetic characteristics and examine ways to apply them in gymnastic classes. Because walking is the child's first experience with bipedal locomotion, the initial walking action…

  13. Aesthetical Information Impact of a Literary Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, M. F.

    The aim of this study was to explore the aesthetic impact of a literary text on the human mind and to extend the knowledge on how and when the information from a book enters the human brain, and if and when it starts to be processed and, possibly, memorized. Readers' responses to aesthetic texts were measured through a series of biometric…

  14. Neuroaesthetics: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Marcus T; Zaidel, Dahlia W; Vartanian, Oshin; Skov, Martin; Leder, Helmut; Chatterjee, Anjan; Nadal, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics has gained in popularity in recent years but also attracted criticism from the perspectives both of the humanities and the sciences. In an effort to consolidate research in the field, we characterize neuroaesthetics as the cognitive neuroscience of aesthetic experience, drawing on long traditions of research in empirical aesthetics on the one hand and cognitive neuroscience on the other. We clarify the aims and scope of the field, identifying relations among neuroscientific investigations of aesthetics, beauty, and art. The approach we advocate takes as its object of study a wide spectrum of aesthetic experiences, resulting from interactions of individuals, sensory stimuli, and context. Drawing on its parent fields, a cognitive neuroscience of aesthetics would investigate the complex cognitive processes and functional networks of brain regions involved in those experiences without placing a value on them. Thus, the cognitive neuroscientific approach may develop in a way that is mutually complementary to approaches in the humanities. PMID:26993278

  15. The ethical dilemmas of aesthetic medicine: what every provider should consider.

    PubMed

    Spear, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of aesthetic medicine is embellishment and enhancement. As these procedures are elective in nature, media messages and misleading advertisements do influence those consumers seeking to improve or enhance their appearance. The role of provider demands that prudent guide these treatment options and not only succumb to patient demands. This article discusses the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice, and presents a framework to guide practice to enhance resolution of ethical dilemmas confronting the provider of aesthetic medicine. PMID:20814270

  16. Quantitative assessment of the relationships among ecological, morphological and aesthetic values in a river rehabilitation initiative.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Ashlee; Fisher, Karen; Brierley, Gary

    2015-04-15

    Promoting community support in rehabilitation efforts through incorporation of aesthetic considerations is an important component of environmental management. This research utilised a small-scale survey methodology to explore relationships among the ecological and morphological goals of scientists and the aesthetic goals of the public using the Twin Streams Catchment, Auckland, New Zealand, as a case study. Analyses using a linear model and a generalised linear mixed model showed statistically significant relationships between perceived naturalness of landscapes and their aesthetic ratings, and among ratings of perceived naturalness and ecological integrity and morphological condition. Expert measures of health and the aesthetic evaluations of the public were well aligned, indicating public preferences for landscapes of high ecological integrity with good morphological condition. Further analysis revealed participants used 'cues to care' to rate naturalness. This suggests that environmental education endeavours could further align values with these cues in efforts to enhance approaches to landscape sustainability. PMID:25660497

  17. Embodied image: gender differences in functional and aesthetic body image among Australian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Bree D; Barber, Bonnie L

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of the body are not restricted to the way the body "looks"; they may also extend to the way the body "functions". This research explores body image among male and female adolescents using the Embodied Image Scale (EIS), which incorporates body function into body image. Adolescents (N=1526, male=673, female=853) aged 12-17 (M=13.83, SD=1.02), from 26 Western Australian high schools were surveyed. Information was gathered on pubertal timing, body mass index (BMI) and body image. Participants reported significantly higher value of, behavioral-investment in, and satisfaction with the functional dimension of the body compared to the aesthetic dimension. After controlling for age, pubertal timing, and BMI, females reported significantly higher aesthetic values and aesthetic behavioral-investment, and lower aesthetic satisfaction, functional values, functional behavioral-investment and functional satisfaction than male participants. Grade, pubertal timing and BMI category differences were also explored. PMID:19945925

  18. Stacked graphs--geometry & aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Byron, Lee; Wattenberg, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In February 2008, the New York Times published an unusual chart of box office revenues for 7500 movies over 21 years. The chart was based on a similar visualization, developed by the first author, that displayed trends in music listening. This paper describes the design decisions and algorithms behind these graphics, and discusses the reaction on the Web. We suggest that this type of complex layered graph is effective for displaying large data sets to a mass audience. We provide a mathematical analysis of how this layered graph relates to traditional stacked graphs and to techniques such as ThemeRiver, showing how each method is optimizing a different "energy function". Finally, we discuss techniques for coloring and ordering the layers of such graphs. Throughout the paper, we emphasize the interplay between considerations of aesthetics and legibility. PMID:18988970

  19. Maintaining standards of aesthetic practice in trainees subject to NHS restrictions.

    PubMed

    Paterson, P; Allison, K

    2006-01-01

    The Specialist Advisory Committee (SAC) in plastic surgery within the United Kingdom (UK) recommends a modular training programme to include aesthetic surgery. The intercollegiate board examinations test candidates on all aspects of aesthetic practice yet there is no formal, national aesthetic training in the UK. Closure of National Health Service (NHS) private patient facilities has reduced training opportunity [Nicolle FV. Sir Harold Gillies Memorial Lecture; Aesthetic plastic surgery and the future plastic surgeon. Br J Plast Surg 1998;51:419-24.] Calmanisation [Hospital doctors: training for the future. The Report of the Working Group on Specialist Medical Training (The Calman Report). London: HMSO; 1993.], the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) [; Phillips H, Fleet Z, Bowman K. The European Working time Directive-interim report and guidance from The Royal College of Surgeons of England working party chaired by Mr Hugh Phillips; 2003 []; Chesser S, Bowman K, Phillips H. The European Working Time Directive and the training of surgeons. BMJ Careers Focus 2002;s69-7.], and more importantly the implementation of "local" aesthetic guidelines have placed further pressures on training. Reductions of NHS case mix will ultimately lead to a reduction in trainee experience. With increasing regulatory pressure from the Commission for Healthcare Improvement, standards of aesthetic practice can only be maintained by increasing private/independent sector involvement. At present a disparity exists between the demand and provision of aesthetic surgery training in the UK. Aesthetic surgery forms part of the training curriculum for plastic surgery and as such remains a training issue. A review of aesthetic surgery training is needed in the UK through consultation with trainers and trainee representatives. PMID:16876084

  20. PILOT SCALE EXPERIMENTS TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes pilot plant experience with techniques with a potential for improving the performance of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) by using a novel rapping reentrainment collector and flexible steel cable (in place of solid large-diameter discharge electrodes) for bo...

  1. Simulating subsurface heterogeneity improves large-scale water resources predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A. J.; Gleeson, T.; Wagener, T.; Wada, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneity is abundant everywhere across the hydrosphere. It exists in the soil, the vadose zone and the groundwater. In large-scale hydrological models, subsurface heterogeneity is usually not considered. Instead average or representative values are chosen for each of the simulated grid cells, not incorporating any sub-grid variability. This may lead to unreliable predictions when the models are used for assessing future water resources availability, floods or droughts, or when they are used for recommendations for more sustainable water management. In this study we use a novel, large-scale model that takes into account sub-grid heterogeneity for the simulation of groundwater recharge by using statistical distribution functions. We choose all regions over Europe that are comprised by carbonate rock (~35% of the total area) because the well understood dissolvability of carbonate rocks (karstification) allows for assessing the strength of subsurface heterogeneity. Applying the model with historic data and future climate projections we show that subsurface heterogeneity lowers the vulnerability of groundwater recharge on hydro-climatic extremes and future changes of climate. Comparing our simulations with the PCR-GLOBWB model we can quantify the deviations of simulations for different sub-regions in Europe.

  2. A New Scale Based 'Heterogeneity Matrix' for Improving Soil Moisture Spatial Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, N.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture is a dynamic state variable of interest to agronomists, hydrologists and climate modelers alike. But the spatial scales at which they require soil moisture data are very different from each other. Past studies have established that the spatial structure of soil moisture is dependent upon the heterogeneity in physical controls, namely, precipitation, soil, vegetation and topography of the region. However, the spatial structure of soil moisture has also been found to be severely affected by scale. In order to estimate the spatial structure of soil moisture at different scales, it is important to first identify an effective scale based representation of heterogeneity with respect to its effect on soil moisture spatial distribution. In this study, we are attempting to devise a 3x3 heterogeneity matrix to accurately represent the existing heterogeneity in a region at the field, watershed and regional scale. Heterogeneity in terms of soil, vegetation and topography is being investigated for 2 hydro-climates (humid and sub-humid). An exhaustive sensitivity analysis using the Community Land -Surface Model (CLM) is being conducted to determine the most appropriate scale based parameters (like NDVI, % sand, slope etc.) that can represent the different physical controls. The statistical entropy of each chosen parameter will be used to represent the heterogeneity magnitude of a particular physical control which will form the diagonal of the heterogeneity matrix. The remainder elements of the matrix will be estimated as the joint entropy and will represent the correlation between the different physical controls.

  3. Full-scale demonstration of improvement in aeration efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.A.; Kim, Y.K.; Krupa, J.J.; Shkreli, F.; Nasr, S.; Fitzpatrick, B.

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the results of side-by-side full-scale aeration testing of a plug-flow process and a modified contact stabilization process incorporating an anaerobic selector at the wastewater treatment facility in Fredonia, NY. Over 40 tests were completed utilizing the off-gas technique during the 2-month investigation period (summer of 1995). Compared to the plug-flow process, the modified contact stabilization process with internal sludge recycle was shown to have higher {alpha} values and to require less blower energy consumption when the selector operation was properly controlled. Dissolved oxygen concentration, selector COD concentration, and internal recycle sludge levels were found to be critical parameters in the successful operation of the modified process. Higher internal recycle sludge levels allowed the plant to run at more stable operating conditions in terms of the oxygen transfer efficiency, {alpha}, and sludge volume index.

  4. Body image dysmorphic disorder in persons who undergo aesthetic medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews the literature on body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in patients who seek aesthetic surgery and other appearance-enhancing medical treatments such as dermatologic treatment. It begins with a discussion of the growing popularity of aesthetic medical treatments. The literature investigating the psychological characteristics of individuals interested in these treatments is highlighted. Studies suggest that 5% to 15% of individuals who seek these aesthetic medical treatments suffer from BDD. Retrospective reports suggest that persons with BDD rarely experience improvement in their symptoms following these treatments, leading some to suggest that BDD is a contraindication to treatment. The article ends with a discussion of the clinical management of patients with BDD who present for an aesthetic change in their appearance. PMID:23015692

  5. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  6. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  7. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  8. Reimer through Confucian Lenses: Resonances with Classical Chinese Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I compare all three editions of Bennett Reimer's "A Philosophy of Music Education" with early Chinese philosophy, in particular, classical Chinese aesthetics. I structure my analysis around a quartet of interrelated themes: aesthetic education, education of feeling, aesthetic experience, and ethics and aesthetics. This…

  9. The Aesthetics of Race versus the Beauty of Humanity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontynen, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    Recommends rejecting race (an aesthetic concept) and returning to the apprehension, appreciation, and realization of beauty. Discusses aesthetics and racism, racism and postmodernism, and postmodernism and despair. Explains that recognition of the continuum from aesthetics to beauty would mark the demise of aesthetics and the rise of a new and…

  10. The "nuts & bolts" of becoming an aesthetic provider: part 2-building your aesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Part 2 of this three-part series of articles on becoming an aesthetic provider centers on the steps necessary to build an aesthetic practice. We will discuss the legal (e.g., licensure, scope of practice, malpractice, and documentation) and the business aspects (e.g., "your brand," staff development, networking, marketing, and revenue possibilities) of building a successful aesthetic practice. On the basis of years of experience, "pearls and pitfalls" will be discussed so novice, intermediate, and advanced aesthetic providers can minimize mistakes and maximize their success in this exciting and growing profession. PMID:24583661

  11. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  12. Coherence and Credibility: The Aesthetics of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Ernest R.

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation studies are discussed in terms of aesthetic and literary qualities. Concepts such as imagery, coherence, credibility, dramatic structure, mode of presentation, and story line, are analyzed in relation to evaluative documents. (MH)

  13. Nietzsche and the Aesthetics of Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Steve; Poulakos, John

    1993-01-01

    Addresses the debate over rhetoric's epistemic status in terms of Nietzsche's critique of epistemology. Suggests that Nietzsche's aestheticism provides an alternative to the debate. Focuses on differences between the rhetorics of the epistemic and the aesthetic. (SR)

  14. through the Use of Aesthetic Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crim, Courtney L.; Kennedy, Kimberley D.; Thornton, Jenifer S.

    2013-01-01

    multiple intelligences, and aesthetic representations. Next, it presents the methodology, reports findings, and discusses themes related to the authors' research questions. Finally, it concludes that tapping into students' multiple intelligence strength(s) is an…

  15. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  16. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  17. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  18. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can mar the beauty of natural...

  19. Silberman and the British on Aesthetic Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1973-01-01

    Author describes two instructive ways of illustrating the principal business of aesthetic education and summarizes the way in which the notion of a form of understanding is dealt with by Dearden. (Author/RK)

  20. Aesthetic Surgery of the Male Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Gary J.; Salgado, Christopher J.; Chim, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Appearance of the male genitalia is linked with self-esteem and sexual identity. Aesthetic surgery of the male genitalia serves to correct perceived deficiencies as well as physical deformities, which may cause psychological distress. Attention to patient motivation for surgery and to surgical technique is key to achieving optimal results. In this review, the authors describe aesthetic surgical techniques for treatment of penile and scrotal deficiencies. They also discuss techniques for revision in patients with previous surgery. PMID:22851910

  1. Aesthetic surgery of the male genitalia.

    PubMed

    Alter, Gary J; Salgado, Christopher J; Chim, Harvey

    2011-08-01

    Appearance of the male genitalia is linked with self-esteem and sexual identity. Aesthetic surgery of the male genitalia serves to correct perceived deficiencies as well as physical deformities, which may cause psychological distress. Attention to patient motivation for surgery and to surgical technique is key to achieving optimal results. In this review, the authors describe aesthetic surgical techniques for treatment of penile and scrotal deficiencies. They also discuss techniques for revision in patients with previous surgery. PMID:22851910

  2. Aesthetic and Artistic; Two Separate Concepts: The Dangers of "Aesthetic Education." Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David

    2004-01-01

    In this essay, the author notes a danger concerning the general approach to teaching about the arts through improper use of the concepts "aesthetic" and "artistic." Observing that both concepts are often used interchangeably, with "aesthetic" being seen as the more generic term, the author argues that these concepts are separate and should be…

  3. Aesthetics, the Arts, and Education: The Painter as a Model in Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munski, Marilyn L.

    Arguing that the visual arts serve as the focus for potential aesthetic experience in the discipline of art education, this paper describes the influence of the sensory elements of aesthetic experience in nature and other art forms on the work of three artists--Kandinsky, Van Gogh, and Picasso--and suggests that teachers can enrich students'…

  4. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  5. Large-Scale High School Reform through School Improvement Networks: Exploring Possibilities for "Developmental Evaluation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peurach, Donald J.; Lenhoff, Sarah Winchell; Glazer, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing school improvement networks as a leading strategy for large-scale high school reform, this analysis examines developmental evaluation as an approach to examining school improvement networks as "learning systems" able to produce, use, and refine practical knowledge in large numbers of schools. Through a case study of one…

  6. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures. PMID:18207423

  7. Body dysmorphic disorder in aesthetic rhinoplasty candidates

    PubMed Central

    MR, Fathololoomi; Tabrizi A, Goljanian; Bafghi A, Fattahi; SA, Noohi; A, Makhdoom

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder defined as obsessive ideas about distorted physical appearance, leading to social, professional and personal dysfunction. Many of these patients seek aesthetic surgery and are generally dissatisfied with the outcome of their surgery. In the present study patients coming to the otolaryngology clinic of Thaleghani Hospital in Tehran seeking rhinoplasty were evaluated. Methodology: Between October 2010 and October 2011, 130 patients seeking rhinoplasty were recruited in a cross-sectional study. These patients were consecutively interviewed in the otolaryngology clinic of Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Questionnaires were filled containing demographic data. BDD was evaluated by a separate questionnaire. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire was filled to evaluate depression and anxiety. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software. The frequency and standard deviations were calculated. Differences between groups were evaluated by using the chi-square, and t-tests. Results: Ninety nine (76.2%) of rhinoplasty candidates were female and thirty one (23.8%) were male. Eighty five (65.4%) were single and thirty eight (29.2%) were married while seven were divorced. About 63.8% were University students or University graduates. Mean age was 26.43±6.29 years old. 41 patients (31.5%) had BDD. Among BDD patients 12 (29.3%) had concurrent depression and 11 (26.8%) had concurrent anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was found between the presence or severity of BDD and age, gender, marital status, level of education and profession. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) among rhinoplasty candidates, psychiatric evaluation is advisable before surgery to avoid unnecessary operations and patient dissatisfaction. PMID:24353539

  8. Assessing the rhinoplasty outcome: inter-rater variability of aesthetic perception in the light of objective facial analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Kerem; Gode, Sercan; Karahan, Ceyda; Midilli, Rasit

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the success of rhinoplasty by evaluating the inter-rater variability in the light of primary indication as functional or cosmetic. Subjective aesthetic perception was compared with objective facial analysis. 45 rhinoplasty patients were included in the study. 25 had cosmetic plus functional reasons with septal deviation (group 1) and 20 had pure cosmetic reasons without septal deviation (group 2). Preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively, four individuals (patient, surgeon, 2 independent surgeons) rated the aesthetic appearance of the nose with visual analogue scale. Facial photogrammetric analysis was applied. The patient's aesthetic perception score was significantly correlated with the two independent surgeons (p < 0.05) whereas not with the primary surgeons. Regarding the objective parameters, patient's aesthetic perception was significantly correlated with the dorsal alignment in both groups (p < 0.05). General satisfaction score was significantly correlated with the nasal breathing as well as with the aesthetic perception scores in both groups. This correlation was higher for aesthetic perception in group 1 and nasal breathing in group 2. Inter-rater variability of outcome perception was higher in cosmetic patients. Nasal dorsal alignment was the only objective parameter which was correlated with the patient's perception. Patient's perception of outcome has better represented the objective photogrammetric analysis rather than the primary surgeons. An interesting finding was the more significant correlation of general satisfaction with aesthetic perception in the functional group whereas nasal breathing in the cosmetic group. PMID:25563240

  9. Complications associated with cutaneous aesthetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniela; Ruzicka, Thomas; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, a plethora of novel therapeutic approaches to fight signs of aging and to influence external body appearance have become available in aesthetic dermatology. Extensive research in this field has led to advanced understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the aging face. To successfully address the complex age-related alterations anti-aging treatment nowadays calls for a multi-faceted approach. Most frequently utilized aesthetic procedures include the use of botulinum toxin, a variety of filling substances, microneedling (collagen induction therapy), chemical peeling, lasers, radiofrequency, thread facelift and injectional lipolysis with phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate among others. Unfortunately, many clinicians still lack in-depth understanding of potential complications, risk factors and side effects associated with minimal-invasive procedures. The following review aims to give a broad overview of nowadays most frequently used approaches in the dermato-aesthetic field and their related complications. PMID:26177157

  10. Enhancing Facial Aesthetics with Muscle Retraining Exercises-A Review

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D’souza, Henston; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-01-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. ‘Smile’ is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects. PMID:25302289

  11. Aesthetic Surgery of the Female Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Dobbeleir, Julie M.L.C.L.; Landuyt, Koenraad Van; Monstrey, Stan J.

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic genital surgery seems to have become a fashionable issue nowadays. Many procedures and techniques have been described these last years, but very few long-term results or follow up studies are available. The novelty of this aspect of plastic surgery and the lack of evidence-based interventions, have led to a comparison with female genital mutilation. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the possible surgical procedures as well as the general principles of aesthetic surgery of the female genitalia. PMID:22547970

  12. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology. PMID:22699003

  13. The neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation.

    PubMed

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Agnati, Luigi; Huston, Joseph P; Mora, Francisco; Nadal, Marcos

    2011-06-01

    The study of the cognitive and neural underpinnings of aesthetic appreciation by means of neuroimaging techniques has yielded a wealth of fascinating information. Although the results of these studies have been somewhat divergent, here we provide an integrative view of the early approaches, which identified some of the core mechanisms involved in aesthetic preference. Then, a number of more specific issues under the perspective of recent work are addressed. Finally, we propose a framework to accommodate these findings and we explore future prospects for the emerging field of neuroaesthetics. PMID:21421021

  14. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically “safe” materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  15. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically "safe" materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  16. Aesthetic surgery of the female genitalia.

    PubMed

    Dobbeleir, Julie M L C L; Landuyt, Koenraad Van; Monstrey, Stan J

    2011-05-01

    Aesthetic genital surgery seems to have become a fashionable issue nowadays. Many procedures and techniques have been described these last years, but very few long-term results or follow up studies are available. The novelty of this aspect of plastic surgery and the lack of evidence-based interventions, have led to a comparison with female genital mutilation. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the possible surgical procedures as well as the general principles of aesthetic surgery of the female genitalia. PMID:22547970

  17. Improved pattern scaling approaches for the use in climate impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herger, Nadja; Sanderson, Benjamin M.; Knutti, Reto

    2015-05-01

    Pattern scaling is a simple way to produce climate projections beyond the scenarios run with expensive global climate models (GCMs). The simplest technique has known limitations and assumes that a spatial climate anomaly pattern obtained from a GCM can be scaled by the global mean temperature (GMT) anomaly. We propose alternatives and assess their skills and limitations. One approach which avoids scaling is to consider a period in a different scenario with the same GMT change. It is attractive as it provides patterns of any temporal resolution that are consistent across variables, and it does not distort variability. Second, we extend the traditional approach with a land-sea contrast term, which provides the largest improvements over the traditional technique. When interpolating between known bounding scenarios, the proposed methods significantly improve the accuracy of the pattern scaled scenario with little computational cost. The remaining errors are much smaller than the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 model spread.

  18. Multi-scale surface texture to improve blue response of nanoporous black silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.; Jones, Kim M.; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-09-01

    We characterize the optical and carrier-collection physics of multi-scale textured p-type black Si solar cells with conversion efficiency of 17.1%. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining density-graded nanoporous layer made by metal-assisted etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. We found that (1) reducing the thickness of nanostructured Si layer improves the short-wavelength spectral response and (2) multi-scale texture permits thinning of the nanostructured layer while maintaining low surface reflection. We have reduced the nanostructured layer thickness by 60% while retaining a solar-spectrum-averaged black Si reflectance of less than 2%. Spectral response at 450 nm has improved from 57% to 71%.

  19. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration...

  20. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austring, Bennye D.; Sorensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic activities in the potential space and in this way…

  1. Curator and Critic: Role of the Assessor in Aesthetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Assessment in aesthetic fields presents a myriad of challenges in the higher education environment. This paper uses a metaphorical representation to explore the role of assessors within aesthetic assessment settings in higher education. It begins with a discussion of aesthetic fields and an exploration of the role of assessment in this area.…

  2. Aesthetical Information Impact of Artworks on the Human Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, M. F.

    The major areas of concern in this paper are the information and aesthetical impacts of artwork on the human mind, and the modes, structures, and media of artwork which influence the formulation of aesthetical impact. The analysis of aesthetical information impact follows current discoveries in the disciplines of biocybernetics, system and…

  3. On the Possibility of the Formation of Aesthetic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollenhauer, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    Examines the recent emphasis on aesthetics, which goes beyond the scope of a didactics of art education, stating that it is a symptom of the German cultural-historical situation. Sketches tentative approaches to research questions on aesthetic education. Questions whether aesthetic education must be conceived in the form of reflections on…

  4. The Idealization of Contingency in Traditional Japanese Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In reaction to prevailing views that characterize traditional Japanese aesthetics as an "aesthetics of imperfection and insufficiency," this essay indicates how the concept of perfection has been underthematized. To highlight the importance of perfection within this context, the author recalls the familiar principle of aesthetic complementarity…

  5. Aesthetic Discourses in Early Childhood Settings: Dewey, Steiner, and Vygotsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Booyeun

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood, when young children are already capable of undergoing aesthetic experience, must be the starting point for aesthetic education. Despite increasing attention to the significant values of the arts in early childhood classrooms, no theoretical framework to support aesthetic education has been established. This article introduces the…

  6. Chairs, Cars, and Bridges: Teaching Aesthetics from the Everyday

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zande, Robin Vande

    2007-01-01

    It is very typical for students in K-12 art education to study aesthetics based on artistic objects. Artistic objects, however, need not be the sole source for aesthetic investigation. In this article, the author discusses the use of designed objects such as chairs, cars, and bridges in the discussion of aesthetic concepts. Students, as consumers…

  7. Aesthetics for the 21st Century: Another Challenge for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Barbara W.

    This paper distinguishes several closely interrelated aesthetics terms, establishes criteria for and facets of the aesthetic experience, and examines aesthetic theories which have guided values systems for imagery of the past and present. These include: (1) mimetic theories of art as imitation; (2) instrumental theories of art as teacher; (3)…

  8. The Roles of the Aesthetic in Mathematical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Mathematicians have long claimed that the aesthetic plays a fundamental role in the development and appreciation of mathematical knowledge. To date, however, it has been unclear how the aesthetic might contribute to the teaching and learning of school mathematics. This is due in part to the fact that mathematicians' aesthetic claims have been…

  9. Evaluation of Eyelid Function and Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Neimkin, Michael G; Holds, John B

    2016-05-01

    The eyes and periocular area are the central aesthetic unit of the face. Facial aging is a dynamic process that involves skin, subcutaneous soft tissues, and bony structures. An understanding of what is perceived as youthful and beautiful is critical for success. Knowledge of the functional aspects of the eyelid and periocular area can identify pre-preoperative red flags. PMID:27105795

  10. Pragmatic Aesthetics and the Autistic Artist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Kyle; Barnbaum, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    There are many prominent examples of artists with autism. However, even when confronted with evidence of these accomplished "autistic savants", pragmatic aesthetic theories cannot adequately account for the work of these accomplished artists as "artists". This article first examines the nature of autism and explores a prominent psychological…

  11. Incorporating the Aesthetic Dimension into Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott; Wolfe, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study that was undertaken to discover not only the belief and intent behind the everyday opportunities that four exemplary teachers offered their high performing students but what activities they incorporated into their everyday lessons in an attempt to make sense of how aesthetic experiences may enhance learning. The…

  12. The Aesthetic Potential of Global Issues Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudelli, William; Hewitt, Randall

    2010-01-01

    There is a despondency and desperation about schools, and thereby curriculum, that too often fails to teach for and about something more than narrow, capitalist-driven, techno-rationalist ends. The prevailing educational theory undergirding schools, as well as the conceptualization of curriculum entailed, lacks an aesthetic and spiritual rationale…

  13. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  14. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  15. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  16. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  17. Seeing, Feeling, Evoking: Imagery and Aesthetic Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleckenstein, K.

    Louise Rosenblatt differentiates between two reading transactions: efferent reading, or concentrating on the information in a text, and aesthetic reading, a holistic process by which the reader "lives through" a text-world event. Current research in the whole language approach to reading instruction attests to the growing stature of aesthetic…

  18. Therapy and the Aesthetics of the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Post-structuralists argue that personal identity is a function of societal power dynamics. This becomes especially problematic for persons recruited into problem-saturated identities. In this paper, inspired by Foucault's call for us to "create ourselves as a work of art" (p. 262), I explore the therapeutic value of an aesthetic approach…

  19. Foucault, Counselling and the Aesthetics of Existence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Michel Foucault was drawn late in life to study the "arts of the self" in Greco-Roman culture as a basis, following Nietzsche, for what he called an "aesthetics of existence." By this, he meant a set of creative and experimental processes and techniques by which an individual turns him- or herself into a work of art. For Nietzsche, it was above…

  20. "ZEAL": An Aesthetic Revolution for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Barbara A.; French, James Joss

    2012-01-01

    Educators are hesitant to venture into the unknown landscape within a child's heart and mind because they have throughout their education experienced the same non-compassionate teachers. This research proposes an awakening, making a wave for a new revolution of compassionate teachers that institutes aesthetic methodology to address relevant…

  1. Art's Detour: A Clash of Aesthetic Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertz, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Both John Dewey and Martin Heidegger thought that art's audience had to take a detour in order to appreciate or understand a work of art. They wrote about this around the same time (mid-1930s) and independently of one another, so this similar circumstance in the history of aesthetics is unusual since they come from very different philosophical…

  2. Aesthetic surgery of the buttocks: imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Frank, Susan J; Flusberg, Milana; Friedman, Shari; Sternschein, Michael; Wolf, Ellen L; Stein, Marjorie W

    2014-02-01

    Familiarity with the imaging appearance and potential complications of buttocks aesthetic surgery is important for radiologists. In this review, we illustrate the spectrum of imaging features after buttocks implants, liposuction, fat injections and silicone injections. Complications such as fat necrosis, abscess, and silicone migration are also presented. PMID:24240204

  3. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  4. Aesthetic Experiences with Music: Musicians versus Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Phyllis M.

    2009-01-01

    This study, which is a replication and extension of earlier research by Paul, examines the correspondence of perceived aesthetic experiences between musicians, in the present investigation, and children, from Paul's previous experiment. As did fourth-grade students (N = 60) in Paul's earlier study, 56 adult musicians listened to Rachmaninoff's…

  5. The Aesthetic Classroom and the Beautiful Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores an analogy: A well-played soccer game has much in common with a well-taught lesson or course. Aesthetic pedagogy, as conceived by Dewey, Gadamer, and contemporary theorists and practitioners, is set alongside the world's favorite sport, including events from the 2006 World Cup and the autobiography of Pele. The discussion moves…

  6. Aesthetics in Asian Child Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice S.

    This speech presents observations, made on a trip in June 1976, of the aesthetic environments of children in China, Japan, and Hong Kong. Home, school and day care environments are compared in terms of living and play space, room decor, the presence of art and toys, dramatic play and performance, music, nature and outdoor appreciation, food and…

  7. Do Reading Habits Influence Aesthetic Preferences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Allaith, Zainab

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that the directionality of a person's primary writing system has influences outside the domain of reading and writing, specifically influences on aesthetic preferences. The results of several previous studies suggest that people whose primary writing system goes from left to right prefer pictures of moving and static…

  8. The Value of the Aesthetic in Marxism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudich, Norman

    1975-01-01

    This paper defined and characterized the aesthetic by relating it to, rather than isolating it from, the economic, scientific, and political realities wich are its foundations, its living-sources, and the very materials of its forms and meanings. (Author/RK)

  9. Reconceptualizing Play: Aesthetic Self-Definitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guss, Faith

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to trouble the identity of children's dramatic play(ing). It contains two interweaving threads of discourse. In one thread lies a discussion of how children can trouble and extend their own identities through the aesthetic form-languages and conventions they employ and deploy in their dramatic playing/pretend playing.…

  10. McLuhan: The Aesthete as Historian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Attributes McLuhan's theories about media to his interpretation of history as an interpenetrating sequence of three processes: all history originated in oral societies, which were fragmented by literacy, but electronic media are returning society to that original state through implosion. Reviews the historical, literary, and aesthetic sources for…

  11. Creative Writing and Schiller's Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Peter

    2007-01-01

    For academics committed to the idea of an all-round aesthetic education, one of the great successes of the last thirty years has been the tremendous expansion of creative writing classes. Despite the dramatic expansion of creative writing as an academic discipline, the methods, ideals, and values of creative writing workshops have very often been…

  12. Aesthetic Crown Lengthening Using Chu Aesthetic Gauges And Evaluation of Biologic Width Healing

    PubMed Central

    Gujjari, Sheela; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The principles of biologic width have governed the literature and served as a clinical guideline during the evaluation of perio- restorative interrelationships. An adequate understanding of this concept is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, aesthetics and comfort of the dentition. Biologic width violation has become a common problem as most of the practitioners tend to underestimate the amount of tooth structure that must be exposed during a crown lengthening procedure. Also, adding to the confusion, there is a lack of general agreement regarding the amount of tooth structure that must be exposed above the crest of bone for restorative purposes. Aim The aim of this study was to perform aesthetic crown lengthening using Chu aesthetic gauges and evaluate the healing of biologic width. Materials and Methods A total of 90 teeth in 15 patients were included into the study of which 30 teeth required crown lengthening and 60 teeth shared a proximal surface with the experimental teeth. Aesthetic crown lengthening was performed using the Chu aesthetic gauges. Presurgical and intraoperative data were recorded at baseline, three and six months at six sites per tooth. Results The computed data suggest that although the positional changes of the periodontal tissues stabilize by three months, the biologic width if adequate crown lengthening is carried out re-establishes itself by three months to the original vertical levels and further gets stabilized by six months. Conclusion A step by step approach to periodontal aesthetic crown lengthening using Chu aesthetic gauge can serve to be vital for successful, predictable, and aesthetic restorative outcome. PMID:26894176

  13. Recent improvements in tensor scale computation and its applications to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ziyue; Sonka, Milan; Saha, Punam K.

    2009-02-01

    Tensor scale (t-scale) is a local morphometric parameter describing local structure shape, orientation and scale. At any image location, t-scale is the parametric representation of the largest ellipse (an ellipsoid in 3D) centered at that location and contained in the same homogeneous region. Recently, we have improved the t-scale computation algorithm by: (1) optimizing digital representations for LoG and DoG kernels for edge detection and (2) ellipse fitting by using minimization of both algebraic and geometric distance errors. Also, t-scale has been applied to computing the deformation vector field with applications to medical image registration. Currently, the method is implemented in twodimension (2D) and the deformation vector field is directly computed from t-scale-derived normal vectors at matching locations in two images to be registered. Also, the method has been used to develop a simple algorithm for computing 2D warping from one shape onto another. Normal vector yields local structure orientation pointing to the closest edge. However, this information is less reliable along the medial axis of a shape as it may be associated with either of the two opposite edges of the local shape. This problem is overcome using a shape-linearity measure estimating relative changes in scale along the orthogonal direction. Preliminary results demonstrate the method's potential in estimating deformation between two images.

  14. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words. PMID:18820963

  15. An improved method to characterise the modulation of small-scale turbulent by large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Lionel; Leschziner, Michael; Gaitonde, Datta

    2015-11-01

    A key aspect of turbulent boundary layer dynamics is ``modulation,'' which refers to degree to which the intensity of coherent large-scale structures (LS) cause an amplification or attenuation of the intensity of the small-scale structures (SS) through large-scale-linkage. In order to identify the variation of the amplitude of the SS motion, the envelope of the fluctuations needs to be determined. Mathis et al. (2009) proposed to define this latter by low-pass filtering the modulus of the analytic signal built from the Hilbert transform of SS. The validity of this definition, as a basis for quantifying the modulated SS signal, is re-examined on the basis of DNS data for a channel flow. The analysis shows that the modulus of the analytic signal is very sensitive to the skewness of its PDF, which is dependent, in turn, on the sign of the LS fluctuation and thus of whether these fluctuations are associated with sweeps or ejections. The conclusion is that generating an envelope by use of a low-pass filtering step leads to an important loss of information associated with the effects of the local skewness of the PDF of the SS on the modulation process. An improved Hilbert-transform-based method is proposed to characterize the modulation of SS turbulence by LS structures

  16. An empirical scaling law for improved confinement in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Frassinetti, L.

    2005-02-01

    A database of the confinement properties of the toroidal pinch experiment (TPE) series reversed-field pinch (RFP) devices was established, and an empirical scaling law for the energy confinement time, τE, was deduced for a consistently selected set of the database (Yagi Y. et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1787). The scaling for τE [TPE-scaling; \\smash{\\tau _E \\sim a^{1.7} I_p^{0.8} (I_p/N)^{0.3} \\Theta ^{3}} ], in particular, is a power law similar to that predicted on the basis of the tearing modes, as a function of the plasma minor radius (a), plasma current (Ip), and Ip/N, where N is the column density. On the other hand, the TPE-scaling has a strong dependence on the pinch parameter, Θ, namely τE ~ Θ3. Recently, we have investigated the database of the improved confinement in the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD). We show that the TPE-scaling agrees well with the improved τE in the PPCD database, because of its strong Θ dependence. Namely, Θ3 is a factor of merit for RFP plasmas. We discuss why this agreement is obtained in spite of the general difference between the underlying transport mechanisms of the standard and PPCD discharges. We also show that this improvement, represented by Θ3, is related to the increase in magnetic shear with Θ.

  17. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Bies, Alexander J.; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R.; Boydston, Cooper R.; Taylor, Richard P.; Sereno, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  18. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity.

    PubMed

    Bies, Alexander J; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R; Boydston, Cooper R; Taylor, Richard P; Sereno, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  19. Psychology in an Interdisciplinary Setting: A Large-Scale Project to Improve University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Franziska D.; Vogt, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    At a German university of technology, a large-scale project was funded as a part of the "Quality Pact for Teaching", a programme launched by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research to improve the quality of university teaching and study conditions. The project aims at intensifying interdisciplinary networking in teaching,…

  20. Improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Summarized is a study which satisfies the need for improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. The resulting laws are applicable to current and future vehicle systems and designs for a comprehensive spectrum of anticipated planetary missions.

  1. Methods for Improving Fine-Scale Applications of the WRF-CMAQ Modeling System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation on the work in AMAD to improve fine-scale (e.g. 4km and 1km) WRF-CMAQ simulations. Includes iterative analysis, updated sea surface temperature and snow cover fields, and inclusion of impervious surface information (urban parameterization).

  2. Aesthetic aspects of abdominal wall and external genital reconstructive surgery in bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex.

    PubMed

    VanderBrink, Brian A; Stock, Jeffrey A; Hanna, Moneer K

    2006-03-01

    Long-term follow-up of patients born with classical bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (EEC) reveals that many of them suffer from poor self-image, and the aesthetic aspects of the genitalia and lower abdomen acquire greater significance with age. In this article, we review the aesthetic outcomes in performing puboplasty, umbilicoplasty, and genitoplasty in patients born with EEC. Retrospective review of the cosmetic and functional outcomes in 116 patients born with EEC treated by puboplasty, umbilicoplasty, or genitoplasty was performed. Satisfaction with the cosmetic and functional outcomes of these three reconstructive surgeries was high following initial reconstructive efforts (> 90%). Attention to cosmesis during abdominal wall and genital reconstruction for EEC helps to improve a patient's perception of body image and self-esteem. Our experience with these procedures over the past 25 years demonstrated that the efforts directed toward aesthetics have been well worthwhile. PMID:16527001

  3. Estimation of Crop Gross Primary Production (GPP). 2; Do Scaled (MODIS) Vegetation Indices Improve Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qingyuan; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Suyker, Andrew; Verma, Shashi; Shuai, Yanmin; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing estimates of Gross Primary Production (GPP) have routinely been made using spectral Vegetation Indices (VIs) over the past two decades. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), the green band Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index (WDRVIgreen), and the green band Chlorophyll Index (CIgreen) have been employed to estimate GPP under the assumption that GPP is proportional to the product of VI and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (where VI is one of four VIs: NDVI, EVI, WDRVIgreen, or CIgreen). However, the empirical regressions between VI*PAR and GPP measured locally at flux towers do not pass through the origin (i.e., the zero X-Y value for regressions). Therefore they are somewhat difficult to interpret and apply. This study investigates (1) what are the scaling factors and offsets (i.e., regression slopes and intercepts) between the fraction of PAR absorbed by chlorophyll of a canopy (fAPARchl) and the VIs, and (2) whether the scaled VIs developed in (1) can eliminate the deficiency and improve the accuracy of GPP estimates. Three AmeriFlux maize and soybean fields were selected for this study, two of which are irrigated and one is rainfed. The four VIs and fAPARchl of the fields were computed with the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images. The GPP estimation performance for the scaled VIs was compared to results obtained with the original VIs and evaluated with standard statistics: the coefficient of determination (R2), the root mean square error (RMSE), and the coefficient of variation (CV). Overall, the scaled EVI obtained the best performance. The performance of the scaled NDVI, EVI and WDRVIgreen was improved across sites, crop types and soil/background wetness conditions. The scaled CIgreen did not improve results, compared to the original CIgreen. The scaled green band indices (WDRVIgreen, CIgreen) did not exhibit superior performance to either the

  4. Retinal identification based on an Improved Circular Gabor Filter and Scale Invariant Feature Transform.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianjing; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Gongping; Xi, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Retinal identification based on retinal vasculatures in the retina provides the most secure and accurate means of authentication among biometrics and has primarily been used in combination with access control systems at high security facilities. Recently, there has been much interest in retina identification. As digital retina images always suffer from deformations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), which is known for its distinctiveness and invariance for scale and rotation, has been introduced to retinal based identification. However, some shortcomings like the difficulty of feature extraction and mismatching exist in SIFT-based identification. To solve these problems, a novel preprocessing method based on the Improved Circular Gabor Transform (ICGF) is proposed. After further processing by the iterated spatial anisotropic smooth method, the number of uninformative SIFT keypoints is decreased dramatically. Tested on the VARIA and eight simulated retina databases combining rotation and scaling, the developed method presents promising results and shows robustness to rotations and scale changes. PMID:23873409

  5. Retinal Identification Based on an Improved Circular Gabor Filter and Scale Invariant Feature Transform

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianjing; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Gongping; Xi, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Retinal identification based on retinal vasculatures in the retina provides the most secure and accurate means of authentication among biometrics and has primarily been used in combination with access control systems at high security facilities. Recently, there has been much interest in retina identification. As digital retina images always suffer from deformations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), which is known for its distinctiveness and invariance for scale and rotation, has been introduced to retinal based identification. However, some shortcomings like the difficulty of feature extraction and mismatching exist in SIFT-based identification. To solve these problems, a novel preprocessing method based on the Improved Circular Gabor Transform (ICGF) is proposed. After further processing by the iterated spatial anisotropic smooth method, the number of uninformative SIFT keypoints is decreased dramatically. Tested on the VARIA and eight simulated retina databases combining rotation and scaling, the developed method presents promising results and shows robustness to rotations and scale changes. PMID:23873409

  6. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation

    PubMed Central

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction. PMID:23754437

  7. School Improvement Networks as a Strategy for Large-Scale Education Reform: The Role of Educational Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Joshua L.; Peurach, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and scale-up of school improvement networks is among the most important educational innovations of the last decade, and current federal, state, and district efforts attempt to use school improvement networks as a mechanism for supporting large-scale change. The potential of improvement networks, however, rests on the extent to…

  8. An improved upper limit to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales

    SciTech Connect

    Mainini, R.; Minelli, D.; Gervasi, M.; Boella, G.; Sironi, G.; Baú, A.; Banfi, S.; Passerini, A.; Lucia, A. De; Cavaliere, F. E-mail: daniele.minelli@gmail.com E-mail: giuliano.boella@unimib.it E-mail: bau@mib.infn.it E-mail: andrea.passerini@mib.infn.it E-mail: francesco.cavaliere@fisica.unimi.it

    2013-08-01

    Circular polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offers the possibility of detecting rotations of the universe and magnetic fields in the primeval universe or in distant clusters of galaxies. We used the Milano Polarimeter (MIPOL) installed at the Testa Grigia Observatory, on the italian Alps, to improve the existing upper limits to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales. We obtain 95% confidence level upper limits to the degree of the CMB circular polarization ranging between 5.0⋅10{sup −4} and 0.7⋅10{sup −4} at angular scales between 8° and 24°, improving by one order of magnitude preexisting upper limits at large angular scales. Our results are still far from the nK region where today expectations place the amplitude of the V Stokes parameter used to characterize circular polarization of the CMB but improve the preexisting limit at similar angular scales. Our observations offered also the opportunity of characterizing the atmospheric emission at 33 GHz at the Testa Grigia Observatory.

  9. An improved upper limit to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainini, R.; Minelli, D.; Gervasi, M.; Boella, G.; Sironi, G.; Baú, A.; Banfi, S.; Passerini, A.; De Lucia, A.; Cavaliere, F.

    2013-08-01

    Circular polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offers the possibility of detecting rotations of the universe and magnetic fields in the primeval universe or in distant clusters of galaxies. We used the Milano Polarimeter (MIPOL) installed at the Testa Grigia Observatory, on the italian Alps, to improve the existing upper limits to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales. We obtain 95% confidence level upper limits to the degree of the CMB circular polarization ranging between 5.0ṡ10-4 and 0.7ṡ10-4 at angular scales between 8° and 24°, improving by one order of magnitude preexisting upper limits at large angular scales. Our results are still far from the nK region where today expectations place the amplitude of the V Stokes parameter used to characterize circular polarization of the CMB but improve the preexisting limit at similar angular scales. Our observations offered also the opportunity of characterizing the atmospheric emission at 33 GHz at the Testa Grigia Observatory.

  10. Accuracy improvement in laser stripe extraction for large-scale triangulation scanning measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Fan; Gao, Peng; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale triangulation scanning measurement systems are widely used to measure the three-dimensional profile of large-scale components and parts. The accuracy and speed of the laser stripe center extraction are essential for guaranteeing the accuracy and efficiency of the measuring system. However, in the process of large-scale measurement, multiple factors can cause deviation of the laser stripe center, including the spatial light intensity distribution, material reflectivity characteristics, and spatial transmission characteristics. A center extraction method is proposed for improving the accuracy of the laser stripe center extraction based on image evaluation of Gaussian fitting structural similarity and analysis of the multiple source factors. First, according to the features of the gray distribution of the laser stripe, evaluation of the Gaussian fitting structural similarity is estimated to provide a threshold value for center compensation. Then using the relationships between the gray distribution of the laser stripe and the multiple source factors, a compensation method of center extraction is presented. Finally, measurement experiments for a large-scale aviation composite component are carried out. The experimental results for this specific implementation verify the feasibility of the proposed center extraction method and the improved accuracy for large-scale triangulation scanning measurements.

  11. Combining scales in habitat models to improve conservation planning in an endangered vulture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Olea, Pedro P.

    2009-07-01

    Predictive modelling of species' distributions has been successfully applied in conservation ecology, but effective conservation requires predictive and accurate models. The combination of different scales to build habitat models might improve their predictive ability and hence their usefulness for conservation, but this approach has rarely been evaluated. We developed habitat-occupancy models combining scales from nest-site to landscape for a key population at the northwestern edge of the distribution of the globally endangered Egyptian vulture ( Neophron percnopterus). We used generalised linear models (GLM) and an information-theoretic approach to identify the best combination of scales and resolutions for explaining occurrence. Those models that combined nest-site and landscape scales improved the predictive ability compared with the scale-specific ones. The best combined model had a very high predictive ability when used against an independent dataset (92% correct classifications). Egyptian vultures preferred to nest in caves with vegetation at the entrance that were situated at the base of long cliffs, provided that these cliffs are embedded within low-lying, heterogeneous areas with little topographic irregularity and with little human disturbance. The density of sheep around the nest positively influenced Egyptian vulture presence. Conservation of the studied population should focus on minimising human disturbance and on promoting sustainable development through conservation of traditional pastoralism. Our findings highlight the importance of developing region-specific multiscale models in order to design effective conservation strategies. The approach described here may be applied similarly in other populations and species.

  12. Scaling up antiretroviral treatment and improving patient retention in care: lessons from Ethiopia, 2005-2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment (ART) was provided to more than nine million people by the end of 2012. Although ART programs in resource-limited settings have expanded treatment, inadequate retention in care has been a challenge. Ethiopia has been scaling up ART and improving retention (defined as continuous engagement of patients in care) in care. We aimed to analyze the ART program in Ethiopia. Methods A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was used. Routine ART program data was used to study ART scale up and patient retention in care. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with program managers. Results The number of people receiving ART in Ethiopia increased from less than 9,000 in 2005 to more than 439, 000 in 2013. Initially, the public health approach, health system strengthening, community mobilization and provision of care and support services allowed scaling up of ART services. While ART was being scaled up, retention was recognized to be insufficient. To improve retention, a second wave of interventions, related to programmatic, structural, socio-cultural, and patient information systems, have been implemented. Retention rate increased from 77% in 2004/5 to 92% in 2012/13. Conclusion Ethiopia has been able to scale up ART and improve retention in care in spite of its limited resources. This has been possible due to interventions by the ART program, supported by health systems strengthening, community-based organizations and the communities themselves. ART programs in resource-limited settings need to put in place similar measures to scale up ART and retain patients in care. PMID:24886686

  13. Review of feedstock pretreatment strategies for improved anaerobic digestion: From lab-scale research to full-scale application.

    PubMed

    Carrere, Hélène; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Affes, Rim; Passos, Fabiana; Battimelli, Audrey; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Ferrer, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    When properly designed, pretreatments may enhance the methane potential and/or anaerobic digestion rate, improving digester performance. This paper aims at providing some guidelines on the most appropriate pretreatments for the main feedstocks of biogas plants. Waste activated sludge was firstly investigated and implemented at full-scale, its thermal pretreatment with steam explosion being most recommended as it increases the methane potential and digestion rate, ensures sludge sanitation and the heat needed is produced on-site. Regarding fatty residues, saponification is preferred for enhancing their solubilisation and bioavailability. In the case of animal by-products, this pretreatment can be optimised to ensure sterilisation, solubilisation and to reduce inhibition linked to long chain fatty acids. With regards to lignocellulosic biomass, the first goal should be delignification, followed by hemicellulose and cellulose hydrolysis, alkali or biological (fungi) pretreatments being most promising. As far as microalgae are concerned, thermal pretreatment seems the most promising technique so far. PMID:26384658

  14. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  15. Adverse reactions to injectable aesthetic microimplants.

    PubMed

    Requena, C; Izquierdo, M J; Navarro, M; Martínez, A; Vilata, J J; Botella, R; Amorrortu, J; Sabater, V; Aliaga, A; Requena, L

    2001-06-01

    New inert materials such as polymerized silicones, Bioplastique, Artecoll, and Dermalive are now being used as injectable aesthetic microimplants. These substances are better than the old ones because they tend not to migrate and do not usually produce much of a host immune response. Adverse reactions after injection of these materials are rare, although there are a few reported cases as a result of bad technique or anomalous granulomatous reactions. We report on four patients with unsightly results after cosmetic microimplants, including one of Artecoll, one of Dermalive (to the best of our knowledge, the latter is the first such case reported), and two of silicone. This report describes the histopathologic features of cutaneous reactions to these injectable aesthetic materials. PMID:11391099

  16. Aesthetic Applications of Radiofrequency Devices.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil; Rothaus, Kenneth O

    2016-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-based devices are used to improve face and neck laxity, a major feature of aging that until recently could only be addressed with surgery. Although these treatments are not meant to replace surgical procedures, patient satisfaction studies have been consistently high. For physicians offering these skin rejuvenation procedures, it is essential to have intimate knowledge of how the devices work, select appropriate candidates, set realistic expectations, and combine treatments to optimize outcomes. This article discusses the various noninvasive RF technologies currently in use and reviews pertinent clinical studies evaluating their efficacy and safety. PMID:27363770

  17. The aesthetic applications of intense pulsed light using the Lumenis M-22 device

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Yehuda; Elkhatib, Rania; Fodor, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fifteen years have passed since the first Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) devices were introduced into the market. A variety of devices that use light energy for aesthetic puposes are currently manufactured by several companies, and newer devices offering improved performance and features are periodically being introduced. Herein we present our experience with the MP-22 device (Lumenis Ltd., Yokneam, Israel) for cosmetic treatment of benign skin lesions. Patients and Methods: We collected patient data from all patients who received IPL and Nd:Yag laser treatments with the MP-22 over a one year period (Jan 2009–Jan 2010). The study group included 92 patients who were treated on the face, neck, trunk and hands. The main indications for treatment were lentigo and superficial vascular lesions. Patient age ranged from 16 to 72 years old, and 89 patients were female. Exclusion criteria for treatment were suspicion of skin cancer, isotretinoin treatment during the previous 6 months, and pregnancy. Satisfaction after treatment was evaluated by the patients on a scale ranging from 0 to 5, with 5 = excellent, 4 = very good, 3= good, 2= moderate improvement, 1= mild improvement and 0= no improvement. Results: Ninety-three percent of the patients were satisfied (rating 3, 4 or 5 on the above scale). Ninety-five percent of the patients had one or two treatment sessions. Of the treatments, 82 were on the face, two on the neck, four on the trunk and 13 on the dorsal aspect of the hands. Minor side effects such as erythema for longer than 24 hours and facial edema for more than one day were reported by 9 patients. Major complications such as scars, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation were not recorded. The fluence delivered varied from 14–18 J/cm2. Conclusion: IPL is an effective and safe method for skin treatments, namely removal of vascular and pigmented lesions. PMID:24155509

  18. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research. PMID:21655710

  19. Estimation of root zone storage capacity at the catchment scale using improved Mass Curve Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Xu, Zongxue; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-09-01

    The root zone storage capacity (Sr) greatly influences runoff generation, soil water movement, and vegetation growth and is hence an important variable for ecological and hydrological modelling. However, due to the great heterogeneity in soil texture and structure, there seems to be no effective approach to monitor or estimate Sr at the catchment scale presently. To fill the gap, in this study the Mass Curve Technique (MCT) was improved by incorporating a snowmelt module for the estimation of Sr at the catchment scale in different climatic regions. The "range of perturbation" method was also used to generate different scenarios for determining the sensitivity of the improved MCT-derived Sr to its influencing factors after the evaluation of plausibility of Sr derived from the improved MCT. Results can be showed as: (i) Sr estimates of different catchments varied greatly from ∼10 mm to ∼200 mm with the changes of climatic conditions and underlying surface characteristics. (ii) The improved MCT is a simple but powerful tool for the Sr estimation in different climatic regions of China, and incorporation of more catchments into Sr comparisons can further improve our knowledge on the variability of Sr. (iii) Variation of Sr values is an integrated consequence of variations in rainfall, snowmelt water and evapotranspiration. Sr values are most sensitive to variations in evapotranspiration of ecosystems. Besides, Sr values with a longer return period are more stable than those with a shorter return period when affected by fluctuations in its influencing factors.

  20. Aesthetic perception and its minimal content: a naturalistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Xenakis, Ioannis; Arnellos, Argyris

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic perception is one of the most interesting topics for philosophers and scientists who investigate how it influences our interactions with objects and states of affairs. Over the last few years, several studies have attempted to determine “how aesthetics is represented in an object,” and how a specific feature of an object could evoke the respective feelings during perception. Despite the vast number of approaches and models, we believe that these explanations do not resolve the problem concerning the conditions under which aesthetic perception occurs, and what constitutes the content of these perceptions. Adopting a naturalistic perspective, we here view aesthetic perception as a normative process that enables agents to enhance their interactions with physical and socio-cultural environments. Considering perception as an anticipatory and preparatory process of detection and evaluation of indications of potential interactions (what we call “interactive affordances”), we argue that the minimal content of aesthetic perception is an emotionally valued indication of interaction potentiality. Aesthetic perception allows an agent to normatively anticipate interaction potentialities, thus increasing sense making and reducing the uncertainty of interaction. This conception of aesthetic perception is compatible with contemporary evidence from neuroscience, experimental aesthetics, and interaction design. The proposed model overcomes several problems of transcendental, art-centered, and objective aesthetics as it offers an alternative to the idea of aesthetic objects that carry inherent values by explaining “the aesthetic” as emergent in perception within a context of uncertain interaction. PMID:25285084

  1. Multi-Scale Fusion for Improved Localization of Malicious Tampering in Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Korus, Paweł; Huang, Jiwu

    2016-03-01

    A sliding window-based analysis is a prevailing mechanism for tampering localization in passive image authentication. It uses existing forensic detectors, originally designed for a full-frame analysis, to obtain the detection scores for individual image regions. One of the main problems with a window-based analysis is its impractically low localization resolution stemming from the need to use relatively large analysis windows. While decreasing the window size can improve the localization resolution, the classification results tend to become unreliable due to insufficient statistics about the relevant forensic features. In this paper, we investigate a multi-scale analysis approach that fuses multiple candidate tampering maps, resulting from the analysis with different windows, to obtain a single, more reliable tampering map with better localization resolution. We propose three different techniques for multi-scale fusion, and verify their feasibility against various reference strategies. We consider a popular tampering scenario with mode-based first digit features to distinguish between singly and doubly compressed regions. Our results clearly indicate that the proposed fusion strategies can successfully combine the benefits of small-scale and large-scale analyses and improve the tampering localization performance. PMID:26800540

  2. Improvement and Extension of Shape Evaluation Criteria in Multi-Scale Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Kondo, A.

    2016-06-01

    From the last decade, the multi-scale image segmentation is getting a particular interest and practically being used for object-based image analysis. In this study, we have addressed the issues on multi-scale image segmentation, especially, in improving the performances for validity of merging and variety of derived region's shape. Firstly, we have introduced constraints on the application of spectral criterion which could suppress excessive merging between dissimilar regions. Secondly, we have extended the evaluation for smoothness criterion by modifying the definition on the extent of the object, which was brought for controlling the shape's diversity. Thirdly, we have developed new shape criterion called aspect ratio. This criterion helps to improve the reproducibility on the shape of object to be matched to the actual objectives of interest. This criterion provides constraint on the aspect ratio in the bounding box of object by keeping properties controlled with conventional shape criteria. These improvements and extensions lead to more accurate, flexible, and diverse segmentation results according to the shape characteristics of the target of interest. Furthermore, we also investigated a technique for quantitative and automatic parameterization in multi-scale image segmentation. This approach is achieved by comparing segmentation result with training area specified in advance by considering the maximization of the average area in derived objects or satisfying the evaluation index called F-measure. Thus, it has been possible to automate the parameterization that suited the objectives especially in the view point of shape's reproducibility.

  3. Improving the City-scale Emission Inventory of Anthropogenic Air Pollutants: A Case Study of Nanjing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, L.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, R.; Xie, F.; Wang, H.; Qin, H.; Wu, X.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the improvement of city-scale emission inventory, a high-resolution emission inventory of air pollutants for Nanjing is first developed combining detailed source information, and then justified through quantitative analysis with observations. The best available domestic emission factors and unit-/facility-based activity level data were compiled based on a thorough field survey on major emission sources. Totally 1089 individual emission sources were identified as point sources and all the emission-related parameters including burner type, combustion technology, fuel quality, and removal efficiency of pollution control devices, are carefully investigated and analyzed. Some new data such as detailed information of city fueling-gas stations, construction sites, monthly activity level, data from continuous emission monitoring systems and traffic flow information were combined to improve spatiotemporal distribution of this inventory. For SO2, NOX and CO, good spatial correlations were found between ground observation (9 state controlling air sampling sites in Nanjing) and city-scale emission inventory (R2=0.34, 0.38 and 0.74, respectively). For TSP, PM10 and PM2.5, however, poorer correlation was found due to relatively weaker accuracy in emission estimation and spatial distribution of road dust. The mixing ratios between specific pollutants including OC/EC, BC/CO and CO2/CO, are well correlated between those from ground observation and emission. Compared to MEIC (Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China), there is a better spatial consistence between this city-scale emission inventory and NO2 measured by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument). In particular, the city-scale emission inventory still correlated well with satellite observations (R2=0.28) while the regional emission inventory showed little correlation with satellite observations (R2=0.09) when grids containing power plants are excluded. It thus confirms the improvement of city-scale emission

  4. Improving national-scale carbon stock inventories using knowledge on land use history.

    PubMed

    Schulp, Catharina J E; Verburg, Peter H; Kuikman, Peter J; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Olivier, Jos G J; de Vries, Wim; Veldkamp, Tom

    2013-03-01

    National-scale inventories of soil organic carbon (SOC) and forest floor carbon (FFC) stocks have a high uncertainty. Inventories are often based on the interpolation of sampled information, often using a number of covariables to help such interpolation. The rationale for the choice of these covariables is not always documented, despite the fact that many local-scale studies have identified the factors explaining spatial variability of SOC and FFC stocks. These studies indicate, among others the importance of long-term land use history. Despite this, information on the effects of land use history has never been used to explain variability of carbon stocks in national-scale inventories. We designed an alternative method to improve national-scale inventories of SOC and FCC for the Dutch sand area that takes stock of the findings of detailed case studies. Determinants for SOC and FFC stocks derived from landscape-scale case studies were used to map national-scale spatial variability and to calculate national totals. The resulting national-scale spatial distribution was compared with the SOC stock map from the current Dutch greenhouse gas inventory. Using land use history to explain SOC variability decreased the error of the SOC stock estimate in 60 % of the area. The error in FFC stocks decreased in half of the forest area after including soil fertility, tree species, and forest age as explanatory factors. Estimates with reduced uncertainty will make land use and land management a more attractive and acceptable mitigation option to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases for the LULUCF sector. PMID:23124553

  5. Development of interactive workplace improvement programs in collaboration with trade associations of small-scale industries.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akiyoshi; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Kogi, Kazutaka

    2006-01-01

    Serial participatory action programs for reducing occupational safety and health risks were undertaken to know the types of support suited for small-scale industries. Working groups were formed with workplace people and occupational safety and health experts. It was agreed to develop an action-oriented strategy focusing on improving both work environment and productivity by making low-cost improvements through group work. Many workplace improvements achieved by participating enterprises and the group work procedures taken were analyzed. As supporting tools for effectively implementing the workplace improvement action programs, we developed action checklists according to industry and workplace implementation guides. Collections of local good examples also served as part of these support tools. These experiences show that keys to the sustainable action in small-scale industries are: (1) mobilization of the industry-wise network by trade associations, (2) an output-oriented strategy based on interactive group work and (3) the effective use of support tools such as low-cost action checklists and group work methods. PMID:16610539

  6. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  7. Efficacy and Safety of a Hyaluronic Acid Filler to Correct Aesthetically Detracting or Deficient Features of the Asian Nose: A Prospective, Open-Label, Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Steven; Scamp, Terrence; de Maio, Mauricio; Halstead, Michael; Johnston, Nicole; Silberberg, Michael; Rogers, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest among patients and plastic surgeons for alternatives to rhinoplasty, a common surgical procedure performed in Asia. Objectives To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and longevity of a hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose. Methods Twenty-nine carefully screened Asian patients had their noses corrected with the study filler (Juvéderm VOLUMA [Allergan plc, Dublin, Ireland] with lidocaine injectable gel), reflecting individualized treatment goals and utilizing a standardized injection procedure, and were followed for over 12 months. Results A clinically meaningful correction (≥1 grade improvement on the Assessment of Aesthetic Improvement Scale) was achieved in 27 (93.1%) patients at the first follow-up visit. This was maintained in 28 (96.6%) patients at the final visit, based on the independent assessments of a central non-injecting physician and the patients. At this final visit, 23 (79.3%) patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the study filler and 25 (86.2%) would recommend it to others. In this small series of patients, there were no serious adverse events (AEs), with all treatment-related AEs being mild to moderate, transient injection site reactions, unrelated to the study filler. Conclusions Using specific eligibility criteria, individualized treatment goals, and a standardized injection procedure, the study filler corrected aesthetically detracting or deficient features of the Asian nose, with the therapeutic effects lasting for over 12 months, consistent with a high degree of patient satisfaction. This study supports the safety and efficacy of this HA filler for specific nose augmentation procedures in selected Asian patients. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:27301371

  8. Use of Forward Sensitivity Analysis Method to Improve Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau; Nam T. Dinh

    2010-10-01

    Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology was developed in late 1980s by US NRC to systematically quantify reactor simulation uncertainty. Basing on CSAU methodology, Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methods have been developed and widely used for new reactor designs and existing LWRs power uprate. In spite of these successes, several aspects of CSAU have been criticized for further improvement: i.e., (1) subjective judgement in PIRT process; (2) high cost due to heavily relying large experimental database, needing many experts man-years work, and very high computational overhead; (3) mixing numerical errors with other uncertainties; (4) grid dependence and same numerical grids for both scaled experiments and real plants applications; (5) user effects; Although large amount of efforts have been used to improve CSAU methodology, the above issues still exist. With the effort to develop next generation safety analysis codes, new opportunities appear to take advantage of new numerical methods, better physical models, and modern uncertainty qualification methods. Forward sensitivity analysis (FSA) directly solves the PDEs for parameter sensitivities (defined as the differential of physical solution with respective to any constant parameter). When the parameter sensitivities are available in a new advanced system analysis code, CSAU could be significantly improved: (1) Quantifying numerical errors: New codes which are totally implicit and with higher order accuracy can run much faster with numerical errors quantified by FSA. (2) Quantitative PIRT (Q-PIRT) to reduce subjective judgement and improving efficiency: treat numerical errors as special sensitivities against other physical uncertainties; only parameters having large uncertainty effects on design criterions are considered. (3) Greatly reducing computational costs for uncertainty qualification by (a) choosing optimized time steps and spatial sizes; (b) using gradient information

  9. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales: The Expanded Format as an Alternative to the Likert Scale Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format,…

  10. Improving Large-scale Storage System Performance via Topology-aware and Balanced Data Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H Sarp; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of big data, the I/O subsystems of large-scale compute clusters are becoming a center of focus, with more applications putting greater demands on end-to-end I/O performance. These subsystems are often complex in design. They comprise of multiple hardware and software layers to cope with the increasing capacity, capability and scalability requirements of data intensive applications. The sharing nature of storage resources and the intrinsic interactions across these layers make it to realize user-level, end-to-end performance gains a great challenge. We propose a topology-aware resource load balancing strategy to improve per-application I/O performance. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on an extreme-scale compute cluster, Titan, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Our experiments with both synthetic benchmarks and a real-world application show that, even under congestion, our proposed algorithm can improve large-scale application I/O performance significantly, resulting in both the reduction of application run times and higher resolution simulation runs.

  11. Scale Invariance Properties of Intracerebral EEG Improve Seizure Prediction in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gadhoumi, Kais; Gotman, Jean; Lina, Jean Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents—the first cumulants—derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5%) and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning) for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance. PMID:25867083

  12. Evaluating and improving CLM hydrologic processes for integrated earth system modeling at regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Leung, L.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Coleman, A. M.; Ke, Y.; Tesfa, T. K.; Li, H.

    2010-12-01

    The community land model (CLM) was designed for coupling with atmospheric models to simulate water, energy, and carbon fluxes between the land surface and atmosphere. These fluxes are regulated in various degrees by its hydrologic processes, which have not been vigorously evaluated for applications at watershed or regional scales. In the framework of an integrated regional earth system model being developed, accurate hydrologic information in all of its components including socio-economy, atmosphere, land, and energy infrastructure is needed to represent the interactions between human and earth system processes. Applying CLM in this framework requires evaluation and model improvement so that CLM could be used to represent hydrology, soil, managed and unmanaged ecosystems, and biogeochemical processes across scales in a single modeling framework. In this presentation, we will report preliminary results on the development of CLM featuring: (1) improved land surface hydrology that incorporates hydrologic processes from the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model, including the parameterizations of subgrid variability, dynamic surface- and groundwater interactions, and hydraulic redistribution; (2) a semi-distributed extension of CLM (DCLM) for more spatially-explicit hydrologic modeling, which is critical for regional land and water management decisions under climate change mitigation and adaptation scenarios. The model development will be evaluated at flux towers and watersheds at various scales.

  13. [Side effects in aesthetic medicine. Spectrum, management and avoidance].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Goldman, A; Naoum, C

    2013-03-01

    Aesthetic medicine has become increasingly popular in the last two decades. The same trend has occurred in dermatology. Aesthetic dermatology prefers minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, even these procedures are not free of possible adverse effects. The spectrum of possible adverse effects, their management and prevention are discussed for four popular procedures in aesthetic dermatology, i.e. chemical peels, mesotherapy, botulinum toxin, and dermal fillers. Aesthetic procedures should only be performed by well-educated, well-trained medical doctors with an excellent medical background, never by lay persons. PMID:23430168

  14. Sonic morphology: Aesthetic dimensional auditory spatial awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Martha M.

    The sound and ceramic sculpture installation, " Skirting the Edge: Experiences in Sound & Form," is an integration of art and science demonstrating the concept of sonic morphology. "Sonic morphology" is herein defined as aesthetic three-dimensional auditory spatial awareness. The exhibition explicates my empirical phenomenal observations that sound has a three-dimensional form. Composed of ceramic sculptures that allude to different social and physical situations, coupled with sound compositions that enhance and create a three-dimensional auditory and visual aesthetic experience (see accompanying DVD), the exhibition supports the research question, "What is the relationship between sound and form?" Precisely how people aurally experience three-dimensional space involves an integration of spatial properties, auditory perception, individual history, and cultural mores. People also utilize environmental sound events as a guide in social situations and in remembering their personal history, as well as a guide in moving through space. Aesthetically, sound affects the fascination, meaning, and attention one has within a particular space. Sonic morphology brings art forms such as a movie, video, sound composition, and musical performance into the cognitive scope by generating meaning from the link between the visual and auditory senses. This research examined sonic morphology as an extension of musique concrete, sound as object, originating in Pierre Schaeffer's work in the 1940s. Pointing, as John Cage did, to the corporeal three-dimensional experience of "all sound," I composed works that took their total form only through the perceiver-participant's participation in the exhibition. While contemporary artist Alvin Lucier creates artworks that draw attention to making sound visible, "Skirting the Edge" engages the perceiver-participant visually and aurally, leading to recognition of sonic morphology.

  15. Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wenbin

    2015-02-05

    This report documents the work performed by General Motors (GM) under the Cooperative agreement No. DE-EE0000470, “Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance,” in collaboration with the Penn State University (PSU), University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and University of Rochester (UR) via subcontracts. The overall objectives of the project are to investigate and synthesize fundamental understanding of transport phenomena at both the macro- and micro-scales for the development of a down-the-channel model that accounts for all transport domains in a broad operating space. GM as a prime contractor focused on cell level experiments and modeling, and the Universities as subcontractors worked toward fundamental understanding of each component and associated interface.

  16. Improvement of mixing patterns in pilot-scale anaerobic ponds treating domestic sewage.

    PubMed

    Peña, M R; Mara, D D; Piguet, J M

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ponds are customarily designed as completely mixed reactors. However, evidence from experiments on full-scale facilities shows large deviations from ideal flow models, which in turn cause a reduced process performance. Thus, modified pilot scale anaerobic ponds receiving domestic sewage were developed and studied in parallel. A factorially designed experiment evaluated horizontal and vertical baffling, ponds fitted with cross-sectional plastic nets and a pond with a mixing pit. The hydrodynamic behaviour and process performance of these modified configurations were monitored for four flow rates (1.0, 1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 l/s). The results showed that baffling (vertical and horizontal) and the mixing pit configuration had the best hydrodynamic behaviours and removal efficiencies. Consequently, the development of high-rate anaerobic ponds, through improvements of hydrodynamic behaviour, seems feasible. PMID:14510216

  17. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles.

  18. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  19. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. PMID:26698020

  20. Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadlez, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    During the eighteenth century, amateurs as well as philosophers ventured critical commentary on the arts. Talk concerning taste or beauty or the sublime was so much a part of general discourse that even novelists of that era incorporated such subjects in their work. So it would not be surprising to find that perspectives on aesthetics are…

  1. Aesthetic surgery of the orbits and eyelids.

    PubMed

    Broujerdi, Joseph A

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the relevant anatomy, the aging process of the eyelid with periorbital structure, and how to evaluate patients for a proper surgical approach. A description is given of how to achieve an aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface to provide the patient with a natural youthful appearance. The paradigm in oculoplastic surgery has shifted to more conservative eyelid skin, muscle, and fat resection as well as more periorbital soft tissue lift, suspension, and volumization. Recent innovations and developments are discussed as well as the most common complications in eyelid and periorbital surgery. PMID:22995154

  2. Fat embolism syndrome after combined aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Erba, Paolo; Farhadi, Jian; Schaefer, Dirk Johannes; Pierer, Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a rare complication that develops after extended soft tissue disruption by liposuction, in particular if combined with time consuming, multiple procedures. Early signs are non-specific and often not considered, so that diagnosis and correct management may be delayed. We report a case in which liposuction combined with other aesthetic surgical procedures caused a fat embolism syndrome in a 46-year-old woman, which was followed by multiple organ failure and the development of sepsis with perimammary abscesses. Extended liposuction of the abdomen and thighs, bilateral augmentation mammaplasty, and stripping of both greater saphenous veins were combined. PMID:20158423

  3. Home-use devices in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C

    2014-12-01

    The world of aesthetic medicine is increasingly a consumer-driven market with a wide variety of home-use devices from which the consumer can choose for treating hair removal, hair loss, acne, facial rejuvenation, and other dermatologic conditions. Where these devices fit in the physician practice and consumer routine can be confusing, as scientific studies may be weak or lacking. The specifications, price, ease-of-use, maintenance, and technology can differ greatly between devices. Thus, the physician and consumer need to define exp. PMID:25830253

  4. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Aesthetic Objects

    ScienceCinema

    Hart, George [SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York, United States

    2009-09-01

    Solid Freeform Fabrication (aka. Rapid Prototyping) equipment can produce beautiful three-dimensional objects of exquisite intricacy. To use this technology to its full potential requires spatial visualization in the designer and new geometric algorithms as tools. As both a sculptor and a research professor in the Computer Science department at Stony Brook University, George Hart is exploring algorithms for the design of elaborate aesthetic objects. In this talk, he will describe this work, show many images, and bring many physical models to display.

  5. PAVING THE WAY TO A &LDQUO;GREENER&RDQUO; CAMPUS: ALTERNATIVE PAVING MATERIALS FOR POLLUTION CONTROL AND AESTHETIC APPEAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    There were two major areas of focus in this project: a) determination of potential water quality improvements using sustainable paving alternatives and b) determination of potential aesthetic improvement by the use of the sustainable alternatives. In order to address both obje...

  6. Evaluating and Improving Cloud Processes in the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2015-03-01

    The research performed under this grant was intended to improve the embedded cloud model in the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) for convective clouds by using a 2-moment microphysics scheme rather than the single moment scheme used in all the MMF runs to date. The technical report and associated documents describe the results of testing the cloud resolving model with fixed boundary conditions and evaluation of model results with data. The overarching conclusion is that such model evaluations are problematic because errors in the forcing fields control the results so strongly that variations in parameterization values cannot be usefully constrained

  7. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  8. Prospective randomized study comparing clinical, functional, and aesthetic results of minipterional and classic pterional craniotomies.

    PubMed

    Welling, Leonardo C; Figueiredo, Eberval G; Wen, Hung T; Gomes, Marcos Q T; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Casarolli, Cesar; Guirado, Vinicius M P; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The object of this study was to compare the clinical, functional, and aesthetic results of 2 surgical techniques, pterional (PT) and minipterional (MPT) craniotomies, for microsurgical clipping of anterior circulation aneurysms. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled into a prospective randomized study. The first group included 28 patients who underwent the MPT technique, and the second group comprised 30 patients who underwent the classic PT craniotomy. To evaluate the aesthetic effects, patients were asked to grade on a rule from 0 to 100 the best and the worst aesthetic result. Photographs were also taken, assessed by 2 independent observers, and classified as showing excellent, good, regular, or poor aesthetic results. Furthermore, quantitative radiological assessment (percentage reduction in thickness and volumetric analysis) of the temporal muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin was performed. Functional outcomes were compared using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Frontal facial palsy, postoperative hemorrhage, cerebrospinal fistula, hydrocephalus, and mortality were also analyzed. RESULTS Demographic and preoperative characteristics were similar in both groups. Satisfaction in terms of aesthetic result was observed in 19 patients (79%) in the MPT group and 13 (52%) in the PT group (p = 0.07). The mean score on the aesthetic rule was 27 in the MPT group and 45.8 in the PT group (p = 0.03). Two independent observers analyzed the patient photos, and the kappa coefficient for the aesthetic results was 0.73. According to these observers, excellent and good results were seen in 21 patients (87%) in the MPT and 12 (48%) in the PT groups. The degree of temporal muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin atrophy was 14.9% in the MPT group and 24.3% in the PT group (p = 0.01). Measurements of the temporal muscle revealed 12.7% atrophy in the MPT group and 22% atrophy in the PT group (p = 0.005). The

  9. An improved fusion algorithm for infrared and visible images based on multi-scale transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Liu, Lei; Huang, Wei; Yue, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved fusion algorithm for infrared and visible images based on multi-scale transform is proposed. First of all, Morphology-Hat transform is used for an infrared image and a visible image separately. Then two images were decomposed into high-frequency and low-frequency images by contourlet transform (CT). The fusion strategy of high-frequency images is based on mean gradient and the fusion strategy of low-frequency images is based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Finally, the final fused image is obtained by using the inverse contourlet transform (ICT). The experiments and results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly improve image fusion performance, accomplish notable target information and high contrast and preserve rich details information at the same time.

  10. The aesthetic experience of 'contour binding'.

    PubMed

    Casco, Clara; Guzzon, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    To find the diagnostic spatial frequency information in different painting styles (cubism, impressionism and realism), we have compared sensitivity (d') in distinguishing signal (subject of the painting) from noise with normal, high-pass and low-pass filtered images at long (150 ms) and short (30 ms) exposure. We found that for cubist-style images, d' increases with high-pass filtering compared with normal and low-pass filtered images, but decreases with low-pass filtering compared with normal images. These results indicate that channels with high spatial resolution provide the diagnostic information to solve the binding problem. Sensitivity for images in impressionist style was instead reduced by both low- and high-pass filtering. This indicates that both high and low spatial frequency channels play a role in solving the binding problem, suggesting the involvement of large collator units that group the response of small channels tuned to the same orientation. The difference between realism, which shows higher sensitivity for low-frequency filtering at short durations and cubism in which the binding problem is solved by high spatial frequency channels, has a corresponding difference in aesthetic judgment: the probability of judging a painting as 'intriguing' is larger with low-pass filtering than with high-pass filtering in realism, while the opposite is true for cubism. This suggests that the aesthetic experience is available during early processing of an image, and could preferentially influence high-level categorization of the subject of a painting. PMID:18534105

  11. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  12. Studying large-scale programmes to improve patient safety in whole care systems: challenges for research.

    PubMed

    Benn, Jonathan; Burnett, Susan; Parand, Anam; Pinto, Anna; Iskander, Sandra; Vincent, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale national and multi-institutional patient safety improvement programmes are being developed in the health care systems of several countries to address problems in the reliability of care delivered to patients. Drawing upon popular collaborative improvement models, these campaigns are ambitious in their aims to improve patient safety in macro-level systems such as whole health care organisations. This article considers the methodological issues involved in conducting research and evaluation of these programmes. Several specific research challenges are outlined, which result from the complexity of longitudinal, multi-level intervention programmes and the variable, highly sociotechnical care systems, with which they interact. Organisational-level improvement programmes are often underspecified due to local variations in context and organisational readiness for improvement work. The result is variable implementation patterns and local adaptations. Programme effects span levels and other boundaries within a system, vary dynamically or are cumulative over time and are problematic to understand in terms of cause and effect, where concurrent external influences exist and the impact upon study endpoints may be mediated by a range of organisational and social factors. We outline the methodological approach to research in the United Kingdom Safer Patients Initiative, to exemplify how some of the challenges for research in this area can be met through a multi-method, longitudinal research design. Specifically, effective research designs must be sensitive to complex variation, through employing multiple qualitative and quantitative measures, collect data over time to understand change and utilise descriptive techniques to capture specific interactions between programme and context for implementation. When considering the long-term, sustained impact of an improvement programme, researchers must consider how to define and measure the capability for continuous safe and

  13. Titer improvement and pilot-scale production of platensimycin from Streptomyces platensis SB12026.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Pan, Jian; Liu, Ling; Yang, Dong; Lu, Songquan; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Shen, Ben; Duan, Yanwen; Huang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Platensimycin (PTM) and platencin (PTN), isolated from several strains of Streptomyces platensis are potent antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria. PTM was also shown to have antidiabetic and antisteatotic activities in mouse models. Through a novel genome-mining method, we have recently identified six PTM and PTN dual-producing strains, and generated several mutants with improved production of PTM or PTN by inactivating the pathway-specific transcriptional repressor gene ptmR1. Among them, S. platensis SB12026 gave the highest titer of 310 mg/L for PTM. In this study, we now report titer improvement by medium and fermentation optimization and pilot-scale production and isolation of PTM from SB12026. The fermentation medium optimization was achieved by manipulating the carbon and nitrogen sources, as well as the inorganic salts. The highest titer of 1560 mg/L PTM was obtained in 15-L fermentors, using a formulated medium mainly containing soluble starch, soybean flour, morpholinepropanesulfonic acid sodium salt and CaCO3. In addition, a polyamide chromatographic step was applied to facilitate the purification and 45.14 g of PTM was successfully obtained from a 60 L scale fermentation. These results would speed up the future development of PTM as human medicine. PMID:27126098

  14. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  15. RichMind: A Tool for Improved Inference from Large-Scale Neuroimaging Results

    PubMed Central

    Maron-Katz, Adi; Amar, David; Simon, Eti Ben; Hendler, Talma; Shamir, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As the use of large-scale data-driven analysis becomes increasingly common, the need for robust methods for interpreting a large number of results increases. To date, neuroimaging attempts to interpret large-scale activity or connectivity results often turn to existing neural mapping based on previous literature. In case of a large number of results, manual selection or percent of overlap with existing maps is frequently used to facilitate interpretation, often without a clear statistical justification. Such methodology holds the risk of reporting false positive results and overlooking additional results. Here, we propose using enrichment analysis for improving the interpretation of large-scale neuroimaging results. We focus on two possible cases: position group analysis, where the identified results are a set of neural positions; and connection group analysis, where the identified results are a set of neural position-pairs (i.e. neural connections). We explore different models for detecting significant overrepresentation of known functional brain annotations using simulated and real data. We implemented our methods in a tool called RichMind, which provides both statistical significance reports and brain visualization. We demonstrate the abilities of RichMind by revisiting two previous fMRI studies. In both studies RichMind automatically highlighted most of the findings that were reported in the original studies as well as several additional findings that were overlooked. Hence, RichMind is a valuable new tool for rigorous inference from neuroimaging results. PMID:27455041

  16. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Dennis M.; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  17. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Dennis M; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J

    2016-04-15

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  18. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M.; Kisner, Roger A.; Drira, Anis; Reed, Frederick K.

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  19. A registration algorithm of improved correlation coefficient for image of rotation and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chun-tao; Hu, Tao; Yuan, Kai-min

    2015-12-01

    In stereo vision technology, image matching is one of the most important parts, and the coefficient of correlation matching is recognized to be more mature and stable matching algorithm. Correlation coefficient method has high sensitivity to image rotation, but do not have rotation invariance, and require a large computational complexity. Because of this it cannot be widely applied in the field of real-time image matching. This paper is aimed at this drawback to make its computational complexity greatly reduced, posses the scale and rotation invariance, so as to meet the requirements of real-time image matching system, this paper proposes a image registration algorithm of accurate registration combined with Fourier-Mellin transform and Radon transform of image. After the introduction of Fourier transform and correlation coefficient method to detect the correct rotation factor and scale factor, it is provided a reliable basis for correlation coefficient method of image registration to achieve both rotation and scaling invariance, image using this method is verified by the experiments on the feasibility of the registration, the registration accuracy is improved.

  20. An extended bioreaction database that significantly improves reconstruction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Michael; Sun, Jibin; Kamphans, Tom; Fekete, Sándor P; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The bioreaction database established by Ma and Zeng (Bioinformatics, 2003, 19, 270-277) for in silico reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks has been widely used. Based on more recent information in the reference databases KEGG LIGAND and Brenda, we upgrade the bioreaction database in this work by almost doubling the number of reactions from 3565 to 6851. Over 70% of the reactions have been manually updated/revised in terms of reversibility, reactant pairs, currency metabolites and error correction. For the first time, 41 spontaneous sugar mutarotation reactions are introduced into the biochemical database. The upgrade significantly improves the reconstruction of genome scale metabolic networks. Many gaps or missing biochemical links can be recovered, as exemplified with three model organisms Homo sapiens, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli. The topological parameters of the constructed networks were also largely affected, however, the overall network structure remains scale-free. Furthermore, we consider the problem of computing biologically feasible shortest paths in reconstructed metabolic networks. We show that these paths are hard to compute and present solutions to find such paths in networks of small and medium size. PMID:21952610

  1. Analysis and improvement of a scaled-up and stacked microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Arjan; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Saakes, Michel; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2009-12-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is inevitable when power outputs have to be obtained that can power electrical devices other than small sensors. This research has used a bipolar plate MFC stack of four cells with a total working volume of 20 L and a total membrane surface area of 2 m(2). The cathode limited MFC performance due to oxygen reduction rate and cell reversal. Furthermore, residence time distribution curves showed that bending membranes resulted in flow paths through which the catholyte could flow from inlet to outlet, while leaving the reactants unconverted. The cathode was improved by decreasing the pH, purging pure oxygen, and increasing the flow rate, which resulted in a 13-fold power density increase to 144 W m(-3) and a volumetric resistivity of only 1.2 mOmega m(3) per cell. Both results are major achievements compared to results currently published for laboratory and scaled-up MFCs. When designing a scaled-up MFC, it is important to ensure optimal contact between electrodes and substrate and to minimize the distances between electrodes. PMID:19943685

  2. Aesthetic Implications of the New Paradigm in Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simus, Jason Boaz

    2008-01-01

    The new paradigm in ecology emphasizes dynamic change, disturbance, and nonequilibrium in natural systems, and it presents some challenges for contemporary environmental aesthetics, one of which has to do with the thesis known as "scientific cognitivism." Scientific cognitivism holds that appropriate aesthetic appreciation of nature must be…

  3. Aesthetics, Usefulness and Performance in User--Search-Engine Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Adi

    2010-01-01

    Issues of visual appeal have become an integral part of designing interactive systems. Interface aesthetics may form users' attitudes towards computer applications and information technology. Aesthetics can affect user satisfaction, and influence their willingness to buy or adopt a system. This study follows previous studies that found that users…

  4. Technological Effects on Aesthetic Evaluation: Vermeer and the Camera Obscura

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.; Sudduth, Mary Margaret; Clabaugh, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether an artist's use of technology to create art results in a detectable aesthetic difference was investigated in the case of Dutch realist painter Johannes Vermeer and his use of the camera obscura. In Experiment 1, participants evaluated 20 Vermeer paintings on 6 aesthetic dimensions and preferred paintings created with the…

  5. The Subordination of Aesthetic Fundamentals in College Art Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Opportunities for college students of art and design to study fundamentals of visual aesthetics, integrity of form, and principles of composition are limited today by a number of factors. With the well-documented prominence of postmodern critical theory in the world of contemporary art, the study of aesthetic fundamentals is largely subordinated…

  6. Pragmatic Choices: Teaching Applied Aesthetics through Brecht's "Life of Galileo"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Robert Scott; Nicholls, Rod

    2002-01-01

    Aesthetics, as a distinctively "philosophical" exercise, whether with respect to research or to teaching, is supposed to be about the "theory/theories" that underpin the works of art in these various fields. Given this, "applied aesthetics" demands a preliminary explanation. First of all, the phrase might refer to an analysis of a particular work…

  7. Response to Tavin's "The Magical Quality of Aesthetics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, I argue that Kevin Tavin's (2008) use of Lacan's "objet a" in his "Studies in Art Education" commentary "The Magical Quality of Aesthetics" is not a helpful analogy or solution for art education's search for the role of aesthetics. I offer that a pragmatist and dialogic viewpoint may be more useful and, because it describes the…

  8. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  9. Aesthetics, Education, the Critical Autonomous Self, and the Culture Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2006-01-01

    The author contends that by reclaiming their own valuable connection to reflective artistic experience and reception, aesthetic theory and art education can contribute to a reconceptualization of autonomy and critique and, perhaps more importantly, to a reorientation of educational practice. Adorno's aesthetics is exceptionally relevant to this…

  10. The Aesthetic Experience: An Historical Review and Behavioral Hierarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Terroil, Anna M.

    This analysis of aesthetic appreciation provides a theoretical model to help teachers recognize the aesthetic level at which students are operating. The purpose of the study is to explain to art educators how to expand a student's capacity to appreciate works of art. The study is presented in two parts. Part I describes and evaluates theories of…

  11. Activating Aesthetics: Working with Heidegger and Bourdieu for Engaged Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grierson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate art in public urban space via a process of activating aesthetics as a way of enhancing pedagogies of engagement. It does this firstly by addressing the question of aesthetics in Enlightenment and twentieth-century frames; then it seeks to understand how artworks may be approached ontologically and…

  12. Aesthetic Relationships and Ethics in "The Oh Fuck Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breel, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the aesthetics and ethics of participatory performance through "The Oh Fuck Moment" by Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe, a performance that aesthetically explores ethically troubling material and manipulation. Ethical criticism of participatory art in recent years has focused on the way the audience member is…

  13. Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David

    2003-01-01

    We are presently witnessing a renewed interest in the aesthetics of philosopher and educator John Dewey. And it would seem that this interest marks a significant intellectual reorientation and not simply a passing fad. The publications Educational Theory, Studies in Philosophy and Education, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of…

  14. Science in Action: Aesthetic Considerations for Stream Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aesthetics are an integral component of the social and economic benefits of stream restoration and should be considered in restoration projects for sustainable management. According to Bernhardt et al. (2005), aesthetics is one of the frequently listed goals for stream restoratio...

  15. Lessons of Solitude: The Awakening of Aesthetic Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the contextual value of solitude in learning; in so doing, it attempts to suggest an alternative method of instruction that is based on aesthetics as the reciprocal relationship between emotions and intellect, and between action and contemplation. Such an aesthetic education or method seeks to guide the student towards the…

  16. An Aesthetic Theory of School Vandalism. Discussion Papers 419.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.; Greenberger, David B.

    This study presents an aesthetic theory of school vandalism and reports on nine original empirical studies that are relevant to the theory. It is proposed that the act of destroying an object is very enjoyable because it is, in effect, an aesthetic experience. The theory posits that the variables accounting for positive hedonic value associated…

  17. Improving Shade Modelling in a Regional River Temperature Model Using Fine-Scale LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Loicq, P.; Moatar, F.; Beaufort, A.; Melin, E.; Jullian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Air temperature is often considered as a proxy of the stream temperature to model the distribution areas of aquatic species water temperature is not available at a regional scale. To simulate the water temperature at a regional scale (105 km²), a physically-based model using the equilibrium temperature concept and including upstream-downstream propagation of the thermal signal was developed and applied to the entire Loire basin (Beaufort et al., submitted). This model, called T-NET (Temperature-NETwork) is based on a hydrographical network topology. Computations are made hourly on 52,000 reaches which average 1.7 km long in the Loire drainage basin. The model gives a median Root Mean Square Error of 1.8°C at hourly time step on the basis of 128 water temperature stations (2008-2012). In that version of the model, tree shadings is modelled by a constant factor proportional to the vegetation cover on 10 meters sides the river reaches. According to sensitivity analysis, improving the shade representation would enhance T-NET accuracy, especially for the maximum daily temperatures, which are currently not very well modelized. This study evaluates the most efficient way (accuracy/computing time) to improve the shade model thanks to 1-m resolution LIDAR data available on tributary of the LoireRiver (317 km long and an area of 8280 km²). Two methods are tested and compared: the first one is a spatially explicit computation of the cast shadow for every LIDAR pixel. The second is based on averaged vegetation cover characteristics of buffers and reaches of variable size. Validation of the water temperature model is made against 4 temperature sensors well spread along the stream, as well as two airborne thermal infrared imageries acquired in summer 2014 and winter 2015 over a 80 km reach. The poster will present the optimal length- and crosswise scale to characterize the vegetation from LIDAR data.

  18. Automatic large-scale classification of bird sounds is strongly improved by unsupervised feature learning

    PubMed Central

    Plumbley, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Automatic species classification of birds from their sound is a computational tool of increasing importance in ecology, conservation monitoring and vocal communication studies. To make classification useful in practice, it is crucial to improve its accuracy while ensuring that it can run at big data scales. Many approaches use acoustic measures based on spectrogram-type data, such as the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) features which represent a manually-designed summary of spectral information. However, recent work in machine learning has demonstrated that features learnt automatically from data can often outperform manually-designed feature transforms. Feature learning can be performed at large scale and “unsupervised”, meaning it requires no manual data labelling, yet it can improve performance on “supervised” tasks such as classification. In this work we introduce a technique for feature learning from large volumes of bird sound recordings, inspired by techniques that have proven useful in other domains. We experimentally compare twelve different feature representations derived from the Mel spectrum (of which six use this technique), using four large and diverse databases of bird vocalisations, classified using a random forest classifier. We demonstrate that in our classification tasks, MFCCs can often lead to worse performance than the raw Mel spectral data from which they are derived. Conversely, we demonstrate that unsupervised feature learning provides a substantial boost over MFCCs and Mel spectra without adding computational complexity after the model has been trained. The boost is particularly notable for single-label classification tasks at large scale. The spectro-temporal activations learned through our procedure resemble spectro-temporal receptive fields calculated from avian primary auditory forebrain. However, for one of our datasets, which contains substantial audio data but few annotations, increased performance is not

  19. Enablers and Barriers to Large-Scale Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Puzzolo, Elisa; Stanistreet, Debbi; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Globally, 2.8 billion people rely on household solid fuels. Reducing the resulting adverse health, environmental, and development consequences will involve transitioning through a mix of clean fuels and improved solid fuel stoves (IS) of demonstrable effectiveness. To date, achieving uptake of IS has presented significant challenges. Objectives: We performed a systematic review of factors that enable or limit large-scale uptake of IS in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: We conducted systematic searches through multidisciplinary databases, specialist websites, and consulting experts. The review drew on qualitative, quantitative, and case studies and used standardized methods for screening, data extraction, critical appraisal, and synthesis. We summarized our findings as “factors” relating to one of seven domains—fuel and technology characteristics; household and setting characteristics; knowledge and perceptions; finance, tax, and subsidy aspects; market development; regulation, legislation, and standards; programmatic and policy mechanisms—and also recorded issues that impacted equity. Results: We identified 31 factors influencing uptake from 57 studies conducted in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. All domains matter. Although factors such as offering technologies that meet household needs and save fuel, user training and support, effective financing, and facilitative government action appear to be critical, none guarantee success: All factors can be influential, depending on context. The nature of available evidence did not permit further prioritization. Conclusions: Achieving adoption and sustained use of IS at a large scale requires that all factors, spanning household/community and program/societal levels, be assessed and supported by policy. We propose a planning tool that would aid this process and suggest further research to incorporate an evaluation of effectiveness. Citation: Rehfuess EA, Puzzolo E, Stanistreet D, Pope D, Bruce

  20. Automatic large-scale classification of bird sounds is strongly improved by unsupervised feature learning.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Plumbley, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Automatic species classification of birds from their sound is a computational tool of increasing importance in ecology, conservation monitoring and vocal communication studies. To make classification useful in practice, it is crucial to improve its accuracy while ensuring that it can run at big data scales. Many approaches use acoustic measures based on spectrogram-type data, such as the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) features which represent a manually-designed summary of spectral information. However, recent work in machine learning has demonstrated that features learnt automatically from data can often outperform manually-designed feature transforms. Feature learning can be performed at large scale and "unsupervised", meaning it requires no manual data labelling, yet it can improve performance on "supervised" tasks such as classification. In this work we introduce a technique for feature learning from large volumes of bird sound recordings, inspired by techniques that have proven useful in other domains. We experimentally compare twelve different feature representations derived from the Mel spectrum (of which six use this technique), using four large and diverse databases of bird vocalisations, classified using a random forest classifier. We demonstrate that in our classification tasks, MFCCs can often lead to worse performance than the raw Mel spectral data from which they are derived. Conversely, we demonstrate that unsupervised feature learning provides a substantial boost over MFCCs and Mel spectra without adding computational complexity after the model has been trained. The boost is particularly notable for single-label classification tasks at large scale. The spectro-temporal activations learned through our procedure resemble spectro-temporal receptive fields calculated from avian primary auditory forebrain. However, for one of our datasets, which contains substantial audio data but few annotations, increased performance is not discernible. We

  1. An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Chow, F K; Mirocha, J D; Lundquist, K A

    2007-09-04

    Simulations of atmospheric flow through urban areas must account for a wide range of physical phenomena including both mesoscale and urban processes. Numerical weather prediction models, such as the Weather and Research Forecasting model (WRF), excel at predicting synoptic and mesoscale phenomena. With grid spacings of less than 1 km (as is required for complex heterogeneous urban areas), however, the limits of WRF's terrain capabilities and subfilter scale (SFS) turbulence parameterizations are exposed. Observations of turbulence in urban areas frequently illustrate a local imbalance of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), which cannot be captured by current turbulence models. Furthermore, WRF's terrain-following coordinate system is inappropriate for high-resolution simulations that include buildings. To address these issues, we are implementing significant modifications to the ARW core of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. First, we are implementing an improved turbulence model, the Dynamic Reconstruction Model (DRM), following Chow et al. (2005). Second, we are modifying WRF's terrain-following coordinate system by implementing an immersed boundary method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion papers detailing the improvements enabled by the DRM and the IBM approaches are also presented (by Mirocha et al., paper 13.1, and K.A. Lundquist et al., paper 11.1, respectively). This overview of the LLNL-UC Berkeley collaboration presents the motivation for this work and some highlights of our progress to date. After implementing both DRM and an IBM for buildings in WRF, we will be able to seamlessly integrate mesoscale synoptic boundary conditions with building-scale urban simulations using grid nesting and lateral boundary forcing. This multi-scale integration will enable high-resolution simulations of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities in

  2. A Taste-intensity Visual Analog Scale: An Improved Zinc Taste-test Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zdilla, Matthew J.; Starkey, Leah D.; Saling, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Context Studies employing methods for measurement of zinc sulfate taste acuity have had diverse results, and although the studies have had limitations in design and implementation, they have suggested salient findings beyond the assessment of taste acuity. These findings have included, but were not limited to, relationships between zinc sulfate taste acuity and weight, levels of serum zinc, diastolic hypertension, levels of salivary carbonic anhydrase 6, and frequency of illness. However, current protocols for zinc sulfate taste assessment are problematic and warrant improvement. Objective The current study intended to compare the ranking scale for the original Bryce-Smith and Simpson zinc taste test (BS-ZTT) with a novel, taste-intensity visual analog scale (TI-VAS) to explore the potential for improved zinc sulfate taste-acuity measurement. Design Participants were administered a 0.1% solution of zinc sulfate and assessed using the 2 scales. Setting The study took place at West Liberty University, in West Liberty, WV, USA. Participants Participants were 500 West Liberty University students who volunteered to participate in the study. Results A strong, statistically significant, positive correlation existed between the BS-ZTT and the TI-VAS scores (rs = 0.79; P < .0001; n = 491). Conclusions The study found that the BS-ZTT offered a limited number of ordinal variable ranks and depended on an examiner’s evaluation. Conversely, the TI-VAS had an expanded range of variables and was independent of the examiner. The TI-VAS can be used as a taste-acuity test for zinc sulfate and as a benchmark for future analyses of zinc sulfate taste acuity and zinc taste tests. PMID:26770137

  3. Large-scale multi-configuration electromagnetic induction: a promising tool to improve hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hebel, Christian; Rudolph, Sebastian; Mester, Achim; Huisman, Johan A.; Montzka, Carsten; Weihermüller, Lutz; Vereecken, Harry; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale multi-configuration electromagnetic induction (EMI) use different coil configurations, i.e., coil offsets and coil orientations, to sense coil specific depth volumes. The obtained apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) maps can be related to some soil properties such as clay content, soil water content, and pore water conductivity, which are important characteristics that influence hydrological processes. Here, we use large-scale EMI measurements to investigate changes in soil texture that drive the available water supply causing crop development patterns that were observed in leaf area index (LAI) maps obtained from RapidEye satellite images taken after a drought period. The 20 ha test site is situated within the Ellebach catchment (Germany) and consists of a sand-and-gravel dominated upper terrace (UT) and a loamy lower terrace (LT). The large-scale multi-configuration EMI measurements were calibrated using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements at selected transects and soil samples were taken at representative locations where changes in the electrical conductivity were observed and therefore changing soil properties were expected. By analyzing all the data, the observed LAI patterns could be attributed to buried paleo-river channel systems that contained a higher silt and clay content and provided a higher water holding capacity than the surrounding coarser material. Moreover, the measured EMI data showed highest correlation with LAI for the deepest sensing coil offset (up to 1.9 m), which indicates that the deeper subsoil is responsible for root water uptake especially under drought conditions. To obtain a layered subsurface electrical conductivity model that shows the subsurface structures more clearly, a novel EMI inversion scheme was applied to the field data. The obtained electrical conductivity distributions were validated with soil probes and ERT transects that confirmed the inverted lateral and vertical large-scale electrical

  4. Enhancing Aesthetic Outcomes of Soft Tissue Coverage of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Kowalski, Evan; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Hand aesthetics in general and aesthetic refinements of soft-tissue coverage of the hand in particular have been increasingly considered over the past few years. Advancements of microsurgery together with the traditional methods of tissue transfer have expanded the armamentarium of the reconstructive surgeon, thus shifting the reconstructive paradigm from simply ‘filling the defect’ to reconstructive refinement to provide the best functional and aesthetic results. However, drawing the boundary between what does and what does not constitute ‘aesthetic’ reconstruction of the hand is not straightforward. The selection amongst the vast amount of currently available reconstructive methods and the difficulties in objectively measuring or quantifying aesthetics has made this task complex and rather arbitrary. In this article we divide the hand into several units and subunits to simplify our understanding of the basic functional and aesthetic requirements of these regions that may ultimately bring order to complexity. PMID:25626826

  5. Brain connectivity reflects human aesthetic responses to music.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Matthew E; Ellis, Robert J; Schlaug, Gottfried; Loui, Psyche

    2016-06-01

    Humans uniquely appreciate aesthetics, experiencing pleasurable responses to complex stimuli that confer no clear intrinsic value for survival. However, substantial variability exists in the frequency and specificity of aesthetic responses. While pleasure from aesthetics is attributed to the neural circuitry for reward, what accounts for individual differences in aesthetic reward sensitivity remains unclear. Using a combination of survey data, behavioral and psychophysiological measures and diffusion tensor imaging, we found that white matter connectivity between sensory processing areas in the superior temporal gyrus and emotional and social processing areas in the insula and medial prefrontal cortex explains individual differences in reward sensitivity to music. Our findings provide the first evidence for a neural basis of individual differences in sensory access to the reward system, and suggest that social-emotional communication through the auditory channel may offer an evolutionary basis for music making as an aesthetically rewarding function in humans. PMID:26966157

  6. The Use Of Earth Observation Techniques To Improve Catchment-scale Pollution Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, I. J.; Silgram, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Lamb, A.; Settle, J. J.

    Remote sensing has the potential to provide information useful in improving the mod- elling of pollution transport in agricultural catchments. The realisation of this potential will depend on the availability of the raw data, the development of techniques for ex- tracting information from this data, and the assimilation of the derived information into models. Each of these aspects has been explored and assessed by this group, and this presentation will describe its findings. Two main objectives were defined in this work. Firstly, to define, quantify, and demonstrate how future spaceborne Earth Ob- servation (EO) derived information can be utilised to improve the accuracy and spatial resolution of input parameters to pollution models of nitrate (N) and phosphate (P) export at the field and catchment scale. Secondly, to quantify the impact of improved accuracy and spatial resolution of input data on model predictions of nutrient export from agricultural fields. These objectives were explored by acquiring high spatial resolution hyperspectral data and laser altimetry of two farm sites near Hereford, UK. The data were then analysed to generate information such as topography, crop type and fractional vegetation cover at different resolutions. A technique was developed to identify the soil and vegetation endmembers within high resolution hyperspectral imagery of a field, enabling an es- timation of the vegetation fraction to be extracted. The results of this technique were compared to conventional methods used with fewer spectral bands. Aerially-acquired laser altimetry was also processed to produce high resolution Digital Elevation Models of the site. Nutrient flow models were then developed to assimilate this information and predict N and P run-off. At the sub-field scale the hypothesis that higher resolution topography will make a substantial difference to contaminant transport was tested using the AGricultural Non- Point Source (AGNPS) model at 20m, 50m and 100m cell

  7. The Epistemic of Aesthetic Knowledge and Knowing: Implications for Aesthetic Education Curricula and Rational Pedagogy in Nigerian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghaosa, Ike P.

    2015-01-01

    Using essentially the philosophical and documentary, methodologies of language and logical analysis and deductions, analogical inference; and historical inspection of documents, the paper examined the issues and arguments involved in Aesthetics as an epistemological concept. These were in terms of aesthetic: knowledge, faculty of knowing and…

  8. A dual-process perspective on fluency-based aesthetics: the pleasure-interest model of aesthetic liking.

    PubMed

    Graf, Laura K M; Landwehr, Jan R

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we develop an account of how aesthetic preferences can be formed as a result of two hierarchical, fluency-based processes. Our model suggests that processing performed immediately upon encountering an aesthetic object is stimulus driven, and aesthetic preferences that accrue from this processing reflect aesthetic evaluations of pleasure or displeasure. When sufficient processing motivation is provided by a perceiver's need for cognitive enrichment and/or the stimulus' processing affordance, elaborate perceiver-driven processing can emerge, which gives rise to fluency-based aesthetic evaluations of interest, boredom, or confusion. Because the positive outcomes in our model are pleasure and interest, we call it the Pleasure-Interest Model of Aesthetic Liking (PIA Model). Theoretically, this model integrates a dual-process perspective and ideas from lay epistemology into processing fluency theory, and it provides a parsimonious framework to embed and unite a wealth of aesthetic phenomena, including contradictory preference patterns for easy versus difficult-to-process aesthetic stimuli. PMID:25742990

  9. A Study on the Effect of Aesthetic Education on the Development of Aesthetic Judgment of Six-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acer, Dilek; Omerodlu, Esra

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aesthetic education on the development of aesthetic judgment of 6 year-old children. The sample of the study comprised 77 children selected randomly from state run primary schools from various socioeconomic levels in Ankara. The experiment group consisted of 22 children, the placebo group of…

  10. Assessment of improved root growth representation in a 1-D, field scale crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltin Mboh, Cho; Gaiser, Thomas; Ewert, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Many 1-D, field scale crop models over-simplify root growth. The over-simplification of this "hidden half" of the crop may have significant consequences on simulated root water and nutrient uptake with a corresponding reflection on the simulated crop yields. Poor representation of root growth in crop models may therefore constitute a major source of uncertainty propagation. In this study we assess the effect of an improved representation of root growth in a model solution of the model framework SIMPLACE (Scientific Impact assessment and Modeling PLatform for Advanced Crop and Ecosystem management) compared to conventional 1-D approaches. The LINTUL5 crop growth model is coupled to the Hillflow soil water balance model within the SIMPLACE modeling framework (Gaiser et al, 2013). Root water uptake scenarios in the soil hydrological simulator Hillflow (Bronstert, 1995) together with an improved representation of root growth is compared to scenarios for which root growth is simplified. The improvement of root growth is achieved by integrating root growth solutions from R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008) into the SIMPLACE model solution. R-SWMS is a three dimensional model for simultaneous modeling of root growth, soil water fluxes and solute transport and uptake. These scenarios are tested by comparing how well the simulated water contents match with the observed soil water dynamics. The impacts of the scenarios on above ground biomass and wheat grain are assessed

  11. [Informed consent in aesthetic plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Fenger, H

    2006-02-01

    The informed consent plays a very decisive part in aesthetic plastic surgery. As there is often no medical indication in plastic surgery, the patient has to be informed about all the facts of an operation, especially about the possible risks. The legal requests for therapeutic and economic clarification gain in importance. The jurisdiction in Germany demands a merciless clarification for the patient. The patient needs to be clarified about all facts early enough so that he has a sufficient amount of time to weigh-up the pros und cons of the operation and if necessary to take advice from someone else. The sufficient documentation is very important at the sight of the extensive burden of proof at the expense of the physician. PMID:16538575

  12. Aesthetic judgement of orientation in modern art.

    PubMed

    Mather, George

    2012-01-01

    When creating an artwork, the artist makes a decision regarding the orientation at which the work is to be hung based on their aesthetic judgement and the message conveyed by the piece. Is the impact or aesthetic appeal of a work diminished when it is hung at an incorrect orientation? To investigate this question, Experiment 1 asked whether naïve observers can appreciate the correct orientation (as defined by the artist) of 40 modern artworks, some of which are entirely abstract. Eighteen participants were shown 40 paintings in a series of trials. Each trial presented all four cardinal orientations on a computer screen, and the participant was asked to select the orientation that was most attractive or meaningful. Results showed that the correct orientation was selected in 48% of trials on average, significantly above the 25% chance level, but well below perfect performance. A second experiment investigated the extent to which the 40 paintings contained recognisable content, which may have mediated orientation judgements. Recognition rates varied from 0% for seven of the paintings to 100% for five paintings. Orientation judgements in Experiment 1 correlated significantly with "meaningful" content judgements in Experiment 2: 42% of the variance in orientation judgements in Experiment 1 was shared with recognition of meaningful content in Experiment 2. For the seven paintings in which no meaningful content at all was detected, 41% of the variance in orientation judgements was shared with variance in a physical measure of image content, Fourier amplitude spectrum slope. For some paintings, orientation judgements were quite consistent, despite a lack of meaningful content. The origin of these orientation judgements remains to be identified. PMID:23145264

  13. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Surpkis, D. E.; Price, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests to evaluate the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials by comparing their burning characteristics with those of older aircraft materials are described. Three tests were conducted and are detailed. Test 1, using pre-1968 materials, was run to correlate the procedures and to compare the results with previous tests by other organizations. Test 2 included newer, improved fire-resistant materials. Test 3 was essentially a duplicate of test 2, but a smokeless fuel was used. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. Results indicate that the pre-1968 materials ignited easily, allowed the fire to spread, produced large amounts of smoke and toxic combustion products, and resulted in a flash fire and major fire damage. The newer fire-resistant materials did not allow the fire to spread. Furthermore, they produced less, lower concentrations of toxic combustion products, and lower temperatures. The newer materials did not produce a flash fire.

  14. Improving Large-Scale Testing Capability by Modifying the 40- by 80-ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mort, Kenneth W.; Soderman, Paul T.; Eckert, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Interagency studies conducted during the last several years have indicated the need to Improve full-scale testing capabilities. The studies showed that the most effective trade between test capability and facility cost was provided by re-powering the existing Ames Research Center 40- by 80-ft Wind Tunnel to Increase the maximum speed from about 100 m/s (200 knots) lo about 150 m/s (300 knots) and by adding a new 24- by 37-m (80- by 120-ft) test section powered for about a 50-m/s (100-knot) maximum speed. This paper reviews the design of the facility, a few or its capabilities, and some of its unique features.

  15. Nano-scale hydrogen-bond network improves the durability of greener cements

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Johan; Rodrigues, Michelle Santos; Telling, Mark T. F.; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Santos, Sérgio Francisco; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    More than ever before, the world's increasing need for new infrastructure demands the construction of efficient, sustainable and durable buildings, requiring minimal climate-changing gas-generation in their production. Maintenance-free “greener” building materials made from blended cements have advantages over ordinary Portland cements, as they are cheaper, generate less carbon dioxide and are more durable. The key for the improved performance of blends (which substitute fine amorphous silicates for cement) is related to their resistance to water penetration. The mechanism of this water resistance is of great environmental and economical impact but is not yet understood due to the complexity of the cement's hydration reactions. Using neutron spectroscopy, we studied a blend where cement was replaced by ash from sugar cane residuals originating from agricultural waste. Our findings demonstrate that the development of a distinctive hydrogen bond network at the nano-scale is the key to the performance of these greener materials. PMID:24036676

  16. Improving wildlife habitat model performance: Sensitivity to the scale and detail of vegetation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lance Jay, Jr.

    Monitoring the impacts of resource use and landscape change on wildlife habitat over large areas is a daunting assignment. Forest land managers could benefit from linking the frequent decisions of resource use (timber harvesting) with a system of wildlife habitat accounting, but to date these tools are not widely available. I examined aspects of wildlife habitat modeling that: (in Chapter 2) could potentially lead to the establishment of wildlife habitat accounting within a resource decision support tool, (in Chapter 3) improve our theoretical understanding and methods to interpret the accuracy of wildlife habitat models, (in Chapter 4) explore the effects of vegetation classification systems on wildlife habitat model results, and (in Chapter 5) show that forest structural estimates from satellite imagery can improve potential habitat distribution models (GAP) for forest bird species. The majority of the analyses in this dissertation were done using a forest resource inventory developed by the State of Michigan (IFMAP). Paired with field vegetation and bird samples from sites across the lower peninsula of Michigan, we compared the relative accuracy of wildlife habitat relationship models built with plot-scale vegetation samples and stand-scale forest inventory maps. Recursive partitioning trees were used to build wildlife habitat models for 30 bird species. The habitat distribution maps from the Michigan Gap Analysis (MIGAP) were used as a baseline for comparison of model accuracy results. Both the plot and stand-scale measurements achieved high accuracy and there were few large differences between plot and stand-scale models for any individual species. Where the plot and stand-scale models were different, they tended to be species associated with mixed habitats. This may be evidence that scale of vegetation measurement has a larger influence on species associated with edges and ecotones. Habitat models that were built solely with land cover data were less accurate

  17. Improved evidence-based genome-scale metabolic models for maize leaf, embryo, and endosperm

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seaver, Samuel M.D.; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Frelin, Océane; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-03-10

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions andmore » possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.« less

  18. Improved evidence-based genome-scale metabolic models for maize leaf, embryo, and endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Seaver, Samuel M.D.; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Frelin, Océane; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-03-10

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  19. Improved evidence-based genome-scale metabolic models for maize leaf, embryo, and endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Frelin, Océane; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes. PMID:25806041

  20. Balancing detail and scale in assessing transparency to improve the governance of agricultural commodity supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godar, Javier; Suavet, Clément; Gardner, Toby A.; Dawkins, Elena; Meyfroidt, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    To date, assessments of the sustainability of agricultural commodity supply chains have largely relied on some combination of macro-scale footprint accounts, detailed life-cycle analyses and fine-scale traceability systems. Yet these approaches are limited in their ability to support the sustainability governance of agricultural supply chains, whether because they are intended for coarser-grained analyses, do not identify individual actors, or are too costly to be implemented in a consistent manner for an entire region of production. Here we illustrate some of the advantages of a complementary middle-ground approach that balances detail and scale of supply chain transparency information by combining consistent country-wide data on commodity production at the sub-national (e.g. municipal) level with per shipment customs data to describe trade flows of a given commodity covering all companies and production regions within that country. This approach can support supply chain governance in two key ways. First, enhanced spatial resolution of the production regions that connect to individual supply chains allows for a more accurate consideration of geographic variability in measures of risk and performance that are associated with different production practices. Second, identification of key actors that operate within a specific supply chain, including producers, traders, shippers and consumers can help discriminate coalitions of actors that have shared stake in a particular region, and that together are capable of delivering more cost-effective and coordinated interventions. We illustrate the potential of this approach with examples from Brazil, Indonesia and Colombia. We discuss how transparency information can deepen understanding of the environmental and social impacts of commodity production systems, how benefits are distributed among actors, and some of the trade-offs involved in efforts to improve supply chain sustainability. We then discuss the challenges and

  1. The use of earth observation techniques to improve catchment-scale pollution predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, I. J.; Silgram, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Lamb, A.; Settle, J. J.; Willig, A.

    Remote sensing can potentially provide information useful in improving pollution transport modelling in agricultural catchments. Realisation of this potential will depend on the availability of the raw data, development of information extraction techniques, and the impact of the assimilation of the derived information into models. High spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery of a farm near Hereford, UK is analysed. A technique is described to automatically identify the soil and vegetation endmembers within a field, enabling vegetation fractional cover estimation. The aerially-acquired laser altimetry is used to produce digital elevation models of the site. At the subfield scale the hypothesis that higher resolution topography will make a substantial difference to contaminant transport is tested using the AGricultural Non-Point Source (AGNPS) model. Slope aspect and direction information are extracted from the topography at different resolutions to study the effects on soil erosion, deposition, runoff and nutrient losses. Field-scale models are often used to model drainage water, nitrate and runoff/sediment loss, but the demanding input data requirements make scaling up to catchment level difficult. By determining the input range of spatial variables gathered from EO data, and comparing the response of models to the range of variation measured, the critical model inputs can be identified. Response surfaces to variation in these inputs constrain uncertainty in model predictions and are presented. Although optical earth observation analysis can provide fractional vegetation cover, cloud cover and semi-random weather patterns can hinder data acquisition in Northern Europe. A Spring and Autumn cloud cover analysis is carried out over seven UK sites close to agricultural districts, using historic satellite image metadata, climate modelling and historic ground weather observations. Results are assessed in terms of probability of acquisition probability and implications

  2. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  3. Enabling Wide-Scale Computer Science Education through Improved Automated Assessment Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boe, Bryce A.

    There is a proliferating demand for newly trained computer scientists as the number of computer science related jobs continues to increase. University programs will only be able to train enough new computer scientists to meet this demand when two things happen: when there are more primary and secondary school students interested in computer science, and when university departments have the resources to handle the resulting increase in enrollment. To meet these goals, significant effort is being made to both incorporate computational thinking into existing primary school education, and to support larger university computer science class sizes. We contribute to this effort through the creation and use of improved automated assessment tools. To enable wide-scale computer science education we do two things. First, we create a framework called Hairball to support the static analysis of Scratch programs targeted for fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students. Scratch is a popular building-block language utilized to pique interest in and teach the basics of computer science. We observe that Hairball allows for rapid curriculum alterations and thus contributes to wide-scale deployment of computer science curriculum. Second, we create a real-time feedback and assessment system utilized in university computer science classes to provide better feedback to students while reducing assessment time. Insights from our analysis of student submission data show that modifications to the system configuration support the way students learn and progress through course material, making it possible for instructors to tailor assignments to optimize learning in growing computer science classes.

  4. The physics of energy transfer toward improved subgrid-scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Andrea; De Angelis, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Starting from physical insight on the energy transfer phenomena in wall turbulent flows, it is shown how modeling of subgrid stresses in large-eddy simulations can be improved. Each model should aim at reproducing the double feature of energy sink and source of the small scales of wall flows which become relevant when large filter lengths are considered. Here we propose one possible choice where the main ingredient is the coupling of the classical linear formulation of eddy viscosity with the nonlinear anisotropic features of the velocity increments tensor. This approach, which actually presents most of the features of the mixed models, captures the near-wall dynamics for very large filter lengths reproducing the small scales source physics responsible for backward energy transfer. A posteriori tests show excellent agreement with direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows even when very coarse grids are considered. The capability of the balance of the filtered second order structure function as a post-processing tool to evaluate the physics of any model is also shown.

  5. Combining snowpack modeling and terrestrial laser scanner observations improves the simulation of small scale snow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelto, Jesús; Vionnet, Vincent; López-Moreno, Juan-Ignacio; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Morin, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Accurately determining the snowpack distribution in mountain areas is complex because of the difficulty of establishing over large areas the spatial distribution of all variables that define the state of the snowpack at any particular time. In this study we used distributed snowpack simulations that were corrected throughout the snow season using snow depth distributions measured using a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). This enabled us to obtain a more realistic view of the small scale spatial evolution of the mass and depth of the snowpack. Several TLS snow depth data acquisitions were made during the 2012, 2013 and 2014 snow seasons in a small catchment (55 ha) located in the central Spanish Pyrenees. The Crocus snowpack model was used to simulate the snowpack evolution on a 5-m grid, based on downscaled meteorological variables obtained using SAFRAN reanalysis. The simulation was stopped when a snow depth distribution map measured using the TLS was available, and the modeled snow depth distribution was adjusted to match the observed snow depth. The snow simulation was then restarted and run until the next TLS acquisition was available. Prior to matching the simulation and observational data, both snowpack distributions were compared. The results for the three snow seasons showed an improvement in the snowpack simulation, especially with respect to simulating the influence of small scale topographic effects on the observed snowpack distribution, and also the timing of snow melt dynamics.

  6. Mindfulness-oriented meditation improves self-related character scales in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Fabio; Crescentini, Cristiano; Urgesi, Cosimo; Fabbro, Franco

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that mindfulness meditation may improve well-being in healthy individuals and be effective in the treatment of mental and neurological disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of an 8-week mindfulness-mediation program on the personality profiles of three groups of healthy individuals with no previous experience with meditation as compared to a control group not enrolled in any training. Personality profiles were obtained through the Temperament and Character Inventory (Cloninger et al., 1993). In the experimental groups, significant increments after the training were obtained in all the three character scales describing the levels of self maturity at the intrapersonal (Self-Directedness), interpersonal (Cooperativeness), and transpersonal (Self-Transcendence) levels. No changes were found in the control group. Strikingly, these effects were significant only in those groups who were engaged in consistent daily meditation practice but not in the group who attended the meditation training but were less consistent in home practice. Since higher scores in the character scales are associated to a lower risk of personality disorder, we propose that the increase of self maturity after the training may be an important mechanism for the effectiveness of mindfulness-oriented meditation in psychotherapeutic contexts. PMID:24746260

  7. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    PubMed

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users. PMID:26742134

  8. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of Saccharopolyspora spinosa for Spinosad Production improvement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinosad is a macrolide antibiotic produced by Saccharopolyspora spinosa with aerobic fermentation. However, the wild strain has a low productivity. In this article, a computational guided engineering approach was adopted in order to improve the yield of spinosad in S. spinosa. Results Firstly, a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction (GSMR) for S.spinosa based on its genome information, literature data and experimental data was extablished. The model was consists of 1,577 reactions, 1,726 metabolites, and 733 enzymes after manually refined. Then, amino acids supplying experiments were performed in order to test the capabilities of the model, and the results showed a high consistency. Subsequently, transhydrogenase (PntAB, EC 1.6.1.2) was chosen as the potential target for spinosad yield improvement based on the in silico metabolic network models. Furthermore, the target gene was manipulated in the parent strain in order to validate the model predictions. At last, shake flask fermentation was carried out which led to spinosad production of 75.32 mg/L, 86.5% higher than the parent strain (40.39 mg/L). Conclusions Results confirmed the model had a high potential in engineering S. spinosa for spinosad production. It is the first GSMM for S.spinosa, it has significance for a better understanding of the comprehensive metabolism and guiding strain designing of Saccharopolyspora spinosa in the future. PMID:24628959

  9. Water Quality Improvement through Reductions of Pollutant Loads on Small Scale of Bioretention System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyza Muha, Norshafa; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Jajarmizadeh, Milad

    2016-03-01

    Bioretention system is introduced as an important topic namely Urban Storm Water Management Manual for Malaysia (MSMA) by the Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia (DID) in May 2012. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of water quality for small scale bioretention system under tropical climate via MUSIC model. Two bioretention systems 1 and 2 are observed based on the difference media depth. The result of bioretention system is compared with a reference model which has infrastructure with Urban Stormwater Improvement Conceptualisation (MUSIC) for pollutants load reduction and water quality results. Assessment of results via MUSIC software indicates a significant percentage of reduction for Total Suspended Solid (TSS), Total Phosphorus (TP) and Total Nitrogen (TN). The prediction of pollutant reduction via using MUSIC has the harmony for requirement in MSMA. TSS pollutant reduction is more than 80%, while for TP and TN more than 50%. The outcome of this study can be helpful for improvement of the existing MSMA guidelines for application of bioretention systems in Malaysia.

  10. Can experience-based household food security scales help improve food security governance?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-12-01

    Experience-based food security scales (EBFSSs) have been shown to be valid across world regions. EBFSSs are increasingly been included in national food and nutrition assessments and food hardship items have been added to regional and global public opinion polls. EBFSSs meet the SMART criteria for identifying useful indicators. And have the potential to help improve accountability, transparency, intersectoral coordination and a more effective and equitable distribution of resources. EBFSSs have increased awareness about food and nutrition insecurity in the court of public opinion. Thus, it's important to understand the potential that EBFSSs have for improving food and nutrition security governance within and across countries. The case of Brazil illustrates the strong likelihood that EBFSSs do have a strong potential to influence food and governance from the national to the municipal level. A recent Gallup World Poll data analysis on the influence of the '2008 food crisis' on food hardship illustrates how even a single item from EBFSSs can help examine if food security governance in different world regions modifies the impact of crises on household food insecurity. Systematic research that bridges across economics, political science, ethics, public health and program evaluation is needed to better understand if and how measurement in general and EBFSSs in particular affect food security governance. PMID:23795344

  11. Can experience-based household food security scales help improve food security governance?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Experience-based food security scales (EBFSSs) have been shown to be valid across world regions. EBFSSs are increasingly been included in national food and nutrition assessments and food hardship items have been added to regional and global public opinion polls. EBFSSs meet the SMART criteria for identifying useful indicators. And have the potential to help improve accountability, transparency, intersectoral coordination and a more effective and equitable distribution of resources. EBFSSs have increased awareness about food and nutrition insecurity in the court of public opinion. Thus, it’s important to understand the potential that EBFSSs have for improving food and nutrition security governance within and across countries. The case of Brazil illustrates the strong likelihood that EBFSSs do have a strong potential to influence food and governance from the national to the municipal level. A recent Gallup World Poll data analysis on the influence of the ‘2008 food crisis’ on food hardship illustrates how even a single item from EBFSSs can help examine if food security governance in different world regions modifies the impact of crises on household food insecurity. Systematic research that bridges across economics, political science, ethics, public health and program evaluation is needed to better understand if and how measurement in general and EBFSSs in particular affect food security governance. PMID:23795344

  12. Teaching 5th grade science for aesthetic understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Mark A.

    Many scientists speak with great zeal about the role of aesthetics and beauty in their science and inquiry. Few systematic efforts have been made to teach science in ways that appeal directly to aesthetics and this research is designed to do just that. Drawing from the aesthetic theory of Dewey, I describe an analytic lens called learning for aesthetic understanding that finds power in the degree to which our perceptions of the world are transformed, our interests and enthusiasm piqued, and our actions changed as we seek further experiences in the world. This learning theory is contrasted against two other current and popular theories of science learning, that of learning for conceptual understanding via conceptual change theory and learning for a language-oriented or discourse-based understanding. After a lengthy articulation of the pedagogical strategies used to teach for aesthetic understanding the research is described in which comparisons are drawn between students in two 5th grade classrooms---one taught for the goal of conceptual understanding and the other taught for the goal of aesthetic understanding. Results of this comparison show that more students in the treatment classroom had aesthetic experiences with science ideas and came to an aesthetic understanding when studying weather, erosion, and structure of matter than students in the control group. Also statistically significant effects are shown on measures of interest, affect, and efficacy for students in the treatment class. On measures of conceptual understanding it appears that treatment class students learned more and forgot less over time than control class students. The effect of the treatment does not generally depend on gender, ethnicity, or prior achievement except in students' identity beliefs about themselves as science learners. In this case, a significant interaction for treatment class females on science identity beliefs did occur. A discussion of these results as well as elaboration and

  13. Using public surveys to assess aesthetic resource impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, T.

    1995-12-31

    FERC regulations require that hydropower license applicants prepare reports that describe the visual characteristics of the project area and discuss any expected impacts to aesthetic resources. While describing the visual character of the project area is relatively straightforward, scenic beauty and aesthetic quality are far more difficult to define and quantify. How do you determine the aesthetic consequences of lake level fluctuations or changes in streamflow, for example? What conditions are acceptable? Is there some threshold beyond which adverse impacts on scenic quality occur? Mitigation measures for aesthetic resources (such as increased minimum flows) may have significant consequences on project economics. Therefore, it is important that aesthetic resource evaluations be conducted in a fashion that provides reasonable and defensible conclusions. The inherently subjective nature of aesthetics dictates that evaluations be conducted in a rigorous, systematic manor. A study approach based on a well designed and implemented public survey accomplishes these goals. Most aesthetic impact assessments are carried out by one or two highly trained individuals. Unfortunately, these {open_quotes}professional judgement{close_quotes} methods may be sensitive to bias. Public survey techniques which rely on data representative of the public-at-large offer significant advantages. This paper describes how public surveys have been used by EDAW to identify impacts of hydropower developments and operations on aesthetic resources drawing on recent applications at Mono Lake California, and the North Umpqua River in Oregon. Studies at Mono Lake focused on the potential scenic quality impacts of different lake levels being considered as management alternatives. Studies of the North Umpqua River focused on the relationship between streamflows associated with hydropower operations the aesthetic quality of the river channel and several popular waterfalls.

  14. Systemic Change for School Improvement: Designing, Implementing, and Sustaining Prototypes and Going to Scale. Center Policy Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2005

    2005-01-01

    To encourage a greater policy discussion of the complexities of implementing major school improvements on a large scale, this report (a) discusses the need to expand school improvement planning to address how schools and districts will accomplish necessary systemic changes, (b) outlines some basic considerations related to systemic change, and (c)…

  15. Improvement of Baltic proper water quality using large-scale ecological engineering.

    PubMed

    Stigebrandt, Anders; Gustafsson, Bo G

    2007-04-01

    Eutrophication of the Baltic proper has led to impaired water quality, demonstrated by, e.g., extensive blooming of cyanobacteria during the premium summer holiday season and severe oxygen deficit in the deepwater. Sustainable improvements in water quality by the reduction of phosphorus (P) supplies will take several decades before giving full effects because of large P storages both in soils in the watershed and in the water column and bottom sediments of the Baltic proper. In this article it is shown that drastically improved water quality may be obtained within a few years using large-scale ecological engineering methods. Natural variations in the Baltic proper during the last decades have demonstrated how rapid improvements may be achieved. The present article describes the basic dynamics of P, organic matter, and oxygen in the Baltic proper. It also briefly discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different classes of methods of ecological engineering aimed at restoring the Baltic proper from eutrophication effects. Preliminary computations show that the P content might be halved within a few years if about 100 kg O2 s(-1) are supplied to the upper deepwater. This would require 100 pump stations, each transporting about 100 m3 s(-1) of oxygen-rich so-called winter water from about 50 to 125 m depth where the water is released as a buoyant jet. Each pump station needs a power supply of 0.6 MW. Offshore wind power technology seems mature enough to provide the power needed by the pump stations. The cost to install 100 wind-powered pump stations, each with 0.6 MW power, at about 125-m depth is about 200 million Euros. PMID:17520945

  16. Improving urban streamflow forecasting using a high-resolution large scale modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Laura; Hogue, Terri; Gochis, David; Salas, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Urban flood forecasting is a critical component in effective water management, emergency response, regional planning, and disaster mitigation. As populations across the world continue to move to cities (~1.8% growth per year), and studies indicate that significant flood damages are occurring outside the floodplain in urban areas, the ability to model and forecast flow over the urban landscape becomes critical to maintaining infrastructure and society. In this work, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting- Hydrological (WRF-Hydro) modeling framework as a platform for testing improvements to representation of urban land cover, impervious surfaces, and urban infrastructure. The three improvements we evaluate include: updating the land cover to the latest 30-meter National Land Cover Dataset, routing flow over a high-resolution 30-meter grid, and testing a methodology for integrating an urban drainage network into the routing regime. We evaluate performance of these improvements in the WRF-Hydro model for specific flood events in the Denver-Metro Colorado domain, comparing to historic gaged streamflow for retrospective forecasts. Denver-Metro provides an interesting case study as it is a rapidly growing urban/peri-urban region with an active history of flooding events that have caused significant loss of life and property. Considering that the WRF-Hydro model will soon be implemented nationally in the U.S. to provide flow forecasts on the National Hydrography Dataset Plus river reaches - increasing capability from 3,600 forecast points to 2.7 million, we anticipate that this work will support validation of this service in urban areas for operational forecasting. Broadly, this research aims to provide guidance for integrating complex urban infrastructure with a large-scale, high resolution coupled land-surface and distributed hydrologic model.

  17. Complications of aesthetic medicine procedures: five case studies.

    PubMed

    Smędra, A; Szustowski, S; Klemm, J; Jurczyk, A; Zalewska-Janowska, A; Berent, J

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the cases of five patients who developed complications after aesthetic medicine procedures. Four of the cases involved women who reported to the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, for a description and legal qualification of bodily injuries suffered as a result of aesthetic medicine procedures, whereas one was related to the assessment of accuracy of medical management at the request of the prosecutor handling the case. The reported cases concerned acid exfoliation treatments, photoepilation and cryotherapy. The authors attempt to discuss the most common complications that may occur after aesthetic medicine procedures, and measures to avoid them. PMID:27003866

  18. The Use of Newer High Translucency Zirconia in Aesthetic Zone

    PubMed Central

    Dangra, Zishan; Gandhewar, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Loss of anterior tooth causes aesthetic and functional disharmony. Although no restorative material can approach the appearance of intact tooth enamel, glass ceramic, at the increased risk of brittle fracture, can mimic original tooth color better than the other restorative options. The newest zirconia material comes with unparalleled individualization in aesthetics and optimal physical properties. One of the basic principles of tooth preparation is conservation of tooth structure. This clinical report describes the replacement of maxillary and mandibular incisor with latest generation zirconia adhesive fixed partial denture. The authors have achieved unmatched aesthetics with newer high translucency zirconia. PMID:24715994

  19. Clive Bell's "Significant Form" and the neurobiology of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Zeki, Semir

    2013-01-01

    Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics. In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics. I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view. PMID:24273502

  20. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling. PMID:12608427

  1. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Caetano, Isabela Maria; Dalitz, Fernando; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Mondelli, José

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative) is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin) for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material) associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:25045546

  2. Improving plot- and regional-scale crop models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, F.; Rötter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies on global climate report that climate variability is increasing with more frequent and intense extreme events1. There are quite large uncertainties from both the plot- and regional-scale models in simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes on crop development, growth and productivity2,3. One key to reducing the uncertainties is better exploitation of experimental data to eliminate crop model deficiencies and develop better algorithms that more adequately capture the impacts of extreme events, such as high temperature and drought, on crop performance4,5. In the present study, in a first step, the inter-annual variability in wheat yield and climate from 1971 to 2012 in Finland was investigated. Using statistical approaches the impacts of climate variability and extremes on wheat growth and productivity were quantified. In a second step, a plot-scale model, WOFOST6, and a regional-scale crop model, MCWLA7, were calibrated and validated, and applied to simulate wheat growth and yield variability from 1971-2012. Next, the estimated impacts of high temperature stress, cold damage, and drought stress on crop growth and productivity based on the statistical approaches, and on crop simulation models WOFOST and MCWLA were compared. Then, the impact mechanisms of climate extremes on crop growth and productivity in the WOFOST model and MCWLA model were identified, and subsequently, the various algorithm and impact functions were fitted against the long-term crop trial data. Finally, the impact mechanisms, algorithms and functions in WOFOST model and MCWLA model were improved to better simulate the impacts of climate variability and extremes, particularly high temperature stress, cold damage and drought stress for location-specific and large area climate impact assessments. Our studies provide a good example of how to improve, in parallel, the plot- and regional-scale models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes, as needed for

  3. Aesthetic Analysis of Media Texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic analysis of media texts, ie the analysis of art concept of the media texts of different types and genres, is closely related to the aesthetic (artistic) theory of media (Aesthetical Approach, Media as Popular Arts Approach, Discriminatory Approach). Aesthetic theory of media literacy education has been very popular in the 1960s…

  4. The Impact of Design and Aesthetics on Usability, Credibility, and Learning in an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Alicia; Glore, Peyton

    2010-01-01

    This article surveys research in the areas of aesthetics and design, usability, visual aesthetics in education, and recent statistics related to online education. The focus of the article is on defining the role of visual content and aesthetics in the user interface and exploring what importance aesthetics and visual content have to education.…

  5. Mendelssohn's Last Wish or Case Studies about Aesthetics in Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Aesthetics is commonly considered a complicated field of inquiry, particularly for students. Nevertheless, aesthetic experiences often raise questions about the nature of music which philosophical aesthetics is intended to answer. To bring students in contact with aesthetics depends primarily on the choice of appropriate methods. Case studies…

  6. An Exegetic Study of the So-Called Proposition of Confucian Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Since Wang Guowei and Cai Yuanpei introduced the concepts of aesthetics and aesthetic education, respectively, to China in the early twentieth century, there has been a strong tendency in many of the aesthetic discussions to examine ancient texts and materials using modern concepts of aesthetics. In particular, sentences with the character-word…

  7. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  8. Rehabilitation of the severely atrophied dentoalveolar ridge in the aesthetic region with corticocancellous grafts from the iliac crest and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Lehmijoki, Miikka; Holming, Heli; Thorén, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess changes in bone volume after block bone augmentation and placement of dental implants and further evaluate the aesthetic outcome of the treatment. Material and Methods 9 Patients with atrophied anterior maxilla were included in this study. They received total of 21 implants. Dimensions of the alveolar ridge were measured from cone-beam computed tomography x-rays. The bone level at the implant sites was analysed from intraoral x-rays and the aesthetic outcome was assessed from clinical photographs using a pink aesthetic score (PES) scaling. Results The mean gained horizontal bone width at the marginal crest and 5 mm apically was accordingly 2.7mm and 5.0 mm. The mean PES rating was 9.8/14. The survival rate of. Conclusions Reconstruction of the atrophied anterior maxilla with bone blocks and dental implants is a safe procedure with high survival rate and acceptable aesthetic outcome. Key words:Dental implants, aesthetic region, corticocancellous bone grafts, pink aesthetic score, survival rate. PMID:27475690

  9. Wonder, the Rainbow and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Watson, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Describes the book 'Wonder, the Rainbow and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences' which is not ostensibly connected to mathematics education but which turns out to have deep connections with mathematics, education, and mathematics education. (MM)

  10. Hollywood's Conversion to Color: The Technological, Economic and Aesthetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindem, Forham A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the film industry's conversion to color cinematography in the period between the 1920s and 1960s. Cites economic considerations, technological modifications, and aesthetic preferences by audiences as factors in this development. (JMF)

  11. Improvement of methods for large scale sequencing; application to human Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, R.A.; Andersson, B.; Wentland, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    Sequencing of a one-metabase region of Xq28, spanning the FRAXA and IDS loci has been undertaken in order to investigate the practicality of the shotgun approach for large scale sequencing and as a platform to develop improved methods. The efficiency of several steps in the shotgun sequencing strategy has been increased using PCR-based approaches. An improved method for preparation of M13 libraries has been developed. This protocol combines a previously described adaptor-based protocol with the uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG)-cloning procedure. The efficiency of this procedure has been found to be up to 100-fold higher than that of previously used protocols. In addition the novel protocol is more reliable and thus easy to establish in a laboratory. The method has also been adapted for the simultaneous shotgun sequencing of multiple short fragments by concentrating them before library construction is presented. This protocol is suitable for rapid characterization of cDNA clones. A library was constructed from 15 PCR-amplified and concentrated human cDNA inserts, and the insert sequences could easily be identified as separate contigs during the assembly process and the sequence coverage was even along each fragment. Using this strategy, the fine structures of the FraxA and IDS loci have been revealed and several EST homologies indicating novel expressed sequences have been identified. Use of PCR to close repetitive regions that are difficult to clone was tested by determination of the sequence of a cosmid mapping DXS455 in Xq28, containing a polymorphic VNTR. The region containing the VNTR was not represented in the shotgun library, but by designing PCR primers in the sequences flanking the gap and by cloning and sequencing the PCR product, the fine structure of the VNTR has been determined. It was found to be an AT-rich VNTR with a repeated 25-mer at the center.

  12. Retrieval of short scale geophysical signals and improved coastal data from SAR satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Buchhaupt, Christopher; Dinardo, Salvatore; Scharroo, Remko; Benveniste, Jerome; Becker, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The Delay Doppler/Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimeter offers a new quality of observational data in comparison to the pulse-limited low resolution mode (LRM) data collected over the past twenty years. Due to the reduced noise in the measurements an improved retrieval of the geophysical signal is expected in SAR. The goal of this study is to characterize these improvements both in open ocean and coastal zone using standard Level 2 and Level 1 data reprocessed with improved algorithms. We have carried out, from CryoSat-2 Level 1a Full Bit Rate (L1a FBR) data, a Delay-Doppler processing and waveform retracking tailored specifically for coastal zone by applying Hamming Window and Zero-Padding, using an extended vertical swath window in order to minimize tracker errors and a dedicated SAMOSA-based coastal retracker (named SAMOSA+). SAMOSA+ accepts mean square slope as free parameter and the epoch's first guess fitting value is decided according to the peak in correlation between 20 consecutive waveforms (in order to mitigate land off-ranging effect). Those products can be extracted from ESA-ESRIN GPOD service (named SARvatore). In order to quantify the improvement with respect to pulse-limited altimetry, we build 20 Hz PLRM (pseudo-LRM) data from CryoSat-1 L1a FBR and retrack them with numerical convolutional Brown-based retracker. Hence, here, PLRM is used as a proxy for real pulse-limited products (LRM), since there is no direct comparison of SAR and LRM possible otherwise. The PLRM data are built and retracked by Technical University of Darmstadt (TUDa). In the open ocean the study consists on the retrieval of short scale geophysical, as the swell signals. The selected areas are the CryoSat-2 Pacific and Atlantic Boxes in which it operated in SAR mode. In the coastal zone of the North Sea the study concentrates on the reduction of land and ships contamination by dedicated procedures including improved retracking. Effects of different options and retracking

  13. Achieving Anterior Aesthetics in a Full-Arch Implant Case.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, Dino

    2016-01-01

    The proper approach to achieving the best possible smile for any aesthetic case must start with a full-smile analysis. Only when the practitioner determines the ideal final position of the teeth can the restorative phase begin. In this case, using provisional restorations and a transferable wax-up resulted in a final restoration that yielded optimal aesthetics, excellent function, and a very satisfied patient. PMID:26846060

  14. Essential Requirements to Setting up an Aesthetic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Mukta; Britto, Gillian R

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic dermatology is becoming a vital and popular branch of medicine. This article aims to guide dermatologists to set up a professional and ethical aesthetic practice. Dermatologists should have an integrated practice of clinical dermatology, dermatosurgery and cosmetic dermatology. Ethical practice is the gold standard for any medical field, especially with dermatologists, who should avoid doing unnecessary procedures. Proper patient counselling and addressing the patients’ concerns is imperative. PMID:25538440

  15. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  16. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2-δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner.

  17. An improved prescription for merger time-scales from controlled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Á.; De Lucia, G.; Weinmann, S. M.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.

    2013-06-01

    We compare three analytical prescriptions for merger times available from the literature to simulations of isolated mergers. We probe three different redshifts, and several halo concentrations, mass ratios, orbital circularities and orbital energies of the satellite. We find that prescriptions available in the literature significantly underpredict long time-scales for mergers at high redshift. We argue that these results have not been highlighted previously either because the evolution of halo concentration of satellite galaxies has been neglected (in previous isolated merger simulations) or because long merger times and mergers with high initial orbital circularities are under-represented (for prescriptions based on cosmological simulations). Motivated by the evolution of halo concentration at fixed mass, an explicit dependence on redshift added as tmergermod(z) = (1 + z)0.44 tmerger to the prescription based on isolated mergers gives a significant improvement in the predicted merger times up to ˜20 tdyn in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 2. When this modified prescription is used to compute galaxy stellar mass functions, we find that it leads up to a 25 per cent increase in the number of low-mass galaxies surviving at z = 0, and a 10 per cent increase for more massive galaxies. This worsens the known overprediction in the number of low-mass galaxies by hierarchical models of galaxy formation.

  18. Vehicle impoundments improve drinking and driving licence suspension outcomes: Large-scale evidence from Ontario.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Patrick A; Ma, Tracey; Elzohairy, Yoassry

    2016-10-01

    Although vehicle impoundment has become a common sanction for various driving offences, large-scale evaluations of its effectiveness in preventing drinking and driving recidivism are almost non-existent in the peer-reviewed literature. One reason is that impoundment programs have typically been introduced simultaneously with other countermeasures, rendering it difficult to disentangle any observed effects. Previous studies of impoundment effectiveness conducted when such programs were implemented in isolation have typically been restricted to small jurisdictions, making high-quality evaluation difficult. In contrast, Ontario's "long-term" and "seven-day" impoundment programs were implemented in relative isolation, but with tight relationships to already existing drinking and driving suspensions. In this work, we used offence data produced by Ontario's population of over 9 million licensed drivers to perform interrupted time series analysis on drinking and driving recidivism and on rates of driving while suspended for drinking and driving. Our results demonstrate two key findings: (1) impoundment, or its threat, improves compliance with drinking and driving licence suspensions; and (2) addition of impoundment to suspension reduces drinking and driving recidivism, possibly through enhanced suspension compliance. PMID:27434801

  19. Effect on orange juice of batch pasteurization in an improved pilot-scale microwave oven.

    PubMed

    Cinquanta, L; Albanese, D; Cuccurullo, G; Di Matteo, M

    2010-01-01

    The effects on orange juice batch pasteurization in an improved pilot-scale microwave (MW) oven was evaluated by monitoring pectin methyl-esterase (PME) activity, color, carotenoid compounds and vitamin C content. Trials were performed on stirred orange juice heated at different temperatures (60, 70, 75, and 85 degrees C) during batch process. MW pilot plant allowed real-time temperature control of samples using proportional integrative derivative (PID) techniques based on the infrared thermography temperature read-out. The inactivation of heat sensitive fraction of PME, that verifies orange juice pasteurization, showed a z-value of 22.1 degrees C. Carotenoid content, responsible for sensorial and nutritional quality in fresh juices, decreased by about 13% after MW pasteurization at 70 degrees C for 1 min. Total of 7 carotenoid compounds were quantified during MW heating: zeaxanthin and beta-carotene content decreased by about 26%, while no differences (P < 0.05) were found for beta-cryptoxanthin in the same trial. A slight decrease in vitamin C content was monitored after MW heating. Results showed that MW heating with a fine temperature control could result in promising stabilization treatments. PMID:20492165

  20. Large Scale Data Mining to Improve Usability of Data: An Intelligent Archive Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Isaac, David; Yang, Wenli; Morse, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Research in certain scientific disciplines - including Earth science, particle physics, and astrophysics - continually faces the challenge that the volume of data needed to perform valid scientific research can at times overwhelm even a sizable research community. The desire to improve utilization of this data gave rise to the Intelligent Archives project, which seeks to make data archives active participants in a knowledge building system capable of discovering events or patterns that represent new information or knowledge. Data mining can automatically discover patterns and events, but it is generally viewed as unsuited for large-scale use in disciplines like Earth science that routinely involve very high data volumes. Dozens of research projects have shown promising uses of data mining in Earth science, but all of these are based on experiments with data subsets of a few gigabytes or less, rather than the terabytes or petabytes typically encountered in operational systems. To bridge this gap, the Intelligent Archives project is establishing a testbed with the goal of demonstrating the use of data mining techniques in an operationally-relevant environment. This paper discusses the goals of the testbed and the design choices surrounding critical issues that arose during testbed implementation.

  1. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y T; Zhang, B; Zheng, S J; Wang, J; San, X Y; Ma, X L

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu(2+)-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu(2-δ)S layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  2. Profiling and Improving I/O Performance of a Large-Scale Climate Scientific Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Bin; Wang, Teng; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Cong; Wang, Yandong; Yu, Weikuan; Cruz, Carlos A.; Zhou, Shujia; Clune, Tom; Klasky, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Exascale computing systems are soon to emerge, which will pose great challenges on the huge gap between computing and I/O performance. Many large-scale scientific applications play an important role in our daily life. The huge amounts of data generated by such applications require highly parallel and efficient I/O management policies. In this paper, we adopt a mission-critical scientific application, GEOS-5, as a case to profile and analyze the communication and I/O issues that are preventing applications from fully utilizing the underlying parallel storage systems. Through in-detail architectural and experimental characterization, we observe that current legacy I/O schemes incur significant network communication overheads and are unable to fully parallelize the data access, thus degrading applications' I/O performance and scalability. To address these inefficiencies, we redesign its I/O framework along with a set of parallel I/O techniques to achieve high scalability and performance. Evaluation results on the NASA discover cluster show that our optimization of GEOS-5 with ADIOS has led to significant performance improvements compared to the original GEOS-5 implementation.

  3. Checklist Model to Improve Work Practices in Small-Scale Demolition Operations with Silica Dust Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Muianga, Custodio; Rice, Carol; Lentz, Thomas; Lockey, James; Niemeier, Richard; Succop, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A systematic approach was developed to review, revise and adapt existing exposure control guidance used in developed countries for use in developing countries. One-page employee and multiple-page supervisor guidance sheets were adapted from existing documents using a logic framework and workers were trained to use the information to improve work practices. Interactive, hands-on training was delivered to 26 workers at five small-scale demolition projects in Maputo City, Mozambique, and evaluated. A pre-and-post walkthrough survey used by trained observers documented work practice changes. Worker feedback indicated that the training was effective and useful. Workers acquired knowledge (84% increase, p < 0.01) and applied the work practice guidance. The difference of proportions between use of work practice components before and after the intervention was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Changes in work practices following training included preplanning, use of wet methods and natural ventilation and end-of-task review. Respirable dust measurements indicated a reduction in exposure following training. Consistency in observer ratings and observations support the reliability and validity of the instruments. This approach demonstrated the short-term benefit of training in changing work practices; follow-up is required to determine the long-term impact on changes in work practices, and to evaluate the need for refresher training. PMID:22470296

  4. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  5. Silo & HDF5 I/O Scaling Improvements on BG/P Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, M R; Miller, M C

    2010-12-02

    Silo and HDF5 are I/O libraries used by many codes important to the LLNL's Weapons and Complex Integration (WCI) mission. In the past year, modest adjustments and tuning of Silo, HDF5 and the I/O configuration of the BG/P platform, Dawn, were undertaken. A key goal of this work was to improve I/O performance without requiring any changes in the application codes themselves. In particular, the application codes have been allowed to continue to use a simplified yet highly flexible I/O paradigm known as 'Poor Man's Parallel I/O', where scalability is achieved through concurrent, serial I/O to multiple files. The results demonstrate substantial performance gains (better than 50x in many cases) at large scale (greater than 64,000 MPI tasks). They describe key enhancements made to Silo, HDF5 and the I/O configuration of our BG/P platform and present very favorable results from scalability studies over a wide range of operating scenarios.

  6. An improved unified network protocol framework for large-scale wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jin; Sivalingam, Krishna M.

    2004-08-01

    Rapid technological advances in wireless communication have made it possible for networking sensor devices. Given the low computation and battery power capacities of these sensor nodes, the key design factors of network protocols are self-configuring, energy-efficient, adaptive, and scalable. We presented the multi-hop infrastructure network architecture (MINA) for a wireless sensor network consisting of a few hundred sensors that communicate data to a base station (BS). We designed a Unified Network Protocol Framework for MINA that encompasses network organization, medium access control (MAC) and routing protocols. In this paper, we improve it by adaptively varying transmission range to maintain network connectivity. It is a derivative-free optimization algorithm. The BS periodically evaluates the objective function, chooses the appropriate transmission range and broadcasts it to the sensor nodes that then update the transmission range. The advantages are: (i) Avoids the disconnectivity; (ii) Maximizes the number of nodes that can be connected to the BS, (iii) Minimizes the energyxdelay metric and (iv) Avoids the "hot-spot" nodes in the network. The performance in terms of delay, throughput, energy consumption and network lifetimes, is studied in detail using discrete-event simulation compared with other protocol. The results show that it is energy efficient in a large scale network.

  7. Ethical and legal issues in aesthetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth and expansion of plastic surgery in general and aesthetic surgery in particular in the past decade has brought in its wake some confusions particularly raising questions for the surgeons conduct towards his colleagues and the patients in the light of ethical requirements. Some thoughts from eminent thinkers form a backdrop to consideration of theories of medical ethics. In this article raging and continuous debates on these subjects have been avoided to maintain the momentum. Apart from the western thoughts, directions from our old scriptures on ethical conduct have been included to accommodate prevelant Indian practices. The confusion created by specialists advertising their abilities directly to the lay public following removal of ethical bars by the American Courts as also latitudes allowed by the General Medical Council of Great Britain have been discussed. The medical fraternity however has its reservations. Unnecessary skirmishes with the law arose in cosmetic surgery from the freedom exercised by the police to file criminal proceedings against attending doctors in the event of a patient's death with or without any evidence of wrong doing. This has now been curtailed in the judgement of the Supreme Court of India[1] where norms have been laid down for such prosecution. This has helped doctors to function without fear of harassment. An effort has been made to state a simple day-to-day routine for an ethical doctor-patient relationship. PMID:23450235

  8. Obsessive States: Aesthetics, Erotism, and Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Aya

    2016-08-01

    Starting from his early writings, Freud devoted much thought to "obsessional neurosis" and continued developing this theme for more than thirty years. However, unlike the disorder hysteria, which in recent years has regained its honorable status in psychoanalytic literature, obsessional neurosis has been continually neglected and relegated to the fields of psychiatry and behavioral psychology, which emphasize the symptomatic and the overt. This process, by clinging to the objective aspects of obsessional neurosis and disassociating it from the instincts and from its historical sources, may itself be deemed obsessive. This paper suggests that obsessive processes should be viewed as structuring a distinct psychic state pertinent to analysis even when obsessive symptoms are not clearly present or apparent. Freud's conceptualizations thus become more flexibly and widely applicable, allowing the analyst once again to relate to the patient's inner world and to the original, implicit essence of obsession, relying less significantly on what is outwardly apparent. The paper will elaborate on three aspects of this "obsessive state": aesthetics, eroticism, and fantasy. Finally, the value of the notion of obsessive psychic states will be reassessed in the broader context of the role of sexuality in psychoanalytic theory. PMID:27500702

  9. Visually representing reality: aesthetics and accessibility aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2009-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the visual representation of reality with three imaging technologies: painting, photography and electronic imaging. The contribution of the important image aspects, called dimensions hereafter, such as color, fine detail and total image size, to the degree of reality and aesthetic value of the rendered image are described for each of these technologies. Whereas quite a few of these dimensions - or approximations, or even only suggestions thereof - were already present in prehistoric paintings, apparent motion and true stereoscopic vision only recently were added - unfortunately also introducing accessibility and image safety issues. Efforts are made to reduce the incidence of undesirable biomedical effects such as photosensitive seizures (PSS), visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), and visual fatigue from stereoscopic images (VFSI) by international standardization of the image parameters to be avoided by image providers and display manufacturers. The history of this type of standardization, from an International Workshop Agreement to a strategy for accomplishing effective international standardization by ISO, is treated at some length. One of the difficulties to be mastered in this process is the reconciliation of the, sometimes opposing, interests of vulnerable persons, thrill-seeking viewers, creative video designers and the game industry.

  10. Ethical and legal issues in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suresh

    2012-09-01

    Rapid growth and expansion of plastic surgery in general and aesthetic surgery in particular in the past decade has brought in its wake some confusions particularly raising questions for the surgeons conduct towards his colleagues and the patients in the light of ethical requirements. Some thoughts from eminent thinkers form a backdrop to consideration of theories of medical ethics. In this article raging and continuous debates on these subjects have been avoided to maintain the momentum. Apart from the western thoughts, directions from our old scriptures on ethical conduct have been included to accommodate prevelant Indian practices. The confusion created by specialists advertising their abilities directly to the lay public following removal of ethical bars by the American Courts as also latitudes allowed by the General Medical Council of Great Britain have been discussed. The medical fraternity however has its reservations. Unnecessary skirmishes with the law arose in cosmetic surgery from the freedom exercised by the police to file criminal proceedings against attending doctors in the event of a patient's death with or without any evidence of wrong doing. This has now been curtailed in the judgement of the Supreme Court of India[1] where norms have been laid down for such prosecution. This has helped doctors to function without fear of harassment. An effort has been made to state a simple day-to-day routine for an ethical doctor-patient relationship. PMID:23450235

  11. Minimally Invasive Procedures for Nasal Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Alessio; Limardo, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Nose has an important role in the aesthetics of face. It is easy to understand the reason of the major interest that has revolved around the correction of its imperfections for several centuries, or even from the ancient times. In the last decade, all the surgical or medical minimal-invasive techniques evolved exponentially. The techniques of rejuvenation and corrections of nasal imperfections did not escape this development that is much widespread in the medicine of the third millennium. In many cases, the techniques of surgical correction involve invasive procedure that necessitates, for the majority of cases, hospitalisation. The author, using a different approach, has developed mini-invasive techniques using botulinum toxin A (BTxA) and absorbable fillers for the correction of nasal imperfections. BTxA allows to reduce the imperfections due to hypertension of muscles, while the absorbable fillers allow to correct all the imperfections of the nasal profile from the root to the tip in total safety. The correction is based on the precise rules that allow avoiding the majority of side effects. Results are long lasting and well appreciated by patients. PMID:23060706

  12. Cognitive mechanisms for explaining dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    For many domains aesthetic appreciation has proven to be highly reliable. Evaluations of facial attractiveness, for instance, show high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. This indicates general mechanisms underlying such evaluations. It is, however, also obvious that our taste for specific objects is not always stable—in some realms such stability is hardly conceivable at all since aesthetic domains such as fashion, design, or art are inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for psychologists as this will probably reveal essential mechanisms of aesthetic evaluations per se. The present paper develops a two-step model, dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy, and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders— aesthetic appreciation. PMID:23145254

  13. That is Cool: the Nature Of Aesthetics in Fluid Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Aesthetics has historically been defined as the study of beauty and thus as a metric of art. More recently, psychologists are using the term to describe a spectrum of responses from ``I hate it'' to ``I love it.'' In the context of fluid physics, what is beautiful? What elicits a ``Wow! Awesome! Cool!'' response versus a snore? Can we use aesthetics to deepen or change students' or the public's perceptions of physics and/or the world around them? For example, students seem to appreciate the aesthetics of destruction: environmental fluid dynamics such as storms, tornadoes, floods and wildfires are often responsible for massive destruction, yet humans draw pleasure from watching such physics and the attendant destruction from a safe distance. Can this voyeurism be turned to our advantage in communicating science? Observations of student and Facebook Flow Visualization group choices for fluid physics that draw a positive aesthetic response are sorted into empirical categories; the aesthetics of beauty, power, destruction, and oddness. Each aesthetic will be illustrated with examples drawn from flow visualizations from both the Flow Visualization course (MCEN 4151) taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and sources on the web. This work is supported by NSF: EEC 1240294.

  14. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza-Filho, Leopoldino; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters. PMID:24523969

  15. Post-black etching on emitter to improve performance of multi-scale texture silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yurong; Yang, Haigang; Cao, Weiwei; Wang, Guangna; Ma, Heng; Chang, Fanggao

    2014-09-01

    A simple, low-cost, post-black etching process atop the random pyramidal emitter has been proposed and investigated. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining nanoporous layer formed by the post-black etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. Compared to the pre-black etched Si solar cells, our experiments clearly show the advantage of post-black etched texturing: it enables high blue response and improved conversion efficiency. As a result, the enhancement of 7.1 mA/cm2 on the short-circuit current density and improvement of 31 % in the conversion efficiency have been reached.

  16. Evidence-based improvement of the National Trauma Triage Protocol: The Glasgow Coma Scale versus Glasgow Coma Scale motor subscale

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Forsythe, Raquel M.; Stassen, Nicole A.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.; Gestring, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ideal triage uses simple criteria to identify severely injured patients. Glasgow Coma Scale motor (GCSm) may be easier for field use and was considered for the National Trauma Triage Protocol (NTTP). This study evaluated performance of the NTTP if GCSm is substituted for the current GCS score ≤ 13 criterion. METHODS Subjects in the National Trauma Data Bank undergoing scene transport were included. Presence of NTTP physiologic (Step 1) and anatomic (Step 2) criteria was determined. GCSm score ≤ 5 was defined as a positive criterion. Trauma center need (TCN) was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15, intensive care unit admission, urgent operation, or emergency department death. Test characteristics were calculated to predict TCN. Area under the curve was compared between GCSm and GCS scores, individually and within the NTTP. Logistic regression was used to determine the association of GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 with TCN after adjusting for other triage criteria. Predicted versus actual TCN was compared. RESULTS There were 811,143 subjects. Sensitivity was lower (26.7% vs. 30.3%), specificity was higher (95.1% vs. 93.1%), and accuracy was similar (66.1% vs. 66.3%) for GCSm score ≤ 5 compared with GCS score ≤ 13. Incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2, GCSm score ≤ 5 traded sensitivity (60.4% vs. 62.1%) for specificity (67.1% vs. 65.7%) with similar accuracy (64.2% vs. 64.2%) to GCS score ≤ 13. There was no difference in the area under the curve between GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 when incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2 (p = 0.10). GCSm score ≤ 5 had a stronger association with TCN (odds ratio, 3.37; 95% confidence interval, 3.27–3.48; p < 0.01) than GCS score ≤ 13 (odds ratio, 3.03; 95% confidence interval, 2.94–3.13; p < 0.01). GCSm had a better fit of predicted versus actual TCN than GCS at the lower end of the scales. CONCLUSION GCSm score ≤ 5 increases specificity at the expense of sensitivity

  17. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal

    PubMed Central

    Melmer, Tamara; Amirshahi, Seyed A.; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e., the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal, and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale-invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies) relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies) than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy) and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian, and Arabic). Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art, and fine art) were similar across cultures. PMID:23554592

  18. From regular text to artistic writing and artworks: Fourier statistics of images with low and high aesthetic appeal.

    PubMed

    Melmer, Tamara; Amirshahi, Seyed A; Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of letters and their influence on readability and letter identification have been intensely studied during the last decades. There have been few studies, however, on statistical image properties that reflect more global aspects of text, for example properties that may relate to its aesthetic appeal. It has been shown that natural scenes and a large variety of visual artworks possess a scale-invariant Fourier power spectrum that falls off linearly with increasing frequency in log-log plots. We asked whether images of text share this property. As expected, the Fourier spectrum of images of regular typed or handwritten text is highly anisotropic, i.e., the spectral image properties in vertical, horizontal, and oblique orientations differ. Moreover, the spatial frequency spectra of text images are not scale-invariant in any direction. The decline is shallower in the low-frequency part of the spectrum for text than for aesthetic artworks, whereas, in the high-frequency part, it is steeper. These results indicate that, in general, images of regular text contain less global structure (low spatial frequencies) relative to fine detail (high spatial frequencies) than images of aesthetics artworks. Moreover, we studied images of text with artistic claim (ornate print and calligraphy) and ornamental art. For some measures, these images assume average values intermediate between regular text and aesthetic artworks. Finally, to answer the question of whether the statistical properties measured by us are universal amongst humans or are subject to intercultural differences, we compared images from three different cultural backgrounds (Western, East Asian, and Arabic). Results for different categories (regular text, aesthetic writing, ornamental art, and fine art) were similar across cultures. PMID:23554592

  19. A new visual analog scale to measure distinctive well-being effects of LED photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, François; Barolet, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    LED photobiomodulation is known mostly for its restorative effects on skin and joints. While providing LED photobiomodulation aesthetic treatments of the face, not only the skin condition was improved, but a subjective well-being effect was observed, obvious both in photographs of the treated areas and in patient behaviour. This has been supported by studies showing the beneficial effects of transcranial lasers and LEDs on neurological and psychological conditions, providing great insight. LED therapy can now be used as a standalone procedure to regulate neuronal function. To measure such neurological outcomes in humans, we developed a visual analog scale questionnaire with the purpose of having a convenient tool for the assessment of quality of life following facial LED photobiomodulation.We also gauged patients' emotional state regarding overall aesthetic improvement.

  20. Comparison of lab, pilot, and industrial scale low consistency mechanical refining for improvements in enzymatic digestibility of pretreated hardwood.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon W; Venditti, Richard; Park, Sunkyu; Jameel, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical refining has been shown to improve biomass enzymatic digestibility. In this study industrial high-yield sodium carbonate hardwood pulp was subjected to lab, pilot and industrial refining to determine if the mechanical refining improves the enzymatic hydrolysis sugar conversion efficiency differently at different refining scales. Lab, pilot and industrial refining increased the biomass digestibility for lignocellulosic biomass relative to the unrefined material. The sugar conversion was increased from 36% to 65% at 5 FPU/g of biomass with industrial refining at 67.0 kWh/t, which was more energy efficient than lab and pilot scale refining. There is a maximum in the sugar conversion with respect to the amount of refining energy. Water retention value is a good predictor of improvements in sugar conversion for a given fiber source and composition. Improvements in biomass digestibility with refining due to lab, pilot plant and industrial refining were similar with respect to water retention value. PMID:25016156

  1. Hydrological improvements for nutrient and pollutant emission modeling in large scale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höllering, S.; Ihringer, J.

    2012-04-01

    An estimation of emissions and loads of nutrients and pollutants into European water bodies with as much accuracy as possible depends largely on the knowledge about the spatially and temporally distributed hydrological runoff patterns. An improved hydrological water balance model for the pollutant emission model MoRE (Modeling of Regionalized Emissions) (IWG, 2011) has been introduced, that can form an adequate basis to simulate discharge in a hydrologically differentiated, land-use based way to subsequently provide the required distributed discharge components. First of all the hydrological model had to comply both with requirements of space and time in order to calculate sufficiently precise the water balance on the catchment scale spatially distributed in sub-catchments and with a higher temporal resolution. Aiming to reproduce seasonal dynamics and the characteristic hydrological regimes of river catchments a daily (instead of a yearly) time increment was applied allowing for a more process oriented simulation of discharge dynamics, volume and therefore water balance. The enhancement of the hydrological model became also necessary to potentially account for the hydrological functioning of catchments in regard to scenarios of e.g. a changing climate or alterations of land use. As a deterministic, partly physically based, conceptual hydrological watershed and water balance model the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) (USGS, 2009) was selected to improve the hydrological input for MoRE. In PRMS the spatial discretization is implemented with sub-catchments and so called hydrologic response units (HRUs) which are the hydrotropic, distributed, finite modeling entities each having a homogeneous runoff reaction due to hydro-meteorological events. Spatial structures and heterogeneities in sub-catchments e.g. urbanity, land use and soil types were identified to derive hydrological similarities and classify in different urban and rural HRUs. In this way the

  2. Improving the Integration of Recreation Management with Management of Other Natural Resources by Applying Concepts of Scale from Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Wayde C.; Hall, Troy E.; Kruger, Linda E.

    2009-03-01

    In this article, we examine how issues of scale affect the integration of recreation management with the management of other natural resources on public lands. We present two theories used to address scale issues in ecology and explore how they can improve the two most widely applied recreation-planning frameworks. The theory of patch dynamics and hierarchy theory are applied to the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) and the limits of acceptable change (LAC) recreation-planning frameworks. These frameworks have been widely adopted internationally, and improving their ability to integrate with other aspects of natural resource management has significant social and conservation implications. We propose that incorporating ecologic criteria and scale concepts into these recreation-planning frameworks will improve the foundation for integrated land management by resolving issues of incongruent boundaries, mismatched scales, and multiple-scale analysis. Specifically, we argue that whereas the spatially explicit process of the ROS facilitates integrated decision making, its lack of ecologic criteria, broad extent, and large patch size decrease its usefulness for integration at finer scales. The LAC provides explicit considerations for weighing competing values, but measurement of recreation disturbances within an LAC analysis is often done at too fine a grain and at too narrow an extent for integration with other recreation and resource concerns. We suggest that planners should perform analysis at multiple scales when making management decisions that involve trade-offs among competing values. The United States Forest Service is used as an example to discuss how resource-management agencies can improve this integration.

  3. Improved color reproduction based on CIELAB color space in integrated multi-scale retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Wang-Jun; Lee, Tae-Hyoung; Lee, Cheol-Hee; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Recently, tone reproduction is widely used in the field of image enhancement and HDR imaging. This method is especially used to provide the proper luminance so that captured images give the same sensation as the scene. As a result, we can get high contrast and naturalness of colors. There is ample literature on the topic of tone reproduction that has the objective of reproducing natural looking color in digital images. In recent papers, IMSR (Integrated multi-scale Retinex) shows great naturalness in the result images. Most methods, including IMSR, work in RGB or quasi-RGB color spaces, although some method adopted the use of luminance. This raises hue distortion from the point of the human visual system, that is, hue distortion in CIELAB color space. Accordingly, this paper proposes an enhanced IMSR method in a device-independent color space, CIELAB, to preserve hue and obtain high contrast and naturalness. In order to achieve the devised objectives, a captured sRGB image is transformed to the CIELAB color space. IMSR is then applied to only L* values, thus the balance of colors components are preserved. This process causes unnatural saturation, therefore saturation adjustment is performed by applying the ratio of chroma variation at the sRGB gamut boundary according to the corrected luminance. Finally, the adjusted CIELAB values are transformed to sRGB using the inverse transform function. In the result images of the proposed method, containing both high and low luminance regions, visibility in dark shadow and bright regions was improved and color distortion was reduced.

  4. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  5. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  6. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  7. Potential for improved radiation thermometry measurement uncertainty through implementing a primary scale in an industrial laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, Jon R.; Lowe, David; Broughton, Mick; White, Ben S.; Machin, Graham

    2016-09-01

    A primary temperature scale requires realising a unit in terms of its definition. For high temperature radiation thermometry in terms of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 this means extrapolating from the signal measured at the freezing temperature of gold, silver or copper using Planck’s radiation law. The difficulty in doing this means that primary scales above 1000 °C require specialist equipment and careful characterisation in order to achieve the extrapolation with sufficient accuracy. As such, maintenance of the scale at high temperatures is usually only practicable for National Metrology Institutes, and calibration laboratories have to rely on a scale calibrated against transfer standards. At lower temperatures it is practicable for an industrial calibration laboratory to have its own primary temperature scale, which reduces the number of steps between the primary scale and end user. Proposed changes to the SI that will introduce internationally accepted high temperature reference standards might make it practicable to have a primary high temperature scale in a calibration laboratory. In this study such a scale was established by calibrating radiation thermometers directly to high temperature reference standards. The possible reduction in uncertainty to an end user as a result of the reduced calibration chain was evaluated.

  8. IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana; Gubanova, Elena; Khrustaleva, Irina; Atamanov, Vasiliy; Saybel, Anastasiya; Parsagashvili, Elena; Dmitrieva, Irina; Sanchez, Elena; Lapatina, Natalia; Korolkova, Tatiana; Saromytskaya, Alena; Goltsova, Elena; Satardinova, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Background Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013), and Moscow, Russia (March 2014). The expert group reviewed and analyzed the existing evidence, consensus recommendations, and Russian experts’ extensive practical experience of incobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics to reach consensus on optimal doses, potential dose adjustments, and injection sites of incobotulinumtoxinA for facial aesthetics. Results All experts developed guidance on the optimal doses for incobotulinumtoxinA treatment of different regions of the upper and lower face. The expert panel agreed that there are no differences in the efficacy and duration of the effect between the four BoNT/As that are commercially available for facial aesthetic indications in Russia and that, when administered correctly, all BoNT/As can achieve optimal results. Experts also agreed that nonresponse to BoNT/A can be caused by neutralizing antibodies. Conclusion On the basis of the scientific and clinical evidence available for incobotulinumtoxinA, coupled with the extensive clinical experience of the consensus group, experts recommended the optimal doses of incobotulinumtoxinA effective for treatment of wrinkles of the upper and lower face to achieve the expected aesthetic outcome. These first Russian guidelines on the optimal use of incobotulinumtoxinA for

  9. Can we measure beauty? Computational evaluation of coral reef aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Guibert, Marine; Foerschner, Anja; Co, Tim; Calhoun, Sandi; George, Emma; Hatay, Mark; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Sandin, Stuart A.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; Felts, Ben; Dustan, Phillip; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    The natural beauty of coral reefs attracts millions of tourists worldwide resulting in substantial revenues for the adjoining economies. Although their visual appearance is a pivotal factor attracting humans to coral reefs current monitoring protocols exclusively target biogeochemical parameters, neglecting changes in their aesthetic appearance. Here we introduce a standardized computational approach to assess coral reef environments based on 109 visual features designed to evaluate the aesthetic appearance of art. The main feature groups include color intensity and diversity of the image, relative size, color, and distribution of discernable objects within the image, and texture. Specific coral reef aesthetic values combining all 109 features were calibrated against an established biogeochemical assessment (NCEAS) using machine learning algorithms. These values were generated for ∼2,100 random photographic images collected from 9 coral reef locations exposed to varying levels of anthropogenic influence across 2 ocean systems. Aesthetic values proved accurate predictors of the NCEAS scores (root mean square error < 5 for N ≥ 3) and significantly correlated to microbial abundance at each site. This shows that mathematical approaches designed to assess the aesthetic appearance of photographic images can be used as an inexpensive monitoring tool for coral reef ecosystems. It further suggests that human perception of aesthetics is not purely subjective but influenced by inherent reactions towards measurable visual cues. By quantifying aesthetic features of coral reef systems this method provides a cost efficient monitoring tool that targets one of the most important socioeconomic values of coral reefs directly tied to revenue for its local population. PMID:26587350

  10. Can we measure beauty? Computational evaluation of coral reef aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Guibert, Marine; Foerschner, Anja; Co, Tim; Calhoun, Sandi; George, Emma; Hatay, Mark; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Vermeij, Mark J A; Felts, Ben; Dustan, Phillip; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    The natural beauty of coral reefs attracts millions of tourists worldwide resulting in substantial revenues for the adjoining economies. Although their visual appearance is a pivotal factor attracting humans to coral reefs current monitoring protocols exclusively target biogeochemical parameters, neglecting changes in their aesthetic appearance. Here we introduce a standardized computational approach to assess coral reef environments based on 109 visual features designed to evaluate the aesthetic appearance of art. The main feature groups include color intensity and diversity of the image, relative size, color, and distribution of discernable objects within the image, and texture. Specific coral reef aesthetic values combining all 109 features were calibrated against an established biogeochemical assessment (NCEAS) using machine learning algorithms. These values were generated for ∼2,100 random photographic images collected from 9 coral reef locations exposed to varying levels of anthropogenic influence across 2 ocean systems. Aesthetic values proved accurate predictors of the NCEAS scores (root mean square error < 5 for N ≥ 3) and significantly correlated to microbial abundance at each site. This shows that mathematical approaches designed to assess the aesthetic appearance of photographic images can be used as an inexpensive monitoring tool for coral reef ecosystems. It further suggests that human perception of aesthetics is not purely subjective but influenced by inherent reactions towards measurable visual cues. By quantifying aesthetic features of coral reef systems this method provides a cost efficient monitoring tool that targets one of the most important socioeconomic values of coral reefs directly tied to revenue for its local population. PMID:26587350

  11. A Complex Story: Universal Preference vs. Individual Differences Shaping Aesthetic Response to Fractals Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Street, Nichola; Forsythe, Alexandra M.; Reilly, Ronan; Taylor, Richard; Helmy, Mai S.

    2016-01-01

    Fractal patterns offer one way to represent the rough complexity of the natural world. Whilst they dominate many of our visual experiences in nature, little large-scale perceptual research has been done to explore how we respond aesthetically to these patterns. Previous research (Taylor et al., 2011) suggests that the fractal patterns with mid-range fractal dimensions (FDs) have universal aesthetic appeal. Perceptual and aesthetic responses to visual complexity have been more varied with findings suggesting both linear (Forsythe et al., 2011) and curvilinear (Berlyne, 1970) relationships. Individual differences have been found to account for many of the differences we see in aesthetic responses but some, such as culture, have received little attention within the fractal and complexity research fields. This two-study article aims to test preference responses to FD and visual complexity, using a large cohort (N = 443) of participants from around the world to allow universality claims to be tested. It explores the extent to which age, culture and gender can predict our preferences for fractally complex patterns. Following exploratory analysis that found strong correlations between FD and visual complexity, a series of linear mixed-effect models were implemented to explore if each of the individual variables could predict preference. The first tested a linear complexity model (likelihood of selecting the more complex image from the pair of images) and the second a mid-range FD model (likelihood of selecting an image within mid-range). Results show that individual differences can reliably predict preferences for complexity across culture, gender and age. However, in fitting with current findings the mid-range models show greater consistency in preference not mediated by gender, age or culture. This article supports the established theory that the mid-range fractal patterns appear to be a universal construct underlying preference but also highlights the fragility of

  12. A Complex Story: Universal Preference vs. Individual Differences Shaping Aesthetic Response to Fractals Patterns.

    PubMed

    Street, Nichola; Forsythe, Alexandra M; Reilly, Ronan; Taylor, Richard; Helmy, Mai S

    2016-01-01

    Fractal patterns offer one way to represent the rough complexity of the natural world. Whilst they dominate many of our visual experiences in nature, little large-scale perceptual research has been done to explore how we respond aesthetically to these patterns. Previous research (Taylor et al., 2011) suggests that the fractal patterns with mid-range fractal dimensions (FDs) have universal aesthetic appeal. Perceptual and aesthetic responses to visual complexity have been more varied with findings suggesting both linear (Forsythe et al., 2011) and curvilinear (Berlyne, 1970) relationships. Individual differences have been found to account for many of the differences we see in aesthetic responses but some, such as culture, have received little attention within the fractal and complexity research fields. This two-study article aims to test preference responses to FD and visual complexity, using a large cohort (N = 443) of participants from around the world to allow universality claims to be tested. It explores the extent to which age, culture and gender can predict our preferences for fractally complex patterns. Following exploratory analysis that found strong correlations between FD and visual complexity, a series of linear mixed-effect models were implemented to explore if each of the individual variables could predict preference. The first tested a linear complexity model (likelihood of selecting the more complex image from the pair of images) and the second a mid-range FD model (likelihood of selecting an image within mid-range). Results show that individual differences can reliably predict preferences for complexity across culture, gender and age. However, in fitting with current findings the mid-range models show greater consistency in preference not mediated by gender, age or culture. This article supports the established theory that the mid-range fractal patterns appear to be a universal construct underlying preference but also highlights the fragility of

  13. Tennessee TCAP Science Scale Scores: Implications for Continuous Improvement and Educational Reform or Is It Possible To Beat the Odds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Whitehead, Marie

    Evidence provided by analysis of science scale scores on the McGraw-Hill CTB/4 science test for grades 2 through 8 in Tennessee, part of the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP), shows that it is possible for high achieving school systems to show continuous improvement from year to year. These results would tend to offset fears that…

  14. A Model of Continuous Improvement in High Schools: A Process for Research, Innovation Design, Implementation, and Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Cannata, Marisa; Rutledge, Stacey A.; Socol, Allison Rose

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a model for continuous improvement that guides the work of the National Center on Scaling Up Effective Schools, or NCSU. NCSU is a research and development center funded by the Institute for Education Sciences, the research arm of the United States Department of Education. At the core of the Center's work is an innovative…

  15. Getting It "Better": The Importance of Improving Background Questionnaires in International Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Leslie; Rutkowski, David

    2010-01-01

    In addition to collecting achievement data, international large-scale assessment programmes gather auxiliary information from students and schools regarding the context of teaching and learning. In an effort to clarify some of the opacity surrounding international large-scale assessment programmes and the potential problems associated with less…

  16. MULTI-SCALED VULNERABILITY ANALYSES: IMPROVING DECISION-MAKING AT REGIONAL TO LOCAL LEVELS THROUGH PARTNERSHIP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decision-makers at all scales are faced with setting priorities for both use of limited resources and for risk management. While there are all kinds of monitoring data and models to project conditions at different spatial and temporal scales, synthesized information to establish ...

  17. Improving measurement methods in rehabilitation: core concepts and recommendations for scale development.

    PubMed

    Velozo, Craig A; Seel, Ronald T; Magasi, Susan; Heinemann, Allen W; Romero, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Validated measurement scales are essential to evaluating clinical outcomes and conducting meaningful and reliable research. The purpose of this article is to present the clinician and researcher with a contemporary 8-stage framework for measurement scale development based on a mixed-methods qualitative and quantitative approach. Core concepts related to item response theory are presented. Qualitative methods are described to conceptualize scale constructs; obtain patient, family, and other stakeholder perspectives; and develop item pools. Item response theory statistical methodologies are presented, including approaches for testing the assumptions of unidimensionality, local independence, monotonicity, and indices of model fit. Lastly, challenges faced by scale developers in implementing these methodologies are discussed. While rehabilitation research has recently started to apply mixed-methods qualitative and quantitative methodologies to scale development, these approaches show considerable promise in advancing rehabilitation measurement. PMID:22840881

  18. Towards an improved wind speed scale and damage description adapted for Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Groenemeijer, Pieter; Dirksen, Erik; Hubrig, Martin; Holzer, Alois M.; Dotzek, Nikolai

    2011-06-01

    We propose an updated wind speed scale description adapted for Central Europe considering wind impact to buildings as well as to vegetation. The scale is motivated by the need of a broadly applicable, accurate and consistent tornado or downburst intensity rating system based on a standardised wind speed scale for the purpose of climatological homogeneity. The description comprises building and vegetation damage characteristics, which can be found in Central Europe - but similar in other parts of the world, occurring with the various classes of the Fujita- and T-scales. The scale description is supplemented by photographs of typical damage. For practical application, an ensemble-based use of a decision matrix for specific building structures and vegetation types is suggested.

  19. Improving the local relevance of large scale water demand predictions: the way forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Jeroen; Reynaud, Arnaud; de Roo, Ad

    2016-04-01

    use and water prices. Subsequently, econometric estimates allow us to make a monetary valuation of water and identify the dominant drivers of domestic and industrial water demand per country. Combined with socio-economic, demographic and climate scenarios we made predictions for future Europe. Since this is a first attempt we obtained mixed results between countries when it comes to data availability and therefore model uncertainty. For some countries we have been able to develop robust predictions based on vast amounts of data while some other countries proved more challenging. We do feel however, that large scale predictions based on regional data are the way forward to provide relevant scientific policy support. In order to improve on our work it is imperative to further expand our database of consistent regional data. We are looking forward to any kind of input and would be very interested in sharing our data to collaborate towards a better understanding of the water use system.

  20. Aesthetic and Emotional Effects of Meter and Rhyme in Poetry

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal. PMID:23386837

  1. Toward a Neural Chronometry for the Aesthetic Experience of Music

    PubMed Central

    Brattico, Elvira; Bogert, Brigitte; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Music is often studied as a cognitive domain alongside language. The emotional aspects of music have also been shown to be important, but views on their nature diverge. For instance, the specific emotions that music induces and how they relate to emotional expression are still under debate. Here we propose a mental and neural chronometry of the aesthetic experience of music initiated and mediated by external and internal contexts such as intentionality, background mood, attention, and expertise. The initial stages necessary for an aesthetic experience of music are feature analysis, integration across modalities, and cognitive processing on the basis of long-term knowledge. These stages are common to individuals belonging to the same musical culture. The initial emotional reactions to music include the startle reflex, core “liking,” and arousal. Subsequently, discrete emotions are perceived and induced. Presumably somatomotor processes synchronizing the body with the music also come into play here. The subsequent stages, in which cognitive, affective, and decisional processes intermingle, require controlled cross-modal neural processes to result in aesthetic emotions, aesthetic judgments, and conscious liking. These latter aesthetic stages often require attention, intentionality, and expertise for their full actualization. PMID:23641223

  2. Comparison of aesthetic preferences among Roman and Arabic script readers.

    PubMed

    Heath, Robin L; Mahmasanni, Oula; Rouhana, Aida; Nassif, Nader

    2005-09-01

    The systemic bias for aesthetic preferences demonstrated by prior research is thought to reflect neural organisation. Research on aesthetic preference and laterality has usually been conducted with participants who read a left-to-right Roman script, e.g., English. In order to determine if the aesthetic judgments were influenced by habitual scanning direction, we administered a geometric aesthetic preference test to 578 right-handed adults who represented a range of script experience, i.e., left-to-right Roman script readers (English); right-to-left Arabic script readers; bi-directional readers of Roman and Arabic scripts; and illiterates. We also administered an asymmetric chimeric faces test. Our findings showed that biases in aesthetic preference were influenced by script direction and pictorial dimensions. In a laterally balanced composition, participants preferred to begin their scan with the object representing Interest and terminate with the object representing Weight, the direction being determined by the script. In an unbalanced composition, participants tended to fixate on content, whether Interest or Weight, and move in a direction consistent with the script. PMID:16191811

  3. Perception of Aesthetics by Different Professionals of Different Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vadgaonkar, Vaishali Devidas; Deshpande, Kiran Jayant; Gangurde, Parag Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the perception of aesthetics by different professionals of different communities in India by a photographic study. Materials and Methods This was a photographic study conducted among different professionals of different communities to establish an aesthetic norm for Indian population. The communities to which the professionals belonged were North Indian, South Indian, Maharashtrian, Gujarati and Parsi. The subjects photographed were aesthetic profiles with good occlusion. Five different facial photographic views each for male and female were obtained. These photographs were then subjected to changes in increments of 2 mm and 4 mm in retrusive and protrusive profile in Adobe Photoshop CS5 after which they were evaluated by different professionals of different communities according to their preference from most liked to least liked. Results The aesthetic preferences differed widely among different professionals of different community. Conclusion The established aesthetic norms can be utilized by the dental fraternity in general and Orthodontist’s in particular in diagnosis and treatment planning of Samples belonging to different communities to have the treatment outcome in unison with the established soft tissue norm for that particular community. PMID:26557609

  4. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    PubMed

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike. PMID:27066153

  5. Aesthetic evolution by mate choice: Darwin's really dangerous idea

    PubMed Central

    Prum, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin proposed an explicitly aesthetic theory of sexual selection in which he described mate preferences as a ‘taste for the beautiful’, an ‘aesthetic capacity’, etc. These statements were not merely colourful Victorian mannerisms, but explicit expressions of Darwin's hypothesis that mate preferences can evolve for arbitrarily attractive traits that do not provide any additional benefits to mate choice. In his critique of Darwin, A. R. Wallace proposed an entirely modern mechanism of mate preference evolution through the correlation of display traits with male vigour or viability, but he called this mechanism natural selection. Wallace's honest advertisement proposal was stridently anti-Darwinian and anti-aesthetic. Most modern sexual selection research relies on essentially the same Neo-Wallacean theory renamed as sexual selection. I define the process of aesthetic evolution as the evolution of a communication signal through sensory/cognitive evaluation, which is most elaborated through coevolution of the signal and its evaluation. Sensory evaluation includes the possibility that display traits do not encode information that is being assessed, but are merely preferred. A genuinely Darwinian, aesthetic theory of sexual selection requires the incorporation of the Lande–Kirkpatrick null model into sexual selection research, but also encompasses the possibility of sensory bias, good genes and direct benefits mechanisms. PMID:22777014

  6. Aesthetic evolution by mate choice: Darwin's really dangerous idea.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O

    2012-08-19

    Darwin proposed an explicitly aesthetic theory of sexual selection in which he described mate preferences as a 'taste for the beautiful', an 'aesthetic capacity', etc. These statements were not merely colourful Victorian mannerisms, but explicit expressions of Darwin's hypothesis that mate preferences can evolve for arbitrarily attractive traits that do not provide any additional benefits to mate choice. In his critique of Darwin, A. R. Wallace proposed an entirely modern mechanism of mate preference evolution through the correlation of display traits with male vigour or viability, but he called this mechanism natural selection. Wallace's honest advertisement proposal was stridently anti-Darwinian and anti-aesthetic. Most modern sexual selection research relies on essentially the same Neo-Wallacean theory renamed as sexual selection. I define the process of aesthetic evolution as the evolution of a communication signal through sensory/cognitive evaluation, which is most elaborated through coevolution of the signal and its evaluation. Sensory evaluation includes the possibility that display traits do not encode information that is being assessed, but are merely preferred. A genuinely Darwinian, aesthetic theory of sexual selection requires the incorporation of the Lande-Kirkpatrick null model into sexual selection research, but also encompasses the possibility of sensory bias, good genes and direct benefits mechanisms. PMID:22777014

  7. Adolescent aesthetic athletes: a group at risk for eating pathology?

    PubMed

    Van Durme, Kim; Goossens, Lien; Braet, Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Previous research shows that leanness- and weight-dependent sports increase the risk of developing disturbed eating behaviour. This study investigated whether adolescent aesthetic athletes (n=68, M=14.6 years), particularly ballet dancers and figure skaters, exhibit more eating pathology compared to the general population. Furthermore, it was investigated whether sport-related factors have explanatory value for the dieting behaviour of aesthetic athletes. To asses eating pathology, reliable and valid self-report questionnaires were used including the Eating Disorder Inventory-II, the Children's Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. Results show that female aesthetic athletes show more drive for thinness, features of bulimia, dieting behaviour and concerns about weight and shape compared to female adolescents from the general population. Concerning the explanation of dieting behaviour in aesthetic athletes, both sport-related factors (competition state anxiety) and general risk factors (eating concern) seem to be relevant. These results suggest that female aesthetic athletes show more disturbed eating behaviour and thoughts than female adolescents from the general population and therefore may have an enhanced risk of developing clinical eating disorders. PMID:22365793

  8. Toward a neural chronometry for the aesthetic experience of music.

    PubMed

    Brattico, Elvira; Bogert, Brigitte; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Music is often studied as a cognitive domain alongside language. The emotional aspects of music have also been shown to be important, but views on their nature diverge. For instance, the specific emotions that music induces and how they relate to emotional expression are still under debate. Here we propose a mental and neural chronometry of the aesthetic experience of music initiated and mediated by external and internal contexts such as intentionality, background mood, attention, and expertise. The initial stages necessary for an aesthetic experience of music are feature analysis, integration across modalities, and cognitive processing on the basis of long-term knowledge. These stages are common to individuals belonging to the same musical culture. The initial emotional reactions to music include the startle reflex, core "liking," and arousal. Subsequently, discrete emotions are perceived and induced. Presumably somatomotor processes synchronizing the body with the music also come into play here. The subsequent stages, in which cognitive, affective, and decisional processes intermingle, require controlled cross-modal neural processes to result in aesthetic emotions, aesthetic judgments, and conscious liking. These latter aesthetic stages often require attention, intentionality, and expertise for their full actualization. PMID:23641223

  9. Advances in catchment scale bank erosion modelling - quantifying the improved representation of temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, Victoria; Holman, Ian; O'Donnell, Greg; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Kilsby, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Channel bank erosion processes are influenced by numerous factors resulting in high spatial and temporal variability of sediment production. The representation of channel bank erosion is overly simplistic within most catchment models, despite its significance to catchment sediment budgets. Within this study, the physically-based distributed SHETRAN model is modified to incorporate bank vegetation and channel sinuosity factors that influence spatial and temporal bank erosion rates. The modified model simulates the temporal variation of bank erosion in response to high magnitude events with the potential to remove bank vegetation and de-stabilise banks, thereby increasing erodibility. As vegetation re-establishes, simulated bank erodibility decreases. During the recovery period, banks have increased vulnerability to further high magnitude events that will result in increased bank erosion. This enables the model to represent the impact of flood clustering on sediment generation. The modified model also represents the spatial variation of bank erosion as a result of varying channel planform. Channel geometry has also been linked to bank erosion rates as a result of flow circulation within channels. Channel sinuosity shows a non-linear relationship with bank erosion, with bank erosion increasing up to a threshold value of sinuosity and decreasing as sinuosity increases above this point. The original and modified models have been applied to the Eden catchment in north east England. Bank erosion data derived from a GIS overlay methodology covering 150 years has been used to validate the models, indicating annual sediment generation from bank erosion processes within the catchment is 410-4500 t yr-1, equivalent to 2-11% of the catchment sediment budget. Comparison of the original and modified models highlights the improved ability of the modified model to simulate annual variation of bank eroded sediment production; annual sediment production from the original model ranged

  10. Improving the modeling of road dust levels for Barcelona at urban scale and street level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Zandveld, Peter; Keuken, Menno; Jonkers, Sander; Querol, Xavier; Reche, Cristina; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Schaap, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Road dust emission is an emerging issue in air quality due to the lack of remediation measures in contrast to vehicle exhaust emissions. The evidence of receptor modeling studies allows for quantifying impact on a few receptors, but the high cost of PM chemical speciation data and the questionable representativeness of single monitoring sites, limit considerably the development of population exposure estimates and epidemiologic studies based on georeferenced data. This study attempts to initiate and promote urban-scale dispersion modeling for road dust emissions, which will allow for a more robust estimate of population exposure and health outcomes. The TNO URBIS (URBan Information System) model was applied in the city of Barcelona, implementing a Gaussian line source and a street canyon dispersion model, together with new experimental estimates of road dust emission factors and algorithm to describe the time variability. Annual, daily and hourly road dust contributions were simulated and validated against observation of PM10, mineral dust and hourly PM2.5-10 concentrations. Results show that road dust contributed 9-15% to PM10 levels at background sites, and 23-44% at traffic sites. Highest contributions were modeled in the commercial/residential district where most of population live and work (Eixample) structured by 120 m wide square blocks, separated by roads with >10,000 vehicles per day. Street level contributions rise up to 20 μg/m3 (96% of roads) and an additional 3% of roads within 20-40 μg/m3. Hourly simulations of road dust contributions revealed to benefit from the implementation of the new emission module (Amato et al., 2012), able to describe the exponential recovery of road dust emission potential after rain events, when compared to common approach such as the use of constant emission factor or an ON/OFF approach. Correlation coefficients with observed data varied from 0.61, 0.58 and 0.43 for annual, daily and hourly means, respectively, revealing

  11. Improving the Rapid Refresh and High Resolution Rapid Refresh physics to better perform across a wide range of spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joseph; Grell, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Model development at NOAA/GSD spans a wide range of spatial scales: global scale (Flow-following finite-volume Icosohedral Model, FIM; 10-250 km grid spacing), continental scale (RAP; 13 km grid spacing), CONUS scale (HRRR; 3 km grid spacing), and regional modeling (experimental nesting at 1 km grid spacing over complex terrain). As the model resolution changes, the proportion of resolved vs unresolved physical processes changes; therefore, physical parameterizations need to adapt to different model resolutions to more accurately handle the unresolved processes. The Limited Area Model (LAM) component of the Grey Zone Experiment was designed to assess the change in behavior of numerical weather prediction models between 16 and 1 km by simulating a cold-air outbreak over the North Atlantic and North Sea. The RAP and HRRR model physics were tested in this case study in order to examine the change in behavior of the model physics at 16, 8, 4, 2, and 1 km grid spacings with and without the use a convective parameterization. The primary purpose of these tests is to better understand the change in behavior of the boundary layer and convective schemes across the grey zone, such that further targeted modifications can then help improve general performance at various scales. The RAP currently employs a modified form of the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which is an improved TKE-based scheme tuned to match large-eddy simulations. Modifications have been performed to better match observations at 13 km (RAP) grid spacing but more multi-scale testing is required before modifications are introduced to make it scale-aware. A scale-aware convective parameterization, the Grell-Freitas scheme (both deep- and shallow-cumulus scheme), has been developed to better handle the transition in behavior of the sub-grid scale convective processes through the grey zone. This study examines the change in behavior of both schemes across the grey zone. Their transitional behavior

  12. Combined use of meteorological drought indices at multi-time scales for improving hydrological drought detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Singh, Vijay P; Liu, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Prediction of hydrological drought in the absence of hydrological records is of great significance for water resources management and risk assessment. In this study, two meteorological drought indices, including standardized precipitation index (SPI) and standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) calculated at different time scales (1 to 12months), were analyzed for their capabilities in detecting hydrological droughts. The predictive skills of meteorological drought indices were assessed through correlation analysis, and two skill scores, i.e. probability of detection (POD) and false alarm rate (FAR). When used independently, indices of short time scales generally performed better than did those of long time scales. However, at least 31% of hydrological droughts were still missed in view of the peak POD score (0.69) of a single meteorological drought index. Considering the distinguished roles of different time scales in explaining hydrological droughts with disparate features, an optimization approach of blending SPI/SPEI at multiple time scales was proposed. To examine the robustness of the proposed method, data of 1964-1990 was used to establish the multiscalar index, then validate during 2000-2010. Results showed that POD exhibited a significant increase when more than two time scales were used, and the best performances were found when blending 8 time scales of SPI and 9 for SPEI, with the corresponding values of 0.82 and 0.85 for POD, 0.205 and 0.21 for FAR, in the calibration period, and even better performance in the validation period. These results far exceeded the performance of any single meteorological drought index. This suggests that when there is lack of streamflow measurements, blending climatic information of multiple time scales to jointly monitor hydrological droughts could be an alternative solution. PMID:27450249

  13. Identifying pediatric emergence delirium by using the PAED Scale: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Matthew J; Hawks, Sharon J; Taicher, Brad M; Bonta, Juliet; Brandon, Debra H

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric emergence delirium is a postoperative phenomenon characterized by aberrant cognitive and psychomotor behavior, which can place the patient and health care personnel at risk for injury. A common tool for identifying emergence delirium is the Level of Consciousness-Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (LOC-RASS), although it has not been validated for use in the pediatric population. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED) is a newly validated tool to measure emergence delirium in children. We chose to implement and evaluate the effectiveness and fidelity of using the PAED Scale to identify pediatric emergence delirium in one eight-bed postanesthesia care unit in comparison with the traditional LOC-RASS. The overall incidence of pediatric emergence delirium found by using the LOC-RASS with a retrospective chart review (3%) was significantly lower than the incidence found by using the LOC-RASS (7.5%) and PAED Scale (11.5%) during the implementation period. Our findings suggest that the PAED Scale may be a more sensitive measure of pediatric emergence delirium, and, in the future, we recommend that health care personnel at our facility use the PAED Scale rather than the LOC-RASS. PMID:24674794

  14. Comparing humans to automation in rating photographic aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarala, Ramakrishna; Agrawal, Abhishek; Morales, Sandino

    2015-03-01

    Computer vision researchers have recently developed automated methods for rating the aesthetic appeal of a photograph. Machine learning techniques, applied to large databases of photos, mimic with reasonably good accuracy the mean ratings of online viewers. However, owing to the many factors underlying aesthetics, it is likely that such techniques for rating photos do not generalize well beyond the data on which they are trained. This paper reviews recent attempts to compare human ratings, obtained in a controlled setting, to ratings provided by machine learning techniques. We review methods to obtain meaningful ratings both from selected groups of judges and also from crowd sourcing. We find that state-of-the-art techniques for automatic aesthetic evaluation are only weakly correlated with human ratings. This shows the importance of obtaining data used for training automated systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  15. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation. PMID:23789508

  16. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse. PMID:26091400

  17. Therapeutic and Aesthetic Uses of Photodynamic Therapy Part One of a Five-Part Series

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of aminolevulinic acid–photodynamic therapy in dermatology has steadily been on the rise since its introduction into our therapeutic armamentarium almost 10 years ago. Clinicians are realizing the continued benefits of this therapy from a therapeutic and cosmetic/aesthetic outcome. This was first seen in the treatment of nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses of the face and scalp where resolution of the actinic keratoses was achieved and a cosmetic improvement noted from the therapies. Clinicians are embracing photorejuvenation utilizing aminolevulinic acid–photodynamic therapy, which is reviewed in this article. PMID:21103321

  18. The small step toward asymmetry: Aesthetic judgment of broken symmetries.

    PubMed

    Gartus, Andreas; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry and complexity both affect the aesthetic judgment of abstract patterns. However, although beauty tends to be associated with symmetry, there are indications that small asymmetries can also be beautiful. We investigated the influence of small deviations from symmetry on people's aesthetic liking for abstract patterns. Breaking symmetry not only decreased patterns' symmetry but also increased their complexity. While an increase of complexity normally results in a higher liking, we found that even a small decrease of symmetry has a strong effect, such that patterns with slightly broken symmetries were significantly less liked than fully symmetric ones. PMID:24349695

  19. Sibling jealousy and aesthetic ambiguity in Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Margaret Ann Fitzpatrick

    2009-04-01

    Jane Austen's most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice (1813), illuminates and is illuminated by psychoanalytic aesthetics. When Austen dramatizes unconscious oedipal/sibling rivalries, irony acts as a type of aesthetic ambiguity (E. Kris 1952). A psychoanalytic perspective shows that Austen uses a grammar of negatives (negation, denial, minimization) to achieve the dual meanings of irony, engaging the reader's unconscious instinctual satisfactions, while at the same time protecting the reader from unpleasant affects. Austen's plot, which portrays regressions driven by sibling jealousy, reveals that a new tolerance of remorse and depression in her heroine and hero leads to psychic growth. PMID:19507448

  20. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: a new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-08-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10% (5%) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency-separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5% and 2%, respectively.

  1. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: a new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-08-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10 per cent (5 per cent) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper, we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5 per cent and 2 per cent, respectively.

  2. Significantly improving stellar mass and radius estimates: A new reference function for the Δν scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Bellinger, Earl

    2016-06-01

    The scaling relations between global asteroseismic observables and stellar properties are widely used to estimate masses and radii of stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. Since the mass and radius of the Sun are known independently, the Sun is commonly used as a reference to scale to. However, the validity of the scaling relations depends on the homology between the star under study and the reference star. Solar-like oscillators span a wide range of masses and metallicities, as well as evolutionary phases. Most of these stars are therefore not homologous to the Sun. This leads to errors of up to 10% (5%) in mass (radius) when using the asteroseismic scaling relations with the Sun as the reference. In this paper we derive a reference function to replace the solar-reference value used in the large-frequency-separation scaling relation. Our function is the first that depends on both effective temperature and metallicity, and is applicable from the end of the main sequence to just above the bump on the red giant branch. This reference function improves the estimates of masses and radii determined through scaling relations by a factor of 2, i.e. allows masses and radii to be recovered with an accuracy of 5% and 2%, respectively.

  3. Translation and validation of the Turkish version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Baysal, Asli; Demirci, Kadir; Dikmen, Ferhan; Aglarci, Ali Vasfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to translate the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) into Turkish, validate the questionnaire, and provide a cross-cultural adaptation. Methods The translation process included the following steps, which were performed by a translation committee: (1) translation into Turkish, (2) back translation into English, (3) pretesting, and (4) cross-cultural adaptation. The Turkish version of the PIDAQ was produced subsequent to the translation process. Validity and reliability were measured using the Perception of Occlusion Scale and the aesthetic component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. The questionnaire was administered to 260 individuals (age range, 18–30 years; mean age, 20.50 ± 1.9 years). Structural validity was assessed via factor analysis, and internal consistency was measured using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure, with factor loadings for included items ranging from 0.380 to 0.868. Few questions were shuffled among domains various factor loadings. Cronbach's alphas for the Turkish version of the PIDAQ ranged from 0.534 to 0.904. Mean scores for the PIDAQ subscale and total scores differed significantly according to Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need and Perception of Occlusion Scale scores. Conclusions This study provided a Turkish version of the PIDAQ, which could be a useful tool in the evaluation of the psychosocial impact of malocclusion in young Turkish adults. PMID:27478799

  4. An Improved Multi-Scale Modeling Framework for WRF over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, D. J.; Lundquist, K. A.; Chow, F. K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric modelers continue to push towards higher resolution simulations of the planetary boundary layer. As resolution is refined, the resolved terrain slopes increase. Atmospheric models using terrain-following coordinates, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, suffer from numerical errors since steep terrain slopes lead to grid skewness, resulting in model failure. One solution to this problem is the use of an immersed boundary method, which uses a non-conforming grid, for simulations over complex terrain. Our implementation of an immersed boundary method in WRF, known as WRF-IBM, was developed for use at the micro-scale and has been shown to accurately simulate flow around complex topography, such as urban environments or mountainous terrain. The research presented here describes our newly developed framework to enable concurrently run multi-scale simulations using the WRF model at the meso-scale and the WRF-IBM model at the micro-scale. WRF and WRF-IBM use different vertical coordinates therefore it is not possible to use the existing nesting framework to pass lateral boundary conditions from a WRF parent domain to a WRF-IBM nested domain. Nesting between WRF and WRF-IBM requires "vertical grid nesting", meaning the ability to pass information between domains with different vertical levels. Our newly implemented method for vertical grid nesting, available in the public release of WRFv3.6.1, allows nested domains to utilize different vertical levels. Using our vertical grid nesting code, we are currently developing the ability to nest a domain using IBM within a domain using terrain-following coordinates. Here we present results from idealized cases displaying the functionality of the multi-scale nesting framework and the advancement towards multi-scale meteorological simulations over complex terrain.

  5. Conceptualizing the aesthetic experience: using the influence matrix to show causal relationships between basic concepts in aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Rué, Emma; Mrotzek, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that using tools from systems science for teaching and learning in the Humanities offers innovative insights that can prove helpful for both students and lecturers. Our contention here is that a method used in systems science, namely the influence matrix, can be a suitable tool to facilitate the understanding of elementary notions in Aesthetics by means of systematizing this process. As we will demonstrate in the upcoming sections, the influence matrix can help us to understand the nature and function of the basic elements that take part in the aesthetic experience and their evolving relevance in the history of Aesthetics. The implementation of these elements to an influence matrix will contribute to a more detailed understanding of (i) the nature of each element, (ii) the interrelation between them and (iii) the influence each element has on all the others.

  6. Psychosocial consequences of nasal aesthetic and functional surgery: a controlled prospective study in an ENT setting.

    PubMed

    Dinis, P B; Dinis, M; Gomes, A

    1998-03-01

    Much still needs to be known about what motivates and goes through patients' minds when undergoing nasal aesthetic surgery. Little is also known on how the aesthetic change affects the way other people see those patients after surgery, and if the improved appearance significantly benefits the patients' psychosocial functioning. So far, research has largely focused on subjects in Plastic Surgery settings, neglecting to investigate the specificities of rhinoplasty as performed by otolaryngologists. In order to elucidate these, a prospective controlled-study design was developed. Twenty-five consecutive patients, selected from an ENT practice for septorhinoplasty, were enrolled. They were submitted to pre-operative psychiatric interviews and psychological tests. Two control groups were simultaneously enlisted, and were submitted also to the same tests. Four to seven months after surgery, the septorhinoplasty patients were again evaluated by psychiatric interviews and psychological tests as well as asked to fill out a questionnaire addressing subjective satisfaction with the surgical results. They also underwent, at that time, a rhinomanometric examination assessing the objective success of surgery on nasal function. It was concluded that the study population was basically a psychologically well balanced group of patients, and that a successful surgical result could indeed, in some, improve pre-operative psychological "suffering" related to the nasal deformity, and give these patients a new social identity. Ultimately, it was found that the meeting of aesthetic requirements, frequently not put forward by the patient preoperatively, was the single most important factor required for a final complete satisfaction with the overall surgical results in this population. PMID:9569440

  7. Improving UK Chalk hydrometeorology across spatial scales using a small hydrometeorological network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, Rafael; Iwema, Joost; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Desilets, Darin; Koltermann da Silva, Juliana

    2016-04-01

    Chalk in the UK acts as a primary aquifer providing up to 80% of the public water supply locally. Chalk outcrops are located over most of southern and eastern England. Despite its importance, the characterization of Chalk in hydrometeorological models is still very limited. There is a need for a comprehensive and coherent integration of observations and modeling efforts across spatial scales for better understanding Chalk hydrometeorology. Here we introduce the "A MUlti-scale Soil moisture-Evapotranspiration Dynamics" (AMUSED) project. AMUSED goal is to better identify the key dominant processes controlling changes in soil moisture and surface fluxes (e.g., evapotranspiration) across spatial scales by combining ground-based observations with hydrometeorological models and satellite remote sensing products. The AMUSED observational platform consists of three sites located in Upper Chalk region of the Lambourn Catchment located in southern England covering approximately 2 square-km characterized by distinct combinations of soil and vegetation types. The network includes standard meteorological measurements, an eddy covariance system for turbulent fluxes and cosmic-ray neutron sensors for integrated soil moisture estimates at intermediate scales. Here we present our initial results from our three sites.

  8. Scaling Up Success: Lessons Learned from Technology-Based Educational Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Honan, James P., Ed.; Peters, Laurence C., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing from the information presented at a conference sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Technology in Education Consortium, educators, researchers, and policymakers translate theory into practice to provide a hands-on resource that describes different models for scaling up success. This resource…

  9. Improved point scale climate projections using a block bootstrap simulation and quantile matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokic, Philip; Jin, Huidong; Crimp, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Statistical downscaling methods are commonly used to address the scale mismatch between coarse resolution Global Climate Model output and the regional or local scales required for climate change impact assessments. The effectiveness of a downscaling method can be measured against four broad criteria: consistency with the existing baseline data in terms of means, trends and distributional characteristics; consistency with the broader scale climate data used to generate the projections; the degree of transparency and repeatability; and the plausibility of results produced. Many existing downscaling methods fail to fulfil all of these criteria. In this paper we examine a block bootstrap simulation technique combined with a quantile prediction and matching method for simulating future daily climate data. By utilising this method the distributional properties of the projected data will be influenced by the distribution of the observed data, the trends in predictors derived from the Global Climate Models and the relationship of these predictors to the observed data. Using observed data from several climate stations in Vanuatu and Fiji and out-of-sample validation techniques, we show that the method is successful at projecting various climate characteristics including the variability and auto-correlation of daily temperature and rainfall, the correlations between these variables and between spatial locations. This paper also illustrates how this novel method can produce more effective point scale projections and a more credible alternative to other approaches in the Pacific region.

  10. Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiufeng; Hong, Tianzhen; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-06-03

    This paper describes work in progress toward an urban-scale system aiming to reduce energy use in neighboring buildings by providing three components: a database for accessing past and present weather data from high quality weather stations; a network for communicating energy-saving strategies between building owners; and a set of modeling tools for real-time building energy simulation.

  11. Using Short Forms of Several Classroom Environment Scales to Assess and Improve Classroom Psychosocial Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Darrell L.; Fraser, Barry J.

    Economical, short forms of three measures were developed to facilitate science teachers' use of classroom climate assessments. The Classroom Environment Scale (CES) is a 24-item measure requiring a true or false response for each item. The My Class Inventory (MCI) is a 25-item measure requiring a yes or no response for each item. The…

  12. Improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. Volume 2: System modeling and weight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technical models and analytical approaches used to develop the weight data for vehicle system concepts using advanced technology are reported. Weight data are supplied for the following major system elements: engine, pressurization, propellant containers, structural shells and secondary structure, and environmental protection shields for the meteoroid and thermal design requirements. Scaling laws, improved and a simplified set, are developed from the system weight data. The laws consider the implications of the major design parameters and mission requirements on the stage inert mass.

  13. Toward Improved Parameterization of a Meso-Scale Hydrologic Model in a Discontinuous Permafrost, Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endalamaw, A. M.; Bolton, W. R.; Young, J. M.; Morton, D.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    The sub-arctic environment can be characterized as being located in the zone of discontinuous permafrost. Although the distribution of permafrost is site specific, it dominates many of the hydrologic and ecologic responses and functions including vegetation distribution, stream flow, soil moisture, and storage processes. In this region, the boundaries that separate the major ecosystem types (deciduous dominated and coniferous dominated ecosystems) as well as permafrost (permafrost verses non-permafrost) occur over very short spatial scales. One of the goals of this research project is to improve parameterizations of meso-scale hydrologic models in this environment. Using the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (CPCRW) as the test area, simulations of the headwater catchments of varying permafrost and vegetation distributions were performed. CPCRW, located approximately 50 km northeast of Fairbanks, Alaska, is located within the zone of discontinuous permafrost and the boreal forest ecosystem. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was selected as the hydrologic model. In CPCRW, permafrost and coniferous vegetation is generally found on north facing slopes and valley bottoms. Permafrost free soils and deciduous vegetation is generally found on south facing slopes. In this study, hydrologic simulations using fine scale vegetation and soil parameterizations - based upon slope and aspect analysis at a 50 meter resolution - were conducted. Simulations were also conducted using downscaled vegetation from the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning (SNAP) (1 km resolution) and soil data sets from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (approximately 9 km resolution). Preliminary simulation results show that soil and vegetation parameterizations based upon fine scale slope/aspect analysis increases the R2 values (0.5 to 0.65 in the high permafrost (53%) basin; 0.43 to 0.56 in the low permafrost (2%) basin) relative to parameterization based on

  14. Signal Scaling Improves the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Measurements with Segmented 2D-Selective Radiofrequency Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Busch, Martin G.; Larson, Peder E. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations can be used to acquire irregularly shaped target regions, e.g., in single-voxel MR spectroscopy, without involving excessive radiofrequency pulse durations. However, segments covering only outer k-space regions nominally use reduced B1 amplitudes (i.e., smaller flip angles) and yield lower signal contributions, which decreases the efficiency of the measurement. The purpose of this study was to show that applying the full flip angle for all segments and scaling down the acquired signal appropriately (signal scaling) retains the desired signal amplitude but reduces the noise level accordingly and, thus, increases the signal-to-noise ratio. Methods The principles and improvements of signal scaling were demonstrated with MR imaging and spectroscopy experiments at 3 T for a single-line segmentation of a blipped-planar trajectory. Results The observed signal-to-noise ration gain depended on the 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation’s resolution, field-of-excitation, and its excitation profile and was between 40 and 500% for typical acquisition parameters. Conclusion Signal scaling can further improve the performance of measurements with segmented 2D-selective radiofrequency excitations, e.g., for MR spectroscopy of anatomically defined voxels. PMID:23440633

  15. Evaluation and improvement of the cloud resolving model component of the multi-scale modeling framework

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cheng, Anning

    2009-10-01

    Developed, implemented and tested an improved Colorado State University (CSU) SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling) cloud-resolving model (CRM) with the advanced third-order turbulence closure (IPHOC).

  16. Carbon Sequestration in Dryland and Irrigated Agroecosystems: Quantification at Different Scales for Improved Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Shashi B; Cassman, Kenneth G; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Hubbard, Kenneth G; Knops, Johannes M; Suyker, Andrew E

    2012-09-14

    The overall objective of this research is to improve our basic understanding of the biophysical processes that govern C sequestration in major rainfed and irrigated agroecosystems in the north-central USA.

  17. A hybrid approach to improving the skills of seasonal climate outlook at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyan; Wang, Julian X. L.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Morris, Vernon

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid seasonal forecasting approach was generated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction operational Climate Forecast System (CFS) and its nesting Climate extension of Weather Research and Forecasting (CWRF) model to improve forecasting skill over the United States. Skills for the three summers of 2011-2013 were evaluated regarding location, timing, magnitude, and frequency. Higher spatial pattern correlation coefficients showed that the hybrid approach substantially improved summer mean precipitation and 2-m temperature geographical distributions compared with the results of the CFS and CWRF models. The area mean temporal correlation coefficients demonstrated that the hybrid approach also consistently improved the timing prediction skills for both variables. In general, the smaller root mean square errors indicated that the hybrid approach reduced the magnitude of the biases for both precipitation and temperature. The greatest improvements were achieved when the individual models had similar skills. The comparison with a North American multi-model ensemble further proved the feasibility of improving real-time seasonal forecast skill by using the hybrid approach, especially for heavy rain forecasting. Based on the complementary advantages of CFS the global model and CWRF the nesting regional model, the hybrid approach showed a substantial enhancement over CFS real-time forecasts during the summer. Future works are needed for further improving the quality of the hybrid approach through CWRF's optimized physics ensemble, which has been proven to be feasible and reliable.

  18. Aesthetic and Utilitarian Qualities of Clothing: Use of a Multidimensional Clothing Value Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganosky, Michelle

    1984-01-01

    This study investigated consumers' valuation of clothing on the basis of aesthetic and utilitarian qualities. Findings indicated that subjects were willing to pay the most for high aesthetic items regardless of utility and the least for low aesthetic, low utility items. (JB)

  19. Aesthetic Education Program: Initial Survey of Selected Implementation Sites. 1971-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, J. Riley

    The document presents a report from a survey to evaluate aesthetic consciousness among participants in an aesthetic education pilot project (AEP). The AEP consisted of curriculum packages entitled "Meter,""Sound and Movement,""Word Pictures,""Characterization," and "Dramatic Plot." Extended pilot trials of the aesthetic education packages were…

  20. Design and Aesthetics in E-Learning: A Usability and Credibility Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glore, Peyton; David, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews research pertaining to the use aesthetics design, and usability in education. This article focuses on defining the role of visual elements and aesthetics in the user interface while exploring the importance of their application in a web-based learning environment. Research demonstrates that aesthetics are pivotal in…

  1. How Might Aesthetic Knowing Relate to Leadership? A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz-Buonincontro, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic knowing may be valuable to educational leadership practice because it links feeling and intuition to procedural information to inform decision-making. Within the large and diverse field of aesthetics, some models apply aesthetic knowing to leadership practice. Scholarly interest in this area emerged in the late 1980's, and various…

  2. An Exploration of the Aesthetics of an Oral History Performance Developed in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wan-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to explore a range of aesthetic aspects involved in the devising and production processes of oral history performance in a classroom setting. It touches upon the ethical dimension of aesthetics employing the Confucianist Wang Yang Ming's aesthetic philosophy and Buber's theories of relation as the theoretical frames. The devising…

  3. The effect of system aesthetics on trust, cooperation, satisfaction and annoyance in an imperfect automated system.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Alona; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Parmet, Yisrael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of system reliability has been repeatedly identified as a factor that decreases trust. However, aesthetics has an important role in the development of trust. Most of the research concerning the connection between aesthetics and trust focused on mobile commerce and websites while very little has been done in examining aesthetics in automated systems. This study integrated aesthetics manipulations into an imperfect in-vehicle automation system and focused on the power of aesthetics to decrease the negative effects of errors on trust, satisfaction, annoyance, and human-automation cooperation perceptions. Participants used the navigation system in either 100% or 85% accuracy levels with an aesthetic or non aesthetic system (4 conditions). In both aesthetic and non aesthetic systems, perceptions of trust, satisfaction and human automation cooperation were decreased in the imperfect system compared to the perfect one. However, in the annoyance rating, this trend was found only in the aesthetic system while in the non-aesthetic system no difference was found between the two levels of accuracy. This single effect may indicate upon the possibility that in automated systems aesthetics affects trust and satisfaction more moderately compared to mobile commerce applications and websites. However, more research is needed to assess this assumption. PMID:22316732

  4. The Mind of the Beholder: Some Provisional Doubts about the U-Shaped Aesthetic Development Thesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pariser, David; Berg, Axel van den

    1997-01-01

    Replicates Jessica Davis' study of the U-shaped aesthetic development curve in a cross-cultural setting. Examines whether a similar U-curve is evidenced in Chinese aesthetic development. Presents results that suggest that Chinese aesthetic criteria do not produce a U-shaped evaluation of artistic skills. Discusses limitations of the study. (DSK)

  5. Eyes Wide Shut: The Use and Uselessness of the Discourse of Aesthetics in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavin, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The discourse of aesthetics appears repeatedly throughout literature in art education and is employed frequently through K-12 classroom practice. This article discusses the use and uselessness of the discourse of aesthetics in art education. Discourse, as used in this article, refers to the specific term "aesthetics," and all the individual and…

  6. Drama in Aesthetic Education: An Invitation to Imagine the World as if It Could Be Otherwise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Florence

    2005-01-01

    Aesthetic education, an inquiry-driven engagement with a work of art, can be a catalyst to bringing about change. The aesthetic education experience consists of a number of components. The Lincoln Center Institute Teacher Collaboration in Aesthetic Education agrees upon a repertoire of "works of art" deemed likely to fulfill the requirements of…

  7. Aesthetic Learning about, in, with and through the Arts: A Curriculum Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic learning is a major issue in arts education. The "method of art" is often expected to facilitate in-depth learning not only in the arts but across the curriculum. This article defines aesthetic learning in terms of a conceptual framework based on two dimensions, one representing the goal and the other the means of aesthetic learning. The…

  8. Venturing into Unknown Territory: Using Aesthetic Representations to Understand Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuero, Kimberley K.; Bonner, Jennifer; Smith, Brittaney; Schwartz, Michelle; Touchstone, Rose; Vela, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Based on Elliot Eisner's notions of multiple forms of representation and Rosenblatt's aesthetic/efferent responses to reading, a teacher educator/researcher had her undergraduate students explore their connections, using aesthetic representations, to a course entitled "Reading Comprehension". Each aesthetic representation revealed the complexities…

  9. Aesthetic concepts, perceptual learning, and linguistic enculturation: considerations from Wittgenstein, language, and music.

    PubMed

    Croom, Adam M

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express genuinely aesthetic beliefs and instead hold that they work primarily to express something non-cognitive, such as attitudes of approval or disapproval, or desire. Non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express aesthetic beliefs because they deny that there are aesthetic features in the world for aesthetic beliefs to represent. Their assumption, shared by scientists and theorists of mind alike, was that language-users possess cognitive mechanisms with which to objectively grasp abstract rules fixed independently of human responses, and that cognizers are thereby capable of grasping rules for the correct application of aesthetic concepts without relying on evaluation or enculturation. However, in this article I use Wittgenstein's rule-following considerations to argue that psychological theories grounded upon this so-called objective model of rule-following fail to adequately account for concept acquisition and mastery. I argue that this is because linguistic enculturation, and the perceptual learning that's often involved, influences and enables the mastery of aesthetic concepts. I argue that part of what's involved in speaking aesthetically is to belong to a cultural practice of making sense of things aesthetically, and that it's within a socio-linguistic community, and that community's practices, that such aesthetic sense can be made intelligible. PMID:21904955

  10. Challenging and improving conceptual models for isothermal flow in unsaturated, fractured rock through exploration of small-scale processes

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.J.; Nicholl, M.J.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1996-07-01

    Over the past several years, the authors have performed experimental studies focused on understanding small-scale flow processes within discrete fractures and individual matrix blocks; much of the understanding gained in that time differs from that underlying the basic assumptions used in effective media representations. Here they synthesize the process level understanding gained from their laboratory studies to explore how such small-scale processes may influence the behavior of fluid flow in fracture networks and ensembles of matrix blocks at levels sufficient to impact the formulation of intermediate-scale effective media properties. They also explore, by means of a thought experiment, how these same small-scale processes could couple to produce a large-scale system response inconsistent with current conceptual models based on continuum representations of flow through unsaturated, fractured rock. Based on their findings, a number of modifications to existing dual permeability models are suggested that should allow them improved applicability; however, even with these modifications, it is likely that continuum representations of flow through unsaturated fractured rock will have limited validity and must therefore be applied with caution.

  11. Improving the textural characterization of trabecular bone structure to quantify its changes: the locally adapted scaling vector method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Boehm, Holger F.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    We extend the recently introduced scaling vector method (SVM) to improve the textural characterization of oriented trabecular bone structures in the context of osteoporosis. Using the concept of scaling vectors one obtains non-linear structural information from data sets, which can account for global anisotropies. In this work we present a method which allows us to determine the local directionalities in images by using scaling vectors. Thus it becomes possible to better account for local anisotropies and to implement this knowledge in the calculation of the scaling properties of the image. By applying this adaptive technique, a refined quantification of the image structure is possible: we test and evaluate our new method using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. The partial differential equations involved in the model are solved numerically using cellular automata (CA). Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameters of the system, become discernible by applying the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results are superior to those obtained by isotropic and/or bulk measures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  12. The Aesthetic As Immediately Sensuous: An Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madenfort, Duke

    1974-01-01

    The views of Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Henri Bergson, John Dewey, and Susanne Langer were discussed. In this article they served as five important figures in a historical account of the concept of the aesthetic as the immediately sensuous. (Author/RK)

  13. Different Aspects of Informed Consent in Aesthetic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Providing an informed consent has an important role in promotion of medical treatments and reduction of judiciary litigations in this process. Today with cultural changes and wide propagation that is usually charming, the request for aesthetic surgery has an increasing trend. These problems with complexity of cosmetic surgeries lead to deeper differences of information between plastic surgeons and patients, so the discussion on giving information to a patient is of great importance. Regarding the elective choice of aesthetic surgeries, there is a need on providing a standard informed consent form. There are some problems on advertisements of aesthetic surgeries by non-plastic surgeons, taking insufficient or incorrect information to the patients affecting the patients’ autonomy. In fact, correct operative information should be share with the patients. Probable complications and alternative procedures should be presented to the patient to choose an operative option freely and without any charming. Obtaining a written informed consent can protect researchers and their sponsor institutions from any litigation. Patients with psychiatric problems can not benefit from aesthetic surgery and also they have no competency for giving any informed consent. So psychiatric problems can even worsen the surgical interventions. In this article, fundamentals of plastic surgery to provide an informed consent were reviewed and the legal and ethical considerations were evaluated. PMID:25489529

  14. Pre-Service Teachers' Aesthetic Learning about Inclusion and Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedžune, Ginta; Gedžune, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to contribute to the body of practical knowledge about reorienting teacher education to address sustainability by reflecting on an action research experience from a study course on sustainability in a regional university. Design/methodology/approach: It contemplates the usage of aesthetic learning to activate pre-service…

  15. Perceptual Factors in the Study of Television Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Mike

    Knowledge of the processes involved in visual and auditory perception, as well as basic understanding of the mechanisms employed by the human brain in transforming perceptions into cognitions are prerequisites for the study of television aesthetics. Numerous scientific studies now found in such diversified fields as perceptual psychology,…

  16. Once More unto the Breach: Aesthetic Experience Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic experience as a determining factor in music appreciation has lost salience in recent years, especially in philosophy of music education. Markand Thakar, music director of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra and Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra and co-director of graduate conducting at Peabody Conservatory, has written a book subtitled…

  17. Reflections on Beardsley's "Aesthetics: Problems in the Philosophy of Criticism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Monroe Beardsley's "Aesthetics" was published the year the author was a junior philosophy major at the University of California, Berkeley, and by the end of that academic year, the author had completed semester courses in the history of ancient as well as modern philosophy, logic, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. The requirements remaining…

  18. Physical Education as an Aesthetic-Ethical Educational Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ávila da Costa, Luísa; McNamee, Michael; Lacerda, Teresa Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Commencing with a discussion of the various conceptions of education for the development of humanity, this essay articulates four essential vectors of educational processes--epistemic, ethical, aesthetic, and political, as they are instantiated in Physical Education. Drawing on philosophical literature, it is argued that the sporting activities…

  19. Anatomical Evolution and the Aesthetic Response to Figurative Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magro, Albert

    2012-01-01

    With regard to general aesthetic education, the university liberal studies curriculum is designed to provide a balance of the humanities and sciences. Beyond offering a balanced curriculum, there is the current trend for universities to offer a liberal studies curriculum that interfaces the sciences and the humanities. A prime example of this is…

  20. Integrating Aesthetics into Professional Development for Teachers of English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Audrey Figueroa

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis on testing in curricular content areas has left little room in most U.S. schools for education in the arts. Yet research supports the pedagogical value of aesthetic education, particularly for English learners (ELs), whose representation in schools continues to increase. This article presents a qualitative action research study…

  1. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Dawson, Kelvin; Cross, Emily S

    2015-03-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study directly compared how learning to embody an action impacts the neural response when watching and aesthetically evaluating the same action. Twenty-two participants trained for 4 days on dance sequences. Each day they physically rehearsed one set of sequences, passively watched a second set, listened to the music of a third set, and a fourth set remained untrained. Functional MRI was obtained prior to and immediately following the training period, as were affective and physical ability ratings for each dance sequence. This approach enabled precise comparison of self-report methods of embodiment with nonbiased, empirical measures of action performance. Results suggest that after experience, participants most enjoy watching those dance sequences they danced or observed. Moreover, brain regions involved in mediating the aesthetic response shift from subcortical regions associated with dopaminergic reward processing to posterior temporal regions involved in processing multisensory integration, emotion, and biological motion. PMID:25773627

  2. Forgeries and Art Evaluation: An Argument for Dualism in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulka, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Can there be an aesthetic difference between an original painting and its forgery if they are visually indistinguishable? Answers of different philosophers are critically examined with the conclusion that none of them is satisfactory. Although their "solutions" stem from different views of the nature of art, they have one thing in common: They all…

  3. Incisor reduction: a provisional aesthetic technique for traumatised teeth.

    PubMed

    Darby, L J; O'Connell, A C

    2010-12-11

    Patients in the mixed dentition who have suffered severe extrusion or avulsion injuries often present with difficult treatment decisions, especially when the initial emergency care has been compromised. Here we describe a well-tolerated, aesthetically acceptable and conservative method for treating such patients until a definitive treatment plan is possible. PMID:21151063

  4. From Children's Perspectives: A Model of Aesthetic Processing in Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    While several developmental models of aesthetic understanding, experience, and appreciation exist in the realms of visual art and music education, few examples have been proposed in regard to theatre, particularly for child audiences. This author argues that children gaze upon theatre in differential ways by including age as a variable…

  5. The Aesthetic Dimension of the Theatrical Event: A Practical View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, L. L.

    The author examines the characteristics of aesthetic factors operative in theatrical art. He views the theatrical event as an auditory, graphic, and kinetic stimulus complex derived from prolonged, violent, emotional situations. The theatrical event is conceptualized as a sign process in which a specific line of dialogue or piece of action…

  6. Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Involvement in Initial Negative Aesthetic Impression Formation

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC. PMID:22675517

  7. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P; Dawson, Kelvin; Cross, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study directly compared how learning to embody an action impacts the neural response when watching and aesthetically evaluating the same action. Twenty-two participants trained for 4 days on dance sequences. Each day they physically rehearsed one set of sequences, passively watched a second set, listened to the music of a third set, and a fourth set remained untrained. Functional MRI was obtained prior to and immediately following the training period, as were affective and physical ability ratings for each dance sequence. This approach enabled precise comparison of self-report methods of embodiment with nonbiased, empirical measures of action performance. Results suggest that after experience, participants most enjoy watching those dance sequences they danced or observed. Moreover, brain regions involved in mediating the aesthetic response shift from subcortical regions associated with dopaminergic reward processing to posterior temporal regions involved in processing multisensory integration, emotion, and biological motion. PMID:25773627

  8. New Communication Media Technologies: Perceptual, Cognitive, and Aesthetic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    1994-01-01

    Developing visual communication media technologies, such as computerized television, three-dimensional video, digital video interactive (DVI), and high-definition television hinder rather than enhance viewers' perceptual processes, understanding, and aesthetic appreciation of visual messages. Visual communication media researchers should reach out…

  9. Transformative Learning and Online Education: Aesthetics, Dimensions and Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuzer, T. Volkan, Ed.; Kurubacak, Gulsun, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how to prepare transformative learning sessions and courses and design an environment for prospective online learners is a critical, as it facilitates the transfer of information, knowledge and learning from theoretical forms to real life experiences. This book provides an understanding and comprehension of aesthetics and its…

  10. Orientational Meliorism, Pragmatist Aesthetics, and the "Bhagavad Gita"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    This article develops an understanding of Dewey's aesthetics by connecting it to a project that can be extracted from his overall pragmatist approach--orientational meliorism. As I will argue, Dewey emphasizes the effect that one's mental habits or orientations toward experience and activity has on the quality of one's experience. Orientational…

  11. Beauty and the Beholder: A Survey of Aesthetic Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Bill

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the nature of "aesthetic experience" in a sample of urban community college students (N=170). The majority of students claimed to have had experiences of beauty, and that these experiences were important to their quality of life (95% and 72%, respectively). Strongest "depth of experience" ratings were given…

  12. Parent-Child Aesthetic Shared Reading with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The participation of parents-shared reading with children is a topic that has generated a lot of attention among many researchers in the world. For the use of picture story books, which have caused positive impact on the child's learning process, has also been recommended as the best strategies to develop children's aesthetic ability. The purpose…

  13. Looking to Learn: Museum Educators and Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blume, Nancy; Henning, Jean; Herman, Amy; Richner, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Museum education. Aesthetic education. How are they similar? How do they differ? How do they relate to each other? What are their goals? As museum educators working with classroom and art teachers, they are often asked these questions, and they ask them themselves. "What do they DO?" is probably the most frequently asked question of all, and the…

  14. Visual aesthetic quality of Northern Ontario's forested shorelines.

    PubMed

    Haider, Wolfgang; Hunt, Len

    2002-03-01

    Only a few empirical studies on forest aesthetics have adopted a water-based perspective for observers and have investigated the perceived visual quality of forested shorelines. In forested environments with many lakes, such as the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield, individuals have greater exposure to forests from water-based rather than in-stand vantage points. This study employed the psychophysical research direction to explore the relationships between scenic beauty and biophysical characteristics of the forested shorelines in the boreal forests. Two model forms were tested. One model related the variation of shoreline forest aesthetic evaluations of near-vista views (140 m offshore) to a set of forest mensuration data. Tree size, tree mortality, conifer shrubs, tree density, amount of hardwood, and slope explained 60.2% of the variance in scenic beauty between the study sites. A second model was calibrated to test the relationship between an already existing ecosystem vegetation classification system and the aesthetic evaluations of the same forested shorelines. When the ecosystem classification was simplified to eight groups, the model explained 48.5% of variance. These models suggest that the psychophysical approach to studying aesthetics can be applied successfully to near-vista evaluations of scenic beauty. The finding that a forest ecosystem classification system is highly related to scenic beauty suggests that, at least in the boreal forest, managers can reasonably estimate the scenic beauty of forested shoreline environments from an ecosystem classification, with little need for intensive data on these sites. PMID:11830763

  15. Form, Truth, and Emotion: Transatlantic Influences on Formalist Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankiewicz, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Discusses formalism, the aesthetic theory which recommends that the value of art be sought in the lines, shapes, and colors of the work and their interrelationships. Examines the exchange of theories and practices between British artists such as Roger Fry and John Ruskin, and U.S. scholars such as Denman Ross. (GEA)

  16. Means Without End: Production, Reception, and Teaching in Kant's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Gary

    2004-01-01

    This essay originates in the experience of teaching aesthetics to artists within the context of undergraduate and postgraduate art education. Its main aim is to feed this experience into a reading of Kant's Critique of Judgment as a means of identifying the productive moment within his thought typically obscured by the continuing dominance of…

  17. The Aesthetic Experience of Nature and Hermeneutic Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iared, Valéria Ghisloti; de Oliveira, Haydée Torres; Payne, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    One aim of environmental education is to encourage different ways of generating meanings of, valuing, conceiving, and contextualizing "nature." The field of aesthetics provides an affective basis for interpreting our perceptions of environments and relations with other more-than-human beings. This critical essay examines some of the key…

  18. Implementing the Study of Multicultural Aesthetics in Film and Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutenko, Gregory

    Film and television in the western world are highly stylized and culturally specific products. A course on multicultural aesthetics in film and video should introduce the student to perceptual alternatives in film and television use. Some of these alternatives can be derived from three well-established areas of film/television study: the…

  19. Teaching and Learning Science for Transformative, Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark; Twyman, Todd; Wojcikiewicz, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from the Deweyan theory of experience (1934, 1938), the goal of teaching and learning for transformative, aesthetic experience is contrasted against teaching and learning from a cognitive, rational framework. A quasi-experimental design was used to investigate teaching and learning of fifth grade science from each perspective across an…

  20. Refugee Performance: Aesthetic Representation and Accountability in Playback Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Rea

    2008-01-01

    This essay seeks to unpack some of the issues concerning representation when performing refugee stories using playback theatre. It questions the reductive influence of narrative structure and, using the framework of "artist as ethnographer," it argues that strong aesthetic production is required to overcome the dampening effect of empathy when…

  1. Using Aesthetic Work To Inspire Storytelling, Writing and Illustration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Linda T.

    Incorporating an integrated curriculum around a subject matter takes creativity on the part of the teacher. Using fine art, specifically, reproduction postcards of famous paintings for a second-grade science lesson pertaining to the Hudson River, enhances aesthetic appreciation while utilizing storytelling, writing and illustration skills. Using…

  2. Can aesthetic facial reconstruction be judged in black and white?

    PubMed

    Silfen, Ram; Ritz, Morris; Morgan, David; Southwick, Graeme

    2005-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations of the face need to be evaluated in real-life full color. Staged contouring and insetting of a transferred free flap is sometimes required. This consists of debulking, thinning, and reshaping the flap. If the facial area is involved, however, color mismatch of a free flap represents an aesthetic challenge for the reconstructive surgeon, and often is missed with black and white photos. This article reports on a patient in whom a first dorsal metatarsal cutaneous free flap was used to reconstruct a full-thickness defect in the lateral orbit including upper and lower eyelids and outer canthus. The flap resulted in an unacceptable aesthetic outcome consisting of a bulky, hypopigmented deformity. Revisional surgery consisted of debulking the free flap and resurfacing it with a full-thickness skin graft taken from the postauricular area. This resulted in a pleasant, thin, and better color match reconstruction. The advantages of the first web space of foot free flap to the eyelid are well described. The authors are of the opinion that the flap does not match the color of the eyelid region, and therefore suggest that if used, prefabrication or a second procedure is needed. Evaluation of the postoperative results needs to be in color because black and white can mask the final aesthetic result. PMID:15870959

  3. Democratizing Children's Computation: Learning Computational Science as Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Amy Voss; Sengupta, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Amy Voss Farris and Pratim Sengupta argue that a democratic approach to children's computing education in a science class must focus on the "aesthetics" of children's experience. In "Democracy and Education," Dewey links "democracy" with a distinctive understanding of "experience." For Dewey,…

  4. Operating Classroom Aesthetic Reading Environment to Raise Children's Reading Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore how preschool educators understand about raising children's reading motivation through operating classroom aesthetic reading environment. With one year qualitative research, sixteen 4-6 years old young were observed and interviewed. The first stage interviews were undergone with environmental guidance. After the…

  5. Historical Development of Television Aesthetics/Television Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Even though television scholar Herbert Zettl singlehandedly created the term "television aesthetics" by proclaiming that TV is an art, television studies are still excluded from the respectable divisions and disciplines of knowledge. Television is considered the epitome of mass culture/kitsch, and the very idea of a TV "masterpiece," for example,…

  6. Non-Western Aesthetics as a Colonial Invention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blocker, H. Gene

    2001-01-01

    As people seek to educate their children in a multicultural society to understand and appreciate and to be able to interact with a culturally diverse and ever-shrinking world, they need to ask themselves whether Western forms of knowledge are appropriate for understanding non-Western forms of culture; in particular, whether Western aesthetics is…

  7. Frost Bite: A Dramatic Tale of Research in Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article follows the author's research on the integration of an aesthetic arts initiative in a private elementary school with an established traditional arts program. The narrative describes the sequence of events, interpersonal interactions, and learning experiences in the format of a full-length dramatic performance. Informed by Ben Peretz's…

  8. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  11. Classical Chinese Landscape Painting and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Recent theories of the aesthetic appreciation of nature or natural environments have done much to clarify what might be essential to such appreciation. Such accounts are incomplete, however, as they depend on a strict separation between works of art and nature itself. This paper shows how classical Chinese landscape painting offers a way to…

  12. Creative and Aesthetic Responses to Picturebooks and Fine Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet

    2009-01-01

    It has long been accepted that one can respond to fine art in a variety of different ways. However, it is only in the last decade or so that picturebooks have been attracting the kind of recognition that they have long deserved as art forms to be considered and responded to both creatively and aesthetically. There is a growing body of research…

  13. Relational Contexts and Aesthetics: Achieving Positive Connections with Mandated Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKaig, Ann McCullough

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a model for group art therapy using an art-based and relational-aesthetic approach. The group was developed to address the complicated issues presented when working with survivors of abuse who are court-mandated to attend counseling. The concept of "gender entrapment" (Richie, 1996) is offered to explain the survivors'…

  14. Compassion Fatigue: Strategies for Minimizing Impact on Aesthetic Medical Providers.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Compassion fatigue is emotional, physical, and spiritual exhaustion from witnessing and absorbing the problems of others. Aesthetic providers are prone to becoming victims of compassion fatigue because of the stress of meeting the often overwhelming needs of patients. This article discusses what is known about compassion fatigue, what differentiates it from burnout, and how to recognize and combat it. PMID:26605823

  15. The Aesthetic Calculus: Sex Appeal, Circuitry, and Invisibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arntfield, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Since antiquity, ideas regarding true beauty have been usurped by the purview of mathematics. From the aesthetic "logic" of Aristotle to the instrumentalized brutality of the Final Solution and its methodical anthropometric measurements, we see how the symmetry of numbers has been used to quantify the bodily politic according to an empirical…

  16. Application of Science Aesthetics in the Teaching of Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    As the important part of the theoretical physics, the electrodynamics is a theoretical basic course of the physics and relative subjects. To adapt the demands for cultivating the target of highly-quality talents in the 21st century, the aesthetic principle can be used in the teaching to stimulate students' learning desire and cultivate students'…

  17. Program of Studies, Aesthetic Education: Music, Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    Educational objectives and brief course descriptions are presented for music education, grades 9-12, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland. The program, divided into general, choral, and instrumental categories, stresses refining cognitive perception, developing creative potential, and heightening aesthetic sensitivity.…

  18. Knowledge Discovery in Chess Using an Aesthetics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Azlan

    2012-01-01

    Computational aesthetics is a relatively new subfield of artificial intelligence (AI). It includes research that enables computers to "recognize" (and evaluate) beauty in various domains such as visual art, music, and games. Aside from the benefit this gives to humans in terms of creating and appreciating art in these domains, there are perhaps…

  19. Students Give Themselves and Their School an Aesthetic Boost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Richard R.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment in student performance evaluation, for art students at New Providence High School (New Jersey), is helping reinforce the objective that the elevation of the visual sensitivities of the school student-faculty population lies within the student designers' acceptance to give problems an aesthetic value and solution. (Author)

  20. The Aesthetic and Moral Character of Oakeshott's Educational Writings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This article is an investigation of two apparently contradictory impulses in Oakeshott's writings about liberal education. On the one hand, he implied that it was primarily "aesthetic", something undertaken for its own sake with no practical consequences. On the other hand, he often implied that a student might undergo a moral transformation in…