Science.gov

Sample records for aesthetic index dai

  1. An analysis of reproducibility of DAI and IOTN indexes in a Brazilian scene.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rejane Bezerra de; Paiva, Angela Cristina Pinto de; Farias, Arthur Costa Rodrigues; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the indexes DAI and IOTN in predicting the need of orthodontic treatment based in one property: reproducibility. The index DAI was developed in USA in 1989 and can identify 10 occlusal alterations that result, mathematically, in scores, with weights based in its relative importance according with the judgment of laypeople. The IOTN was developed in England also in 1989 and incorporates an aesthetic component AC and a component of dental health DHC. The AC component consists on a scale illustrated with 10 photos which had been divided in bands of degrees in accordance with a hierarchic scale and classifies the patients in degrees of treatment needed. The instruments of collection of the data were: plastic rule of DHC component and an aesthetic visual scale of component AC praised for the IOTN and one periodontal OMS probe praised for DAI. The sample was composite by 60 patients. The results indicated that both indexes were highly reproducible in accordance with Pearson and Spearman coefficients, which were strengthened by t-tests of Student and Wilcoxon, respectively. The correlation results between the examiners had varied between r=0.85 and r=1.00.

  2. Dental Aesthetic Index of school students in Telangana region - An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Anita, G; Kumar, G Anil; Reddy, Vamsi; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Rao, M S Rama; Wankhade, Swapnil B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malocclusion should be identified at its earliest before it produces any detrimental effects. The objective of this study is to evaluate the orthodontic status and treatment need of school children in Telangana region, Andhra Pradesh, using Dental Aesthetic Index. Materials & Methods: One thousand children in the age group of 12 - 14 years who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were considered. The demographic details of the students along with the information on the orthodontic status were collected using a predesigned questionnaire by a single orthodontist. The information on orthodontic status was obtained using Dentofacial Anomalies with the criteria of Dental Aesthetic Index (W H O Oral Health Assessment form 1997). Results: Results were subjected to ANOVA, Tukeys test and chi square test using SPSS, version 16. 86.1% of the subjects had DAI score of less than 25, suggesting ‘no treatment’; 10% had DAI score of 26-30, suggesting ‘elective treatment’; 3% had DAI score of 31-35, suggesting ‘highly desirable treatment’; 0.9% had DAI score of >36, indicating ‘mandatory treatment’; Higher prevalence of malocclusion among females than males. Conclusion: It is necessary to identify this abnormality at its earliest before it produces detrimental effects. It is also essential to know the prevalence of malocclusion in any society, as it reveals the true extent of the problem and guides in overcoming it. The general public can, then, be educated on widespread occurrence of malocclusion and its deleterious effects, so that appropriate preventive and corrective measures can be instituted. How to cite this article: Anita G, Kumar GA, Reddy V, Reddy TP, Rao MS, Wankhade SB. Dental Aesthetic Index of school students in Telangana region - An epidemiological study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):55-60 . PMID:24453445

  3. The Facial Aesthetic index: An additional tool for assessing treatment need

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Shobha; Ramakrishnan, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Facial Aesthetics, a major consideration in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, may not be judged correctly and completely by simply analyzing dental occlusion or osseous structures. Despite this importance, there is no index to guarantee availability of treatment or prioritize patients based on their soft tissue treatment needs. Individuals having well-aligned teeth but unaesthetic convex profiles do not get included for treatment as per current malocclusion indices. The aim of this investigation is to develop an aesthetic index based on facial profiles which could be used as an additional tool with malocclusion indices. Materials and Methods: A chart showing typical facial profile changes due to underlying malocclusions was generated by soft tissue manipulations of standardized profile photographs of a well-balanced male and female face. A panel of 62 orthodontists judged the profile photographs of 100 patients with different soft tissue patterns for assessing profile variations and treatment need. The index was later tested in a cross-section of school population. Statistical analysis was done using “irr” package of R environment version 2.15.1. Results: The index exhibited very good reliability in determining profile variations (Fleiss kappa 0.866, P < 0.001), excellent reproducibility (kappa 0.9078), high sensitivity, and specificity (95.7%). Testing in population yielded excellent agreement among orthodontists (kappa 0.9286). Conclusions: A new Facial Aesthetic index, based on patient's soft tissue profile requirements is proposed, which can complement existing indices to ensure treatment to those in need. PMID:27127752

  4. Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, David E. W.

    2003-01-01

    The "raw data" that aesthetics is meant to explain is the aesthetic experience. People have experiences that they class off from other experiences and label, as a class, the aesthetic ones. Aesthetic experience is basic, and all other things aesthetic--aesthetic properties, aesthetic objects, aesthetic attitudes--are secondary in their importance…

  5. Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojnar, Irena

    1978-01-01

    Includes 387 citations related to aesthetic education arranged as follows: leading thinkers on aesthetic education, role of the humanities in modeling aesthetic education, goals and theories, content at different educational levels, aesthetic education methods, creativity, out-of-school facilities, current trends and debates in cultural policy,…

  6. Validation of the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics questionnaire (Pidaq) in Spanish adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Company, José M.; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of PIDAQ for application in adolescents. Study Design: The questionnaire was translated, cross-culturally adapted and completed by 627 adolescents (366 12-year-olds and 261 15-year-olds). The adolescents were also examined by 4 examiners who had been calibrated against a gold standard and relative to each other (Kappa >0.85) in determining treatment need with the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) DHC and AC components. Results: Cronbach´s alpha of the translated PIDAQ was 0.90. The 23 items of the questionnaire were divided into four domains that explained 60% of the variance. The test-retest reliability of the questionnaire was 0.93. Discriminant validity revealed a significant association between the scores for the questionnaire and its subscales or domains and those for the DAI, IOTN-DHC and IOTN-AC treatment need indices. Adolescents with orthodontic treatment need scored higher in the questionnaires. Conclusions: The results show that the Spanish version of PIDAQ has a very similar internal structure and psychometric properties to those of the original questionnaire and demonstrate its validity for use with Spanish adolescents. Key words:Orthodontics, epidemiology, quality of life, malocclusion. PMID:23229257

  7. Validity of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire for use on Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Paula Mendes; Gonçalves, Alcides Ricardo; Marega, Tatiane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) is a multi-item psychometric instrument used to assess patients' perspective of the impact specifically related to Orthodontics. The cross-culturally adapted Brazilian version of the PIDAQ has demonstrated good reliability, validity and acceptability. Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the validity and reliability of the Brazilian version of the PIDAQ for use among adolescents aged between 11 and 14 years old. Methods: Having established the possibility of maintaining the operational characteristics of the Brazilian version of PIDAQ for the target age group, 194 individuals in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, completed the questionnaire. The subjects were examined for the presence/absence of malocclusion based on the criteria of the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) to test discriminant validity. Internal consistency was measured by means of Cronbach's alpha coefficient which ranged from 0.59 to 0.86 for the subscales. Test-retest reliability was assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficient which ranged from 0.54 to 0.89 for aesthetic concern and psychological impact. Results: Discriminant validity revealed that subjects without malocclusion had different PIDAQ scores in comparison to those with malocclusion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the Brazilian version of PIDAQ for adolescents has satisfactory psychometric properties and is applicable to this age group in Brazil. PMID:27409655

  8. African Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun, Rowland

    2001-01-01

    No single traditional discipline can adequately supply answers to the many unresolved questions in African art history. Because of the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and, not infrequently, political biases, already built into the conception and development of Western art history, the discipline of art history as defined and practiced in the West…

  9. Troiage Aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  10. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Impact of DAIS Concept on Life Cycle Cost. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goclowski, John C.; And Others

    Designed to identify and quantify the potential impacts of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) on weapon system personnel requirements and life cycle cost (LCC), this study postulated a typical close-air-support (CAS) mission avionics suite to serve as a basis for comparing present day and DAIS configuration specifications. The purpose…

  11. Dental caries status of Dai preschool children in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dai people, one of the ethnic minorities in China, have a population of 1,260,000. They have the same origin as one of the main ethnic groups of Laos and Thailand. Most of the Dai live in Yunnan province, which is located in the less-developed southwestern part of China. This study aimed to describe the oral health status of Dai preschool children in China and the factors that influence their oral health status. Methods An oral health survey was performed between 2011 and 2012 to select Dai five-year-old children using multi-stage stratified sampling in Yunnan. Their dental caries experience was measured using the “dmft” index, and severe caries was assessed using the “pa” index, which is modified from the “pufa” index. Oral hygiene status was assessed using the visual plaque index (VPI). A questionnaire to study the children’s socio-demographic background and oral health-related behaviours was completed by the children’s parents. Results A total of 833 children were examined. Their caries prevalence was 89% and 49% of the children had carious tooth with pulp involvement. The mean (SD) dmft score was 7.0 (5.3). Higher dmft scores were found among children who were girls, were currently bottle-fed, took daily sweet snacks, had higher VPI scores, and had visited a dentist within the last year. Conclusions The caries prevalence and experience of the five-year-old Dai children in Yunnan, China was high, and almost half had severe caries. The caries experience was associated with gender, snack habits, dental visit habits, and oral hygiene status. PMID:24279504

  12. DAI-CLIPS: Distributed, Asynchronous, Interacting CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Denis; Garant, Alain

    1994-01-01

    DAI-CLIPS is a distributed computational environment within which each CLIPS is an active independent computational entity with the ability to communicate freely with other CLIPS. Furthermore, new CLIPS can be created, others can be deleted or modify their expertise, all dynamically in an asynchronous and independent fashion during execution. The participating CLIPS are distributed over a network of heterogeneous processors taking full advantage of the available processing power. We present the general framework encompassing DAI-CLIPS and discuss some of its advantages and potential applications.

  13. [The method of quantitative assessment of dentition aesthetic parameters].

    PubMed

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Kalacheva, Ya A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the formula for calculating the aesthetic index of treatment outcome. The formula was derived on the basis of the obtained regression equations showing the dependence of visual assessment of the value of aesthetic violations. The formula can be used for objective quantitative evaluation of the aesthetics of the teeth when smiling before and after dental treatment.

  14. [The method of quantitative assessment of dentition aesthetic parameters].

    PubMed

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Kalacheva, Ya A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the formula for calculating the aesthetic index of treatment outcome. The formula was derived on the basis of the obtained regression equations showing the dependence of visual assessment of the value of aesthetic violations. The formula can be used for objective quantitative evaluation of the aesthetics of the teeth when smiling before and after dental treatment. PMID:27367198

  15. Educational Aesthetics and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author conceptualizes educational aesthetics in terms of two domains: educational aesthetics as arts education and educational aesthetics as a range of nonarts educational activities understood from artistic and aesthetic points of view. A lead is taken from Harry S. Broudy's midcentury essay "Some Duties of an Educational…

  16. Critical Aesthetic Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    A clear-cut concept of the aesthetic is elusive. Kant's "Critique of Judgment" presents one of the more comprehensive aesthetic theories from which one can extract a set of features, some of which pertain to aesthetic experience and others to the logical structure of aesthetic judgment. When considered together, however, these features present a…

  17. The Aesthetic in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, David

    This paper examines the relationship between sport and the aesthetic. It traces the logical character of the concept of the aesthetic as it applies to sport. A salient characteristic of the concept of the aesthetic is revealed by examining the aesthetic in relation to works of art, and this is then applied to the consideration of sporting…

  18. Aesthetics & Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcand, K. K.; Smith, L. F.; Smith, J.; Watzke, M.; Hove, K. H. T.; Smith, R.

    2010-08-01

    Astronomy is considered by many to be one of the most visual of the sciences. Most people have some experience with visually processing and reacting to astronomical information, beginning with gazing at the night sky. Today, modern astronomy and astrophysics extend far beyond what is detectable with the human eye. Researchers explore the Universe through a fleet of space-based telescopes, as well as major facilities on the ground, which cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The release of science results from these different types of light poses major questions about the dissemination and communication of that knowledge including: how do non-experts (i.e., the public) perceive these images? Recently the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory hosted a survey and focus group meetings to study the perception of multi-wavelength astronomical imagery and the effects of the scientific and artistic choices in processing astronomical data. The images in the study came from a variety of space and ground-based observatories, including the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, the Very Large Array, the Hinode satellite, and many others. This talk will provide an overview of the results of the preliminary Aesthetics and Astronomy study.

  19. Reflections on Aesthetic Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how it is possible to use the aesthetic process to enrich teaching practices in preschool and elementary school education. What is under scrutiny is the aesthetic dimension of a core curricular subject, the ultimate goal being to achieve an understanding of curricular content through aesthetic learning processes. For this…

  20. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  1. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  2. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  3. Components of aesthetic experience: aesthetic fascination, aesthetic appraisal, and aesthetic emotion

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind. Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: fascination with an aesthetic object (high arousal and attention), appraisal of the symbolic reality of an object (high cognitive engagement), and a strong feeling of unity with the object of aesthetic fascination and aesthetic appraisal. In a proposed model, two parallel levels of aesthetic information processing are proposed. On the first level two sub-levels of narrative are processed, story (theme) and symbolism (deeper meanings). The second level includes two sub-levels, perceptual associations (implicit meanings of object's physical features) and detection of compositional regularities. Two sub-levels are defined as crucial for aesthetic experience, appraisal of symbolism and compositional regularities. These sub-levels require some specific cognitive and personality dispositions, such as expertise, creative thinking, and openness to experience. Finally, feedback of emotional processing is included in our model: appraisals of everyday emotions are specified as a matter of narrative content (eg, empathy with characters), whereas the aesthetic emotion is defined as an affective evaluation in the process of symbolism appraisal or the detection of compositional regularities. PMID:23145263

  4. Aesthetics and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, L. Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author talks about the aesthetic aspects of education with some special reference to movement in different senses. First, he discusses the aesthetic and its relation to education in a general way. He then explains the concepts of expression and embodiment in the appreciation of the arts. Lastly, the author talks about the…

  5. Toward Aesthetic Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFurio, Anthony G.

    1979-01-01

    The view of aesthetic responding presented herein has grown out of a theory of contextual aesthetics as explicated by John Dewey and Stephen Pepper and a phenomenological inquiry into art by John Anderson. The method for entry into the responsive domain has evolved from a direction elaborated by Kenneth Beittel. (Author)

  6. Aesthetics and Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carolyn E.

    The nine articles in this monograph deal with aesthetics from a broad-based approach appealing to an eclectic dance audience. The papers were written by dancers, dance philosophers, and physical educators. Two papers examine the role of the body as the dancers' aesthetic medium, including the use of yoga to increase body awareness. Other papers…

  7. Queering the Homeboy Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    The homeboy aesthetic is identifiable as an assemblage of key signifiers: clothing (baggy pants and undershirts are perhaps the most significant), hair (or, in the current moment of the aesthetic, lack of hair), bold stance, and distinct language (think "calo" mixed with hip-hop parlance), all combining to form a distinguishable cultural…

  8. Neuroscience of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-04-01

    Aesthetic evaluations are appraisals that influence choices in important domains of human activity, including mate selection, consumer behavior, art appreciation, and possibly even moral judgment. The nascent field of neuroaesthetics is advancing our understanding of the role of aesthetic evaluations by examining their biological bases. Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion-valuation, sensory-motor, and meaning-knowledge neural systems. This tripartite model can in turn be evoked to explain phenomena central to aesthetics, such as context effects on preferences. Indeed, context-dependent appraisals that focus on objects rather than on outcomes could be an important factor distinguishing aesthetic experiences from other kinds of evaluations.

  9. Neuroscience of aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Vartanian, Oshin

    2016-04-01

    Aesthetic evaluations are appraisals that influence choices in important domains of human activity, including mate selection, consumer behavior, art appreciation, and possibly even moral judgment. The nascent field of neuroaesthetics is advancing our understanding of the role of aesthetic evaluations by examining their biological bases. Here, we conduct a selective review of the literature on neuroaesthetics to demonstrate that aesthetic experiences likely emerge from the interaction between emotion-valuation, sensory-motor, and meaning-knowledge neural systems. This tripartite model can in turn be evoked to explain phenomena central to aesthetics, such as context effects on preferences. Indeed, context-dependent appraisals that focus on objects rather than on outcomes could be an important factor distinguishing aesthetic experiences from other kinds of evaluations. PMID:27037898

  10. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  11. [Ethics in aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    de Fontaine, S

    2013-09-01

    The use of aesthetic medicine and surgery is increasingly popular, and becomes a true phenomenon of society. Many women and men are asking for such treatments. A large proportion of the population carry the idea that this branch of medicine is a true consumer product. The acts of aesthetic medicine and surgery are not without consequences. They produce important changes in the human body, and carry risks of complications that must be taken into account. The overrated media interest of this subject produce commercial drifts that act against the general health of the patients. The invasive acts of medical aesthetics must be placed in a precise legal and ethical framework to protect the patients. A project of a new Belgian law is on the way, awaiting for publication in "Le Moniteur": this law (proposed by Senator Dominique Tilmans) clarifies the competences required for performing non-surgical aesthetic treatments and specific aesthetic invasive treatments. Other projects of law are being studied, and will concern publicity, information of the public, and rules of private clinics where aesthetic invasive acts are performed. Recent international news have shown, with the PIP breast prosthesis scandal, that surveillance of the medical aesthetic field is mandatory. To provide a better protection of patients, the legislator has decided legislate over the subject.

  12. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  13. The aesthetics of chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and philosophers have long reflected on the place of aesthetics in science. In this essay, I review these discussions, identifying work of relevance to chemistry and, in particular, to the field of chemical biology. Topics discussed include the role of aesthetics in scientific theory choice, the aesthetics of molecular images, the beauty-making features of molecules, and the relation between the aesthetics of chemical biology and the aesthetics of industrial design.

  14. Personalized visual aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  15. Riding Pontic--Aesthetic Journey Aesthetic Goal.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Byajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Manisha, Kukreja; Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Nafria, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The increasing concern for esthetics during the orthodontic treatment can be measured by the increasing popularity ofaesthetic brackets, lingual technique, smaller sized metal brackets, and clear alignment therapy. Many clients, especially adolescents, are self-conscious about their appearance in social and professional situations, and they refuse to tolerate the inevitable "black holes" of edentulous spaces during orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use, fabrication, modifications, and shortcomings of riding pontics; and illustrates how their use provides aesthetic, psychological and functional benefits. PMID:26720951

  16. Hepburn's Natural Aesthetic and Its Implications for Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The world is rich in natural beauty, and learning how to appreciate the beauty of nature is an important part of aesthetic education. Unfortunately, the teaching of aesthetics is usually restricted to art education, especially in Taiwan. Students' perceptual awareness of and sensitivity to the aesthetics of nature should be cultivated so that…

  17. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Training Requirements Analysis Model (TRAMOD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The training requirements analysis model (TRAMOD) described in this report represents an important portion of the larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. TRAMOD is the second of three models that comprise an LCC impact modeling system for use in the early stages of system development. As…

  18. Ideal female brow aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Garrett R; Kim, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the ideal female eyebrow has changed over time. Modern studies examining youthful brow aesthetics are reviewed. An analysis of ideal female brow characteristics as depicted in the Western print media between 1945 and 2011 was performed. This analysis provided objective evidence that the ideal youthful brow peak has migrated laterally over time to lie at the lateral canthus. There has been a nonstatistically significant trend toward lower and flatter brows. These findings are discussed in relation to current concepts of female brow aging, with repercussions regarding endoscopic brow lift and aesthetic forehead surgery.

  19. Men's aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Cosmetic dermatology is continuing to see a dramatic increase in both procedures performed and technological advancements. Men's aesthetic dermatology is burgeoning with more men seeking cosmetic consultations and intervention. Whether it is targeted cosmeceuticals for men or male-specific procedures, dermatologists must be aware of this evolving demographic and understand the biological, anatomical, and psychological aspects that separate this cohort from their female counterparts. Cosmetic dermatology has moved beyond just applying the same techniques used for females onto males. The use of our cosmetic toolbox can differ for men in terms of technique and dosage. This article will review the state of men's aesthetic dermatology with. PMID:25830252

  20. [History of aesthetic rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Mazzola, R F

    2014-12-01

    One of the first surgical procedures described in the history of medicine is reconstructive surgery of the nose. Over the centuries, surgeons have developed techniques aimed at reconstructing noses amputated or traumatized by disease. The concept of aesthetic rhinoplasty was only introduced at the end of the 19th century. Since then, techniques have evolved toward constant ameliorations. Nowadays, this surgery is one of the most performed aesthetic procedures. Current technical sophistication is the result of over a century of history marked by many surgeons. All of these techniques derive from a detailed understanding of the anatomical nose from the surgical and artistic point of view.

  1. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  2. Scientific aesthetics: three steps forward.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-11-01

    Leder and Nadal (2014, this issue) examine the current state of scientific aesthetics through the lens of a prescient psychological model proposed 10 years ago. These retrospective points to several future directions of which I touch on three: the nature of aesthetic emotions, the time course of emotions in aesthetic episodes, and the relationship of art and evolution.

  3. What's Wrong with "Aesthetic Education"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luca-Marshall, Judith B.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers definitions of "aesthetic," especially that offered by Woodrow Wilson in his essay on Adam Smith. Her major contention is that too much of aesthetic and other education is not very aesthetic, for it does not excite both senses and intellect nor develop the ability to generalize. (Author/SJL)

  4. Anterior dental aesthetics: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I

    2005-06-25

    The purpose of this series is to convey the principles governing our aesthetic senses. Usually meaning visual perception, aesthetics is not merely limited to the ocular apparatus. The concept of aesthetics encompasses both the time - arts such as music, theatre, literature and film, as well as space - arts such as paintings, sculpture and architecture.

  5. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Impact of DAIS Concept on Life Cycle Cost--Supplement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goclowski, John C.; And Others

    This supplement to a technical report providing the results of a preliminary investigation of the potential impact of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) concept on system support personnel requirements and life cycle cost (LCC) includes: (1) additional details of the cost comparison of a hypothetical application of a conceptual…

  6. Ideology and Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Landon E.

    The paper documents current theories that schools serve as agents of economic and/or cultural reproduction by examining the content and form of a unit in an aesthetic education program. The central argument of reproduction theorists is that schools serve as a means of social control by perpetuating those social and cultural patterns which ensure…

  7. [Aesthetic Response to Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, Helen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The "Bulletin of the Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education" is an annual publication, with each issue devoted to a unified theme. The theme of this issue is aesthetic response. The following papers focus on the audience and the persons responding to art: "Attitudes of Three Urban Appalachian Teenagers Toward Selected Early Modern American…

  8. The Aesthetics of Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, James Marston

    The basic concepts and several examples of the effects of the physical environment on man are discussed. Aesthetic judgments of the environment are related primarily to the physiological well-being of an individual and secondarily to his social experiences. Excessive loading of any one of the senses can prevent a balanced assessment of the…

  9. Risking Aesthetic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Patricia E.

    2005-01-01

    This reflective article explores a tension between private and public expression of deep aesthetic response to reading, with specific reference to the play of this tension in the public space of the classroom. Implications for teaching are included, most specifically the need to understand the sensitivities and emotional vulnerability of students,…

  10. Against Moderate Aesthetic Formalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Formalists believe that the aesthetic appreciation of an artwork generally involves an attentive awareness of its sensory or perceptual qualities and does not require knowledge about its nonperceptual properties. Criticisms of classical formalist views, such as that of Clive Bell, are well known. However, a number of philosophers have recently…

  11. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  12. Aesthetics in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    This article applies the principles and concepts of the aesthetics of movement to actual physical education teaching situations. It does so by discussing the author's one-day observations of several middle school physical education classes taught by three different teachers. During these classes, the teachers taught students how to calculate and…

  13. Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments : The aesthetic episode - Developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Leder, Helmut; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-11-01

    About a decade ago, psychology of the arts started to gain momentum owing to a number of drives: technological progress improved the conditions under which art could be studied in the laboratory, neuroscience discovered the arts as an area of interest, and new theories offered a more comprehensive look at aesthetic experiences. Ten years ago, Leder, Belke, Oeberst, and Augustin (2004) proposed a descriptive information-processing model of the components that integrate an aesthetic episode. This theory offered explanations for modern art's large number of individualized styles, innovativeness, and for the diverse aesthetic experiences it can stimulate. In addition, it described how information is processed over the time course of an aesthetic episode, within and over perceptual, cognitive and emotional components. Here, we review the current state of the model, and its relation to the major topics in empirical aesthetics today, including the nature of aesthetic emotions, the role of context, and the neural and evolutionary foundations of art and aesthetics.

  14. Looking time predicts choice but not aesthetic value.

    PubMed

    Isham, Eve A; Geng, Joy J

    2013-01-01

    Although visual fixations are commonly used to index stimulus-driven or internally-determined preference, recent evidence suggests that visual fixations can also be a source of decisional bias that moves selection toward the fixated object. These contrasting results raise the question of whether visual fixations always index comparative processes during choice-based tasks, or whether they might better reflect internal preferences when the decision does not carry any economic or corporeal consequences. In two experiments, participants chose which of two objects were more aesthetically pleasing (Exp.1) or appeared more organic (Exp.2), and provided independent aesthetic ratings of the stimuli. Our results demonstrated that fixation parameters were a better index of choice in both decisional domains than of aesthetic preference. The data support models in which visual fixations are specifically related to the evolution of decision processes even when the decision has no tangible consequences. PMID:23977115

  15. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored. PMID:25730537

  16. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored.

  17. [Lasers and aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Stratigos, A J; Dover, J S; Arndt, K A

    2003-07-01

    The improved understanding of laser-tissue interaction along with the latest advances of laser technology have led to the development of sophisticated, safe, and user-friendly laser systems that provide effective treatment for a variety of aesthetic skin conditions. The use of lasers and their tissue-specific capabilities in the treatment of pigmented and vascular lesions has been greatly expanded to include rhytides, photoaged skin, atrophic scars, and unwanted hair. In addition, laser techniques have been employed in traditional "rejuvenating" procedures of aged skin, e.g., face-lifting, blepharoplasty, and hair transplantation, decreasing the intra-operative time and limiting the recovery period. These advances have led to a wide acceptance of cutaneous laser surgery by the dermatologic community and have created an increasing popularity among the public. The purpose of this article is to review the applications of lasers in aesthetic dermatology and discuss their limitations and potential side effects. PMID:12835862

  18. Brief: Multizone subsea completions in the Dai Hung field, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, K.R.

    1996-04-01

    The early production phase of the Dai Hung field development involved drilling and completion of five subsea wells. Owing to the complex nature of the reservoirs, selective multizone completions were installed for effective reservoir data acquisition and reservoir management. Downhole completion designs used equipment that was primarily of existing proven design, and downhole equipment was installed in a single trip. Ongoing reservoir management will be aided by use of a subsea wireline system to facilitate data acquisition.

  19. Multizone subsea completions in the Dai Hung field, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, K.R.

    1996-09-01

    The early production phase of the Dai Hung field development resulted in the drilling and completion of five subsea wells. Because of the complex nature of the reservoirs, selective multizone completions were installed for effective reservoir data acquisition and reservoir management. The downhole completion designs used equipment that was primarily of existing proven design and downhole equipment installation was successfully achieved in a single trip. Ongoing reservoir management will be aided by the use of a subsea wireline system to facilitate data acquisition.

  20. Aesthetic lip splits.

    PubMed

    Hayter, J P; Vaughan, E D; Brown, J S

    1996-10-01

    Both upper and lower lip splits, usually with osteotomy of the underlying jaw, improve access to the deep structures of the head and neck. A simple modification to the midline lip split is to incorporate a chevron in both the peri-oral skin and vermilion margin. The advantages are: accurate wound closure, no straight line contracture and a broken line of the peri-oral scar. This improves the aesthetic result of the healed lip.

  1. What Can the Aesthetic Movement Tell Us about Aesthetic Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldsen, Jette

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the author presents two quotations from Walter Pater which suggest a provoking and demanding recipe by which to live one's aesthetic life and point out where all aesthetic education must begin. The author also exemplifies Walter Pater's ideas through two works by the painter James McNeill Whistler and the poet Algernon Swinburne…

  2. Ultrasonic aesthetic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Robiony, Massimo; Casadei, Matteo; Sbuelz, Massimo; Della Pietra, Lorenzo; Politi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    The management of frontal bone injury is an important issue, and inappropriate management of such injuries may give rise to serious complications. Piezosurgery is a technique used to perform safe and effective osteotomies using piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations. This instrument allows a safe method for osteotomy of the cranial vault in close proximity to extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as the brain. After a wide review of the literature, the authors present this technical report, introduce the use of piezosurgery to perform a safe "slim-osteotomies" for treatment of posttraumatic frontal bone deformities, and suggest the use of this instrument for aesthetic recontouring of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24914759

  3. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj; Choudhary, Rama Shankar Kashinath

    2014-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is defined as a break in the continuity of enamel with a reduction in the layers leading to depressions or grooves. Chronological hypoplasia is differentiated from other forms of hypoplasia due to its characteristic presentation (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement. Prevention of interaction of aetiological factors is not possible because multiple factors are required for enamel synthesis. This paper highlights how to diagnose, intercept and treat chronological hypoplasias. It also mentions reasons for treating a case and different modalities available. PMID:24907208

  4. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts.

  5. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  6. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts. PMID:20819476

  7. Towards an Aesthetics of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This article is an enquiry into the possible shape of "an aesthetics of care" drawn from the experience of looking after a Congolese colleague after he was injured in a massacre in the DR Congo. The mix of different professional and personal circumstances directs the writing towards concerns with the ethics and aesthetics of caring for…

  8. Dai-Freed theorem and topological phases of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We describe a physics derivation of theorems due to Dai and Freed about the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer eta-invariant which is important for anomalies and topological phases of matter. This is done by studying a massive fermion. The key role is played by the wave function of the ground state in the Hilbert space of the fermion in the large mass limit. The ground state takes values in the determinant line bundle and has nontrivial Berry phases which characterize the low energy topological phases.

  9. Aesthetic valence of visual illusions

    PubMed Central

    Stevanov, Jasmina; Marković, Slobodan; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Visual illusions constitute an interesting perceptual phenomenon, but they also have an aesthetic and affective dimension. We hypothesized that the illusive nature itself causes the increased aesthetic and affective valence of illusions compared with their non-illusory counterparts. We created pairs of stimuli. One qualified as a standard visual illusion whereas the other one did not, although they were matched in as many perceptual dimensions as possible. The phenomenal quality of being an illusion had significant effects on “Aesthetic Experience” (fascinating, irresistible, exceptional, etc), “Evaluation” (pleasant, cheerful, clear, bright, etc), “Arousal” (interesting, imaginative, complex, diverse, etc), and “Regularity” (balanced, coherent, clear, realistic, etc). A subsequent multiple regression analysis suggested that Arousal was a better predictor of Aesthetic Experience than Evaluation. The findings of this study demonstrate that illusion is a phenomenal quality of the percept which has measurable aesthetic and affective valence. PMID:23145272

  10. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  11. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  12. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. PMID:27428582

  13. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed.

  14. [Aesthetic surgery and public health].

    PubMed

    Fogli, A

    2003-10-01

    The increasing number of requests for aesthetic surgery legitimately leads to the question of whether it can be covered by Public Health. If we look at the definition of the World Health Organization, the answer is without any doubt an affirmative one. However, economic considerations show that there is no social system in the world that covers aesthetic surgery, except for some definite interventions. Requests for aesthetic surgery occur in all social classes. It is a personal choice and a voluntary decision. It is no longer society who assists a sick or ill patient but it is the person that assumes the responsibility for himself. PMID:14599901

  15. Columellar Aesthetics in Open Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kridel, Russell W H; Kwak, Edward S; Watson, Jeffrey B

    2016-08-01

    Detailed descriptions of the ideals of columellar aesthetics and nostril shape are conspicuously lacking from the medical literature. Achieving an aesthetic nasal base is critical to an optimal rhinoplasty result. Deviations in the columella and variations in its width and height lead to distortion of nostril shape and frequently compromise function. Six types of columellar disproportion are presented with detailed explanations of how to treat each. By properly recognizing and addressing columellar deformities, the surgeon can optimize both the aesthetic and functional results that are achieved. PMID:27494576

  16. Comparison of aesthetic posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1991-09-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased desire by the profession and the public for an aesthetic restoration that will restore a posterior tooth to its original form and function. The currently available aesthetic posterior restoration materials and techniques are porcelain, cast ceramic, direct composite, direct-indirect composite, indirect composite, and CAD-CAM fabrications. The indications and contraindications of these restorative materials and proper diagnosis and case selection are described.

  17. Naturalizing aesthetics: brain areas for aesthetic appraisal across sensory modalities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Gao, Xiaoqing; Tisdelle, Loren; Eickhoff, Simon B; Liotti, Mario

    2011-09-01

    We present here the most comprehensive analysis to date of neuroaesthetic processing by reporting the results of voxel-based meta-analyses of 93 neuroimaging studies of positive-valence aesthetic appraisal across four sensory modalities. The results demonstrate that the most concordant area of activation across all four modalities is the right anterior insula, an area typically associated with visceral perception, especially of negative valence (disgust, pain, etc.). We argue that aesthetic processing is, at its core, the appraisal of the valence of perceived objects. This appraisal is in no way limited to artworks but is instead applicable to all types of perceived objects. Therefore, one way to naturalize aesthetics is to argue that such a system evolved first for the appraisal of objects of survival advantage, such as food sources, and was later co-opted in humans for the experience of artworks for the satisfaction of social needs.

  18. Finding a New Vision of Gifted Education: An Interview with David Yun Dai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Zijiang lecture professor of education and psychology at East China Normal University. Dr. Dai has published seven books and over 70 journal articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, and book and…

  19. Thinking About the Aesthetics of Children's Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    1987-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of aesthetic elements such as color, light, texture, plants, art, and music in children's centers and schools. Describes how aesthetic elements may be added to the environment. (NH)

  20. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  1. North Korean Aesthetic Theory: Aesthetics, Beauty, and "Man"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David-West, Alzo

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetics is not a subject usually associated with North Korea in Western scholarship, the usual tropes being autocracy, counterfeiting, drugs, human-rights abuse, famine, nuclear weapons, party-military dictatorship, Stalinism, and totalitarianism. Where the arts are concerned, they are typically seen as crude political propaganda. One British…

  2. Embodied Aesthetics, Evocative Art Criticism: Aesthetically Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Boyd

    2011-01-01

    This study introduces one approach to arts-based research, one that emerges from aesthetic encounters and ensuing art criticism. Examples are drawn from one preservice teacher's attempts to write art criticism, both discursive and evocative, based on her personal responses to a chosen artwork. The articulation of her responses is a form of…

  3. Teaching Aesthetics and Aesthetic Teaching: Toward a Deweyan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David A.

    2006-01-01

    According to John Dewey, author of "Art as Experience," science and other forms of knowledge are properly "handmaidens" to art, intellectual tools for enhancing the overall quality and value of human life and activity. Recently, scholars in education have began to examine the possible significance of Dewey's aesthetics for the practices of…

  4. Holding Aesthetics and Ideology in Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Studying imagery, irrespective of the kind, must focus equally upon its aesthetic attractiveness, its sensory lures, and its oftentimes dubious social ideology. The terms "aesthetic" and "ideology" are addressed as problematic and are defined in current, ordinary language terms: aesthetics as visual appearances and their effects and ideology as a…

  5. It's Catch-up Time for Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, John

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to refocus aesthetic education for art teachers and argues the need to see aesthetics in society. Discusses the ideas of T. Irene Sanders, Bernd Schmitt, and Alex Simonson to demonstrate real-world support for aesthetic education. Uses two examples: eye glasses and bathrooms. (CMK)

  6. Aesthetic perception of single implants placed in the anterior zone. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Burgueño-Barris, Genís; Cortés-Acha, Berta; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Background Several aesthetic indexes have been described to assess implant aesthetics. The aim of this study was to compare the aesthetic assessment made by dental professionals and students of single-tooth implants placed in the upper incisors. Material and Methods A cross-sectional survey study using a subjective questionnaire to assess the aesthetics in 3 implant supported single-tooth cases in the anterior maxilla was performed. The interviewed subjects were divided into 4 groups: dentists with experience in implant treatment, dentists without experience in implants and 3rd and 5th year dental students. The questionnaire consisted of 2 visual analogue scales (VAS) to evaluate aesthetics, the pink esthetic score (PES), the white esthetic score (WES) and the simplified papilla index (PI). Results One-hundred dentists and one-hundred dental students filled the aesthetic assessment questionnaire. The results showed that the subjects were more critical than reference values, specially concerning prosthetic issues. The differences between groups were more obvious in the case with the best result. On the other hand, few differences were detected in the remaining cases. Regarding soft tissue and crown features, experienced dentists in implant dentistry were the most demanding. Cronbach’s Alpha showed values ≥ 0,8 in the questionnaire in every case, which indicates an adequate reliability. Conclusions Dentists and dental students have different opinions when assessing aesthetics of single tooth implant supported cases. Experience and area of expertise seem to influence the evaluation of aesthetics in the anterior region. Key words:Dental implant, anterior area, aesthetics. PMID:27031072

  7. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  8. Aesthetic Education: Questions and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    2005-01-01

    An aesthetically educated person may be understood to subscribe to values and possess dispositions that in important respects are distinctive. The respects in which such values and dispositions are unique and the methods by which they might be developed are, however, subject to interpretation. This article provides brief summaries of three…

  9. Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela M

    2013-02-01

    Jung's contribution to the understanding of the relevance of psychology to alchemy has become increasingly invalidated by the ahistorical nature of his approach, just as his tendency to ignore the importance of cognitive aesthetics for an improved comprehension of the functions of alchemical images has prevented Jungians from further extending Jung's insight of the importance of alchemy for psychology. This paper explores the history of the development of alchemical illustrations in Western Europe from the 14(th) to the 16(th) century, tracing the emergent processes over time. It is only when we take into consideration the historical dimension and the aesthetics of alchemical imagery that it becomes possible to demonstrate how the increasing use of certain aesthetic techniques such as the disjunction and recombination of separate metaphorical elements of previous illustrations, the use of compressive combinations and the use of framing devices worked to gradually increase the cognitive function and the symbolical power of the images. If alchemy is still relevant to psychotherapy it is exactly because it helps us to understand the importance of cognitive aesthetics in our approach to the images, metaphors and narratives of our patients.

  10. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  11. Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela M

    2013-02-01

    Jung's contribution to the understanding of the relevance of psychology to alchemy has become increasingly invalidated by the ahistorical nature of his approach, just as his tendency to ignore the importance of cognitive aesthetics for an improved comprehension of the functions of alchemical images has prevented Jungians from further extending Jung's insight of the importance of alchemy for psychology. This paper explores the history of the development of alchemical illustrations in Western Europe from the 14(th) to the 16(th) century, tracing the emergent processes over time. It is only when we take into consideration the historical dimension and the aesthetics of alchemical imagery that it becomes possible to demonstrate how the increasing use of certain aesthetic techniques such as the disjunction and recombination of separate metaphorical elements of previous illustrations, the use of compressive combinations and the use of framing devices worked to gradually increase the cognitive function and the symbolical power of the images. If alchemy is still relevant to psychotherapy it is exactly because it helps us to understand the importance of cognitive aesthetics in our approach to the images, metaphors and narratives of our patients. PMID:23350996

  12. Toward Connectedness: Aesthetically Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Liora

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I suggest that aesthetics is at the heart of both artistic experience and qualitative research, and that artistic processes, in particular, the space surrounding art experiences, can illuminate significant aspects of qualitative research, including data collection, data analysis, and writing. Examining the ways in which the arts…

  13. Contextualism and Autonomy in Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krukowski, Lucian

    1990-01-01

    Describes different theories of art and how they disagree on the question of the way that artworks relate to the circumstance of their origins and use. Discusses how these circumstances influence the way one thinks about artworks. Considers where E. D. Hirsch's ideas on cultural literacy fit into this aesthetic controversy. (KM)

  14. The Aesthetics of Behavioral Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    With their origins in scientific validation, behavior-analytic applications have understandably been developed with an engineering rather than a crafting orientation. Nevertheless, traditions of craftsmanship can be instructive for devising aesthetically pleasing arrangements--arrangements that people will try, and having tried, will choose to…

  15. Magic and the aesthetic illusion.

    PubMed

    Balter, Leon

    2002-01-01

    The aesthetic illusion is the subjective experience that the content of a work of art is reality. It has an intrinsic relation to magic, an intrapsychic maneuver oriented toward modification and control of the extraspyschic world, principally through ego functioning. Magic is ontogenetically and culturally archaic, expresses the omnipotence inherent in primary narcissism, and operates according to the logic of the primary process. Magic is a constituent of all ego functioning, usually latent in later development. It may persist as an archaic feature or may be evoked regressively in global or circumscribed ways. It causes a general disinhibition of instincts and impulses attended by a sense of confidence, exhiliration, and exuberance. The aesthetic illusion is a combination of illusions: (1) that the daydream embodied by the work of art is the beholder's own, the artist being ignored, and (2) that the artistically described protagonist is a real person with a real "world." The first illusion arises through the beholder's emotional-instinctual gratification from his or her own fantasy-memory constellations; the second comes about because the beholder, by taking the protagonist as proxy, mobilizes the subjective experience of the imaginary protagonist's "reality." The first illusion is necessary for the second to take place; the second establishes the aesthetic illusion proper. Both illusions are instances of magic. Accordingly, the aesthetic illusion is accompanied by a heady experience of excitement and euphoria. The relation among the aesthetic illusion, magic, and enthusiasm is illustrated by an analytic case, J. D. Salinger's "The Laughing Man," Woody Allen's Play It Again, Sam, Don Quixote, and the medieval Cult of the Saints.

  16. An eco-spatial index for evaluating stabilization state of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Yehonathan; Groner, Elli; Yizhaq, Hezi; Svoray, Tal; Bar (Kutiel), Pua

    2013-06-01

    Geomorphologies tend to categorize dunes into three major states (mobile, semi-stabilized and stabilized) based on their shape and mobility rate. However, the ecologists try to find bio-indicators that can characterize the mobility rate and the ecological features of the various dune states. Unfortunately, there are limited numbers of significant bio-indicators, if any. The aim of our study was to develop a Dune Assemblage Index (DAI) in order to indicate the affinity of annual plants and arthropods assemblages to dune mobility. The DAI values range between 0 for stabilized dunes and 1 for bare and active dunes. The index was calculated for 10 coastal dunes in Nizzanim nature reserve, located at the southern part of the Israeli Mediterranean coast, from data that were collected in the years 2006 and 2007. Generally, the lower the vegetation cover is, the higher are DAI values for both taxon groups. Generalist species tend to mask the differences between active and stabilized dunes whereas psammophiles (sand-dwelling species) tend to increase the DAI values. Additionally, the DAI may differ among dunes with the same perennial coverage due to differences in the spatial plant distribution patterns. Likewise, the DAI depends also on the distance of the dunes from rural areas, which encourage invasion of generalist species, thus decreases the DAI value. This new defined spatial index that relies on plant and animal assemblages, rather than on individual bio-indicators, can be adapted to any taxon and dune ecosystems. The use of several taxons may support better understanding of the ecosystem state of the dune.

  17. The significance of large variations in oil properties of the Dai Hung field, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenbruch, P.; Du, P.Q.

    1995-10-01

    The Dai Hung Oil field, offshore Vietnam, is comprised of a complex subsurface structure containing stacked reservoir sequences typically found in many other Southeast Asian fields. Combined with areal fault compartmentalization, this situation has led to the observed, large variations in oil properties. Furthermore, the depositional environment in terms of burial history has created a unique overpressure situation which also had an affect, particularly on the crude saturation conditions of individual reservoirs. For commercial and technical reasons, this situation required a detailed analysis, both in terms of variation in crude assay and live oil properties. For whole crude properties: gravity, K factor, wax content and pour point-graphs were drawn up using a large data base of worldwide crudes against which the Dai Hung data could be validated. In case of PVT properties (bubble point and formation volume factor) existing industry correlations were examined. It could be concluded that the sweet, medium gravity and moderately waxy Dai Hung crude has whole crude properties which are comparable to other, similar crudes. The general framework of crude properties established is suitable to type other crudes, even if limited information is available. Of the existing PVT correlations tested, it was found that Standing`s correlation for the oil formation volume factor and the Kartoatmodjo-Schmidt correlation for the bubble point fitted the Dai Hung crude data the best. For the lower shrinkage Dai Hung crudes the Malaysian oil formation volume factor correlation by Omar-Todd gave the best data fit.

  18. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP)

    PubMed Central

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors and the upper lip. Conclusion: FAOP can complement an existing and established orthodontic treatment plan, facilitating the visualization of functional and aesthetic demands by giving a greater focus on the position of incisors in the relationship established among the incisors, molars and the upper lip stomion. PMID:27653271

  19. The aesthetics of behavioral arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Hineline, Philip N.

    2005-01-01

    With their origins in scientific validation, behavior-analytic applications have understandably been developed with an engineering rather than a crafting orientation. Nevertheless, traditions of craftsmanship can be instructive for devising aesthetically pleasing arrangements—arrangements that people will try, and having tried, will choose to continue living with. Pye (1968) provides suggestions for this, particularly through his distinctions between workmanship of risk versus workmanship of certainty, and the mating of functional precision with effective or otherwise pleasing variability. Close examination of woodworking tools as well as antique machines offers instructive analogues that show, for instance, that misplaced precision can be dysfunctional when precision is not essential to a design. Variability should be allowed or even encouraged. Thus, in the design of behavioral contingencies as well as of practical or purely aesthetic objects, “precise versus variable” is not necessarily a distinction between good and bad. More generally, behavior analysts would do well to look beyond their technical experience for ways to improve the aesthetics of contingency design while continuing to understand the resulting innovations in relation to behavior-analytic principles. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:22478437

  20. Relationship between perception of malocclusion and the psychological impact of dental aesthetics in university students

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Company, José-María; Pinho, Teresa; Almerich-Silla, José-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The objectives were to assess the relationship between perceived smile aesthetics and perceived psychological impact as measured by the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ), and their own perception of it using the Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS); relate the IOTN-AC and VAS to the PIDAQ; and study the predictive capacity of the scales for psychological impact. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 447 college students in Spain and Portugal (average age 20.4 years, 33.1% men and 66.9% women). The online self-completed surveys used the recently-validated Spanish and Portuguese versions of the PIDAQ to assess the self–reported psychological impact of the students’ dental aesthetics and IOTN-AC and an ad hoc 100 mm VAS for their perception of their dental aesthetics. Results: PIDAQ was linearly correlated with IOTN AC and VAS. Pearson’s coefficient was 0.55 for PIDAQ and IOTN-AC (CI 95% 0.48-0.61) and -0.72 for PIDAQ and VAS (CI 95% -0.66 - -0.76). VAS and IOTN-AC were predictive variables in a linear regression model of the total PIDAQ score. The VAS diagnosed individuals whose dental aesthetics had a self-perceived psychological impact (area under the curve 0.827, CI 95% 0.787-0.868) more precisely than the IOTN-AC (area under the curve 0.742, CI 95% 0. 696-0.788). Conclusions: In adults patients, there is a significant linear relationship between perceived smile aesthetics and self-perceived psychological impact. Key words:Visual Analog Scale, Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need, malocclusion, psychological, aesthetics. PMID:25810834

  1. On the electrophysiology of aesthetic processing.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    One important method that can be applied for gaining an understanding of the underpinning of aesthetics in the brain is that of electrophysiology. Cognitive electrophysiology, in particular, allows the identification of components in a mental processing architecture. The present chapter reviews findings in the neurocognitive psychology of aesthetics, or neuroaesthetics, that have been obtained with the method of event-related brain potentials, as derived from the human electroencephalogram. The cognitive-perceptual bases as well as affective substages of aesthetic processing have been investigated and those are described here. The event-related potential method allows for the identification of mental processing modes in cognitive and aesthetic processing. It also provides an assessment of the mental chronometry of cognitive and affective stages in aesthetic appreciation. As the work described here shows, distinct processes in the brain are engaged in aesthetic judgments. PMID:24041323

  2. Domain specificity and mental chronometry in empirical aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This article is a commentary on 'Ten years of a model of aesthetic appreciation and aesthetic judgments: The aesthetic episode - developments and challenges in empirical aesthetics' (Leder & Nadal, 2014, this issue). It focuses on domain specificity and mental chronometry in empirical aesthetics.

  3. Aesthetic inquiry and the art of nursing.

    PubMed

    Chinn, P L; Maeve, M K; Bostick, C

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the development of aesthetic inquiry and the emerging conceptualization of the art of nursing as an art form. Aesthetic knowing, which emerges from aesthetic inquiry, is described as connoisseurship of the art of nursing and includes appreciation of the art form and insight into meanings of the art. A method of aesthetic criticism is described that links artistic experience, history, form, alternate meanings, and future possibilities. The inquiry yielded two essential elements of the art of nursing, movement and narrative, which, when manifested as an art form have the capacity to shift experience into a different realm.

  4. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Reliability and Maintainability Model. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The reliability and maintainability (R&M) model described in this report represents an important portion of a larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. The R&M model is the first of three models that comprise a modeling system for use in LCC analysis of avionics systems. The total system will…

  5. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Mid-1980's Maintenance Task Analysis. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The fundamental objective of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study is to provide the Air Force with an enhanced in-house capability to incorporate LCC considerations during all stages of the system acquisition process. The purpose of this report is to describe the technical approach, results, and conclusions…

  6. Contesting modernity: Tobacco use and romanticism among older Dai farmers in Xishuangbanna, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Davey, Gareth

    2015-11-01

    The majority of research about tobacco use in China focuses on Han Chinese, the main ethnic group comprising over 90 per cent of the population, and a paucity of research exists on ethnic minorities. The present study elucidates tobacco use among the Dai people, an ethnic group in Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The study design consisted of interviews and grounded theory methodology in a symbolic interactionist theoretical framework. The categories of the grounded theory revealed tobacco consumption was weaved in a complex web of meanings: social practices, perceptions of health, and work lives as agriculturalists, situated in Dai cultural and social milieu. An important finding was the stage-managing of tobacco as a symbol of 'tradition' versus 'modernity': Through a process of contested modernity, the older men championed long-standing tobacco customs as representative of Dai heritage and thus their own tobacco use as upholding traditions amid encroaching cultural and societal change in China. These findings are important because little is known about Dai people's tobacco use and how they are responding to social change. There are also implications for the development of culturally-appropriate tobacco control strategies. PMID:26147626

  7. Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P.

    2012-07-16

    This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

  8. Nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Fudalej, Piotr; Katsaros, Christos; Hozyasz, Kamil; Borstlap, Wilfred A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP). Frontal and basal photographs of 60 consecutively treated children with CUCLP (cleft group: 41 boys and 19 girls, mean (SD) age 11 (2) years) and 44 children without clefts (control group: 16 boys and 28 girls, mean (SD) age 11(2) years), were used for evaluation of nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics. Nasal and labial measurements were made to calculate the coefficient of asymmetry (CA). The 5-grade aesthetic index described by Asher-McDade et al. was used to evaluate nasolabial appearance. Correlation and regression analysis were used to identify an association between aesthetics and CA, sex, and the presence of CUCLP. Ten measurements in the cleft, and 2 in the control, group differed significantly between the cleft and non-cleft (or right and left) sides, respectively. The significantly higher values of 9 of 11 CA in the children with CUCLP indicated that they had more asymmetrical nasolabial areas than children without clefts. However, the regression analyses showed that only a few CA were associated with nasolabial aesthetics. In conclusion, nasolabial aesthetics and nasolabial symmetry seem to be only weakly associated in patients with CUCLP.

  9. The influence of aesthetic surgery on the profile of emotion.

    PubMed

    Rubesa, Gordana; Tic-Bacić, Tamara; Svesko-Visentin, Helena; Bacić, Giordano

    2011-09-01

    In the clinical practise it has been observed that the person changes physically, too, after aesthetic surgery. The aim of this work was to examine, by objective psychological measurements, what changes occur, and what personality features change. Forty six subjects that had an aesthetic surgery were examined; they were tested before, and eighteen month after the surgery by the Profile Index of Emotion (PIE). Before the re-testing the subjects were analyzed by "The Life Events Scale" to exclude the possibility of the influence of new life events on the results of the re-test. The control group of 29 volunteers was tested by the same psychological instruments. The control group never verbalized the wish for an aesthetic surgery; they were never in psychiatric treatment, and the corresponded to the experimental group in the age, sex and education level. Analysis of the data obtained from PIE test before and after the operation shows a statistical significant increase of the adaptability segments and an improvement of capacity for taking and giving. Emotional conflict does not disappear, but a new balance is established, satisfaction is higher, and the identity is more integrated. PMID:22220403

  10. Qing Dai attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in gastrointestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Rie; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Nagano, Yumiko; Suzuki, Hideo; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Mizokami, Yuji; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2015-01-01

    Treatments with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have increased the number of patients with gastrointestinal complications. Qing Dai has been traditionally used in Chinese herbal medicine for various inflammatory diseases such as ulcerative colitis. We previously reported that Qing Dai suppressed inflammations by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ulcerative colitis patients. Thus, Qing Dai can attenuate the production of ROS, which play an important role in NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injuries. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Qing Dai decreased mitochondrial ROS production in NSAID-treated gastrointestinal cells by examining cellular injury, mitochondrial membrane potentials, and ROS production with specific fluorescent indicators. We also performed electron paramagnetic resonance measurement in isolated mitochondria with a spin-trapping reagent (CYPMPO or DMPO). Treatments with indomethacin and aspirin induced cellular injury and mitochondrial impairment in the gastrointestinal cells. Under these conditions, mitochondrial alterations were observed on electron microscopy. Qing Dai prevented these complications by suppressing ROS production in gastrointestinal cells. These results indicate that Qing Dai attenuated the ROS production from the NSAID-induced mitochondrial alteration in the gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Qing Dai treatment may be considered effective for the prevention NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injury. PMID:25678747

  11. Engineering aesthetics and aesthetic ergonomics: theoretical foundations and a dual-process research methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yili

    Although industrial and product designers are keenly aware of the importance of design aesthetics, they make aesthetic design decisions largely on the basis of their intuitive judgments and "educated guesses". Whilst ergonomics and human factors researchers have made great contributions to the safety, productivity, ease-of-use, and comfort of human-machine-environment systems, aesthetics is largely ignored as a topic of systematic scientific research in human factors and ergonomics. This article discusses the need for incorporating the aesthetics dimension in ergonomics and proposes the establishment of a new scientific and engineering discipline that we can call "engineering aesthetics". This discipline addresses two major questions: How do we use engineering and scientific methods to study aesthetics concepts in general and design aesthetics in particular? How do we incorporate engineering and scientific methods in the aesthetic design and evaluation process? This article identifies two special features that distinguish aesthetic appraisal of products and system designs from aesthetic appreciation of art, and lays out a theoretical foundation as well as a dual-process research methodology for "engineering aesthetics". Sample applications of this methodology are also described.

  12. Shampoos and their aesthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Scandel, J; Reinstein, J A; Brudney, N

    1983-10-01

    Synopsis We investigated whether the aesthetic appearance of the hair after shampooing was more closely related to certain specific effects than to others. Sensorial assessments were carried out on subjects tested on 'split heads'according to the Profile Method and on subjects tested on the whole head by means of three consumer tests. In the split head procedure, forty subjects had the hair washed with two different shampoos on the right and left sides; fifty-six diverse shampoos were used. The ratings, statistically analysed, showed close correlations of the overall aesthetic assessment with 'spring back'(P < 0.001), 'volume'(P < 0.001) and 'bounce'(P < 0.01). Furthermore, interdependence of several parameters (P < 0.01 or 0.001) was obvious. In the whole head procedure each group (respectively 185, 200 and 458 subjects) having applied two different shampoos, at least twice for each shampoo, were tested by means of three consumer tests. Analysis of the results makes evident that 'supple hair'and 'soft hair'were significantly correlated to the overall preferences of shampoos (P < 0.001). For the consumers their overall preference appeared to be the deciding factor in the specific preferences. Correlations of the overall preferences with perfume and/or colour (P < 0.001) were shown. For trained observers and consumers, mechanical properties of the hair seemed related to the idea of a good shampoo.

  13. Nietzsche's aesthetic critique of Darwin.

    PubMed

    Pence, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the "post-Darwinian" world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche's critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche's and Darwin's impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche's critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche's core criticism of Darwin. An important part of Nietzsche's response can best be understood as an aesthetic critique of Darwin, reacting to what he saw as Darwin having drained life of an essential component of objective aesthetic value. For Nietzsche, Darwin's theory is false because it is too intellectual, because it searches for rules, regulations, and uniformity in a realm where none of these are to be found - and, moreover, where they should not be found. Such a reading goes furthest toward making Nietzsche's criticism substantive and relevant. Finally, I attempt to relate this novel explanation of Nietzsche's critique to topics in contemporary philosophy of biology, particularly work on the evolutionary explanation of culture.

  14. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-05-22

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis.

  15. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-01-01

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis. PMID:23704468

  16. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  17. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  18. Aesthetical Information Impact of a Literary Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, M. F.

    The aim of this study was to explore the aesthetic impact of a literary text on the human mind and to extend the knowledge on how and when the information from a book enters the human brain, and if and when it starts to be processed and, possibly, memorized. Readers' responses to aesthetic texts were measured through a series of biometric…

  19. Introducing Aesthetic Features in Gymnastic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollatou, Elisana; Savrami, Katia; Karadimou, Konstanding

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on an aesthetic approach that takes the simplest functional skill, such as walking, and develops it into an artistic skill. The aim then is to identify aesthetic characteristics and examine ways to apply them in gymnastic classes. Because walking is the child's first experience with bipedal locomotion, the initial walking action…

  20. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  1. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  2. 40 CFR 240.207 - Aesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aesthetics. 240.207 Section 240.207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.207 Aesthetics....

  3. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  4. Coleridge's Biographia Literaria and Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanger, David

    1980-01-01

    This paper makes two principal assertions: first, that Coleridge's "Biographia Literaria" is a valuable and hitherto neglected resource for aesthetic educators and, second, that the distinction Coleridge makes between fancy and imagination affords the aesthetic educator a unique insight into the differences between the popular and fine arts.…

  5. Rhinoplasty: surface aesthetics and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Çakir, Bariş; Doğan, Teoman; Öreroğlu, Ali Riza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2013-03-01

    Surface aesthetics of the attractive nose are created by certain lines, shadows, and highlights, with specific proportions and breakpoints. Our evaluation of the nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using the concept of geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits, both to define the existing deformity and the aesthetic goals. Surgical techniques have been developed and modified to achieve the desired surface appearance, and those are detailed in this article. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, to define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and to select the appropriate operative technique. These aesthetic concepts and surgical techniques were used in 257 consecutive rhinoplasties performed in the past 3 years by the principal author (B.Ç.).

  6. Neuroaesthetics: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Marcus T; Zaidel, Dahlia W; Vartanian, Oshin; Skov, Martin; Leder, Helmut; Chatterjee, Anjan; Nadal, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics has gained in popularity in recent years but also attracted criticism from the perspectives both of the humanities and the sciences. In an effort to consolidate research in the field, we characterize neuroaesthetics as the cognitive neuroscience of aesthetic experience, drawing on long traditions of research in empirical aesthetics on the one hand and cognitive neuroscience on the other. We clarify the aims and scope of the field, identifying relations among neuroscientific investigations of aesthetics, beauty, and art. The approach we advocate takes as its object of study a wide spectrum of aesthetic experiences, resulting from interactions of individuals, sensory stimuli, and context. Drawing on its parent fields, a cognitive neuroscience of aesthetics would investigate the complex cognitive processes and functional networks of brain regions involved in those experiences without placing a value on them. Thus, the cognitive neuroscientific approach may develop in a way that is mutually complementary to approaches in the humanities. PMID:26993278

  7. Emerging technologies in aesthetic medicine.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bobby Y; Hantash, Basil M

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in technology have drastically improved aesthetic treatment for skin. Of particular interest is the emergence of laser- and lightbased technologies, which have offered great promise among skin-rejuvenation therapies. New laser resurfacing techniques for skin rejuvenation offer significant advantages over conventional ablative lasers, such as the CO(2) and erbiumYAG laser systems. Nonablative and fractional lasers, although not as efficacious as ablative therapies, are associated with significantly diminished complication rates and shortened recovery times. Novel devices combining ablative and fractional technologies have also surfaced, demonstrating noteworthy results. In this review, the authors will discuss the implications of current developments in research and technology for skin rejuvenation. Furthermore, the authors will address emerging therapies for acne vulgaris, lipolysis, and cellulite. PMID:19850201

  8. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  9. Aesthetic Education between Critique and Self-Certainty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollenhauer, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the limits to fitting aesthetic experiences into theories of education or curricula, claiming that this often results in aesthetic alphabetization. Contrasts this to the aesthetic education possibilities in art therapy. Beginning with a statement by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, theorizes about the existence of an aesthetic self-identity. (CH)

  10. Reimer through Confucian Lenses: Resonances with Classical Chinese Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I compare all three editions of Bennett Reimer's "A Philosophy of Music Education" with early Chinese philosophy, in particular, classical Chinese aesthetics. I structure my analysis around a quartet of interrelated themes: aesthetic education, education of feeling, aesthetic experience, and ethics and aesthetics. This…

  11. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  12. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research.

  13. Aesthetic Chills: Knowledge-Acquisition, Meaning-Making, and Aesthetic Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeller, Felix; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the relation between aesthetic emotions, knowledge-acquisition, and meaning-making. We briefly review theoretical foundations and present experimental data related to aesthetic chills. These results suggest that aesthetic chills are inhibited by exposing the subject to an incoherent prime prior to the chill-eliciting stimulation and that a meaningful prime makes the aesthetic experience more pleasurable than a neutral or an incoherent one. Aesthetic chills induced by narrative structures seem to be related to the pinnacle of the story, to have a significant calming effect and subjects describe a strong empathy for the characters. We discuss the relation between meaning-making and aesthetic emotions at the psychological, physiological, narratological, and mathematical levels and propose a series of hypotheses to be tested in future research. PMID:27540366

  14. Expression of DAI by an oncolytic vaccinia virus boosts the immunogenicity of the virus and enhances antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hirvinen, Mari; Capasso, Cristian; Guse, Kilian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Vitale, Andrea; Ahonen, Marko; Kuryk, Lukasz; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli; Fortino, Vittorio; Greco, Dario; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In oncolytic virotherapy, the ability of the virus to activate the immune system is a key attribute with regard to long-term antitumor effects. Vaccinia viruses bear one of the strongest oncolytic activities among all oncolytic viruses. However, its capacity for stimulation of antitumor immunity is not optimal, mainly due to its immunosuppressive nature. To overcome this problem, we developed an oncolytic VV that expresses intracellular pattern recognition receptor DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) to boost the innate immune system and to activate adaptive immune cells in the tumor. We showed that infection with DAI-expressing VV increases expression of several genes related to important immunological pathways. Treatment with DAI-armed VV resulted in significant reduction in the size of syngeneic melanoma tumors in mice. When the mice were rechallenged with the same tumor, DAI-VV-treated mice completely rejected growth of the new tumor, which indicates immunity established against the tumor. We also showed enhanced control of growth of human melanoma tumors and elevated levels of human T-cells in DAI-VV-treated mice humanized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We conclude that expression of DAI by an oncolytic VV is a promising way to amplify the vaccine potency of an oncolytic vaccinia virus to trigger the innate—and eventually the long-lasting adaptive immunity against cancer. PMID:27626058

  15. Expression of DAI by an oncolytic vaccinia virus boosts the immunogenicity of the virus and enhances antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Capasso, Cristian; Guse, Kilian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Vitale, Andrea; Ahonen, Marko; Kuryk, Lukasz; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli; Fortino, Vittorio; Greco, Dario; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In oncolytic virotherapy, the ability of the virus to activate the immune system is a key attribute with regard to long-term antitumor effects. Vaccinia viruses bear one of the strongest oncolytic activities among all oncolytic viruses. However, its capacity for stimulation of antitumor immunity is not optimal, mainly due to its immunosuppressive nature. To overcome this problem, we developed an oncolytic VV that expresses intracellular pattern recognition receptor DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) to boost the innate immune system and to activate adaptive immune cells in the tumor. We showed that infection with DAI-expressing VV increases expression of several genes related to important immunological pathways. Treatment with DAI-armed VV resulted in significant reduction in the size of syngeneic melanoma tumors in mice. When the mice were rechallenged with the same tumor, DAI-VV-treated mice completely rejected growth of the new tumor, which indicates immunity established against the tumor. We also showed enhanced control of growth of human melanoma tumors and elevated levels of human T-cells in DAI-VV-treated mice humanized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We conclude that expression of DAI by an oncolytic VV is a promising way to amplify the vaccine potency of an oncolytic vaccinia virus to trigger the innate-and eventually the long-lasting adaptive immunity against cancer. PMID:27626058

  16. Analysis of prescription database extracted from standard textbooks of traditional Dai medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional Dai Medicine (TDM) is one of the four major ethnomedicine of China. In 2007 a group of experts produced a set of seven Dai medical textbooks on this subject. The first two were selected as the main data source to analyse well recognized prescriptions. Objective To quantify patterns of prescriptions, common ingredients, indications and usages of TDM. Methods A relational database linking the prescriptions, ingredients, herb names, indications, and usages was set up. Frequency of pattern of combination and common ingredients were tabulated. Results A total of 200 prescriptions and 402 herbs were compiled. Prescriptions based on "wind" disorders, a detoxification theory that most commonly deals with symptoms of digestive system diseases, accounted for over one third of all prescriptions. The major methods of preparations mostly used roots and whole herbs. Conclusion The information extracted from the relational database may be useful for understanding symptomatic treatments. Antidote and detoxification theory deserves further research. PMID:22931752

  17. The potential of imaging spectrometry (DAIS 7915) for the monitoring of recultivation activities in mining areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Lehmann, F.; Rothfuss, H.

    1996-08-01

    DLR`s airborne Daedalus-ATM scanner and the new Digital Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (DAIS 7915) were used to map the area of a former uranium mining site in Eastern Germany. The spectral reflectance and temperature images derived after the calibration and atmospheric correction of the data are very helpful in assessing potential environmental risks related to this site. Mapping of temperature anomalies, differentiation of surface materials - relevant for the recultivation of the site and the assessment of the hydrological situation - are activities that are addressed in this study. Preliminary results show that the radiometric quality of the DAIS in combination with its spectral coverage allows a better discrimination of surface materials and an improved understanding of effects in the thermal wavelength range.

  18. Aesthetic satisfaction scoring - introducing an aesthetic numeric analogue scale (ANA-scale).

    PubMed

    Funk, Wolfgang; Podmelle, Fred; Guiol, Claudia; Metelmann, Hans Robert

    2012-07-01

    To objectively and reproducibly assess the outcome of aesthetic procedures remains one of the major, unmet challenges in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery. Frequently employed scoring systems for the evaluation of aesthetic procedures are confounded by observer bias, be it that of the patient or of the surgeon. A new approach of pragmatic and simple scoring is the ANA [Aesthetic Numeric Analogue] scale, which facilitates the objective, reproducible, standardized and internationally uniform evaluation of aesthetic procedure outcome by converting all ratings for any kind of aesthetic procedures from a subjective value to an objective figure. The intention of the ANA-scale is to relate aesthetic satisfaction from wording to figures and by this create a rating system. The study is arranging matching pairs of verbal description and figures to finally queue up generating a scale. The clinical feasibility of this rating system is demonstrated in a surgical case. As a detail of the results the influence of the viewer's age to the aesthetic benefit assessment is obvious. In summary the ANA-scale looks to be a tool useful in individual treatment protocols as well as analysis of different techniques of aesthetic surgery for rating of the pure aesthetic satisfaction of the patients.

  19. The "nuts & bolts" of becoming an aesthetic provider: part 2-building your aesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Part 2 of this three-part series of articles on becoming an aesthetic provider centers on the steps necessary to build an aesthetic practice. We will discuss the legal (e.g., licensure, scope of practice, malpractice, and documentation) and the business aspects (e.g., "your brand," staff development, networking, marketing, and revenue possibilities) of building a successful aesthetic practice. On the basis of years of experience, "pearls and pitfalls" will be discussed so novice, intermediate, and advanced aesthetic providers can minimize mistakes and maximize their success in this exciting and growing profession.

  20. Aesthetic satisfaction scoring - introducing an aesthetic numeric analogue scale (ANA-scale).

    PubMed

    Funk, Wolfgang; Podmelle, Fred; Guiol, Claudia; Metelmann, Hans Robert

    2012-07-01

    To objectively and reproducibly assess the outcome of aesthetic procedures remains one of the major, unmet challenges in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery. Frequently employed scoring systems for the evaluation of aesthetic procedures are confounded by observer bias, be it that of the patient or of the surgeon. A new approach of pragmatic and simple scoring is the ANA [Aesthetic Numeric Analogue] scale, which facilitates the objective, reproducible, standardized and internationally uniform evaluation of aesthetic procedure outcome by converting all ratings for any kind of aesthetic procedures from a subjective value to an objective figure. The intention of the ANA-scale is to relate aesthetic satisfaction from wording to figures and by this create a rating system. The study is arranging matching pairs of verbal description and figures to finally queue up generating a scale. The clinical feasibility of this rating system is demonstrated in a surgical case. As a detail of the results the influence of the viewer's age to the aesthetic benefit assessment is obvious. In summary the ANA-scale looks to be a tool useful in individual treatment protocols as well as analysis of different techniques of aesthetic surgery for rating of the pure aesthetic satisfaction of the patients. PMID:21872486

  1. Aesthetics and reconstruction--seeing before cutting.

    PubMed

    Clark, David P

    2003-12-01

    In order to restore a specific form during aesthetic surgery it is self-evident that the surgeon needs to know the form exists. But more than this simple form restoration, the development of aesthetic restoration suggests a specific restoration in the context of the whole form. Developing a disciplined method of visualizing the problem is the first step toward being able to start an aesthetic sense or eye. Careful study of master artists drawings often forces the surgeon to simplify and concentrate not on parts, but parts as they relate to the whole face. Often the artist, as with the successful surgeon, must continually alternate consideration of a specific part with consideration of the whole. This discussion is meant to provide a few relationships and constructs so that the surgeon may start on the journey to development of the aesthetic eye.

  2. Silberman and the British on Aesthetic Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1973-01-01

    Author describes two instructive ways of illustrating the principal business of aesthetic education and summarizes the way in which the notion of a form of understanding is dealt with by Dearden. (Author/RK)

  3. Theory of Aesthetic Education: A Polish Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojnar, Irena

    1978-01-01

    Poland is the backdrop for this discussion of the contemporary theoretical concepts of aesthetic education. Art is seen as the essential element of communicating cultural values, and creating a region of common feelings and experiences. (Author/RK)

  4. Why Sally Can Draw: An Aesthetic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jessica

    1993-01-01

    The natural graphic talents of very young children do not deteriorate with age. Rather, aesthetic symbols are progressively devalued in the curriculum. Greater acknowledgement of the importance of graphic symbolization will improve symbolic literacy and contribute to cognitive development. (SK)

  5. through the Use of Aesthetic Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crim, Courtney L.; Kennedy, Kimberley D.; Thornton, Jenifer S.

    2013-01-01

    multiple intelligences, and aesthetic representations. Next, it presents the methodology, reports findings, and discusses themes related to the authors' research questions. Finally, it concludes that tapping into students' multiple intelligence strength(s) is an…

  6. Aesthetics in synthesis and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Benner, Steven A

    2012-12-01

    Physicists frequently allow aesthetics to guide their science. Chemists sometimes do. Biologists rarely do. They have encountered too frequently the consequences of the Darwinian 'hack'. The biological parts delivered by Darwinian processes are rarely simple, efficient, or elegant solutions to the biological problems that they address. Nevertheless, as humans, we seek to find aesthetics within our activities. In general, however, it is hard to distinguish what we say is beautiful from what is, in reality, utilitarian.

  7. The art of nursing: an aesthetics?

    PubMed

    de Raeve, L

    1998-09-01

    This article explores the question of whether or not the 'art' of nursing can properly be described as an 'aesthetics'. The author concludes that, although much nursing literature on the subject is confused and even incoherent, there is nevertheless some justification for seeing a connection between the art of nursing and aesthetics. The philosophical writings of Martha Nussbaum and Iris Murdoch are used to support this position.

  8. Brain correlates of aesthetic judgment of beauty.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Höfel, Lea; Cramon, D Yves V

    2006-01-01

    Functional MRI was used to investigate the neural correlates of aesthetic judgments of beauty of geometrical shapes. Participants performed evaluative aesthetic judgments (beautiful or not?) and descriptive symmetry judgments (symmetric or not?) on the same stimulus material. Symmetry was employed because aesthetic judgments are known to be often guided by criteria of symmetry. Novel, abstract graphic patterns were presented to minimize influences of attitudes or memory-related processes and to test effects of stimulus symmetry and complexity. Behavioral results confirmed the influence of stimulus symmetry and complexity on aesthetic judgments. Direct contrasts showed specific activations for aesthetic judgments in the frontomedian cortex (BA 9/10), bilateral prefrontal BA 45/47, and posterior cingulate, left temporal pole, and the temporoparietal junction. In contrast, symmetry judgments elicited specific activations in parietal and premotor areas subserving spatial processing. Interestingly, beautiful judgments enhanced BOLD signals not only in the frontomedian cortex, but also in the left intraparietal sulcus of the symmetry network. Moreover, stimulus complexity caused differential effects for each of the two judgment types. Findings indicate aesthetic judgments of beauty to rely on a network partially overlapping with that underlying evaluative judgments on social and moral cues and substantiate the significance of symmetry and complexity for our judgment of beauty.

  9. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted.

  10. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted. PMID:27029088

  11. Aesthetics, the Arts, and Education: The Painter as a Model in Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munski, Marilyn L.

    Arguing that the visual arts serve as the focus for potential aesthetic experience in the discipline of art education, this paper describes the influence of the sensory elements of aesthetic experience in nature and other art forms on the work of three artists--Kandinsky, Van Gogh, and Picasso--and suggests that teachers can enrich students'…

  12. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  13. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures. PMID:18207423

  14. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures.

  15. Dynamic stimuli: accentuating aesthetic preference biases.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Trista E; Harms, Victoria L; Elias, Lorin J

    2014-01-01

    Despite humans' preference for symmetry, artwork often portrays asymmetrical characteristics that influence the viewer's aesthetic preference for the image. When presented with asymmetrical images, aesthetic preference is often given to images whose content flows from left-to-right and whose mass is located on the right of the image. Cerebral lateralization has been suggested to account for the left-to-right directionality bias; however, the influence of cultural factors, such as scanning habits, on aesthetic preference biases is debated. The current research investigates aesthetic preference for mobile objects and landscapes, as previous research has found contrasting preference for the two image types. Additionally, the current experiment examines the effects of dynamic movement on directionality preference to test the assumption that static images are perceived as aesthetically equivalent to dynamic images. After viewing mirror-imaged pairs of pictures and videos, right-to-left readers failed to show a preference bias, whereas left-to-right readers preferred stimuli with left-to-right directionality regardless of the location of the mass. The directionality bias in both reading groups was accentuated by the videos, but the bias was significantly stronger in left-to-right readers. The findings suggest that scanning habits moderate the leftward bias resulting from hemispheric specialization and that dynamic stimuli further fluent visual processing.

  16. Aesthetic quality inference for online fashion shopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Allebach, Jan

    2014-03-01

    On-line fashion communities in which participants post photos of personal fashion items for viewing and possible purchase by others are becoming increasingly popular. Generally, these photos are taken by individuals who have no training in photography with low-cost mobile phone cameras. It is desired that photos of the products have high aesthetic quality to improve the users' online shopping experience. In this work, we design features for aesthetic quality inference in the context of online fashion shopping. Psychophysical experiments are conducted to construct a database of the photos' aesthetic evaluation, specifically for photos from an online fashion shopping website. We then extract both generic low-level features and high-level image attributes to represent the aesthetic quality. Using a support vector machine framework, we train a predictor of the aesthetic quality rating based on the feature vector. Experimental results validate the efficacy of our approach. Metadata such as the product type are also used to further improve the result.

  17. [A "dialogue" between the aesthetics of nursing and philosophy].

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hsiu; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2012-02-01

    Nursing aesthetics belong to the broader school of aesthetics, a branch of philosophy, as well as the nursing arts, an element of professional nursing. The philosophy of aesthetics recognizes the connection between an author and appreciators and identifies both substantive and abstract aesthetic experiences in interpersonal communication through the fine arts. Nursing aesthetics values the meaningful moments of patients, is sensitive to the influences of different circumstances and situations, and appreciates the unique qualities of humanness. Nursing aesthetics is emancipatory knowledge and involves empirical, ethical and personal knowing. The article is based on a search of OvidSP and Chinese Electronic Periodical Services (CEPS) database references using key words including aesthetic, aesthetics, art of nursing, or nursing aesthetics as well as a review of books related to aesthetics, knowledge construction, and nursing aesthetics. Authors determined definitions as defined by nursing experts and the applications thereof in clinical practice. This article aimed to illustrate that the ultimate concern of philosophy is "goodness" and that the foundation of caring behaviors is "love". In practice, nursing aesthetics is expressed through empathy, appreciation, inspiration and the therapeutic use of the self. Through aesthetic knowing and enhanced perceptual sensibility and reflection, nurses can transform intuitive knowing into art-acts and ultimately enhance nursing care quality.

  18. The unique contribution of elements of smile aesthetics to psychosocial well-being.

    PubMed

    Lukez, A; Pavlic, A; Trinajstic Zrinski, M; Spalj, S

    2015-04-01

    Pleasant smile aesthetics is an important contributory factor to psychosocial well-being. The aim of this study was to determine the psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics. The study was cross-sectional on a convenient sample that included patients, pupils, students and faculty staff. A total of 155 subjects (36% male) aged 12-39 (mean age 21, interquartile range 19-23) were included. Occlusal characteristics were recorded by the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need, and smiling frontal view photographs were obtained. Fourteen variables were measured using photogrammetric analysis: smile width, visibility of buccal corridors, maximum teeth exposure, total gingival display, lip thickness, degree of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth in maxillary intercanine sector. Psychometric instruments included the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Statistical analysis comprised multiple linear regressions. Malocclusion severity is the most important predictor of psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics and self-esteem, the unique contribution of which accounts for a total of 4-27% of variability. Female gender is associated with higher psychological influence of dental aesthetics while male gender and older age with self-esteem. Malocclusions have higher psychosocial impact than parameters of mini- and micro-aesthetics of smile related to visibility of buccal corridors, amount of teeth exposure, gingival display, lip thickness, presence of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth. It appears that people are not as focused on details of their smile as they are on distinctive malposition of teeth.

  19. Aesthetic considerations of the cleft lip operation.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, T; Keyama, A; Asada, K; Shinomiya, S; Aoyama, R

    1986-01-01

    The results of a cleft lip operation are checked from the anterior, the profile, and the caudal views and even if the deformities are minimal, for aesthetic reasons they should be repaired. Philtrum length, philtrum shape, philtrum depth, nasolabial triangular area, vermilion thickness, Cupid's bow peak, horizontal upper lip groove, vermilion border, alar size, depth of alar groove, nasal deviation, nostril shape, nasal tip, columella height, sill shape, columella width, and facial balance of the anterior, profile, and caudal views are used as aesthetic checkpoints for the results of a cleft lip operation. If deformities are found, the aesthetic plastic surgeon should repair them to achieve a more satisfactory result. In addition, augmentation rhinoplasty, augmentation mentoplasty, or other craniofacial surgery may be performed.

  20. Radioiodine in the atmosphere after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Luke S; Dickson, Raymond S; Glowa, Glenn A

    2016-01-01

    About 160 PBq of (131)I was released into the atmosphere during the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The chemistry of radioiodine is complicated, and it can be released in several different forms. In addition, the different physical forms, like molecular iodine, aerosol-form iodine, or organic iodine, would have all behaved differently once in the atmosphere, and would have been removed at different rates. These releases were detected by monitoring stations throughout Japan, and from these measurements, key insights can be made about the different chemical forms that were released, as well as the persistence of each in the environment.

  1. The biological roots of aesthetics and art.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Bernd

    2013-07-18

    Animals' choice behavior is driven by motivation that is attributable to both innate urges and from positive and negative reinforcements. Using a comparative approach as well as experimental evidence, I explore how the first involves fitness-enhancing benefits from aesthetics that are derived from ancestral choices via natural selection. Innate urges and aesthetics help guide animals to produce appropriate positive and negative choices that are species-specific. Choices of food, habitat and mates or associates are considered. I propose that art is not a uniquely human product, but a representation or an extension of the maker, as are the ornaments, displays, and songs of a bird.

  2. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically “safe” materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  3. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology.

  4. The neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation.

    PubMed

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Agnati, Luigi; Huston, Joseph P; Mora, Francisco; Nadal, Marcos

    2011-06-01

    The study of the cognitive and neural underpinnings of aesthetic appreciation by means of neuroimaging techniques has yielded a wealth of fascinating information. Although the results of these studies have been somewhat divergent, here we provide an integrative view of the early approaches, which identified some of the core mechanisms involved in aesthetic preference. Then, a number of more specific issues under the perspective of recent work are addressed. Finally, we propose a framework to accommodate these findings and we explore future prospects for the emerging field of neuroaesthetics. PMID:21421021

  5. The history of aesthetic medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Nils; Luebberding, Stefanie; Sattler, Gerhard; Hanke, C William; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sadick, Neil

    2013-07-01

    The history of beauty is as old as mankind itself--throughout history people have tried to improve their attractiveness and to enhance their beauty. The technical basis for many of nowadays procedures like lipoplasty, breast augmentation or rhinoplasty was thereby initiated more than a hundred years ago and evolved to the modern standards of today. The aim of this article is to recall the early days of aesthetic medicine and show the swift progress up to the highly specialized medical discipline of our modern time. Combining the past, present and future of aesthetic medicine, allows to incorporate this perspective and ultimately to delivery better patient care. PMID:23884484

  6. Treatment of aesthetic problems in paediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Rosemary A; Welbury, Richard R

    2003-01-01

    Aesthetic problems in childhood and adolescence can have a significant effect on psychosocial development and interaction with peers. Abnormalities of shape, size, colour and structure of the whole or part of the anterior dentition of children can lead to such problems. This article outlines the most appropriate options for the clinical management of different aetiological categories of aesthetic problems, and develops a hierarchy of intervention that should be pursued in a logical order until a satisfactory cosmetic outcome is achieved. These techniques are readily available to most dental practitioners and there is no reason for a child to have to wait until late adolescence for treatment. PMID:12955952

  7. Linked spaces of vulnerability: HIV risk amongst migrant Dai women and their left-behind husbands in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Rui; Lyttleton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In one county of Southwest China bordering Myanmar, large numbers of minority Dai women leave to work in southern Thailand. Many are married and they leave behind husbands and children, sending remittances and returning home intermittently. These women commonly establish relations with Chinese/Malaysian men in their worksites--massage parlours in the tourist sites near the Malaysian border. These men become second husbands just as the Dai women become second wives. This paper examines the complicated set of HIV risks and assumptions that emerge from the circular Dai exodus to Thailand and the manner in which transnational employment networks impact on domestic and sexual relationships for women and their non-migrant husbands back home. PMID:23484495

  8. Curator and Critic: Role of the Assessor in Aesthetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Assessment in aesthetic fields presents a myriad of challenges in the higher education environment. This paper uses a metaphorical representation to explore the role of assessors within aesthetic assessment settings in higher education. It begins with a discussion of aesthetic fields and an exploration of the role of assessment in this area.…

  9. Chairs, Cars, and Bridges: Teaching Aesthetics from the Everyday

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zande, Robin Vande

    2007-01-01

    It is very typical for students in K-12 art education to study aesthetics based on artistic objects. Artistic objects, however, need not be the sole source for aesthetic investigation. In this article, the author discusses the use of designed objects such as chairs, cars, and bridges in the discussion of aesthetic concepts. Students, as consumers…

  10. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austring, Bennye D.; Sorensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic activities in the potential space and in this way…

  11. The Aesthetics of Representation: Dramatic Texts and Dramatic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    There are several ways in which aesthetic discourses might be positioned in the field of drama education. While some might locate "aesthetics" in the cognitive or interpretive realm of learning, and others the affective or philosophical realm. In this article, the author has chosen to speak of the discourses of aesthetics as they relate to both…

  12. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration...

  13. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration...

  14. The Roles of the Aesthetic in Mathematical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Mathematicians have long claimed that the aesthetic plays a fundamental role in the development and appreciation of mathematical knowledge. To date, however, it has been unclear how the aesthetic might contribute to the teaching and learning of school mathematics. This is due in part to the fact that mathematicians' aesthetic claims have been…

  15. Optimizing implant placement and aesthetics: technology to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Timothy

    2009-08-01

    The goal for this patient was to create an aesthetic smile design using individual dental implants to reconstruct the edentulous spaces. Procera crowns aesthetically restored the separate and distinct teeth (Figures 18 and 19). The patient was thrilled with the final aesthetic result, and she was able to smile confidently again.

  16. James Mark Baldwin and the Aesthetic Development of the Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper recounts the ideas of the American cognitive-developmental psychologist James Mark Baldwin (1861-1934) on aesthetic experience: his conceptualization of aesthetic experience as immediate, semblant, personalized, and idealized; and his three-stage theory of aesthetic development. (SJL)

  17. Aesthetics in Asian Child Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice S.

    This speech presents observations, made on a trip in June 1976, of the aesthetic environments of children in China, Japan, and Hong Kong. Home, school and day care environments are compared in terms of living and play space, room decor, the presence of art and toys, dramatic play and performance, music, nature and outdoor appreciation, food and…

  18. The Aesthetic Classroom and the Beautiful Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores an analogy: A well-played soccer game has much in common with a well-taught lesson or course. Aesthetic pedagogy, as conceived by Dewey, Gadamer, and contemporary theorists and practitioners, is set alongside the world's favorite sport, including events from the 2006 World Cup and the autobiography of Pele. The discussion moves…

  19. Creative Writing and Schiller's Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Peter

    2007-01-01

    For academics committed to the idea of an all-round aesthetic education, one of the great successes of the last thirty years has been the tremendous expansion of creative writing classes. Despite the dramatic expansion of creative writing as an academic discipline, the methods, ideals, and values of creative writing workshops have very often been…

  20. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  1. Literary Aesthetics and the Black Woman Writer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryar, Imani L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how the aesthetic concerns of African Americans are reflected in the writing of Black women and introduces the characteristics of African culture as they relate to African-American culture. Emphasizes the intuitive musical quality of Black language as expressed in poetry and fiction. (FMW)

  2. Incorporating the Aesthetic Dimension into Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott; Wolfe, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study that was undertaken to discover not only the belief and intent behind the everyday opportunities that four exemplary teachers offered their high performing students but what activities they incorporated into their everyday lessons in an attempt to make sense of how aesthetic experiences may enhance learning. The…

  3. The Aesthetic Potential of Global Issues Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudelli, William; Hewitt, Randall

    2010-01-01

    There is a despondency and desperation about schools, and thereby curriculum, that too often fails to teach for and about something more than narrow, capitalist-driven, techno-rationalist ends. The prevailing educational theory undergirding schools, as well as the conceptualization of curriculum entailed, lacks an aesthetic and spiritual rationale…

  4. "ZEAL": An Aesthetic Revolution for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Barbara A.; French, James Joss

    2012-01-01

    Educators are hesitant to venture into the unknown landscape within a child's heart and mind because they have throughout their education experienced the same non-compassionate teachers. This research proposes an awakening, making a wave for a new revolution of compassionate teachers that institutes aesthetic methodology to address relevant…

  5. [Promoting aesthetics to enhance nursing services].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

    2011-10-01

    Nursing is a client-oriented profession dedicated to helping people. Nurses are responsible to both help relieve client physical and psychological symptoms and assist clients as necessary to die with dignity. As such, nursing schools should strengthen not only science and professional skills, but also student aesthetics. Today, fast changing medical technology is improving the treatment of diseases and extending average life spans. The National Health Insurance System in Taiwan, however, is increasingly restricting nursing manpower and raising staff workloads. Nurses are increasingly required to sacrifice ethical principles and conduct technical operations in medical settings defined by stringent cost controls. Nursing aesthetics cannot provide appropriate levels of care dignity and quality to clients under severe time and emotional distress constraints. Burnout, dissatisfaction, strained doctor-nurse relationships and lower quality care are all-too-frequent results. Under the circumstances, nursing functions are negatively influenced and fine nursing service is difficult to achieve. This article reviewed the literature to discuss the definition and meaning of aesthetics and relative factors that are difficult to define in clinical settings. This article may assist nurses to present aesthetics, upgrade care quality and further enhance nursing services.

  6. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  7. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  8. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit

    2008-01-01

    When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ‘Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery’. PMID:20174541

  9. The Relevance of Sociology to Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Janet

    1981-01-01

    The author maintains that art is a social product and that, in the teaching of or about the arts, the social setting in which the arts exist must be acknowledged. She discusses British developments in the sociology of art. (Paper presented at the Aesthetic Education Conference, London, September 1980.) (Editor/SJL)

  10. Foucault, Counselling and the Aesthetics of Existence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Michel Foucault was drawn late in life to study the "arts of the self" in Greco-Roman culture as a basis, following Nietzsche, for what he called an "aesthetics of existence." By this, he meant a set of creative and experimental processes and techniques by which an individual turns him- or herself into a work of art. For Nietzsche, it was above…

  11. Therapy and the Aesthetics of the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Post-structuralists argue that personal identity is a function of societal power dynamics. This becomes especially problematic for persons recruited into problem-saturated identities. In this paper, inspired by Foucault's call for us to "create ourselves as a work of art" (p. 262), I explore the therapeutic value of an aesthetic approach…

  12. An Aesthetic Value Scale of the Rorschach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insua, Ana Maria

    1981-01-01

    An aesthetic value scale of the Rorschach cards was built by the successive interval method. This scale was compared with the ratings obtained by means of the Semantic Differential Scales and was found to successfully differentiate sexes in their judgment of card attractiveness. (Author)

  13. Symposium: Aesthetic Education in Japan Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Ako; Masuda, Kingo; Kaneda, Takuya; Hino, Yoko; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Kinichi; Nagamori, Motoki; Yamada, Kazumi; Motomura, Kenta; Ishizaki, Kazhiro; Okada, Masashi; Kaneko, Yoshimasa; Naoe, Toshio; Fujie, Mitsuru; Iwano, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide readers with a general understanding of Japanese art and aesthetics education and its interaction with other cultures. The essays cover a variety of topics, including historical, cross-cultural, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Following an introduction by Ako Okazaki, the following papers are…

  14. [Aesthetic reconstructive surgery of the lip].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, P; Arnaud, D; Huguier, V; Chemli, H; Dhouib, M; Bali, D; Darsonval, V

    2013-10-01

    Lip reconstruction can be performed with numerous surgical techniques. The aim was here to present these usual techniques and to focus on the details that can be used to obtain the most favourable results. The goal of this surgery, that represents a compromise between function and aesthetic, has to be kept in mind to prevent mistakes that decrease the quality of the result.

  15. Dewey's Aesthetics and Today's Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jiwon

    2009-01-01

    This article opens by raising a need to examine today's moral education for a new century. John Dewey insists that "arts are educative," so that "they open the door to an expansion of meaning and to an enlarged capacity to experience the world." This insight retains remarkable implications for today's moral education. Aesthetic experience is…

  16. Pragmatic Aesthetics and the Autistic Artist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Kyle; Barnbaum, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    There are many prominent examples of artists with autism. However, even when confronted with evidence of these accomplished "autistic savants", pragmatic aesthetic theories cannot adequately account for the work of these accomplished artists as "artists". This article first examines the nature of autism and explores a prominent psychological…

  17. Seeing, Feeling, Evoking: Imagery and Aesthetic Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleckenstein, K.

    Louise Rosenblatt differentiates between two reading transactions: efferent reading, or concentrating on the information in a text, and aesthetic reading, a holistic process by which the reader "lives through" a text-world event. Current research in the whole language approach to reading instruction attests to the growing stature of aesthetic…

  18. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit

    2008-10-01

    When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered 'Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery'.

  19. Art's Detour: A Clash of Aesthetic Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertz, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Both John Dewey and Martin Heidegger thought that art's audience had to take a detour in order to appreciate or understand a work of art. They wrote about this around the same time (mid-1930s) and independently of one another, so this similar circumstance in the history of aesthetics is unusual since they come from very different philosophical…

  20. Moving Aesthetic Education Into the Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubart, Mark

    1976-01-01

    What is basic to the school isn't so much the arts themselves as the human capacities, perceptions, skills and critical judgments that are the very stuff of the artistic process. Gives reasons why aesthetic education deserves a central place in the school curriculum. (Author/RK)

  1. Midface anatomy, aging, and aesthetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Andre Yuan; de la Torre, Jorge I

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the key anatomic structures in the region of the midface, including important surface and bony landmarks, innervation, blood supply, muscle layers, and fat compartments. It also discusses changes in these structures related to the aging process and aesthetic analysis of the midface to aid with operative planning. PMID:25921564

  2. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  3. Do Reading Habits Influence Aesthetic Preferences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Allaith, Zainab

    2013-01-01

    We tested the idea that the directionality of a person's primary writing system has influences outside the domain of reading and writing, specifically influences on aesthetic preferences. The results of several previous studies suggest that people whose primary writing system goes from left to right prefer pictures of moving and static…

  4. Reconceptualizing Play: Aesthetic Self-Definitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guss, Faith

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to trouble the identity of children's dramatic play(ing). It contains two interweaving threads of discourse. In one thread lies a discussion of how children can trouble and extend their own identities through the aesthetic form-languages and conventions they employ and deploy in their dramatic playing/pretend playing.…

  5. McLuhan: The Aesthete as Historian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Attributes McLuhan's theories about media to his interpretation of history as an interpenetrating sequence of three processes: all history originated in oral societies, which were fragmented by literacy, but electronic media are returning society to that original state through implosion. Reviews the historical, literary, and aesthetic sources for…

  6. 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident: summary of regional radioactive deposition monitoring results.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsumi

    2012-09-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting Tsunami on March 11, 2011, serious accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has been occurred. Huge amounts of radionuclides were released in atmosphere and ocean. Japanese prefectural governments have carried out environmental radioactivity monitoring; external dose rate, radioactivity measurements in environmental samples and others. Since March 18, 2011, daily and monthly deposition samples were collected in 45 stations covering Japanese Islands and radionuclides in the deposition samples were determined. We summarize radioactive deposition data reported by Japanese Government and study the depositional behaviors of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides. The results revealed that Fukushima-derived radioactive cloud dominantly affected in the central and eastern part of Honshu-Island, although it affected all of Japanese land area and also western North Pacific. The temporal change of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs revealed that the apparent atmospheric residence time of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in sites within 300 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPPis about 10 d.

  7. Aesthetic Crown Lengthening Using Chu Aesthetic Gauges And Evaluation of Biologic Width Healing

    PubMed Central

    Gujjari, Sheela; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The principles of biologic width have governed the literature and served as a clinical guideline during the evaluation of perio- restorative interrelationships. An adequate understanding of this concept is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, aesthetics and comfort of the dentition. Biologic width violation has become a common problem as most of the practitioners tend to underestimate the amount of tooth structure that must be exposed during a crown lengthening procedure. Also, adding to the confusion, there is a lack of general agreement regarding the amount of tooth structure that must be exposed above the crest of bone for restorative purposes. Aim The aim of this study was to perform aesthetic crown lengthening using Chu aesthetic gauges and evaluate the healing of biologic width. Materials and Methods A total of 90 teeth in 15 patients were included into the study of which 30 teeth required crown lengthening and 60 teeth shared a proximal surface with the experimental teeth. Aesthetic crown lengthening was performed using the Chu aesthetic gauges. Presurgical and intraoperative data were recorded at baseline, three and six months at six sites per tooth. Results The computed data suggest that although the positional changes of the periodontal tissues stabilize by three months, the biologic width if adequate crown lengthening is carried out re-establishes itself by three months to the original vertical levels and further gets stabilized by six months. Conclusion A step by step approach to periodontal aesthetic crown lengthening using Chu aesthetic gauge can serve to be vital for successful, predictable, and aesthetic restorative outcome. PMID:26894176

  8. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words. PMID:18820963

  9. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words.

  10. Music, New Aesthetic and Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David; Grigolini, Paolo

    This paper illustrates an algorithm to generate a complex acoustic stimulus whose statistical properties are as close as possible to the non-stationary dynamics revealed by the current analysis of the electro-encephalogram activity of the human brain. Thus, the composition is driven by crucial events, namely renewal non-Poisson events with an inter-time distribution density ψ(τ), which is an inverse power law with index μ, fitting the condition 1 ≤ μ ≤ 2. We find that the music composition is more attractive when we fill the time region between two consecutive crucial events so as to enhance the leading role of μ. In all cases the spectra markedly depart from the ideal 1/f condition, thereby suggesting a shift from the 1/f noise perspective of the pioneer work of Voss and Clark to the Zipf’s law perspective advocated by more recent work on music composition.

  11. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation.

    PubMed

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J; Mirasso, Claudio R; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-06-18

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction.

  12. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation

    PubMed Central

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction. PMID:23754437

  13. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  14. Population-based assessment of visual impairment among ethnic Dai adults in a rural community in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Yan; Li, Jun; Zhao, Chun-Hua; Qian, Deng-Juan; Niu, Zhiqiang; Shen, Wei; Yuan, Yuansheng; Zhong, Hua; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dai ethnicity is one of the major Chinese ethnic minorities with a population of about 1.2 million. We aimed to determine the prevalence and potential causes of visual impairment (VI) among ethnic Dai adults aged 50 years or older in a rural community in China. A population-based survey including 2163 ethnic Dai people (80.5%) was undertaken using a random cluster sampling strategy. The detailed eye examination was performed after pupil dilation by trained study ophthalmologists and optometrists. Presenting visual acuity (PVA) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study logMAR chart and VI was defined as a VA of less than 20/63 in the better-seeing eye. The overall prevalence of presenting blindness and low vision was 3.0% (95% CI, 2.3–3.7) and 13.3% (95% CI, 11.9–14.8), respectively. The prevalence estimates were reduced to 2.1% (95% CI, 1.5–2.8) and 6.7% (95% CI, 5.7–7.8) when BCVA was considered. Men were more likely to be affected by low vision but less likely to be blind compared with women. Cataract accounted for 62.7% of presenting low vision and 68.8% of presenting blindness, respectively. In conclusion, VI was a significant health concern in Dai Chinese in China. PMID:26932265

  15. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Reliability and Maintainability Model Users Guide. Final Report, May 1975-July 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    This report provides a complete guide to the stand alone mode operation of the reliability and maintenance (R&M) model, which was developed to facilitate the performance of design versus cost trade-offs within the digital avionics information system (DAIS) acquisition process. The features and structure of the model, its input data requirements,…

  16. The effect of malocclusion and self-perceived aesthetics on the self-esteem of a sample of Jordanian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Badran, Serene Adnan

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of normative treatment need, perceived social impact of malocclusion and satisfaction with dental appearance on self-perceived treatment need, self-perceived aesthetics, and self-esteem; the influence of self-perceived need and aesthetics on self-esteem; and whether receipt of orthodontic treatment influences self-esteem. A questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 410 students (195 males and 215 females) aged 14-16 years. Self-esteem was measured using the Global Negative Self-Evaluation (GSE) scale. The Aesthetic and Dental Health Components (AC and DHC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) were used to assess orthodontic treatment need. Students' AC scores determined their self-perceived dental aesthetics. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyse the association between all variables, and multiple stepwise regression analysis to study the effect of independent variables on self-perceived need for treatment, self-perceived aesthetics, and self-esteem. A correlation existed between the students' and examiner's AC scores (P < 0.01); however, students were less critical in evaluating their aesthetic appearance. Students who perceived themselves in need of treatment had a great need for treatment, as assessed by the DHC and the AC of the IOTN (r = 0.421 and 0.489, respectively), were dissatisfied with their dental appearance (r = 0.542) and avoided smiling to hide their teeth (r = 0.457). Students who scored high on the GSE scale perceived a need for orthodontic treatment, evaluated their dental aesthetics poorly, perceived an impact of malocclusion on social acceptance, and had a great normative orthodontic treatment need; the correlation, however, was weak with r values ranging from 0.134 to 0.317. Students who had received orthodontic treatment showed greater self-esteem than those who had not, although the correlation was weak. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance had a

  17. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  18. Aesthetic perception and its minimal content: a naturalistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Xenakis, Ioannis; Arnellos, Argyris

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic perception is one of the most interesting topics for philosophers and scientists who investigate how it influences our interactions with objects and states of affairs. Over the last few years, several studies have attempted to determine “how aesthetics is represented in an object,” and how a specific feature of an object could evoke the respective feelings during perception. Despite the vast number of approaches and models, we believe that these explanations do not resolve the problem concerning the conditions under which aesthetic perception occurs, and what constitutes the content of these perceptions. Adopting a naturalistic perspective, we here view aesthetic perception as a normative process that enables agents to enhance their interactions with physical and socio-cultural environments. Considering perception as an anticipatory and preparatory process of detection and evaluation of indications of potential interactions (what we call “interactive affordances”), we argue that the minimal content of aesthetic perception is an emotionally valued indication of interaction potentiality. Aesthetic perception allows an agent to normatively anticipate interaction potentialities, thus increasing sense making and reducing the uncertainty of interaction. This conception of aesthetic perception is compatible with contemporary evidence from neuroscience, experimental aesthetics, and interaction design. The proposed model overcomes several problems of transcendental, art-centered, and objective aesthetics as it offers an alternative to the idea of aesthetic objects that carry inherent values by explaining “the aesthetic” as emergent in perception within a context of uncertain interaction. PMID:25285084

  19. Aerial radiation monitoring around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using an unmanned helicopter.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 generated a series of large tsunami that seriously damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), which resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the environment. To provide further details regarding the distribution of air dose rate and the distribution of radioactive cesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) deposition on the ground within a radius of approximately 5 km from the nuclear power plant, we carried out measurements using an unmanned helicopter equipped with a radiation detection system. The distribution of the air dose rate at a height of 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground was calculated. Accordingly, the footprint of radioactive plumes that extended from the FDNPP was illustrated. PMID:25053518

  20. The Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident and its implications for the safety of nuclear power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William

    2016-05-01

    Five years ago the dramatic events in Fukushima that followed the massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011 sharpened the focus of scientists, engineers and general public on the broad range of technical, environmental and societal issues involved in assuring the safety of the world's nuclear power complex. They also called into question the potential of nuclear power to provide a growing, sustainable resource of CO2-free energy. The issues raised by Fukushima Dai-ichi have provoked urgent concern, not only because of the potential harm that could result from severe accidents or from intentional damage to nuclear reactors or to facilities involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, but also because of the extensive economic impact of those accidents and of the measures taken to avoid them.

  1. Aerial radiation monitoring around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using an unmanned helicopter.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 generated a series of large tsunami that seriously damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), which resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the environment. To provide further details regarding the distribution of air dose rate and the distribution of radioactive cesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) deposition on the ground within a radius of approximately 5 km from the nuclear power plant, we carried out measurements using an unmanned helicopter equipped with a radiation detection system. The distribution of the air dose rate at a height of 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground was calculated. Accordingly, the footprint of radioactive plumes that extended from the FDNPP was illustrated.

  2. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv.

  3. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv.

  4. An update on radioactive release and exposures after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear disaster

    PubMed Central

    Mclaughlin, P D; Jones, B; Maher, M M

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Richter scale 0.9-magnitude Tokohu earthquake and tsunami struck the northeast coast of Japan, resulting in widespread injury and loss of life. Compounding this tragic loss of life, a series of equipment and structural failures at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNP) resulted in the release of many volatile radioisotopes into the atmosphere. In this update, we detail currently available evidence about the nature of immediate radioactive exposure to FDNP workers and the general population. We contrast the nature of the radioactive exposure at FDNP with that which occurred at the Chernobyl power plant 25 years previously. Prediction of the exact health effects related to the FDNP release is difficult at present and this disaster provides the scientific community with a challenge to help those involved and to continue research that will improve our understanding of the potential complications of radionuclide fallout. PMID:22919005

  5. Workplace aesthetics: Impact of environments upon employee health?

    PubMed

    Schell, Elisabet; Theorell, Tores; Saraste, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Associations between self-reported need for aesthetic improvements in the workplace and the need for ergonomic improvement and health factors were investigated to determine the possible impact of aesthetic needs on job performance. The need for aesthetic improvements were compared with the need for ergonomic improvements. All employees at a Swedish broadcasting company were invited to participate in this cross sectional study. Of those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria the participation rate was 74% (1961/2641). Demographic data was obtained from company files and pre-validated questionnaire was used for data collections from the participants. additional questions on needs for improvement were developed, tested for repeatability, and demonstrated to be within acceptable limits. Differences between 'high rank' and 'low rank' aesthetic needs and ergonomic needs were correlated to set ups of demographic, work environmental and organisational and health variables.The perceived needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements showed significantly different distributions (p<0.001). Aesthetic needs were more frequently reported than ergonomic needs. There was no significant gender related difference in response distribution of aesthetic or ergonomic needs, whereas differences between occupational groups were shown (0.006 and 0.003). 'High rank' needs for aesthetic improvement were associated to psychologically demanding work, negative work stress, sleep disturbances, problems at work, musculoskeletal pain and lower age. Gender and physical training did not differ between 'high and low rank' responders regarding neither aesthetic nor ergonomic needs. Sick leave was stronger related to ergonomics. The independently tested associations with aesthetic needs were similar to, but fewer than those for ergonomic needs with regard to the variable set ups. Sixteen studied factors out of 24, showed significant difference between 'high and low rank' aesthetic needs, and 21/24 of

  6. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research. PMID:21655710

  7. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research.

  8. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members

  9. Stop "cruising for a bruising": mitigating bruising in aesthetic medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The quest to restore a more youthful appearance by filling and volumizing facial deformities and deficiencies continues to be an ongoing pursuit in the noninvasive aesthetics market. Bruising can result from the delivery of neuromodulators and dermal fillers--common tools in the aesthetic provider's armamentarium to combat the ravages of aging. There are steps both the aesthetic provider and the client can take to minimize the potential for bruising. This article focuses on the etiology of bruising, the pharmacological and herbal agents to avoid prior to an aesthetic procedure, techniques to utilize during aesthetic procedures that lessen the potential of bruise formation, and pharmacological and herbal agents to administer after an aesthetic procedure to ultimately mitigate bruise formation.

  10. Fechner revisited: towards an inclusive approach to aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh; Westphal-Fitch, Gesche

    2013-04-01

    Accepting Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) criteria for art appreciation would confine the study of aesthetics to those works for which historical information is available, mainly post-eighteenth-century Western "high art." We reject their contention that "correct" artistic understanding is limited to experts with detailed knowledge or education in art, which implies a narrowly elitist conception of aesthetics. Scientific aesthetics must be broadly inclusive.

  11. The Roles of Aesthetic Experience in Elementary School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, Britt; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2008-01-01

    The role of aesthetic experiences for learning was examined in elementary school science. Numerous authors have argued for a science education also involving aesthetic experiences, but few have examined what this means empirically. Recordings of children’s talk with each other and with the teacher during hands-on activities in nine different science units were made. How the children and teachers used aesthetic judgements and how these judgements were part of aesthetic experiences of the science assignments were analysed. For the analysis a pragmatist perspective was used, especially drawing on Dewey and the later Wittgenstein. The results showed how aesthetic judgements occurred in moments of anticipation and moments when the science activities were brought to fulfilment. In this way children used aesthetic judgements normatively about what belonged in science class and what to include and exclude. In this way aesthetic judgements were an important part of learning how to proceed in science class. In using aesthetic judgements the children also talked about their own place in science class and whether they belonged there or not. In this way aesthetic experience is tightly related to learning science as participation. Learning science also meant learning a special kind of aesthetics, that is, learning how to distinguish the science context from other contexts. The fact that children liked or disliked something outside school did not necessarily mean that it was experienced aesthetically in the same way in school, but needed to be re-learnt. What these results mean for science education is discussed at length. The connection between aesthetics and learning to observe is also briefly discussed.

  12. Sonic morphology: Aesthetic dimensional auditory spatial awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Martha M.

    The sound and ceramic sculpture installation, " Skirting the Edge: Experiences in Sound & Form," is an integration of art and science demonstrating the concept of sonic morphology. "Sonic morphology" is herein defined as aesthetic three-dimensional auditory spatial awareness. The exhibition explicates my empirical phenomenal observations that sound has a three-dimensional form. Composed of ceramic sculptures that allude to different social and physical situations, coupled with sound compositions that enhance and create a three-dimensional auditory and visual aesthetic experience (see accompanying DVD), the exhibition supports the research question, "What is the relationship between sound and form?" Precisely how people aurally experience three-dimensional space involves an integration of spatial properties, auditory perception, individual history, and cultural mores. People also utilize environmental sound events as a guide in social situations and in remembering their personal history, as well as a guide in moving through space. Aesthetically, sound affects the fascination, meaning, and attention one has within a particular space. Sonic morphology brings art forms such as a movie, video, sound composition, and musical performance into the cognitive scope by generating meaning from the link between the visual and auditory senses. This research examined sonic morphology as an extension of musique concrete, sound as object, originating in Pierre Schaeffer's work in the 1940s. Pointing, as John Cage did, to the corporeal three-dimensional experience of "all sound," I composed works that took their total form only through the perceiver-participant's participation in the exhibition. While contemporary artist Alvin Lucier creates artworks that draw attention to making sound visible, "Skirting the Edge" engages the perceiver-participant visually and aurally, leading to recognition of sonic morphology.

  13. Aesthetic Leadership (AL): Development and Implementation of Aesthetic Leadership Scale (ALS) of the School Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Soner; Oztoprak-Kavak, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to develop a scale for measuring the aesthetic leadership (AL) characteristics of the school directors and to show that it can be applicable. The population of the study is composed of the teachers who are on duty in the elementary, secondary and high schools located in Izmit, Kocaeli. Sample of this descriptive study comprises 400…

  14. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry.

  15. Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadlez, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    During the eighteenth century, amateurs as well as philosophers ventured critical commentary on the arts. Talk concerning taste or beauty or the sublime was so much a part of general discourse that even novelists of that era incorporated such subjects in their work. So it would not be surprising to find that perspectives on aesthetics are…

  16. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. PMID:26698020

  17. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  18. The "nuts & bolts" of becoming an aesthetic provider: part 3-maximizing your aesthetic practice and client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The final installment of this 3-part series of articles on becoming an aesthetic provider centers on the steps necessary to maximize an aesthetic medical practice and tips for optimal client outcomes. We discuss the importance of education for the aesthetic provider, the staff, and the client, as well as how to create client loyalty. On the basis of years of experience, "pearls and pitfalls" are discussed, so the novice, intermediate, and advanced aesthetic providers can minimize mistakes and maximize their success in this exciting and growing profession.

  19. Aesthetic surgery of the orbits and eyelids.

    PubMed

    Broujerdi, Joseph A

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the relevant anatomy, the aging process of the eyelid with periorbital structure, and how to evaluate patients for a proper surgical approach. A description is given of how to achieve an aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface to provide the patient with a natural youthful appearance. The paradigm in oculoplastic surgery has shifted to more conservative eyelid skin, muscle, and fat resection as well as more periorbital soft tissue lift, suspension, and volumization. Recent innovations and developments are discussed as well as the most common complications in eyelid and periorbital surgery.

  20. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Aesthetic Objects

    ScienceCinema

    Hart, George [SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York, United States

    2016-07-12

    Solid Freeform Fabrication (aka. Rapid Prototyping) equipment can produce beautiful three-dimensional objects of exquisite intricacy. To use this technology to its full potential requires spatial visualization in the designer and new geometric algorithms as tools. As both a sculptor and a research professor in the Computer Science department at Stony Brook University, George Hart is exploring algorithms for the design of elaborate aesthetic objects. In this talk, he will describe this work, show many images, and bring many physical models to display.

  1. Home-use devices in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C

    2014-12-01

    The world of aesthetic medicine is increasingly a consumer-driven market with a wide variety of home-use devices from which the consumer can choose for treating hair removal, hair loss, acne, facial rejuvenation, and other dermatologic conditions. Where these devices fit in the physician practice and consumer routine can be confusing, as scientific studies may be weak or lacking. The specifications, price, ease-of-use, maintenance, and technology can differ greatly between devices. Thus, the physician and consumer need to define exp. PMID:25830253

  2. Photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlmann, C.

    2006-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recent developments of photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications. The range of products covers lasers, continuous Xenon lamps, Intense Pulsed Light systems, and LEDs. We will mention several applications and how different photonics systems are used. We will also discuss methods combining photonics with other technologies. For example, in Photo Dynamic Therapy (PDT) this includes a drugs, or equally the combination of intense light pulses with Radio Frequency (RF) for applications like hair removal. We will also describe some new developments in photonics technology that affect the development of new products, showing the direction of market development. Additionally, some examples of new technology are shown.

  3. New Standards in Liquid Waste Treatment at Fukushima Dai-ichi - 13134

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, Paul; Milner, Tim; Ruffing, Jennifer; Poole, Scott; Townson, Paul; Jensen, Jesse

    2013-07-01

    The earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 severely damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant leading to the most severe nuclear incident since Chernobyl. Ongoing operations to cool the damaged reactors at the site have led to the generation of highly radioactive coolant water. This is currently mainly treated to remove Cs-137 and Cs-134 and passed through a reverse osmosis (RO) unit to reduce the salinity before being cycled back to the reactors. Because only the Cs isotopes are removed, the RO reject water still contains many radioactive isotopes and this has led to the accumulation of over 200,000 cubic meters (52 million gallons) of extremely contaminated water which is currently stored on site in tanks. EnergySolutions, in partnership with Toshiba, were contracted to develop a system to reduce 62 isotopes in this waste down to allowable levels. This was a significant technical challenge given the high background salt content of the wastewater, the variation in aqueous chemistry of the radioactive isotopes and the presence of non-active competing ions (e.g. Ca and Mg) which inhibit the removal of isotopes such as Sr-89 and Sr-90. Extensive testing was performed to design a suitable system that could meet the required decontamination goals. These tests were performed over a 6 month period at facilities available in the nearby Fukushima Dai-ni laboratory using actual waste samples. This data was then utilized to design a Multi Radioactive Nuclides Removal System (MRRS) for Fukushima which is a modified version of EnergySolutions' proprietary Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS)'. The stored tank waste is fed into a preliminary precipitation system where iron flocculation is performed to remove a number of isotopes, including Sb-125, Ru-106, Mn-54 and Co-60. The supernatant is then fed into a second precipitation tank where the pH is adjusted and the bulk of the Mg, Ca and Sr precipitated out as carbonates and hydroxides. After passing through a cross

  4. Color stability evaluation of aesthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Samra, Adriana Postiglione Bührer; Pereira, Stella Kossatz; Delgado, Leyla Cotrina; Borges, Christiane Phillipini

    2008-01-01

    Color match is one of the most important characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials. Maintenance of color throughout the functional lifetime of restorations is important for the durability of treatment. This characteristic is not constant among dental materials. The purpose of this research was to assess the color stability of five aesthetic restorative materials when immersed in a coffee solution. Seventy-one 17 mm x 1 mm specimens, divided into five groups, were made using one direct composite resin (Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G1), three indirect composite resins (Targis, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G2; Resilab Master, Wilcos - G3; belleGlass HP, Kerr - G4) and one porcelain (IPS Empress 2, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G5). The specimens were immersed in a coffee staining media for 15 days and stored under a controlled temperature of 37 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C in the dark. The evaluations were made after 1, 7 and 15 days by means of reflectance spectrophotometry. The data was submitted to two-way ANOVA (p < 0.005) and post hoc tests. Statistical difference was observed between G1 / G3 and the other groups; G2 / G4 and the other groups; and G5 and all the other groups. It was concluded that G1 and G3 showed significantly higher discoloration than the other groups. G2 and G4 showed intermediary pigmentation, while G5 showed the smallest changes.

  5. The aesthetic experience of 'contour binding'.

    PubMed

    Casco, Clara; Guzzon, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    To find the diagnostic spatial frequency information in different painting styles (cubism, impressionism and realism), we have compared sensitivity (d') in distinguishing signal (subject of the painting) from noise with normal, high-pass and low-pass filtered images at long (150 ms) and short (30 ms) exposure. We found that for cubist-style images, d' increases with high-pass filtering compared with normal and low-pass filtered images, but decreases with low-pass filtering compared with normal images. These results indicate that channels with high spatial resolution provide the diagnostic information to solve the binding problem. Sensitivity for images in impressionist style was instead reduced by both low- and high-pass filtering. This indicates that both high and low spatial frequency channels play a role in solving the binding problem, suggesting the involvement of large collator units that group the response of small channels tuned to the same orientation. The difference between realism, which shows higher sensitivity for low-frequency filtering at short durations and cubism in which the binding problem is solved by high spatial frequency channels, has a corresponding difference in aesthetic judgment: the probability of judging a painting as 'intriguing' is larger with low-pass filtering than with high-pass filtering in realism, while the opposite is true for cubism. This suggests that the aesthetic experience is available during early processing of an image, and could preferentially influence high-level categorization of the subject of a painting. PMID:18534105

  6. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  7. Aesthetic Implications of the New Paradigm in Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simus, Jason Boaz

    2008-01-01

    The new paradigm in ecology emphasizes dynamic change, disturbance, and nonequilibrium in natural systems, and it presents some challenges for contemporary environmental aesthetics, one of which has to do with the thesis known as "scientific cognitivism." Scientific cognitivism holds that appropriate aesthetic appreciation of nature must be…

  8. Aesthetic Relationships and Ethics in "The Oh Fuck Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breel, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the aesthetics and ethics of participatory performance through "The Oh Fuck Moment" by Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe, a performance that aesthetically explores ethically troubling material and manipulation. Ethical criticism of participatory art in recent years has focused on the way the audience member is…

  9. Technological Effects on Aesthetic Evaluation: Vermeer and the Camera Obscura

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.; Sudduth, Mary Margaret; Clabaugh, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether an artist's use of technology to create art results in a detectable aesthetic difference was investigated in the case of Dutch realist painter Johannes Vermeer and his use of the camera obscura. In Experiment 1, participants evaluated 20 Vermeer paintings on 6 aesthetic dimensions and preferred paintings created with the…

  10. Activating Aesthetics: Working with Heidegger and Bourdieu for Engaged Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grierson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate art in public urban space via a process of activating aesthetics as a way of enhancing pedagogies of engagement. It does this firstly by addressing the question of aesthetics in Enlightenment and twentieth-century frames; then it seeks to understand how artworks may be approached ontologically and…

  11. The Aesthetic Experience: An Historical Review and Behavioral Hierarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Terroil, Anna M.

    This analysis of aesthetic appreciation provides a theoretical model to help teachers recognize the aesthetic level at which students are operating. The purpose of the study is to explain to art educators how to expand a student's capacity to appreciate works of art. The study is presented in two parts. Part I describes and evaluates theories of…

  12. A Role for Aesthetics in Centering the K-12 Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom; McRorie, Sally

    1997-01-01

    Asserts that aesthetic questions and aesthetic understanding provide the framework for learning in art. Contrasts formalism (the belief that art exists for its own sake) with contextualism (the belief that art is part of a social communication system). Maintains that a balanced art program should incorporate both approaches. (MJP)

  13. Aesthetic Codes in Context: An Exploration in Two Preschool Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Jose; Collazo, Edith

    1981-01-01

    In order to examine the role of aesthetic knowledge in the early socialization of children into art, the authors observed two preschool classrooms for evidence of teacher- and child-initiated aesthetic experiences. This article describes the study's background, reference model, methodological approach, and findings. (Author/SJL)

  14. "Playing Attention": Contemporary Aesthetics and Performing Arts Audience Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2004-01-01

    This essay draws on the contemporary aesthetic theories of four writers -Hans-Georg Gadamer, Paul Ricoeur, Paul Thom, and James O. Young-who represent both the continental and analytic contemporary philosophical schools of thought. Each writer offers valuable perspectives on issues in aesthetic education pertaining to a key question in my…

  15. Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David

    2003-01-01

    We are presently witnessing a renewed interest in the aesthetics of philosopher and educator John Dewey. And it would seem that this interest marks a significant intellectual reorientation and not simply a passing fad. The publications Educational Theory, Studies in Philosophy and Education, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of…

  16. Aesthetics, Usefulness and Performance in User--Search-Engine Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Adi

    2010-01-01

    Issues of visual appeal have become an integral part of designing interactive systems. Interface aesthetics may form users' attitudes towards computer applications and information technology. Aesthetics can affect user satisfaction, and influence their willingness to buy or adopt a system. This study follows previous studies that found that users…

  17. A Case for an Art Education of Everyday Aesthetic Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Argues for incorporating everyday sites, such as shopping malls, amusement parks, advertising, the Internet, and television, into art education. Also argues that everyday aesthetic experiences significantly impact the formation of individual identities and world views and that the dynamics behind the influence of everyday aesthetics will only…

  18. Aesthetics, Education, the Critical Autonomous Self, and the Culture Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2006-01-01

    The author contends that by reclaiming their own valuable connection to reflective artistic experience and reception, aesthetic theory and art education can contribute to a reconceptualization of autonomy and critique and, perhaps more importantly, to a reorientation of educational practice. Adorno's aesthetics is exceptionally relevant to this…

  19. Response to Tavin's "The Magical Quality of Aesthetics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, I argue that Kevin Tavin's (2008) use of Lacan's "objet a" in his "Studies in Art Education" commentary "The Magical Quality of Aesthetics" is not a helpful analogy or solution for art education's search for the role of aesthetics. I offer that a pragmatist and dialogic viewpoint may be more useful and, because it describes the…

  20. The Aesthetic Turn and the Rhetorical Perspective on Argumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ronald Walter

    1998-01-01

    Argues that Robert Scott's landmark 1967 essay sets in motion a constitutive model of rhetorical effectivity. States Scott's essay belongs to a disciplinary history that brings forth a central preoccupation with the ethical problematization of rhetorical practices from an aesthetic point of view. Discusses how this aesthetic turn transforms the…

  1. Confronting "Difficult Knowledge": Critical Aesthetics and War in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heybach Vivirito, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative multi-site case study explores critical aesthetic experiences in teacher education classrooms, and advocates for the inclusion of theoretical and practical knowledge of "difficult knowledge," visual culture, and critical aesthetics in the classroom. Social reality consists of a perpetual stream of tragic and horrific…

  2. Science in Action: Aesthetic Considerations for Stream Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aesthetics are an integral component of the social and economic benefits of stream restoration and should be considered in restoration projects for sustainable management. According to Bernhardt et al. (2005), aesthetics is one of the frequently listed goals for stream restoratio...

  3. An Aesthetic Theory of School Vandalism. Discussion Papers 419.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.; Greenberger, David B.

    This study presents an aesthetic theory of school vandalism and reports on nine original empirical studies that are relevant to the theory. It is proposed that the act of destroying an object is very enjoyable because it is, in effect, an aesthetic experience. The theory posits that the variables accounting for positive hedonic value associated…

  4. Facial aesthetic surgical goals in patients of different cultures.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Jones, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of facial aesthetic surgery is to improve the patient's psychological well-being. To achieve this, the surgeon must understand the patient's body image and their aesthetic and psychological expectations. These factors must be judged in the context of their cultural background. The patient's cultural values must also be understood to optimize the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25049120

  5. The Subordination of Aesthetic Fundamentals in College Art Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Randall

    2003-01-01

    Opportunities for college students of art and design to study fundamentals of visual aesthetics, integrity of form, and principles of composition are limited today by a number of factors. With the well-documented prominence of postmodern critical theory in the world of contemporary art, the study of aesthetic fundamentals is largely subordinated…

  6. Lessons of Solitude: The Awakening of Aesthetic Sensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the contextual value of solitude in learning; in so doing, it attempts to suggest an alternative method of instruction that is based on aesthetics as the reciprocal relationship between emotions and intellect, and between action and contemplation. Such an aesthetic education or method seeks to guide the student towards the…

  7. John Dalton and the aesthetics of molecular representation.

    PubMed

    Spector, Tami I

    2003-05-01

    This paper examines the negative response to Dalton's symbolism in the context of the representational system of affinity tables. When situated in an iconoclastic scientific culture that rejected overt speculation, affinity tables reflected a functionalist empirical aesthetic, while Dalton's symbols embraced a deductive aesthetic suggestive of alchemical iconography.

  8. Brain connectivity reflects human aesthetic responses to music.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Matthew E; Ellis, Robert J; Schlaug, Gottfried; Loui, Psyche

    2016-06-01

    Humans uniquely appreciate aesthetics, experiencing pleasurable responses to complex stimuli that confer no clear intrinsic value for survival. However, substantial variability exists in the frequency and specificity of aesthetic responses. While pleasure from aesthetics is attributed to the neural circuitry for reward, what accounts for individual differences in aesthetic reward sensitivity remains unclear. Using a combination of survey data, behavioral and psychophysiological measures and diffusion tensor imaging, we found that white matter connectivity between sensory processing areas in the superior temporal gyrus and emotional and social processing areas in the insula and medial prefrontal cortex explains individual differences in reward sensitivity to music. Our findings provide the first evidence for a neural basis of individual differences in sensory access to the reward system, and suggest that social-emotional communication through the auditory channel may offer an evolutionary basis for music making as an aesthetically rewarding function in humans. PMID:26966157

  9. Aesthetic preference in the spatial composition of traditional Chinese paintings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Gao, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic psychology has discussed many aspects of aesthetic preferences for spatial composition. However, there have been few empirical explorations of the spatial composition of traditional Chinese paintings. The results of this experiment showed that the shape of the frame had a significant effect on aesthetic preferences. Participants preferred to put two figures at certain relative horizontal distances from each other according to the horizontal shape of the frame but may have difficulty in adapting the relative vertical distance according to the vertical shape of the frame. Furthermore, the unique aesthetic interest of traditional Chinese long-vertical scroll paintings was discussed. This discussion revealed that, in a creative way, ancient Chinese artists followed the same aesthetic principles we observed, and they developed the artistic conception and romantic charm of traditional Chinese paintings.

  10. Enhancing Aesthetic Outcomes of Soft Tissue Coverage of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Kowalski, Evan; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Hand aesthetics in general and aesthetic refinements of soft-tissue coverage of the hand in particular have been increasingly considered over the past few years. Advancements of microsurgery together with the traditional methods of tissue transfer have expanded the armamentarium of the reconstructive surgeon, thus shifting the reconstructive paradigm from simply ‘filling the defect’ to reconstructive refinement to provide the best functional and aesthetic results. However, drawing the boundary between what does and what does not constitute ‘aesthetic’ reconstruction of the hand is not straightforward. The selection amongst the vast amount of currently available reconstructive methods and the difficulties in objectively measuring or quantifying aesthetics has made this task complex and rather arbitrary. In this article we divide the hand into several units and subunits to simplify our understanding of the basic functional and aesthetic requirements of these regions that may ultimately bring order to complexity. PMID:25626826

  11. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  12. Deposition of fission and activation products after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Shozugawa, Katsumi; Nogawa, Norio; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2012-04-01

    The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, damaged reactor cooling systems at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The subsequent venting operation and hydrogen explosion resulted in a large radioactive nuclide emission from reactor containers into the environment. Here, we collected environmental samples such as soil, plant species, and water on April 10, 2011, in front of the power plant main gate as well as 35 km away in Iitate village, and observed gamma-rays with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. We observed activation products ((239)Np and (59)Fe) and fission products ((131)I, (134)Cs ((133)Cs), (137)Cs, (110m)Ag ((109)Ag), (132)Te, (132)I, (140)Ba, (140)La, (91)Sr, (91)Y, (95)Zr, and (95)Nb). (239)Np is the parent nuclide of (239)Pu; (59)Fe are presumably activation products of (58)Fe obtained by corrosion of cooling pipes. The results show that these activation and fission products, diffused within a month of the accident.

  13. The Fukushima Dai-ichi accident: additional lessons from a radiological emergency assistance mission.

    PubMed

    Becker, Steven M

    2013-11-01

    In response to the March 2011 earthquake-tsunami disaster and the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident, a special nongovernmental Radiological Emergency Assistance Mission flew to Japan from the United States. Invited by one of Japan's largest hospital and healthcare groups and facilitated by a New York-based international disaster relief organization, the mission included an emergency physician, a health physicist, and a disaster management specialist. During the 10 d mission, team members conducted fieldwork in areas affected by the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident; went to cities and towns in the 20-30 km Emergency Evacuation Preparation Zone around the damaged nuclear plant; visited other communities affected by the nuclear accident; went to evacuation shelters; met with mayors and other local officials; met with central government officials; exchanged observations, experiences, and information with Japanese medical, emergency response, and disaster management colleagues; and provided radiological information and training to more than 1,100 Japanese hospital and healthcare personnel and first responders. The mission produced many insights with potential relevance for radiological/nuclear emergency preparedness and response. The first "lessons learned" were published in December 2011. Since that time, additional broad insights from the mission and mission followup have been identified. Five of these new lessons, which focus primarily on community impacts and responses and public communication issues, are presented and discussed in this article. PMID:24077046

  14. Atmospheric radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident observed in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Long, N Q; Truong, Y; Hien, P D; Binh, N T; Sieu, L N; Giap, T V; Phan, N T

    2012-09-01

    Radionuclides from the reactor accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were observed in the surface air at stations in Hanoi, Dalat, and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in Vietnam, about 4500 km southwest of Japan, during the period from March 27 to April 22, 2011. The maximum activity concentrations in the air measured at those three sites were 193, 33, and 37 μBq m(-3) for (131)I, (13)(4)Cs, and (13)(7)Cs, respectively. Peaks of radionuclide concentrations in the air corresponded to arrival of the air mass from Fukushima to Vietnam after traveling for 8 d over the Pacific Ocean. Cesium-134 was detected with the (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio of about 0.85 in line with observations made elsewhere. The (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratio was observed to decrease exponentially with time as expected from radioactive decay. The ratio at Dalat, where is 1500 m high, was higher than those at Hanoi and HCMC in low lands, indicating the relative enrichment of the iodine in comparison to cesium at high altitudes. The time-integrated surface air concentrations of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the Southeast Asia showed exponential decrease with distance from Fukushima.

  15. Influence of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident on Spanish environmental radioactivity levels.

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Rodríguez, A; Galván, J; García-Tenorio, R; Manjón, G; Mantero, J; Vioque, I; Arnold, D; Grossi, C; Serrano, I; Vallés, I; Vargas, A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of the effect of the atmospheric radioactive release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station at three sites belonging to the Spanish environmental monitoring system. Measured values varied depending on the locations of the sites in Spain and their respective climatic characteristics. (134)Cs, (136)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, and (132)Te activity concentrations in filter samples were studied and associated levels of (131)I fallout were estimated from wet and dry deposition. Particulate aerosol activity concentrations ranges, in μBq/m(3), were 1.63-3080 ((131)I), 2.8-690 ((137)Cs), 1.3-620 ((134)Cs) and 3.6-330 ((132)Te), while the associated (131)I fallout was roughly estimated to be less than 20 Bq/m(2), Gaseous (131)I was also detected and the (131)I-gaseous/(131)I-total ratio increased at the three stations from approximately 0.75 at the end of March to 0.85-0.9 during the first few days of April. Finally, the presence of (131)I in some crucial parts of the food chain was also studied. (131)I was detected in samples from goat's and cow's milk (maximum levels of 1.11 Bq/L) and in broadleaf plants (maximum level 1.42 Bq/kg).

  16. Deposition of fission and activation products after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Shozugawa, Katsumi; Nogawa, Norio; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2012-04-01

    The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, damaged reactor cooling systems at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The subsequent venting operation and hydrogen explosion resulted in a large radioactive nuclide emission from reactor containers into the environment. Here, we collected environmental samples such as soil, plant species, and water on April 10, 2011, in front of the power plant main gate as well as 35 km away in Iitate village, and observed gamma-rays with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. We observed activation products ((239)Np and (59)Fe) and fission products ((131)I, (134)Cs ((133)Cs), (137)Cs, (110m)Ag ((109)Ag), (132)Te, (132)I, (140)Ba, (140)La, (91)Sr, (91)Y, (95)Zr, and (95)Nb). (239)Np is the parent nuclide of (239)Pu; (59)Fe are presumably activation products of (58)Fe obtained by corrosion of cooling pipes. The results show that these activation and fission products, diffused within a month of the accident. PMID:22266366

  17. A dual-process perspective on fluency-based aesthetics: the pleasure-interest model of aesthetic liking.

    PubMed

    Graf, Laura K M; Landwehr, Jan R

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we develop an account of how aesthetic preferences can be formed as a result of two hierarchical, fluency-based processes. Our model suggests that processing performed immediately upon encountering an aesthetic object is stimulus driven, and aesthetic preferences that accrue from this processing reflect aesthetic evaluations of pleasure or displeasure. When sufficient processing motivation is provided by a perceiver's need for cognitive enrichment and/or the stimulus' processing affordance, elaborate perceiver-driven processing can emerge, which gives rise to fluency-based aesthetic evaluations of interest, boredom, or confusion. Because the positive outcomes in our model are pleasure and interest, we call it the Pleasure-Interest Model of Aesthetic Liking (PIA Model). Theoretically, this model integrates a dual-process perspective and ideas from lay epistemology into processing fluency theory, and it provides a parsimonious framework to embed and unite a wealth of aesthetic phenomena, including contradictory preference patterns for easy versus difficult-to-process aesthetic stimuli.

  18. The Epistemic of Aesthetic Knowledge and Knowing: Implications for Aesthetic Education Curricula and Rational Pedagogy in Nigerian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghaosa, Ike P.

    2015-01-01

    Using essentially the philosophical and documentary, methodologies of language and logical analysis and deductions, analogical inference; and historical inspection of documents, the paper examined the issues and arguments involved in Aesthetics as an epistemological concept. These were in terms of aesthetic: knowledge, faculty of knowing and…

  19. A Study on the Effect of Aesthetic Education on the Development of Aesthetic Judgment of Six-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acer, Dilek; Omerodlu, Esra

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aesthetic education on the development of aesthetic judgment of 6 year-old children. The sample of the study comprised 77 children selected randomly from state run primary schools from various socioeconomic levels in Ankara. The experiment group consisted of 22 children, the placebo group of…

  20. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, C A; Butterworth, G; Roberts, T; Graupner, L; Hole, G

    1994-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:7845772

  1. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:24601036

  2. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  3. Aesthetic changes with four anterior units.

    PubMed

    Bloom, D R; Padayachy, J N

    2006-02-11

    Cosmetic dentistry has evolved with the advent of more robust porcelain materials and ever-stronger bonding agents. This series of three articles aims to provide a practical overview of what is now possible both functionally and cosmetically from the preparation of a small number of teeth, through a whole smile, to full mouth rehabilitation. A complete diagnosis is the starting point to planning any cosmetic or functional changes. Guidance is given on the techniques used but adequate training must be considered essential before embarking upon modification in occlusal schemes or even minor adjustments in smile design. Conservative use of porcelain laminate veneers can result in significant aesthetic improvements to a patient's smile and it is not always necessary to prepare all the teeth visible in a smile.

  4. Combining Aesthetic with Ecological Values for Landscape Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. water body and forest) contributed positively more to both aesthetic and ecological values than semi-natural and human-dominated landscapes (i.e. farmland and non-ecological land). The distribution maps of landscape values indicated that the aesthetic, ecological and integrated landscape values were significantly associated with landscape attributes and human activity intensity. To combine aesthetic preferences with ecological services, the methods (i.e. field survey, landscape value coefficients, normalized method, a two-dimensional coordinate system, and landscape value distribution maps) were employed in landscape assessment. Our results could facilitate to identify the underlying structure-function-value chain, and also improve the understanding of multiple functions in landscape planning. The situation context could also be emphasized to bring ecological and aesthetic goals into better alignment. PMID:25050886

  5. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    PubMed

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users.

  6. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    PubMed

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users. PMID:26742134

  7. Using public surveys to assess aesthetic resource impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, T.

    1995-12-31

    FERC regulations require that hydropower license applicants prepare reports that describe the visual characteristics of the project area and discuss any expected impacts to aesthetic resources. While describing the visual character of the project area is relatively straightforward, scenic beauty and aesthetic quality are far more difficult to define and quantify. How do you determine the aesthetic consequences of lake level fluctuations or changes in streamflow, for example? What conditions are acceptable? Is there some threshold beyond which adverse impacts on scenic quality occur? Mitigation measures for aesthetic resources (such as increased minimum flows) may have significant consequences on project economics. Therefore, it is important that aesthetic resource evaluations be conducted in a fashion that provides reasonable and defensible conclusions. The inherently subjective nature of aesthetics dictates that evaluations be conducted in a rigorous, systematic manor. A study approach based on a well designed and implemented public survey accomplishes these goals. Most aesthetic impact assessments are carried out by one or two highly trained individuals. Unfortunately, these {open_quotes}professional judgement{close_quotes} methods may be sensitive to bias. Public survey techniques which rely on data representative of the public-at-large offer significant advantages. This paper describes how public surveys have been used by EDAW to identify impacts of hydropower developments and operations on aesthetic resources drawing on recent applications at Mono Lake California, and the North Umpqua River in Oregon. Studies at Mono Lake focused on the potential scenic quality impacts of different lake levels being considered as management alternatives. Studies of the North Umpqua River focused on the relationship between streamflows associated with hydropower operations the aesthetic quality of the river channel and several popular waterfalls.

  8. The Use of Newer High Translucency Zirconia in Aesthetic Zone

    PubMed Central

    Dangra, Zishan; Gandhewar, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Loss of anterior tooth causes aesthetic and functional disharmony. Although no restorative material can approach the appearance of intact tooth enamel, glass ceramic, at the increased risk of brittle fracture, can mimic original tooth color better than the other restorative options. The newest zirconia material comes with unparalleled individualization in aesthetics and optimal physical properties. One of the basic principles of tooth preparation is conservation of tooth structure. This clinical report describes the replacement of maxillary and mandibular incisor with latest generation zirconia adhesive fixed partial denture. The authors have achieved unmatched aesthetics with newer high translucency zirconia. PMID:24715994

  9. Biology a la mode: Charles Darwin's aesthetics of "ornament".

    PubMed

    Menninghaus, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    Historians have long noted the importance of Victorian culture for the emergence of Darwin's ideas. This paper takes this understanding one step further by illustrating a deep cultural analysis for the underlying aesthetics framework which, on the one hand, is part of Darwin's notion of sexual selection while, at the same time, serving to give rise to a new "aesthetics semantics." While evolutionary biology avoids this language, it nevertheless had far-reaching influences in the decades following the publication of Darwin's work. Additionally, evolutionary aesthetics from Darwin provides unique insights on the philosophical foundations it draws upon.

  10. Tracking of airborne radionuclides from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactors by European networks.

    PubMed

    Masson, O; Baeza, A; Bieringer, J; Brudecki, K; Bucci, S; Cappai, M; Carvalho, F P; Connan, O; Cosma, C; Dalheimer, A; Didier, D; Depuydt, G; De Geer, L E; De Vismes, A; Gini, L; Groppi, F; Gudnason, K; Gurriaran, R; Hainz, D; Halldórsson, Ó; Hammond, D; Hanley, O; Holeý, K; Homoki, Zs; Ioannidou, A; Isajenko, K; Jankovic, M; Katzlberger, C; Kettunen, M; Kierepko, R; Kontro, R; Kwakman, P J M; Lecomte, M; Leon Vintro, L; Leppänen, A-P; Lind, B; Lujaniene, G; Mc Ginnity, P; Mc Mahon, C; Malá, H; Manenti, S; Manolopoulou, M; Mattila, A; Mauring, A; Mietelski, J W; Møller, B; Nielsen, S P; Nikolic, J; Overwater, R M W; Pálsson, S E; Papastefanou, C; Penev, I; Pham, M K; Povinec, P P; Ramebäck, H; Reis, M C; Ringer, W; Rodriguez, A; Rulík, P; Saey, P R J; Samsonov, V; Schlosser, C; Sgorbati, G; Silobritiene, B V; Söderström, C; Sogni, R; Solier, L; Sonck, M; Steinhauser, G; Steinkopff, T; Steinmann, P; Stoulos, S; Sýkora, I; Todorovic, D; Tooloutalaie, N; Tositti, L; Tschiersch, J; Ugron, A; Vagena, E; Vargas, A; Wershofen, H; Zhukova, O

    2011-09-15

    Radioactive emissions into the atmosphere from the damaged reactors of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (NPP) started on March 12th, 2011. Among the various radionuclides released, iodine-131 ((131)I) and cesium isotopes ((137)Cs and (134)Cs) were transported across the Pacific toward the North American continent and reached Europe despite dispersion and washout along the route of the contaminated air masses. In Europe, the first signs of the releases were detected 7 days later while the first peak of activity level was observed between March 28th and March 30th. Time variations over a 20-day period and spatial variations across more than 150 sampling locations in Europe made it possible to characterize the contaminated air masses. After the Chernobyl accident, only a few measurements of the gaseous (131)I fraction were conducted compared to the number of measurements for the particulate fraction. Several studies had already pointed out the importance of the gaseous (131)I and the large underestimation of the total (131)I airborne activity level, and subsequent calculations of inhalation dose, if neglected. The measurements made across Europe following the releases from the Fukushima NPP reactors have provided a significant amount of new data on the ratio of the gaseous (131)I fraction to total (131)I, both on a spatial scale and its temporal variation. It can be pointed out that during the Fukushima event, the (134)Cs to (137)Cs ratio proved to be different from that observed after the Chernobyl accident. The data set provided in this paper is the most comprehensive survey of the main relevant airborne radionuclides from the Fukushima reactors, measured across Europe. A rough estimate of the total (131)I inventory that has passed over Europe during this period was <1% of the released amount. According to the measurements, airborne activity levels remain of no concern for public health in Europe.

  11. Estimation of marine source-term following Fukushima Dai-ichi accident.

    PubMed

    Bailly du Bois, P; Laguionie, P; Boust, D; Korsakissok, I; Didier, D; Fiévet, B

    2012-12-01

    Contamination of the marine environment following the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant represented the most important artificial radioactive release flux into the sea ever known. The radioactive marine pollution came from atmospheric fallout onto the ocean, direct release of contaminated water from the plant and transport of radioactive pollution from leaching through contaminated soil. In the immediate vicinity of the plant (less than 500 m), the seawater concentrations reached 68,000 Bq.L(-1) for (134)Cs and (137)Cs, and exceeded 100,000 Bq.L(-1) for (131)I in early April. Due to the accidental context of the releases, it is difficult to estimate the total amount of radionuclides introduced into seawater from data obtained in the plant. An evaluation is proposed here, based on measurements performed in seawater for monitoring purposes. Quantities of (137)Cs in seawater in a 50-km area around the plant were calculated from interpolation of seawater measurements. The environmental halftime of seawater in this area is deduced from the time-evolution of these quantities. This halftime appeared constant at about 7 days for (137)Cs. These data allowed estimation of the amount of principal marine inputs and their evolution in time: a total of 27 PBq (12 PBq-41 PBq) of (137)Cs was estimated up to July 18. Even though this main release may be followed by residual inputs from the plant, river runoff and leakage from deposited sediments, it represents the principal source-term that must be accounted for future studies of the consequences of the accident on marine systems. The (137)Cs from Fukushima will remain detectable for several years throughout the North Pacific, and (137)Cs/(134)Cs ratio will be a tracer for future studies.

  12. Dai-Kenchu-To, a Herbal Medicine, Attenuates Colorectal Distention-induced Visceromotor Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Kumi; Nagura, Yohko; Hasegawa, Ryoko; Ito, Hitomi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, is known to increase gastrointestinal motility and improve ileal function. We tested our hypotheses that (1) pretreatment with DKT would block the colorectal distention-induced visceromotor response in rats, and (2) pretreatment with DKT would attenuate colorectal distention-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release and anxiety-related behavior. Methods Rats were pretreated with vehicle or DKT (300 mg/kg/5 mL, per os). Visceromotor responses were analyzed using electromyography in response to colorectal distention (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 mmHg for 20 seconds at 3-minutes intervals). Anxiety-related behavior was measured during exposure to an elevated-plus maze after colorectal distention. Plasma ACTH and serum corticosterone levels were measured after exposure to the elevated-plus maze. Results Colorectal distention produced robust contractions of the abdominal musculature, graded according to stimulus intensity, in vehicle-treated rats. At 40, 60, and 80 mmHg of colorectal distention, the visceromotor responses of DKT-treated rats was significantly lower than that of vehicle-treated rats. At 80 mmHg, the amplitude was suppressed to approximately one-third in DKT-treated rats, compared with that in vehicle-treated rats. Smooth muscle compliance and the velocity of accommodation to 60 mmHg of stretching did not significantly differ between the vehicle-treated and DKT-treated rats. Similarly, the DKT did not influence colorectal distention-induced ACTH release, corticosterone levels, or anxiety-related behavior in rats. Conclusions Our results suggest that DKT attenuates the colorectal distention-induced visceromotor responses, without increasing smooth muscle compliance, ACTH release or anxiety-related behavior in rats. PMID:27095743

  13. The Impact of Design and Aesthetics on Usability, Credibility, and Learning in an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Alicia; Glore, Peyton

    2010-01-01

    This article surveys research in the areas of aesthetics and design, usability, visual aesthetics in education, and recent statistics related to online education. The focus of the article is on defining the role of visual content and aesthetics in the user interface and exploring what importance aesthetics and visual content have to education.…

  14. Mendelssohn's Last Wish or Case Studies about Aesthetics in Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Aesthetics is commonly considered a complicated field of inquiry, particularly for students. Nevertheless, aesthetic experiences often raise questions about the nature of music which philosophical aesthetics is intended to answer. To bring students in contact with aesthetics depends primarily on the choice of appropriate methods. Case studies…

  15. Aesthetic Analysis of Media Texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic analysis of media texts, ie the analysis of art concept of the media texts of different types and genres, is closely related to the aesthetic (artistic) theory of media (Aesthetical Approach, Media as Popular Arts Approach, Discriminatory Approach). Aesthetic theory of media literacy education has been very popular in the 1960s…

  16. Aesthetic Response: An Overview of Selected Theories and the Postulation of a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison

    In response to a growing interest among educators in improving aesthetic education, this paper explores aesthetic response, defined as what happens in the mind and body of a person who encounters an aesthetic object or phenomenon. An initial section overviews the major theories of aesthetic response, including the work of Plato, Aristotle, Freud,…

  17. An Exegetic Study of the So-Called Proposition of Confucian Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Since Wang Guowei and Cai Yuanpei introduced the concepts of aesthetics and aesthetic education, respectively, to China in the early twentieth century, there has been a strong tendency in many of the aesthetic discussions to examine ancient texts and materials using modern concepts of aesthetics. In particular, sentences with the character-word…

  18. Translation and validation of the Turkish version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Baysal, Asli; Demirci, Kadir; Dikmen, Ferhan; Aglarci, Ali Vasfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to translate the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) into Turkish, validate the questionnaire, and provide a cross-cultural adaptation. Methods The translation process included the following steps, which were performed by a translation committee: (1) translation into Turkish, (2) back translation into English, (3) pretesting, and (4) cross-cultural adaptation. The Turkish version of the PIDAQ was produced subsequent to the translation process. Validity and reliability were measured using the Perception of Occlusion Scale and the aesthetic component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. The questionnaire was administered to 260 individuals (age range, 18–30 years; mean age, 20.50 ± 1.9 years). Structural validity was assessed via factor analysis, and internal consistency was measured using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure, with factor loadings for included items ranging from 0.380 to 0.868. Few questions were shuffled among domains various factor loadings. Cronbach's alphas for the Turkish version of the PIDAQ ranged from 0.534 to 0.904. Mean scores for the PIDAQ subscale and total scores differed significantly according to Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need and Perception of Occlusion Scale scores. Conclusions This study provided a Turkish version of the PIDAQ, which could be a useful tool in the evaluation of the psychosocial impact of malocclusion in young Turkish adults. PMID:27478799

  19. Aesthetic scoring of digital portraits for consumer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, S.; Moltisanti, M.; Ravı, F.; Bruna, A. R.; Naccari, F.

    2013-01-01

    Computational Aesthetics applied on digital photography is becoming an interesting issue in different frameworks (e.g., photo album summarization, imaging acquisition devices). Although it is widely believed and can often be experimentally demonstrated that aesthetics is mainly subjective, we aim to find some formal or mathematical explanations of aesthetics in photographs. We propose a scoring function to give an aesthetic evaluation of digital portraits and group pictures, taking into account faces aspect ratio, their perceptual goodness in terms of lighting of the skin and their position. Also well-known composition rules (e.g., rule of thirds) are considered especially for single portrait. Both subjective and quantitatively experiments have confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  20. Aesthetics and ethics in engineering: insights from Polanyi.

    PubMed

    Dias, Priyan

    2011-06-01

    Polanyi insisted that scientific knowledge was intensely personal in nature, though held with universal intent. His insights regarding the personal values of beauty and morality in science are first enunciated. These are then explored for their relevance to engineering. It is shown that the practice of engineering is also governed by aesthetics and ethics. For example, Polanyi's three spheres of morality in science--that of the individual scientist, the scientific community and the wider society--has parallel entities in engineering. The existence of shared values in engineering is also demonstrated, in aesthetics through an example that shows convergence of practitioner opinion to solutions that represent accepted models of aesthetics; and in ethics through the recognition that many professional engineering institutions hold that the safety of the public supersedes the interests of the client. Such professional consensus can be seen as justification for studying engineering aesthetics and ethics as inter-subjective disciplines.

  1. Wonder, the Rainbow and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Watson, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Describes the book 'Wonder, the Rainbow and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences' which is not ostensibly connected to mathematics education but which turns out to have deep connections with mathematics, education, and mathematics education. (MM)

  2. Guided Gingival Growth: Improving Aesthetics During Second-Stage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby

    2016-01-01

    GGG is a conservative, efficient, and relatively straightforward treatment for mild soft-tissue deficits. When applied within its limitations, it may be a valuable tool for aesthetic refinement around dental implants. PMID:26846058

  3. Hollywood's Conversion to Color: The Technological, Economic and Aesthetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindem, Forham A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the film industry's conversion to color cinematography in the period between the 1920s and 1960s. Cites economic considerations, technological modifications, and aesthetic preferences by audiences as factors in this development. (JMF)

  4. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  5. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  6. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    PubMed

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  7. Ancillary role of vitamin C in pink aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Sheel, Vaibhav; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Rai, Priya

    2015-06-08

    A smile expresses feelings of joy, affection and self-confidence in an individual. Melanin hyperpigmentation of the gingiva jeopardises the aesthetics of an individual significantly. In the present case, gingival depigmentation was performed with a surgical scalpel along with local applications of ascorbic acid, yielding satisfactory aesthetic results with low subjective pain levels, and no recurrence has been observed after 9 months of follow-up.

  8. Essential Requirements to Setting up an Aesthetic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Mukta; Britto, Gillian R

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic dermatology is becoming a vital and popular branch of medicine. This article aims to guide dermatologists to set up a professional and ethical aesthetic practice. Dermatologists should have an integrated practice of clinical dermatology, dermatosurgery and cosmetic dermatology. Ethical practice is the gold standard for any medical field, especially with dermatologists, who should avoid doing unnecessary procedures. Proper patient counselling and addressing the patients’ concerns is imperative. PMID:25538440

  9. The crystal structure of the second Z-DNA binding domain of human DAI (ZBP1) in complex with Z-DNA reveals an unusual binding mode to Z-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung Chul; Kim, Doyoun; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Rich, Alexander; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian DAI (DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors), an activator of the innate immune response, senses cytosolic DNA by using 2 N-terminal Z-DNA binding domains (ZBDs) and a third putative DNA binding domain located next to the second ZBD. Compared with other previously known ZBDs, the second ZBD of human DAI (hZβDAI) shows significant variation in the sequence of the residues that are essential for DNA binding. In this article, the crystal structure of the hZβDAI/Z-DNA complex reveals that hZβDAI has a similar fold to that of other ZBDs, but adopts an unusual binding mode for recognition of Z-DNA. A residue in the first β-strand rather than residues in the β-loop contributes to DNA binding, and part of the (α3) recognition helix adopts a 310 helix conformation. The role of each residue that makes contact with DNA was confirmed by mutational analysis. The 2 ZBDs of DAI can together bind to DNA and both are necessary for full B-to-Z conversion. It is possible that binding 2 DAIs to 1 dsDNA brings about dimerization of DAI that might facilitate DNA-mediated innate immune activation. PMID:19095800

  10. Cognitive mechanisms for explaining dynamics of aesthetic appreciation.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    For many domains aesthetic appreciation has proven to be highly reliable. Evaluations of facial attractiveness, for instance, show high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. This indicates general mechanisms underlying such evaluations. It is, however, also obvious that our taste for specific objects is not always stable-in some realms such stability is hardly conceivable at all since aesthetic domains such as fashion, design, or art are inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for psychologists as this will probably reveal essential mechanisms of aesthetic evaluations per se. The present paper develops a two-step model, dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy, and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders- aesthetic appreciation.

  11. That is Cool: the Nature Of Aesthetics in Fluid Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Aesthetics has historically been defined as the study of beauty and thus as a metric of art. More recently, psychologists are using the term to describe a spectrum of responses from ``I hate it'' to ``I love it.'' In the context of fluid physics, what is beautiful? What elicits a ``Wow! Awesome! Cool!'' response versus a snore? Can we use aesthetics to deepen or change students' or the public's perceptions of physics and/or the world around them? For example, students seem to appreciate the aesthetics of destruction: environmental fluid dynamics such as storms, tornadoes, floods and wildfires are often responsible for massive destruction, yet humans draw pleasure from watching such physics and the attendant destruction from a safe distance. Can this voyeurism be turned to our advantage in communicating science? Observations of student and Facebook Flow Visualization group choices for fluid physics that draw a positive aesthetic response are sorted into empirical categories; the aesthetics of beauty, power, destruction, and oddness. Each aesthetic will be illustrated with examples drawn from flow visualizations from both the Flow Visualization course (MCEN 4151) taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and sources on the web. This work is supported by NSF: EEC 1240294.

  12. Cognitive mechanisms for explaining dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    For many domains aesthetic appreciation has proven to be highly reliable. Evaluations of facial attractiveness, for instance, show high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. This indicates general mechanisms underlying such evaluations. It is, however, also obvious that our taste for specific objects is not always stable—in some realms such stability is hardly conceivable at all since aesthetic domains such as fashion, design, or art are inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for psychologists as this will probably reveal essential mechanisms of aesthetic evaluations per se. The present paper develops a two-step model, dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy, and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders— aesthetic appreciation. PMID:23145254

  13. Two new species of freshwater crabs of the genus Heterochelamon Türkay & Dai, 1997 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Potamidae) from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Tohru; Zhu, Chunchao; Zhou, Xianmin

    2013-01-01

    Heterochelamon tessellatum n. sp. and H. castanea n. sp. are described trom the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China. Heterochelamon tessellatum n. sp. and H. castanea n. sp. are morphologically most similar to H. yangshuoense Türkay & Dai, 1997, and H. guangxiense Türkay & Dai, 1997, respectively. The new species can be differentiated from these allied species by differences in the shape of external orbital tooth, epibranchial tooth, and male first gonopod. The present study brings the number of Heterochelamon species to five. A key to species of the genus Heterochelamon is provided.

  14. Minimally Invasive Procedures for Nasal Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Alessio; Limardo, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Nose has an important role in the aesthetics of face. It is easy to understand the reason of the major interest that has revolved around the correction of its imperfections for several centuries, or even from the ancient times. In the last decade, all the surgical or medical minimal-invasive techniques evolved exponentially. The techniques of rejuvenation and corrections of nasal imperfections did not escape this development that is much widespread in the medicine of the third millennium. In many cases, the techniques of surgical correction involve invasive procedure that necessitates, for the majority of cases, hospitalisation. The author, using a different approach, has developed mini-invasive techniques using botulinum toxin A (BTxA) and absorbable fillers for the correction of nasal imperfections. BTxA allows to reduce the imperfections due to hypertension of muscles, while the absorbable fillers allow to correct all the imperfections of the nasal profile from the root to the tip in total safety. The correction is based on the precise rules that allow avoiding the majority of side effects. Results are long lasting and well appreciated by patients. PMID:23060706

  15. Obsessive States: Aesthetics, Erotism, and Fantasy.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Aya

    2016-08-01

    Starting from his early writings, Freud devoted much thought to "obsessional neurosis" and continued developing this theme for more than thirty years. However, unlike the disorder hysteria, which in recent years has regained its honorable status in psychoanalytic literature, obsessional neurosis has been continually neglected and relegated to the fields of psychiatry and behavioral psychology, which emphasize the symptomatic and the overt. This process, by clinging to the objective aspects of obsessional neurosis and disassociating it from the instincts and from its historical sources, may itself be deemed obsessive. This paper suggests that obsessive processes should be viewed as structuring a distinct psychic state pertinent to analysis even when obsessive symptoms are not clearly present or apparent. Freud's conceptualizations thus become more flexibly and widely applicable, allowing the analyst once again to relate to the patient's inner world and to the original, implicit essence of obsession, relying less significantly on what is outwardly apparent. The paper will elaborate on three aspects of this "obsessive state": aesthetics, eroticism, and fantasy. Finally, the value of the notion of obsessive psychic states will be reassessed in the broader context of the role of sexuality in psychoanalytic theory. PMID:27500702

  16. Ethical and legal issues in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suresh

    2012-09-01

    Rapid growth and expansion of plastic surgery in general and aesthetic surgery in particular in the past decade has brought in its wake some confusions particularly raising questions for the surgeons conduct towards his colleagues and the patients in the light of ethical requirements. Some thoughts from eminent thinkers form a backdrop to consideration of theories of medical ethics. In this article raging and continuous debates on these subjects have been avoided to maintain the momentum. Apart from the western thoughts, directions from our old scriptures on ethical conduct have been included to accommodate prevelant Indian practices. The confusion created by specialists advertising their abilities directly to the lay public following removal of ethical bars by the American Courts as also latitudes allowed by the General Medical Council of Great Britain have been discussed. The medical fraternity however has its reservations. Unnecessary skirmishes with the law arose in cosmetic surgery from the freedom exercised by the police to file criminal proceedings against attending doctors in the event of a patient's death with or without any evidence of wrong doing. This has now been curtailed in the judgement of the Supreme Court of India[1] where norms have been laid down for such prosecution. This has helped doctors to function without fear of harassment. An effort has been made to state a simple day-to-day routine for an ethical doctor-patient relationship. PMID:23450235

  17. Visually representing reality: aesthetics and accessibility aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2009-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the visual representation of reality with three imaging technologies: painting, photography and electronic imaging. The contribution of the important image aspects, called dimensions hereafter, such as color, fine detail and total image size, to the degree of reality and aesthetic value of the rendered image are described for each of these technologies. Whereas quite a few of these dimensions - or approximations, or even only suggestions thereof - were already present in prehistoric paintings, apparent motion and true stereoscopic vision only recently were added - unfortunately also introducing accessibility and image safety issues. Efforts are made to reduce the incidence of undesirable biomedical effects such as photosensitive seizures (PSS), visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), and visual fatigue from stereoscopic images (VFSI) by international standardization of the image parameters to be avoided by image providers and display manufacturers. The history of this type of standardization, from an International Workshop Agreement to a strategy for accomplishing effective international standardization by ISO, is treated at some length. One of the difficulties to be mastered in this process is the reconciliation of the, sometimes opposing, interests of vulnerable persons, thrill-seeking viewers, creative video designers and the game industry.

  18. [The aesthetic practice of care ethics].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-I

    2013-08-01

    Situated between the doctor and the patient, nurses play a central role in the doctor-patient relationship. Nurses attend to patients' exhaustion and take responsibility for the "Other," in Lévinas' sense of the word. In discussions of the doctor-patient relationship, the patient is often regarded as the "Other". This perspective seeks to challenge the traditional contention that the doctor plays the dominant role. In the structure of this relationship, the doctor, responsible for providing diagnoses, is the subject and the patient is the object. The latter constantly feels frustrated and helpless and requires the comfort of the nurse. In this sense, the nurse, having the direct contact with the patient, constantly sees the faces of the patients. In the care relationship, the patient's frustration and helplessness will sometimes be expressed to the nurse if the patient cannot be affectively affirmed. In this type of situation, the nurse bears not simply his / her routine work, but also affective devotion and endurance. On the one hand, the nurse must practice professional medical care in the face of patients' affective feelings and emotions and, on the other hand, he / she must treat the patient as a relative and suppress inner feelings and emotions. How does a nurse situate herself into the doctor-patient relationship? As the nurse is asked to treat the patient as a relative, how does he / she face inner emotions? This paper reflects on the possibility of the aesthetic practice of care ethics.

  19. Associated and dissociated neural substrates of aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion during the appreciation of everyday designed products.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chu; Lin, Chung-Wei; Hsu, Wei-Chin; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Chan, Yu-Chen

    2015-07-01

    The aesthetics of designed products have become part of our life in modern society. This study explores the neural mechanisms of how aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion interplay during the appreciation of designed products that are commonly seen in daily life. Participants were 30 college students, and the stimuli were 90 pictures of everyday designed products. Based on an event-related paradigm, the findings of this study suggest that there are associative and dissociative neutral mechanisms underlying different types of aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion. The study identified the following main findings: (a) normative beauty and subjective beauty both involved the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); (b) subjective beauty and positive emotion both involved the right ACC; (c) subjective beauty and negative emotion both involved the precuneus; (d) subjective ugliness and negative emotion both involved the right inferior frontal gyrus; (e) subjective ugliness alone additionally activated the insula; and (f) subjective beauty alone additionally activated the caudate. The findings in this study shed light on complex but ordinary processes of aesthetic appreciation.

  20. Associated and dissociated neural substrates of aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion during the appreciation of everyday designed products.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chu; Lin, Chung-Wei; Hsu, Wei-Chin; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Chan, Yu-Chen

    2015-07-01

    The aesthetics of designed products have become part of our life in modern society. This study explores the neural mechanisms of how aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion interplay during the appreciation of designed products that are commonly seen in daily life. Participants were 30 college students, and the stimuli were 90 pictures of everyday designed products. Based on an event-related paradigm, the findings of this study suggest that there are associative and dissociative neutral mechanisms underlying different types of aesthetic judgment and aesthetic emotion. The study identified the following main findings: (a) normative beauty and subjective beauty both involved the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); (b) subjective beauty and positive emotion both involved the right ACC; (c) subjective beauty and negative emotion both involved the precuneus; (d) subjective ugliness and negative emotion both involved the right inferior frontal gyrus; (e) subjective ugliness alone additionally activated the insula; and (f) subjective beauty alone additionally activated the caudate. The findings in this study shed light on complex but ordinary processes of aesthetic appreciation. PMID:25998491

  1. Influence of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on environmental radioactivity in Aomori Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Kudo, S; Igarashi, K; Kimura, H

    2015-11-01

    Radioactive nuclides with a short half-life, such as (131)I and (134)Cs, were detected in environmental samples collected in Aomori Prefecture after the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. In addition, the observed (137)Cs concentration was increased over the background level. The gaseous (131)I concentration in air observed in April was higher than that observed in March immediately after the accident. Using a backward trajectory analysis, the authors found that the air mass had passed the vicinity of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant when the gaseous (131)I concentration in air was increasing. Maximum (131)I and radioactive Cs concentrations in daily fallout samples collected in Aomori city were observed on 28 April, when (131)I was also detected in air. (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentration ratios in pine needles and pasture grass were nearly equal to 1, which indicates that the source of these radionuclides was the nuclear power plant accident.

  2. Psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics and desire for orthodontic treatment among Chinese undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Song; Zhang, Chuqin; Ni, Chulei; Qian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics in undergraduate students in the People’s Republic of China and to investigate the association between normal orthodontic treatment needs, psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics, and desire for orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two universities in a city of the People’s Republic of China with 374 young adults aged between 19 years and 24 years. The students answered a Chinese version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) and addressed their desire for orthodontic treatment. Objective malocclusion severity was assessed with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS software (Version 15.0). Results There was no statistical sex difference in relation to the dental health component of IOTN (P=0.893) and PIDAQ scores (P=0.06), but it was found that the desire for orthodontic treatment was significantly stronger among females. The total and subscale PIDAQ scores and malocclusion severity differed significantly among the five grades of desire (P<0.01). Significant positive correlation was found among desire for orthodontic treatment, IOTN-dental health component grades, and total or subscale PIDAQ scores (P<0.01). High correlation was found between desire and PIDAQ score (r=0.93). Conclusion The desire for orthodontic treatment is higher among female young adults who have the same orthodontic treatment needs compared to males. The desire for orthodontic treatment has high positive correlation with PIDAQ scores and increases with the increase in self-perceived psychosocial impacts of malocclusion and the needs for orthodontic treatment. PMID:27354773

  3. Cultural ecosystem services of mountain regions: Modelling the aesthetic value

    PubMed Central

    Schirpke, Uta; Timmermann, Florian; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Tasser, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Mountain regions meet an increasing demand for pleasant landscapes, offering many cultural ecosystem services to both their residents and tourists. As a result of global change, land managers and policy makers are faced with changes to this landscape and need efficient evaluation techniques to assess cultural ecosystem services. This study provides a spatially explicit modelling approach to estimating aesthetic landscape values by relating spatial landscape patterns to human perceptions via a photo-based survey. The respondents attributed higher aesthetic values to the Alpine landscape in respect to areas with settlements, infrastructure or intensive agricultural use. The aesthetic value of two study areas in the Central Alps (Stubai Valley, Austria and Vinschgau, Italy) was modelled for 10,215 viewpoints along hiking trails according to current land cover and a scenario considering the spontaneous reforestation of abandoned land. Viewpoints with high aesthetic values were mainly located at high altitude, allowing long vistas, and included views of lakes or glaciers, and the lowest values were for viewpoints close to streets and in narrow valleys with little view. The aesthetic values of the reforestation scenario decreased mainly at higher altitudes, but the whole area was affected, reducing aesthetic value by almost 10% in Stubai Valley and 15% in Vinschgau. Our proposed modelling approach allows the estimation of aesthetic values in spatial and qualitative terms for most viewpoints in the European Alps. The resulting maps can be used as information and the basis for discussion by stakeholders, to support the decision-making process and landscape planning. This paper also discusses the role of mountain farming in preserving an attractive landscape and related cultural values. PMID:27482152

  4. IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana; Gubanova, Elena; Khrustaleva, Irina; Atamanov, Vasiliy; Saybel, Anastasiya; Parsagashvili, Elena; Dmitrieva, Irina; Sanchez, Elena; Lapatina, Natalia; Korolkova, Tatiana; Saromytskaya, Alena; Goltsova, Elena; Satardinova, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Background Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013), and Moscow, Russia (March 2014). The expert group reviewed and analyzed the existing evidence, consensus recommendations, and Russian experts’ extensive practical experience of incobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics to reach consensus on optimal doses, potential dose adjustments, and injection sites of incobotulinumtoxinA for facial aesthetics. Results All experts developed guidance on the optimal doses for incobotulinumtoxinA treatment of different regions of the upper and lower face. The expert panel agreed that there are no differences in the efficacy and duration of the effect between the four BoNT/As that are commercially available for facial aesthetic indications in Russia and that, when administered correctly, all BoNT/As can achieve optimal results. Experts also agreed that nonresponse to BoNT/A can be caused by neutralizing antibodies. Conclusion On the basis of the scientific and clinical evidence available for incobotulinumtoxinA, coupled with the extensive clinical experience of the consensus group, experts recommended the optimal doses of incobotulinumtoxinA effective for treatment of wrinkles of the upper and lower face to achieve the expected aesthetic outcome. These first Russian guidelines on the optimal use of incobotulinumtoxinA for

  5. Can we measure beauty? Computational evaluation of coral reef aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Guibert, Marine; Foerschner, Anja; Co, Tim; Calhoun, Sandi; George, Emma; Hatay, Mark; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Vermeij, Mark J A; Felts, Ben; Dustan, Phillip; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    The natural beauty of coral reefs attracts millions of tourists worldwide resulting in substantial revenues for the adjoining economies. Although their visual appearance is a pivotal factor attracting humans to coral reefs current monitoring protocols exclusively target biogeochemical parameters, neglecting changes in their aesthetic appearance. Here we introduce a standardized computational approach to assess coral reef environments based on 109 visual features designed to evaluate the aesthetic appearance of art. The main feature groups include color intensity and diversity of the image, relative size, color, and distribution of discernable objects within the image, and texture. Specific coral reef aesthetic values combining all 109 features were calibrated against an established biogeochemical assessment (NCEAS) using machine learning algorithms. These values were generated for ∼2,100 random photographic images collected from 9 coral reef locations exposed to varying levels of anthropogenic influence across 2 ocean systems. Aesthetic values proved accurate predictors of the NCEAS scores (root mean square error < 5 for N ≥ 3) and significantly correlated to microbial abundance at each site. This shows that mathematical approaches designed to assess the aesthetic appearance of photographic images can be used as an inexpensive monitoring tool for coral reef ecosystems. It further suggests that human perception of aesthetics is not purely subjective but influenced by inherent reactions towards measurable visual cues. By quantifying aesthetic features of coral reef systems this method provides a cost efficient monitoring tool that targets one of the most important socioeconomic values of coral reefs directly tied to revenue for its local population. PMID:26587350

  6. Can we measure beauty? Computational evaluation of coral reef aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Guibert, Marine; Foerschner, Anja; Co, Tim; Calhoun, Sandi; George, Emma; Hatay, Mark; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Sandin, Stuart A.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; Felts, Ben; Dustan, Phillip; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    The natural beauty of coral reefs attracts millions of tourists worldwide resulting in substantial revenues for the adjoining economies. Although their visual appearance is a pivotal factor attracting humans to coral reefs current monitoring protocols exclusively target biogeochemical parameters, neglecting changes in their aesthetic appearance. Here we introduce a standardized computational approach to assess coral reef environments based on 109 visual features designed to evaluate the aesthetic appearance of art. The main feature groups include color intensity and diversity of the image, relative size, color, and distribution of discernable objects within the image, and texture. Specific coral reef aesthetic values combining all 109 features were calibrated against an established biogeochemical assessment (NCEAS) using machine learning algorithms. These values were generated for ∼2,100 random photographic images collected from 9 coral reef locations exposed to varying levels of anthropogenic influence across 2 ocean systems. Aesthetic values proved accurate predictors of the NCEAS scores (root mean square error < 5 for N ≥ 3) and significantly correlated to microbial abundance at each site. This shows that mathematical approaches designed to assess the aesthetic appearance of photographic images can be used as an inexpensive monitoring tool for coral reef ecosystems. It further suggests that human perception of aesthetics is not purely subjective but influenced by inherent reactions towards measurable visual cues. By quantifying aesthetic features of coral reef systems this method provides a cost efficient monitoring tool that targets one of the most important socioeconomic values of coral reefs directly tied to revenue for its local population. PMID:26587350

  7. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  8. Aesthetic evolution by mate choice: Darwin's really dangerous idea.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O

    2012-08-19

    Darwin proposed an explicitly aesthetic theory of sexual selection in which he described mate preferences as a 'taste for the beautiful', an 'aesthetic capacity', etc. These statements were not merely colourful Victorian mannerisms, but explicit expressions of Darwin's hypothesis that mate preferences can evolve for arbitrarily attractive traits that do not provide any additional benefits to mate choice. In his critique of Darwin, A. R. Wallace proposed an entirely modern mechanism of mate preference evolution through the correlation of display traits with male vigour or viability, but he called this mechanism natural selection. Wallace's honest advertisement proposal was stridently anti-Darwinian and anti-aesthetic. Most modern sexual selection research relies on essentially the same Neo-Wallacean theory renamed as sexual selection. I define the process of aesthetic evolution as the evolution of a communication signal through sensory/cognitive evaluation, which is most elaborated through coevolution of the signal and its evaluation. Sensory evaluation includes the possibility that display traits do not encode information that is being assessed, but are merely preferred. A genuinely Darwinian, aesthetic theory of sexual selection requires the incorporation of the Lande-Kirkpatrick null model into sexual selection research, but also encompasses the possibility of sensory bias, good genes and direct benefits mechanisms.

  9. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    PubMed

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike. PMID:27066153

  10. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations.

  11. Adolescent aesthetic athletes: a group at risk for eating pathology?

    PubMed

    Van Durme, Kim; Goossens, Lien; Braet, Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Previous research shows that leanness- and weight-dependent sports increase the risk of developing disturbed eating behaviour. This study investigated whether adolescent aesthetic athletes (n=68, M=14.6 years), particularly ballet dancers and figure skaters, exhibit more eating pathology compared to the general population. Furthermore, it was investigated whether sport-related factors have explanatory value for the dieting behaviour of aesthetic athletes. To asses eating pathology, reliable and valid self-report questionnaires were used including the Eating Disorder Inventory-II, the Children's Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire and the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. Results show that female aesthetic athletes show more drive for thinness, features of bulimia, dieting behaviour and concerns about weight and shape compared to female adolescents from the general population. Concerning the explanation of dieting behaviour in aesthetic athletes, both sport-related factors (competition state anxiety) and general risk factors (eating concern) seem to be relevant. These results suggest that female aesthetic athletes show more disturbed eating behaviour and thoughts than female adolescents from the general population and therefore may have an enhanced risk of developing clinical eating disorders.

  12. Aesthetic and Emotional Effects of Meter and Rhyme in Poetry

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal. PMID:23386837

  13. Toward a Neural Chronometry for the Aesthetic Experience of Music

    PubMed Central

    Brattico, Elvira; Bogert, Brigitte; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Music is often studied as a cognitive domain alongside language. The emotional aspects of music have also been shown to be important, but views on their nature diverge. For instance, the specific emotions that music induces and how they relate to emotional expression are still under debate. Here we propose a mental and neural chronometry of the aesthetic experience of music initiated and mediated by external and internal contexts such as intentionality, background mood, attention, and expertise. The initial stages necessary for an aesthetic experience of music are feature analysis, integration across modalities, and cognitive processing on the basis of long-term knowledge. These stages are common to individuals belonging to the same musical culture. The initial emotional reactions to music include the startle reflex, core “liking,” and arousal. Subsequently, discrete emotions are perceived and induced. Presumably somatomotor processes synchronizing the body with the music also come into play here. The subsequent stages, in which cognitive, affective, and decisional processes intermingle, require controlled cross-modal neural processes to result in aesthetic emotions, aesthetic judgments, and conscious liking. These latter aesthetic stages often require attention, intentionality, and expertise for their full actualization. PMID:23641223

  14. The Impact of Aesthetics in Restorative Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Little, David

    2015-05-01

    Although patients frequently request enhanced aesthetics, additional considerations--including tooth structure and gingival condition, function, form, and communication--also contribute to treatment planning and successful outcomes. While some patients may only desire and require aesthetic alterations, others may require treatments that are more complicated (eg, surgery) in order to achieve their desired results. Thorough assessment and communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among all members of the dental team, prior to and throughout treatment planning, ensures that any problems, conditions, or complications are addressed before or alongside aesthetic concerns. Using visual tools when communicating with patients can help clinicians avoid unrealistic expectations while improving patient satisfaction. They can also help maximize dental team communication and ensure that all components, from the diagnostic wax-up to the final restorations, are completed predictably. By addressing patients' conditions and functionality first, and then actively listening to their aesthetic desires, clinicians are better equipped to create functional restorations that realistically meet their patients' aesthetic expectations. PMID:26470580

  15. Perception of Aesthetics by Different Professionals of Different Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vadgaonkar, Vaishali Devidas; Deshpande, Kiran Jayant; Gangurde, Parag Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the perception of aesthetics by different professionals of different communities in India by a photographic study. Materials and Methods This was a photographic study conducted among different professionals of different communities to establish an aesthetic norm for Indian population. The communities to which the professionals belonged were North Indian, South Indian, Maharashtrian, Gujarati and Parsi. The subjects photographed were aesthetic profiles with good occlusion. Five different facial photographic views each for male and female were obtained. These photographs were then subjected to changes in increments of 2 mm and 4 mm in retrusive and protrusive profile in Adobe Photoshop CS5 after which they were evaluated by different professionals of different communities according to their preference from most liked to least liked. Results The aesthetic preferences differed widely among different professionals of different community. Conclusion The established aesthetic norms can be utilized by the dental fraternity in general and Orthodontist’s in particular in diagnosis and treatment planning of Samples belonging to different communities to have the treatment outcome in unison with the established soft tissue norm for that particular community. PMID:26557609

  16. Comparison of aesthetic preferences among Roman and Arabic script readers.

    PubMed

    Heath, Robin L; Mahmasanni, Oula; Rouhana, Aida; Nassif, Nader

    2005-09-01

    The systemic bias for aesthetic preferences demonstrated by prior research is thought to reflect neural organisation. Research on aesthetic preference and laterality has usually been conducted with participants who read a left-to-right Roman script, e.g., English. In order to determine if the aesthetic judgments were influenced by habitual scanning direction, we administered a geometric aesthetic preference test to 578 right-handed adults who represented a range of script experience, i.e., left-to-right Roman script readers (English); right-to-left Arabic script readers; bi-directional readers of Roman and Arabic scripts; and illiterates. We also administered an asymmetric chimeric faces test. Our findings showed that biases in aesthetic preference were influenced by script direction and pictorial dimensions. In a laterally balanced composition, participants preferred to begin their scan with the object representing Interest and terminate with the object representing Weight, the direction being determined by the script. In an unbalanced composition, participants tended to fixate on content, whether Interest or Weight, and move in a direction consistent with the script. PMID:16191811

  17. Appreciating the beauty of science ideas: Teaching for aesthetic understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Mark; Rau, Cheryl; Schepige, Adele

    2003-07-01

    A large literature exists in which scientists describe their field as beautiful and the work they do as inspiring and passionate. Science teaching should strive to foster learning of substantive and powerful science ideas in ways that connect to the beauty inherent in those ideas. Our conception of learning science, that of learning for aesthetic understanding, achieves this goal by building on a framework of aesthetic experiences proposed by Dewey. This study is an articulation of the major components of aesthetic understanding, pedagogy designed to foster it, and the results of a pilot study designed to investigate its effectiveness. Responses to a survey and a semistructured interview are compared for students in two, fourth grade classrooms. The instructional goals were different in each classroom; one taught for the goal of aesthetic understanding, the second for the goal of conceptual understanding. Survey results indicate that the pedagogical moves were effective in scaffolding aesthetic understanding in treatment class students. More interesting, however, are student reports of the quality of the learning experience in the treatment class.

  18. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    PubMed

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike.

  19. Aesthetic evolution by mate choice: Darwin's really dangerous idea

    PubMed Central

    Prum, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin proposed an explicitly aesthetic theory of sexual selection in which he described mate preferences as a ‘taste for the beautiful’, an ‘aesthetic capacity’, etc. These statements were not merely colourful Victorian mannerisms, but explicit expressions of Darwin's hypothesis that mate preferences can evolve for arbitrarily attractive traits that do not provide any additional benefits to mate choice. In his critique of Darwin, A. R. Wallace proposed an entirely modern mechanism of mate preference evolution through the correlation of display traits with male vigour or viability, but he called this mechanism natural selection. Wallace's honest advertisement proposal was stridently anti-Darwinian and anti-aesthetic. Most modern sexual selection research relies on essentially the same Neo-Wallacean theory renamed as sexual selection. I define the process of aesthetic evolution as the evolution of a communication signal through sensory/cognitive evaluation, which is most elaborated through coevolution of the signal and its evaluation. Sensory evaluation includes the possibility that display traits do not encode information that is being assessed, but are merely preferred. A genuinely Darwinian, aesthetic theory of sexual selection requires the incorporation of the Lande–Kirkpatrick null model into sexual selection research, but also encompasses the possibility of sensory bias, good genes and direct benefits mechanisms. PMID:22777014

  20. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Crill, Emma K; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R; Marriott, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes.

  1. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Life Cycle Cost Impact Modeling System Reliability, Maintainability, and Cost Model (RMCM)--Description. Users Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goclowski, John C.; And Others

    The Reliability, Maintainability, and Cost Model (RMCM) described in this report is an interactive mathematical model with a built-in sensitivity analysis capability. It is a major component of the Life Cycle Cost Impact Model (LCCIM), which was developed as part of the DAIS advanced development program to be used to assess the potential impacts…

  2. Environmental Remediation Activities in Japan Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Incident - 12603

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, J.W.; Kelley, J.L.; Marcial, M.R.; Yashio, Shoko; Kuriu, Nobou; Kamijo, Hiroaki; Jotatsu, Kato

    2012-07-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor power plant was crippled by the Great Pacific earthquake and subsequent tsunami. Much of the focus in the news was on the reactor site itself as the utility company (TEPCO), the Japanese government, and experts from around the world worked to bring the damaged plants into a safe shutdown condition and stem the release of radioactivity to the environment. Most of the radioactivity released was carried out to sea with the prevailing winds. Still, as weather patterns changed and winds shifted, a significant plume of radioactive materials released from the plant deposited in the environment surrounding the plant, contaminating large land areas of the Fukushima Prefecture. The magnitude of the radiological impact to the surrounding environmental is so large that the Japanese government has had to reevaluate the meaning of 'acceptably clean'. In many respects, 'acceptably clean' cannot be a one-size-fits-all standard. The economics costs of such an approach would make impossible what is already an enormous and costly environmental response and remediation task. Thus, the Japanese government has embarked upon an approach that is both situation-specific and reasonably achievable. For example, the determination of acceptably clean for a nursery school or kindergarten play yard may be different from that for a parking lot. The acceptably clean level of residual radioactivity in the surface soil of a rice paddy is different from that in a forested area. The recognized exposure situation (scenario) thus plays a large role in the decision process. While sometimes complicated to grasp or implement, such an approach does prioritize national resources to address environment remediation based upon immediate and significant risks. In addition, the Japanese government is testing means and methods, including advanced or promising technologies, that could be proven to be effective in reducing the amount of radioactivity in the environment

  3. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse. PMID:26091400

  4. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation.

  5. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation. PMID:23789508

  6. [Aesthetic dermatology. Botulinumtoxin A and soft tissue augmentation].

    PubMed

    Rauch, L; Ruzicka, T

    2004-07-01

    Younger and younger patients are undergoing aesthetic procedures to achieve "wrinkle-free" aging. This has had great impact on the field of aesthetic dermatology. The rapid development of new indications and filler materials requires a critical approach to the available substances particularly concerning side effects and long-term effects. The quality of the chosen approach depends on the applied filler substance, clear indication the compliance of the patient and the experience of the physician. The growing expectations of patients require a critical analysis of the available therapy options. Botulinum toxin A is one of the preferred treatments for wrinkles secondary to facial expression. In addition there are a variety of biologically inert and completely resorbable filler materials such as collagen and hyaluronic acid and autologous materials such as fat implants or plasma gel available. This article gives an overview about the most common fillers and their use in aesthetic dermatology.

  7. Comparing humans to automation in rating photographic aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarala, Ramakrishna; Agrawal, Abhishek; Morales, Sandino

    2015-03-01

    Computer vision researchers have recently developed automated methods for rating the aesthetic appeal of a photograph. Machine learning techniques, applied to large databases of photos, mimic with reasonably good accuracy the mean ratings of online viewers. However, owing to the many factors underlying aesthetics, it is likely that such techniques for rating photos do not generalize well beyond the data on which they are trained. This paper reviews recent attempts to compare human ratings, obtained in a controlled setting, to ratings provided by machine learning techniques. We review methods to obtain meaningful ratings both from selected groups of judges and also from crowd sourcing. We find that state-of-the-art techniques for automatic aesthetic evaluation are only weakly correlated with human ratings. This shows the importance of obtaining data used for training automated systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  8. Radioactivity from Fukushima Dai-ichi in air over Europe; part 2: what can it tell us about the accident?

    PubMed

    Kirchner, G; Bossew, P; De Cort, M

    2012-12-01

    It is shown which information can be extracted from the monitoring of radionuclides emitted from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant and transported to Europe. In this part the focus will be on the analysis of the concentration ratios. While (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were reported by most stations, other detected radionuclides, reported by some, are (95)Nb, (129m)Te, (132)Te, (132)I, (136)Cs and (140)La. From their activity ratios a mean burn-up of 26.7 GWd/t of the fuel from which they originated is estimated. Based on these data, inventories of radionuclides present at the time of the accident are calculated. The caesium activity ratios indicate emissions from the core of unit 4 which had been unloaded into the fuel storage pool prior to the accident.

  9. Accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Stations of TEPCO —Outline & lessons learned—

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Shun-ichi

    2012-01-01

    The severe accident that broke out at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power stations on March 11, 2011, caused seemingly infinite damage to the daily life of residents. Serious and wide-spread contamination of the environment occurred due to radioactive materials discharged from nuclear power stations (NPSs). At the same time, many issues were highlighted concerning countermeasures to severe nuclear accidents. The accident is outlined, and lessons learned are extracted with respect to the safety of NPSs, as well as radiation protection of residents under the emergency involving the accident. The materials of the current paper are those released by governmental agencies, academic societies, interim reports of committees under the government, and others. PMID:23138450

  10. Distribution of local 137Cs anomalies on the seafloor near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Blair; Ohnishi, Seiki; Ura, Tamaki; Odano, Naoteru; Sasaki, Shun; Fujita, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Tomowo; Nakata, Kaoru; Ono, Tsuneo; Ambe, Daisuke

    2013-09-15

    An estimated 3.5±0.7×10(15) Bq of (137)Cs is thought to have been discharged into the ocean following the melt down at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP). While efforts have been made to monitor seafloor radiation levels, the sampling techniques used cannot capture the continuous distribution of radionuclides. In this work, we apply in situ measurement techniques using a towed gamma ray spectrometer to map the continuous distribution of (137)Cs on the seafloor within 20 km of the F1NPP. The results reveal the existence of local (137)Cs anomalies, with levels of (137)Cs an order of magnitude higher than the surrounding seafloors. The sizes of the anomalies mapped in this work range from a few meters to a few hundreds of meters in length, and it is demonstrated that the distribution of these anomalies is strongly influenced by meter scale features of the terrain.

  11. Multi-Phased, Post-Accident Support of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant - 12246

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Arnaud; Gillet, Philippe; Ytournel, Bertrand; Varet, Thierry; David, Laurent; Prevost, Thierry; Redonnet, Carol; Piot, Gregoire; Jouaville, Stephane; Pagis, Georges

    2012-07-01

    In the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent flooding of several of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactors, Japan and the Japanese utility TEPCO faced a crisis situation with incredible challenges: substantial amounts of radioactive mixed seawater and freshwater accumulated in the basements of four reactor and other buildings on the site. This water held varying levels of contamination due to the fact that it had been in contact with damaged fuel elements in the cores and with other contaminated components. The overall water inventory was estimated at around 110,000 tons of water with contamination levels up to the order of 1 Ci/l. Time was of the essence to avoid overflow of this accumulated water into the ocean. AREVA proposed, designed and implemented a water treatment solution using a proven chemical coprecipitation process with ppFeNi reagent, which is currently in use for effluent treatment on several nuclear sites including AREVA sites. In addition to the extremely short schedule the other challenge was to adapt the chemical treatment process to the expected composition of the Fukushima water and, in particular, to evaluate the impact of salinity on process performance. It was also necessary to define operating conditions for the VEOLIA equipment that had been selected for implementation of the process in the future facility. The operation phase began on June 17, and by the end of July more than 30,000 tons of highly radioactive saltwater had been decontaminated - the Decontamination Factor (DF) for Cesium was ∼10{sup 4}. It allowed recycling the contaminated water to cool the reactors while protecting workers and the environment. This paper focuses on the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad water treatment unit project that was part of the TEPCO general water treatment scheme. It presents a detailed look at the principles of the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad, related on-the-fly R and D, an explanation of system implementation challenges, and a brief summary of

  12. Measurement of Airborne Fission Products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Kukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Accident

    SciTech Connect

    MacMullin, S.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Henning, R.; Holmes, R.; Vorren, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present measurement results of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 d following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products 131I and 137Cs were measured with maximum activity concentrations of 4.2 0.6 mBq/m3 and 0.42 0.07 mBq/m3 respectively. Additional activity from 131,132I, 134,136,137Cs and 132Te were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

  13. Precision Attachments for Aesthetics and Function: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Nitin Bhaskar; Shetty, Sanyuktha; E, Nagaraj; Shetty, Omkar; D’souza, Raina

    2014-01-01

    Successful restoration of the dentition requires plenty of contemporary and conventional treatment techniques and planning and attachment retained partial dentures are one such kind of treatment modality in prosthodontics. Limited space for extracoronal attachments is a serious gap in the design and the fabrication of a precision attachment Removable Partial Denture (RPD). A custom semi-precision attachment with a partial denture offers strength and improved aesthetics in cases with minimal space. This article presents a method of fabrication of semi-precision attachment to eliminate metal display and enhance aestheticity. PMID:24596792

  14. The use and abuse of aesthetic materials in posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Mitchem, J C

    1988-06-01

    This paper summarizes the clinically significant concerns surrounding the use of aesthetic restoratives in posterior teeth. Composite resins are far from ideal and possess some properties that should be of real concern to the dentist. They are not amalgam substitutes. On the other hand, they do have a place in the conservative cavity where aesthetics are desired. The suggested use of composite and porcelain inlays or onlays is an attempt to circumvent some of the concerns generated by the routine use of composites. However, the relative scarcity of clinical studies suggests a limited usage at this time.

  15. Sibling jealousy and aesthetic ambiguity in Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Margaret Ann Fitzpatrick

    2009-04-01

    Jane Austen's most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice (1813), illuminates and is illuminated by psychoanalytic aesthetics. When Austen dramatizes unconscious oedipal/sibling rivalries, irony acts as a type of aesthetic ambiguity (E. Kris 1952). A psychoanalytic perspective shows that Austen uses a grammar of negatives (negation, denial, minimization) to achieve the dual meanings of irony, engaging the reader's unconscious instinctual satisfactions, while at the same time protecting the reader from unpleasant affects. Austen's plot, which portrays regressions driven by sibling jealousy, reveals that a new tolerance of remorse and depression in her heroine and hero leads to psychic growth.

  16. Ingot selection for aesthetic restorations using contemporary pressed ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Robert G; Culp, Lee

    2002-08-01

    Accurate communication among the patient, clinician, and laboratory technician is critical to the development of a functional, aesthetic restoration. The use of pressed ceramic restorations has provided a durable, consistent alternative for full-coverage crowns, veneers, onlays, and short-span fixed partial dentures. This article discusses the importance of proper ingot selection in the fabrication of aesthetic restorations and in the realization of patients' expectations for smile design. Ceramic ingots are available in a variety of colors and opacities that provide the clinician and laboratory technician with the latitude to select an ingot that will ultimately ensure patient satisfaction.

  17. Subjective assessment of facial aesthetics after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiq; Aleem, Fahd; Ormiston, Ian W

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the subjective perception of facial appearance by patients after maxillofacial surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and explored the possible correlation between satisfaction and surgical outcome. A total of 26 patients, 24 men and 2 women (mean (SD) age 45 (7) years), subjectively assessed their facial appearance before and after operation using a visual analogue scale (VAS). To investigate a possible association between postoperative facial appearance and surgical outcome, we analysed postoperative scores for the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Postoperatively, 14 (54%) indicated that their facial appearance had improved, 4 (15%) recorded a neutral score, and 8 (31%) a lower score. The rating of facial appearance did not correlate with changes in the AHI or ESS following surgery. This study supports the view that most patients are satisfied with their appearance after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for OSA. The subjective perception of facial aesthetics was independent of the surgical outcome.

  18. Conceptualizing the aesthetic experience: using the influence matrix to show causal relationships between basic concepts in aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Rué, Emma; Mrotzek, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that using tools from systems science for teaching and learning in the Humanities offers innovative insights that can prove helpful for both students and lecturers. Our contention here is that a method used in systems science, namely the influence matrix, can be a suitable tool to facilitate the understanding of elementary notions in Aesthetics by means of systematizing this process. As we will demonstrate in the upcoming sections, the influence matrix can help us to understand the nature and function of the basic elements that take part in the aesthetic experience and their evolving relevance in the history of Aesthetics. The implementation of these elements to an influence matrix will contribute to a more detailed understanding of (i) the nature of each element, (ii) the interrelation between them and (iii) the influence each element has on all the others.

  19. How Might Aesthetic Knowing Relate to Leadership? A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz-Buonincontro, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic knowing may be valuable to educational leadership practice because it links feeling and intuition to procedural information to inform decision-making. Within the large and diverse field of aesthetics, some models apply aesthetic knowing to leadership practice. Scholarly interest in this area emerged in the late 1980's, and various…

  20. The effect of system aesthetics on trust, cooperation, satisfaction and annoyance in an imperfect automated system.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Alona; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Parmet, Yisrael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of system reliability has been repeatedly identified as a factor that decreases trust. However, aesthetics has an important role in the development of trust. Most of the research concerning the connection between aesthetics and trust focused on mobile commerce and websites while very little has been done in examining aesthetics in automated systems. This study integrated aesthetics manipulations into an imperfect in-vehicle automation system and focused on the power of aesthetics to decrease the negative effects of errors on trust, satisfaction, annoyance, and human-automation cooperation perceptions. Participants used the navigation system in either 100% or 85% accuracy levels with an aesthetic or non aesthetic system (4 conditions). In both aesthetic and non aesthetic systems, perceptions of trust, satisfaction and human automation cooperation were decreased in the imperfect system compared to the perfect one. However, in the annoyance rating, this trend was found only in the aesthetic system while in the non-aesthetic system no difference was found between the two levels of accuracy. This single effect may indicate upon the possibility that in automated systems aesthetics affects trust and satisfaction more moderately compared to mobile commerce applications and websites. However, more research is needed to assess this assumption.

  1. Design and Aesthetics in E-Learning: A Usability and Credibility Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glore, Peyton; David, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews research pertaining to the use aesthetics design, and usability in education. This article focuses on defining the role of visual elements and aesthetics in the user interface while exploring the importance of their application in a web-based learning environment. Research demonstrates that aesthetics are pivotal in…

  2. The Divine and Artistic Ideal: Ideas and Insights for Cross-Cultural Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Ming Dong

    2008-01-01

    Art has been related to the divine across cultures. In most traditions, the divine has been viewed as the ultimate aesthetic ideal, and aesthetics is full of notions, ideas, and concepts related to it without which artistic criticism and aesthetic education would be in a much impoverished state. The divine in art, however, is a slippery category.…

  3. Aesthetic Learning about, in, with and through the Arts: A Curriculum Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic learning is a major issue in arts education. The "method of art" is often expected to facilitate in-depth learning not only in the arts but across the curriculum. This article defines aesthetic learning in terms of a conceptual framework based on two dimensions, one representing the goal and the other the means of aesthetic learning. The…

  4. Aesthetic concepts, perceptual learning, and linguistic enculturation: considerations from Wittgenstein, language, and music.

    PubMed

    Croom, Adam M

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express genuinely aesthetic beliefs and instead hold that they work primarily to express something non-cognitive, such as attitudes of approval or disapproval, or desire. Non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express aesthetic beliefs because they deny that there are aesthetic features in the world for aesthetic beliefs to represent. Their assumption, shared by scientists and theorists of mind alike, was that language-users possess cognitive mechanisms with which to objectively grasp abstract rules fixed independently of human responses, and that cognizers are thereby capable of grasping rules for the correct application of aesthetic concepts without relying on evaluation or enculturation. However, in this article I use Wittgenstein's rule-following considerations to argue that psychological theories grounded upon this so-called objective model of rule-following fail to adequately account for concept acquisition and mastery. I argue that this is because linguistic enculturation, and the perceptual learning that's often involved, influences and enables the mastery of aesthetic concepts. I argue that part of what's involved in speaking aesthetically is to belong to a cultural practice of making sense of things aesthetically, and that it's within a socio-linguistic community, and that community's practices, that such aesthetic sense can be made intelligible.

  5. Venturing into Unknown Territory: Using Aesthetic Representations to Understand Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuero, Kimberley K.; Bonner, Jennifer; Smith, Brittaney; Schwartz, Michelle; Touchstone, Rose; Vela, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Based on Elliot Eisner's notions of multiple forms of representation and Rosenblatt's aesthetic/efferent responses to reading, a teacher educator/researcher had her undergraduate students explore their connections, using aesthetic representations, to a course entitled "Reading Comprehension". Each aesthetic representation revealed the complexities…

  6. An Exploration of the Aesthetics of an Oral History Performance Developed in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wan-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to explore a range of aesthetic aspects involved in the devising and production processes of oral history performance in a classroom setting. It touches upon the ethical dimension of aesthetics employing the Confucianist Wang Yang Ming's aesthetic philosophy and Buber's theories of relation as the theoretical frames. The devising…

  7. Eyes Wide Shut: The Use and Uselessness of the Discourse of Aesthetics in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavin, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The discourse of aesthetics appears repeatedly throughout literature in art education and is employed frequently through K-12 classroom practice. This article discusses the use and uselessness of the discourse of aesthetics in art education. Discourse, as used in this article, refers to the specific term "aesthetics," and all the individual and…

  8. MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit 4

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    Unit 4 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered a hydrogen explosion at 6:00 am on March 15, 2011, exactly 3.64 days after the earthquake hit the plant and the off-site power was lost. The earthquake occurred on March 11 at 2:47 pm. Since the reactor of this Unit 4 was defueled on November 29, 2010, and all its fuel was stored in the spent fuel pool (SFP4), it was first believed that the explosion was caused by hydrogen generated by the spent fuel, in particular, by the recently discharged core. The hypothetical scenario was: power was lost, cooling to the SFP4 water was lost, pool water heated/boiled, water level decreased, fuel was uncovered, hot Zircaloy reacted with steam, hydrogen was generated and accumulated above the pool, and the explosion occurred. Recent analyses of the radioisotopes present in the water of the SFP4 and underwater video indicated that this scenario did not occur - the fuel in this pool was not damaged and was never uncovered the hydrogen of the explosion was apparently generated in Unit 3 and transported through exhaust ducts that shared the same chimney with Unit 4. This paper will try to answer the following questions: Could that hypothetical scenario in the SFP4 had occurred? Could the spent fuel in the SPF4 generate enough hydrogen to produce the explosion that occurred 3.64 days after the earthquake? Given the magnitude of the explosion, it was estimated that at least 150 kg of hydrogen had to be generated. As part of the investigations of this accident, MELCOR models of the SFP4 were prepared and a series of calculations were completed. The latest version of MELCOR, version 2.1 (Ref. 1), was employed in these calculations. The spent fuel pool option for BWR fuel was selected in MELCOR. The MELCOR model of the SFP4 consists of a total of 1535 fuel assemblies out of which 548 assemblies are from the core defueled on Nov. 29, 2010, 783 assemblies are older assemblies, and 204 are new/fresh assemblies. The total decay

  9. Use of IBM Infowindows Workstation for Aesthetic Preference Studies Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinnie, Harold J.

    This paper presents some research which makes use of the computer with a video disk player to do aesthetic analyses of the work of Vincent Van Gogh which can be used in art history slide lectures. It begins with discussions of a video disk system with IBM (International Business Machines) Infowindows and of several software systems. The paper…

  10. Compassion Fatigue: Strategies for Minimizing Impact on Aesthetic Medical Providers.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Compassion fatigue is emotional, physical, and spiritual exhaustion from witnessing and absorbing the problems of others. Aesthetic providers are prone to becoming victims of compassion fatigue because of the stress of meeting the often overwhelming needs of patients. This article discusses what is known about compassion fatigue, what differentiates it from burnout, and how to recognize and combat it. PMID:26605823

  11. Refugee Performance: Aesthetic Representation and Accountability in Playback Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Rea

    2008-01-01

    This essay seeks to unpack some of the issues concerning representation when performing refugee stories using playback theatre. It questions the reductive influence of narrative structure and, using the framework of "artist as ethnographer," it argues that strong aesthetic production is required to overcome the dampening effect of empathy when…

  12. Program of Studies, Aesthetic Education: Music, Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    Educational objectives and brief course descriptions are presented for music education, grades 9-12, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland. The program, divided into general, choral, and instrumental categories, stresses refining cognitive perception, developing creative potential, and heightening aesthetic sensitivity.…

  13. The brain's specialized systems for aesthetic and perceptual judgment.

    PubMed

    Ishizu, T; Zeki, S

    2013-05-01

    We recorded brain activity when 21 subjects judged the beauty (aesthetic or affective judgment) and brightness (perceptual or cognitive judgment) of simultaneously presented paintings. Aesthetic judgments engaged medial and lateral subdivisions of the orbitofrontal cortex as well as subcortical stations associated with affective motor planning (globus pallidus, putamen-claustrum, amygdala, and cerebellar vermis), whereas the motor, premotor and supplementary motor areas, as well as the anterior insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, were engaged by both kinds of judgment. The results lead us to conclude: (i) that there is a functional specialization for judgment, with aesthetic judgments engaging distinct systems, in addition to those that they share with perceptual judgments; (ii) that the systems engaged by affective judgments are those in which activity correlates with polar experiences (e.g. love-hate, beauty-ugliness, and attraction-repulsion); and (iii) that there is also a functional specialization in the motor pathways, with aesthetic judgments engaging motor systems not engaged by perceptual judgments, in addition to those engaged by both kinds of judgment.

  14. Operating Classroom Aesthetic Reading Environment to Raise Children's Reading Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore how preschool educators understand about raising children's reading motivation through operating classroom aesthetic reading environment. With one year qualitative research, sixteen 4-6 years old young were observed and interviewed. The first stage interviews were undergone with environmental guidance. After the…

  15. Application of Science Aesthetics in the Teaching of Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    As the important part of the theoretical physics, the electrodynamics is a theoretical basic course of the physics and relative subjects. To adapt the demands for cultivating the target of highly-quality talents in the 21st century, the aesthetic principle can be used in the teaching to stimulate students' learning desire and cultivate students'…

  16. Reflections on Beardsley's "Aesthetics: Problems in the Philosophy of Criticism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Monroe Beardsley's "Aesthetics" was published the year the author was a junior philosophy major at the University of California, Berkeley, and by the end of that academic year, the author had completed semester courses in the history of ancient as well as modern philosophy, logic, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. The requirements remaining…

  17. Orientational Meliorism, Pragmatist Aesthetics, and the "Bhagavad Gita"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    This article develops an understanding of Dewey's aesthetics by connecting it to a project that can be extracted from his overall pragmatist approach--orientational meliorism. As I will argue, Dewey emphasizes the effect that one's mental habits or orientations toward experience and activity has on the quality of one's experience. Orientational…

  18. Historical Development of Television Aesthetics/Television Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Even though television scholar Herbert Zettl singlehandedly created the term "television aesthetics" by proclaiming that TV is an art, television studies are still excluded from the respectable divisions and disciplines of knowledge. Television is considered the epitome of mass culture/kitsch, and the very idea of a TV "masterpiece," for example,…

  19. Aesthetic provisional restoration for the partially edentulous, immediate, postimplantation patient.

    PubMed

    McCord, J F; Smith, G A; Quayle, A A

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the methods currently used for making provisional restorations for endosseous dental implants. With the requirements for osseointegration in mind, a simple and aesthetic alternative is suggested. The clinical and laboratory stages for the fabrication of the prosthesis are outlined.

  20. Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Involvement in Initial Negative Aesthetic Impression Formation

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC. PMID:22675517

  1. The role of aesthetic sensitivity in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lambrou, Christina; Veale, David; Wilson, Glenn

    2011-05-01

    Individuals with a higher aesthetic sensitivity may be more vulnerable to developing body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Aesthetic sensitivity has 3 components: (a) perceptual, (b) emotional, and (c) evaluative. Individuals with BDD (n = 50) were compared with a control group of individuals with an education or employment in art and design related fields (n = 50) and a control group of individuals without aesthetic training (n = 50). A facial photograph of each participant was manipulated to create a 9-image symmetry continuum. Presented with the continuum on a computer, participants were required to select and rate the image representing their self-actual, self-ideal, idea of perfect, most physically attractive, most pleasure, and most disgust. Control symmetry continua examined the specificity of the disturbance. As predicted, BDD participants displayed no distortion in their perceptual processing but were disturbed in their negative emotional/evaluative processing of their self-image. A significant discrepancy between their self-actual and self-ideal, resulting from an absent self-serving bias in their self-actual (a bias exhibited by controls) appears to be the source of their disturbance. They also overvalued the importance of appearance and self-objectified. These aesthetic evaluations may predispose individuals to BDD and/or maintain the disorder.

  2. Means Without End: Production, Reception, and Teaching in Kant's Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Gary

    2004-01-01

    This essay originates in the experience of teaching aesthetics to artists within the context of undergraduate and postgraduate art education. Its main aim is to feed this experience into a reading of Kant's Critique of Judgment as a means of identifying the productive moment within his thought typically obscured by the continuing dominance of…

  3. Beauty and the Beholder: A Survey of Aesthetic Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Bill

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the nature of "aesthetic experience" in a sample of urban community college students (N=170). The majority of students claimed to have had experiences of beauty, and that these experiences were important to their quality of life (95% and 72%, respectively). Strongest "depth of experience" ratings were given…

  4. A technique for simple and aesthetic treatment of anterior toothwear.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Basil

    2004-03-01

    This article describes a technique for treating anterior toothwear. The technique allows the placement of direct composite on the palatal surface of upper anterior teeth in an efficient and accurate manner. The advantages of an indirect wax-up technique and a direct intra-oral approach are combined to give an aesthetic and conservative result.

  5. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P; Dawson, Kelvin; Cross, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study directly compared how learning to embody an action impacts the neural response when watching and aesthetically evaluating the same action. Twenty-two participants trained for 4 days on dance sequences. Each day they physically rehearsed one set of sequences, passively watched a second set, listened to the music of a third set, and a fourth set remained untrained. Functional MRI was obtained prior to and immediately following the training period, as were affective and physical ability ratings for each dance sequence. This approach enabled precise comparison of self-report methods of embodiment with nonbiased, empirical measures of action performance. Results suggest that after experience, participants most enjoy watching those dance sequences they danced or observed. Moreover, brain regions involved in mediating the aesthetic response shift from subcortical regions associated with dopaminergic reward processing to posterior temporal regions involved in processing multisensory integration, emotion, and biological motion. PMID:25773627

  6. Anatomical Evolution and the Aesthetic Response to Figurative Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magro, Albert

    2012-01-01

    With regard to general aesthetic education, the university liberal studies curriculum is designed to provide a balance of the humanities and sciences. Beyond offering a balanced curriculum, there is the current trend for universities to offer a liberal studies curriculum that interfaces the sciences and the humanities. A prime example of this is…

  7. Aesthetic Experience in the World of Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    This article draws attention to three important aesthetic ideas--ideas which have become, in the early twenty-first century, so widely endorsed in Western culture that they have become the stock platform of much theorizing and teaching about our experience of art and its relation to the rest of life. All of these ideas sprang from Beat thought in…

  8. Art appreciation and aesthetic feeling as objects of explanation.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2013-04-01

    The target article presents a thought-provoking approach to the relation of neuroscience and art. However, at least two issues pose potential difficulties. The first concerns whether "art appreciation" is a coherent topic for scientific study. The second concerns the degree to which processing fluency can explain aesthetic feeling or may simply be one component of a more complex account.

  9. Transformative Learning and Online Education: Aesthetics, Dimensions and Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuzer, T. Volkan, Ed.; Kurubacak, Gulsun, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how to prepare transformative learning sessions and courses and design an environment for prospective online learners is a critical, as it facilitates the transfer of information, knowledge and learning from theoretical forms to real life experiences. This book provides an understanding and comprehension of aesthetics and its…

  10. Once More unto the Breach: Aesthetic Experience Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic experience as a determining factor in music appreciation has lost salience in recent years, especially in philosophy of music education. Markand Thakar, music director of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra and Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra and co-director of graduate conducting at Peabody Conservatory, has written a book subtitled…

  11. Visual aesthetic quality of Northern Ontario's forested shorelines.

    PubMed

    Haider, Wolfgang; Hunt, Len

    2002-03-01

    Only a few empirical studies on forest aesthetics have adopted a water-based perspective for observers and have investigated the perceived visual quality of forested shorelines. In forested environments with many lakes, such as the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield, individuals have greater exposure to forests from water-based rather than in-stand vantage points. This study employed the psychophysical research direction to explore the relationships between scenic beauty and biophysical characteristics of the forested shorelines in the boreal forests. Two model forms were tested. One model related the variation of shoreline forest aesthetic evaluations of near-vista views (140 m offshore) to a set of forest mensuration data. Tree size, tree mortality, conifer shrubs, tree density, amount of hardwood, and slope explained 60.2% of the variance in scenic beauty between the study sites. A second model was calibrated to test the relationship between an already existing ecosystem vegetation classification system and the aesthetic evaluations of the same forested shorelines. When the ecosystem classification was simplified to eight groups, the model explained 48.5% of variance. These models suggest that the psychophysical approach to studying aesthetics can be applied successfully to near-vista evaluations of scenic beauty. The finding that a forest ecosystem classification system is highly related to scenic beauty suggests that, at least in the boreal forest, managers can reasonably estimate the scenic beauty of forested shoreline environments from an ecosystem classification, with little need for intensive data on these sites. PMID:11830763

  12. Form, Truth, and Emotion: Transatlantic Influences on Formalist Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankiewicz, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Discusses formalism, the aesthetic theory which recommends that the value of art be sought in the lines, shapes, and colors of the work and their interrelationships. Examines the exchange of theories and practices between British artists such as Roger Fry and John Ruskin, and U.S. scholars such as Denman Ross. (GEA)

  13. Democratizing Children's Computation: Learning Computational Science as Aesthetic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Amy Voss; Sengupta, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Amy Voss Farris and Pratim Sengupta argue that a democratic approach to children's computing education in a science class must focus on the "aesthetics" of children's experience. In "Democracy and Education," Dewey links "democracy" with a distinctive understanding of "experience." For Dewey,…

  14. Mozart, Hawthorne, and Mario Savio: Aesthetic Power and Political Complicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, T. Walter

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the false dichotomy pitting aesthetic power against political complicity in literary criticism. Considers the sexual politics of the household of Nathaniel Hawthorne in light of this opposition. Suggests how literary works keep warring voices and inner conflicts alive and at odds. (HB)

  15. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878.3800 Section 878.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  17. The Aesthetic Dimension of the Theatrical Event: A Practical View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, L. L.

    The author examines the characteristics of aesthetic factors operative in theatrical art. He views the theatrical event as an auditory, graphic, and kinetic stimulus complex derived from prolonged, violent, emotional situations. The theatrical event is conceptualized as a sign process in which a specific line of dialogue or piece of action…

  18. Knowledge Discovery in Chess Using an Aesthetics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Azlan

    2012-01-01

    Computational aesthetics is a relatively new subfield of artificial intelligence (AI). It includes research that enables computers to "recognize" (and evaluate) beauty in various domains such as visual art, music, and games. Aside from the benefit this gives to humans in terms of creating and appreciating art in these domains, there are perhaps…

  19. The Aesthetic Calculus: Sex Appeal, Circuitry, and Invisibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arntfield, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Since antiquity, ideas regarding true beauty have been usurped by the purview of mathematics. From the aesthetic "logic" of Aristotle to the instrumentalized brutality of the Final Solution and its methodical anthropometric measurements, we see how the symmetry of numbers has been used to quantify the bodily politic according to an empirical…

  20. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Dawson, Kelvin; Cross, Emily S

    2015-03-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study directly compared how learning to embody an action impacts the neural response when watching and aesthetically evaluating the same action. Twenty-two participants trained for 4 days on dance sequences. Each day they physically rehearsed one set of sequences, passively watched a second set, listened to the music of a third set, and a fourth set remained untrained. Functional MRI was obtained prior to and immediately following the training period, as were affective and physical ability ratings for each dance sequence. This approach enabled precise comparison of self-report methods of embodiment with nonbiased, empirical measures of action performance. Results suggest that after experience, participants most enjoy watching those dance sequences they danced or observed. Moreover, brain regions involved in mediating the aesthetic response shift from subcortical regions associated with dopaminergic reward processing to posterior temporal regions involved in processing multisensory integration, emotion, and biological motion.

  1. The Aesthetic As Immediately Sensuous: An Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madenfort, Duke

    1974-01-01

    The views of Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Henri Bergson, John Dewey, and Susanne Langer were discussed. In this article they served as five important figures in a historical account of the concept of the aesthetic as the immediately sensuous. (Author/RK)

  2. Using verbal reports to investigate children's aesthetic experiences with music.

    PubMed

    Paul, Phyllis M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore children's aesthetic experiences with music through verbal report. (The term "aesthetic experience" was defined as follows: "intense subjective and personal experience; feelingful reaction; requires perception, experience of feelings and reactions, and psychological involvement," Price, 1986, p. 152). Participants were fourth graders, 31 girls and 29 boys, who possessed a variety of developmental statuses and conditions: normally developing (n = 35), gifted (n = 11), and special needs (n = 14). Students listened individually to Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43, Variation 18. Immediately following the listening session, I used structured interviews to investigate the students' aesthetic reactions to the music. Their comments were recorded and later transcribed. Content of the transcripts was analyzed, and categories emerged from the responses. Although it is impossible to ascertain if these children truly had aesthetic experiences, data indicate that they did respond to the music and could communicate their feelings verbally, some of which were deeply emotional. Except for word counts of student responses, there was little difference in reactions from the three developmental groups (normally developing, gifted, and special needs).

  3. Integrating Aesthetics into Professional Development for Teachers of English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Audrey Figueroa

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis on testing in curricular content areas has left little room in most U.S. schools for education in the arts. Yet research supports the pedagogical value of aesthetic education, particularly for English learners (ELs), whose representation in schools continues to increase. This article presents a qualitative action research study…

  4. Visual aesthetic quality of Northern Ontario's forested shorelines.

    PubMed

    Haider, Wolfgang; Hunt, Len

    2002-03-01

    Only a few empirical studies on forest aesthetics have adopted a water-based perspective for observers and have investigated the perceived visual quality of forested shorelines. In forested environments with many lakes, such as the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield, individuals have greater exposure to forests from water-based rather than in-stand vantage points. This study employed the psychophysical research direction to explore the relationships between scenic beauty and biophysical characteristics of the forested shorelines in the boreal forests. Two model forms were tested. One model related the variation of shoreline forest aesthetic evaluations of near-vista views (140 m offshore) to a set of forest mensuration data. Tree size, tree mortality, conifer shrubs, tree density, amount of hardwood, and slope explained 60.2% of the variance in scenic beauty between the study sites. A second model was calibrated to test the relationship between an already existing ecosystem vegetation classification system and the aesthetic evaluations of the same forested shorelines. When the ecosystem classification was simplified to eight groups, the model explained 48.5% of variance. These models suggest that the psychophysical approach to studying aesthetics can be applied successfully to near-vista evaluations of scenic beauty. The finding that a forest ecosystem classification system is highly related to scenic beauty suggests that, at least in the boreal forest, managers can reasonably estimate the scenic beauty of forested shoreline environments from an ecosystem classification, with little need for intensive data on these sites.

  5. Implementing the Study of Multicultural Aesthetics in Film and Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutenko, Gregory

    Film and television in the western world are highly stylized and culturally specific products. A course on multicultural aesthetics in film and video should introduce the student to perceptual alternatives in film and television use. Some of these alternatives can be derived from three well-established areas of film/television study: the…

  6. Frost Bite: A Dramatic Tale of Research in Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article follows the author's research on the integration of an aesthetic arts initiative in a private elementary school with an established traditional arts program. The narrative describes the sequence of events, interpersonal interactions, and learning experiences in the format of a full-length dramatic performance. Informed by Ben Peretz's…

  7. Physical Education as an Aesthetic-Ethical Educational Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ávila da Costa, Luísa; McNamee, Michael; Lacerda, Teresa Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Commencing with a discussion of the various conceptions of education for the development of humanity, this essay articulates four essential vectors of educational processes--epistemic, ethical, aesthetic, and political, as they are instantiated in Physical Education. Drawing on philosophical literature, it is argued that the sporting activities…

  8. From Children's Perspectives: A Model of Aesthetic Processing in Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    While several developmental models of aesthetic understanding, experience, and appreciation exist in the realms of visual art and music education, few examples have been proposed in regard to theatre, particularly for child audiences. This author argues that children gaze upon theatre in differential ways by including age as a variable…

  9. The Aesthetic Experience of Nature and Hermeneutic Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iared, Valéria Ghisloti; de Oliveira, Haydée Torres; Payne, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    One aim of environmental education is to encourage different ways of generating meanings of, valuing, conceiving, and contextualizing "nature." The field of aesthetics provides an affective basis for interpreting our perceptions of environments and relations with other more-than-human beings. This critical essay examines some of the key…

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Aesthetic Learning about Inclusion and Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedžune, Ginta; Gedžune, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to contribute to the body of practical knowledge about reorienting teacher education to address sustainability by reflecting on an action research experience from a study course on sustainability in a regional university. Design/methodology/approach: It contemplates the usage of aesthetic learning to activate pre-service…

  11. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Dawson, Kelvin; Cross, Emily S

    2015-03-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study directly compared how learning to embody an action impacts the neural response when watching and aesthetically evaluating the same action. Twenty-two participants trained for 4 days on dance sequences. Each day they physically rehearsed one set of sequences, passively watched a second set, listened to the music of a third set, and a fourth set remained untrained. Functional MRI was obtained prior to and immediately following the training period, as were affective and physical ability ratings for each dance sequence. This approach enabled precise comparison of self-report methods of embodiment with nonbiased, empirical measures of action performance. Results suggest that after experience, participants most enjoy watching those dance sequences they danced or observed. Moreover, brain regions involved in mediating the aesthetic response shift from subcortical regions associated with dopaminergic reward processing to posterior temporal regions involved in processing multisensory integration, emotion, and biological motion. PMID:25773627

  12. The Aesthetic and Moral Character of Oakeshott's Educational Writings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This article is an investigation of two apparently contradictory impulses in Oakeshott's writings about liberal education. On the one hand, he implied that it was primarily "aesthetic", something undertaken for its own sake with no practical consequences. On the other hand, he often implied that a student might undergo a moral transformation in…

  13. Classical Chinese Landscape Painting and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Recent theories of the aesthetic appreciation of nature or natural environments have done much to clarify what might be essential to such appreciation. Such accounts are incomplete, however, as they depend on a strict separation between works of art and nature itself. This paper shows how classical Chinese landscape painting offers a way to…

  14. Parent-Child Aesthetic Shared Reading with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The participation of parents-shared reading with children is a topic that has generated a lot of attention among many researchers in the world. For the use of picture story books, which have caused positive impact on the child's learning process, has also been recommended as the best strategies to develop children's aesthetic ability. The purpose…

  15. The moral aesthetics of simulated suffering in standardized patient performances.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janelle S

    2011-06-01

    Standardized patient (SP) performances are staged clinical encounters between health-professional students and people who specialize in role-playing the part of patients. Such performances have in recent years become increasingly central to the teaching and assessment of clinical skills in U.S. medical schools. SP performances are valued for being both "real" (in that they involve interaction with a real person, unlike written examinations) and "not real" (in that the SP does not actually suffer from the condition portrayed, unlike an actual patient). This article considers how people involved in creating SP performances reconcile a moral commitment to avoid suffering (to keep it "not real"), with an aesthetic commitment to realistically portray it (to keep it "real"). The term "moral aesthetic" is proposed, to indicate a sensibility that combines ideas about what is morally right with ideas about what is aesthetically compelling. Drawing on ethnographic research among SPs and SP program staff and medical faculty who work closely with them, this article argues that their work of creating "realism" in simulated clinical encounters encompasses multiple different (and sometimes conflicting) understandings and practices of realism, informed by three different moral aesthetics: (1) a moral aesthetic of induction, in which an accurate portrayal with a well-documented provenance serves to introduce experientially distant forms of suffering; (2) a moral aesthetic of inoculation, in which the authenticity and emotional impact of a performance are meant to inoculate students against the impact of future encounters with suffering; (3) a moral aesthetic of presence, generating forms of voice and care that are born out of the embodied presence of suffering individuals in a clinical space. All are premised on the assumption that risk and suffering can be banished from SP performances. This article suggests, however, that SP performances necessarily raise the same difficult

  16. Nursing Care Aesthetic in Iran: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Radmehr, Maryam; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Abedsaeedi, Zhila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the emphasis of contemporary nursing theories on the belief that nursing is a science and an art in care, published studies show that only the nursing science has developed. Many experts believe that by recognizing and perceiving this concept, the clinical field can develop aesthetic knowledge in nursing and education of students. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explain clients and nurses perspective of nursing care aesthetics. Patients and Methods: Using an interpretive phenomenology, 12 clients and 14 nurses were interviewed. Participants in this study were purposefully selected and their experiences were analyzed using Van Manen’s hermeneutic phenomenological framework. Results: Emerged themes were as follows: subjective description, overt spirituality, opening desperate impasse, sense of unity, continue to shine, and painful pass and pleasing. According the participants experiences, nursing care aesthetics includes subjective description of spiritual and desirable caring behaviors combined with sense of unity and sympathy between the nurse and the patients, which leads to opening in desperate impasse with creating the feeling of satisfaction and peace in the patient. It is a shining of clinical capabilities and an action beyond what should be combined with a decorating care that leads to a pleasant ending against the pain and suffering of the others for the nurse. Conclusions: Many caring behaviors associate with aesthetic experience for both patients and nurses and despite two different views, findings of this study showed that these experiences were similar in most cases. The aesthetics of nursing care was defined as what reflects the holistic nature of nursing with an emphasis on spirituality and skill. Results of this study are effective in identification of the values existed in nurse caring behaviors and developing of profession by instruction, implementation, and evaluation them. PMID:26339668

  17. The development of an index of orthodontic treatment priority.

    PubMed

    Brook, P H; Shaw, W C

    1989-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a valid and reproducible index of orthodontic treatment priority. After reviewing the available literature, it was felt that this could be best achieved by using two separate components to record firstly the dental health and functional indications for treatment, and secondly the aesthetic impairment caused by the malocclusion. A modification of the index used by the Swedish Dental Health Board was used to record the need for orthodontic treatment on dental health and functional grounds. This index was modified by defining five grades, with precise dividing lines between each grade. An illustrated 10-point scale was used to assess independently the aesthetic treatment need of the patients. This scale was constructed using dental photographs of 12-year-olds collected during a large multi-disciplinary survey. Six non-dental judges rated these photographs on a visual analogue scale, and at equal intervals along the judged range, representative photographs were chosen. To test the index in use, two sample populations were defined; a group of patients referred for treatment, and a random sample of 11-12-year-old schoolchildren. Both samples were examined using the index and satisfactory levels of intra- and inter-examiner agreement were obtained. PMID:2792220

  18. Stumbling on Aesthetic Experience: A Factual Account of the Accidental Discovery of Aesthetic Education in an Irish Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Nora

    1990-01-01

    Describes how an elementary classroom teacher discovers and explores the power of aesthetic experience in an educational context. Discusses how the artwork of Vincent Van Gogh helps an exceptionally difficult class of 11-year-old female students in suburban Dublin, Ireland, become interested in their education. (KM)

  19. Deconstructing "Aesthetic Response" in Small-Group Discussions about Literature: A Possible Solution to the "Aesthetic Response" Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soter, Anna O.; Wilkinson, Ian A. G.; Connors, Sean P.; Murphy, P. Karen; Shen, Vincent Fu-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Through their study of classroom talk about and around literary text, the authors discovered that their application of Rosenblatt's (1938/1995, 1978) "aesthetic" stance to elementary (primarily Grades 4-6) students' affective responses to literary text uniformly lacked the simultaneous articulation of "the real impact between the book and the mind…

  20. Aesthetic perception of visual textures: a holistic exploration using texture analysis, psychological experiment, and perception modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianli; Lughofer, Edwin; Zeng, Xianyi

    2015-01-01

    Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design, and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective, and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and non-linear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties. PMID:26582987

  1. Aesthetic perception of visual textures: a holistic exploration using texture analysis, psychological experiment, and perception modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianli; Lughofer, Edwin; Zeng, Xianyi

    2015-01-01

    Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design, and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective, and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and non-linear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties. PMID:26582987

  2. Aesthetic perception of visual textures: a holistic exploration using texture analysis, psychological experiment, and perception modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianli; Lughofer, Edwin; Zeng, Xianyi

    2015-01-01

    Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design, and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective, and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and non-linear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties.

  3. [Nursing between ethic and aesthetic. Profession described by media].

    PubMed

    Gradellini, Cinzia; Idamou, Sara; Lusetti, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Da una presa visione del messaggio mediatico, riguardo alla figura infermieristica, il ruolo e l’evoluzione che la professione ha avuto negli anni, restano sconosciuti ai non addetti ai lavori. L’obiettivo della ricerca è definire come l’immagine dell’infermiere è descritta dai media. Metodo: analisi di articoli di due quotidiani (a tiratura locale e nazionale) in merito a numero di articoli riguardante la professione, posizione dell’articolo, argomento (malasanità, truffe/reati, lavoro/tagli, riconoscimenti/elogi). A questo è seguita un’integrazione con analisi di quotidiani on line, utilizzando parole chiave. Analisi dei medical drama televisivi, relativamente a presenza, competenze, relazione con medico e paziente, aspetti sociali, contesto di cura in cui opera, impatto sul benessere della persona ed eventuali aspetti etico-deontologici. Risultati: su circa trecento articoli relativi all’ambito della salute, trentanove parlano di infermieri; cinque di questi hanno rilevanza da prima pagina. Il 39% degli articoli parla di truffe/reati, il 19% lavoro/tagli, il 15% malasanità. Dai quotidiani on line emerge un 66% di articoli relativi a truffe/reati. Nei format televisivi alla figura si porge poca attenzione, con competenze generiche a qualsiasi figura diversa da quella medica; quasi esclusivamente di sesso femminile, rispecchia stereotipi considerati di genere. Discussione: da entrambi i media presi in esame emerge una figura poco professionale; nello specifico della televisione, la figura dell’infermiere non ha una precisa identità ed è relegata a un ruolo di debolezza, riscontrabile nel contesto lavorativo e privato.

  4. Monitoring Cs-134 and 137 released by Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in ground, soil, and stream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, Maki; Onda, Yuichi; Hada, Manami; Ishwar, Pun; Abe, Yutaka

    2013-04-01

    Due to Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear power plant accident occurred in March 2011, large amount of radionuclides was released into the atmosphere and was fallen onto ground by rainfall. Few researches have monitored radioactive cesium dynamics in whole hydrological cycle system such as groundwater, soil water, spring water and stream water. Thus, the purpose of this study is to monitor concentration of radioactive cesium in those waters in time series in the headwaters. We have performed an intensive monitoring at three small mountainous catchments in Yamakiya district, Kawamata town, Fukushima prefecture, locating 35 km northwest from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant since June 2011, also we consider the movement of radioactive cesium and its relation with the hydrological cycle.

  5. [Aesthetics theory and method of landscape resource assessment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Baozhong; Wang, Baoming; He, Ping

    2006-09-01

    With the destruction of natural environment by human beings, scenic resources are no longer inexhaustible in supply and use. Human beings begin to lay the scenic resources on the same important strategic status as other natural resources, while landscape resources assessment is the prerequisite of their sustainable exploitation and conservation. This paper illustrated the psychological mechanisms of aesthetic and its approaches, compared with the methodologies of traditional and modem landscape aesthetic research, discussed the characteristics of important aesthetic theories (Platonism, Kant paradigm, Empathizing theory, Gestalt paradigm, Marxism aesthetics theory, and Appleton theory) and the landscape assessment theories of 4 paradigms (expert, psychological, cognitive, and empirical) and 2 groups (landscape environment science and landscape architecture culture), and summarized the important practices and successful examples at home and abroad. It was demonstrated that the historical development of landscape assessment had the feature of a contest between expert- and perception-based approaches, with the expert approach dominated in landscape management, while the perception-based approach dominated in landscape research. Both of these approaches generallty accepted that landscape quality was derived from the interaction between the biophysical features of landscape and the percepultual (judgmental) processes of human viewer. In the future, landscape quality assessment will evolve toward a shaky marriage, both expert- and perceptual approaches will be applied in parallel and merged in the final landscape management decision-making process in some but unspecified way, landscape information and complex geo-temporal dynamics representation central to scenic ecosystem management will present major challenges to the traditional landscape aesthetic assessment, and modem science and technology will continue to help meet these challenges. The main trends of landscape

  6. Aesthetic Depigmentation of Gingival Smoker's Melanosis Using Carbon Dioxide Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Costa, José Adriano; da Câmara, Marco Infante; Albuquerque, Rui; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Figueira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Melanic pigmentation results from melanin produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the oral epithelium. One of the most common causes of oral pigmentation is smoker melanosis, a condition associated with the melanocyte stimulation caused by cigarette smoke. This paper aims to illustrate the use of a carbon dioxide laser in the removal of the gingival melanic pigmentation for aesthetic reasons in a 27-year-old female patient with history of a smoking habit. The carbon dioxide laser vaporisation was performed on the gingival mucosa with effective and quick results and without any complications or significant symptoms after the treatment. We conclude that a carbon dioxide laser could be a useful, effective, and safe instrument to treat the aesthetic complications caused by oral smoker melanosis. PMID:25954535

  7. Indirect aesthetic adhesive restoration with fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Garcia, P P N S; Palma-Dibb, R G; Chimello, D T

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the restoration of an endodontically treated upper first molar with a fibre-reinforced onlay indirect composite resin restoration. The clinical and radiographic examination confirmed that the tooth had suffered considerable loss of structure. Therefore, an indirect restoration was indicated. First, a core was built with resin-modified glass ionomer cement, followed by onlay preparation, mechanical/chemical gingival retraction and impression with addition-cured silicone. After the laboratory phase, the onlay was tried in, followed by adhesive bonding and occlusal adjustment. It can be concluded that fibre-reinforced aesthetic indirect composite resin restoration represented, in the present clinical case, an aesthetic and conservative treatment option. However, the use of fibres should be more extensively studied to verify the real improvement in physical and mechanical properties.

  8. The artist speaks. Sigmund Koch on aesthetics and creative work.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M B

    2001-05-01

    Sigmund Koch is widely recognized as a prime mover of the radical transformation of psychology from a discipline dominated by behaviorism and related views to a multivalenced set of inquiries into human mentality and functioning. It is less widely remarked that Koch saw aesthetic endeavors as standing at the center of human life and thus warranting psychologists' closest attention. Koch's interest in aesthetics and art making is evident in his writings from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s on different states of mind, the notion of value properties, and the theory of definition. Koch's study of creative work in the latter decades of his life with artists of high accomplishment was guided by a set of methodological signposts for the study of creative work, contains formulations relevant to contemporary psychoaesthetics, and generates significant questions for further inquiry.

  9. Perceptual fluency and judgments of vocal aesthetics and stereotypicality.

    PubMed

    Babel, Molly; McGuire, Grant

    2015-05-01

    Research has shown that processing dynamics on the perceiver's end determine aesthetic pleasure. Specifically, typical objects, which are processed more fluently, are perceived as more attractive. We extend this notion of perceptual fluency to judgments of vocal aesthetics. Vocal attractiveness has traditionally been examined with respect to sexual dimorphism and the apparent size of a talker, as reconstructed from the acoustic signal, despite evidence that gender-specific speech patterns are learned social behaviors. In this study, we report on a series of three experiments using 60 voices (30 females) to compare the relationship between judgments of vocal attractiveness, stereotypicality, and gender categorization fluency. Our results indicate that attractiveness and stereotypicality are highly correlated for female and male voices. Stereotypicality and categorization fluency were also correlated for male voices, but not female voices. Crucially, stereotypicality and categorization fluency interacted to predict attractiveness, suggesting the role of perceptual fluency is present, but nuanced, in judgments of human voices.

  10. [Accepting a mastectomy thanks to socio-aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Arquillière, Agnès; Blanc, Nathalie

    2012-12-01

    For women of all ages, a mastectomy can affect their body image and femininity. Poor management, both physical and emotional, of a breast removal, can have major consequences on a patient's intimate, family and social life. In the framework of the multi-disciplinary treatment of breast cancer, a team in Lyon carried out a study on the impact of including socio-aesthetic practices in the overall care.

  11. Analysis of Facial Aesthetics as Applied to Injectables.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M; Glasgold, Robert; Glasgold, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the role of volume loss in the aging face has resulted in a paradigm shift in facial rejuvenation techniques. Injectable materials for volume restoration are among the most widespread cosmetic procedures performed. A new approach to the aesthetics of facial aging is necessary to allow the greatest improvement from volumetric techniques while maintaining natural appearing results. Examining the face in terms of facial frames and facial shadows provides the fundamental basis for our injectable analysis.

  12. Your Brain on Art: Emergent Cortical Dynamics During Aesthetic Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kontson, Kimberly L.; Megjhani, Murad; Brantley, Justin A.; Cruz-Garza, Jesus G.; Nakagome, Sho; Robleto, Dario; White, Michelle; Civillico, Eugene; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    The brain response to conceptual art was studied with mobile electroencephalography (EEG) to examine the neural basis of aesthetic experiences. In contrast to most studies of perceptual phenomena, participants were moving and thinking freely as they viewed the exhibit The Boundary of Life is Quietly Crossed by Dario Robleto at the Menil Collection-Houston. The brain activity of over 400 subjects was recorded using dry-electrode and one reference gel-based EEG systems over a period of 3 months. Here, we report initial findings based on the reference system. EEG segments corresponding to each art piece were grouped into one of three classes (complex, moderate, and baseline) based on analysis of a digital image of each piece. Time, frequency, and wavelet features extracted from EEG were used to classify patterns associated with viewing art, and ranked based on their relevance for classification. The maximum classification accuracy was 55% (chance = 33%) with delta and gamma features the most relevant for classification. Functional analysis revealed a significant increase in connection strength in localized brain networks while subjects viewed the most aesthetically pleasing art compared to viewing a blank wall. The direction of signal flow showed early recruitment of broad posterior areas followed by focal anterior activation. Significant differences in the strength of connections were also observed across age and gender. This work provides evidence that EEG, deployed on freely behaving subjects, can detect selective signal flow in neural networks, identify significant differences between subject groups, and report with greater-than-chance accuracy the complexity of a subject's visual percept of aesthetically pleasing art. Our approach, which allows acquisition of neural activity “in action and context,” could lead to understanding of how the brain integrates sensory input and its ongoing internal state to produce the phenomenon which we term aesthetic experience

  13. [Socio-aesthetic care blending professionalism and humanism].

    PubMed

    Jolivel, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    After working for several years as an aesthetician in a beauty institute, then as a trainer in a beauty training school, Fabienne Jolivel, 44 years old, became a socio-aesthetician to use her skills in a different way, giving aesthetic treatments to people suffering from illness. Here she gives a personal account of her work which offers job satisfaction and a different perspective on life.

  14. Your Brain on Art: Emergent Cortical Dynamics During Aesthetic Experiences.

    PubMed

    Kontson, Kimberly L; Megjhani, Murad; Brantley, Justin A; Cruz-Garza, Jesus G; Nakagome, Sho; Robleto, Dario; White, Michelle; Civillico, Eugene; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    The brain response to conceptual art was studied with mobile electroencephalography (EEG) to examine the neural basis of aesthetic experiences. In contrast to most studies of perceptual phenomena, participants were moving and thinking freely as they viewed the exhibit The Boundary of Life is Quietly Crossed by Dario Robleto at the Menil Collection-Houston. The brain activity of over 400 subjects was recorded using dry-electrode and one reference gel-based EEG systems over a period of 3 months. Here, we report initial findings based on the reference system. EEG segments corresponding to each art piece were grouped into one of three classes (complex, moderate, and baseline) based on analysis of a digital image of each piece. Time, frequency, and wavelet features extracted from EEG were used to classify patterns associated with viewing art, and ranked based on their relevance for classification. The maximum classification accuracy was 55% (chance = 33%) with delta and gamma features the most relevant for classification. Functional analysis revealed a significant increase in connection strength in localized brain networks while subjects viewed the most aesthetically pleasing art compared to viewing a blank wall. The direction of signal flow showed early recruitment of broad posterior areas followed by focal anterior activation. Significant differences in the strength of connections were also observed across age and gender. This work provides evidence that EEG, deployed on freely behaving subjects, can detect selective signal flow in neural networks, identify significant differences between subject groups, and report with greater-than-chance accuracy the complexity of a subject's visual percept of aesthetically pleasing art. Our approach, which allows acquisition of neural activity "in action and context," could lead to understanding of how the brain integrates sensory input and its ongoing internal state to produce the phenomenon which we term aesthetic experience.

  15. Fusion of multichannel local and global structural cues for photo aesthetics evaluation.

    PubMed

    Luming Zhang; Yue Gao; Zimmermann, Roger; Qi Tian; Xuelong Li

    2014-03-01

    Photo aesthetic quality evaluation is a fundamental yet under addressed task in computer vision and image processing fields. Conventional approaches are frustrated by the following two drawbacks. First, both the local and global spatial arrangements of image regions play an important role in photo aesthetics. However, existing rules, e.g., visual balance, heuristically define which spatial distribution among the salient regions of a photo is aesthetically pleasing. Second, it is difficult to adjust visual cues from multiple channels automatically in photo aesthetics assessment. To solve these problems, we propose a new photo aesthetics evaluation framework, focusing on learning the image descriptors that characterize local and global structural aesthetics from multiple visual channels. In particular, to describe the spatial structure of the image local regions, we construct graphlets small-sized connected graphs by connecting spatially adjacent atomic regions. Since spatially adjacent graphlets distribute closely in their feature space, we project them onto a manifold and subsequently propose an embedding algorithm. The embedding algorithm encodes the photo global spatial layout into graphlets. Simultaneously, the importance of graphlets from multiple visual channels are dynamically adjusted. Finally, these post-embedding graphlets are integrated for photo aesthetics evaluation using a probabilistic model. Experimental results show that: 1) the visualized graphlets explicitly capture the aesthetically arranged atomic regions; 2) the proposed approach generalizes and improves four prominent aesthetic rules; and 3) our approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms in photo aesthetics prediction.

  16. All is beautiful? Generality vs. specificity of word usage in visual aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Augustin, M Dorothee; Wagemans, Johan; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-01-01

    A central problem in the literature on psychological aesthetics is a lack of precision in terminology regarding the description and measurement of aesthetic impressions. The current research project approached the problem of terminology empirically, by studying people's word usage to describe aesthetic impressions. For eight different object classes that are relevant in visual aesthetics, including visual art, landscapes, faces and different design classes, we examined which words people use to describe their aesthetic impressions, and which general conceptual dimensions might underlie similarities and differences between the classes. The results show an interplay between generality and specificity in aesthetic word usage. In line with results by Jacobsen, Buchta, Kohler, and Schroger (2004)beautiful and ugly seem to be the words with most general relevance, but in addition each object class has its own distinct pattern of relevant terms. Multidimensional scaling and correspondence analysis suggest that the most extreme positions in aesthetic word usage for the classes studied are taken by landscapes and geometric shapes and patterns. This research aims to develop a language of aesthetics for the visual modality. Such a common vocabulary should facilitate the development of cross-disciplinary models of aesthetics and create a basis for the construction of standardised aesthetic measures.

  17. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  18. Use of otolith for detecting strontium-90 in fish from the harbor of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ken; Miki, Shizuho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shigenobu, Yuya; Takagi, Kaori; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Tomowo; Morinaga, Kenji; Nakata, Kaoru; Morita, Takami

    2015-06-16

    To clarify the level of contamination with radioactive cesium (radiocesium) discharged from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), three fish species caught in the main harbor of FDNPP were subjected to γ-ray analysis. The concentration of radiocesium in muscle differed among individual fish, even those of similar size of the same species, and showed little relation to the standard length of fish. The maximum concentration of radiocesium (202 kBq/kg wet) was detected from fat greenling samples. A comparison to data from outside the port indicated that the level of radiocesium contamination inside the port was higher than that outside. We found that β-rays were emitted from otoliths of fishes caught in the port of FDNPP. β-ray intensities were correlated with the concentrations of radiocesium in muscles of the three fish species. In Japanese rockfish, the β-ray count rates from otoliths were significantly correlated with the concentration of radiocesium and (90)Sr in the whole body without internal organs of Japanese rockfish. However, no β-rays were detected from brown hakeling samples collected around FDNPP, suggesting that the detection of β-rays from otoliths may indicate living in the main harbor of FDNPP.

  19. Analysis of data from sensitive U.S. monitoring stations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Biegalski, S R; Bowyer, T W; Eslinger, P W; Friese, J A; Greenwood, L R; Haas, D A; Hayes, J C; Hoffman, I; Keillor, M; Miley, H S; Moring, M

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 9.0 magnitude undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan and subsequent tsunami waves triggered a major nuclear event at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. At the time of the event, units 1, 2, and 3 were operating and units 4, 5, and 6 were in a shutdown condition for maintenance. Loss of cooling capacity to the plants along with structural damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami resulted in a breach of the nuclear fuel integrity and release of radioactive fission products to the environment. Fission products started to arrive in the United States via atmospheric transport on March 15, 2011 and peaked by March 23, 2011. Atmospheric activity concentrations of (131)I reached levels of 3.0×10(-2) Bqm(-3) in Melbourne, FL. The noble gas (133)Xe reached atmospheric activity concentrations in Ashland, KS of 17 Bqm(-3). While these levels are not health concerns, they were well above the detection capability of the radionuclide monitoring systems within the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  20. Development and deployment of an underway radioactive cesium monitor off the Japanese coast near Fukushima Dai-ichi.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, J A; Higley, K A; Farsoni, A T; Smith, S; Menn, S

    2012-09-01

    A custom radiation monitoring system was developed by Oregon State University at the request of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute to measure radioactive cesium contaminants in the ocean waters near Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The system was to be used on board the R/V Ka'imikai-O-Kanaloa during a 15 d research cruise to provide real-time approximations of radionuclide concentration and alert researchers to the possible occurrence of highly elevated radionuclide concentrations. A NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was coupled to a custom-built compact digital spectroscopy system and suspended within a sealed tank of continuously flowing seawater. A series of counts were acquired within an energy region corresponding to the main photopeak of (137)Cs. The system was calibrated using known quantities of radioactive (134)Cs and (137)Cs in a ratio equating to that present at the reactors' ocean outlet. The response between net count rate and concentration of (137)Cs was then used to generate temporal and geographic plots of (137)Cs concentration throughout the research cruise in Japanese coastal waters. The concentration of (137)Cs was low but detectable, reaching a peak of 3.8 ± 0.2 Bq/L.

  1. Analysis of data from sensitive U.S. monitoring stations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Hoffman, Ian; Keillor, Martin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morin, Marc P.

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 9.0 magnitude undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan and subsequent tsunami waves triggered a major nuclear event at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. At the time of the event, units 1, 2, and 3 were operating and units 4, 5, and 6 were in a shutdown condition for maintenance. Loss of cooling capacity to the plants along with structural damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami resulted in a breach of the nuclear fuel integrity and release of radioactive fission products to the environment. Fission products started to arrive in the United States via atmospheric transport on March 15, 2011 and peaked by March 23, 2011. Atmospheric activity concentrations of 131I reached levels of 3.0 * 10*2 Bqm*3 in Melbourne, FL. The noble gas 133Xe reached atmospheric activity concentrations in Ashland, KS of 17 Bqm*3. While these levels are not health concerns, they were well above the detection capability of the radionuclide monitoring systems within the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  2. Wet deposition of fission-product isotopes to North America from the Fukushima Dai-ichi incident, March 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Gay, David A.; Debey, Timothy M.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Nilles, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Using the infrastructure of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP), numerous measurements of radionuclide wet deposition over North America were made for 167 NADP sites before and after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station incident of March 12, 2011. For the period from March 8 through April 5, 2011, wet-only precipitation samples were collected by NADP and analyzed for fission-product isotopes within whole-water and filterable solid samples by the United States Geological Survey using gamma spectrometry. Variable amounts of 131I, 134Cs, or 137Cs were measured at approximately 21% of sampled NADP sites distributed widely across the contiguous United States and Alaska. Calculated 1- to 2-week individual radionuclide deposition fluxes ranged from 0.47 to 5100 Becquerels per square meter during the sampling period. Wet deposition activity was small compared to measured activity already present in U.S. soil. NADP networks responded to this complex disaster, and provided scientifically valid measurements that are comparable and complementary to other networks in North America and Europe.

  3. Use of otolith for detecting strontium-90 in fish from the harbor of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ken; Miki, Shizuho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shigenobu, Yuya; Takagi, Kaori; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Tomowo; Morinaga, Kenji; Nakata, Kaoru; Morita, Takami

    2015-06-16

    To clarify the level of contamination with radioactive cesium (radiocesium) discharged from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), three fish species caught in the main harbor of FDNPP were subjected to γ-ray analysis. The concentration of radiocesium in muscle differed among individual fish, even those of similar size of the same species, and showed little relation to the standard length of fish. The maximum concentration of radiocesium (202 kBq/kg wet) was detected from fat greenling samples. A comparison to data from outside the port indicated that the level of radiocesium contamination inside the port was higher than that outside. We found that β-rays were emitted from otoliths of fishes caught in the port of FDNPP. β-ray intensities were correlated with the concentrations of radiocesium in muscles of the three fish species. In Japanese rockfish, the β-ray count rates from otoliths were significantly correlated with the concentration of radiocesium and (90)Sr in the whole body without internal organs of Japanese rockfish. However, no β-rays were detected from brown hakeling samples collected around FDNPP, suggesting that the detection of β-rays from otoliths may indicate living in the main harbor of FDNPP. PMID:26000895

  4. Chromosomal Aberrations in Wild Mice Captured in Areas Differentially Contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshihisa; Tsuji, Hideo; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshito; Fuma, Shoichi; Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao; Aoki, Masanari; Kubota, Masahide; Furuhata, Yoshiaki; Shigemura, Yusaku; Mizoguchi, Masahiko; Yamada, Fumio; Tomozawa, Morihiko; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-08-18

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radiation effects on nonhuman biota in the contaminated areas have been a great concern. The induction of chromosomal aberrations in splenic lymphocytes of small Japanese field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and house mice (Mus musculus) inhabiting Fukushima Prefecture was investigated. In mice inhabiting the slightly contaminated area, the average frequency of dicentric chromosomes was similar to that seen in mice inhabiting a noncontaminated control area. In contrast, mice inhabiting the moderately and heavily contaminated areas showed a significant increase in the average frequencies of dicentric chromosomes. Total absorbed dose rate was estimated to be approximately 1 mGy d(-1) and 3 mGy d(-1) in the moderately and heavily contaminated areas, respectively. Chromosomal aberrations tended to roughly increase with dose rate. Although theoretically, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was considered proportional to the absorbed dose, chromosomal aberrations in old mice (estimated median age 300 days) did not increase with radiation dose at the same rate as that observed in young mice (estimated median age 105 days). PMID:26217955

  5. 137Cs vertical migration in a deciduous forest soil following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Koarashi, Jun; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko

    2014-02-01

    The large amount of (137)Cs deposited on the forest floor because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident represents a major potential long-term source for mobile (137)Cs. To investigate (137)Cs mobility in forest soils, we investigated the vertical migration of (137)Cs through seepage water, using a lysimetric method. The study was conducted in a deciduous forest soil over a period spanning 2 month to 2 y after the Fukushima nuclear accident. Our observations demonstrated that the major part of (137)Cs in the litter layer moved into the mineral soil within one year after the accident. On the other hand, the topsoil prevented migration of (137)Cs, and only 2% of (137)Cs in the leachate from litter and humus layer penetrated below a 10 cm depth. The annual migration below a 10 cm depth accounted for 0.1% of the total (137)Cs inventory. Therefore, the migration of (137)Cs by seepage water comprised only a very small part of the total (137)Cs inventory in the mineral soil, which was undetectable from the vertical distribution of (137)Cs in the soil profile. In the present and immediate future, most of the (137)Cs deposited on the forest floor will probably remain in the topsoil successively, although a small but certain amount of bioavailable (137)Cs exists in forest surface soil.

  6. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm. PMID:25388282

  7. Literary aesthetics: beauty, the brain, and Mrs. Dalloway.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2013-01-01

    Empirical research indicates that beauty is in part a matter of prototype approximation. Some research suggests that unanticipated pattern recognition is important as well. This essay begins by briefly outlining an account of beauty based on these factors. It goes on to consider complications. Minor complications include the partial incompatibility of these accounts and the importance of differentiating judgments of beauty from aesthetic response. More serious issues include the relative neglect of literature in neurologically-based discussions of beauty, which tend to focus on music or visual art. There is also a relative neglect of emotion, beyond the reward system. Finally, there is the almost complete absence of the sublime. After considering these problems broadly, the essay turns to Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, examining its treatment of beauty and sublimity. The aim of this section is not merely to illuminate Woolf's novel by reference to neuroscientific research. It is equally, perhaps more fully, to expand our neuroscientifically grounded account of aesthetic response by drawing on Woolf's novel. In Mrs. Dalloway, there are gestures toward prototypes and patterns in beauty. But the key features are clearly emotional. Specifically, the emotions at issue in feelings of beauty and sublimity appear to be primarily attachment, on the one hand, and a profound sense of isolation, on the other. Woolf's novel also points us toward other features of aesthetic experience, crucially including the emotion-sharing that is a key function of the production and circulation of art.

  8. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  9. Literary aesthetics: beauty, the brain, and Mrs. Dalloway.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2013-01-01

    Empirical research indicates that beauty is in part a matter of prototype approximation. Some research suggests that unanticipated pattern recognition is important as well. This essay begins by briefly outlining an account of beauty based on these factors. It goes on to consider complications. Minor complications include the partial incompatibility of these accounts and the importance of differentiating judgments of beauty from aesthetic response. More serious issues include the relative neglect of literature in neurologically-based discussions of beauty, which tend to focus on music or visual art. There is also a relative neglect of emotion, beyond the reward system. Finally, there is the almost complete absence of the sublime. After considering these problems broadly, the essay turns to Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, examining its treatment of beauty and sublimity. The aim of this section is not merely to illuminate Woolf's novel by reference to neuroscientific research. It is equally, perhaps more fully, to expand our neuroscientifically grounded account of aesthetic response by drawing on Woolf's novel. In Mrs. Dalloway, there are gestures toward prototypes and patterns in beauty. But the key features are clearly emotional. Specifically, the emotions at issue in feelings of beauty and sublimity appear to be primarily attachment, on the one hand, and a profound sense of isolation, on the other. Woolf's novel also points us toward other features of aesthetic experience, crucially including the emotion-sharing that is a key function of the production and circulation of art. PMID:24290272

  10. Spatial Covariance between Aesthetic Value & Other Ecosystem Services

    PubMed Central

    Casalegno, Stefano; Inger, Richard; DeSilvey, Caitlin; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mapping the spatial distribution of ecosystem goods and services represents a burgeoning field of research, although how different services covary with one another remains poorly understood. This is particularly true for the covariation of supporting, provisioning and regulating services with cultural services (the non-material benefits people gain from nature). This is largely because of challenges associated with the spatially specific quantification of cultural ecosystem services. We propose an innovative approach for evaluating a cultural service, the perceived aesthetic value of ecosystems, by quantifying geo-tagged digital photographs uploaded to social media resources. Our analysis proceeds from the premise that images will be captured by greater numbers of people in areas that are more highly valued for their aesthetic attributes. This approach was applied in Cornwall, UK, to carry out a spatial analysis of the covariation between ecosystem services: soil carbon stocks, agricultural production, and aesthetic value. Our findings suggest that online geo-tagged images provide an effective metric for mapping a key component of cultural ecosystem services. They also highlight the non-stationarity in the spatial relationships between patterns of ecosystem services. PMID:23840853

  11. Exploring user acceptance of a robotic arm: an aesthetic orientation.

    PubMed

    Apostolos, M K

    1985-07-01

    An industrial robotic arm has been programmed for use by quadriplegics, as a personal assistant in a rehabilitative setting. This case study is an investigation of the acceptance of this device by disabled individuals who may be likely to use the robot in an actual home or work setting. The use and acceptance of assistive devices have been a significant problem in the utilization of these instruments. An assessment of attitudinal changes of selected quadriplegics in response to the presentation of two orientation programs on the use of a robotic arm was the focus of this project. One program included a discussion of aesthetic sequences of robotic movement, industrial design, and kinetic art. In contrast, the other program presented the "standard" introduction to the robotic arm which involves utilitarian sequences of robotic movement. A robotics questionnaire was administered to both groups before and after the treatment operations. A follow-up study has been conducted. One of the subjects participating in the aesthetic treatment was part of this experiment which followed the posttest. The subject in the follow-up study was trained to use the Robotic Aid for utilitarian tasks. The questionnaire was readministered to this individual in a post-posttest. The whole study can be conceived of as series of investigations of the hypothesis that aesthetic movement of a robotic arm can affect an individual's attitude toward the acceptance and use of robots. As a piece of exploratory research, this case study does not reveal conclusive evidence to support the hypothesis.

  12. Satisfaction with Appearance and the Desired Treatment to Improve Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zarea, Bader K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To identify participants' satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics. Materials and Methods. 220 participants (127 males and 93 females, mean age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years) were recruited into the study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' satisfaction with appearance and what treatment they desire to improve aesthetics. Participants scored the level of satisfaction with appearance using visual analogue scale. Results. The VAS mean score of satisfaction with general appearance was 6.8 ± 2.3. Half participants were dissatisfied with tooth appearance and 65.9% were dissatisfied with tooth colour. Higher VAS scores were associated with higher desire for all treatments that improve tooth appearance (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance increased with increased dissatisfaction with teeth colour, feeling of poor tooth alignment, presence of fractured anterior teeth, and increased desire for orthodontic, crowns, and dentures treatments (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth colour was associated with increased desire for tooth whitening and tooth coloured fillings (P < .05). Conclusions. Participants had high levels of dissatisfaction with tooth appearance and tooth colour. Dissatisfaction with tooth colour contributed to the increased dissatisfaction with tooth appearance. Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance, colour, alignment, and condition was significantly related to high desire for aesthetic treatments. PMID:23509462

  13. Aesthetic Emotions and Aesthetic People: Openness Predicts Sensitivity to Novelty in the Experiences of Interest and Pleasure

    PubMed Central

    Fayn, Kirill; MacCann, Carolyn; Tiliopoulos, Niko; Silvia, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a stable relationship between the Openness/Intellect domain of personality and aesthetic engagement. However, neither of these are simple constructs and while the relationship exists, process based evidence explaining the relationship is still lacking. This research sought to clarify the relationship by evaluating the influence of the Openness and Intellect aspects on several different aesthetic emotions. Two studies looked at the between- and within-person differences in arousal and the emotions of interest, pleasure and confusion in response to visual art. The results suggest that Openness, as opposed to Intellect, was predictive of greater arousal, interest and pleasure, while both aspects explained less confusion. Differences in Openness were associated with within-person emotion appraisal contingencies, particularly greater novelty-interest and novelty-pleasure relationships. Those higher in Openness were particularly influenced by novelty in artworks. For pleasure this relationship suggested a different qualitative structure of appraisals. The appraisal of novelty is part of the experience of pleasure for those high in Openness, but not those low in Openness. This research supports the utility of studying Openness and Intellect as separate aspects of the broad domain and clarifies the relationship between Openness and aesthetic states in terms of within-person appraisal processes. PMID:26696940

  14. A blessing, not a curse: experimental evidence for beneficial effects of visual aesthetics on performance.

    PubMed

    Moshagen, Morten; Musch, Jochen; Göritz, Anja S

    2009-10-01

    The present experiment investigated the effect of visual aesthetics on performance. A total of 257 volunteers completed a series of search tasks on a website providing health-related information. Four versions of the website were created by manipulating visual aesthetics (high vs. low) and usability (good vs. poor) in a 2 x 2 between-subjects design. Task completion times and error rates were used as performance measures. A main effect of usability on both error rates and completion time was observed. Additionally, a significant interaction of visual aesthetics and usability revealed that high aesthetics enhanced performance under conditions of poor usability. Thus, in contrast to the notion that visual aesthetics may worsen performance, visual aesthetics even compensated for poor usability by speeding up task completion. The practical and theoretical implications of this finding are discussed.

  15. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surgeries become linked to other medical procedures with perceived greater medical necessity, health and aesthetics become entangled. One consequence is that medical needs are magnified while perceptions of the risks of surgery are minimized. Drawing on ethnographic work on plastic surgery, as well as other studies of obstetrics and cosmetic surgery, I illustrate this entanglement of health and aesthetics within the field of women's reproductive health care in Brazil. I argue that while it would be difficult to wholly disentangle aesthetics and health, analysis of how risk-benefit calculations are made in clinical practice offers a useful critical strategy for illuminating ethical problems posed by aesthetic medicine.

  16. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step. PMID:27579270

  17. Taxonomic and functional diversity increase the aesthetic value of coralligenous reefs

    PubMed Central

    Tribot, Anne-Sophie; Mouquet, Nicolas; Villéger, Sébastien; Raymond, Michel; Hoff, Fabrice; Boissery, Pierre; Holon, Florian; Deter, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being. However, studies which have investigated the link between biodiversity and ecosystem services have not taken aesthetic value into account. In this study we evaluated how the aesthetics of coralligenous reefs, a key marine ecosystem in the Mediterranean, is perceived by the general public and how aesthetic preferences are related to biodiversity facets (taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversities). We performed both biodiversity measures and online-surveys of aesthetic perception on photographic quadrats sampled along the French Mediterranean coast. Our results show that species richness and functional richness have a significant positive effect on aesthetic value. Most of the ecological literature, exploring the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning and service has focused so far on ‘economical’ aspects of biodiversity (provision or regulation). Our results illustrate that cultural facets, such as ‘beauty’, should also be central in our motivations to preserve ecological diversity. PMID:27677850

  18. Inventory and evaluation of California coastal recreation and aesthetic resources: Volume I. Executive summary (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The objective of this study is to describe existing California coastal and offshore recreation and aesthetic resources and to determine the value of recreation activities to recreationists, the recreation industry, and local economies. Aesthetic resources include visual resources as well as other sensory experiences. The primary purpose of this study is to inventory coastal California recreation and aesthetic resources that may be affected by proposed Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development activities and to evaluate their significance.

  19. A Visual Aesthetic Prediction Method for Use in Benefit-Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1980-08-01

    This report discusses the development of a method to predict landscape visual aesthetic changes caused by the siting of nuclear power plants. The methodology uses public perceptions as a measure of visual aesthetics. Individuals scored landscape photographs on a 0 to 50 visual aesthetic scale. The visual aesthetic scores were explained statistically by landscape characteristics, percent of the scene in clear, still water, and characteristics of the individuals scoring the photographs. Three visual aesthetic relationships were empirically estimated. The first is the relationship among group mean visual aesthetic scores and landscape characteristics. The second is the relationship among individual visual aesthetic scores, landscape characteristics, and the characteristics of the individuals who ranked the landscapes. These relationships were estimated using data from two regions in the U.S. and a diverse set of landscape photographs. The third relationship is among group mean visual aesthetic scores for landscapes with a visible nuclear power plant, landscape characteristics, and mean individual characteristics of the groups who scored the landscapes. This relationship was estimated using data from six regions in the U.S. and landscapes showing nuclear plants with a closed cycle cooling system. The statistical results are highly significant. Prediction validity test results indicate that the estimated relationships can predict visual aesthetic scores for groups of individuals outside the samples used to estimate the visual aesthetic relationships. This prediction method is not intended to determine social welfare impact. The social welfare impact of visible change is a measure of how consumers value changes in visual aesthetics relative to all other goods and services. The prediction methodology only provides an estimate of the impact of visible change on the perceived aesthetics associated with that landscape relative to other landscapes. It does not provide a

  20. [Journal selection and indexing for Index Medicus and Chinese periodicals indexed in Index Medicus].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Ling, Chang-Quan; Bai, Yu-Jin; Yin, Hui-Xia

    2005-01-01

    Index Medicus/MEDLINE/PubMed published by U. S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) is the most important and commonly used biomedical literature retrieval system in the world. According to the"List of Journals Indexed in Index Medicus (2004)", 4,098 journals are indexed for Index Medicus, including 70 journals from mainland China and Hong Kong and 9 journals from Taiwan. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine established in May, 2003 is indexed in Index Medicus in 2004. This article outlines the critical elements of journal selection for Index Medicus/MEDLINE and the journal selection process for indexing at NLM, and introduces some measures for the Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine being indexed in Index Medicus/MEDLINE.

  1. Brain intersections of aesthetics and morals: perspectives from biology, neuroscience, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, D W; Nadal, M

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, only philosophers debated the relationship between aesthetics and morality. Recently, with advances in neuroscience, the debate has moved to include the brain and an evolved neural underpinning linking aesthetic reactions and moral judgment. Biological survival emphasizes mate selection strategies, and the ritual displays have been linked to human aesthetics in the arts, in faces, and in various daily decision making. In parallel, cultural human practices have evolved to emphasize altruism and morality. This article explores the biological background and discusses the neuroscientific evidence for shared brain pathways for aesthetics and morals.

  2. Workplace aesthetics: impact of environments upon employee health as compared to ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Schell, Elisabet; Theorell, Tores; Saraste, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Associations between self-reported needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were studied to analyse a possible impact of aesthetic needs on job performance as compared to ergonomic needs in 11 occupational groups. Employees at Swedish broadcasting company were invited to participate in a cross sectional study. 74% (n=1961/2641) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Demographic data from company files and a pre-validated questionnaire were used. 'High rank' and 'low rank' aesthetic and ergonomic needs were compared. The perceived needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements showed significantly different distributions (p<0.001). Aesthetic needs were more frequently reported. No gender related differences were observed. Differences between occupational groups were shown (p=0.006, 0.003).'High rank' needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were similarly associated to psychological demands, stress, pain and age. 16/24 factors showed significant differences between 'high and low rank' aesthetic needs, whereas 21/24 between ergonomic needs. Sick leave was stronger related to ergonomics. The study results show a relation between not only work place ergonomics but also work place aesthetics to health and well-being. Future work health promotion and prevention may benefit from the inclusion of workplace aesthetics.

  3. Applying Computational Aesthetics to a Video Game Application Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ali Naci; Halici, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    The authors have developed a novel approach to evaluating the aesthetic quality of the camera direction in video game scenes rendered in real time while the game is being played. Their goal was to improve the visual aesthetic quality of computer-generated images using a computational aesthetics approach via a regression machine learning model. Considering the challenges and limitations involved, the proposed approach yielded promising prediction performance. The results show that near-real-time aesthetic analysis and visual improvement is possible using a virtual camera director. PMID:27244720

  4. Applying Computational Aesthetics to a Video Game Application Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ali Naci; Halici, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    The authors have developed a novel approach to evaluating the aesthetic quality of the camera direction in video game scenes rendered in real time while the game is being played. Their goal was to improve the visual aesthetic quality of computer-generated images using a computational aesthetics approach via a regression machine learning model. Considering the challenges and limitations involved, the proposed approach yielded promising prediction performance. The results show that near-real-time aesthetic analysis and visual improvement is possible using a virtual camera director.

  5. Workplace aesthetics: impact of environments upon employee health as compared to ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Schell, Elisabet; Theorell, Tores; Saraste, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Associations between self-reported needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were studied to analyse a possible impact of aesthetic needs on job performance as compared to ergonomic needs in 11 occupational groups. Employees at Swedish broadcasting company were invited to participate in a cross sectional study. 74% (n=1961/2641) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Demographic data from company files and a pre-validated questionnaire were used. 'High rank' and 'low rank' aesthetic and ergonomic needs were compared. The perceived needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements showed significantly different distributions (p<0.001). Aesthetic needs were more frequently reported. No gender related differences were observed. Differences between occupational groups were shown (p=0.006, 0.003).'High rank' needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements were similarly associated to psychological demands, stress, pain and age. 16/24 factors showed significant differences between 'high and low rank' aesthetic needs, whereas 21/24 between ergonomic needs. Sick leave was stronger related to ergonomics. The study results show a relation between not only work place ergonomics but also work place aesthetics to health and well-being. Future work health promotion and prevention may benefit from the inclusion of workplace aesthetics. PMID:22316918

  6. Aesthetic Treatment Related to Clinical Need--An Illustrated Case Report.

    PubMed

    Worskett, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Aesthetic treatment may be patient driven and usually by a 'want', rather than a 'need'. This paper describes the management of a patient who presented with aesthetic wants and clinical needs, both of which were caused as a result of unsuccessful aesthetic treatment which the patient had received previously. The diagnostic process, discussion of the treatment plan and clinical procedures, which produced a satisfactory result, are described and illustrated. Clinical Relevance: This case demonstrates that aesthetic treatment may commit the patient to future dental treatment needs, particularly if treatment provided is poorly planned and carried out to an unsatisfactory standard. PMID:26076548

  7. Artificial radionuclides in surface air in Finland following the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Mattila, Aleksi; Kettunen, Markku; Kontro, Riitta

    2013-12-01

    We present observations of radionuclides released during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident in ambient air and in deposition made in Finland during March-May 2011. The first observed fission product was (131)I, which arrived in Finland 8-9 days after the accident. Detections of (137)Cs and (134)Cs were made 2-3 days after the first (131)I observations. The highest concentrations of fission products in Finland were observed during March 31st and April 1st. The highest observed concentrations of the following isotopes were: (131)I (10.6 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3)), (134)Cs (0.397 ± 0.020 mBq/m(3)), (137)Cs (0.405 ± 0.017 mBq/m(3)), (136)Cs (28 ± 2 μBq/m(3)), (129)Te (129 ± 9 μBq/m(3)), (129m)Te (234 ± 20 μBq/m(3)), (132)Te (51 ± 3 μBq/m(3)) and (132)I (54 ± 3 μBq/m(3)). Generally, higher concentrations of fission product were observed in Southern Finland than in Northern Finland. The variations in the (137)Cs and (134)Cs activity concentration data suggest that three separate plumes passed over Finland with decreasing concentrations. The first plume, with highest cesium concentrations, passed over Finland during March 31st - April 2nd, the second plume during April 4th - 6th and the third and smallest one during April 10th - April 11th. Both aerosol and gaseous iodine fractions were sampled simultaneously and thus an accurate view of the behaviour of aerosol and gaseous fractions was obtained. Large variations between different fractions were observed with the gaseous fraction representing 65-98% of the total (131)I. The (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio was determined to be 0.99 ± 0.10, which indicates a fuel burnup of approximately 30 MWd/t. The (136)Cs/(137)Cs and (129m)Te/(132)Te ratios were used to estimate the time lapse after the accident. The differences between true time lapse and the ones deduced from the isotope ratios were from the correct time lapse to 0-3 days for (136)Cs/(137)Cs and 5 days for (129m)Te/(132)Te, respectively. Radionuclides from

  8. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    Proposed is a measure of indexing consistency based on the concept of "fuzzy sets." By this procedure a higher consistency value is assigned if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on…

  9. Comparative Index Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Muhammad Abdur

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that compared indexing terms suggested by authors of articles in "The American Journal of the Medical Science" and indexing terms assigned to the same articles in MEDLARS. Case studies are used to examine the differences between author and indexer indexing. (CLB)

  10. Quaker Resources Online Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke-Harrigan, Heidi

    The Quaker Resources Online Index is a World Wide Web-based index, including author, title, subject, and meeting indexes, that provides access to Quaker materials available on the Web. Given the current failings and shortcomings of search engines and automated key word searches, this index brings together information from a variety of sources and…

  11. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  12. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  13. Vertical distribution of radiocesium in soils of the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, A. V.; Golosov, V. N.; Yoschenko, V. I.; Nanba, K.; Onda, Y.; Takase, T.; Wakiyama, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Presented are results of the study of radiocesium vertical distribution in the soils of the irrigation pond catchments in the near field 0.25 to 8 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, on sections of the Niida River floodplain, and in a forest ecosystem typical of the territory contaminated after the accident. It is shown that the vertical migration of radiocesium in undisturbed forest and grassland soils in the zone affected by the Fukushima accident is faster than it was in the soils of the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl NPP for a similar time interval after the accident. The effective dispersion coefficients in the Fukushima soils are several times higher than those for the Chernobyl soils. This may be associated with higher annual precipitation (by about 2.5 times) in Fukushima as compared to the Chernobyl zone. In the forest soils the radiocesium dispersion is faster as compared to grassland soils, both in the Fukushima and Chernobyl zones. The study and analysis of the vertical distribution of the Fukushima origin radiocesium in the Niida gawa floodplain soils has made it possible to identify areas of contaminated sediment accumulation on the floodplain. The average accumulation rate for sediments at the study locations on the Niida gawa floodplain varied from 0.3 to 3.3 cm/year. Taking into account the sediments accumulation leading to an increase in the radiocesium inventory in alluvial soils is key for predicting redistribution of radioactive contamination after the Fukushima accident on the river catchments, as well as for decision-making on contaminated territories remediation and clean-up. Clean-up of alluvial soils does not seem to be worthwhile because of the following accumulation of contaminated sediments originating from more contaminated areas, including the exclusion zone.

  14. (14)C levels in the vicinity of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant prior to the 2011 accident.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T; Cresswell, Alan J; Dunbar, Elaine; Freeman, Stewart P H T; Hastie, Helen; Hou, Xiaolin; Jacobsson, Piotr; Naysmith, Philip; Sanderson, David C W; Tripney, Brian G; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) from Okuma, ∼1 km southwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, was cored and each annual ring was analysed for (14)C. The (14)C specific activity values varied from 330.4 Bq kg(-1) C in the tree ring formed in 1971 to 231.2 Bq kg(-1) C in the 2014 ring. During the periods 1971-1976 and 2011-2014, the (14)C specific activities are indistinguishable from the ambient background values. However, compared with the ambient atmospheric levels, the (14)C specific activities between 1977 and 2010 are significantly elevated, clearly indicating (14)C discharges from the reactors during their normal operations. In addition, the specific activities are positively correlated with the annual electricity generation values. The excess (14)C specific activities were <36 Bq kg(-1) C, corresponding to an additional annual effective dose of <2 μSv via the food ingestion pathway in the study location. The primary wind direction is east-southeast/southeast with a frequency of ∼30%, in comparison to ∼20% frequency for the direction of the site under study (north-northeast/northeast). This would tend to indicate a similar magnitude of additional effective dose and consequently no significant radiological impact of atmospheric (14)C discharges from the FDNPP during the entire period of normal operations. Additionally, no (14)C pulse in activity can be observed in the year 2011 ring. This might be caused by a limited (14)C release from the damaged reactors during the accident or that the prevailing wind during the short period of release (11th-25th March 2011) was not in the direction of Okuma. PMID:27023156

  15. Radiological impact of TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on invertebrates in the coastal benthic food web.

    PubMed

    Sohtome, Tadahiro; Wada, Toshihiro; Mizuno, Takuji; Nemoto, Yoshiharu; Igarashi, Satoshi; Nishimune, Atsushi; Aono, Tatsuo; Ito, Yukari; Kanda, Jota; Ishimaru, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Radioactive cesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) concentrations in invertebrates of benthic food web (10 taxonomic classes with 46 identified families) collected from wide areas off Fukushima Prefecture (3-500 m depth) were inspected from July 2011, four months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, to August 2013 to elucidate time-series trends among taxa and areas. Cesium-137 was detected in seven classes (77% of 592 specimens). Higher (137)Cs concentrations within detected data were often found in areas near or south of the FDNPP, which is consistent with the reported spatial distribution of (137)Cs concentrations in highly contaminated seawater and sediments after the FDNPP accident. Overall (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, the maxima of which (290 Bq kg(-1)-wet in the sea urchin Glyptocidaris crenularis) were lower than in many demersal fishes, had decreased exponentially with time, and exhibited taxon-specific decreasing trends. Concentrations in Bivalvia and Gastropoda decreased clearly with respective ecological half-lives of 188 d and 102 d. In contrast, decreasing trends in Malacostraca and Polychaeta were more gradual, with longer respective ecological half-lives of 208 d and 487 d. Echinoidea showed no consistent trend, presumably because of effects of contaminated sediments taken into their digestive tract. Comparison of (137)Cs concentrations in the invertebrates and those in seawater and sediments suggest that contaminated sediments are the major source of continuing contamination in benthic invertebrates, especially in Malacostraca and Polychaeta.

  16. Investigation of Depth Distribution of Radionuclides in Soil Contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Niizato, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Shingo; Abe, Hironobu; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    This work was conducted as one of the researches relating to distribution maps of radiation dose rate etc. which the government has promoted as one of the counter-measures to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, and the 2nd investigation on the depth distribution of radionuclides (RNs) in soil was conducted after about 1 year from the accident, succeedingly to the 1st investigation which was conducted after about 3 months from the accident. Soil core samples to about 50cm deep were taken at 11 locations in Nihonmatsu-city, Kawamata-town and Namie-town. Sorption-desorption experiments of Cs-137 and I-131, CEC and AEC measurements and mineralogical analyses by XRD were conducted for 3 types of soils (sandy, clayey, organic) and those elutriated components (clay, silt, sand). Radiocaesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) and Ag-110m were detected at all locations investigated and only at locations where radiation dose rate is high, respectively. Radiocaesium more than 95% and 99% of the inventory distributed within 5cm and 10cm deep in soil in the surface layer (mainly sandy soil), respectively, and distributed within 16cm and 20cm deep in organic soil and soil at locations where are supposed to have been used as farmland, respectively. Radiocaesium tended to extend to deeper parts in soil that organic and clayey soils are the support layer, particularly in organic soil, compared with the 1st investigation. Distribution coefficients of Cs-137 onto organic soil and its elutriated components were also lower than that onto other soils. This is consistent with trend of penetration profile.

  17. Fluvial discharges of radiocaesium from watersheds contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Akata, Naofumi; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2013-04-01

    A large amount of radiocaesium, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, was released to the atmosphere and Pacific Ocean from the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that was damaged by the tsunami caused by the Tohoku earthquake on 11 March 2011. Radiocaesium deposited on the ground is now the most important consideration in assessing the risk to people in the vicinity of the FDNPP and remediating the contaminated area. Transfer of radiocaesium from the ground through rivers is an important factor in the downstream contamination of irrigation waters, paddy fields, lakes, and the sea. We estimated the transport of radiocaesium through two small rivers, the Hiso River and Wariki River, that traverse mountainous areas in Fukushima Prefecture. Areal depositions of radiocaesium in their watersheds (catchments) were high (1-3 MBq m(-2)). Water samples were collected from the rivers twice during each of two baseflow and two flood stages in 2011 and analysed for radiocaesium in particulate and dissolved forms. The radiocaesium concentrations depended strongly on the rates of water discharge. Maximum activities of radiocaesium in the samples from the Hiso River and Wariki River when there was precipitation or flooding (July and September) were 25 ± 0.31 and 35 ± 0.25 Bq L(-1), respectively. Particulate radiocaesium during periods of flooding contributed over 90% of the total radiocaesium activity in the samples. The discharge of radiocaesium from the catchments during 2011 was estimated to be 0.5% and 0.3% of the total amount of radiocaesium deposited on the catchments of the Hiso River and Wariki River, respectively. It is considered that the most of the radiocaesium deposited in the catchment remains on the soil surface. PMID:23274616

  18. Soil radiocesium distribution in rice fields disturbed by farming process after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Nonaka, Masanori

    2012-11-01

    A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent large tsunami hit the northeastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. This resulted in serious damage to the reactors of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company. Large amounts of radionuclides were released from the FDNPP, a proportion of which were deposited onto the ground. In this study, we investigated soil radiocesium contamination of rice fields in Aga and Minamiuonuma, Niigata, ~130 and 200 km away from the FDNPP, respectively, as Niigata is one of the largest rice growing regions in Japan. Soil samples were collected from the plow layer of five rice fields in August and September, 5-6 months after the FDNPP accident. Results showed that radiocesium concentrations (the sum of Cs-134 and Cs-137) in the rice soil samples were ~300 Bq (kg dry soil)(-1). All samples contained a Cs-134/Cs-137 activity ratio of 0.68-0.96 after correction to March 11, 2011, showing that the radiocesium released from the FDNPP were deposited on these areas. Although the rice fields had been disturbed by farming processes after the FDNPP accident, the depth distribution of radiocesium concentrations in the plow layers showed higher concentrations in the upper soil layers. This suggests that spring tillage, flooding and puddling performed before rice transplantation may not disperse radiocesium deposited on the surface through the whole plow layer. In addition, the planar distribution of radiocesium concentrations was examined near the water inlet in one of the rice fields. Highest activities were found aligned with the direction of irrigation water discharge, indicating that radioactivity levels in rice fields may be elevated by an influx of additional radionuclides, probably in irrigation water, during farming.

  19. Modelling the transport of radioactive cesium released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP with sediments through the hydrologic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinouchi, T.; Omata, T.; Wei, L.; Liu, T.; Araya, M.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides including Cesium-134 and Cesium-137 was deposited over the main island of Japan and the Pacific Ocean, resulting in further transfer and diffusion of Cesium through the atmospheric flow, watershed hydrological processes, and terrestrial ecosystem. Particularly, for the transfer of Cesium-134 and Cesium-137, sediments eroded and transported by the rainfall-runoff processes play an important role as Cesium tends to be strongly adsorbed to soil particles such as clay and silt. In this study, we focus on the transport of sediment and adsorbed Cesium in the watershed-scale hydrologic system to predict the long-term change of distribution of Cesium and its discharge to rivers and ocean. We coupled a physically-based distributed hydrological model with the modules of erosion and transport of sediments and adsorbed Cesium, and applied the coupled model to the Abukuma River watershed, which is located over the area of higher deposition of Cesium. In the model, complex land use and land cover distributions, and the effect of human activities such as irrigation, dam control and urban drainage system are taken into accounts. Simulation was conducted for the period of March 2011 until August 2012, with initial spatial distribution of Cesium-134 and Cesium-137 obtained by the airborne survey. Simulated flow rates and sediment concentrations agreed well with observed, and found that since the accident, two major storms in July and September 2011 transported about 50% of total sediments transported during the simulated periods. Cesium concentration in the sediment was reproduced well except for the difference in the initial periods. This difference is attributable to the uncertainty arisen from the initial distribution of Cesium in the soil and the transfer of Cesium from the forest canopy.

  20. Fluvial discharges of radiocaesium from watersheds contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shinji; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Akata, Naofumi; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2013-04-01

    A large amount of radiocaesium, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, was released to the atmosphere and Pacific Ocean from the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that was damaged by the tsunami caused by the Tohoku earthquake on 11 March 2011. Radiocaesium deposited on the ground is now the most important consideration in assessing the risk to people in the vicinity of the FDNPP and remediating the contaminated area. Transfer of radiocaesium from the ground through rivers is an important factor in the downstream contamination of irrigation waters, paddy fields, lakes, and the sea. We estimated the transport of radiocaesium through two small rivers, the Hiso River and Wariki River, that traverse mountainous areas in Fukushima Prefecture. Areal depositions of radiocaesium in their watersheds (catchments) were high (1-3 MBq m(-2)). Water samples were collected from the rivers twice during each of two baseflow and two flood stages in 2011 and analysed for radiocaesium in particulate and dissolved forms. The radiocaesium concentrations depended strongly on the rates of water discharge. Maximum activities of radiocaesium in the samples from the Hiso River and Wariki River when there was precipitation or flooding (July and September) were 25 ± 0.31 and 35 ± 0.25 Bq L(-1), respectively. Particulate radiocaesium during periods of flooding contributed over 90% of the total radiocaesium activity in the samples. The discharge of radiocaesium from the catchments during 2011 was estimated to be 0.5% and 0.3% of the total amount of radiocaesium deposited on the catchments of the Hiso River and Wariki River, respectively. It is considered that the most of the radiocaesium deposited in the catchment remains on the soil surface.

  1. (14)C levels in the vicinity of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant prior to the 2011 accident.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T; Cresswell, Alan J; Dunbar, Elaine; Freeman, Stewart P H T; Hastie, Helen; Hou, Xiaolin; Jacobsson, Piotr; Naysmith, Philip; Sanderson, David C W; Tripney, Brian G; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) from Okuma, ∼1 km southwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, was cored and each annual ring was analysed for (14)C. The (14)C specific activity values varied from 330.4 Bq kg(-1) C in the tree ring formed in 1971 to 231.2 Bq kg(-1) C in the 2014 ring. During the periods 1971-1976 and 2011-2014, the (14)C specific activities are indistinguishable from the ambient background values. However, compared with the ambient atmospheric levels, the (14)C specific activities between 1977 and 2010 are significantly elevated, clearly indicating (14)C discharges from the reactors during their normal operations. In addition, the specific activities are positively correlated with the annual electricity generation values. The excess (14)C specific activities were <36 Bq kg(-1) C, corresponding to an additional annual effective dose of <2 μSv via the food ingestion pathway in the study location. The primary wind direction is east-southeast/southeast with a frequency of ∼30%, in comparison to ∼20% frequency for the direction of the site under study (north-northeast/northeast). This would tend to indicate a similar magnitude of additional effective dose and consequently no significant radiological impact of atmospheric (14)C discharges from the FDNPP during the entire period of normal operations. Additionally, no (14)C pulse in activity can be observed in the year 2011 ring. This might be caused by a limited (14)C release from the damaged reactors during the accident or that the prevailing wind during the short period of release (11th-25th March 2011) was not in the direction of Okuma.

  2. Isotopic Pu, Am and Cm signatures in environmental samples contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Sakaguchi, A; Ochiai, S; Takada, T; Hamataka, K; Murakami, T; Nagao, S

    2014-06-01

    Dust samples from the sides of roads (black substances) have been collected together with litter and soil samples at more than 100 sites contaminated heavily in the 20-km exclusion zones around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) (Minamisoma City, and Namie, Futaba and Okuma Towns), in Iitate Village located from 25 to 45 km northwest of the plant and in southern areas from the plant. Isotopes of Pu, Am and Cm have been measured in the samples to evaluate their total releases into the environment from the FDNPP and to get the isotopic compositions among these nuclides. For black substances and litter samples, in addition to Pu isotopes, (241)Am, (242)Cm and (243,244)Cm were determined for most of samples examined, while for soil samples, only Pu isotopes were determined. The results provided a coherent data set on (239,240)Pu inventories and isotopic composition among these transuranic nuclides. When these activity ratios were compared with those for fuel core inventories in the FDNPP accident estimated by a group at JAEA, except (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios, fairly good agreements were found, indicating that transuranic nuclides, probably in the forms of fine particles, were released into the environment without their large fractionations. The obtained data may lead to more accurate information about the on-site situation (e.g., burn-up, conditions of fuel during the release phase, etc.), which would be difficult to get otherwise, and more detailed information on the dispersion and deposition processes of transuranic nuclides and the behavior of these nuclides in the environment. PMID:24531259

  3. Aesthetic Emotions Across Arts: A Comparison Between Painting and Music

    PubMed Central

    Miu, Andrei C.; Pițur, Simina; Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors, and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971) interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness, and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience. PMID:26779072

  4. Golden Ratio and the heart: A review of divine aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Yalta, Kenan; Ozturk, Selcuk; Yetkin, Ertan

    2016-07-01

    In human history, certain mathematical figures or concepts had gained a significant reputation largely due to their occult and esoteric meanings. Among these, Golden Ratio and associated concepts, namely golden proportions, had elicited a tremendous breakthrough in our human awareness and perception regarding mundane and spiritual aspects of physical existence. Golden Ratio or Number (with a numerical value of 1.618) that is also referred to as the Greek letter Phi (φ), has been universally expressed on a line partitioned into two unequal lengths (L, the longer and S, the shorter) in such a manner that L/S=(L+S)/L. Besides, appearing in certain number sequences (Fibonacci Series, etc.), golden proportions, to the consternation of observers, appear to be strikingly prevalent across all levels of physical existence from the innermost structures to the colossal galaxies of the universe potentially labeling these concepts as the measures of divine aesthetics. Accordingly, the human body also serves as an epitome of these mysterious concepts as exemplified by its outward appearance including general stature and extremities along with a variety of inner organ systems. Based on preliminary studies, the human cardiovascular system might also be suggested to serve as a major predilection site of divine aesthetics as measured with Golden Ratio and its allies. This appears to be completely in line with the ancient knowledge associating the human heart with the esoteric and spiritual components of human nature including human soul. Within this context, the present paper primarily aims to discuss human manifestations of divine aesthetics as measured with 'Golden Ratio' and associated indices with a particular and detailed emphasis on their potential link with the human cardiovascular system.

  5. Development and Validation of the Expectations of Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale

    PubMed Central

    Naraghi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing concern in the field of aesthetic surgery about the need to measure patients' expectations preoperatively. The present study was designed to develop and validate the Expectations of Aesthetic Rhinoplasty Scale (EARS), and to compare expectations between rhinoplasty patients with and without body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Methods In total, 162 college students and 20 rhinoplasty candidates were recruited. The measures included the newly developed EARS, a measure of psychopathology, and demographics. The DSM-IV structured clinical interview for BDD was used to confirm the diagnosis in rhinoplasty patients. Results The EARS was constructed of six items based on their significant content validity. In the scale development phase, Cronbach's alpha was 0.87. The test-retest reliability coefficient of the scale was satisfactory (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–0.98) over a four-week period. Scores on the EARS were significantly positively correlated with psychopathological symptoms (r=0.16; P<0.05). Moreover, comparison of EARS scores between BDD (M=25.90, standard deviation [SD]=6.91) and non-BDD rhinoplastic patients (M=15.70, SD=5.27) suggested that BDD patients held significantly higher expectations (P<0.01). Conclusions The expectations of aesthetic rhinoplasty patients toward surgery may play a crucial role in their postoperative satisfaction. While the value of patients' expectations is clinically recognized, no empirical study has measured these expectations in a psychometrically sound manner. The current study developed and validated the EARS. It may be easily used as a valid and reliable instrument in clinical and research settings. PMID:27462570

  6. Aesthetic Emotions Across Arts: A Comparison Between Painting and Music.

    PubMed

    Miu, Andrei C; Pițur, Simina; Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors, and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971) interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness, and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience.

  7. Aesthetic analysis of the ideal eyebrow shape and position.

    PubMed

    Yalçınkaya, Esin; Cingi, Cemal; Söken, Hakan; Ulusoy, Seçkin; Muluk, Nuray Bayar

    2016-02-01

    The aesthetic importance of the eyebrow has been highlighted for centuries. In this paper, we investigated ideal eyebrow. Eyebrows and eyelids, varies among different races, ages and genders. It is considered to be of primary importance in facial expression and beauty. We present one form of the ideal eyebrow aesthetic and discuss methods of optimising surgical results. For the modern acceptable concept of the ideal brow, the medial brow should begin on the same vertical plane as the lateral extent of the ala and the inner canthus and end laterally at an oblique line drawn from the most lateral point of the ala through the lateral canthus. The medial and lateral ends of the brow lie approximately at the same horizontal level. The apex lies on a vertical line directly above the lateral limbus. Individual perceptions and expectations also differ from person to person. The brow should over lie the orbital rim in males and be several millimetres above the rim in female. Male tend to have a heavier, thicker brow with a little arch present. There are some pitfalls in brow aesthetics. Overelevation creates an unnatural, surprised and unintelligent look which is the most common surgical mistake in brow lifting. Medial placement of the brow peak would create an undesired 'surprised' appearance. Moreover, a low medial brow with a high lateral peak induces an angry look. Overresection of the medial brow depressors may lead to widening and elevation of the medial brow, which creates an insensitive look and can also lead to glabellar contour defects. It is impossible to define an ideal eyebrow that is suitable for every face. However, one must consider previously described criteria and other periorbital structures when performing a brow surgery.

  8. Aesthetic Emotions Across Arts: A Comparison Between Painting and Music.

    PubMed

    Miu, Andrei C; Pițur, Simina; Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors, and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971) interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness, and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience. PMID:26779072

  9. Golden Ratio and the heart: A review of divine aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Yalta, Kenan; Ozturk, Selcuk; Yetkin, Ertan

    2016-07-01

    In human history, certain mathematical figures or concepts had gained a significant reputation largely due to their occult and esoteric meanings. Among these, Golden Ratio and associated concepts, namely golden proportions, had elicited a tremendous breakthrough in our human awareness and perception regarding mundane and spiritual aspects of physical existence. Golden Ratio or Number (with a numerical value of 1.618) that is also referred to as the Greek letter Phi (φ), has been universally expressed on a line partitioned into two unequal lengths (L, the longer and S, the shorter) in such a manner that L/S=(L+S)/L. Besides, appearing in certain number sequences (Fibonacci Series, etc.), golden proportions, to the consternation of observers, appear to be strikingly prevalent across all levels of physical existence from the innermost structures to the colossal galaxies of the universe potentially labeling these concepts as the measures of divine aesthetics. Accordingly, the human body also serves as an epitome of these mysterious concepts as exemplified by its outward appearance including general stature and extremities along with a variety of inner organ systems. Based on preliminary studies, the human cardiovascular system might also be suggested to serve as a major predilection site of divine aesthetics as measured with Golden Ratio and its allies. This appears to be completely in line with the ancient knowledge associating the human heart with the esoteric and spiritual components of human nature including human soul. Within this context, the present paper primarily aims to discuss human manifestations of divine aesthetics as measured with 'Golden Ratio' and associated indices with a particular and detailed emphasis on their potential link with the human cardiovascular system. PMID:27060268

  10. Restabilizing attachment to cultural objects. Aesthetics, emotions and biography.

    PubMed

    Benzecry, Claudio E

    2015-12-01

    The scholarship on aesthetics and materiality has studied how objects help shape identity, social action and subjectivity. Objects, as 'equipment[s] for living' (Luhmann 2000), become the 'obligatory passage points humans have to contend with in order to pursue their projects (Latour 1991). They provide patterns to which bodies can unconsciously latch onto, or help human agents work towards particular states of being (DeNora 2000, 2003). Objects are central in the long term process of taste construction, as any attachment to an object is made out of a delicate equilibrium of mediators, bodies, situations and techniques (Hennion and his collaborators (Hennion and Fouquet 2001; Hennion and Gomart 1999). In all of these accounts objects are the end result of long-term processes of stabilization, in which the actual material object (a musical piece, a sculpture, an art installation, a glass of wine, the oeuvre of Bach as we know it) is both a result and yet a key co-producer of its own generation. Whereas the literature has been generous and detailed in exploring the processes of assembling and sustaining object-centered attachments, it has not sufficiently engaged with what happens when the aesthetic elements of cultural artifacts that have produced emotional resonance are transformed: what do these artifacts morph into? What explains the transition (or not) of different cultural objects? And relatedly, what happens to the key aesthetic qualities that were so central to how the objects had been defined, and to those who have emotionally attached to them? To answer these questions, this article uses as exemplars two different cases of attachment, predicated on the distinctive features of a cultural object--the transcendence of opera and the authenticity of a soccer jersey--that have undergone transformations. PMID:26560345

  11. Restabilizing attachment to cultural objects. Aesthetics, emotions and biography.

    PubMed

    Benzecry, Claudio E

    2015-12-01

    The scholarship on aesthetics and materiality has studied how objects help shape identity, social action and subjectivity. Objects, as 'equipment[s] for living' (Luhmann 2000), become the 'obligatory passage points humans have to contend with in order to pursue their projects (Latour 1991). They provide patterns to which bodies can unconsciously latch onto, or help human agents work towards particular states of being (DeNora 2000, 2003). Objects are central in the long term process of taste construction, as any attachment to an object is made out of a delicate equilibrium of mediators, bodies, situations and techniques (Hennion and his collaborators (Hennion and Fouquet 2001; Hennion and Gomart 1999). In all of these accounts objects are the end result of long-term processes of stabilization, in which the actual material object (a musical piece, a sculpture, an art installation, a glass of wine, the oeuvre of Bach as we know it) is both a result and yet a key co-producer of its own generation. Whereas the literature has been generous and detailed in exploring the processes of assembling and sustaining object-centered attachments, it has not sufficiently engaged with what happens when the aesthetic elements of cultural artifacts that have produced emotional resonance are transformed: what do these artifacts morph into? What explains the transition (or not) of different cultural objects? And relatedly, what happens to the key aesthetic qualities that were so central to how the objects had been defined, and to those who have emotionally attached to them? To answer these questions, this article uses as exemplars two different cases of attachment, predicated on the distinctive features of a cultural object--the transcendence of opera and the authenticity of a soccer jersey--that have undergone transformations.

  12. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way.

  13. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity.

    PubMed

    Bies, Alexander J; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R; Boydston, Cooper R; Taylor, Richard P; Sereno, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  14. Aesthetic tooth modification for patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Burke, F J; Shaw, W C

    1992-11-01

    Alongside orthodontic treatment, tooth shape modification may be indicated for teeth associated with clefts of the lip and alveolus, and in non-carious teeth, minimal tooth preparation techniques appear to be most appropriate. Two methods of tooth shape modification are described. In one, hybrid composite materials, bonded to tooth enamel using the acid-etch technique, may be considered to provide a permanent, low cost, aesthetically satisfactory result, often without tooth preparation and with minimal operating time. Alternatively, indirect veneers may be appropriate for treatment of more severely malformed teeth.

  15. The role of calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) in nonsurgical aesthetic rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Lizzul, Paul F; Narurkar, Vic A

    2010-05-01

    Radiesse (Bioform Medical, San Mateo, CA) is a synthetic calcium hydroxylapatite microsphere filler suspended in an aqueous carrier gel. Radiesse currently has indications in the United States (U.S.) for the correction of signs of lipoatrophy in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as well as for the correction of moderate-to-deep nasolabial folds. There are also numerous off label reports in the literature of use in other facial aesthetic procedures. This review describes the composition of calcium hydroxylapatite, its mechanism of action, durability and safety, pre- and post-procedure care, injection techniques, appropriate use, concomitant anesthesia, as well as potential adverse events and complications.

  16. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Bies, Alexander J.; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R.; Boydston, Cooper R.; Taylor, Richard P.; Sereno, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  17. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way. PMID:26579858

  18. Washing the patient: dignity and aesthetic values in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Pols, Jeannette

    2013-07-01

    Dignity is a fundamental concept, but its meaning is not clear. This paper attempts to clarify the term by analysing and reconnecting two meanings of dignity: humanitas and dignitas. Humanitas refers to citizen values that protect individuals as equal to one another. Dignitas refers to aesthetic values embedded in genres of sociality that relate to differences between people. The paper explores these values by way of an empirical ethical analysis of practices of washing psychiatric patients in nursing care. Nurses legitimate the washing of reluctant patients with reference to dignity. The analysis shows the intertwinement of humanitas and dignitas that gives dignity its fundamental meaning.

  19. Enhancing Facial Aesthetics with Muscle Retraining Exercises-A Review

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D’souza, Henston; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-01-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. ‘Smile’ is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects. PMID:25302289

  20. Aesthetic-functional rehabilitation through single restorations: immediate load

    PubMed Central

    BONINO, M.; DE VICO, G.; BAIA, C.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In this case report of monoedentulia we will deal with the positioning o fan upper jaw implant in zone 2.6. In such surgery the strategy of a flapless (1, 2) operation with minimum invasive approach has allowed u sto combine both the aesthetic and functionality with an immediate provisional rehabilitation, thus saving recuperation time and trouble for the patient (3). Multidisciplinary character of the execution of this clinical case is underlined, where we associate the knowleadge of conservatori of the prosthetic; always maintaining respect for the canons of gnatology which must not be left out of consideration. PMID:23285348