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Sample records for af ablation procedure

  1. Korean Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Network: Genetic Variants for AF Do Not Predict Ablation Success

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eue-Keun; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji-Young; Nam, Chung Mo; Hwang, Min Ki; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Ko, Young-Guk; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Lubitz, Steven A; Ellinor, Patrick T; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomewide association studies have identified several loci associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) and have been reportedly associated with response to catheter ablation for AF in patients of European ancestry; however, associations between top susceptibility loci and AF recurrence after ablation have not been examined in Asian populations. We examined whether the top single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (PITX2), 16q22 (ZFHX3), and 1q21 (KCNN3) were associated with AF in a Korean population and whether these SNPs were associated with clinical outcomes after catheter ablation for AF. Methods and Results We determined the association between 4 SNPs and AF in 1068 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation (74.6% male, aged 57.5±10.9 years, 67.9% paroxysmal AF) and 1068 age- and sex-matched controls. The SNPs at the PITX2 and ZFHX3 loci, but not the KCNN3 locus, were significantly associated with AF (PITX2/rs6843082_G: odds ratio 3.41, 95% CI 2.55 to 4.55, P=1.32×10−16; PITX2/rs2200733_T: odds ratio 2.05, 95% CI 1.66 to 2.53, P=2.20×10−11; ZFHX3/rs2106261_A: odds ratio 2.33, 95% CI 1.87 to 2.91, P=3.75×10−14; KCNN3/rs13376333_T: odds ratio 1.74, 95% CI 0.93 to 3.25, P=0.085). Among those patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, none of the top AF-associated SNPs were associated with long-term clinical recurrence of AF after catheter ablation. Conclusions SNPs at the PITX2 and ZFHX3 loci were strongly associated with AF in Korean patients. In contrast to prior reports, none of the 4 top AF-susceptibility SNPs predicted clinical recurrence after catheter ablation. PMID:26272656

  2. AF Therapy Now and in the Future: Drugs, Biologicals, and Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Christopher E.; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex disease with multiple interrelating causes culminating in rapid, seemingly disorganized atrial activation. Therapy targeting AF is rapidly changing and improving. Objective The purpose of this review is to summarize current state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for treatment of atrial fibrillation. The review focuses on reviewing treatment as it relates to the pathophysiological basis of disease and reviews pre-clinical and clinical evidence for potential new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, including imaging, biomarkers, pharmacologic therapy as well as ablative strategies for AF. Conclusions Current ablation and drug therapy approaches to treating AF are largely based on treating the arrhythmia once the substrate occurs and is more effective in paroxysmal AF rather than persistent or permanent AF. However, there is much research aimed at prevention strategies, targeting AF substrate—so called upstream therapy. Improved diagnostics, using imaging, genetics and biomarkers are needed to better identify sub-types of AF based on underlying substrate/mechanism to allow more directed therapeutic approaches. In addition, novel anti-arrhythmics with more atrial specific effects may reduce limiting pro-arrhythmic side-effects. Advances in ablation therapy are aimed at improving technology to reduce procedure time and in mechanism targeted approaches. PMID:24763469

  3. Totally thorascopic surgical ablation of persistent AF and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation using the "Dallas" lesion set.

    PubMed

    Edgerton, James R; Jackman, Warren M; Mahoney, Cecile; Mack, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgery consisting of bipolar radiofrequency pulmonary vein (PV) isolation and limited ganglionated plexus ablation is effective in eliminating atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with paroxysmal AF but is less effective in those with persistent AF or long-standing persistent AF. The purpose of this study was examine the results of minimally invasive surgery incorporating an additional set of radiofrequency ablation lines replicating a left-sided Cox maze III procedure. Thirty patients with persistent AF (n = 10) or long-standing persistent AF (n = 20) underwent minimally invasive surgery with an extended lesion set and PV isolation for a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Linear lesions were created at the roof line, at the anterior line, and between the roof line and the left atrial appendage. All patients underwent limited ganglionated plexus ablation and left atrial appendage excision as well as PV isolation verification. Block across the roof and anterior lines was confirmed in 29 (96.6%) of the 30 patients. Follow-up included 2-week event monitoring with auto-trigger in 21 patients, pacemaker interrogation in 8, and ECG in 1 who was in AF and refused longer-term monitoring. No operative mortality or major morbidity occurred. At 6 months, 24 (80%) of the 30 patients were free of AF: 15 (75%) with long-standing persistent AF and 9 (90%) with persistent AF. Among the six failures, burden of AF was low: one had 1 episode >15 seconds, two had 4 episodes, one had 6 episodes, one had >50 episodes, and one had AF on ECG and refused further monitoring. Early results of minimally invasive surgery with a new extended linear lesion set suggest increased efficacy over PV isolation and limited ganglionated plexus ablation in patients with persistent AF or long-standing persistent AF. PMID:19959146

  4. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

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  5. Major ablative procedures in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Soucacos, P N; Dailiana, Z H; Beris, A E; Xenakis, T H; Malizos, K N; Chrisovitsinos, J

    1996-01-01

    In the presence of the notable progress in limb-sparing techniques afforded by the developments in microsurgery and musculoskeletal oncology, major ablative surgery of the extremities still remains a last-resort, yet powerful tool in managing patients with primary tumors in whom wide excision is not possible, as well as in cases with severe trauma to the limbs. During the last thirteen years, eight major ablative procedures were performed at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University of Ioannina Medical School. Seven out of the eight procedures were performed in patients with primary malignant tumors either because the anatomical location or multiple recurrences of the tumor did not allow removal by wide local excision or by amputation at a lower level. In one patient, the procedure was related to a severe, mangling trauma. Four illustrative cases of the eight major ablative procedures performed are reported to highlight the current indications of this rarely used, complex, and extensive surgery. The characteristic cases presented are: hemipelvectomy in a patient with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis, disarticulation of the hip in a patient with a malignant histiocytoma of the supracondylar area of the knee, forequarter amputation in a patient with a basal cell carcinoma of the axilla, and disarticulation of the shoulder in a patient with an incomplete nonviable amputation at the level of the shoulder girdle associated with severe damage to the brachial plexus and axillary artery. After a five to over a ten year follow-up, six of the eight patients who where subjected to major ablative procedures are doing well and are satisfactorily active. These cases reflect the dilemma that orthopaedic surgeons geons still face in selecting limb salvage or major ablative surgery in cases of aggressive malignant tumors to severe trauma. PMID:8771355

  6. Atrioesophageal fistula following ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation: systematic review of case reports

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Patricia; Messerli, Franz H; Casso Dominguez, Abel; Aziz, Emad F; Sichrovsky, Tina; Garcia, Daniel; Barrett, Connor D; Danik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but serious adverse event of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Objective To identify the clinical characteristics of AEF following ablation procedures for AF and determine the associated mortality. Methods A systematic review of observational cases of AEF following ablation procedures for AF was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement protocol. Results 53 cases were identified. Mean age was 54±13 years; 73% (39/53) of cases occurred in males. Mean interval between procedure and presentation was 20±12 days, ranging from 2 to 60 days. AEF was observed in 12 patients who underwent surgical radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and in 41 patients with percutaneous RFA. Fever was the most common presenting symptom (n=44) followed by neurological deficits (n=27) and haematemesis (n=19). CT of the chest (n=27) was the preferred diagnostic test. Patients who did not receive a primary esophageal repair were more likely to have a deadly outcome (34% vs 83%; p<0.05). No difference in mortality rate was found between patients who underwent surgical RFA when compared with percutaneous RFA (58% vs 56%; p=0.579). No association was found between onset of symptoms and mortality (19±10 vs 23±14 days; p=0.355). Conclusions AEF following ablation procedures for AF is a serious complication with high mortality rates. Presenting symptoms most often include a triad of fever, neurological deficit and/or haematemesis within 60 days of procedure. The preferred diagnostic test is CT of the chest. The treatments of choice is surgical repair. PMID:26380098

  7. Impact of Free Thyroxine on the Outcomes of Left Atrial Ablation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro A; Providência, Rui; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Khoueiry, Ziad; Combes, Nicolas; Combes, Stéphane; Boveda, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increased in hyperthyroidism. The degree to which thyroid hormones affect the outcomes of left atrial (LA) ablation is still unclear. From September 2010 to September 2013, 1,095 patients who underwent LA ablation (59.7% paroxysmal AF, 32.3% persistent AF, and 8.0% LA tachycardia) had their serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels measured in the 48 hours before the procedure. Patients were followed until they presented the first AF relapse after a blanking period of 3 months. TSH and FT4 were assessed as predictors of arrhythmia relapse and were adjusted for possible confounders. During a mean follow-up of 12.5 ± 7.9 months, 28.9% of patients presented an atrial arrhythmia relapse. TSH was not a predictor of relapse. In contrast, after adjustment, FT4 (median = 11.8 ng/L and interquartile range 10.6 to 14.6 ng/L) remained a predictor of relapse with 15% increase per quartile (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.29, p = 0.014). In conclusion, FT4 levels influence the success rate of LA ablation procedures, even when in the normal range. PMID:26514301

  8. Multimodality Imaging for Guiding EP Ablation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Njeim, Mario; Desjardins, Benoit; Bogun, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in 3-dimensional electroanatomical mapping have been met by continuous improvements in the field of cardiac imaging and image integration during ablation procedures. Echocardiography, computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging provide information about cardiac anatomy and ultrastructure of the heart that may be crucial for a successful ablation procedure. Techniques and value of pre-procedural, intraprocedural, and post-procedural imaging and image integration are discussed in this review article. Pre-procedural imaging provides key anatomic information that can be complemented by intraprocedural imaging to minimize procedural complications. Furthermore, the presence and extent of structural heart disease can be assessed pre-procedurally and can be displayed intraprocedurally to limit and focus the mapping and ablation procedure to the area of interest. Pre-procedural imaging combined with imaging obtained during the ablation procedure further enhances procedural safety, reduces exposure to ionizing radiation from fluoroscopy, reduces procedure time, and may improve outcomes. PMID:27388666

  9. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors: lessons learned from 3000 procedures.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K; Kim, Young-sum; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae

    2008-10-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has been accepted as the most popular local ablative therapy for unresectable malignant hepatic tumors. For 9 years from April 1999, we performed 3000 radiofrequency ablation procedures for hepatic tumors in our institution. Our results on the safety (mortality, 0.15%/patient) and therapeutic efficacy (5-year survival rate, 58%) are similar to those of previous studies reported, supporting the growing evidence of a clear survival benefit, excellent results for local tumor control and improved quality of life. The most important lesson learned from our 3000 procedures is that the best planning, safe ablation and complete ablation are key factors for patient outcome. Furthermore, multimodality treatment is the best strategy for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma encountered after any kind of first-line treatment.

  10. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  11. Automatic segmentation of rotational x-ray images for anatomic intra-procedural surface generation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    Manzke, Robert; Meyer, Carsten; Ecabert, Olivier; Peters, Jochen; Noordhoek, Niels J; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Reddy, Vivek Y; Chan, Raymond C; Weese, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Since the introduction of 3-D rotational X-ray imaging, protocols for 3-D rotational coronary artery imaging have become widely available in routine clinical practice. Intra-procedural cardiac imaging in a computed tomography (CT)-like fashion has been particularly compelling due to the reduction of clinical overhead and ability to characterize anatomy at the time of intervention. We previously introduced a clinically feasible approach for imaging the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPVs) with short contrast bolus injections and scan times of approximately 4 -10 s. The resulting data have sufficient image quality for intra-procedural use during electro-anatomic mapping (EAM) and interventional guidance in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures. In this paper, we present a novel technique to intra-procedural surface generation which integrates fully-automated segmentation of the LAPVs for guidance in AF ablation interventions. Contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray angiography (3-D RA) acquisitions in combination with filtered-back-projection-based reconstruction allows for volumetric interrogation of LAPV anatomy in near-real-time. An automatic model-based segmentation algorithm allows for fast and accurate LAPV mesh generation despite the challenges posed by image quality; relative to pre-procedural cardiac CT/MR, 3-D RA images suffer from more artifacts and reduced signal-to-noise. We validate our integrated method by comparing 1) automatic and manual segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA data, 2) automatic segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA and pre-procedural CT/MR data, and 3) intra-procedural EAM point cloud data with automatic segmentations of 3-D RA and CT/MR data. Our validation results for automatically segmented intra-procedural 3-D RA data show average segmentation errors of 1) approximately 1.3 mm compared with manual 3-D RA segmentations 2) approximately 2.3 mm compared with automatic segmentation of pre-procedural CT/MR data and 3

  12. Low rate of asymptomatic cerebral embolism and improved procedural efficiency with the novel pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD: results of the PRECISION GOLD trial

    PubMed Central

    De Greef, Yves; Dekker, Lukas; Boersma, Lucas; Murray, Stephen; Wieczorek, Marcus; Spitzer, Stefan G.; Davidson, Neil; Furniss, Steve; Hocini, Mélèze; Geller, J. Christoph; Csanádi, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Aims This prospective, multicentre study (PRECISION GOLD) evaluated the incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism (ACE) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using a new gold multi-electrode radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter, pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) GOLD. Also, procedural efficiency of PVAC GOLD was compared with ERACE. The ERACE study demonstrated that a low incidence of ACE can be achieved with a platinum multi-electrode RF catheter (PVAC) combined with procedural manoeuvres to reduce emboli. Methods and results A total of 51 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) (age 57 ± 9 years, CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.4 ± 1.4) underwent AF ablation with PVAC GOLD. Continuous oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists, submerged catheter introduction, and heparinization (ACT ≥ 350 s prior to ablation) were applied. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed within 48 h before and 16–72 h post-ablation. Cognitive function assessed by the Mini-Mental State Exam at baseline and 30 days post-ablation. New post-procedural ACE occurred in only 1 of 48 patients (2.1%) and was not detectable on MRI after 30 days. The average number of RF applications per patient to achieve PVI was lower in PRECISION GOLD (20.3 ± 10.0) than in ERACE (28.8 ± 16.1; P = 0.001). Further, PVAC GOLD ablations resulted in significantly fewer low-power (<3 W) ablations (15 vs. 23%, 5 vs. 10% and 2 vs. 7% in 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 bipolar:unipolar energy modes, respectively). Mini-Mental State Exam was unchanged in all patients. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation with PVAC GOLD in combination with established embolic lowering manoeuvres results in a low incidence of ACE. Pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD demonstrates improved biophysical efficiency compared with platinum PVAC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01767558. PMID:26826134

  13. Pulmonary vein triggers, focal sources, rotors and atrial cardiomyopathy: implications for the choice of the most effective ablation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pison, L; Tilz, R; Jalife, J; Haïssaguerre, M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism(s) underlying atrial fibrillation (AF) is the foundation on which current ablation strategies are built. In the vast majority of patients with paroxysmal AF, the ablation procedure should target the pulmonary veins. In patients with nonparoxysmal AF, however, pulmonary vein isolation alone seems to be insufficient to prevent the arrhythmia. Several recent clinical trials have investigated the concept that rotors (re-entry based on a meandering central core from which spiral waves emanate) might be the mechanism responsible for sustaining AF. Ablation of these localized AF sources is an important step towards substrate-driven procedures in persistent AF. Hybrid AF ablation procedures, based on the integration of endocardial transcatheter and epicardial off-pump surgical techniques, have been introduced to overcome their mutual shortcomings. The long-term results are encouraging, especially in currently challenging settings such as nonparoxysmal AF and failed endocardial catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26991806

  14. Combined catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and Watchman® left atrial appendage occlusion procedures: Five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Karen P.; Walker, Daniel T.; Humphries, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from undergoing concomitant interventions of left atrial catheter ablation and device occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA) as a two-pronged strategy for rhythm control and stroke prevention. We report on the outcome of combined procedures in a single center case series over a 5-year timeframe. Methods Ninety-eight patients with non-valvular AF and a mean CHA2DS2-VASc score 2.6±1.0 underwent either first time, or redo pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) procedures, followed by successful implant of a Watchman® device. Results All procedures were generally uncomplicated with a mean case time of 213±40 min. Complete LAA occlusion was achieved at initial implant in 92 (94%) patients. Satisfactory LAA occlusion was achieved in 100% of patients at 12 months, with a complete LAA occlusion rate of 86%. All patients discontinued oral anticoagulation. Persistent late peri-device leaks were more frequently associated with device angulation or shoulder protrusion, and were associated with a significantly lower achieved device compression of 12±3% vs. 15±5% (p<0.01) than complete occlusion. One ischemic stroke was recorded over a mean follow-up time of 802±439 days. Twelve months׳ freedom from detectable AF was achieved in 77% of patients. Conclusions Combined procedures of catheter ablation for AF and Watchman® LAA implant appear to be feasible and safe, with excellent rates of LAA occlusion achieved and an observed stroke rate of 0.5% per year during mid-term follow-up. Incomplete occlusion was associated with lower achieved device compression and was more frequently associated with suboptimal device position. PMID:27092193

  15. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Patient Selection, Periprocedural Anticoagulation, Techniques, and Preventive Measures After Ablation.

    PubMed

    Link, Mark S; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Natale, Andrea

    2016-07-26

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered by cardiologists and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for AF include age, male sex, genetic predisposition, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, heart failure, and possibly excessive exercise. The management of AF involves decisions about rate versus rhythm control. Asymptomatic patients are generally managed with rate control and anticoagulation. Symptomatic patients will desire rhythm control. Rhythm control options are either antiarrhythmic agents or ablation, with each having its own risks and benefits. Ablation of AF has evolved from a rare and complex procedure to a common electrophysiological technique. Selection of patients to undergo ablation is an important aspect of AF care. Patients with the highest success rates of ablation are those with normal structural hearts and paroxysmal AF, although those with congestive heart failure have the greatest potential benefit of the procedure. Although pulmonary vein isolation of any means/energy source is the approach generally agreed on for those with paroxysmal AF, optimal techniques for the ablation of nonparoxysmal AF are not yet clear. Anticoagulation reduces thromboembolic complications; the newer anticoagulants have eased management for both the patient and the cardiologist. Aggressive management of modifiable risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, and possibly excessive exercise) after ablation reduces the odds of recurrent AF and is an important element of care. PMID:27462054

  16. Predictors of atrial fibrillation termination and clinical success of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heist, E Kevin; Chalhoub, Fadi; Barrett, Conor; Danik, Stephan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Mansour, Moussa

    2012-08-15

    The termination of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) during catheter ablation has been associated in some, but not all, studies with reduced arrhythmia during clinical follow-up. We sought to determine the rate of persistent AF termination achievable with a stepwise ablation strategy, the predictors of AF termination, and the clinical outcomes associated with termination and nontermination. A total of 143 consecutive patients (age 62 ± 9 years, AF duration 5.7 ± 5.2 years) with persistent and longstanding persistent AF resistant to antiarrhythmic medication who presented in AF for catheter ablation were studied. Ablation was done with a stepwise approach, including pulmonary vein isolation, followed by complex fractionated atrial electrogram ablation and ablation of resultant atrial tachycardias. Clinical follow-up was then performed after a 2-month blanking period to assess arrhythmia recurrence, defined as AF or atrial tachycardia lasting ≥ 30 seconds. AF termination by ablation was achieved in 95 (66%) of the 143 patients. Multivariate predictors of AF termination included longer baseline AF cycle length (p <0.001) and smaller left atrial size (p = 0.002). AF termination by ablation was associated with both a lower incidence of arrhythmia recurrence after a single procedure without antiarrhythmic drugs (p = 0.01) and overall clinical success (single or multiple procedures, with or without antiarrhythmic drugs; p = 0.005). On multivariate analysis, the predictors of overall clinical success included AF termination by ablation (p = 0.001), a shorter ablation duration (p = 0.002), younger age (p = 0.02), male gender (p = 0.03), and the presence of hypertension (p = 0.03). In conclusion, among patients with persistent AF, termination of AF by ablation can be achieved in most patients and is associated with reduced recurrence of arrhythmia. PMID:22591670

  17. A systematic review of minimally invasive surgical treatment for atrial fibrillation: a comparison of the Cox-Maze procedure, beating-heart epicardial ablation, and the hybrid procedure on safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyung Gon; Shuman, Deborah J; Ad, Niv

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing trend to perform off-bypass surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) because it is perceived to be safer and more effective than the Cox-Maze procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support. In this systematic review, we compared three minimally invasive stand-alone surgical ablation procedures for AF: the endocardial Cox-Maze procedure, epicardial surgical ablation and a hybrid epicardial surgical and catheter-based endocardial ablation procedure (hybrid procedure). Relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From 565 initial studies, 37 were included in this review. The total number of patients across all studies was 1877 (range 10-139). Two studies reported on endocardial Cox-Maze procedures (n = 145), 26 reported on epicardial surgical ablation (n = 1382) and 9 reported on hybrid surgical ablation (n = 350). For minimally invasive Cox-Maze, epicardial and hybrid groups, operative mortality rates were 0, 0.5 and 0.9%, perioperative permanent pacemaker insertion rates were 3.5, 2.7 and 1.5%, incidence of conversion to median sternotomy was 0, 2.4 and 2.5%, and reoperation for bleeding was 1.0, 1.5 and 2.2%, with mean length of stay (days) of 5.4, 6.0 and 4.6, respectively. At 12 months, rates of sinus rhythm restoration were 93, 80 and 70%, and sinus restoration without anti-arrhythmic medications was 87, 72 and 71%, for Cox-Maze, epicardial and hybrid procedures, respectively. Of the three procedures, the minimally invasive Cox-Maze procedure with CPB support was most effective for the treatment of stand-alone AF and had important safety advantages in conversion to sternotomy and major bleeding. The minimally invasive Cox-Maze procedure with CPB support also demonstrated the potential for a higher success rate 12 months following the procedure.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Left Appendage Closure in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minesh R.; Biviano, Angelo B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) experience an increased morbidity and mortality from the hemodynamic consequences of AF and an increased stroke risk. Consequently, there has been increased attention to procedural alternatives to pharmacologic rhythm control and anticoagulation for stroke prevention. This review aims to evaluate the evidence for AF ablation and left atrial appendage (LAA) closure in HF patients. Recent Findings Several randomized control trials and systematic reviews support prior literature demonstrating the safety and efficacy of AF ablation in patients with HF and LV systolic dysfunction. In multiple trials, these patients have shown clinical benefit from AF ablation including improved LV systolic function, quality of life, and clinical HF symptoms. The evidence and clinical benefit of AF ablation in HF patients with preserved ejection fraction remains limited. Only a handful of randomized control trials have been performed evaluating LAA closure and there is insufficient data regarding the safety and efficacy of these procedures in HF patients. Summary AF ablation in HF patients remains safe with an overall efficacy comparable to AF ablation in patients without HF. There is consistent evidence for the clinical benefit of AF ablation in HF patients with LV systolic dysfunction and limited evidence for AF ablation in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction. Currently there is insufficient data regarding the safety and efficacy of LAA closure devices in HF patients. PMID:25807223

  19. Microwave Ablation of Porcine Kidneys in vivo: Effect of two Different Ablation Modes ('Temperature Control' and 'Power Control') on Procedural Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Arnegger, F.; Koch, V.; Pap, B.; Holzschuh, M.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Senft, J.; Nickel, F.; Mogler, C.; Zelzer, S.; Meinzer, H. P.; Stampfl, U.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to analyze the effect of two different ablation modes ('temperature control' and 'power control') of a microwave system on procedural outcome in porcine kidneys in vivo. Methods: A commercially available microwave system (Avecure Microwave Generator; MedWaves, San Diego, CA) was used. The system offers the possibility to ablate with two different ablation modes: temperature control and power control. Thirty-two microwave ablations were performed in 16 kidneys of 8 pigs. In each animal, one kidney was ablated twice by applying temperature control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, automatic power set point; group I). The other kidney was ablated twice by applying power control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, ablation power set point at 24 W; group II). Procedural outcome was analyzed: (1) technical success (e.g., system failures, duration of the ablation cycle), and (2) ablation geometry (e.g., long axis diameter, short axis diameter, and circularity). Results: System failures occurred in 0% in group I and 13% in group II. Duration of the ablation cycle was 60 {+-} 0 s in group I and 102 {+-} 21 s in group II. Long axis diameter was 20.3 {+-} 4.6 mm in group I and 19.8 {+-} 3.5 mm in group II (not significant (NS)). Short axis diameter was 10.3 {+-} 2 mm in group I and 10.5 {+-} 2.4 mm in group II (NS). Circularity was 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group I and 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group II (NS). Conclusions: Microwave ablations performed with temperature control showed fewer system failures and were finished faster. Both ablation modes demonstrated no significant differences with respect to ablation geometry.

  20. State-of-the-art and emerging technologies for atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Dewire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh

    2010-03-01

    Catheter ablation is an important treatment modality for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Although the superiority of catheter ablation over antiarrhythmic drug therapy has been demonstrated in middle-aged patients with paroxysmal AF, the role the procedure in other patient subgroups-particularly those with long-standing persistent AF-has not been well defined. Furthermore, although AF ablation can be performed with reasonable efficacy and safety by experienced operators, long-term success rates for single procedures are suboptimal. Fortunately, extensive ongoing research will improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, and considerable funds are being invested in developing new ablation technologies to improve patient outcomes. These technologies include ablation catheters designed to electrically isolate the pulmonary veins with improved safety, efficacy, and speed, catheters designed to deliver radiofrequency energy with improved precision, robotic systems to address the technological demands of the procedure, improved imaging and electrical mapping systems, and MRI-guided ablation strategies. The tools, technologies, and techniques that will ultimately stand the test of time and become the standard approach to AF ablation in the future remain unclear. However, technological advances are sure to result in the necessary improvements in the safety and efficacy of AF ablation procedures.

  1. Outcomes of Cryoballoon Ablation in High- and Low-Volume Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Centres: A Russian Pilot Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylov, Evgeny N.; Lebedev, Dmitry S.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Davtyan, Karapet V.; Ivanitskii, Eduard A.; Nechepurenko, Anatoly A.; Kosonogov, Alexey Ya.; Kolunin, Grigory V.; Morozov, Igor A.; Termosesov, Sergey A.; Maykov, Evgeny B.; Khomutinin, Dmitry N.; Eremin, Sergey A.; Mayorov, Igor M.; Romanov, Alexander B.; Shabanov, Vitaliy V.; Shatakhtsyan, Victoria; Tsivkovskii, Viktor; Revishvili, Amiran Sh.; Shlyakhto, Evgeny V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The results of cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedure have been mainly derived from studies conducted in experienced atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation centres. Here, we report on CBA efficacy and complications resulting from real practice of this procedure at both high- and low-volume centres. Methods. Among 62 Russian centres performing AF ablation, 15 (24%) used CBA technology for pulmonary vein isolation. The centres were asked to provide a detailed description of all CBA procedures performed and complications, if encountered. Results. Thirteen sites completed interviews on all CBAs in their centres (>95% of CBAs in Russia). Six sites were high-volume AF ablation (>100 AF cases/year) centres, and 7 were low-volume AF ablation. There was no statistical difference in arrhythmia-free rates between high- and low-volume centres (64.6 versus 60.8% at 6 months). Major complications developed in 1.5% of patients and were equally distributed between high- and low-volume centres. Minor procedure-related events were encountered in 8% of patients and were more prevalent in high-volume centres. Total event and vascular access site event rates were higher in women than in men. Conclusions. CBA has an acceptable efficacy profile in real practice. In less experienced AF ablation centres, the major complication rate is equal to that in high-volume centres. PMID:26640789

  2. Lung radiofrequency and microwave ablation: a review of indications, techniques and post-procedural imaging appearances

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, P E

    2015-01-01

    Lung ablation can be used to treat both primary and secondary thoracic malignancies. Evidence to support its use, particularly for metastases from colonic primary tumours, is now strong, with survival data in selected cases approaching that seen after surgery. Because of this, the use of ablative techniques (particularly thermal ablation) is growing and the Royal College of Radiologists predict that the number of patients who could benefit from such treatment may reach in excess of 5000 per year in the UK. Treatment is often limited to larger regional centres, and general radiologists often have limited awareness of the current indications and the techniques involved. Furthermore, radiologists without any prior experience are frequently expected to interpret post-treatment imaging, often performed in the context of acute complications, which have occurred after discharge. This review aims to provide an overview of the current indications for pulmonary ablation, together with the techniques involved and the range of post-procedural appearances. PMID:25465192

  3. Respiratory motion influence on catheter contact force during radio frequency ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation is a common treatment option for atrial fibrillation. A common treatment strategy is pulmonary vein isolation. In this case, individual ablation points need to be placed around the ostia of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium to generate transmural lesions and thereby block electric signals. To achieve a durable transmural lesion, the tip of the catheter has to be stable with a sufficient tissue contact during radio-frequency ablation. Besides the steerable interface operated by the physician, the movement of the catheter is also influenced by the heart and breathing motion - particularly during ablation. In this paper we investigate the influence of breathing motion on different areas of the endocardium during radio frequency ablation. To this end, we analyze the frequency spectrum of the continuous catheter contact force to identify areas with increased breathing motion using a classification method. This approach has been applied to clinical patient data acquired during three pulmonary vein isolation procedures. Initial findings show that motion due to respiration is more pronounced at the roof and around the right pulmonary veins.

  4. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  5. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  6. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  7. [Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Health Technology Assessment Report from the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC)].

    PubMed

    Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tritto, Massimo; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Berto, Patrizia; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Catanzariti, Domenico; De Fabrizio, Giuseppe; De Ponti, Roberto; Grimaldi, Massimo; Pandozi, Claudio; Tondo, Claudio; Gulizia, Michele

    2011-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and significantly impact patients' quality of life, morbidity and mortality. The number of affected patients is expected to increase as well as the costs associated with AF management, mainly driven by hospitalizations. Over the last decade, catheter ablation techniques targeting pulmonary vein isolation have demonstrated to be effective in treating AF and preventing AF recurrence. This Health Technology Assessment report of the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC) aims to define the current role of catheter ablation of AF in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and appropriateness. On the basis of an extensive review of the available literature, this report provides (i) an overview of the epidemiology, clinical impact and socio-economic burden of AF; (ii) an evaluation of therapeutic options other than catheter ablation of AF; and (iii) a detailed presentation of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit ratio associated with catheter ablation. The costs of catheter ablation of AF in Italy were obtained using a bottom-up analysis of a resource utilization survey of 52 hospitals that were considered a representative sample, including 4 Centers that contributed with additional unit cost information in a separate questionnaire. An analysis of budget impact was also performed to evaluate the impact of ablation on the management costs of AF. Results of this analysis show that (1) catheter ablation is effective, safe and superior to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in maintaining sinus rhythm; (2) the cost of an ablation procedure in Italy typically ranges from €8868 to €9455, though current reimbursement remains insufficient, covering only about 60% of the costs; (3) the costs of follow-up are modest (about 8% of total costs); (4) assuming an adjustment of reimbursement to the real cost of an ablation procedure and a 5-10% increase in the annual rate of ablation procedures, after

  8. Feasibility and safety of remote-controlled magnetic navigation for ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Katsiyiannis, William T; Melby, Daniel P; Matelski, Jayme L; Ervin, Vanessa L; Laverence, Kerri L; Gornick, Charles C

    2008-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) involves complex catheter manipulation resulting in prolonged procedure time and fluoroscopy exposure. Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) represents a novel approach toward improving the ability to perform complex ablation. Forty patients underwent ablation for AF, 20 using RMN (NIOBE II, Stereotaxis, Inc) with a 4-mm-tip magnetic catheter (Celsius, Biosense Webster) and 20 using a conventional 8-mm-tip bidirectional ablation catheter (Blazer, Boston Scientific). All patients underwent a combined wide area circumferential ablation and segmental pulmonary vein (PV) isolation using a circular mapping catheter and cavotricuspid isthmus ablation for right atrial flutter. The procedural end point was PV entrance block. There was no difference in atrial size, left ventricular systolic function, or type of AF between groups. PV entrance block was achieved in all patients. Mean procedure time was 279 +/- 60 minutes in the conventional group versus 209 +/- 56 minutes in the RMN group (p <0.001). Mean fluoroscopy time in the conventional group was 58.6 +/- 21 minutes versus 19.5 +/- 9.8 in the RMN group (p <0.001). At 1 year there were 15 patients in the conventional group and 16 in the RMN group free from clinical AF and off antiarrhythmic drugs (p = NS). There were 2 additional ablations performed for atypical atrial flutter in the conventional group and 3 in the RMN group (p = ns). Ablation catheter char formation was not observed. There were no procedural complications. In conclusion, radiofrequency ablation of AF performed with RMN is safe and feasible. Compared with conventional hand-navigated ablation, RMN ablation results in similar clinical outcomes with decreased fluoroscopy and procedure times.

  9. One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Blackwell, Ben F.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2007-01-01

    The development and verification of a one-dimensional material thermal response code with ablation is presented. The implicit time integrator, control volume finite element spatial discretization, and Newton's method for nonlinear iteration on the entire system of residual equations have been implemented and verified for the thermochemical ablation of internally decomposing materials. This study is a continuation of the work presented in "One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure" (AIAA-2006-2910), which described the derivation, implementation, and verification of the constant density solid energy equation terms and boundary conditions. The present study extends the model to decomposing materials including decomposition kinetics, pyrolysis gas flow through the porous char layer, and a mixture (solid and gas) energy equation. Verification results are presented for the thermochemical ablation of a carbon-phenolic ablator which involves the solution of the entire system of governing equations.

  10. Thermal Protection During Percutaneous Thermal Ablation Procedures: Interest of Carbon Dioxide Dissection and Temperature Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Buy, Xavier; Tok, Chung-Hong; Szwarc, Daniel; Bierry, Guillaume; Gangi, Afshin

    2009-05-15

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation of tumor is widely used, and thermal injury to collateral structures is a known complication of this technique. To avoid thermal damage to surrounding structures, several protection techniques have been reported. We report the use of a simple and effective protective technique combining carbon dioxide dissection and thermocouple: CO{sub 2} displaces the nontarget structures, and its low thermal conductivity provides excellent insulation; insertion of a thermocouple in contact with vulnerable structures achieves continuous thermal monitoring. We performed percutaneous thermal ablation of 37 tumors in 35 patients (4 laser, 10 radiofrequency, and 23 cryoablations) with protection of adjacent vulnerable structures by using CO{sub 2} dissection combined with continuous thermal monitoring with thermocouple. Tumor locations were various (19 intra-abdominal tumors including 4 livers and 9 kidneys, 18 musculoskeletal tumors including 11 spinal tumors). CO{sub 2} volume ranged from 10 ml (epidural space) to 1500 ml (abdominal). Repeated insufflations were performed if necessary, depending on the information given by the thermocouple and imaging control. Dissection with optimal thermal protection was achieved in all cases except two patients where adherences (one postoperative, one arachnoiditis) blocked proper gaseous distribution. No complication referred to this technique was noted. This safe, cost-effective, and simple method increases the safety and the success rate of percutaneous thermal ablation procedures. It also offers the potential to increase the number of tumors that can be treated via a percutaneous approach.

  11. Is Single-View Fluoroscopy Sufficient in Guiding Cardiac Ablation Procedures?

    PubMed Central

    Fallavollita, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The CARTO XP ablation system provides real-time data on 3D, color-coded maps of the electrical activity of the heart; however, it is expensive and can only use a dedicated costly magnetic catheter per patient intervention. The purpose of our study is to shorten the duration of the radiofrequency ablation procedure and increase its efficacy by developing an affordable prototype catheter navigation system that simulates the CARTO system. To obtain 3D geometrical data from catheter locations inside the heart chamber, we acquired only single-view images using an Integris Allura fluoroscope and estimated the depth of the mapping electrode using pattern recognition techniques. Validation was performed in ideal and clinical conditions. For phantom experiment, when using a 7-French catheter, the average recovered depth error was 2.05 ± 1.46 mm using a single image. However, when using the 8-French catheter, the average recovered depth error was 1.54 ± 1.29 mm. In clinical experimentation, the standard error of estimate for the estimated depth was about 13.1 mm and 10.1 mm, respectively, for the posterior and lateral views. In conclusion, this paper describes our achievements and shortfalls in developing an affordable fluoroscopic navigation system to guide RF catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20368770

  12. Long‐term Outcomes of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Systematic Review and Meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anand N.; Shipp, Nicholas J.; Brooks, Anthony G.; Kuklik, Pawel; Lau, Dennis H.; Lim, Han S.; Sullivan, Thomas; Roberts‐Thomson, Kurt C.; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past decade, catheter ablation has become an established therapy for symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF). Until very recently, few data have been available to guide the clinical community on the outcomes of AF ablation at ≥3 years of follow‐up. We aimed to systematically review the medical literature to evaluate the long‐term outcomes of AF ablation. Methods and Results A structured electronic database search (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane) of the scientific literature was performed for studies describing outcomes at ≥3 years after AF ablation, with a mean follow‐up of ≥24 months after the index procedure. The following data were extracted: (1) single‐procedure success, (2) multiple‐procedure success, and (3) requirement for repeat procedures. Data were extracted from 19 studies, including 6167 patients undergoing AF ablation. Single‐procedure freedom from atrial arrhythmia at long‐term follow‐up was 53.1% (95% CI 46.2% to 60.0%) overall, 54.1% (95% CI 44.4% to 63.4%) in paroxysmal AF, and 41.8% (95% CI 25.2% to 60.5%) in nonparoxysmal AF. Substantial heterogeneity (I2>50%) was noted for single‐procedure outcomes. With multiple procedures, the long‐term success rate was 79.8% (95% CI 75.0% to 83.8%) overall, with significant heterogeneity (I2>50%).The average number of procedures per patient was 1.51 (95% CI 1.36 to 1.67). Conclusions Catheter ablation is an effective and durable long‐term therapeutic strategy for some AF patients. Although significant heterogeneity is seen with single procedures, long‐term freedom from atrial arrhythmia can be achieved in some patients, but multiple procedures may be required. PMID:23537812

  13. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lioni, Louiza; Letsas, Konstantinos P.; Efremidis, Michael; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Kareliotis, Vasileios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Sideris, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation has emerged as a promising treatment strategy for AF, but has not been widely adopted in the elderly population. The present study aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of AF catheter ablation in the elderly population. Methods and Results The study population consisted of 316 patients with paroxysmal AF who underwent left atrial ablation. Ninety-five patients were ≥ 65 years (48 males, mean age 68.9 ± 3.0 years old) and 221 patients were < 65 years old (130 males, mean age 52.5 ± 10.4 years old). After a mean follow-up period of 34.0 ± 15.1 months, 55 (57.9%) patients in the elderly group were free from arrhythmia recurrence compared with 149 (67.4%) patients in the younger group (P = 0.169). Procedural complications were uncommon in both study groups. In logistic regression analysis, left atrial diameter (P = 0.003), hypertension (P = 0.001), dyslipidemia (P = 0.039), and coronary artery disease (P = 0.018) were independent predictors of AF recurrence in the elderly population. Conclusions Catheter ablation of AF is safe and effective in older patients. Invasive strategies should be considered as an alternative choice in symptomatic elderly patients with AF. PMID:25593577

  14. Atrial fibrillation after radiofrequency ablation of atrial flutter: preventive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Anné, W; Willems, R; Van der Merwe, N; Van de Werf, F; Ector, H; Heidbüchel, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine risk factors for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) after atrial flutter (AFL) ablation; and to study the relation between AF development and periprocedural drug use. Methods: AFL ablation was performed in 196 patients. The relation between AF occurrence and clinical, echocardiographic, and procedural factors and periprocedural drug use was analysed retrospectively by a Cox proportional hazard method. Results: After a median follow up of 2.2 years, 114 patients (58%) developed at least one AF episode. Factors associated with AF development were the presence of preprocedural AF, a history of cardioversion, and the number of antiarrhythmic drugs used before the procedure. Use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics was significantly associated by univariate and multivariate analyses with less development of AF. Conclusions: A high proportion of patients develop AF after AFL ablation. The incidence of AF is related to pre-ablation AF and its persistence. ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics seem to protect against AF. PMID:15310691

  15. Cost analysis of periprocedural imaging in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Pokorney, Sean D; Hammill, Bradley G; Qualls, Laura G; Steinberg, Benjamin A; Curtis, Lesley H; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-07-15

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score<2 (p<0.001). In conclusion, periprocedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  16. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation in Systolic Dysfunction: Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Tasso Julio; Pachon, Carlos Thiene; Pachon, Jose Carlos; Pachon, Enrique Indalecio; Pachon, Maria Zelia; Pachon, Juan Carlos; Santillana, Tomas Guillermo; Zerpa, Juan Carlos; Albornoz, Remy Nelson; Jatene, Adib Domingos

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist in a deleterious cycle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction and AF treated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Methods Patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction [ejection fraction (EF) <50%] and AF refractory to drug therapy underwent stepwise RF ablation in the same session with pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of AF nests and of residual atrial tachycardia, named "background tachycardia". Clinical (NYHA functional class) and echocardiographic (EF, left atrial diameter) data were compared (McNemar test and t test) before and after ablation. Results 31 patients (6 women, 25 men), aged 37 to 77 years (mean, 59.8±10.6), underwent RF ablation. The etiology was mainly idiopathic (19 p, 61%). During a mean follow-up of 20.3±17 months, 24 patients (77%) were in sinus rhythm, 11 (35%) being on amiodarone. Eight patients (26%) underwent more than one procedure (6 underwent 2 procedures, and 2 underwent 3 procedures). Significant NYHA functional class improvement was observed (pre-ablation: 2.23±0.56; postablation: 1.13±0.35; p<0.0001). The echocardiographic outcome also showed significant ventricular function improvement (EF pre: 44.68%±6.02%, post: 59%±13.2%, p=0.0005) and a significant left atrial diameter reduction (pre: 46.61±7.3 mm; post: 43.59±6.6 mm; p=0.026). No major complications occurred. Conclusion Our findings suggest that AF ablation in patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction is a safe and highly effective procedure. Arrhythmia control has a great impact on ventricular function recovery and functional class improvement. PMID:25387404

  17. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  18. Current hot potatoes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  19. Spatial learning and memory deficits after telencephalic ablation in goldfish trained in place and turn maze procedures.

    PubMed

    Salas, C; Rodríguez, F; Vargas, J P; Durán, E; Torres, B

    1996-10-01

    The present work investigated whether the fish telencephalon is involved in spatial learning based on place strategies in a manner similar to mammalian hippocampus. Goldfish were trained in a 4-arm maze in a room with relevant spatial cues. Sham and to-be-ablated subjects were trained in each of 4 experimental procedures designed as follows: place, turn, place-turn, and control. After acquisition, complete ablations of both telencephalic hemispheres for the experimental groups were carried out. The results showed that ablation exclusively impaired performance in animals using place strategies; in these, accuracy fell to chance level during both postsurgery retraining and reversal periods. In the other groups, ablation of the telencephalon did not induce any significant deficit. These results suggest that the fish telencephalon plays a crucial role in complex place learning.

  20. Navigation for fluoroscopy-guided cryo-balloon ablation procedures of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourier, Felix; Brost, Alexander; Kleinoeder, Andreas; Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Attila; Schneider, Hans-Juergen; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common arrhythmia, has been identified as a major cause of stroke. The current standard in interventional treatment of AFib is the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). PVI is guided by fluoroscopy or non-fluoroscopic electro-anatomic mapping systems (EAMS). Either classic point-to-point radio-frequency (RF)- catheter ablation or so-called single-shot-devices like cryo-balloons are used to achieve electrically isolation of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium (LA). Fluoroscopy-based systems render overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then merged with fluoroscopic imaging, thereby adding detailed 3-D information to conventional fluoroscopy. EAMS provide tracking and visualization of RF catheters by means of electro-magnetic tracking. Unfortunately, current navigation systems, fluoroscopy-based or EAMS, do not provide tools to localize and visualize single shot devices like cryo-balloon catheters in 3-D. We present a prototype software for fluoroscopy-guided ablation procedures that is capable of superimposing 3-D datasets as well as reconstructing cyro-balloon catheters in 3-D. The 3-D cyro-balloon reconstruction was evaluated on 9 clinical data sets, yielded a reprojected 2-D error of 1.72 mm +/- 1.02 mm.

  1. Gender, Race, and Health Insurance Status in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nileshkumar; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Thakkar, Badal; Coffey, James O; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Patel, Achint; Ainani, Nitesh; Nalluri, Nikhil; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Kowalski, Marcin; Hendel, Robert; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Noseworthy, Peter A; Asirvatham, Samuel; Lo, Kaming; Myerburg, Robert J; Mitrani, Raul D

    2016-04-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has emerged as a popular procedure. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there exist differences or disparities in ablation utilization across gender, socioeconomic class, insurance, or race. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000 to 2012), we identified adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of AF by ICD 9 code 427.31 who had catheter ablation (ICD 9 code-37.34). We stratified patients by race, insurance status, age, gender, and hospital characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate mixed-effect model was created to identify the independent predictors of AF ablation. Among an estimated total of 3,508,122 patients (extrapolated from 20% Nationwide Inpatient Sample) hospitalized with a diagnosis of AF in the United States from the year 2000 to 2012, 102,469 patients (2.9%) underwent catheter ablations. The number of ablations was increased by 940%, from 1,439 in 2000 to 15,090 in 2012. There were significant differences according to gender, race, and health insurance status, which persisted even after adjustment for other risk factors. Female gender (0.83 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.87; p <0.001]), black (0.49 [95% CI 0.44 to 0.55; p <0.001]), and Hispanic race (0.64 [95% CI 0.56 to 0.72; p <0.001]) were associated with lower likelihoods of undergoing an AF ablation. Medicare (0.93, 0.88 to 0.98, <0.001) or Medicaid (0.67, 0.59 to 0.76, <0.001) coverage and uninsured patients (0.55, 0.49 to 0.62, <0.001) also had lower rates of AF ablation compared to patients with private insurance. In conclusion we found differences in utilization of catheter ablation for AF based on gender, race, and insurance status that persisted over time. PMID:26899494

  2. Initial Independent Outcomes from Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Multicenter FIRM Registry

    PubMed Central

    MILLER, JOHN M.; KOWAL, ROBERT C.; SWARUP, VIJAY; DAUBERT, JAMES P.; DAOUD, EMILE G.; DAY, JOHN D.; ELLENBOGEN, KENNETH A.; HUMMEL, JOHN D.; BAYKANER, TINA; KRUMMEN, DAVID E.; NARAYAN, SANJIV M.; REDDY, VIVEK Y.; SHIVKUMAR, KALYANAM; STEINBERG, JONATHAN S.; WHEELAN, KEVIN R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The success of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for atrial fibrillation (AF) may be improved if stable AF sources identified by Focal Impulse and Rotor Mapping (FIRM) are also eliminated. The long-term results of this approach are unclear outside the centers where FIRM was developed; thus, we assessed outcomes of FIRM-guided AF ablation in the first cases at 10 experienced centers. Methods We prospectively enrolled n = 78 consecutive patients (61 ± 10 years) undergoing FIRM guided ablation for persistent (n = 48), longstanding persistent (n = 7), or paroxysmal (n = 23) AF. AF recordings from both atria with a 64-pole basket catheter were analyzed using a novel mapping system (Rhythm View™; Topera Inc., CA, USA). Identified rotors/focal sources were ablated, followed by PVI. Results Each institution recruited a median of 6 patients, each of whom showed 2.3 ± 0.9 AF rotors/focal sources in diverse locations. 25.3% of all sources were right atrial (RA), and 50.0% of patients had ≥1 RA source. Ablation of all sources required a total of 16.6 ± 11.7 minutes, followed by PVI. On >1 year follow-up with a 3-month blanking period, 1 patient lost to follow-up (median time to 1st recurrence: 245 days, IQR 145–354), single-procedure freedom from AF was 87.5% (patients without prior ablation; 35/40) and 80.5% (all patients; 62/77) and similar for persistent and paroxysmal AF (P = 0.89). Conclusions Elimination of patient-specific AF rotors/focal sources produced freedom-from-AF of ≈80% at 1 year at centers new to FIRM. FIRM-guided ablation has a rapid learning curve, yielding similar results to original FIRM reports in each center’s first cases. PMID:24948520

  3. Effective dose analysis of three-dimensional rotational angiography during catheter ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielandts, J.-Y.; Smans, K.; Ector, J.; De Buck, S.; Heidbüchel, H.; Bosmans, H.

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing use of three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA) during cardiac ablation procedures. As compared with 2D angiography, a large series of images are acquired, creating the potential for high radiation doses. The aim of the present study was to quantify patient-specific effective doses. In this study, we developed a computer model to accurately calculate organ doses and the effective dose incurred during 3DRA image acquisition. The computer model simulates the exposure geometry and uses the actual exposure parameters, including the variation in tube voltage and current that is realized through the automatic exposure control (AEC). We performed 3DRA dose calculations in 42 patients referred for ablation on the Siemens Axiom Artis DynaCT system (Erlangen, Germany). Organ doses and effective dose were calculated separately for all projections in the course of the C-arm rotation. The influence of patient body mass index (BMI), dose-area product (DAP), collimation and dose per frame (DPF) rate setting on the calculated doses was also analysed. The effective dose was found to be 5.5 ± 1.4 mSv according to ICRP 60 and 6.6 ± 1.8 mSv according to ICRP 103. Effective dose showed an inversely proportional relationship to BMI, while DAP was nearly BMI independent. No simple conversion coefficient between DAP and effective dose could be derived. DPF reduction did not result in a proportional effective dose decrease. These paradoxical findings were explained by the settings of the AEC and the limitations of the x-ray tube. Collimation reduced the effective dose by more than 20%. Three-dimensional rotational angiography is associated with a definite but acceptable radiation dose that can be calculated for all patients separately. Their BMI is a predictor of the effective dose. The dose reduction achieved with collimation suggests that its use is imperative during the 3DRA procedure.

  4. Use of Dabigatran for Peri-Procedural Anticoagulation in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Mohamed; Saliba, Walid; Rickard, John; Shao, Mingyuan; Sey, Albert; Diab, Mariam; Martin, David O.; Hussein, Ayman; Khoury, Maurice; Abi-Saleh, Bernard; Alam, Samir; Sengupta, Jay; Borek, P. Peter; Baranowski, Bryan; Niebauer, Mark; Callahan, Thomas; Varma, Niraj; Chung, Mina; Tchou, Patrick J.; Kanj, Mohamed; Dresing, Thomas; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a transient increased risk of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events. We hypothesized that dabigatran can be safely used as an alternative to continuous warfarin for the peri-procedural anticoagulation in PVI. Methods and Results 999 consecutive patients undergoing PVI were included; 376 patients were on dabigatran (150 mg) and 623 were on warfarin with therapeutic INR. Dabigatran was held 1 to 2 doses prior to PVI and restarted at the conclusion of the procedure or as soon as patients were transferred to the nursing floor. Propensity score matching was applied to generate a cohort of 344 patients in each group with balanced baseline data. Total hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications were similar in both groups, before (3.2% vs 3.9%; p = 0.59), and after (3.2% vs 4.1%; p = 0.53) matching. Major hemorrhage occurred in 1.1% vs 1.6% (p = 0.48) before, and 1.2% vs 1.5% (p = 0.74) after matching in the dabigatran vs warfarin group respectively. A single thromboembolic event occurred in each of the dabigatran and warfarin groups. Despite higher doses of intra-procedural heparin, the mean ACT was significantly lower in patients who held dabigatran for 1 or 2 doses than those on warfarin. Conclusions Our study found no evidence to suggest a higher risk of thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications with use of dabigatran for peri-procedural anticoagulation in patients undergoing PVI compared to uninterrupted warfarin therapy. PMID:23553523

  5. Common Genetic Variants and Response to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Bollmann, Andreas; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ueberham, Laura; Saini, Harsimran; Montgomery, Jay; Edwards, Todd; Yoneda, Zachary; Sinner, Moritz F.; Arya, Arash; Sommer, Philipp; Delaney, Jessica; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Saavedra, Pablo; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Whalen, S. Patrick; Roden, Dan M.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Ellis, Christopher R.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Darbar, Dawood; Husser, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (rs2200733, rs10033464 near PITX2), 1q21 (rs13376333 in KCNN3), and 16q22 (rs7193343 in ZFHX3) have consistently been associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Single-center studies have shown that 4q25 risk alleles predict recurrence of AF after catheter ablation of AF. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that these 4 AF susceptibility SNPs modulate response to AF ablation. Methods and Results Patients underwent de novo AF ablation between 2008 and 2012 at Vanderbilt University, the Heart Center Leipzig, and Massachusetts General Hospital. The primary outcome was 12-month recurrence, defined as an episode of AF, atrial flutter, or atrial tachycardia lasting >30 seconds after a 3-month blanking period. Multivariable analysis of the individual cohorts using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Summary statistics from the 3 centers were analyzed using fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 991 patients were included (Vanderbilt University, 245; Heart Center Leipzig, 659; and Massachusetts General Hospital, 87). The overall single procedure 12-month recurrence rate was 42%. The overall risk allele frequency for these SNPs ranged from 12% to 35%. Using a dominant genetic model, the 4q25 SNP, rs2200733, predicted a 1.4-fold increased risk of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.3 [95% confidence intervals, 1.1–1.6]; P=0.011). The remaining SNPs, rs10033464 (4q25), rs13376333 (1q21), and rs7193343 (16q22) were not significantly associated with recurrence. Conclusions Among the 3 genetic loci most strongly associated with AF, the chromosome 4q25 SNP rs2200733 is significantly associated with recurrence of atrial arrhythmias after catheter ablation for AF. PMID:25684755

  6. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  7. Personnel, equipment, and facilities for electrophysiological and catheter ablation procedures in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Estner, Heidi L; Chen, Jian; Potpara, Tatjana; Proclemer, Alessandro; Todd, Derick; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Clinical electrophysiology (EP) and catheter ablation of arrhythmias are rapidly evolving in recent years. More than 50 000 catheter ablations are performed every year in Europe. Emerging indications, an increasing number of procedures, and an expected high quality require national and international standards as well as trained specialists. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the practice of requirements for EP personnel, equipment, and facilities in Europe. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 52 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume EP centres, performing >400, 100-399, and under 100 implants per year, respectively. The following topics were explored: (i) EP personnel issues including balance between female and male operators, responsibilities within the EP department, age profiles, role and training of fellows, and EP nurses, (ii) the equipments available in the EP laboratories, (iii) source of patient referrals, and (iv) techniques used for ablation for different procedures including sedation, and peri-procedural use of anticoagulation and antibiotics. The survey reflects the current EP personnel situation characterized by a high training requirement and specialization. Arrhythmia sections are still most often part of cardiology departments and the head of cardiology is seldom a heart rhythm specialist. Currently, the vast majority of EP physicians are men, although in the subgroup of physicians younger than 40 years, the proportion of women is increasing. Uncertainty exists regarding peri-procedural anticoagulation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and the need for sedation during specific procedures. PMID:24966009

  8. Adjusted Left Atrial Emptying Fraction as a Predictor of Procedural Outcome after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Won; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Jin Won; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-01-01

    Structural remodeling of the left atrium is a risk factor for recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation; however, data are sparse regarding the role of functional left atrial remodeling in predicting procedural outcomes. We evaluated whether left atrial transport function could be used to predict recurrent atrial fibrillation. From July 2008 through August 2010, we enrolled 202 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal=120, persistent=82). Left atrial volumes (LAVs) were measured by means of multislice computed tomography at every 10% of the R-R interval, and measurements were adjusted for body surface area to yield the LAV index (LAVI) at baseline. The left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF) was calculated according to LAV differences. During the mean follow-up period of 10 ± 4 months after a single ablation procedure, atrial fibrillation recurred in 59 patients (paroxysmal=19, persistent=40). Multivariate analysis revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation, early mitral inflow velocity, LAVImax, LAVImin, LAEF, LAVImax/LAEF, and LAVImin/LAEF were all independent predictors of atrial fibrillation, but the best predictor was LAVImin/LAEF (β=1.329, P=0.001). The cutoff value was 1.61 (mL/m2)/%, and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.6% and 62.2%, respectively (area under the curve=0.761). Our study shows that adjusted left atrial emptying fraction with use of multislice computed tomography might be a useful, noninvasive method to select patients for ablation. PMID:26175632

  9. Limited angle C-arm tomography and segmentation for guidance of atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Dirk; Meyer, Carsten; Bullens, Roland; Saalbach, Axel; Eshuis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Angiographic projections of the left atrium (LA) and the pulmonary veins (PV) acquired with a rotational C-arm system are used for 3D image reconstruction and subsequent automatic segmentation of the LA and PV to be used as roadmap in fluoroscopy guided LA ablation procedures. Acquisition of projections at high oblique angulations may be problematic due to increased collision danger of the detector with the right shoulder of the patient. We investigate the accuracy of image reconstruction and model based roadmap segmentation using limited angle C-arm tomography. The reduction of the angular range from 200 degrees to 150 degrees leads only to a moderate increase of the segmentation error from 1.5 mm to 2.0 mm if matched conditions are used in the segmentation, i.e., the model based segmentation is trained on images reconstructed with the same angular range as the test images. The minor decrease in accuracy may be outweighed by clinical workflow improvement, gained when large C-arm angulations can be avoided.

  10. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  11. Anesthetic management in atrial fibrillation ablation procedure: Adding non-invasive ventilation to deep sedation.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Francesco; Ripoli, Andrea; Formichi, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation has specific requirements. The feasibility of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) added to deep sedation procedure was evaluated. Seventy-two patients who underwent ablation procedure were retrospectively revised, performed with (57%) or without (43%) application of NIV (Respironic(®) latex-free total face mask connected to Garbin ventilator-Linde Inc.) during deep sedation (Midazolam 0.01-0.02 mg/kg, fentanyl 2.5-5 μg/kg and propofol: bolus dose 1-1.5 mg/kg, maintenance 2-4 mg/kg/h). In the two groups (NIV vs deep sedation), differences were detected in intraprocedural (pH 7.37 ± 0.05 vs 7.32 ± 0.05, p = 0.001; PaO2 117.10 ± 27.25 vs 148.17 ± 45.29, p = 0.004; PaCO2 43.37 ± 6.91 vs 49.33 ± 7.34, p = 0.002) and in percentage variation with respect to basal values (pH -0.52 ± 0.83 vs -1.44 ± 0.87, p = 0.002; PaCO2 7.21 ± 15.55 vs 34.91 ± 25.76, p = 0.001) of arterial blood gas parameters. Two episodes of respiratory complications, treated with application of NIV, were reported in deep sedation procedure. Endotracheal intubation was not necessary in any case. Adverse events related to electrophysiological procedures and recurrence of atrial fibrillation were recorded, respectively, in 36% and 29% of cases. NIV proved to be feasible in this context and maintained better respiratory homeostasis and better arterial blood gas balance when added to deep sedation. PMID:26937093

  12. Intra-atrial conduction block mimicking atrioventricular nodal block after multiple catheter ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia in a patient with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Aman; Yokokawa, Miki; Baman, Timir; Bogun, Frank; Wu, Audrey

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman with a history of cardiomyopathy and multiple ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia developed intra-atrial conduction block that mimicked atrioventricular (AV) nodal block during radiofrequency ablation at the cavotricuspid isthmus. She was treated with atrial pacing (from the coronary sinus), which overcame intra-atrial conduction block and resulted in AV nodal conduction.

  13. Three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margins based on registration of pre- and post-procedural MRI and distance map

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Soichiro; Tatli, Servet; Hata, Nobuhiko; Garcia-Rojas, Xavier; Olubiyi, Olutayo I.; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tokuda, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Contrast-enhanced MR images are widely used to confirm the adequacy of ablation margin after liver ablation for early prediction of local recurrence. However, quantitative assessment of the ablation margin by comparing pre- and post-procedural images remains challenging. We developed and tested a novel method for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margin based on non-rigid image registration and 3D distance map. Methods Our method was tested with pre- and post-procedural MR images acquired in 21 patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous liver ablation. The two images were co-registered using non-rigid intensity-based registration. After the tumor and ablation volumes were segmented, target volume coverage, percent of tumor coverage, and Dice Similarity Coefficient were calculated as metrics representing overall adequacy of ablation. In addition, 3D distance map around the tumor was computed and superimposed on the ablation volume to identify the area with insufficient margins. For patients with local recurrences, the follow-up images were registered to the post-procedural image. Three-D minimum distance between the recurrence and the areas with insufficient margins were quantified. Results The percent tumor coverage for all non-recurrent cases was 100%. Five cases had tumor recurrences, and the 3D distance map revealed insufficient tumor coverage or a 0-millimeter margin. It also showed that two recurrences were remote to the insufficient margin. Conclusions Non-rigid registration and 3D distance map allows us to quantitatively evaluate the adequacy of the ablation margin after percutaneous liver ablation. The method may be useful to predict local recurrences immediately following ablation procedure. PMID:27038962

  14. Management of refractory atrial fibrillation post surgical ablation.

    PubMed

    Altman, Robert K; Proietti, Riccardo; Barrett, Conor D; Paoletti Perini, Alessandro; Santangeli, Pasquale; Danik, Stephan B; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, invasive techniques to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) including catheter-based and surgical procedures have evolved along with our understanding of the pathophysiology of this arrhythmia. Surgical treatment of AF may be performed on patients undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons (concomitant surgical ablation) or as a stand-alone procedure. Advances in technology and technique have made surgical intervention for AF more widespread. Despite improvements in outcome of both catheter-based and surgical treatment for AF, recurrence of atrial arrhythmias following initial invasive therapy may occur.Atrial arrhythmias may occur early or late in the post-operative course after surgical ablation. Early arrhythmias are generally treated with prompt electrical cardioversion with or without antiarrhythmic therapy and do not necessarily represent treatment failure. The mechanism of persistent or late occurring atrial arrhythmias is complex, and these arrhythmias may be resistant to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The characterization and management of recurrent atrial arrhythmias following surgical ablation of AF are discussed below. PMID:24516805

  15. Management of refractory atrial fibrillation post surgical ablation

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robert K.; Proietti, Riccardo; Barrett, Conor D.; Paoletti Perini, Alessandro; Santangeli, Pasquale; Danik, Stephan B.; Di Biase, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, invasive techniques to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) including catheter-based and surgical procedures have evolved along with our understanding of the pathophysiology of this arrhythmia. Surgical treatment of AF may be performed on patients undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons (concomitant surgical ablation) or as a stand-alone procedure. Advances in technology and technique have made surgical intervention for AF more widespread. Despite improvements in outcome of both catheter-based and surgical treatment for AF, recurrence of atrial arrhythmias following initial invasive therapy may occur.Atrial arrhythmias may occur early or late in the post-operative course after surgical ablation. Early arrhythmias are generally treated with prompt electrical cardioversion with or without antiarrhythmic therapy and do not necessarily represent treatment failure. The mechanism of persistent or late occurring atrial arrhythmias is complex, and these arrhythmias may be resistant to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The characterization and management of recurrent atrial arrhythmias following surgical ablation of AF are discussed below. PMID:24516805

  16. Demographic Differences in Catheter Ablation After Hospital Presentation With Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Bhave, Prashant D; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Okin, Peter M; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is increasingly used for rhythm control in symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing this procedure are unclear. Methods and Results We used data on all admissions at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York to identify patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011. Our primary outcome was readmission for catheter ablation of AF, identified using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Cox regression models were used to assess relationships between demographic characteristics and catheter ablation, adjusting for Elixhauser comorbidities. We identified 397 612 eligible patients. Of these, 16 717 (4.20%, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.43) underwent ablation. These patients were significantly younger, more often male, more often white, and more often privately insured, with higher household incomes and lower rates of medical comorbidity. In Cox regression models, the likelihood of ablation was lower in women than men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.86) despite higher rates of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.24). Compared to whites, the likelihood of ablation was lower in Hispanics (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.64) and blacks (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.73), even though blacks had only a slightly lower likelihood of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.99) and a higher likelihood of all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 1.39). Essentially the same pattern existed in Hispanics. Conclusions We found differences in use of catheter ablation for symptomatic AF according to sex and race despite adjustment for available data on demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities. PMID:26396201

  17. Cost Analysis of Periprocedural Imaging in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Pokorney, Sean D.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Qualls, Laura G.; Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score <2 (p <0.001). In conclusion, peri-procedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  18. Effect of novel modified bipolar radiofrequency ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaolei; Ma, Nan; Tang, Min; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao; Yin, Hang; Mei, Ju

    2015-11-01

    We described a novel modified bipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) for patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this novel procedure and to determine whether it can eliminate AF for CAD patients. From January 2007 to June 2013, 45 patients (26 male patients) with AF (9 paroxysmal, 17 persistent, and 19 long-standing persistent) and CAD underwent the novel modified bipolar RF ablation combined with OPCABG in our department. After median sternotomy, the modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed on beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass. Pulmonary vein isolation and left atrium ablation were achieved using a bipolar RF champ. Mitral annular lesion and ganglionic plexus were ablated with a bipolar RF pen. The left atrial appendage was excluded using a surgical stapler. 24 h holter monitoring and echocardiography were performed at discharge and 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively as well as every year thereafter. The modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed successfully in all patients. Mean AF ablation time was 33.6 ± 4.2 min, and mean OPCABG time was 87.6 ± 13.3 min. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 12.6 ± 5.5 days. The maintenance of sinus rhythm was 95.6 % (43/45) at discharge. There was no early death and permanent pacemaker implantation in perioperation. At a mean follow-up of 29.8 ± 10.2 months, 38 of 45 (84.4 %) patients were in sinus rhythm. Follow-up TTE at 6 months postoperatively showed that left atrial diameter was significantly reduced and left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly increased. The novel modified bipolar RF ablation procedure was safe, feasible and effective. It may be useful in selecting the best ablation approaches for patients with AF and CAD. PMID:24820449

  19. Novel balloon catheter device with pacing, ablating, electroporation, and drug-eluting capabilities for atrial fibrillation treatment--preliminary efficacy and safety studies in a canine model.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, Christopher V; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F; Mikell, Susan B; Suddendorf, Scott H; Wahnschaffe, Douglas; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Gilles, Emily J; Danielsen, Andrew J; Holmes, David R; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation is an established therapeutic procedure for symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF). This approach involves ablation of atrial tissue just outside the pulmonary veins. However, patient outcomes are limited because of a high rate of arrhythmia recurrence. Ablation of electrically active tissue inside the pulmonary vein may improve procedural success, but is currently avoided because of the complication of postablation stenosis. An innovative device that can ablate inside pulmonary veins and prevent stenosis is a viable strategy to increase long-term efficacy. We have developed a prototypical balloon catheter device capable of nonthermal pulmonary vein ablation along with elution of an antifibrotic agent intended to eliminate arrhythmogenic substrate without the risk of stenosis and have demonstrated its functionality in 4 acute canine experiments. Further optimization of this device may provide an innovative means to simultaneously ablate and prevent pulmonary vein stenosis for improved AF treatment in humans. PMID:25092516

  20. Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atrial Fibrosis in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    PubMed

    Spragg, David D; Khurram, Irfan; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) likely involves a complex interplay between triggering activity, usually from pulmonary vein foci, and maintenance of the arrhythmia by an arrhythmogenic substrate. Both components of AF, triggers and substrate have been linked to atrial fibrosis and attendant changes in atrial electrophysiology. Recently, there has been a growing use of imaging modalities, particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), to quantify the burden of atrial fibrosis and scar in patients either undergoing AF ablation, or who have recently had the procedure. How to use the CMR derived data is still an open area of investigation. The aim of this article is to summarise what is known as atrial fibrosis, as assessed by traditional catheter-based techniques and newer imaging approaches, and to report on novel efforts from our group to advance the use of CMR in AF ablation patients.

  1. 2D/3D registration using only single-view fluoroscopy to guide cardiac ablation procedures: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallavollita, Pascal

    2010-02-01

    The CARTO XP is an electroanatomical cardiac mapping system that provides 3D color-coded maps of the electrical activity of the heart, however it is expensive and it can only use a single costly magnetic catheter for each patient intervention. Aim: To develop an affordable fluoroscopic navigation system that could shorten the duration of RF ablation procedures and increase its efficacy. Methodology: A 4-step filtering technique was implemented in order to project the tip electrode of an ablation catheter visible in single-view C-arm images in order to calculate its width. The width is directly proportional to the depth of the catheter. Results: For phantom experimentation, when displacing a 7- French catheter at 1cm intervals away from an X-ray source, the recovered depth using a single image was 2.05 +/- 1.47 mm, whereas depth errors improved to 1.55 +/- 1.30 mm when using an 8-French catheter. In clinic experimentation, twenty posterior and left lateral images of a catheter inside the left ventricle of a mongrel dog were acquired. The standard error of estimate for the recovered depth of the tip-electrode of the mapping catheter was 13.1 mm and 10.1 mm respectively for the posterior and lateral views. Conclusions: A filtering implementation using single-view C-arm images showed that it was possible to recover depth in phantom study and proved adequate in clinical experimentation based on isochronal map fusion results.

  2. Designing Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Surgical Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Parides, Michael K.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Geller, Nancy L.; Acker, Michael A.; Gelijns, Annetine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternate energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of AF patients treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this as an effective clinical therapy. Methods and Results This paper describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage (LAA) closure versus LAA closure alone in patients with persistent and longstanding persistent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial, is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and full Maze lesion set. This paper addresses trial design challenges, including how to best characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from AF as a primary endpoint, account for the impact of anti-arrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary endpoints, such as post-operative AF load. Conclusions This paper concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. PMID:21616507

  3. The Role of Three-dimensional Rotational Angiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Nölker, Georg; Horstkotte, Dieter; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging became the cornerstone of catheter guidance in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures during the last few years. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been the technologies of choice for pre-procedural imaging of the left atrium (LA) and the pulmonary veins to make lesions more precisely set in a highly variable and difficult to understand 3D environment. These technologies have been used not only for pre-procedural orientation but have also been overlayed to fluoroscopic views in many fluoroscopy-guided ablation procedures. As image integration into non-fluoroscopic 3D imaging systems became available, 3D reconstructions of MSCT and MRI became the standard approach in many centres. However, 3D imaging is not a cornerstone during ablation as it is not indispensable and ablation can be performed without. Although rare, some very important and key centres do not routinely use 3D imaging during ablation. Being remote to the ablation procedure, these imaging technologies may have the disadvantage of not reflecting the current status of a variable LA volume and scheduling of an additional diagnostic procedure may complicate the workflow of AF ablation procedures. Intra- procedural imaging techniques are likely to overcome both issues. Beside others, rotational angiography has been introduced for proving highly actual imaging by intra-procedural acquisition of 3D shells suitable for overlay to fluoroscopy without need for registration and image integration into 3D mapping systems registered by point-by-point electroanatomical mapping or 3D echocardiographic imaging. PMID:26835052

  4. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  6. Ablation of Myocardial Tissue With Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Varghese, Frency; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Philpott, Jonathan; Zemlin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue is an essential tool for the treatment of arrhythmias, particularly of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technologies suffer from substantial recurrence rates, thermal side effects, and long procedure times. We demonstrate that ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can potentially overcome these limitations. Methods We used optical mapping to monitor electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused New Zealand rabbit hearts (n = 12). We repeatedly inserted two shock electrodes, spaced 2–4 mm apart, into the ventricles (through the entire wall) and applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) (5–20 kV/cm, 350 ns duration, at varying pulse numbers and frequencies) to create linear lesions of 12–18 mm length. Hearts were stained either with tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or propidium iodide (PI) to determine the extent of ablation. Some stained lesions were sectioned to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the ablated volume. Results In all animals (12/12), we were able to create nonconducting lesions with less than 2 seconds of nsPEF application per site and minimal heating (< 0.2°C) of the tissue. The geometry of the ablated volume was smoother and more uniform throughout the wall than typical for RF ablation. The width of the lesions could be controlled up to 6 mm via the electrode spacing and the shock parameters. Conclusions Ablation with nsPEFs is a promising alternative to radiofrequency (RF) ablation of AF. It may dramatically reduce procedure times and produce more consistent lesion thickness than RF ablation. PMID:26658139

  7. An overview of energy sources in clinical use for the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Comas, George M; Imren, Yildirim; Williams, Mathew R

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen many developments in the field of alternative energy sources for arrhythmia surgery. The impetus behind these advances is to replace the traditional, "cut-and-sew" Cox maze III procedure with lesion sets that are simpler, shorter, and safer but just as effective. There is demand for technology to make continuous, linear, transmural ablations reliably with a versatile energy source via an epicardial approach. This would make minimally invasive endoscopic surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) without cardiopulmonary bypass and with a closed chest feasible. These advances would shorten cardio-pulmonary bypass and improve outcomes in patients having surgical ablation and concomitant cardiac surgery. This review summarizes the technology behind alternative energy sources used to treat AF. Alternative energy sources include hypothermic sources (cryoablation) and hyperthermic sources (radiofrequency, microwave, laser, ultrasound). For each source, the biophysical background, mode of tissue injury, factors affecting lesion size, and advantages and complications are discussed.

  8. Major complications of cryoballoon catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and their management.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Tariq; Baydoun, Hassan; Asti, Deepak; Rijal, Jharendra; Teli, Sumaya; Tantray, Mohmad; Bhat, Hilal; Kowalski, Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common symptomatic and sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It affects approximately 2-3 million people in the USA alone with an increased incidence and prevalence worldwide. It is associated, in addition to worsening quality of life, with increased morbidity and mortality especially in poorly controlled AF, affecting mostly those older than 65 years of age. Radiofrequency ablation was found to be a good strategy for focal isolation of pulmonary veins triggering from the vulnerable atrial substrate but is a time-consuming procedure and carries the risk of multiple complications like tamponade which could be fatal, atrioesophageal fistula and local thrombus formation at the site of ablation. Cryoballoon ablation with pulmonary vein isolation has emerged in the past few years as a breakthrough novel technology for the treatment of drug-refractory AF. It is a relatively simple alternative for point-by-point radiofrequency ablation of paroxysmal AF and is associated with fewer incidences of fatal complications such as cardiac perforation. As experience with this new tool accumulates, the field faces new challenges in the form of rare compilations including gastroparesis, phrenic nerve palsy, atrioesophageal fistula, pulmonary vein stenosis, thromboembolism pericardial effusion, and tamponade. PMID:25115140

  9. Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation in Combination With Left Atrial Appendage Closure: First Results of a Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J.; Post, Martijn C.; Rensing, Benno J.W.M.; Boersma, Lucas V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) increasingly is being treated with catheter ablation. However, the long-term success rate, expressed as freedom from AF, is <50%. Therefore, vitamin K antagonists, with all their complications, remain necessary. Recently, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices were introduced as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists. Here, we investigated whether AF ablation and LAA occlusion could be a feasible and safe combination in patients with symptomatic drug-refractory AF and a CHADS2 score ≥1 or a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Methods and Results Ablation was performed by using multielectrode catheters with phased radiofrequency energy. LAA was occluded with the Watchman device (Atritech, Inc, Plymouth, MN). Between February 2010 and February 2011, 30 patients were treated (21 male; age, 62.8±8.5 years). Median CHADS2 score was 2.5 (25th to 75th percentiles: 2 to 3), median CHADS-VASc score was 3 (25th to 75th percentiles: 3 to 5), 77% had prior stroke, and 27% had a contraindication for vitamin K antagonists. Median HAS-BLED score was 2 (range, 1 to 5). Successful device implantation was achieved with a median number of 1.5 devices (median diameter 24 mm [25th to 75th percentiles: 24 to 24 mm]). Total procedure time was 97 minutes (25th to 75th percentiles: 75 to 115 minutes). At 60 days, all patients met the criteria for successful sealing. Follow-up visit at 12 months showed a 30% rate of documented recurrence of AF. A repeated pulmonary vein isolation was performed successfully in 4 patients, without interference of the LAA closure device. No thromboembolic events occurred during 1-year follow-up. Conclusion LAA occlusion with the Watchman device and AF ablation can be combined successfully and safely in a single procedure. The Watchman does not interfere with a repeated ablation. PMID:23316289

  10. Design and rationale of the PRAGUE-12 trial: a large, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial that compares cardiac surgery with left atrial surgical ablation with cardiac surgery without ablation in patients with coronary and/or valvular heart disease plus atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Straka, Zbyněk; Budera, Petr; Osmančík, Pavel; Vaněk, Tomáš; Hulman, Michal; Smíd, Michal; Malý, Marek; Widimský, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ablation procedure can restore sinus rhythm (SR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing cardiac surgery. However, it is not known whether it has any impact on clinical outcomes. There is a need for a randomized trial with long-term follow-up to study the outcome of surgical ablation in patients with coronary and/or valve disease and AF. Patients are prospectively enrolled and randomized either to group A (cardiac surgery with left atrial ablation) or group B (cardiac surgery alone). The primary efficacy outcome is the SR presence (without any AF episode) during a 24-hour electrocardiogram after 1 year. The primary safety outcome is the combined end point of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal failure at 30 days. Long-term outcomes are a composite of total mortality, stroke, bleeding, and heart failure at 1 and 5 years. We finished the enrollment with a total of 224 patients from 3 centers in 2 countries in December 2011. Currently, the incomplete 1-year data are available, and the patients who enrolled first will have their 5-year visits shortly. PRAGUE-12 is the largest study to be conducted so far comparing cardiac surgery with surgical ablation of AF to cardiac surgery without ablation in an unselected population of patients who are operated on for coronary and/or valve disease. Its long-term results will lead to a better recognition of ablation's potential clinical benefits.

  11. Optimization of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Insights Gained from Clinically-Derived Computer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Hansen, Brian J.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  12. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rettmann, Maryam E. Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A.; Kwartowitz, David M.; Gunawan, Mia; Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L.; Dalegrave, Charles; Kolasa, Mark W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved

  13. [Steam ablation of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Renate R; Malskat, Wendy S J; Neumann, H A M Martino

    2013-01-01

    In many western countries endovenous thermal ablation techniques have largely replaced classical surgery for the treatment of saphenous varicose veins as they are more effective and patient friendly. Because these treatments can be performed under local tumescent anaesthesia, patients can mobilize immediately after the procedure. A new method of thermal ablation is endovenous steam ablation, which is a fast and easy procedure. Steam ablation may cause less pain than laser ablation and it is also cheaper and more flexible than segmental radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23484513

  14. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  15. Safety and efficacy of multipolar pulmonary vein ablation catheter vs. irrigated radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    McCready, J.; Chow, A. W.; Lowe, M. D.; Segal, O. R.; Ahsan, S.; de Bono, J.; Dhaliwal, M.; Mfuko, C.; Ng, A.; Rowland, E. R.; Bradley, R. J. W.; Paisey, J.; Roberts, P.; Morgan, J. M.; Sandilands, A.; Yue, A.; Lambiase, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The current challenge in atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment is to develop effective, efficient, and safe ablation strategies. This randomized controlled trial assesses the medium-term efficacy of duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation via the circular pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) vs. conventional electro-anatomically guided wide-area circumferential ablation (WACA). Methods and results One hundred and eighty-eight patients (mean age 62 ± 12 years, 116 M : 72 F) with paroxysmal AF were prospectively randomized to PVAC or WACA strategies and sequentially followed for 12 months. The primary endpoint was freedom from symptomatic or documented >30 s AF off medications for 7 days at 12 months post-procedure. One hundred and eighty-three patients completed 12 m follow-up. Ninety-four patients underwent PVAC PV isolation with 372 of 376 pulmonary veins (PVs) successfully isolated and all PVs isolated in 92 WACA patients. Three WACA and no PVAC patients developed tamponade. Fifty-six percent of WACA and 60% of PVAC patients were free of AF at 12 months post-procedure (P = ns) with a significant attrition rate from 77 to 78%, respectively, at 6 months. The mean procedure (140 ± 43 vs. 167 ± 42 min, P<0.0001), fluoroscopy (35 ± 16 vs. 42 ± 20 min, P<0.05) times were significantly shorter for PVAC than for WACA. Two patients developed strokes within 72 h of the procedure in the PVAC group, one possibly related directly to PVAC ablation in a high-risk patient and none in the WACA group (P = ns). Two of the 47 patients in the PVAC group who underwent repeat ablation had sub-clinical mild PV stenoses of 25–50% and 1 WACA patient developed delayed severe PV stenosis requiring venoplasty. Conclusion The pulmonary vein ablation catheter is equivalent in efficacy to WACA with reduced procedural and fluoroscopy times. However, there is a risk of thrombo-embolic and pulmonary stenosis complications which needs to be addressed and prospectively monitored. Clinical

  16. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  17. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kenichiro; Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-08-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  18. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures.

  19. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  20. Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a right posterolateral bypass tract in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome after a previous failed ablative procedure: taking the high road.

    PubMed

    Cohen, T J

    2000-07-01

    A 16-year-old high school basketball player with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome underwent an unsuccessful radiofrequency catheter ablative procedure from the femoral venous approach. During this procedure, the patient received 30 applications of radiofrequency energy without injury to the accessory pathway. The patient was treated with flecinide 100 mg orally twice daily and rescheduled for a second ablative procedure via the right internal jugular venous approach. At the second session, prior to any right internal jugular venous applications, 3 additional applications were delivered via the right femoral venous approach using a different catheter, without success. A single radiofrequency energy application from the right internal jugular venous approach eliminated the bypass tract in approximately 2 seconds. The superior approach achieved a more stable catheter position thereby eliminating the bypass tract. In conclusion, an alternative plan of attack should be considered after multiple failures from a given approach. In other words, take the high road if you can't take the low road.

  1. The procedure outcome of laparoscopic resection for ‘small’ hepatocellular carcinoma is comparable to vlaparoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Casaccia, Marco; Santori, Gregorio; Bottino, Giuliano; Diviacco, Pietro; Negri, Antonella De; Moraglia, Eva; Adorno, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation (LRFA) in the treatment of small nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We enrolled 50 cirrhotic patients with similar baseline characteristics that underwent LLR (n = 26) or LRFA (n = 24), in both cases with intraoperative ultrasonography. Operative and peri-operative data were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: LLR included anatomic resection in eight cases and non-anatomic resection in 18. In LRFA patients, a thermoablation of 62 nodules was achieved. Between LLR and LRFA groups, a significant difference was found both for median diameters of treated HCC nodules (30 vs. 17.1 mm; P < 0.001) and the number of treated nodules/patient (1.29 ± 0.62 vs. 2.65 ± 1.55; P < 0.001). A conversion to laparotomy occurred in two LLR patient (7.7%) for bleeding. No deaths occurred in both groups. Morbidity rates were 26.9% in the LLR group versus 16.6% in the LRFA group (P = 0.501). Hospital stay in the LLR and LRFA group was 8.30 ± 6.52 and 6.52 ± 2.69 days, respectively (P = 0.022). The surgical margin was free of tumour cells in all LLR patients, with a margin <5 mm in only one case. In the LRFA group, a complete response was achieved in 90.3% of thermoablated HCC nodules at the 1-month post-treatment computed tomography evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: LLR for small peripheral HCC in patients with chronic liver disease represents a valid alternative to LRFA in terms of patient toleration, surgical outcome of the procedure, and short-term morbidity. PMID:26622111

  2. How effective is microwave ablation for atrial fibrillation during concomitant cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, David Robert Walker; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Nagendran, Myura

    2012-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether performing microwave ablative procedures during concomitant cardiac surgical procedures is effective for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). In total, 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Major exclusion criteria included studies exclusively using bipolar ablation, ambiguous or unspecified ablation technique, other energy modalities and studies with highly variable or undisclosed follow-up time. One study reported that 66% of patients were in sinus rhythm (SR) with follow-ups ranging from 1 to 14 months and suggested that the risk of AF recurrence was significantly increased with a larger left atrial diameter (OR = 1.21, P = 0.02) and an increased duration of preoperative AF (OR = 2.14, P = 0.03). A separate study found no significant difference in the success rate on the basis of the concomitant procedure (coronary artery bypass grafting or mitral valve surgery, P > 0.5). In the only randomized trial identified, microwave ablation delivered significantly inferior SR restoration rates to radiofrequency (RF) ablation at all time points from discharge to 24 months. There is a large degree of heterogeneity in the studies, with patients' characteristics, for example type of AF, and patient management postoperatively, for example administration of anti-arrhythmias, being inconsistent. Of the 12 studies, nine assessed SR at a mean of 6-12 months and found postoperative success rates between 62 and 87%. One study looked at the medium range follow-up of 24 months with SR restoration at 71%. Two studies looked at the long-term follow-up (5 and 5.37 years) with SR restoration at 39 and 61%, respectively

  3. Alternative energy sources for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery: microwave ablation vs cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Cho, Won-Chul; Jung, Sung Ho; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Jae Won

    2010-10-01

    The study aim was to compare maze outcomes using microwave ablation or cryoablation in patients with mitral disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Between 1999 and 2005, 340 patients underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant maze procedure involving either microwave ablation (n=96, MW group) or cryoablation (n=244, Cryo group). Mean age at operation was 50.0±12.5 yr. Follow-up period was 46.1±28.2 months. The Cryo group showed a longer aortic clamping time than the MW group (P=0.005). There were no differences in operative mortality and morbidity rates. The unadjusted 5-yr AF free rate was 61.3±1.2% in the MW group and 79.9±3.2% in the Cryo group (P=0.089). After adjustment, the MW group only showed a tendency toward more frequent AF recurrence than the Cryo group (Hazard ration 1.66, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 3.07). Multivariate analysis revealed that older patient age (P<0.001) and greater left atrial size (P<0.001) were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. Although the use of microwave ablation results in shorter aortic clamping time, it has a tendency toward more frequent late AF recurrence than with cryoablation.

  4. Low Left Atrial Compliance Contributes to the Clinical Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Catheter Ablation in Patients with Structurally and Functionally Normal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junbeom; Yang, Pil-sung; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Joung-Youn; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Hwang, Chun; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Stiff left atrial (LA) syndrome was initially reported in post-cardiac surgery patients and known to be associated with low LA compliance. We investigated the physiological and clinical implications of LA compliance by estimating LA pulse pressure (LApp) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and structurally and functionally normal heart. Among 1038 consecutive patients with LA pressure measurements before AF ablation, we included 334 patients with structurally and functionally normal heart (81.7% male, 54.1±10.6 years, 77.0% paroxysmal AF) after excluding those with hypertension, diabetes, and previous ablation or cardiac surgery. We measured LApp (peak-nadir LA pressure) at the beginning of the ablation procedure and compared the values with clinical parameters and the AF recurrence rate.AF patients with normal heart were younger and more frequently male and had paroxysmal AF, a lower body mass index, and a lower LApp compared to others (all p<0.05).Based on the median value, the low LA compliance group (LApp≥13mmHg) had a smaller LA volume index and lower LA voltage (all p<0.05) compared to the high LA compliance group. During a mean follow-up of 16.7±11.8 months, low LA compliance was independently associated with two fold-higher risk of clinical AF recurrence (HR:2.202; 95%CI:1.077–4.503; p = 0.031).Low LA compliance, as determined by an elevated LApp, was associated with a smaller LA volume index and lower LA voltage and independently associated with higher clinical recurrence after catheter ablation in AF patients with structurally and functionally normal heart. PMID:26624617

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation by Use of Electroanatomical Mapping: Efficacy and Recurrence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kalil, Carlos; Bartholomay, Eduardo; Borges, Anibal; Gazzoni, Guilherme; de Lima, Edimar; Etchepare, Renata; Moraes, Rafael; Sussenbach, Carolina; Andrade, Karina; Kalil, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency catheter ablation guided by electroanatomical mapping is currently an important therapeutic option for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The complexity of the procedure, the several techniques used and the diversity of the patients hinder the reproduction of the results and the indication for the procedure. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and factors associated with recurrence of atrial fibrillation. Methods Prospective cohort study with consecutive patients submitted to atrial fibrillation ablation treatment guided by electroanatomical mapping. The inclusion criteria were as follows: minimum age of 18 years; presence of paroxysmal, persistent or long-standing persistent AF; AF recording on an electrocardiogram, exercise testing or Holter monitoring (duration longer than 15 minutes); presence of symptoms associated with AF episodes; AF refractoriness to, at least, two antiarrhythmic drugs, one of which being amiodarone, or impossibility to use antiarrhythmic drugs. Results The study included 95 patients (age 55 ± 12 years, 84% men, mean CHADS2 = 0.8) who underwent 102 procedures with a median follow-up of 13.4 months. The recurrence-free rate after the procedure was 75.5% after 12 months. Atrial fibrillation recurred as follows: 26.9% of patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation; 45.8% of patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (p = 0.04). Of the analyzed variables, the increased size of the left atrium has proven to be an independent predictor of atrial fibrillation recurrence after the procedure (HR = 2.58; 95% CI: 1.26-4.89). Complications occurred in 4.9% of the procedures. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation guided by electroanatomical mapping has shown good efficacy. The increase in left atrium size was associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence. PMID:24162471

  6. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  7. Assessment of concomitant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation in mitral valve surgery patients based on continuous monitoring: does a different lesion set matter?†

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Pivkin, Alexey; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Nazarov, Vladimir; Karaskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The efficacy of concomitant ablation techniques in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing mitral valve surgery remains under debate. The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-centre study was to compare pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) only versus a left atrial maze (LAM) procedure in patients with paroxysmal AF during mitral valve surgery. METHODS Between February 2009 and June 2011, 52 patients with a mean age of 54.2 (standard deviation 7.2 years) underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant bipolar radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal AF. Patients were randomized into the PVI group (n = 27) and the LAM group (n = 25). After surgery, an implantable loop recorder for continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring was implanted. Patients with an AF burden (AF%) of <0.5% were considered AF free (responders). The mean follow-up was 18.6 months (standard deviation 2.1 months), and the patient' data were evaluated every 3 months. RESULTS All patients were alive at discharge. No procedure-related complications occurred for either the ablation or the loop recorder implantation. Mean aortic clamping and ablation times were significantly longer in the LAM group than in the PVI group. The incidence of early AF paroxysm recurrence was significantly higher in the PVI group than in the LAM group (62.9 vs 24.0%, P < 0.001). At 20 months after surgery, 15 (55.6%) of the 27 patients in the PVI group and 22 (88.0%) of the 25 patients in the LAM group had no documented atrial arrhythmias and were considered responders (AF burden <0.5%). The mean AF burden during all follow-up periods was significantly lower in the LAM group (23.6 ± 8.7%) than in the PVI group (6.8 ± 2.2%) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS According to continuous ECG monitoring data, freedom from AF was significantly higher after the concomitant LAM procedure than after PVI in patients with paroxysmal AF who underwent mitral valve surgery. PMID:24254537

  8. Long-term outcomes after ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: an observational study over 6 years

    PubMed Central

    El-Kadri, Moutaz; Haq, Iram; Das, Moloy; Modi, Simon; Snowdon, Richard; Hall, Mark; Waktare, Johan EP; Todd, Derick M; Gupta, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To address the limited long-term outcome data for catheter ablation (CA) of persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), we analysed consecutive ablations performed at our centre from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 and followed patients prospectively until January 2014. Methods Both arrhythmia recurrence and symptom relief were assessed. Follow-up data were collected from hospital records, supplemented by data from general practitioners and referring hospitals. At the end of the follow-up period, all patients were contacted by phone to determine their up-to-date clinical condition. Results 188 consecutive patients with PeAF (157 male, mean age 57.3±9.7 years, 20% with long-standing PeAF) underwent a mean of 1.75 procedures (range 1–4). Telephone follow-up was achieved for 77% of surviving patients. Over a mean follow-up of 46±16 months (range 4–72), 139 (75%) patients experienced arrhythmia recurrence after a single procedure and 90 (48%) after their final procedure. Median time to first recurrence was 210 days (range 91–1850). 71% of recurrences were within the first year following ablation and 91% within 2 years. At final follow-up, 82% of patients reported symptomatic improvement. 7 (2.3%) major complications occurred, and there was no procedure-related death or stroke. Conclusions CA for PeAF is safe with a low rate of complications. Over a follow-up period of up to 6 years, a large majority of patients experience significant symptomatic improvement but recurrence after the initial procedure is the norm rather than the exception. 2 years' follow-up is sufficient to observe 90% of AF recurrences, but recurrence can occur even after 5 years' remission. PMID:27547426

  9. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  10. Repeat Catheter Ablation of Long-standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with a Total Atrial Fibrillation Duration of More Than 2 Years: Effects of the CHA2DS2-VASc Score and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate on the Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Jiang, Shi-Li; Liu, Xu; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the outcome of repeat catheter ablation of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with a total AF duration of more than 2 years. The main objective of this study was to explore the results and factors affecting the clinical success rate of these repeat procedures. Methods We enrolled 99 patients with a total AF duration of more than 2 years and recurrent atrial arrhythmias after the initial catheter ablation of long-standing persistent AF. The enrolled patients were divided into two groups named the AF-recurrence group (50 patients) and the atrial tachycardia (AT)-recurrence group (49 patients) and all underwent a strict follow-up. The quality of life (QOL) and AF-related symptom classification were assessed at baseline and at 24 months post re-ablation. Results After a mean follow-up of 31 months, 30 (30.3%) patients were free from arrhythmia recurrence, and the success rate in the AT-recurrence group was higher than that in the AF-recurrence group (32.7% vs. 28.0%, p=0.614). A Cox regression analysis revealed a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥3 to be a predictor of recurrence. AF recurrent patients with an abnormal renal function were more prone to undergo a failed procedure. However, an abnormal renal function had no effect on the outcome of the repeat procedure for patients with AT recurrence. At the 24-month follow-up, patients maintaining sinus rhythm (SR) had a significantly improved QOL and AF-related symptoms. Conclusion The success rate of repeat procedures for long-standing persistent AF and a total AF duration of more than 2 years is poor for patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥3. An impaired renal function has an unfavorable effect on the outcome for patients with AF recurrence. For patients maintaining SR, both the QOL and AF symptomatology improve significantly. PMID:27629945

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids: Effect of Bowel Interposition on Procedure Feasibility and a Unique Bowel Displacement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bowel interposition on assessing procedure feasibility, and the usefulness and limiting conditions of bowel displacement techniques in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of uterine fibroids. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approved this study. A total of 375 screening MR exams and 206 MR-HIFU ablations for symptomatic uterine fibroids performed between August 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of bowel interposition on procedure feasibility was assessed by comparing pass rates in periods before and after adopting a unique bowel displacement technique (bladder filling, rectal filling and subsequent bladder emptying; BRB maneuver). Risk factors for BRB failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall pass rates of pre- and post-BRB periods were 59.0% (98/166) and 71.7% (150/209), and in bowel-interposed cases they were 14.6% (7/48) and 76.4% (55/72), respectively. BRB maneuver was technically successful in 81.7% (49/60). Through-the-bladder sonication was effective in eight of eleven BRB failure cases, thus MR-HIFU could be initiated in 95.0% (57/60). A small uterus on treatment day was the only significant risk factor for BRB failure (B = 0.111, P = 0.017). Conclusion The BRB maneuver greatly reduces the fraction of patients deemed ineligible for MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids due to interposed bowels, although care is needed when the uterus is small. PMID:27186881

  12. Serum Galectin-3 Levels Predict Recurrences after Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Clementy, Nicolas; Benhenda, Nazih; Piver, Eric; Pierre, Bertrand; Bernard, Anne; Fauchier, Laurent; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Babuty, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a biomarker of fibrosis and atrial remodeling, involved in the mechanisms of initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to study the accuracy of galectin-3 level in predicting recurrences of AF after ablation. Serum concentrations of galectin-3 were determined in a consecutive series of patients addressed for AF ablation in our center. After a 3-month blanking period, recurrences of atrial arrhythmias were collected during the first year in all patients, using Holter monitoring at 3, 6 months and 12 months. A total of 160 patients were included, with a mean galectin-3 rate was 14.4 ± 5.6 ng/mL. At 12-month, 55 patients (34%) had reexperienced sustained atrial arrhythmia. Only higher galectin-3 level (HR = 1.07 [1.01–1.12], p = 0.02) and larger left atrial diameter (HR = 1.07 [1.03–1.12], p = 0.001) independently predicted recurrence. Patients with both galectin-3 level <15 ng/mL and left atrial diameter <40 millimeters had a 1-year arrhythmia-free survival rate − after a single procedure without anti-arrhythmic drug − of 91%, as compared with 41% in patients with galectin-3 ≥ 15 and left trial diameter ≥40 (p < 0.0001), whether AF was paroxysmal or persistent. Galectin-3 and left atrial diameters, rather than clinical presentation of AF, predict recurrences after ablation. PMID:27677964

  13. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.(1) Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)- American College of Cardiology (ACC)-Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines(2) stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.(3).

  14. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.1 Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)– American College of Cardiology (ACC)–Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines2 stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.3 PMID:26566527

  15. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  16. Evaluation of catheter ablation of periatrial ganglionic plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Neuzil, Petr; d'Avila, Andre; Malchano, Zachary J; Kralovec, Stepan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2008-09-01

    Recent data suggests that the cardiac autonomic nervous system has an important role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study investigated (1) the feasibility of identifying and targeting these autonomic ganglia using endocardial radiofrequency stimulation and ablation, respectively; (2) the efficacy of endocardial ablation to completely eliminate the vagal response elicited from epicardial stimulation; and (3) the effect of autonomic ablation on the acute inducibility of AF. The study included 18 patients referred for catheter ablation of suspected vagal-mediated AF. The endocardial left atrial surface was stimulated at high frequency (20 to 50 Hz) to elicit a vagal response. In selected patients (n = 5), pericardial access was obtained using a subxyphoid puncture to permit epicardial stimulation. Catheter ablation of the putative autonomic ganglionic sites was performed from the left atrial endocardium using irrigated radiofrequency energy. After ablation of all identifiable autonomic ganglia, high-frequency pacing was repeated to induce AF. In all patients, stimulation at certain endocardial sites elicited a vagal response. Endocardial ablation abrogated this vagal responsiveness. Furthermore, for sites accessible from the pericardium, the vagal response elicited using epicardial stimulation was also eliminated. Despite successful ablation of these ganglia, AF was still inducible in 17 of 18 patients. In conclusion, successful ablation of autonomic ganglia from an endocardial approach can be reliably achieved using an irrigated catheter. In addition, ablation of these structures in patients with vagal-mediated AF is insufficient to prevent its acute reinduction with high-frequency atrial stimulation. PMID:18721515

  17. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  18. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  19. Initial outcome following invasive cardiac electrophysiologic studies and radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanuruochi, Kelechukwu; Saravanan, Sabari; Ganasekar, Anita; Solomon, Benjamin S; Murugesan, Ravikumar; Shah, Ruchit A; Krishnamoorthy, Jaishankar; Pandurangi, Ulhas M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have become an established mode of treatment for patients with refractory arrhythmias. These procedures are carried out regularly at the cardiac catheterization laboratory of Madras Medical Mission India. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with cardiac electrophysiologic studies (EPS) and RFA catheter of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in the Cardiac Electrophysiology Department of the Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Madras Medical Mission, India. All cases diagnosed to have AF following cardiac EPS between January 2010 and April 2014 was selected for the study. The records, which were obtained from the Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinical Research Office of Madras Medical Mission, were reviewed. Forty-nine cases were chosen for analysis, using SPSS statistical software version 15. Results: There were 49 patients, 23 males and 26 females. The mean age was 57.53 years. Commonly associated diseases were diabetes mellitus 8 (16.3%), hypertension 18 (36.7%), and coronary heart disease 14 (28.5%). The ventricular rate was rapid most cases (91.2%). AF was diagnosed as being paroxysmal in 40 (81.6%), persistent in 5 (10.2%), chronic in 3 (6.1%), and lone in 1 (2.0%). Ablation was carried out in 28 (57.1%), the success rate being 90% for pulmonary vein isolation, and 90.9% for atrioventricular node ablation. Complication rate was 2.04%. Conclusions: Treatment of AF by RFA is highly effective and safe. PMID:27127736

  20. Effectiveness of Integrating Delayed Computed Tomography Angiography Imaging for Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus Exclusion into the Care of Patients Undergoing Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bilchick, Kenneth C.; Mealor, Augustus; Gonzalez, Jorge; Norton, Patrick; Zhuo, David; Mason, Pamela; Ferguson, John D.; Malhotra, Rohit; Mangrum, J. Michael; Darby, Andrew E.; DiMarco, John; Hagspiel, Klaus; Dent, John; Kramer, Christopher M.; Stukenborg, George J.; Salerno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography angiography (CTA) can identify and rule out left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus when delayed imaging is also performed. Objective In patients referred for CTA for pulmonary vein anatomy prior to ablation of atrial fibrillation or atypical left atrial flutter (AF), we sought to determine the effectiveness of a novel clinical protocol for integrating results of CTA delayed imaging of the LAA into pre-procedure care. Methods After making delayed imaging of the LAA part of our routine pre-ablation CTA protocol, we integrated early reporting of pre-ablation CTA LAA imaging results into clinical practice as part of a formal protocol in June 2013. We then analyzed the effectiveness of this protocol by evaluating 320 AF ablation patients with CTA imaging during 2012–2014. Results Among CTA patients with delayed LAA imaging, the sensitivity and negative predictive values for LAA thrombus with intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) or transesophageal echocardiograms (TEEs) as the reference standard were both 100%. ICE during ablation confirmed absence of thrombus in patients with a negative CTA or negative TEE. No patients with either a negative CTA or an equivocal CTA combined with a negative TEE had strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Overall, the need for TEEs decreased from 57.5% to 24.0% during the 3-year period as a result of the CTA protocol. Conclusions Clinical integration of CTA with delayed LAA imaging into the care of patients having catheter ablation of AF is feasible, safe, and effective. Such a protocol could be applied broadly to improve patient care. PMID:26341605

  1. Thermal ablation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Cheng-Song; Yu, Yang; Si, Ya-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryoablation are alternative forms of therapy used widely in various pathological states, including treatment of carcinogenesis. The reason is that ablation techniques have ability of modulating the immune system. Furthermore, recent studies have applied this form of therapy on tumor microenvironment and in the systematic circulation. Moreover, RFA and cryoablation result in an inflammatory immune response along with tissue disruption. Evidence has demonstrated that these procedures affect carcinogenesis by causing a significant local inflammatory response leading to an immunogenic gene signature. The present review enlightens the current view of these techniques in cancer. PMID:27703520

  2. THE COX-MAZE IV PROCEDURE: PREDICTORS OF LATE RECURRENCE

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Ralph J.; Schwartz, Forrest H.; Bailey, Marci S.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; Moon, Marc R.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The Cox-Maze III procedure(CMP) achieved high cure rates and became the surgical gold standard for the treatment of atrial fibrillation(AF). Due to its invasiveness, a more simplified ablation-assisted procedure(CMP-IV) has been performed at our institution since January, 2002. The study examined multiple preoperative and perioperative variables to determine predictors of late recurrence. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 282 patients who underwent the CMP-IV from January 2002 through December 2009. Forty-two percent of patients had paroxysmal and 58% had either persistent or long-standing persistent AF. All patients were available for follow-up. Follow-up included ECGs in all patients. Since 2006, 24 hour holter monitoring was obtained in 94% of patients at 3, 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis at 12 months with 13 preoperative and perioperative variables used as co-variants. Results Sixty-six percent of patients had a concomitant procedure. Following an ablation-assisted CMP, the freedom from AF was 89%, 93%, and 89% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The freedom from both AF and antiarrhythmic drugs was 63%, 79%, and 78% at 3, 6, and 12 months. The risk factors for AF recurrence at one year were enlarged left atrial(LA) diameter(p=0.027), failure to isolate the entire posterior left atrium(p=0.022), and early atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATAs)(p=0.010). Conclusions The CMP-IV has a high success rate at one year, even with improved follow-up and stricter definitions of failure. In patients with large LA, there may be a need for more extensive size reduction or expanded lesion sets. PMID:21168019

  3. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  4. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  5. Ablation therapy for left atrial autonomic modification.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa; Sandler, Belinda C; Sikkel, Markus B; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system is implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) but few studies have attempted neural targeting for therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated that short bursts of stimulation, at specific sites of left atrial ganglionated plexi (GPs), trigger fibrillation-inducing atrial ectopy and importantly continuous stimulation of these sites may not induce AV block, the 'conventional' marker used to locate GPs. We have shown that these ectopy-triggering GP (ET-GP) sites are anatomically stable and can be rendered inactive by either ablation at the site or by ablation between the site and the adjacent pulmonary vein (PV). This may have important implications for planning patient specific strategies for ablation of paroxysmal AF in the future. PMID:27595199

  6. Acute Safety of an Open-Irrigated Ablation Catheter with 56-Hole Porous Tip for Radiofrequency Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Analysis from 2 Observational Registry Studies

    PubMed Central

    OZA, SAUMIL R; HUNTER, TINA D; BIVIANO, ANGELO B; DANDAMUDI, GOPI; HERWEG, BENGT; PATEL, ANSHUL M; POLLAK, SCOTT J; WANG, HUIJIAN; FISHEL, ROBERT S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Safety from 2 AF Ablation Registries Introduction This report presents safety data on the use of a new open-irrigation radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter with a 56-hole porous tip in 742 patients enrolled in 2 US prospective, multicenter observational registry studies representing real-world use of the catheter. Methods This analysis is comprised of patients who underwent RFA of drug-refractory recurrent symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Acute adverse events (AEs) were collected and categorized by seriousness, timing, and relatedness, with 7 days of follow-up data in one study and at least 120 days of data from a 1-year follow-up in the other. Acute serious adverse events (SAEs) that were identified as potentially related to the device and/or procedure were adjudicated by an independent safety committee. Results A total of 30 patients (4.0%) in the combined studies experienced an acute SAE related to the device and/or procedure, which was similar in the subset of patients age 65 and over (4.2%). These SAEs included 1.2% cardiac tamponade/perforation, 0.7% pericarditis, 0.5% pulmonary events, and 0.8% vascular access complications. No myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or atrioesophageal fistulas within 7 days postprocedure were reported. In the study with extended follow-up, 1 pulmonary vein stenosis and 1 esophageal injury were seen beyond 7 days postprocedure (0.2% each). There were no device or procedure related deaths. Conclusion Results from 2 large observational studies demonstrated that a new porous tip RFA catheter was safe for the treatment of drug refractory, recurrent, symptomatic paroxysmal AF, including treatment of older patients (≥65 years). PMID:24602038

  7. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Atrial Fibrillation and the Outcome after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Feng; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Yeh, Hung-I; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Li, Cheng-Hung; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Tang, Paul Wei Hua; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of gene variants with atrial fibrillation (AF) type and the recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in Taiwan is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationships between gene variants, AF type, and the recurrence of AF. Methods In our investigation, we examined 383 consecutive patients with AF (61.9 ± 14.0 years; 63% men); of these 383 patients, 189 underwent catheter ablation for drug-refractory AF. Thereafter, the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2200733, and rs7193343 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The rs7193343 variant was independently associated with non-paroxysmal AF (non-PAF). In the PAF group, the rs7193343 variant was independently associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. However, the rs2200733 variant was not associated with AF recurrence in this group. The combination of the rs7193343 and rs2200733 risk alleles was associated with a better predictive power in the PAF patients. In contrast, in the non-PAF group, the SNPs were not associated with recurrence. The rs7193343 and rs2200733 variants were not associated with different atrial voltage and activation times. Conclusions The rs7193343 variants were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in PAF patients but not in non-PAF patients. The rs7193343 CC variant was independently associated with non-PAF. PMID:27713600

  8. European survey on efficacy and safety of duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, C.; Ng, G.A.; Wieczorek, M.; Deneke, T.; Furniss, S.S.; Murray, St.; Debruyne, Ph.; Hobson, N.; Berntsen, R.F.; Schneider, M.A.; Hauer, H.A.; Halimi, F.; Boveda, S.; Asbach, S.; Boesche, L.; Zimmermann, M.; Brigadeau, F.; Taieb, J.; Merkel, M.; Pfyffer, M.; Brunner-La Rocca, H.P.; Boersma, L.V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for atrial fibrillation (AF) for around 5 years, but large-scale data are scarce. The purpose of this survey was to report the outcome of the technique. Methods and results A survey was conducted among 20 centres from seven European countries including 2748 patients (2128 with paroxysmal and 620 with persistent AF). In paroxysmal AF an overall success rate of 82% [median 80%, interquartile range (IQR) 74–90%], a first procedure success rate of 72% [median 74% (IQR 59–83%)], and a success of antiarrhythmic medication of 59% [median 60% (IQR 39–72%)] was reported. In persistent AF, success rates were significantly lower with 70% [median 74% (IQR 60–92%)]; P = 0.05) as well as the first procedure success rate of 58% [median 55% (IQR 47–81%)]; P = 0.001). The overall success rate was similar among higher and lower volume centres and were not dependent on the duration of experience with duty-cycled RFA (r = −0.08, P = 0.72). Complications were observed in 108 (3.9%) patients, including 31 (1.1%) with symptomatic transient ischaemic attack or stroke, which had the same incidence in paroxysmal and persistent AF (1.1 vs. 1.1%) and was unrelated to the case load (r = 0.24, P = 0.15), bridging anticoagulation to low molecular heparin, routine administration of heparin over the long sheath, whether a transoesophageal echocardiogram was performed in every patient or not and average procedure times. Conclusion Duty-cycled RFA has a self-reported success and complication rate similar to conventional RFA. After technical modifications a prospective registry with controlled data monitoring should be conducted to assess outcome. PMID:22772054

  9. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  11. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  12. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Valcavi, Roberto; Pacella, Claudio M.; Rhim, Hyunchul; Na, Dong Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation. PMID:21927553

  13. [Pulmonary vein ablation in atrial fibrillation. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Velarde, José Luis; Martellotto, Ricardo; Scanavacca, Mauricio; Arévalo, Aldo; Colque, Roberto; Jiménez, Marcelo

    2002-05-01

    Despite the progress in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of the atrial fibrillation (AF), the pharmacologic and non pharmacologic approach to prevent and control this arrhythmia has been shown to be discouraging. In the past few years a new type of AF has been described, of which the focal mechanism -especially bound to the pulmonary veins- allows ablation treatment through the radiofrequency (RF) with a catheter. We present our initial experience with this type of method, in two young patients who suffered from multiples episodes of AF and resistance to the conventional treatment. In both patients the RF ablation was done in the left superior pulmonary vein. One of them received an ablation in only one focus, and the other needed a veno-atrial disconnection through the elimination of the pulmonary venous potential from this vein. After three month of follow-up, patients remain asymptomatic with no relapse. PMID:12015937

  14. Efficacy of circumferential pulmonary vein ablation of atrial fibrillation in endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Naiara; Mont, Lluís; Tamborero, David; Berruezo, Antonio; Viola, Graziana; Guasch, Eduard; Nadal, Mercè; Andreu, David; Vidal, Barbara; Sitges, Marta; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Long-term endurance sport practice has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for lone atrial fibrillation (AF). However, data on the outcome of circumferential pulmonary vein ablation (CPVA) in endurance athletes are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of CPVA in AF secondary to endurance sport practice. Methods and results Patients submitted to CPVA answered a questionnaire about lifetime history of endurance sport practice. Endurance athletes were defined as those who engaged in >3 h per week of high-intensity exercise for at least the 10 years immediately preceding their AF diagnosis. A series of 182 consecutive patients was included (51 ± 11 years, 65% with paroxysmal AF, 81% men, 42 ± 6 mm mean left atrial diameter); 107 (59%) patients had lone AF, and 42 of them (23% of the study population) were classified as endurance athletes (lone AF sport group). Freedom from arrhythmia after a single CPVA was similar in the lone AF sport group compared with the remaining patients (P = 0.446). Left atrial size and long-standing AF were the only independent predictors for arrhythmia recurrence after ablation. Conclusion Circumferential pulmonary vein ablation was as effective in AF secondary to endurance sport practice as in other aetiologies of AF. PMID:19923171

  15. Use of oral gadobenate dimeglumine to visualise the oesophagus during magnetic resonance angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation prior to catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrio-oesophageal fistula was first reported as a fatal complication of surgical endocardial and percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation, with an incidence after catheter ablation between 0.03% and 0.5%. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was usually performed to obtain pre-procedural 3D images, used to merging into an electro-anatomical map, guiding step-by-step ablation strategy of AF. Our aim was to find an easy, safe and cost-effective way to enhance the oesophagus during MRA. Methods In 105 consecutive patients, a right-left phase encoding, free breathing, 3D T1 MRA sequence was performed in the axial plane, >24 hours before catheter ablation, using an intravenous injection of gadobenate dimeglumine contrast medium. The oesophagus was enhanced using an oral gel solution of 0.7 mL gadobenate dimeglumine contrast medium mixed with approximately 40 mg thickened water gel, which was swallowed by the patients on the scanning table, immediately before the MRA sequence acquisition. Results The visualisation of the oesophagus was obtained in 104/105 patients and images were successfully merged, as left atrium and pulmonary veins, into an electro-anatomical map, during percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency ablation. All patients tolerated the study protocol and no immediate or late complication was observed with the oral contrast agent administration. The free-breathing MRA sequence used in our protocol took 7 seconds longer than MRA breath-hold conventional sequence. Conclusion Oesophagus visualization with oral gadobenate dimeglumine is feasible for integration of oesophagus anatomy images into the electro-anatomical map during AF ablation, without undesirable side effects and without significantly increasing cost or examination time. PMID:24927953

  16. Macro-reentrant atrial tachycardia conducting through a left superior vena cava after catheter ablation in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kurotobi, Toshiya; Kino, Naoto; Tonomura, Daisuke; Shimada, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    A left superior vena cava can be a cause of cardiac rhythm or conduction abnormalities, and can also be the arrhythmogenic source of atrial fibrillation (AF) with connections to the coronary sinus and left atrium. In the present study, we report a case with a macro re-entrant atrial tachycardia that coursed through the left superior vena cava after a previous AF ablation, which successfully ablated paroxysmal AF.

  17. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  18. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  19. FBG Sensor for Contact Level Monitoring and Prediction of Perforation in Cardiac Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Nazeri, Alireza; Song, Gangbing

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia, and is characterized by a disordered contractile activity of the atria (top chambers of the heart). A popular treatment for AF is radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In about 2.4% of cardiac RF ablation procedures, the catheter is accidently pushed through the heart wall due to the application of excessive force. Despite the various capabilities of currently available technology, there has yet to be any data establishing how cardiac perforation can be reliably predicted. Thus, two new FBG based sensor prototypes were developed to monitor contact levels and predict perforation. Two live sheep were utilized during the study. It was observed during operation that peaks appeared in rhythm with the heart rate whenever firm contact was made between the sensor and the endocardial wall. The magnitude of these peaks varied with pressure applied by the operator. Lastly, transmural perforation of the left atrial wall was characterized by a visible loading phase and a rapid signal drop-off correlating to perforation. A possible pre-perforation signal was observed for the epoxy-based sensor in the form of a slight signal reversal (12–26% of loading phase magnitude) prior to perforation (occurring over 8 s). PMID:22368507

  20. Cerebrovascular Complications Related to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Strategies for Periprocedural Stroke Prevention.

    PubMed

    Csanadi, Zoltan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Santangeli, Pasquale; Santoro, Francesco; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Transcatheter treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex intervention performed in patients who are at inherently increased risk of a thromboembolic complication, including stroke. It is therefore not surprising that cerebrovascular accidents have been among the most feared complications since the inception of AF ablation. While improvements have been made to limit the incidence of thromboembolic events during catheter ablation of AF, the optimal strategy to minimize such complications has yet to be determined. It is hoped that larger trials using periprocedural anticoagulation strategies can be undertaken to definitively address these important concerns. PMID:27063826

  1. Ibutilide for the Cardioversion of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation during Radiofrequency Ablation of Supraventricular Tachycardias

    PubMed Central

    Polymeropoulos, Kostas; Vassilikos, Vassilios P.; Mantziari, Lilian; Paraskevaidis, Stelios; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Mochlas, Sotirios; Parcharidis, Georgios; Louridas, Georgios; Styliadis, Ioannis H.

    2011-01-01

    Direct current electrical cardioversion (DC-ECV) is the preferred treatment for the termination of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) that occurs during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of supraventricular tachycardias (SVT). Intravenous Ibutilide may be an alternative option in this setting. Thirty-four out of 386 patients who underwent SVT-RFA presented paroxysmal AF during the procedure and were randomized into receiving ibutilide or DC-ECV. Ibutilide infusion successfully cardioverted 16 out of 17 patients (94%) within 17.37 ± 7.87  min. DC-ECV was successful in all patients (100%) within 17.29 ± 3.04  min. Efficacy and total time to cardioversion did not differ between the study groups. No adverse events were observed. RFA was successfully performed in 16 patients (94%) in the ibutilide arm and in all patients (100%) in the DC-ECV arm, p = NS. In conclusion, ibutilide is a safe and effective alternative treatment for restoring sinus rhythm in cases of paroxysmal AF complicating SVT-RFA. PMID:21738857

  2. Different transseptal puncture for different procedures: Optimization of left atrial catheterization guided by transesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Radinovic, Andrea; Mazzone, Patrizio; Landoni, Giovanni; Agricola, Eustachio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Bella, Paolo Della

    2016-01-01

    Background: Left atrial catheterization through transseptal puncture is frequently performed in cardiac catheterization procedures. Appropriate transseptal puncture is critical to achieve procedural success. Aims: The aim of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of selective transseptal punctures, using a modified radiofrequency (RF) transseptal needle and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), in different types of procedures that require specific sites of left atrial catheterization. Setting and Design: This was an observational trial in a cardiac catheterization laboratory of a teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing different percutaneous procedures requiring atrial transseptal puncture such as atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion, and mitral valve repair were included in the study. All procedures were guided by TEE and an RF transseptal needle targeting a specific region of the septum to perform the puncture. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was descriptive only. Results: RF-assisted transseptal punctures were performed in six consecutive patients who underwent AF ablation (two patients), LAA closure (two patients), and mitral valve repair (two patients). In all patients, transseptal punctures were performed successfully at the desired site. No adverse events or complications were observed. Conclusions: Selective transseptal puncture, using TEE and an RF needle, is a feasible technique that can be used in multiple approaches requiring a precise site of access for left atrial catheterization. PMID:27716687

  3. Ablative Thermal Protection: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernie

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Why ablative thermal protections - TPS. Ablative TPS chronology: strategic reentry systems, solid rocket motor nozzles, space (manned missions and planetary entry probes). Ablation mechanisms. Ablation material testing. Ablative material testing.

  4. Remote magnetic with open-irrigated catheter vs. manual navigation for ablation of atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Riccardo; Pecoraro, Valentina; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Santangeli, Pasquale; Viecca, Maurizio; Sagone, Antonio; Galli, Alessio; Moja, Lorenzo; Tagliabue, Ludovica

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of remote magnetic navigation (RMN) with open-irrigated catheter vs. manual catheter navigation (MCN) in performing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. We searched in PubMed (1948-2013) and EMBASE (1974-2013) studies comparing RMN with MCN. Outcomes considered were AF recurrence (primary outcome), pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), procedural complications, and data on procedure's performance. Odds ratios (OR) and mean difference (MD) were extracted and pooled using a random-effect model. Confidence in the estimates of the obtained effects (quality of evidence) was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. We identified seven controlled trials, six non-randomized and one randomized, including a total of 941 patients. Studies were at high risk of bias. No difference was observed between RMN and MCN on AF recurrence [OR 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85 to 1.65, P = 0.32] or PVI (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.11-1.47, P = 0.17). Remote magnetic navigation was associated with less peri-procedural complications (Peto OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.88, P = 0.02). Mean fluoroscopy time was reduced in RMN group (-22.22 min; 95% CI -42.48 to -1.96, P = 0.03), although the overall duration of the procedure was longer (60.91 min; 95% CI 31.17 to 90.65, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, RMN is not superior to MCN in achieving freedom from recurrent AF at mid-term follow-up or PVI. The procedure implies less peri-procedural complications, requires a shorter fluoroscopy time but a longer total procedural time. For the low quality of the available evidence, a proper designed randomized controlled trial could turn the direction and the effect of the dimensions explored.

  5. Local Electrical Dyssynchrony during Atrial Fibrillation: Theoretical Considerations and Initial Catheter Ablation Results

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Boris A.; Ganesan, Anand N.; Schreiber, Doreen; Moser, Julia M.; Akbulak, Ruken Ö.; Sultan, Arian; Steven, Daniel; Maesen, Bart; Schotten, Ulrich; Meyer, Christian; Willems, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrogram-based identification of the regions maintaining persistent Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a subject of ongoing debate. Here, we explore the concept of local electrical dyssynchrony to identify AF drivers. Methods and Results Local electrical dyssynchrony was calculated using mean phase coherence. High-density epicardial mapping along with mathematical model were used to explore the link between local dyssynchrony and properties of wave conduction. High-density mapping showed a positive correlation between the dyssynchrony and number of fibrillatory waves (R2 = 0.68, p<0.001). In the mathematical model, virtual ablation at high dyssynchrony regions resulted in conduction regularization. The clinical study consisted of eighteen patients undergoing catheter ablation of persistent AF. High-density maps of left atrial (LA) were constructed using a circular mapping catheter. After pulmonary vein isolation, regions with the top 10% of the highest dyssynchrony in LA were targeted during ablation and followed with ablation of complex atrial electrograms. Catheter ablation resulted in termination during ablation at high dyssynchrony regions in 7 (41%) patients. In another 4 (24%) patients, transient organization was observed. In 6 (35%) there was no clear effect. Long-term follow-up showed 65% AF freedom at 1 year and 22% at 2 years. Conclusions Local electrical dyssynchrony provides a reasonable estimator of regional AF complexity defined as the number of fibrillatory waves. Additionally, it points to regions of dynamical instability related with action potential alternans. However, despite those characteristics, its utility in guiding catheter ablation of AF is limited suggesting other factors are responsible for AF persistence. PMID:27780243

  6. Novel P Wave Indices to Predict Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Jingzhou; Ma, Yuedong; Tang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) is a widely used treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Several P wave duration (PWD) parameters have been suggested to predict post-ablation recurrence, but their use remains controversial. This study aimed to identify novel P wave indices that predict post-ablation AF recurrence. Material/Methods We selected 171 consecutive patients undergoing CPVI for paroxysmal AF. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were obtained at the beginning and the end of ablation. PWD was measured in all 12 leads. The PWD variation was calculated by subtracting the pre-ablation PWD from the post-ablation PWD. Results PWD was significantly shortened in leads II, III, aVF, and V1 after ablation. During a mean follow-up of 19.96±4.32 months, AF recurrence occurred in 32 (18.7%) patients. No significant differences in baseline characteristics or pre- or post-ablation PWD were observed between the AF recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Patients with AF recurrence exhibited a smaller PWD variation in leads II (1.21(−0.56, 2.40) vs. −5.77(−9.10, −4.06) ms, P<0.001), III (−5.92(−9.87, 3.27) vs. −9.44(−11.89, −5.57) ms, P=0.001) and V1 (−4.43(−6.64, −3.13) vs. −6.33(−8.19,−4.59) ms, P=0.003). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that smaller PWD variations in lead II and III were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. PWD variation ≥−2.21 ms in lead II displayed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (85.29% and 83.94%, respectively) for predicting post-ablation AF recurrence. A PWD variation ≥0 ms displayed the best practical value in predicting AF recurrence. Conclusions PWD variation in lead II is an effective predictor of post-ablation AF recurrence. PMID:27450644

  7. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  8. Lone Atrial Fibrillation Is Associated With Impaired Left Ventricular Energetics That Persists Despite Successful Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S.; Liu, Alexander; Eichhorn, Christian; Ariga, Rina; Levelt, Eylem; Clarke, William T.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Bashir, Yaver; Ginks, Matthew; Rajappan, Kim; Betts, Tim; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lone atrial fibrillation (AF) may reflect a subclinical cardiomyopathy that persists after sinus rhythm (SR) restoration, providing a substrate for AF recurrence. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of restoring SR by catheter ablation on left ventricular (LV) function and energetics in patients with AF but no significant comorbidities. Methods: Fifty-three patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF and without significant valvular disease, uncontrolled hypertension, coronary artery disease, uncontrolled thyroid disease, systemic inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, or obstructive sleep apnea (ie, lone AF) undergoing ablation and 25 matched control subjects in SR were investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging quantified LV ejection fraction (LVEF), peak systolic circumferential strain (PSCS), and left atrial volumes and function, whereas phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluated ventricular energetics (ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP). AF burden was determined before and after ablation by 7-day Holter monitoring; intermittent ECG event monitoring was also undertaken after ablation to investigate for asymptomatic AF recurrence. Results: Before ablation, both LV function and energetics were significantly impaired in patients compared with control subjects (LVEF, 61% [interquartile range (IQR), 52%–65%] versus 71% [IQR, 69%–73%], P<0.001; PSCS, –15% [IQR, –11 to –18%] versus −18% [IQR, –17% to –19%], P=0.002; ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP, 1.81±0.35 versus 2.05±0.29, P=0.004). As expected, patients also had dilated and impaired left atria compared with control subjects (all P<0.001). Early after ablation (1–4 days), LVEF and PSCS improved in patients recovering SR from AF (LVEF, 7.0±10%, P=0.005; PSCS, –3.5±4.3%, P=0.001) but were unchanged in those in SR during both assessments (both P=NS). At 6 to 9 months after ablation, AF burden reduced significantly (from 54% [IQR, 1.5%–100%] to

  9. Ablation of left atrial flutter in a patient surgically treated for atrial fibrillation. Does it indicate a possible hybrid approach?

    PubMed

    Barbato, Gaetano; Marinelli, Giuseppe; Carinci, Valeria; Chiappini, Bruno; Pergolini, Francesco; Bracchetti, Daniele; Di Pasquale, Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) has a high success rate and nowadays simpler and faster procedures have been proposed. The following is a description of the case of a patient who, after a modified Maze procedure, developed an atypical left atrial flutter and underwent a successful radiofrequency ablation procedure. A 71-year-old male underwent surgical biological valve replacement and a concomitant modified Maze procedure. After surgery the patient developed a persistent atrial arrhythmia with severe symptoms and refractory to any drug. For this reason, an electrophysiological study was planned. We performed a three-dimensional atrial mapping using the real-time position management system (Boston Scientific). Right atrial mapping indicated an early activation area on the septum. After transseptal puncture, left atrial mapping showed a reentry circuit around the mitral annulus with positive entrainment. A linear lesion was made between the mitral annulus and the superior right pulmonary vein and sinus rhythm was restored. After 7 months of follow-up the patient is asymptomatic and still in stable sinus rhythm. In conclusion, the follow-up of surgical AF may be improved by close collaboration between the surgeon and electrophysiologist. The available data suggest that a combined surgical and percutaneous approach could be the strategy of choice.

  10. A left atrial ablation with bipolar irrigated radio-frequency for atrial fibrillation during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Marco; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Karimov, Jamshid H; Glauber, Mattia

    2010-04-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery is becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Mitral valve disease is often associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), also due to the ageing of the population. We present a technique to perform a left atrial ablation with bipolar irrigated radio-frequency (RF) through a single right thoracotomy. We have operated on eight patients: six female with a mean age 68+/-8 years. Six patients suffered from permanent AF and other two from paroxysmal AF. PMID:19942447

  11. Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: The importance of substrate modification

    PubMed Central

    Letsas, Konstantinos P; Efremidis, Michael; Sgouros, Nikolaos P; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Asvestas, Dimitrios; Sideris, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating data have shown that elimination of atrial fibrillation (AF) sources should be the goal in persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein isolation, linear lesions and complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs) ablation have shown limited efficacy in patients with persistent AF. A combined approach using voltage, CFAEs and dominant frequency (DF) mapping may be helpful for the identification of AF sources and subsequent focal substrate modification. The fibrillatory activity is maintained by intramural reentry centered on fibrotic patches. Voltage mapping may assist in the identification of fibrotic areas. Stable rotors display the higher DF and possibly drive AF. Furthermore, the single rotor is usually consistent with organized AF electrograms without fractionation. It is therefore quite possible that rotors are located at relatively “healthy islands” within the patchy fibrosis. This is supported by the fact that high DF sites have been negatively correlated to the amount of fibrosis. CFAEs are located in areas adjacent to high DF. In conclusion, patchy fibrotic areas displaying the maximum DF along with high organization index and the lower fractionation index are potential targets of ablation. Prospective studies are required to validate the efficacy of substrate modification in left atrial ablation outcomes. PMID:25810810

  12. Non-fluoroscopic catheter visualization using MediGuide™ technology: experience from the first 600 procedures.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Richter, S; Hindricks, G; Rolf, S

    2014-09-01

    A novel cardiovascular navigation system known as MediGuide™ (MG) which allows non-fluoroscopic catheter tracking over a background of pre-recorded cine loops was recently introduced. This system allows significant reduction of fluoroscopy exposure which is one of the potentially harmful aspects of today's electrophysiological procedures such as ablations or device implantations. We provide a summary of recently published studies related to this new technological platform and describe our experience from the first 600 MG procedures at our institution.After reviewing the currently available publications in the field of MG-supported EP procedures, we describe the workflows for (1) ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), atrial fibrillation (AF), and ventricular tachycardia using MG-enabled diagnostic and ablation catheters, as well as (2) implant of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices using sensor-equipped delivery tools including sheaths, sub-selectors, and guidewires.As shown in several studies [5-9], MG procedures resulted in similar efficacy as conventional cases but with a significant reduction in fluoroscopy time and dose. In particular, for SVT ablations, the median fluoroscopy time using the MG technology was 0.5 ± 1.4 min compared to 10.2 ± 9.6 min in conventional fluoroscopic settings. Similar reductions were demonstrated for AF ablation procedures from 25 min in conventional settings with electroanatomical mapping systems and live x-ray to 4.6 min with the addition of the MG technology. Recently, it was demonstrated that the application of MG for CRT device implants could successfully result in a median fluoroscopy time of 2.6 min for LV lead deployment.In summary, the first measurable clinical impact of the MG technology on a daily clinical routine is the reduction of fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure for various EP indications. These beneficial effects were achieved without negative consequences on procedural

  13. Plasma microRNAs are associated with atrial fibrillation and change after catheter-ablation (the miRhythm Study)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Lin, Honghuang; Esa, Nada; Kinno, Menhel; Mandapati, Divakar; Tam, Stanley; Okike, Okike N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Keaney, John F.; Donahue, J, Kevin; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), control gene expression, and are detectable in the circulation. Objective To test the hypothesis that circulating miRNAs would be associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods Using a prospective study design powered to detect subtle differences in miRNAs, we quantified plasma expression of 86 miRNAs by high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in 112 participants with AF and 99 without AF. To examine parallels between cardiac and plasma miRNA profiles, we quantified atrial tissue and plasma miRNA expression using qRT-PCR in 31 participants undergoing surgery. We also explored the hypothesis that lower AF burden after ablation would be reflected in the circulating blood pool by examining change in plasma miRNAs after AF ablation (n=47). Results The mean age of the cohort was 59 years. 58% of participants were men. Plasma miRs-21 and 150 were 2-fold lower in participants with AF than in those without AF after adjustment (p ≤ 0.0006). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 were also lower in participants with paroxysmal AF than in those with persistent AF (p <0.05). Expression of miR-21, but not miR-150, was lower in atrial tissue from patients with AF compared to no AF (p<0.05). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 increased 3-fold after AF ablation (p ≤ 0.0006). Conclusions Cardiac miRs-21 and 150 are known to regulate genes implicated in atrial remodeling. Our findings show associations between plasma miRs-21 and 150 and AF, suggesting that circulating miRNAs provide insights into cardiac gene regulation. PMID:25257092

  14. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  15. Current Status of Thermal Ablation Treatments for Lung Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Shulman, Maria

    2010-01-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques. PMID:22550366

  16. Atrial fibrillation disorganization is reduced by catheter ablation: a standard ECG study.

    PubMed

    Bonizzi, Pietro; Meste, Olivier; Zarzoso, Vicente; Latcu, Decebal Gabriel; Popescu, Irina; Ricard, Philippe; Saoudi, Nadir

    2010-01-01

    Selection of candidates to catheter ablation (CA) of long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) is challenging, since success is not guaranteed. In this study, we put forward an automated method for noninvasively evaluating the reduction of the complexity of the AF organization following CA. Complexity is meant as the amount of disorganization observed on the ECG, supposed to be directly correlated to the number and interactions of atrial wavefronts. By means of PCA, the complexity of the AF organization is evaluated quantitatively from a 12-lead ECG recording. Preliminary results show that CA is able to reduce the complexity of AF organization in the atrial wavefront pattern propagation, despite the persistence of AF in most cases. This can be viewed as a first clinical validation of this parameter. Whether AF complexity and its reduction by CA are predictive of long-term outcome is thus still to be determined.

  17. Uninterrupted rivaroxaban vs. uninterrupted vitamin K antagonists for catheter ablation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Cappato, Riccardo; Marchlinski, Francis E.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Naccarelli, Gerald V.; Xiang, Jim; Wilber, David J.; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Hess, Susanne; Wells, Darryl S.; Juang, George; Vijgen, Johan; Hügl, Burkhard J.; Balasubramaniam, Richard; De Chillou, Christian; Davies, D. Wyn; Fields, L. Eugene; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Aims VENTURE-AF is the first prospective randomized trial of uninterrupted rivaroxaban and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing catheter ablation (CA). Methods and results Trial size was administratively set at 250, the protocol-specified target. Events were independently and blindly adjudicated. We randomly assigned 248 NVAF patients to uninterrupted rivaroxaban (20 mg once-daily) or to an uninterrupted VKA prior to CA and for 4 weeks afterwards. The primary endpoint was major bleeding events after CA. Secondary endpoints included thromboembolic events (composite of stroke, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and vascular death) and other bleeding or procedure-attributable events. Patients were 59.5 ± 10 years of age, 71% male, 74% paroxysmal AF, and had a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1.6. The average total heparin dose used to manage activated clotting time (ACT) was slightly higher (13 871 vs. 10 964 units; P < 0.001) and the mean ACT level attained slightly lower (302 vs. 332 s; P < 0.001) in rivaroxaban and VKA arms, respectively. The incidence of major bleeding was low (0.4%; 1 major bleeding event). Similarly, thromboembolic events were low (0.8%; 1 ischemic stroke and 1 vascular death). All events occurred in the VKA arm and all after CA. The number of any adjudicated events (26 vs. 25), any bleeding events (21 vs. 18), and any other procedure-attributable events (5 vs. 5) were similar. Conclusion In patients undergoing CA for AF, the use of uninterrupted oral rivaroxaban was feasible and event rates were similar to those for uninterrupted VKA therapy. Name of the Trial Registry Clinicaltrials.gov trial registration number is NCT01729871. PMID:25975659

  18. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort. One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation. There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001–27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred. The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  19. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-01

    As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort.One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation.There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0-3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001-27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred.The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  20. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment.

  1. Position of Totally Thoracoscopic Surgical Ablation in the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: An Alternative Method of Conduction Testing

    PubMed Central

    Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Haldar, Shouvik; Soliman, Rafik F.B.; Fatullayev, Javid; Jones, David; Hussain, Wajid; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom; Bahrami, Toufan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in surgical techniques and understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation has led to the development of a less invasive thoracoscopic surgical treatment including video-assisted bilateral pulmonary vein isolation using bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamps. More recently, the same operation became possible via a totally thoracoscopic approach. In this paper we describe technical aspects of the thoracoscopic approach to surgical treatment of AF and discuss its features, benefits and limitations. Furthermore, we present a new alternative technique of conduction testing using endoscopic multi-electrode recording catheters. An alternative electrophysiological mapping strategy involves a multi-electrode recording catheter designed primarily for percutaneous endocardial electrophysiologic mapping procedure. According to our initial experience, the recordings obtained from the multi-electrode catheters positioned around the pulmonary veins are more accurate than the recordings obtained from the multifunctional ablation and pacing pen. The totally thoracoscopic surgical ablation approach is a feasible and efficient treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation. The conduction testing can be easily and rapidly performed using a multifunctional pen or multi-electrode recording catheter. PMID:25904211

  2. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. RESULTS: Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm3 (range: 4-95 cm3) and 30 cm3 (range: 4-124 cm3), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone. PMID:25593467

  3. Intracardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: A Novel Imaging Method for Intraprocedural Evaluation of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eyerly, Stephanie A.; Bahnson, Tristram D.; Koontz, Jason I.; Bradway, David P.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been linked to conduction through discontinuous lesion lines. Intraprocedural visualization and corrective ablation of lesion line discontinuities could decrease post-procedure AF recurrence. Intracardiac acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new imaging technique that visualizes RFA lesions by mapping the relative elasticity contrast between compliant-unablated and stiff-RFA treated myocardium. Objective To determine if intraprocedure ARFI images can identify RFA treated myocardium in vivo. Methods In eight canines, an electroanatomical mapping (EAM) guided intracardiac echo catheter (ICE) was used to acquire 2D ARFI images along right atrial ablation lines before and after RFA. ARFI images were acquired during diastole with the myocardium positioned at the ARFI focus (1.5 cm) and parallel to the ICE transducer for maximal and uniform energy delivery to the tissue. Three reviewers categorized each ARFI image as depicting no lesion, non-contiguous, or contiguous lesion. For comparison, three separate reviewers confirmed RFA lesion presence and contiguity based on functional conduction block at the imaging plane location on EAM activation maps. Results Ten percent of ARFI images were discarded due to motion artifacts. Reviewers of the ARFI images detected RFA-treated sites with high sensitivity (95.7%) and specificity (91.5%). Reviewer identification of contiguous lesion had 75.3% specificity and 47.1% sensitivity. Conclusions Intracardiac ARFI imaging was successful in identifying endocardial RFA treatment when specific imaging conditions were maintained. Further advances in ARFI imaging technology would facilitate a wider range of imaging opportunities for clinical lesion evaluation. PMID:22772134

  4. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA.

  5. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA. PMID:27647995

  6. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  7. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  8. Electrophysiological Rotor Ablation in In-Silico Modeling of Atrial Fibrillation: Comparisons with Dominant Frequency, Shannon Entropy, and Phase Singularity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Minki; Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Li, Changyong; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although rotors have been considered among the drivers of atrial fibrillation (AF), the rotor definition is inconsistent. We evaluated the nature of rotors in 2D and 3D in- silico models of persistent AF (PeAF) by analyzing phase singularity (PS), dominant frequency (DF), Shannon entropy (ShEn), and complex fractionated atrial electrogram cycle length (CFAE-CL) and their ablation. Methods Mother rotor was spatiotemporally defined as stationary reentries with a meandering tip remaining within half the wavelength and lasting longer than 5 s. We generated 2D- and 3D-maps of the PS, DF, ShEn, and CFAE-CL during AF. The spatial correlations and ablation outcomes targeting each parameter were analyzed. Results 1. In the 2D PeAF model, we observed a mother rotor that matched relatively well with DF (>9 Hz, 71.0%, p<0.001), ShEn (upper 2.5%, 33.2%, p<0.001), and CFAE-CL (lower 2.5%, 23.7%, p<0.001). 2. The 3D-PeAF model also showed mother rotors that had spatial correlations with DF (>5.5 Hz, 39.7%, p<0.001), ShEn (upper 8.5%, 15.1%, p <0.001), and CFAE (lower 8.5%, 8.0%, p = 0.002). 3. In both the 2D and 3D models, virtual ablation targeting the upper 5% of the DF terminated AF within 20 s, but not the ablations based on long-lasting PS, high ShEn area, or lower CFAE-CL area. Conclusion Mother rotors were observed in both 2D and 3D human AF models. Rotor locations were well represented by DF, and their virtual ablation altered wave dynamics and terminated AF. PMID:26909492

  9. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  10. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  11. Development of procedures and instrumentation for use of the Nd:YAG laser in the ablation of metastases from colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.; Mellow, Mark H.; Kostolich, Marilyn; Henry, George A.; Barnes, Bradley R.; Durville, Frederic M.; Schafer, Steven A.; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Powell, Richard C.

    1992-06-01

    While many colon cancers are curable, curability relates closely to stage. Once disease is spread beyond the confines of the colon and adjacent lymph nodes, cure is clearly the exception rather than the rule. Recently, surgical resection of solitary liver metastases has been effective in treatment of colon cancer, producing long term survival in approximately 20% of treatable patients. Surgery, however, is technically complex and there is a high perioperative morbidity and substantial perioperative mortality. For patients with multiple hepatic metastases in whom surgical extirpation is not possible, the outlook is dismal. Other modalities including chemotherapy have also resulted in limited success. Recently, a number of investigators have evaluated the effect of low power interstitial Nd:YAG laser irradiation for inducing hyperthermia and coagulative necrosis is hepatic tissue. In treating multiple or large hepatic metastases, the use of a lower power (1 - 5 watts), long duration (50 - 2400 seconds), single fiber laser delivery system has limitations. A computer controlled continuous wave Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser system using a single fiber 'coupled' to a multiple array of fibers (4 to 6) has been developed for the delivery of low power laser irradiation to hepatic tissue. The advantage of laser energy being delivered simultaneously through multiple fibers is that it expands the area of tissue that can be treated over a given time. Through the use of interventional techniques including percutaneous ultrasound and/or CAT scan directed treatment, laser induced interstitial hyperthermia for large or multiple metastatic lesions could be initiated without the morbidity associated with open surgical procedures.

  12. Image-Guided Tumor Ablation: Emerging Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Justin P.; Lee, Edward W.; Yamamoto, Shota; Loh, Christopher T.; Kee, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    As the trend continues toward the decreased invasiveness of medical procedures, image-guided percutaneous ablation has begun to supplant surgery for the local control of small tumors in the liver, kidney, and lung. New ablation technologies, and refinements of existing technologies, will enable treatment of larger and more complex tumors in these and other organs. At the same time, improvements in intraprocedural imaging promise to improve treatment accuracy and reduce complications. In this review, the latest advancements in clinical and experimental ablation technologies will be summarized, and new applications of image-guided tumor ablation will be discussed. PMID:22550370

  13. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Raises the Plasma Level of NGF-β Which Is Associated with Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyung; Wi, Jin; Lee, Da Lyung; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The expression of nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) is related to cardiac nerve sprouting and sympathetic hyper innervation. We investigated the changes of plasma levels of NGF-β and the relationship to follow-up heart rate variability (HRV) after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods This study included 147 patients with AF (117 men, 55.8±11.5 years, 106 paroxysmal AF) who underwent RFCA. The plasma levels of NGF-β were quantified using double sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method before (NGF-βpre) and 1 hour after RFCA (NGF-βpost-1hr). HRV at pre-procedure (HRVpre), 3 months (HRVpost-3mo), and 1 year post-procedure (HRVpost-1yr) were analyzed and compared with plasma levels of NGF-β. Results 1) The plasma levels of NGF-β significantly increased after RFCA (20.05±11.09 pg/mL vs. 29.60±19.43 pg/mL, p<0.001). The patients who did not show increased NGF-βpost-1hr were older (p=0.023) and had greater left atrial volume index (p=0.028) than those with increased NGF-βpost-1hr. 2) In patients with NGF-βpre >18 pg/mL, low frequency components (LF)/high-frequency components (HF) (p=0.003) and the number of atrial premature contractions (APCs, p=0.045) in HRVpost-3mo were significantly higher than those with ≤18 pg/mL. 3) The LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo was linearly associated with the NGF-βpre (B=4.240, 95% CI 1.114-7.336, p=0.008) and the NGF-βpost-1hr (B=7.617, 95% CI 2.106-13.127, p=0.007). 4) Both NGF-βpre (OR=1.159, 95% CI 1.045-1.286, p=0.005) and NGF-βpost-1hr (OR=1.098, 95% CI 1.030-1.170, p=0.004) were independent predictors for the increase of LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo. Conclusion AF catheter ablation increases plasma level of NGF-β, and high plasma levels of NGF-βpre was associated with higher sympathetic nerve activity and higher frequency of APCs in HRVpost-3mo. PMID:26446633

  14. The AFS Impact Study: Final Report. AFS Research Report 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansel, Bettina

    The AFS Impact Study, initiated in 1977, is an attempt to document changes in learning and personal development associated with an intercultural "homestay" program. Completed in 1985, the study identifies several areas in which students show greater learning and educational growth than that shown by a group of students who had expressed interest…

  15. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  17. Glue septal ablation: A promising alternative to alcohol septal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined as myocardial hypertrophy in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the magnitude of present hypertrophy. In about 70% of patients with HCM, there is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (LVOTO) and this is known as obstructive type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Cases refractory to medical treatment have had two options either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA) to alleviate LVOT gradient. ASA may cause some life-threatening complications including conduction disturbances and complete heart block, hemodynamic compromise, ventricular arrhythmias, distant and massive myocardial necrosis. Glue septal ablation (GSA) is a promising technique for the treatment of HOCM. Glue seems to be superior to alcohol due to some intrinsic advantageous properties of glue such as immediate polymerization which prevents the leak into the left anterior descending coronary artery and it is particularly useful in patients with collaterals to the right coronary artery in whom alcohol ablation is contraindicated. In our experience, GSA is effective and also a safe technique without significant complications. GSA decreases LVOT gradient immediately after the procedure and this reduction persists during 12 months of follow-up. It improves New York Heart Association functional capacity and decrease interventricular septal wall thickness. Further studies are needed in order to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of this technique. PMID:27011786

  18. Outcomes after ablation for typical atrial flutter (from the Loire Valley Atrial Fibrillation Project).

    PubMed

    Clementy, Nicolas; Desprets, Laurent; Pierre, Bertrand; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Simeon, Edouard; Brunet-Bernard, Anne; Babuty, Dominique; Fauchier, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Similar predisposing factors are found in most types of atrial arrhythmias. The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) among patients with atrial flutter is high, suggesting similar outcomes in patients with those arrhythmias. We sought to investigate the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with AF and/or atrial flutter with contemporary management using radiofrequency ablation. In an academic institution, we retrospectively examined the clinical course of 8,962 consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of AF and/or atrial flutter. After a median follow-up of 934 ± 1,134 days, 1,155 deaths and 715 stroke and/thromboembolic (TE) events were recorded. Patients with atrial flutter undergoing cavotricuspid isthmus ablation (n = 875, 37% with a history of AF) had a better survival rate than other patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25 to 0.49, p <0.0001). Using Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score model, after adjustment for main other confounders, ablation for atrial flutter was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.84, p = 0.006) and stroke and/or TE events (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.02). After ablation, there was no significant difference in the risk of TE between patients with a history of AF and those with atrial flutter alone (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.67, p = 0.59). In conclusion, in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias, those with atrial flutter with contemporary management who undergo cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency ablation independently have a lower risk of stroke and/or TE events and death of any cause, whether a history of AF is present or not.

  19. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  20. Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation and inferior vena cava agenesis.

    PubMed

    Galand, Vincent; Pavin, Dominique; Behar, Nathalie; Mabo, Philippe; Martins, Raphaël P

    2016-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and very often diagnosed in asymptomatic patients during computed tomography performed for other purposes. These anomalies can have significant clinical implications, for example if electrophysiology procedures are needed. Diagnostic and ablation procedures are difficult since catheter manipulation and positioning are more complex. We present here a case of successful atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation in a patient with unexpected IVC agenesis, using an azygos route. PMID:27633734

  1. Hybrid epicardial and endocardial ablation of a persistent atrial tachycardia arising from the marshall bundle: the importance of a detailed analysis of the local potentials.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Kenji; Tada, Hiroshi; Kunugida, Fusanori; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Machino, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Hiro; Igarashi, Miyako; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation of an atrial tachycardia (AT) and atrial fibrillation (AF) was performed in a patient with a history of pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal AF. The AT exhibited a centrifugal pattern with the posterolateral LA as the earliest activation site. The AT was not terminated by ablation at the endocardial earliest site, but its cycle length was prolonged by ablation at an opposite site within the Vein of Marshall. Finally, the AT was terminated by an energy application at a site 7 mm posteroinferior to the initial earliest activation site. We analyzed the local potentials of each energy delivery site in detail.

  2. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  3. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  4. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  5. First steps towards initial registration for electrophysiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Yatziv, Liron; Koch, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. The treatment option of choice is radio-frequency catheter ablation, which is performed in electrophysiology labs using C-Arm X-ray systems for navigation and guidance. The goal is to electrically isolate the pulmonary vein-left atrial junction thereby rendering myocardial fibers responsible for induction and maintenance of AF inactive. The use of overlay images for fluoroscopic guidance may improve the quality of the ablation procedure, and can reduce procedure time. Overlay images, acquired using CT, MRI, or C-arm CT, can add soft-tissue information, otherwise not visible under X-ray. MRI can be used to image a wide variety of anatomical details without ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present a method to register a 3-D MRI volume to 2-D biplane X-ray images using the coronary sinus. Current approaches require registration of the overlay images to the fluoroscopic images to be performed after the trans-septal puncture, when contast agent can be administered. We present a new approach for registration to align overlay images before the trans-septal puncture. To this end, we manually extract the coronary sinus from pre-operative MRI and register it to a multi-electorde catheter placed in the coronary sinus.

  6. Rationale and design of a study exploring the efficacy of once-daily oral rivaroxaban (X-TRA) on the outcome of left atrial/left atrial appendage thrombus in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter and a retrospective observational registry providing baseline data (CLOT-AF).

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Marin, Francisco; Cappato, Riccardo; Meng, Isabelle Ling; Kirsch, Bodo; Morandi, Eolo; van Eickels, Martin; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-04-01

    There are still many unresolved issues concerning patient outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and left atrial/left atrial appendage (LA/LAA) thrombi. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), a potent and highly selective oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, is a new therapeutic option in this setting. The planned study program will consist of a prospective interventional study (X-TRA) and a retrospective observational registry (CLOT-AF). The primary objective of the X-TRA study is to explore the efficacy of rivaroxaban in the treatment of LA/LAA thrombi in patients with nonvalvular AF or atrial flutter, scheduled to undergo cardioversion or AF ablation, in whom an LA/LAA thrombus has been found on transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) before the procedure. The primary end point is the complete LA/LAA thrombus resolution rate at 6 weeks of end of treatment confirmed by TEE. The secondary objectives are to describe categories of thrombus outcome in patients (resolved, reduced, unchanged, larger, or new) confirmed on TEE at the end of treatment (after 6 weeks of treatment), incidence of the composite of stroke and noncentral nervous system systemic embolism at the end of treatment and during follow-up, and incidence of all bleeding at the end of treatment and during follow-up. The objective of the CLOT-AF registry is to provide retrospective thrombus-related patient outcome data after standard-of-care anticoagulant treatment in patients with nonvalvular AF or atrial flutter, who have TEE-documented LA/LAA thrombi. The data will be used as a reference for the prospective X-TRA study. In conclusion, X-TRA and CLOT-AF will provide some answers to the many unresolved issues concerning patient outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with AF and LAA thrombi. Results from this study program would provide the first prospective interventional study (X-TRA) and a large international retrospective observational registry (CLOT-AF) on the prevalence and

  7. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  8. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  9. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  10. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  11. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  12. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  13. Present concepts in management of atrial fibrillation: From drug therapy to ablation

    PubMed Central

    Forleo, Giovanni B; Santini, Luca; Romeo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) management requires knowledge of its pattern of presentation, underlying conditions, and decisions about restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm, control of the ventricular rate, and anti-thrombotic therapy. Maintenance of sinus rhythm is a desirable goal in AF patients because the prevention of recurrence may improve cardiac function, relieve symptoms and reduce the likelihood of adverse events. Anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is the first-line treatment for patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF based on current guidelines. However, currently used drugs have limited efficacy and cause cardiac and extracardiac toxicity. Thus, there is a continued need to develop new drugs, device and ablative approaches to rhythm management. Additionally, simpler and safer stroke prevention regimens are needed for AF patients on life-long anticoagulation, including occlusion of the left atrial appendage. The results of the Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy study are encouraging in these settings. Knowledge on the pathophysiology of AF is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led to the development of new treatment options for this arrhythmia. Conversely, the clinical decision whether to restore and maintain sinus rhythm or simply control the ventricular rate has remained a matter of intense debate. In the minority of patients in whom AF cannot be adequately managed by pharmacological therapy, the most appropriate type of non-pharmacological therapy must be selected on an individualized basis. Curative treatment of AF with catheter ablation is now a legitimate option for a large number of patients. The evolution of hybrid therapy, in which two or more different strategies are employed in the same patient, may be an effective approach to management of AF. In any case, planning a treatment regimen for AF should include evaluation of the risks inherent in the use of various drugs as well as more

  14. Effect of eplerenone on maintenance of sinus rhythm after catheter ablation in patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Yamasaki, Hiro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Murakoshi, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Miyako; Kuroki, Kenji; Machino, Takeshi; Xu, Dongzhu; Kunugita, Fusanori; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Sato, Akira; Tada, Hiroshi; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a relation between the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and atrial fibrillation (AF), but there are no reports on the effect of eplerenone, a selective aldosterone blocker, on the prevention of AF recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of eplerenone on clinical outcomes after RFCA in patients with long-standing persistent AF. A total of 161 consecutive patients with long-standing persistent AF (sustained AF duration 1 to 20 years, mean 3.4 ± 3.8) who underwent RFCA were investigated. Eplerenone was used in 55 patients and not used in the remaining 106 patients. Other conventional pharmacologic agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers, were used equally in the 2 groups. After 24 months of follow-up, 47% of the patients were free from AF recurrence. The rate of freedom from AF recurrence was significantly greater in the eplerenone group (60%) than in the noneplerenone group (40%) (p = 0.011). By univariate analysis, the duration of sustained AF (p <0.001), left atrial diameter (p = 0.010), left atrial volume index (p = 0.017), and early AF recurrence (p <0.001) were significantly associated with AF recurrence, and the use of eplerenone was associated with maintenance of sinus rhythm after RFCA (p = 0.022). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that longer duration of sustained AF (>3 years) (p <0.001) and early AF recurrence (p <0.001) were significantly associated with AF recurrence, and only eplerenone therapy significantly improved maintenance of sinus rhythm (p = 0.017). In conclusion, eplerenone significantly improved maintenance of sinus rhythm after RFCA in patients with long-standing persistent AF.

  15. Value of Implantable Loop Recorders in Monitoring Efficacy of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Pu, Lijin; Yang, Liuqing; Li, Fang; Luo, Zhiling; Guo, Tao; Hua, Baotong; Li, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the implantable loop recorder (ILR) in diagnosing atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing the postoperative efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Material/Methods A total of 32 patients who successfully underwent RFCA were selected. These patients discontinued antiarrhythmic medication with no AF recurrence for more than 3 months after RFCA, and underwent ILR placement by a conventional method. The clinical manifestations and information on arrhythmias recorded by the ILR were followed up to assess the efficacy of AF RFCA. Results The mean follow-up period was 24.7±12.5 months. Of 32 patients with ILR information, 27 had successful RFCA and 5 had recurrent AF. The follow-up results obtained by traditional methods showed 29 patients with successful RFCA and 3 with recurrent AF (P<0.05). Among the 18 patients with clinical symptoms, 13 had recorded cardiac arrhythmic events (72.2%) and 5 showed sinus rhythm (27.8%). The ILRs recorded 18 patients with arrhythmic events (56.3%), including 12 cases of atrial arrhythmias, among whom 5 recurred at 9, 12, 16, 17, and 32 months after AF RFCA; there were also 2 patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 4 with bradycardia. Conclusions The value of ILR in assessing the efficacy of AF RFCA was superior to that of traditional methods. ILR can promptly detect asymptomatic AF, and can monitor electrocardiogram features after RFCA, thus providing objective evidence of efficacy. PMID:27518153

  16. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  17. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Subpleural Lung Malignancy: Reduced Pain Using an Artificially Created Pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward W. Suh, Robert D.; Zeidler, Michelle R.; Tsai, Irene S.; Cameron, Robert B.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2009-07-15

    One of the main issues with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the subpleural lung malignancy is pain management during and after RF ablation. In this article, we present a case that utilized a technique to decrease the pain associated with RF ablation of a malignancy located within the subpleural lung. Under CT guidance, we created an artificial pneumothorax prior to the RF ablation, which resulted in minimizing the pain usually experienced during and after the procedure. It also decreased the amount of pain medications usually used in patients undergoing RF ablation of a subpleural lung lesion.

  19. eNOS3 Genetic Polymorphism Is Related to Post-Ablation Early Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jaemin; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji-Young; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated an association between eNOS polymorphisms and atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to determine whether eNOS polymorphisms are associated with AF recurrence after a radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Materials and Methods A total of 500 consecutive patients (56±11 years, 77% male) with paroxysmal (68%) or persistent (32%) AF who underwent RFCA and 500 age, gender-matched controls were genotyped for the eNOS3 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1799983). AF recurrence was monitored according to 2012 ACC/AHA/ESC guidelines. Results The frequencies of the rs1799983 variant alleles (T) in the case and control group were not significantly different (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.75-1.46, p=0.798). AF patients with rs1799983 variants were more likely to have coronary artery disease or stroke than those without genetic variant at this gene (31.0% vs. 17.3%, p=0.004). During mean 17 months follow-up, early recurrence of AF (ERAF; within 3 months) and clinical recurrence (CR) of AF were 31.8% and 24.8%, respectively. The rs1799983 variant was associated with higher risk of ERAF (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.06-2.79, p=0.028), but not with CR. ERAF occurred earlier (11±16 days) in variant group than those without variant allele (20±25 days, p=0.016). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that presence of the rs1799983 variant (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.86, p=0.026) and persistent AF were independent predictors for ERAF after AF ablation. Conclusion The rs1799983 variant of the eNOS3 gene was associated with ERAF, but not with CR, after RFCA. eNOS3 gene variants may have a potential role for stratification of post-ablation management. PMID:26256966

  20. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  1. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  2. Ablation characteristics of quantum square pulse mode dental erbium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Suhovršnik, Tomaž; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Erbium lasers are by now an accepted tool for performing ablative medical procedures, especially when minimal invasiveness is desired. Ideally, a minimally invasive laser cutting procedure should be fast and precise, and with minimal pain and thermal side effects. All these characteristics are significantly influenced by laser pulse duration, albeit not in the same manner. For example, high cutting efficacy and low heat deposition are characteristics of short pulses, while vibrations and ejected debris screening are less pronounced at longer pulse durations. We report on a study of ablation characteristics on dental enamel and cementum, of a chopped-pulse Er:YAG [quantum square pulse (QSP)] mode, which was designed to reduce debris screening during an ablation process. It is shown that in comparison to other studied standard Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser pulse duration modes, the QSP mode exhibits the highest ablation drilling efficacy with lowest heat deposition and reduced vibrations, demonstrating that debris screening has a considerable influence on the ablation process. By measuring single-pulse ablation depths, we also show that tissue desiccation during the consecutive delivery of laser pulses leads to a significant reduction of the intrinsic ablation efficacy that cannot be fully restored under clinical settings by rehydrating the tooth using an external water spray.

  3. Analysis of illicit drugs by direct ablation of solid samples.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Berdakin, Matias; Tejedor, Jesús M; Alonso, José L

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of illicit drugs arises as an important field of work given the high social impacts presented by drugs in the modern society. Direct laser ablation of solid compounds allows their analysis without sampling or preparation procedures. For that purpose, an experimental set-up that combines laser ablation with time-of- flight mass spectrometry has been constructed very recently to perform studies on the mass spectra of such drugs as 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, commonly known as MDMA or ecstasy. Analysis of the observed fragmentation pattern in mass spectra may elucidate the ablation-induced photofragmentation phenomena produced, which differ from those previously observed with conventional ionization methods.

  4. Coverage planning in computer-assisted ablation based on Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Guo, Weian; Sam Ge, Shuzhi; Lim, Wancheng

    2014-06-01

    An ablation planning system plays a pivotal role in tumor ablation procedures, as it provides a dry run to guide the surgeons in a complicated anatomical environment. Over-ablation, over-perforation or under-ablation may result in complications during the treatments. An optimal solution is desired to have complete tumor coverage with minimal invasiveness, including minimal number of ablations and minimal number of perforation trajectories. As the planning of tumor ablation is a multi-objective problem, it is challenging to obtain optimal covering solutions based on clinician׳s experiences. Meanwhile, it is effective for computer-assisted systems to decide a set of optimal plans. This paper proposes a novel approach of integrating a computational optimization algorithm into the ablation planning system. The proposed ablation planning system is designed based on the following objectives: to achieve complete tumor coverage and to minimize the number of ablations, number of needle trajectories and over-ablation to the healthy tissue. These objectives are taken into account using a Genetic Algorithm, which is capable of generating feasible solutions within a constrained search space. The candidate ablation plans can be encoded in generations of chromosomes, which subsequently evolve based on a fitness function. In this paper, an exponential weight-criterion fitness function has been designed by incorporating constraint parameters that were reflective of the different objectives. According to the test results, the proposed planner is able to generate the set of optimal solutions for tumor ablation problem, thereby fulfilling the aforementioned multiple objectives.

  5. [Microwave ablation of a sarcoma lung metastasis in a patient with a pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Guerra, J M; Gallego, O; Franquet, T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a pacemaker and a sarcoma lung metastasis treated with microwave ablation. Although the treatment of tumours with microwave ablation is a successful and minimally invasive approach, there are concerns about the safety of this procedure for patients with implanted cardiac devices, such as a pacemaker. After careful planning between radiology and cardiology, microwave ablation was indicated in the patient since it is safer and shorter than the radiofrequency technique. The lesion was treated without complications. It is important to communicate the procedures performed, as well as any complications in order to formulate guidelines for the use of microwave ablation in patients with pacemakers.

  6. Occipital lobe infarction following cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rukhsana G; Biller, Jose; Jay, Walter M

    2004-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with the chief complaint of seeing a blurred area just up and to the left of the center of his vision. The patient noted this visual field defect immediately after he awoke from a cardiac electrophysiologic study with a catheter ablation procedure. On neuro-ophthalmologic testing, a small scotoma was present superior and left of fixation in both eyes. MRI showed a small irregular area of abnormal signal in the right occipital lobe consistent with an ischemic lesion. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of a homonymous visual field defect secondary to an occipital lobe infarction following a cardiac catheter ablation procedure.

  7. Spatiotemporal electrophysiological changes in a murine ablation model

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Scott A.; Duggirala, Srikant; Floberg, Michael; Elfvendal, Pehr; Kuznekoff, Laura M.; Lader, Joshua M.; Vasquez, Carolina; Morley, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims High recurrence rates after complex radiofrequency ablation procedures, such as for atrial fibrillation, remain a major clinical problem. Local electrophysiological changes that occur following cardiac ablation therapy are incompletely described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alterations in conduction velocity, action potential duration (APD), and effective refractory period resolve dynamically following cardiac ablation. Methods and results  Lesions were delivered to the right ventricle of mice using a subxiphoid approach. The sham-operated control group (SHAM) received the same procedure without energy delivery. Hearts were isolated at 0, 1, 7, 30, and 60 days following the procedure and electrophysiological parameters were obtained using high-resolution optical mapping with a voltage-sensitive dye. Conduction velocity was significantly decreased at the lesion border in the 0, 7, and 30 day groups compared to SHAM. APD70 at the lesion border was significantly increased at all time points compared to SHAM. Effective refractory period was significantly increased at the lesion border at 0, 1, 7, and 30 days but not at 60 days post-ablation. This study demonstrated that post-ablation electrophysiological changes take place immediately following energy delivery and resolve within 60 days. Conclusions Cardiac ablation causes significant electrophysiological changes both within the lesion and beyond the border zone. Late recovery of electrical conduction in individual lesions is consistent with clinical data demonstrating that arrhythmia recurrence is associated with failure to maintain bi-directional conduction block. PMID:21712278

  8. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  9. Acute success and short-term follow-up of catheter ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter; a comparison of 8 mm tip radiofrequency and cryothermy catheters

    PubMed Central

    Janse, P.; Alings, M.; Scholten, M. F.; Mekel, J. M.; Miltenburg, M.; Jessurun, E.; Jordaens, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To compare the acute success and short-term follow-up of ablation of atrial flutter using 8 mm tip radiofrequency (RF) and cryocatheters. Methods Sixty-two patients with atrial flutter were randomized to RF or cryocatheter (cryo) ablation. Right atrial angiography was performed to assess the isthmus. End point was bidirectional isthmus block on multiple criteria. A pain score was used and the analgesics were recorded. Patients were followed for at least 3 months. Results The acute success rate for RF was 83% vs 69% for cryo (NS). Procedure times were similar (mean 144 ± 48 min for RF, vs 158 ± 49 min for cryo). More applications were given with RF than with cryo (26 ± 17 vs. 18 ± 10, p < 0.05). Fluoroscopy time was longer with RF (29 ± 15 vs. 19 ± 12 min, p < 0.02). Peak CK, CK-MB and CK-MB mass were higher, also after 24 h in the cryo group. Troponin T did not differ. Repeated transient block during application (usually with cryoablation) seemed to predict failure. Cryothermy required significantly less analgesia (p < 0.01), and no use of long sheaths (p < 0.005). The isthmus tended to be longer in the failed procedures (p = 0.117). This was similar for both groups, as was the distribution of anatomic variations. Recurrences and complaints in the successful patients were similar for both groups, with a very low recurrence of atrial flutter after initial success. Conclusions In this randomized study there was no statistical difference but a trend to less favorable outcome with 8 mm tip cryocatheters compared to RF catheters for atrial flutter ablation. Cryoablation was associated with less discomfort, fewer applications, shorter fluoroscopy times and similar procedure times. The recurrence rate was very low. Cryotherapy can be considered for atrial flutter ablation under certain circumstances especially when it has been used previously in the same patient, such as in an AF ablation. PMID:18363087

  10. Percutaneous Ablation of the Small Renal Mass—Techniques and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Andrew J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of T1a renal cell carcinomas are being diagnosed in recent years, in part due to incidental detection from the increased use of cross-sectional imaging. Although partial nephrectomy is still considered the primary treatment for these small renal masses, percutaneous ablation is now being performed as a standard therapeutic, nephron-sparing approach in patients who are poor surgical candidates. Clinical studies to date have demonstrated that percutaneous ablation is an effective therapy with acceptable outcomes and low risk in the appropriate clinical settings. This article will review various clinical aspects regarding the percutaneous ablation of small renal masses, including patient selection, preprocedural preparations, and the procedural considerations of commonly employed ablative technologies. Specific techniques such as radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound will be addressed in detail. In addition, the technical and oncologic outcomes of percutaneous ablation will be discussed and referenced to that of partial nephrectomy. PMID:24596438

  11. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  12. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  13. Eaton AF5000+Genesis Communication Driver

    1995-05-25

    Communication driver allows the Genesis Control Series software to interact with Eaton AF5000+ frequency drives via RS-232 communications. All Eaton AF5000+ parameters that support communications are supported by the Genesis driver. Multidrop addressing to multiple units is available with the Genesis communication driver.

  14. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  15. Health Information in Somali (af Soomaali): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Tornadoes Sirens and Telephone Alerts - English Firimbiyada iyo Digniinaha telefonka - af Soomaali (Somali) PDF Healthy Roads Media Tornadoes - English Dabayl xoog badan (Ufo) - af Soomaali (Somali) ...

  16. Impact of computed tomography image and contact force technology on catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Marai, Ibrahim; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Blich, Miry; Lessick, Jonathan; Abadi, Sobhi; Boulos, Monther

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of using computed tomography (CT) and contact force (CF) technology on recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmia after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: This non-randomized study included 2 groups of patients. All patients had symptomatic recurrent paroxysmal or persistent AF and were treated with at least 1 anti arrhythmic medication or intolerant to medication. The first group included 33 patients who underwent circumferential pulmonary veins isolation (PVI) for AF during 2012 and 2013 guided by CT image integration (Cartomerge, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) of left atrium and pulmonary veins into an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system (CT group) using standard irrigated radiofrequency catheter (ThermoCool, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) or irrigated catheter with integrated CF sensor (Smart Touch, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States). The second group included immediately preceding 32 patients who had circumferential PVI by standard irrigated catheter (ThermoCool) using only EAM (Carto) system (EAM group). Linear lesions were performed according to the discretion of operator. RESULTS: Sex, age, and persistent AF were not different between groups. PVI was achieved in all patients in both groups. Linear ablations including cavo-tricuspid isthmus and or roof line ablation were not different between groups. Free of atrial tachyarrhythmia during follow-up of 24 mo was significantly higher among CT group compared to EAM group (81% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.027). When 11 patients from CT group who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter were excluded, the difference between CT group and EAM became non significant (73% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.16). Sub analysis of CT group showed that patients who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter tend to be more free of atrial tachyarrhythmia compared to patients who had ablation using standard irrigated catheter during

  17. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  18. Comparison of Combination Therapies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Transarterial Chemoembolization with Radiofrequency Ablation versus Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Zivin, Sean P.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Doshi, Taral; Vasnani, Raj J.; Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2015-01-01

    management after the procedure (P = 1.00). Conclusions Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, both combination therapies, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation, are effective treatments for HCC. PMID:25534635

  19. Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Spontaneous Wrinkling of Teflon AF.

    PubMed

    Scarratt, Liam R J; Hoatson, Ben S; Wood, Elliot S; Hawkett, Brian S; Neto, Chiara

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication of both single-scale and hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces, created by exploiting the spontaneous wrinkling of a rigid Teflon AF film on two types of shrinkable plastic substrates. Sub-100 nm to micrometric wrinkles were reproducibly generated by this simple process, with remarkable control over the size and hierarchy. Hierarchical Teflon AF wrinkled surfaces showed extremely high water repellence (contact angle 172°) and very low contact angle hysteresis (2°), resulting in droplets rolling off the surface at tilt angles lower than 5°. The wrinkling process intimately binds the Teflon AF layer with its substrate, making these surfaces mechanically robust, as revealed by macroscale and nanoscale wear tests: hardness values were close to that of commercial optical lenses and aluminum films, resistance to scratch was comparable to commercial hydrophobic coatings, and damage by extensive sonication did not significantly affect water repellence. By this fabrication method the size of the wrinkles can be reproducibly tuned from the nanoscale to the microscale, across the whole surface in one step; the fabrication procedure is extremely rapid, requiring only 2 min of thermal annealing to produce the desired topography, and uses inexpensive materials. The very low roll-off angles achieved in the hierarchical surfaces offer a potentially up-scalable alternative as self-cleaning and drag-reducing coatings.

  20. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  1. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  2. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry-a review.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S

    2002-05-24

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas. PMID:18968642

  3. New endometrial ablation techniques for treatment of menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Linda D

    2004-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is an excellent alternative to hysterectomy in women with menorrhagia and small intramural fibroids. Preoperative evaluation, which includes office hysteroscopy or saline infusion sonography, is critical to patient management and choice of procedure. A vast array of endometrial ablation technology is available currently that includes balloon therapy, cryosurgery hot circulating saline, bipolar impedance technology, and microwave: (1) ThermaChoice UTB System (Gynecare, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA), (2) Uterine Balloon Therapy (UBT) System, HerOption Uterine Cryoblation Therapy System (American Medical Systems, Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA), (3) Hydro ThermAblator HTA System (BEI Medical/Boston Scientific, Natick, MA), (4) NovaSure System (Novacept, Palo Alto, CA, USA), and (5) Microsulis Microwave Endometrial Ablation (MEA) System (Microsulis Medical Ltd., Pompano Beach, FL, USA). Each method is described herein, and Summary of Safety and Effectiveness Data (SSED) data for each product are reviewed.

  4. Ingrowing toenails: studies of segmental chemical ablation.

    PubMed

    Gem, M A; Sykes, P A

    1990-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that segmental ablation is the treatment of choice for patients with ingrowing toenails and that the success rate is 96%. This procedure has been common practice among chiropodists for 20 years, usually using phenol in the United Kingdom, and sodium hydroxide in the United States. However, there has been little critical evaluation of the relative merits of the two chemicals, of the period of chemical application, or of the duration of post-operative pain and healing time. We therefore embarked upon a number of controlled prospective studies to examine these questions. A prospective study of 422 procedures for patients with ingrowing toenails (onychocryptosis) shows that good results are achieved by segmental chemical ablation performed by chiropodists in 91% of cases. The average period of post-operative pain is 3.6 days. Similar results are obtained using either 80% phenol or 10% sodium hydroxide. We believe that segmental chemical ablation by a chiropodist is the treatment of choice for the typical patient with an ingrowing toe nail. PMID:2102144

  5. Feasibility of Image-Based Simulation to Estimate Ablation Target in Human Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Blake, Robert C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Nazarian, Saman; Zviman, M. Muz; Tandri, Harikrishna; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Herzka, Daniel A.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that MRI with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) may identify slowly conducting tissues in scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). Objective We tested the feasibility of image-based simulation based on LGE to estimate ablation targets in VT. Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 13 patients who had pre-ablation MRI for scar-related VT ablation. We used image-based simulation to induce VT and estimate target regions according to the simulated VT circuit. The estimated target regions were co-registered with the LGE scar map and the ablation sites from the electroanatomical map in the standard ablation approach. Results In image-based simulation, VT was inducible in 12 patients (92.3%). All VTs showed macro-reentrant propagation patterns, and the narrowest width of estimated target region that an ablation line should span to prevent VT recurrence was 5.0 ± 3.4 mm. Out of 11 patients who underwent ablation, the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were consistent in 9 patients (82%), where ablation within the estimated target region was associated with acute success (n=8) and ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with failure (n=1). In one case (9%), the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were inconsistent, where ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with acute success. Conclusions The image-based simulation can be used to estimate potential ablation targets of scar-related VT. The image-based simulation may be a powerful noninvasive tool for pre-procedural planning of ablation procedures to potentially reduce the procedure time and complication rates. PMID:23608593

  6. Linear left atrial lesions in minimally invasive surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: techniques for assessing conduction block across surgical lesions.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Deborah; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Peyton, Marvin D; Edgerton, James R; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Sivaram, Chittur A; Po, Sunny S; Beckman, Karen J; Abedin, Moeen; Jackman, Warren M

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) ablation, with pulmonary vein (PV) isolation and ganglionated plexi (GP) ablation, has proven highly successful for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but has limited success in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent (P-LSP) AF. A set of linear left atrial (LA) lesions has been added to interrupt some macroreentrant components of P-LSP AF. This includes a Transverse Roof Line and Left Fibrous Trigone Line (from Roof Line to mitral annulus at the left fibrous trigone). With complete conduction block (CCB), these lesions should prevent single- or double-loop macroreentrant LA tachycardias from propagating around the PVs or mitral annulus. It is critical to identify whether CCB has been achieved and, if not, to locate the gap for further ablation, since residual gaps will support macroreentrant atrial tachycardias. Confirming CCB involves pacing close to one side of the ablation line and determining the direction of activation on the opposite side, by recording close bipolar electrograms at multiple paired sites (perpendicular and close to the ablation line) along the entire length of the line. Simpler approaches have been used, but all have limitations, especially when the conduction time across a gap is long. The extended lesion set was created after PV isolation and GP ablation in 14 patients with P-LSP AF. Mapping after the first set of radiofrequency applications for the Transverse Roof and Left Trigone Lines confirmed CCB in only 3/14 (21%) patients for each line, showing the importance of checking for CCB. During follow-up (median 8 months), 10/14 (71%) patients had no symptoms of atrial arrhythmia (7/10 off antiarrhythmic drugs). Of the remaining four patients, three have only infrequent episodes (self-terminating in 2/3). These preliminary results suggest that adding Roof and Trigone Lines may increase MIS success in patients with P-LSP AF. Accurate mapping techniques verify CCB and effectively locate gaps in

  7. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  8. Tissue ablation technologies for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Michael D; Gettman, Matthew T; Zincke, Horst; Blute, Michael L

    2004-12-01

    Traditional treatments for men with localized prostate cancer have included both surgical removal and radiation therapy, with their potential adverse effects on patient quality of life. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the development of minimally invasive procedures that use various technologies to deliver lethal doses of heat or cold to the prostate in an attempt to kill cancer cells. At the same time, it is vital that these newer techniques ablate prostate tissue and spare vital periprostatic organs essential for maintaining function and quality of life. In this article, we evaluate the current status of tissue ablation modalities in the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer, focusing on the different methods, early results, and possible future directions. Although still in the beginning stages, these newer forms of treatment offer exciting potential for first-line and second-line treatment of this common urologic malignancy.

  9. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  10. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  11. Ablation of Martian glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.; Davis, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    Glacier like landforms are observed in the fretted terrain of Mars in the latitude belts near + or - 42 deg. It was suggested that sublimation or accumulation-ablation rates could be estimated for these glaciers if their shapes were known. To this end, photoclinometric profiles were obtained of a number of these landforms. On the basis of analyses of these profiles, it was concluded that ice is chiefly ablating from these landforms that either are inactive rock-glaciers or have materials within them that are moving exceedingly slowly at this time. These conclusions are consistent with other geologic information. The analyses were performed using a two-dimensional model of an isothermal glacier.

  12. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  13. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the

  14. 78 FR 38617 - Procedures for Establishing That an American Indian Group Exists as an Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Part 83 RIN 1076-AF18 Procedures for Establishing That an American Indian....'' --Email: consultation@bia.gov . Include ``1076-AF18'' in the subject line of the message. --Mail or Hand... Interior, 1849 C Street NW., MS 4141, Washington, DC 20240. Include ``1076-AF18'' on the cover of...

  15. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  16. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  17. Ablation, Thermal Response, and Chemistry Program for Analysis of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2010-01-01

    In previous work, the authors documented the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) and Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response (FIAT) programs. In this work, key features from MAT and FIAT were combined to create the new Fully Implicit Ablation, Thermal response, and Chemistry (FIATC) program. FIATC is fully compatible with FIAT (version 2.5) but has expanded capabilities to compute the multispecies surface chemistry and ablation rate as part of the surface energy balance. This new methodology eliminates B' tables, provides blown species fractions as a function of time, and enables calculations that would otherwise be impractical (e.g. 4+ dimensional tables) such as pyrolysis and ablation with kinetic rates or unequal diffusion coefficients. Equations and solution procedures are presented, then representative calculations of equilibrium and finite-rate ablation in flight and ground-test environments are discussed.

  18. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  19. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  20. Prediction of Primary Slow-Pathway Ablation Success Rate according to the Characteristics of Junctional Rhythm Developed during the Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh, Ataallah; Rezaee, Mohammad Esmaeel; Farahani, Maryam Moshkani

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, developed junctional rhythm (JR) that occurs during slow-pathway radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) has been focused upon as a highly sensitive surrogate end point for successful radiofrequency ablation. This study was conducted to assess the relationship between the presence and pattern of developed JR during the RF ablation of AVNRT and a successful outcome. Methods Seventy-five patients aged between 14 and 88 who underwent slow-pathway RF ablation due to symptomatic AVNRT were enrolled into the study and received a total of 162 RF energy applications. Combined anatomic and electrogram mapping approach was used for slow-pathway RF ablation. The ablation procedure consisted of 60-second, 60 °C temperature-controlled energy delivery. After each ablation pulse, successful ablation was assessed according to the loss of AVNRT inducibility via isoproterenol infusion. Four different patterns were considered for the developed JR, namely sparse, intermittent, continuous, and transient block. Success ablation rate was assessed with respect to the position, pattern, and number of junctional beats. Results Successful RF ablation with a loss of AVNRT inducibility was achieved in 43 (57.3%) patients using 119 RF energy applications (73.5%). JR developed in 133 of the 162 (82.1%) applications with a given sensitivity of 90.8% and low specificity of 41.9% as an end point of successful RF ablation, with a negative predictive value of 62.1%. The mean number of the developed junctional beats was significantly higher in the successful ablations (p value < 0.001), and the ROC analysis revealed that the best cut-off point of the cumulative junctional beats for identifying accurate AVNRT ablation therapy is 14 beats with 90.76 % sensitivity and 90.70% specificity. There were no significant differences in terms of successful ablation rates according to the four different patterns of JR and its positions (p

  1. Ventricular dysfunction following direct-current shock atrioventricular junction ablation.

    PubMed

    Warren, R J; Vohra, J K; Chan, W; Lichtenstein, M; Mond, H G; Hunt, D

    1991-02-01

    Catheter-induced His bundle ablation for refractory supraventricular arrhythmias is most commonly performed with direct-current shock energy of 200-300 joules. The high energy pulse delivered by direct-current shock produces a lesion in the atrioventricular node by fulguration, with the residual energy being dissipated as a pressure wave. The effect of direct-current shock His bundle ablation on global and regional ventricular function was assessed in 14 consecutive patients by radionuclide ventriculography performed before and after ablation and again three months later. All studies were performed with ventricular pacing at 110 bpm. Global left ventricular ejection fraction was found to be significantly reduced at the three month study (0.43 +/- 0.03 vs 0.50 +/- 0.03, pre ablation, p = 0.02). A significant reduction in wall-motion score was also seen in six of the seven patients who had normal wall motion in pacing rhythm prior to ablation. Deterioration was mainly seen at the left and right ventricular apices. The observed reduction in ventricular function that follows direct-current shock His bundle ablation may result from myocardial damage from electro-coagulation or from barotrauma and supports continued investigation into alternative, less traumatic energy sources for the procedure. PMID:2036072

  2. Ventricular dysfunction following direct-current shock atrioventricular junction ablation.

    PubMed

    Warren, R J; Vohra, J K; Chan, W; Lichtenstein, M; Mond, H G; Hunt, D

    1991-02-01

    Catheter-induced His bundle ablation for refractory supraventricular arrhythmias is most commonly performed with direct-current shock energy of 200-300 joules. The high energy pulse delivered by direct-current shock produces a lesion in the atrioventricular node by fulguration, with the residual energy being dissipated as a pressure wave. The effect of direct-current shock His bundle ablation on global and regional ventricular function was assessed in 14 consecutive patients by radionuclide ventriculography performed before and after ablation and again three months later. All studies were performed with ventricular pacing at 110 bpm. Global left ventricular ejection fraction was found to be significantly reduced at the three month study (0.43 +/- 0.03 vs 0.50 +/- 0.03, pre ablation, p = 0.02). A significant reduction in wall-motion score was also seen in six of the seven patients who had normal wall motion in pacing rhythm prior to ablation. Deterioration was mainly seen at the left and right ventricular apices. The observed reduction in ventricular function that follows direct-current shock His bundle ablation may result from myocardial damage from electro-coagulation or from barotrauma and supports continued investigation into alternative, less traumatic energy sources for the procedure.

  3. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  4. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Martínez-García, M. Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures. PMID:22076258

  5. Ablation and Other Local Therapy for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how the procedure is being done. Possible side effects include bleeding and damage to the kidneys or other nearby organs. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) This technique uses high-energy radio waves to heat the tumor. A thin, needle-like probe is ...

  6. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  7. Impact of Impaired Renal Function on the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation following Radiofrequency Ablation of Cavotricuspid Isthmus-Dependent Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Kim, Min Su; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Jin Hee; Jo, Uk; Lee, Woo Seok; Kim, Yoo Ri; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs frequently after successful radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL). Renal impairment has been implicated in the development of AF. The purpose of this study is to clarify the impact of impaired renal function on the incidence of AF after RFA of CTI-AFL. Subjects and Methods Between January 2001 and December 2013, 240 non-dialysis patients with no prior history of AF {mean age 55.9±15.2 years old; male, 192 (80.0%)} who had undergone successful CTI-AFL ablation were included in the present study. The baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated, and patients were divided into those with impaired renal function (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) and those with preserved renal function (≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). The incidence of AF was retrospectively analyzed. Results 69 (28.8%) patients experienced new onset AF during a median follow-up duration of 26 months (inter-quartile, 7-53). The incidence of AF was significantly higher in patients with impaired renal function than in those with preserved renal function {13/25 (52.0%) versus 56/215 (26.0%), log rank p=0.019}. Age, CHADS2 score, impaired renal function, and left atrial diameter were significantly associated with the incidence of AF in univariate Cox regression analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that age was the only significant predictor of AF incidence (hazard ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.044, p=0.020). Conclusion Patients with impaired renal function may require careful attention for the incidence of new onset AF following successful RFA of CTI-AFL. PMID:26617649

  8. Role of endocardial septal ablation in the treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Tolga; Güler, Tümer Erdem; Yalın, Kıvanç; Gölcük, Şükriye Ebru; Özcan, Kazım Serhan

    2016-09-01

    Septal reduction therapy is accepted as a first therapeutic option for symptomatic drug-resistant hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Although, surgical septal myectomy is the gold standard method, alcohol septal ablation is a well-studied alternative approach in the patients with suitable anatomy. Endocardial septal ablation (ESA) therapy was relatively new defined modality and outcomes of the procedure were not clearly elucidated yet. We aimed to review the clinical aspects of ESA procedure and provide some historical background. PMID:27609434

  9. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  10. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  11. Topography-guided custom ablation treatment for treatment of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rohit; D'Souza, Sharon; Srivastava, Samaresh; Ashwini, R

    2013-08-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive ectatic disorder of the cornea which often presents with fluctuating refraction and high irregular astigmatism. Correcting the vision of these patients is often a challenge because glasses are unable to correct the irregular astigmatism and regular contact lenses may not fit them very well. Topography-guided custom ablation treatment (T-CAT) is a procedure of limited ablation of the cornea using excimer laser with the aim of regularizing the cornea, improving the quality of vision and possibly contact lens fit. The aim of the procedure is not to give a complete refractive correction. It has been tried with a lot of success by various groups of refractive surgeons around the world but a meticulous and methodical planning of the procedure is essential to ensure optimum results. In this paper, we attempt to elucidate the planning for a T-CAT procedure for various types of cones and asphericities. PMID:23925335

  12. Thermal ablation for the treatment of abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G

    2011-03-07

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue). Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to underlying coagulopathy and

  13. Thermal Ablation for the Treatment of Abdominal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates1,2. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma3-5. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue)6,7. Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating8-10. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices11-13. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver14-16. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications17. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to

  14. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  15. Current role of microwave ablation in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lucchina, Natalie; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Giorlando, Francesca; Macchi, Edoardo; Kehagias, Elias; Duka, Ejona; Fontana, Federico; Livraghi, Lorenzo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be as effective as surgical resection in terms of overall survival and recurrence-free survival rates in patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Effectiveness of RFA is adversely influenced by heat-sink effect. Other ablative therapies could be considered for larger tumors or for tumors located near the vessels. In this regard, recent improvements in microwave energy delivery systems seem to open interesting perspectives to percutaneous ablation, which could become the ablation technique of choice in the near future. Microwave ablation (MWA) has the advantages of possessing a higher thermal efficiency. It has high efficacy in coagulating blood vessels and is a relatively fast procedure. The time required for ablation is short and the shape of necrosis is elliptical with the older systems and spherical with the new one. There is no heat-sink effect and it can be used to ablate tumors adjacent to major vessels. These factors yield a large ablation volume, and result in good local control and fewer complications. This review highlights the most relevant updates on MWA in the treatment of small (<3 cm) HCC. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility of MWA as the first ablative choice, at least in selected cases.

  16. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  17. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  18. Epicardial Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Roderick; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial mapping and ablation via a percutaneous subxiphoid technique has been instrumental in improving the working understanding of complex myocardial scars in various arrhythmogenic substrates. Endocardial ablation alone may not be sufficient in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and Chagas disease to prevent recurrent ventricular tachycardia. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated greater freedom from recurrence with adjunctive epicardial ablation compared with endocardial ablation alone. While epicardial ablation is performed predominantly at tertiary referral centers, knowledge of the technical approach, clinical indications, and potential complications is imperative to maximizing clinical success and patient safety. In 1996, Sosa and colleagues modified the pericardiocentesis technique to enable percutaneous access to the pericardial space for mapping and catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia.1 Originally developed for patients with epicardial scarring due to chagasic cardiomyopathy and patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy refractory to endocardial ablationm,2,3 this approach has since become an essential part of the armamentarium for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Myocardial scars are three-dimensionally complex with varying degrees of transmurality, and the ability to map and ablate the epicardial surface has contributed to a greater understanding of scar-related VT in postinfarction cardiomyopathy and nonischemic substrates including idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and chagasic cardiomyopathy. In this review, we highlight the percutaneous approach and discuss clinical indications and potential complications. PMID:26306131

  19. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  20. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  1. Radio frequency ablation registration, segmentation, and fusion tool.

    PubMed

    McCreedy, Evan S; Cheng, Ruida; Hemler, Paul F; Viswanathan, Anand; Wood, Bradford J; McAuliffe, Matthew J

    2006-07-01

    The radio frequency ablation segmentation tool (RFAST) is a software application developed using the National Institutes of Health's medical image processing analysis and visualization (MIPAV) API for the specific purpose of assisting physicians in the planning of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures. The RFAST application sequentially leads the physician through the steps necessary to register, fuse, segment, visualize, and plan the RFA treatment. Three-dimensional volume visualization of the CT dataset with segmented three dimensional (3-D) surface models enables the physician to interactively position the ablation probe to simulate burns and to semimanually simulate sphere packing in an attempt to optimize probe placement. This paper describes software systems contained in RFAST to address the needs of clinicians in planning, evaluating, and simulating RFA treatments of malignant hepatic tissue. PMID:16871716

  2. Analysis of illicit drugs by direct ablation of solid samples.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Berdakin, Matias; Tejedor, Jesús M; Alonso, José L

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of illicit drugs arises as an important field of work given the high social impacts presented by drugs in the modern society. Direct laser ablation of solid compounds allows their analysis without sampling or preparation procedures. For that purpose, an experimental set-up that combines laser ablation with time-of- flight mass spectrometry has been constructed very recently to perform studies on the mass spectra of such drugs as 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, commonly known as MDMA or ecstasy. Analysis of the observed fragmentation pattern in mass spectra may elucidate the ablation-induced photofragmentation phenomena produced, which differ from those previously observed with conventional ionization methods. PMID:26764307

  3. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  4. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  5. Non-pulmonary vein foci induced before and after pulmonary vein isolation in patients undergoing ablation therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: incidence and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hui; Dai, Yin-yin; Jiang, Ru-hong; Liu, Qiang; Sun, Ya-xun; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhang, Zu-wen; Chen, Shi-quan; Zhu, Jun; Sheng, Xia; Jiang, Chen-yang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and clinical outcome of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plus isoproterenol (ISP)-induced non-pulmonary vein (PV) foci before and after circumferential PV isolation (CPVI) during index ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Methods: In 80 consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation for drug-refractory, symptomatic PAF at our hospital from April 2010 to January 2011, atrial fibrillation (AF) was provoked with ATP (20 mg) and ISP (20 μg/min) administration before and after CPVI. The spontaneous initiation of AF was mapped and recorded. Results: Before ablation, AF mostly originating from PVs (PV vs. non-PV, 36/70 vs. 3/70; P<0.01) was induced in 39 patients with sinus rhythm. CPVI significantly suppressed AF inducibility; however, more non-PV foci were provoked (post-CPVI vs. pre-CPVI, 13/76 vs. 3/70; P=0.016). Patients with pre- and post-CPVI induced AF (n=49) were divided according to non-PV foci being induced (group N, n=17) or not (group P, n=32). After mean (19.2±8.2) months follow-up, 88.2% (15/17) and 65.6% (21/32) of patients in groups N and P, respectively, were free from AF recurrence (P=0.088). Conclusions: ATP+ISP administration effectively provokes non-PV foci, especially after CPVI in PAF patients. Although in this study difference did not achieve statistical significance, supplementary ablation targeting non-PV foci might benefit clinical outcome. PMID:25294381

  6. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Improves the Quality of Life Measured with a Short Form-36 Questionnaire in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of performing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is to improve the quality of life (QoL) and alleviate AF-related symptoms. We aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of RFCA on the QoL in AF patients. Methods We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis using a random effects model. We searched for the studies that reported the physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) of the short form-36, a validated system to assess and quantify the QoL, before and after RFCA in AF patients. PCS and MCS are T-scores with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. Results Of the 470 studies identified through systematic search, we included 13 studies for pre-RFCA vs. the post-RFCA analysis and 5 studies for treatment success vs. AF recurrence analyses. In the pre-RFCA vs. post-RFCA analysis, RFCA was associated with a significant increase in both the PCS (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 6.33 [4.81–7.84]; p < 0.001) and MCS (WMD = 7.80 [6.15–9.44]; p < 0.001). The ΔPCS (post-RFCA PCS–pre-RFCA PCS) and ΔMCS values were used for the treatment success vs. AF recurrence analysis. Patients with successful ablation had a higher ΔPCS (WMD = 7.46 [4.44–10.49]; p < 0.001) and ΔMCS (WMD = 7.59 [4.94–10.24]; p < 0.001). Conclusions RFCA is associated with a significant increase in the PCS and MCS in AF patients. Patients without AF recurrence after RFCA had a better improvement in the PCS and MCS than patients who had AF recurrence. PMID:27681507

  7. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  8. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally.

  9. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources.

    PubMed

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery.

  10. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery. PMID:26934404

  11. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  12. Conformal needle-based ultrasound ablation using EM-tracked conebeam CT image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Banovac, Filip; Diederich, Chris J.; Cheng, Patrick; Wilson, Emmanuel; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of renal and hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to accurately place the ablator device into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several sequential thermal ablation procedures. This study demonstrated feasibility of spatially tracked image-guided conformal ultrasound (US) ablation for percutaneous directional ablation of diseased tissue. Tissue was prepared by suturing the liver within a pig belly and 1mm BBs placed to serve as needle targets. The image guided system used integrated electromagnetic tracking and cone-beam CT (CBCT) with conformable needlebased high-intensity US ablation in the interventional suite. Tomographic images from cone beam CT were transferred electronically to the image-guided tracking system (IGSTK). Paired-point registration was used to register the target specimen to CT images and enable navigation. Path planning is done by selecting the target BB on the GUI of the realtime tracking system and determining skin entry location until an optimal path is selected. Power was applied to create the desired ablation extent within 7-10 minutes at a thermal dose (>300eqm43). The system was successfully used to place the US ablator in planned target locations within ex-vivo kidney and liver through percutaneous access. Targeting accuracy was 3-4 mm. Sectioned specimens demonstrated uniform ablation within the planned target zone. Subsequent experiments were conducted for multiple ablator positions based upon treatment planning simulations. Ablation zones in

  13. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  14. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  15. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  16. Catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias: A 14-year experience with 5330 consecutive patients at the Quebec Heart Institute, Laval Hospital

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Gilles E; Philippon, François; Champagne, Jean; Blier, Louis; Molin, Franck; Côté, Jean-Marc; Nault, Isabelle; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Gilbert, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation is a curative treatment with excellent success and minimal complication rates for patients with supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias. METHODS: The acute outcomes and complications of all catheter ablation procedures for supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias performed at the Quebec Heart Institute (Sainte-Foy, Quebec) during a 14-year period from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 2006, were prospectively assessed. The ablation procedures were classified according to the arrhythmias induced using standard electrophysiological techniques and definitions. Immediate success and complication rates were prospectively included in the database. RESULTS: A total of 5330 patients had catheter ablation performed at the Institute during the period assessed. The mean (± SD) age of patients was 50±18 years (range four to 97 years), and 2340 patients (44%) were men. Most of the patients were younger than 75 years (group 1), and 487 (9%) were 75 years of age and older (group 2). Indications for ablations were as follows: atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) in 2263 patients, accessory pathways in 1147 patients, atrioventricular node ablation in 803 patients, typical atrial flutter in 377 patients and atrial tachycardia in 160 patients; 580 patients had other ablation procedures. The overall success rates were 81% for atrial tachycardia, 92% for accessory pathways or flutter, and 99% for AVNRT or atrioventricular node ablation. There was no difference in the success rates of the younger (group 1) and older (group 2) patients. Seventy-seven patients (1.4%) had complications, including 11 major events (myocardial infarction in one patient, pulmonary embolism in three patients and permanent pacemaker in seven patients). In patients undergoing AVNRT ablation, two had a permanent pacemaker implanted immediately after the procedure and three had a permanent pacemaker implanted at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm that

  17. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  18. Novel Radiofrequency Ablation Strategies for Terminating Atrial Fibrillation in the Left Atrium: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Jason D.; Roney, Caroline H.; Pashaei, Ali; Jaïs, Pierre; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) therapy, but few strategies exist for when it fails. To guide RFA, phase singularity (PS) mapping locates reentrant electrical waves (rotors) that perpetuate AF. The goal of this study was to test existing and develop new RFA strategies for terminating rotors identified with PS mapping. It is unsafe to test experimental RFA strategies in patients, so they were evaluated in silico using a bilayer computer model of the human atria with persistent AF (pAF) electrical (ionic) and structural (fibrosis) remodeling. pAF was initiated by rapidly pacing the right (RSPV) and left (LSPV) superior pulmonary veins during sinus rhythm, and rotor dynamics quantified by PS analysis. Three RFA strategies were studied: (i) PVI, roof, and mitral lines; (ii) circles, perforated circles, lines, and crosses 0.5–1.5 cm in diameter/length administered near rotor locations/pathways identified by PS mapping; and (iii) 4–8 lines streamlining the sequence of electrical activation during sinus rhythm. As in pAF patients, 2 ± 1 rotors with cycle length 185 ± 4 ms and short PS duration 452 ± 401 ms perpetuated simulated pAF. Spatially, PS density had weak to moderate positive correlations with fibrosis density (RSPV: r = 0.38, p = 0.35, LSPV: r = 0.77, p = 0.02). RFA PVI, mitral, and roof lines failed to terminate pAF, but RFA perforated circles and lines 1.5 cm in diameter/length terminated meandering rotors from RSPV pacing when placed at locations with high PS density. Similarly, RFA circles, perforated circles, and crosses 1.5 cm in diameter/length terminated stationary rotors from LSPV pacing. The most effective strategy for terminating pAF was to streamline the sequence of activation during sinus rhythm with >4 RFA lines. These results demonstrate that co-localizing 1.5 cm RFA lesions with locations of high PS density is a promising strategy for terminating pAF rotors

  19. Pulmonary vein isolation using new technologies to improve ablation lesion formation: Initial results comparing enhanced catheter tip irrigation (Surround Flow®) with contact force measurement (Smarttouch®)

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Stephanie; Reents, Tilko; Ammar, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Kathan, Susanne; Dillier, Roger; Buiatti, Alexandra; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vein reconnection after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a significant problem in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We report about patients who underwent contact force (CF) guided PVI using CF catheter and compared them to patients with PVI using an ablation catheter with enhanced tip irrigation. Methods A total of 59 patients were included in the analysis. In 30 patients circumferential PVI was performed using the Thermocool Smarttouch® ablation catheter (ST) whereas in 29 patients circumferential PVI using the Thermocool Surround Flow SF® ablation catheter (SF) was performed. Patients were compared in regard to procedure time, fluoroscopy time/dose as well as RF-application duration and completeness of PVI. Adverse events (pericardial effusion, PV stenosis, stroke, death) were evaluated. The presence of sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication was assessed during 6 months follow-up using multiple 7 day Holter-ECGs. Results In both groups, all PVs were isolated without serious adverse events. Procedure time was 2.15 ± 0.5 h (ST) vs. 2.37 ± 1.13 h (SF) (p = 0.19). Duration of RF-applications was 46.6 ± 18 min (ST) and 49.8 ± 19 min (SF) (p = 0.52). Fluoroscopy time was 25.2 ± 13 min (ST) vs. 29 ± 18 min (SF), fluoroscopy dose 2675.6 ± 1658 versus 3038.3 ± 1997 cGym2 (p = 0.36 and 0.46 respectively). Sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication validated with 7 day Holter ECGs was present in both groups in 72% of patients after 6 months of follow up. Conclusion PVI using the new contact force catheter is safe and effective in patients with paroxysmal AF. PMID:26937108

  20. Dynamics of tissue shrinkage during ablative temperature exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Christian; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rattay, Frank; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that examine dynamics of heat-induced shrinkage of organ tissues. Clinical procedures such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation or high-intensity focused ultrasound, use heat to treat diseases such as cancer and cardiac arrhythmia. When heat is applied to tissues, shrinkage occurs due to protein denaturation, dehydration, and contraction of collagen at temperatures greater 50ºC. This is particularly relevant for image-guided procedures such as tumor ablation, where pre- and post-treatment images are compared and any changes in dimensions must be considered to avoid misinterpretations of the treatment outcome. We present data from ex vivo, isothermal shrinkage tests in porcine liver tissue, where axial changes in tissue length were recorded during 15 minutes of heating to temperatures between 60 and 95ºC. A mathematical model was developed to accurately describe the time and temperature-dependent shrinkage behavior. Shrinkage dynamics had same characteristics independent of temperature; the estimated relative shrinkage, adjusted for time since death, after 15 min heating to temperatures of 60, 65, 75, 85 and 95ºC, was 12.3, 13.8, 16.6, 19.2, and 21.7%, respectively. Our results demonstrate shrinkage dynamics of organ tissues, and suggest the importance of considering tissue shrinkage for thermal ablative treatments. PMID:24345880

  1. Multiple-antenna microwave ablation: analysis of non-parallel antenna implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Souvick; Curto, Sergio; Albin, Nathan; Natarajan, Bala; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    Microwave ablation is a minimally invasive modality increasingly being used for thermal treatment of cancer in various organs. During ablation procedures, treatment planning is typically restricted to vendor specifications of expected ablation zone volumes based on experiments in unperfused ex vivo tissues, presuming parallel insertion of antennas. However, parallel antenna implants are not always clinically possible due to the restricted control of flexible antennas and presence of intervening organs. This paper aims to quantify the effect of non-parallel antenna implants on the ablation volume. 3D electromagnetic-bioheat transfer models were implemented to analyze ablation zone profiles created by dual antenna arrays. Parallel and non-parallel implants spaced 10-25 mm with antenna tips deviated to create converging or diverging configurations were analyzed. Volumetric Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) were calculated to compare ablation zone volumes for parallel and non-parallel configuration. Antenna tip displacements of 3 mm/antenna yielded an average DSC of 0.78. Tip displacements of 5 mm/antenna yielded a DSC of 0.78 and 0.64 for 15 mm and 20 mm antenna spacing, respectively. For ablation with dipole antennas as the frequency of operation decreases from 2.45 GHz to 915 MHz the similarity between the ablation zones for parallel and angled cases increased significantly. In conclusion, ablation volumes with non-parallel antenna implants may differ significantly from the parallel configuration. Patient-specific treatment planning tools may provide more accurate predictions of 3D-ablation volumes based on imaging data of actual implanted antenna configurations. Methods to compare ablation zone volumes incorporating uncertainty in antenna positions and experimental results to validate the numerical modelling are also presented.

  2. Healthcare Utilization and Clinical Outcomes after Catheter Ablation of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Dewland, Thomas A.; Glidden, David V.; Marcus, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial flutter ablation is associated with a high rate of acute procedural success and symptom improvement. The relationship between ablation and other clinical outcomes has been limited to small studies primarily conducted at academic centers. We sought to determine if catheter ablation of atrial flutter is associated with reductions in healthcare utilization, atrial fibrillation, or stroke in a large, real world population. California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project databases were used to identify patients undergoing atrial flutter ablation between 2005 and 2009. The adjusted association between atrial flutter ablation and healthcare utilization, atrial fibrillation, or stroke was investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Among 33,004 patients with a diagnosis of atrial flutter observed for a median of 2.1 years, 2,733 (8.2%) underwent catheter ablation. Atrial flutter ablation significantly lowered the adjusted risk of inpatient hospitalization (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.84–0.92, p<0.001), emergency department visits (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.54–0.65, p<0.001), and overall hospital-based healthcare utilization (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–0.98, p = 0.001). Atrial flutter ablation was also associated with a statistically significant 11% reduction in the adjusted hazard of atrial fibrillation (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81–0.97, p = 0.01). Risk of acute stroke was not significantly reduced after ablation (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.81–1.45, p = 0.57). In a large, real world population, atrial flutter ablation was associated with significant reductions in hospital-based healthcare utilization and a reduced risk of atrial fibrillation. These findings support the early use of catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial flutter. PMID:24983868

  3. Cryoballoon or radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: reintervention, rehospitalization, and quality-of-life outcomes in the FIRE AND ICE trial

    PubMed Central

    Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Chun, K.R. Julian; Metzner, Andreas; Ouyang, Feifan; Schlüter, Michael; Elvan, Arif; Lim, Hae W.; Kueffer, Fred J.; Arentz, Thomas; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Tondo, Claudio; Kühne, Michael; Sticherling, Christian; Brugada, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Aims The primary safety and efficacy endpoints of the randomized FIRE AND ICE trial have recently demonstrated non-inferiority of cryoballoon vs. radiofrequency current (RFC) catheter ablation in patients with drug-refractory symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of the current study was to assess outcome parameters that are important for the daily clinical management of patients using key secondary analyses. Specifically, reinterventions, rehospitalizations, and quality-of-life were examined in this randomized trial of cryoballoon vs. RFC catheter ablation. Methods and results Patients (374 subjects in the cryoballoon group and 376 subjects in the RFC group) were evaluated in the modified intention-to-treat cohort. After the index ablation, log-rank testing over 1000 days of follow-up demonstrated that there were statistically significant differences in favour of cryoballoon ablation with respect to repeat ablations (11.8% cryoballoon vs. 17.6% RFC; P = 0.03), direct-current cardioversions (3.2% cryoballoon vs. 6.4% RFC; P = 0.04), all-cause rehospitalizations (32.6% cryoballoon vs. 41.5% RFC; P = 0.01), and cardiovascular rehospitalizations (23.8% cryoballoon vs. 35.9% RFC; P < 0.01). There were no statistical differences between groups in the quality-of-life surveys (both mental and physical) as measured by the Short Form-12 health survey and the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire. There was an improvement in both mental and physical quality-of-life in all patients that began at 6 months after the index ablation and was maintained throughout the 30 months of follow-up. Conclusion Patients treated with cryoballoon as opposed to RFC ablation had significantly fewer repeat ablations, direct-current cardioversions, all-cause rehospitalizations, and cardiovascular rehospitalizations during follow-up. Both patient groups improved in quality-of-life scores after AF ablation. Clinical trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01490814

  4. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  5. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  6. Direct Pressure Monitoring Accurately Predicts Pulmonary Vein Occlusion During Cryoballoon Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Wooden, Shannnon; Jones, Brian; Deering, Thomas; Wickliffe, Andrew; Dan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein (PV) occlusion is essential for achieving antral contact and PV isolation and is typically assessed by contrast injection. We present a novel method of direct pressure monitoring for assessment of PV occlusion. Transcatheter pressure is monitored during balloon advancement to the PV antrum. Pressure is recorded via a single pressure transducer connected to the inner lumen of the cryoballoon. Pressure curve characteristics are used to assess occlusion in conjunction with fluoroscopic or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) guidance. PV occlusion is confirmed when loss of typical left atrial (LA) pressure waveform is observed with recordings of PA pressure characteristics (no A wave and rapid V wave upstroke). Complete pulmonary vein occlusion as assessed with this technique has been confirmed with concurrent contrast utilization during the initial testing of the technique and has been shown to be highly accurate and readily reproducible. We evaluated the efficacy of this novel technique in 35 patients. A total of 128 veins were assessed for occlusion with the cryoballoon utilizing the pressure monitoring technique; occlusive pressure was demonstrated in 113 veins with resultant successful pulmonary vein isolation in 111 veins (98.2%). Occlusion was confirmed with subsequent contrast injection during the initial ten procedures, after which contrast utilization was rapidly reduced or eliminated given the highly accurate identification of occlusive pressure waveform with limited initial training. Verification of PV occlusive pressure during CBA is a novel approach to assessing effective PV occlusion and it accurately predicts electrical isolation. Utilization of this method results in significant decrease in fluoroscopy time and volume of contrast. PMID:23485956

  7. Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of atrial tissue using a suction catheter.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, T; Prunier, L; Cuize, L; Bruneval, P; Von Euw, D; Le Heuzey, J Y; Peronneau, P

    1989-01-01

    Closed chest ablative technique that avoid barotrauma would be attractive for ablation at thin walled cardiac structures, such as the atrial free wall or coronary sinus. Transcatheter radiofrequency (RF) currents produce tissue necrosis the size of which is dependent on the contact between the tissue and the electrode. In order to assess the effects of transvenous RF ablation of atrial free wall using a suction electrode catheter, we delivered in ten dogs, one single unmodulated RF pulse 1.2 MHz, in a unipolar mode, through the distal electrode of a lumen catheter (USCI 8F) (USCI, Billerica, MA USA) located in the right appendage. During the pulse an 80 KPa vacuum depression was applied to the lumen of the catheter. Each pulse had a 10 seconds duration and the mean delivered power was 4.3 +/- 1.4 W. Aortic pressure and electrocardiogram were monitored during the procedure. A right atrial electrophysiological study was performed at the ablated site, at control, after suction application and after RF pulse delivery. The animals were sacrificed after 14 or 21 days. Atrial pacing threshold values decreased after suction application in comparison to control values after the pulse (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs 0.60 +/- 0.23 mA, P less than O.05) but increased after the pulse delivery (2.60 +/- 1.85 mA, P less than 0.01). In contrast, the atrial effective refractory period did not significantly change after suction, nor after RF pulse delivery. Aortic pressure remained unchanged throughout the procedure. Complex arrhythmias were not observed during or after RF pulse delivery. One dog died suddenly at the first day after ablation, but this death was most probably unrelated to RF ablation. Anatomic lesions had a length of 8.8 +/- 3.3 mm, a width of 4.6 +/- 2.5 mm and a depth of 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm. They were transmural in nine of the ten dogs but without atrial wall perforation in any case. Lesions suggesting tissue volatilization were present in four dogs. These results demonstrate that

  8. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  9. Experimental Evaluation of the Heat Sink Effect in Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Kristina I.; Lutat, Carolin; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Wacker, Frank; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate and quantify the heat sink effect in hepatic microwave ablation (MWA) in a standardized ex vivo model, and to analyze the influence of vessel distance and blood flow on lesion volume and shape. Materials and Methods 108 ex vivo MWA procedures were performed in freshly harvested pig livers. Antennas were inserted parallel to non-perfused and perfused (700,1400 ml/min) glass tubes (diameter 5mm) at different distances (10, 15, 20mm). Ablation zones (radius, area) were analyzed and compared (Kruskal-Wallis Test, Dunn’s multiple comparison Test). Temperature changes adjacent to the tubes were measured throughout the ablation cycle. Results Maximum temperature decreased significantly with increasing flow and distance (p<0.05). Compared to non-perfused tubes, ablation zones were significantly deformed by perfused tubes within 15mm distance to the antenna (p<0.05). At a flow rate of 700ml/min ablation zone radius was reduced to 37.2% and 80.1% at 10 and 15mm tube distance, respectively; ablation zone area was reduced to 50.5% and 89.7%, respectively. Conclusion Significant changes of ablation zones were demonstrated in a pig liver model. Considerable heat sink effect was observed within a diameter of 15mm around simulated vessels, dependent on flow rate. This has to be taken into account when ablating liver lesions close to vessels. PMID:26222431

  10. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmias Exclusively Using Electroanatomic Mapping: A Series of Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Leonardo Martins; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Ronsoni, Rafael; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz

    2013-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is a treatment that can cure various cardiac arrhythmias. Fluoroscopy is used to locate and direct catheters to areas that cause arrhythmias. However, fluoroscopy has several risks. Electroanatomic mapping (EAM) facilitates three-dimensional imaging without X-rays, which reduces risks associated with fluoroscopy. Objective We describe a series of patient cases wherein cardiac arrhythmia ablation was exclusively performed using EAM. Methods Patients who presented with cardiac arrhythmias that were unresponsive to pharmacological therapy were prospectively selected between March 2011 and March 2012 for arrhythmia ablation exclusively through EAM. Patients with indications for a diagnostic electrophysiology study and ablation of atrial fibrillation, left atrial tachyarrhythmias as well as hemodynamically unstable ventricular arrhythmia were excluded. We documented the procedure time, success rate and complications as well as whether fluoroscopy was necessary during the procedure. Results In total, 11 patients were enrolled in the study, including seven female patients (63%). The mean age of the patients was 50 years (SD ±16.5). Indications for the investigated procedures included four cases (35%) of atrial flutter, three cases (27%) of pre-excitation syndrome, two cases (19%) of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and two cases (19%) of ventricular extrasystoles. The mean procedure duration was 86.6 min (SD ± 26 min). Immediate success (at discharge) of the procedure was evident for nine patients (81%). There were no complications during the procedures. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing an arrhythmia ablation exclusively using EAM with satisfactory results. PMID:23877742

  11. [Catheter ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation in patients with structural heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kautzner, Josef; Peichl, Petr

    2014-12-01

    First experiences with ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation were reported in isolated cases of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Later, there were described the options in management of an electrical instability triggered by ectopic activity in patients after myocardial infarction. In both cases it was shown that the sources of extrasystoles originate almost exclusively from conducting system of chambers. Subsequently, isolated cases were also reported in other structural diseases. It is important that the urgent catheter ablation is able to remove focus which triggers electric instability. In many cases it is a lifesaving procedure. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the catheter ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation with structural heart disease.

  12. Laser fiber migration into the pelvic cavity: A rare complication of endovenous laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Lun, Yu; Shen, Shikai; Wu, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Han; Xin, Shijie; Zhang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Endovenous laser ablation is an established alternative to surgery with stripping for the treatment of varicose veins. Ecchymoses and pain are frequently reported side effects of endovenous laser ablation. Device-related complications are rare but serious. We describe here an exceptional complication, necessitating an additional surgical procedure to remove a segment of laser fiber that had migrated into the pelvic cavity. Fortunately, severe damage had not occurred. This case highlights the importance of checking the completeness of the guidewire, catheter, and laser fiber after endovenous laser ablation.

  13. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors: Difficulty Withdrawing the Hooks Resulting in a Split Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, Karin King, Julie; Glenn, Derek; Morris, David L.

    2003-11-15

    We describe a most unusual problem of a split needle following a lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedure. We encountered the problem when retracting the electrode hooks into the shaft at completion of the ablation. We describe the process we adopted to overcome this problem. Charring of the ablated tissue can cause the tissue to become caught in the space between the hooks and the shaft or stick to the hooks. This can prevent withdrawal of the hooks into the shaft and is therefore an important complication of which practitioners need to be aware.

  14. Practice guidelines for ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation for hepatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ping; Yu, Jie; Lu, Ming-De; Dong, Bao-Wei; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Hu, Bing; Xie, Ming-Xing; Cheng, Wen; He, Wen; Jia, Jian-Wen; Lu, Guo-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Primary liver cancer and liver metastases are among the most frequent malignancies worldwide, with an increasing number of new cases and deaths every year. Traditional surgery is only suitable for a limited proportion of patients and imaging-guided percutaneous thermal ablation has achieved optimistic results for management of hepatic malignancy. This synopsis outlines the first clinical practice guidelines for ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation therapy for hepatic malignancy, which was created by a joint task force of the Society of Chinese Interventional Ultrasound. The guidelines aim at standardizing the microwave ablation procedure and therapeutic efficacy assessment, as well as proposing the criteria for the treatment candidates. PMID:24023485

  15. Radiofrequency ablation without the use of fluoroscopy – in what kind of patients is it feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Gawrysiak, Marcin; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Lodziński, Piotr; Kiliszek, Marek; Małkowska, Sylwia; Zaczek, Rajmund; Piątkowski, Radosław; Opolski, Grzegorz; Kozłowski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to describe the experience in performing ablation without fluoroscopy. Material and methods From 575 ablation procedures with CARTO performed in the period 2003–2008, 108 (42 M; age 40 ±16 years) were done without fluoroscopy. One patient had ablation using the Localisa system. There was one man with thrombocytopenia and two pregnant women. Results Right ventricular (RV) outflow tract arrhythmias and other RV arrhythmias were noted in 38 patients (35%) and 17 patients (15%), respectively. There were 5 (4.6%) left ventricular (LV) outflow tract arrhythmias and 19 (17.5%) other LV tachycardias; right accessory pathways in 17 patients (20%), in the middle cardiac vein in 1, Mahaim fibres in 1, and 3 cases of permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardias. One patient with CRT had AV node ablation (Localisa). In 3 patients there were also other arrhythmias treated: slow AV nodal pathway, typical flutter isthmus and right atrial tachycardia. In 2004, 1/96 CARTO procedures was done without fluoroscopy, in 2006 2/97, in 2007 19 (2 in LV) of 93, in 2008 87 (22 in LV) of 204. The percentage of ablations without fluoroscopy in every hundred CARTO procedures was: 1%, 1%, 8%, 23%, 46%, 28% (mean 18%). There were no procedure-related complications. Conclusions It is feasible to perform ablations within both right and left sides of the heart without fluoroscopy. The number and type of non-fluoroscopic procedures depends on the operator's experience. Pregnant patients, with malignant history or with hematologic diseases should be ablated without fluoroscopy in centres that specialise in these kinds of procedures. PMID:24273563

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  17. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  18. Real-time calibration of temperature estimates during radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Daniels, M J

    2004-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an interstitial focal ablative therapy that can be used in a percutaneous fashion and permits in situ destruction of hepatic tumors. Recurrence rates after rf therapy are as high as 34-55%, due to difficulties in accurately identifying the zone of necrosis (thermal lesion) because of the low intrinsic acoustic contrast between normal and ablated liver tissue. Our goal is to provide real-time ultrasonic tracking of temperature changes over the large range of temperatures traditionally used (40-100 degrees C) in rfablation procedures using an external ultrasound transducer. Temperature estimates are obtained using a cross-correlation algorithm applied to rf ultrasound echo signal data acquired at discrete intervals during heating. Apparent tissue displacement estimates obtained at these discrete time-intervals are accumulated to obtain a cumulative displacement map, whose gradient provides after appropriate scaling provides a temperature map at the specified elapsed ablation duration. Temperature maps are used to display the initial temperature rise and to continuously update a thermal map of the treated region. In this paper, we develop calibration curves that relate the echo shift due to the change in the speed of sound and thermal expansion to the corresponding temperature increase on in-vitro tissue specimens. These calibration curves can then be utilized for the real time calibration and analysis of temperature estimates obtained from the rf echo signals during ablation. Temperature maps obtained using the calibration curve compare favorably to temperature estimates observed using the invasive thermosensor readings on the ablation electrode and previous results that utilized a linear calibration factor.

  19. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  20. Laparoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, Andrea; Asch, Murray R. Hawrylyshyn, Peter A.; Allen, Lisa M.; Colgan, Terence J.; Kachura, John R.; Hayeems, Eran B.

    2006-08-15

    Four patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring less than 6 cm underwent laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using multiprobe-array electrodes. Follow-up of the treated fibroids was performed with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and patients' symptoms were assessed by telephone interviews. The procedure was initially technically successful in 3 of the 4 patients and MRI studies at 1 month demonstrated complete fibroid ablation. Symptom improvement, including a decrease in menstrual bleeding and pain, was achieved in 2 patients at 3 months. At 7 months, 1 of these 2 patients experienced symptom worsening which correlated with recurrent fibroid on MRI. The third, initially technically successfully treated patient did not experience any symptom relief after the procedure and was ultimately diagnosed with adenomyosis. Our preliminary results suggest that RFA is a technically feasible treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in appropriately selected patients.

  1. Percutaneous thermal ablation: how to protect the surrounding organs.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Buy, Xavier; Garnon, Julien; Enescu, Julian; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-09-01

    A variety of thermal ablation techniques have been advocated for percutaneous tumor management. Although the above techniques are considered safe, they can be complicated with unintended thermal injury to the surrounding structures, with disastrous results. In the present article we report a number of different insulation techniques (hydrodissection, gas dissection and balloon interposition, warming/cooling systems) that can be applied. Emphasis is given to the procedure-related details, and we present the advantages and drawbacks of the insulation techniques. We also provide tips on avoiding painful skin burns when treating superficial lesions. Finally, we point out the interest of temperature monitoring and how it can be achieved (use of thermocouples, fiberoptic thermosensors, or direct magnetic resonance imaging temperature mapping). The above thermal insulation and temperature monitoring techniques can be applied alone or in combination. Familiarity with these techniques is essential to avoid major complications and to increase the indications of thermal ablation procedures.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  4. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  5. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  6. MLL-AF6 fusion oncogene sequesters AF6 into the nucleus to trigger RAS activation in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manara, Elena; Baron, Emma; Tregnago, Claudia; Aveic, Sanja; Bisio, Valeria; Bresolin, Silvia; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina

    2014-07-10

    A rare location, t(6;11)(q27;q23) (MLL-AF6), is associated with poor outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The described mechanism by which MLL-AF6, through constitutive self-association and in cooperation with DOT-1L, activates aberrant gene expression does not explain the biological differences existing between t(6;11)-rearranged and other MLL-positive patients nor their different clinical outcome. Here, we show that AF6 is expressed in the cytoplasm of healthy bone marrow cells and controls rat sarcoma viral oncogene (RAS)-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels. By contrast, in MLL-AF6-rearranged cells, AF6 is found localized in the nucleus, leading to aberrant activation of RAS and of its downstream targets. Silencing MLL-AF6, we restored AF6 localization in the cytoplasm, thus mediating significant reduction of RAS-GTP levels and of cell clonogenic potential. The rescue of RAS-GTP levels after MLL-AF6 and AF6 co-silencing confirmed that MLL-AF6 oncoprotein potentiates the activity of the RAS pathway through retention of AF6 within the nucleus. Exposure of MLL-AF6-rearranged AML blasts to tipifarnib, a RAS inhibitor, leads to cell autophagy and apoptosis, thus supporting RAS targeting as a novel potential therapeutic strategy in patients carrying t(6;11). Altogether, these data point to a novel role of the MLL-AF6 chimera and show that its gene partner, AF6, is crucial in AML development.

  7. AfsR recruits RNA polymerase to the afsS promoter: a model for transcriptional activation by SARPs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Takano, Yuji; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2007-06-01

    AfsR, a protein belonging to the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family, is a global regulator of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). AfsR consists of three major functional domains: an N-terminal SARP domain, a central ATPase domain, and a C-terminal tetratrico peptide repeat (TPR) domain. Two truncated AfsR proteins, AfsRDeltaTPR containing the SARP and ATPase domains and AfsRDeltaC containing only the SARP domain, exhibited the same DNA-binding specificity as that of full-length AfsR. Two monomers bound cooperatively to a direct repeat located eight nucleotides 5' to the -10 element of the afsS promoter. Both truncated AfsR proteins, as well as full-length AfsR, were able to form ternary complexes with the afsS promoter and RNA polymerase (RNAP), although RNAP alone could not bind to the DNA. The DNA-(AfsRDeltaC)(2)-RNAP complex was capable of initiating afsS transcription in vitro, indicating that the ATPase and TPR domains are dispensable for the basic function of AfsR as a transcriptional activator. However, the ATPase domain was required to fully compensate for the defect in actinorhodin production in an afsR-disrupted mutant, suggesting that the ATPase domain exerts a regulatory function on the basic SARP domain. Deletion or addition of even a single nucleotide between the AfsR-binding site and the -10 element of the afsS promoter abolished afsS transcription both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the recruitment of RNAP by AfsR to the correct location relative to the -10 element is critical for transcriptional activation. Since SARP-binding sites with similar direct repeats are located at the same position relative to the -10 element of their target promoters as is the afsS binding site, the SARP family members presumably activate transcription of their targets by recruiting RNAP to the promoter, where a ternary DNA-SARP-RNAP complex competent for transcriptional initiation is formed.

  8. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsushima, Shigenori; Tanaka, Osamu; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We describe a 71-year-old woman with a hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RF) with a single internally cooled electrode under computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Nine months after the procedure, CT images showed herniation of the large intestine into the right pleural cavity. To our knowledge this complication of RF performed with a single internally cooled electrode under CT guidance has not been previously reported.

  9. 75 FR 39152 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Harry J. Hodges, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420), Flight Technologies and... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3)does not warrant preparation of a... 1 Marianna, AR, Marianna/Lee County-Steve Edwards Field, RNAV (GPS) RWY 18, Orig Marianna,...

  10. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  11. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  12. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV.

  13. [Predictors of Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation of Pulmonary Veins Performed During Coronary Bypass Surgery in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease and Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Iskenderov, B G; Rakhmatullov, A F

    2015-01-01

    We performed simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ostia of pulmonary veins in 254 patients (147 men and 107 women) with ischemic heart disease and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). In-hospital mortality in patients with early recurrence of AF was 8.4%, in patients without recurrence of AF 1.9% (χ2 = 4.65; p = 0.03). The patients were followed-up during 12 months after operation. During follow-up 166 patients (69.5%) had no recurrence of AF without receiving antiarrhythmic drugs (AAP), 33 patients (13.8%) had recurrences of AF, and 40 patients (16.7%) receiving AAD had repeated rare paroxysms of AF. Main predictors of late AF recurrence were age > 65 years, AF duration > 5 years, preoperative atrial effective refractory period < 240 ms, frequency threshold of AF induction < 400 counts/min, anteroposterior left atrial size > 50 mm, glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Reverse dynamics of structural, functional and electrophysiological parameters of the heart due to CABG and RFA, use of β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and aldosterone antagonists were associated with the preservation of a stable sinus rhythm. The cardiovascular mortality during 12 months follow-up accounted for 2.1% and 1.2% in groups of patients with and without late recurrences of AF respectively (p > 0.05) to coronary artery bypass grafting surgery and RFA, taking drugs--β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and aldosterone antagonists--were associated with the preservation of a stable sinus rhythm.

  14. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV. PMID:26498938

  15. The developing pulmonary veins and left atrium: implications for ablation strategy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Hisham M F

    2013-11-01

    The majority of cases of atrial fibrillation (AF) are the result of triggers originating in the area of the pulmonary veins. The reason for the predilection for that area remains unclear. We sought to examine the different mechanisms responsible for this observation through an extensive search of the medical literature, examining the development of the pulmonary veins, genetics of AF and left to -right cardiac chamber differentiation. Results confirm that the LAA is anatomically and embryologically different from other areas of the atrial walls and develops under distinct genetic and transcriptional pathways. Findings support an ablation strategy whose primary focus should be the creation of a 'box' lesion set, plus additional lines to prevent propagation to the left atrial appendage, the isthmus of the left atrium and the right atrium are likely to be more effective than simple pulmonary vein isolation.

  16. Radiofrequency ablation of a misdiagnosed Brodie's abscess.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rs; Abdullah, Bjj; Aik, S; Tok, Ch

    2011-04-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy is recognised as a safe and effective treatment option for osteoid osteoma. This case report describes a 27-year-old man who underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous RFA for a femoral osteoid osteoma, which was diagnosed based on his clinical presentation and CT findings. The patient developed worsening symptoms complicated by osteomyelitis after the procedure. His clinical progression and subsequent MRI findings had led to a revised diagnosis of a Brodie's abscess, which was further supported by the eventual resolution of his symptoms following a combination of antibiotics treatment and surgical irrigations. This case report illustrates the unusual MRI features of osteomyelitis mimicking soft tissue tumours following RFA of a misdiagnosed Brodie's abscess and highlights the importance of a confirmatory histopathological diagnosis for an osteoid osteoma prior to treatment.

  17. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF.

  18. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted.

  19. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  20. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  1. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  2. Photochemical ablation of organic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingling, Yaroslava G.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2003-04-01

    We have investigated by molecular dynamics simulations the ablation of material that is onset by photochemical processes. We compare this system with only photochemical processes to a system containing photochemical and photothermal processes. The simulations reveal that ablation by purely photochemical processes is accompanied by the ejection of relatively cold massive molecular clusters from the surface of the sample. The top of the plume exhibits high temperatures whereas the residual part of the sample is cold. The removal of the damaged material through big molecular cluster ejection is consistent with experimental observations of low heat damage of material.

  3. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  4. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  5. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  6. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  7. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  8. ECG-Guided Surveillance Technique in Cryoballoon Ablation for Paroxysmal and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: A Strategy to Prevent From Phrenic Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Axel; Maagh, Petra; Christoph, Arndt; Oernek, Ahmet; Plehn, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is still a cause for concern in Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedures. New surveillance techniques, such as invasive registration of the compound motor action potential (CMAP), have been thought to prevent the occurrence of PNP. The present study investigates the impact of CMAP surveillance via an alternative and non-invasive ECG-conduction technique during CBA. Methods: PVI with CBA was performed in 166 patients suffering from AF. Diaphragmal contraction was monitored by abdominal hands-on observation in Observation Group I; Observation Group II was treated using additional ECG-conduction, as a means of modified CMAP surveillance method. During the ablation of the right superior and inferior pulmonary veins, the upper extremities lead I was newly adjusted between the inferior sternum and the right chest, thereby recording the maximum CMAP. The CMAP in the above-mentioned ECG leads was continuously observed in a semi-quantitative manner. Results: PNP was observed in 10 (6%) patients in total. In Observation Group I, 6 out of 61 (9.8%) demonstrated PNP. In Observation Group II a significant decrease of PNP could be demonstrated (p <0,001) and occurred in 4 out of 105 patients (3.8%). While three patients from Observation Group I left the EP lap with an ongoing PNP, none of the patients in Observation Group II had persistent PNP outside of the EP lab. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that additional ECG-conduction, used as modified CMAP surveillance, is an easy, effective and helpful additional safety measure to prevent PNP in CBA. PMID:27279788

  9. Catheter ablation of parahisian premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-12-01

    Catheter ablation is performed in selected patients with a symptomatic premature ventricular complex (PVC) or PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Ablation of PVC from the His region has a high risk of inducing a complete atrioventricular block. Here we report successful catheter ablation of a parahisian PVC in a 63-year-old man.

  10. Visual servoing of a laser ablation based cochleostomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrs, Lüder A.; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Werner, Martin; Knapp, Felix B.; Mehrwald, Markus; Hering, Peter; Schipper, Jörg; Klenzner, Thomas; Wörn, Heinz

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is a defined, visually based and camera controlled bone removal by a navigated CO II laser on the promontory of the inner ear. A precise and minimally traumatic opening procedure of the cochlea for the implantation of a cochlear implant electrode (so-called cochleostomy) is intended. Harming the membrane linings of the inner ear can result in damage of remaining organ functions (e.g. complete deafness or vertigo). A precise tissue removal by a laser-based bone ablation system is investigated. Inside the borehole the pulsed laser beam is guided automatically over the bone by using a two mirror galvanometric scanner. The ablation process is controlled by visual servoing. For the detection of the boundary layers of the inner ear the ablation area is monitored by a color camera. The acquired pictures are analyzed by image processing. The results of this analysis are used to control the process of laser ablation. This publication describes the complete system including image processing algorithms and the concept for the resulting distribution of single laser pulses. The system has been tested on human cochleae in ex-vivo studies. Further developments could lead to safe intraoperative openings of the cochlea by a robot based surgical laser instrument.

  11. Regional Pericarditis Status Post Cardiac Ablation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Eddin, Moneer; Loli, Akil

    2014-01-01

    Context: Regional pericarditis is elusive and difficult to diagnosis. Healthcare providers should be familiar with post-cardiac ablation complications as this procedure is now widespread and frequently performed. The management of regional pericarditis differs greatly from that of acute myocardial infarction. Case report: A 52 year-old male underwent atrial fibrillation ablation and developed severe mid-sternal chest pain the following day with electrocardiographic findings suggestive of acute myocardial infarction, and underwent coronary angiography, a left ventriculogram, and 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, all of which were unremarkable without evidence of obstructive coronary disease, wall motion abnormalities, or pericardial effusions. Ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with regional pericarditis. After diagnosis, the patient's presenting symptoms resolved with treatment including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and colchicine. Conclusion: This is the first reported case study of regional pericarditis status post cardiac ablation. Electrocardiographic findings were classic for an acute myocardial infarction; however, coronary angiography and left ventriculogram demonstrated no acute coronary occlusion or ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Healthcare professionals must remember that the electrocardiographic findings in pericarditis are not always classic and that pericarditis can occur status post cardiac ablation. PMID:25317395

  12. [Progress in Teflon AF LWCC/LCW applications].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Hua; Zhou, Wen; Xu, Zhan-Tang; Ye, Hai-Bin; Yang, Chao-Yu; Lin, Jun-Fang; Hu, Shui-Bo; Yang, Yue-Zhong; Li, Cai; Cao, Wen-Xi

    2011-11-01

    Teflon AF is chemically very inert, quite physically and optically stable, a highly vapor-permeable polymer with optical transparency through much of the UV-Vis region and with an RI lower than that of water, so Teflon AF LWCC/LCW (Long path-length liquid waveguide capillary cell/liquid core waveguides) has been used with a range of different detection techniques, including absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and gas sensor. The present article describes the properties and the aspects of Teflon AF LWCC/LCW instrumentation and applications. And finally,the future prospect and outlook of Teflon AF LWCC/LCW is also discussed.

  13. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation. PMID:27138033

  14. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  15. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  16. Remote Magnetic Navigation: A Focus on Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Natale, Andrea; Briceno, David; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Burkhardt, J David; DI Biase, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    VT ablation is based on percutaneous catheter insertion under fluoroscopic guidance to selectively destroy (i.e., ablate) myocardial tissue regions responsible for the initiation or propagation of ventricular arrhythmias. Although the last decade has witnessed a rapid evolution of ablation equipment and techniques, the control over catheter movement during manual ablation has remained largely unchanged. Moreover, the procedures are long, and require ergonomically unfavorable positions, which can lead to operator fatigue. In an attempt to overcome these constraints, several technical advancements, including remote magnetic navigation (RMN), have been developed. RMN utilizes a magnetic field to remotely manipulate specially designed soft-tip ablation catheters anywhere in the x, y, or z plane inside the patient's chest. RMN also facilitates titration of the contact force between the catheter and the myocardial tissue, which may reduce the risk of complications while ensuring adequate lesion formation. There are several non-randomized studies showing that RMN has similar efficacy to manual ablation, while complication rates and total radiation exposure appears to be lower. Although these data are promising, larger randomized studies are needed to prove that RMN is superior to manual ablation of VT.

  17. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation Tools: Microwave, Radiofrequency, or Cryoablation—What Should You Use and Why?

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Lee, Fred T.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25208284

  18. Ablation Technology for the Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Spencer J.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cox maze procedure for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has been simplified from its original cut-and-sew technique. Various energy sources now exist which create linear lines of ablation that can be used to replace the original incisions, greatly facilitating the surgical approach. This review article describes the anatomy of the atria that must be considered in choosing a successful energy source. Furthermore the device characteristics, safety profile, mechanism of tissue injury, and ability to create transmural lesions of the various energy sources that have been used in the Cox maze procedure, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each device is discussed. PMID:23995989

  19. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  20. Reconstruction of an ablated breast.

    PubMed

    Scarfì, A; Ordemann, K; Hüter, J

    1986-01-01

    It is the aim of the reconstruction of an ablated breast to repair the woman's integrity. The technique of this operation, according to Bomert, is the sliding of a flap of skin in the case of a horizontal breast scar. For the reconstruction, a silicone prosthesis is implanted which in most cases is prepectoral.

  1. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  2. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  3. AF4 and AF4N protein complexes: recruitment of P-TEFb kinase, their interactome and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Bastian; Kowarz, Eric; Rössler, Tanja; Ahmad, Khalil; Steinhilber, Dieter; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are the molecular backbone to assemble “super-elongation complexes” (SECs) that have two main functions: (1) control of transcriptional elongation by recruiting the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb = CyclinT1/CDK9) that is usually stored in inhibitory 7SK RNPs; (2) binding of different histone methyltransferases, like DOT1L, NSD1 and CARM1. This way, transcribed genes obtain specific histone signatures (e.g. H3K79me2/3, H3K36me2) to generate a transcriptional memory system. Here we addressed several questions: how is P-TEFb recruited into SEC, how is the AF4 interactome composed, and what is the function of the naturally occuring AF4N protein variant which exhibits only the first 360 amino acids of the AF4 full-length protein. Noteworthy, shorter protein variants are a specific feature of all AFF protein family members. Here, we demonstrate that full-length AF4 and AF4N are both catalyzing the transition of P-TEFb from 7SK RNP to their N-terminal domain. We have also mapped the protein-protein interaction network within both complexes. In addition, we have first evidence that the AF4N protein also recruits TFIIH and the tumor suppressor MEN1. This indicate that AF4N may have additional functions in transcriptional initiation and in MEN1-dependend transcriptional processes. PMID:26171280

  4. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  5. Global Endometrial Ablation in the Presence of Essure® Microinserts

    PubMed Central

    Aldape, Diana; Chudnoff, Scott G; Levie, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) affects 30% of women at some time during their reproductive years and is one of the most common reasons a woman sees a gynecologist. Many women are turning to endometrial ablation to manage their AUB. This article reviews the data relating to the available endometrial ablation techniques performed with hysteroscopic sterilization, and focuses on data from patients who had Essure® (Conceptus, San Carlos, CA) coils placed prior to performance of endometrial ablation. Reviewed specifically are data regarding safety and efficacy of these two procedures when combined. Data submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration for the three devices currently approved are reviewed, as well as all published case series. Articles included were selected based on a PubMed search for endometrial ablation (also using the brand names of the different techniques currently available), hysteroscopic sterilization, and Essure. PMID:24358407

  6. AF-MSCs fate can be regulated by culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zagoura, D S; Trohatou, O; Bitsika, V; Makridakis, M; Pappa, K I; Vlahou, A; Roubelakis, M G; Anagnou, N P

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represent a population of multipotent adherent cells able to differentiate into many lineages. In our previous studies, we isolated and expanded fetal MSCs from second-trimester amniotic fluid (AF) and characterized them based on their phenotype, pluripotency and proteomic profile. In the present study, we investigated the plasticity of these cells based on their differentiation, dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation potential in vitro. To this end, adipocyte-like cells (AL cells) derived from AF-MSCs can regain, under certain culture conditions, a more primitive phenotype through the process of dedifferentiation. Dedifferentiated AL cells derived from AF-MSCs (DAF-MSCs), gradually lost the expression of adipogenic markers and obtained similar morphology and differentiation potential to AF-MSCs, together with regaining the pluripotency marker expression. Moreover, a comparative proteomic analysis of AF-MSCs, AL cells and DAF-MSCs revealed 31 differentially expressed proteins among the three cell populations. Proteins, such as vimentin, galectin-1 and prohibitin that have a significant role in stem cell regulatory mechanisms, were expressed in higher levels in AF-MSCs and DAF-MSCs compared with AL cells. We next investigated whether AL cells could transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HL cells) directly or through a dedifferentiation step. AL cells were cultured in hepatogenic medium and 4 days later they obtained a phenotype similar to AF-MSCs, and were termed as transdifferentiated AF-MSCs (TRAF-MSCs). This finding, together with the increase in pluripotency marker expression, indicated the adaption of a more primitive phenotype before transdifferentiation. Additionally, we observed that AF-, DAF- and TRAF-MSCs displayed similar clonogenic potential, secretome and proteome profile. Considering the easy access to this fetal cell source, the plasticity of AF-MSCs and their potential to dedifferentiate and

  7. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  8. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  9. Software-assisted post-interventional assessment of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Geisler, Benjamin; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter; Na, Hong-Sik; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure for minimally invasive tumor treatment in clinical practice. Due to its common technical procedure, low complication rate, and low cost, RFA has become an alternative to surgical resection in the liver. To evaluate the therapy success of RFA, thorough follow-up imaging is essential. Conventionally, shape, size, and position of tumor and coagulation are visually compared in a side-by-side manner using pre- and post-interventional images. To objectify the verification of the treatment success, a novel software assistant allowing for fast and accurate comparison of tumor and coagulation is proposed. In this work, the clinical value of the proposed assessment software is evaluated. In a retrospective clinical study, 39 cases of hepatic tumor ablation are evaluated using the prototype software and conventional image comparison by four radiologists with different levels of experience. The cases are randomized and evaluated in two sessions to avoid any recall-bias. Self-confidence of correct diagnosis (local recurrence vs. no local recurrence) on a six-point scale is given for each case by the radiologists. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as receiver operating curves are calculated for both methods. It is shown that the software-assisted method allows physicians to correctly identify local tumor recurrence with a higher percentage than the conventional method (sensitivity: 0.6 vs. 0.35), whereas the percentage of correctly identified successful ablations is slightly reduced (specificity: 0.83 vs. 0.89).

  10. Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma: Initial Experience with a New Monopolar Ablation Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H. Bruners, Philipp; Delbrueck, Heide; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to report our initial experience with the 'off-label' use of a new monopolar radiofrequency (RF) probe for percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas. Seventeen patients (12 male and 5 female, mean age 24.8 [range 9-49]) with osteoid osteoma were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation (RFA). All procedures were performed with the patient under general aesthesia. After localization of the nidus, a 13G hollow drill was introduced into the nidus through a 7F introducer sheath. A monopolar 16.5G RF probe with a 9-mm active tip (Soloist; Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) was inserted through the introducer sheath and connected to the RF generator. Energy application was started at 2 W and subsequently increased every 2 min by 1 W to a maximum of 8 W. The procedure ended if impedance increased by 500 Ohm-Sign . Mean duration of energy deposition was 14.2 {+-} 3.3 min. Fourteen of 17 patients (82%) were free of symptoms at 29.9 {+-} 14.8 (range 4 to 47) months of follow-up. The primary and secondary success rates were 83% and 100%, respectively. In 3 patients, recurrence of pain at 6 (n = 1) and 15 (n = 2) months after the initial procedure was successfully treated by reablation. There were no complications. Monopolar RFA using the Soloist probe is effective and safe for the treatment of osteoid osteoma. It results in comparable success rates as other monopolar or bipolar RF systems in the treatment of osteoid osteoma.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma: initial experience with a new monopolar ablation device.

    PubMed

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bruners, Philipp; Delbrück, Heide; Günther, Rolf W

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to report our initial experience with the "off-label" use of a new monopolar radiofrequency (RF) probe for percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas. Seventeen patients (12 male and 5 female, mean age 24.8 [range 9-49]) with osteoid osteoma were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation (RFA). All procedures were performed with the patient under general aesthesia. After localization of the nidus, a 13G hollow drill was introduced into the nidus through a 7F introducer sheath. A monopolar 16.5G RF probe with a 9-mm active tip (Soloist; Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) was inserted through the introducer sheath and connected to the RF generator. Energy application was started at 2 W and subsequently increased every 2 min by 1 W to a maximum of 8 W. The procedure ended if impedance increased by 500 Ω. Mean duration of energy deposition was 14.2±3.3 min. Fourteen of 17 patients (82%) were free of symptoms at 29.9±14.8 (range 4 to 47) months of follow-up. The primary and secondary success rates were 83% and 100%, respectively. In 3 patients, recurrence of pain at 6 (n=1) and 15 (n=2) months after the initial procedure was successfully treated by reablation. There were no complications. Monopolar RFA using the Soloist probe is effective and safe for the treatment of osteoid osteoma. It results in comparable success rates as other monopolar or bipolar RF systems in the treatment of osteoid osteoma. PMID:20490491

  12. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation-induced perinephric hematoma with acute renal failure in a solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lee C; Chan, Sarah W; Macejko, Amanda M; Lin, William W

    2008-07-01

    Iatrogenic occurrences (including radiologically guided renal biopsy, shockwave lithotripsy, and minimally invasive ablative procedures) of subcapsular hematoma that lead to acute renal failure are rare but serious. The advancement of minimally invasive procedures has led to an increase in this complication, especially in patients with a solitary kidney. Fortunately, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma in these patients allows decompression of the renal parenchyma and recovery of renal function. We report a case of acute renal failure in a patient with a solitary kidney that resulted from a subcapsular hematoma as a complication of radiofrequency ablation.

  14. Ablation of swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia affects heart rate variability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Rintaro; Fukamizu, Seiji; Ishikawa, Tae; Hayashi, Takekuni; Komiyama, Kota; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Tejima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Sakurada, Harumizu

    2014-05-01

    A 47-year-old man underwent slow pathway ablation for slow-fast atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. Following the procedure, he felt palpitations while swallowing, and swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia was diagnosed. Swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia arose from the right atrium-superior vena cava junction and was cured by catheter ablation. After the procedure, the patient's heart rate variability changed significantly, indicating suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. In this case, swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia was related to the vagal nerve reflex. Analysis of heart rate variability may be helpful in elucidating the mechanism of swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia.

  15. Ablation of premature ventricular complexes exclusively guided by three-dimensional noninvasive mapping.

    PubMed

    Erkapic, Damir; Neumann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Preprocedural detailed characterization of premature ventricular complexes before ablation, currently limited to the 12-lead electrocardiogram, may aid in planning and improve procedural outcomes. This article summarizes current published data on feasibility, accuracy, and impact on clinical outcomes of a novel, three-dimensional, noninvasive, single-beat mapping system (ECVUE, CardioInsight). ECVUE technology offers premature ventricular complex characterization and localization with clinically relevant accuracy and performance superior to the surface electrocardiogram. With its noninvasive and single beat advantages, ECVUE has the potential to simplify mapping, and reduce ablation and procedural time.

  16. Emergency Renal Ablation for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage from Multiple Capsular Branches During Renal Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cuneyt Yildirim, Utku M.; Ozyer, Umut; Harman, Ali; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-06-15

    A 55-year-old woman underwent bilateral renal artery stent placement with good angiographic result. After the procedure, the patient complained of left flank pain secondary to subcapsular hematoma. Retrospective evaluation of images taken during stent implantation favored the diagnosis of guidewire perforation. Three hours after the procedure, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and subsequent renal angiography showed multifocal extravasations. We performed emergent renal ablation for the treatment of massive bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first use of transcatheter renal ablation technique for this purpose.

  17. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of a Small Renal Mass Complicated by Appendiceal Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Judith; Bex, Axel; Prevoo, Warner

    2012-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained wide acceptance as nephron-sparing therapy for small renal masses in select patients. Generally, it is a safe procedure with minor morbidity and acceptable short-term oncologic outcome. However, as a result of the close proximity of vital structures, such as the bowel, ureter, and large vessels, to the ablative field, complications regarding these structures may occur. This is the first article describing appendiceal perforation as a complication of computed tomography-guided RFA despite hydrodissection. When performing this innovative and promising procedure one should be aware of the possibility of particular minor and even major complications.

  18. Fast and automatic depth control of iterative bone ablation based on optical coherence tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander; Pengel, Steffen; Bergmeier, Jan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Laser surgery is an established clinical procedure in dental applications, soft tissue ablation, and ophthalmology. The presented experimental set-up for closed-loop control of laser bone ablation addresses a feedback system and enables safe ablation towards anatomical structures that usually would have high risk of damage. This study is based on combined working volumes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Er:YAG cutting laser. High level of automation in fast image data processing and tissue treatment enables reproducible results and shortens the time in the operating room. For registration of the two coordinate systems a cross-like incision is ablated with the Er:YAG laser and segmented with OCT in three distances. The resulting Er:YAG coordinate system is reconstructed. A parameter list defines multiple sets of laser parameters including discrete and specific ablation rates as ablation model. The control algorithm uses this model to plan corrective laser paths for each set of laser parameters and dynamically adapts the distance of the laser focus. With this iterative control cycle consisting of image processing, path planning, ablation, and moistening of tissue the target geometry and desired depth are approximated until no further corrective laser paths can be set. The achieved depth stays within the tolerances of the parameter set with the smallest ablation rate. Specimen trials with fresh porcine bone have been conducted to prove the functionality of the developed concept. Flat bottom surfaces and sharp edges of the outline without visual signs of thermal damage verify the feasibility of automated, OCT controlled laser bone ablation with minimal process time.

  19. Ablation produced using a toroidal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound device is independent of hepatic perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, David; N'Djin, William A.; Favre, Julia; Parmentier, Hubert; Rivoire, Michel; Chapelon, Jean Yves

    2011-09-01

    In the liver, the efficacy of radiofrequency or HIFU ablation is impaired by blood perfusion. This can be overcome by hepatic inflow occlusion using a Pringle manoeuver. Here we report the in vivo evaluation of ablations performed in the liver using a surgical toroidal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device used during an open procedure with and without hepatic inflow occlusion. The HIFU device was composed of 256 toroidal-shaped emitters working at 3 MHz and an integrated ultrasound imaging probe working at 7.5 MHz. Using an Intermittent Pringle Manoeuver (IPM), thermal ablations were created in three pigs with hepatic inflow occlusion (IPM Group) and in three pigs with normal perfusion (NoIPM Group). The ablations were studied on sonograms, macroscopically and microscopically fourteen days after the treatment. In the NoIPM group, the average coagulated volume obtained after a 40 s total exposure was 7.4±3.8 cm3 (2.2-16.6). In the IPM group, the average ablated volume was 6.3±2.9 cm3 (2.6-12.1). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of ablated volume (p = 0.25), diameter (p = 0.37), or depth (p = 0.61). The data from the present study demonstrated that there is no significant influence of hepatic vascular flow on the size and shape of ablations created with the toroidal-shaped HIFU device that has been used. The HIFU approach presented in this study is characterized by the brevity of the treatment (40 seconds for one ablation of 7 cm3), which makes it possible to reduce treatment dependence on blood perfusion. Ablations obtained with or without a Pringle manoeuver were homogeneous in both groups and were not significantly different in terms of diameter, depth and volumes in the IPM group compared with the NoIPM group.

  20. Real-time spectroscopic assessment of thermal damage: implications for radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher D; Lin, Wei-Chiang; Buttemere, Clay R; Washington, M Kay; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Pierce, Janene; Nicoud, Ian B; Pinson, C Wright; Chari, Ravi S

    2004-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving technology used to treat unresectable liver tumors. Currently, there is no accurate method to determine RFA margins in real-time during the procedure. We hypothesized that a fiber-optic based spectroscopic monitoring system could detect thermal damage from RFA in real-time. Fluorescence (F) and diffuse reflectance (Rd) spectra were continuously acquired from within the expected ablation zone during canine hepatic RFA using a fiber-optic microinterrogation probe (MIP). The F and Rd spectral feedback were continuously monitored and ablations were stopped based on changes in spectra alone. After each ablation, the MIP tract was marked with India ink and the ablation zone was excised. The relationship of the MIP to the zone of ablation was examined grossly and microscopically. F and Rd spectral changes occurred in three characteristic phases as the ablation zone progresses past the MIP. Phase 1 indicates minimal deviation from normal lives. Phase 2 occurs as the MIP lies within the hemorrhagic zone of the ablated tissue. Phase 3 correlates with complete tissue coagulation. The absolute magnitude of spectral change correlates with the gross and histologic degree of thermal damage. Optical spectroscopy is a technology that allows real-time detection of thermal tissue damage. In this study, both F and Rd spectroscopy accurately defined the advancing hemorrhagic edge of the zone of ablation and the central coagulation zone. These results suggest that F and Rd spectroscopy can be used to create a real-time feedback system to accurately define RFA margins. PMID:15358325

  1. L-histidine reduces inhibitory avoidance in Carassius auratus submitted to cerebellar ablation.

    PubMed

    Garção, D C; Mattioli, R

    2009-01-01

    The effect of post-training treatment with L-histidine (LH) on the memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance was investigated in Carassius auratus submitted to cerebellar ablation. The inhibitory avoidance procedure included 3 days: one habituation day, one training day (5 trials, T1-T5) and one test day. On the training day, each fish was placed individually in a white compartment separated from a black compartment by a sliding door. When the fish crossed into the black compartment, a weight was dropped in front of it (aversive stimulus) and the time to cross was recorded. Saline or LH (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 10 min after the trials. Data were log10 transformed and analyzed by ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (P < 0.05). In T5, all groups [ablation/LH (N = 15; 189.60 +/- 32.52), ablation/saline (N = 14; 204.29 +/- 28.95), sham/LH (N = 14; 232.36 +/- 28.15), and sham/saline (N = 15; 249.07 +/- 25.82)] had similar latencies that were significantly higher than T1 latencies [ablation/LH (89.33 +/- 20.41), ablation/saline (97.00 +/- 25.16), sham/LH (73.86 +/- 18.42), and sham/saline (56.71 +/- 17.59)], suggesting acquisition of inhibitory avoidance. For the test, there was a significant reduction in latencies of ablation/LH (61.53 +/- 17.70) and sham/saline (52.79 +/- 25.37) groups compared to the ablation/saline (213.64 +/- 29.57) and sham/LH (199.43 +/- 24.48) groups, showing that cerebellum ablation facilitated retention of inhibitory avoidance and LH reversed the effect of ablation. The results support other evidence that LH impairs memory consolidation and/or reduces the interpretation of aversion value.

  2. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  3. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  4. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  7. Part III: AFS - A Secure Distributed File System

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsmann, A.; /SLAC

    2005-06-29

    AFS is a secure distributed global file system providing location independence, scalability and transparent migration capabilities for data. AFS works across a multitude of Unix and non-Unix operating systems and is used at many large sites in production for many years. AFS still provides unique features that are not available with other distributed file systems even though AFS is almost 20 years old. This age might make it less appealing to some but with IBM making AFS available as open-source in 2000, new interest in use and development was sparked. When talking about AFS, people often mention other file systems as potential alternatives. Coda (http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/) with its disconnected mode will always be a research project and never have production quality. Intermezzo (http://www.inter-mezzo.org/) is now in the Linux kernel but not available for any other operating systems. NFSv4 (http://www.nfsv4.org/) which picked up many ideas from AFS and Coda is not mature enough yet to be used in serious production mode. This article presents the rich features of AFS and invites readers to play with it.

  8. Embedding Assessment for Learning (AfL) into Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2012-01-01

    Although the National Strategies for improving English schools no longer exist, the "Pedagogy and Practice" pack provides a valuable resource for producing an Assessment for Learning (AfL) framework that describes a hierarchy of skills for AfL. Based on the hierarchy, training took place in three North Yorkshire schools. To focus attention on the…

  9. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of “super elongation complexes” (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs. PMID:27679741

  10. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of "super elongation complexes" (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs. PMID:27679741

  11. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of “super elongation complexes” (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs.

  12. Intracardiac echocardiography to guide transseptal catheterization for radiofrequency catheter ablation of left-sided accessory pathways: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Citro, Rodolfo; Ducceschi, Valentino; Salustri, Alessandro; Santoro, Michele; Salierno, Michele; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2004-10-08

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) is a useful tool for guiding transseptal puncture during electrophysiological mapping and ablation procedures. Left-sided accessory pathways (LSAP) can be ablated by using two different modalities: retrograde approach through the aortic valve and transseptal approach with puncture of the fossa ovalis. We shall report two cases of LSAP where transcatheter radiofrequency ablation (TCRFA) was firstly attempted via transaortic approach with ineffective results. Subsequently, a transseptal approach under ICE guidance has been performed. During atrial septal puncture ICE was able to locate the needle tip position precisely and provided a clear visualization of the "tenting effect" on the fossa ovalis. ICE allowed a better mapping of the mitral ring and a more effective catheter ablation manipulation and tip contact which resulted in a persistent and complete ablation of the accessory pathway with a shorter time of fluoroscopic exposure. ICE-guided transseptal approach might be a promising modality for TCRFA of LSAP.

  13. Bronchopleural Fistula After Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, Mathieu; Cornelis, Francois; Descat, Edouard; Ferron, Stephane; Carteret, Thibault; Castagnede, Hugues; Palussiere, Jean

    2011-02-15

    The present article describes two cases of bronchopleural fistula (BPF) occurring after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors. Both procedures were carried out using expandable multitined electrodes, with no coagulation of the needle track. After both ablations, ground-glass opacities encompassed the nodules and abutted the visceral pleura. The first patient had a delayed pneumothorax, and the second had a recurrent pneumothorax. Both cases of BPF were diagnosed on follow-up computed tomography chest scans (i.e., visibility of a distinct channel between the lung or a peripheral bronchus and the pleura) and were successfully treated with chest tubes alone. Our goal is to highlight the fact that BPF can occur without needle-track coagulation and to suggest that minimally invasive treatment is sufficient to cure BPFs of this specific origin.

  14. Treatment of bone tumours by radiofrequency thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Fernando Ruiz; Del Mar Castellano García, María; Montes, Jose Luis Martínez; García, Manuel Ruiz; Fernández, Juan Miguel Tristán

    2009-03-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is considered the treatment of choice for osteoid osteomas, in which it has long been safely used. Other benign conditions (chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, etc.) can also be treated by this technique, which is less invasive than traditional surgical procedures. RFTA ablation is also an option for the palliation of localized, painful osteolytic metastatic and myeloma lesions. The reduction in pain improves the quality of life of patients with cancer, who often have multiple morbidities and a limited life expectancy. In some cases, these patients are treated with RFTA because conventional therapies (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, etc.) have been exhausted. In other cases, it is combined with conventional therapies or other percutaneous treatments, e.g., cementoplasty, offering faster pain relief and bone strengthening. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is recommended to select the optimal treatment, including orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, medical and radiation oncologists and interventional radiologists. PMID:19468917

  15. Effective Treatment of Chronic Radiation Proctitis Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Becker, Laren; Chen, Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Figueiredo, Marisa; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopic argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocautery are currently preferred treatments for chronic radiation proctitis, but ulcerations and strictures frequently occur. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been successful for mucosal ablation in the esophagus. Here we report the efficacy of RFA with the BarRx Halo90 system in three patients with bleeding from chronic radiation proctitis. In all cases, the procedure was well tolerated and hemostasis was achieved after 1 or 2 RFA sessions. Re-epithelialization of squamous mucosa was observed over areas of prior hemorrhage. No stricturing or ulceration was seen on follow-up up to 19 months after RFA treatment. Real-time endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) visualized epithelialization and subsurface tissue microvasculature pre- and post-treatment, demonstrating its potential for follow-up assessment of endoscopic therapies. PMID:20593010

  16. Chronic incomplete atrioventricular block induced by radiofrequency catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Bharati, S.; Graham, A.R.; Gorman, G.; Lev, M. )

    1989-10-01

    To determine if catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction with radiofrequency energy can induce chronic incomplete (first- and second-degree) AV block to avoid the need for a permanent pacemaker, 20 closed-chest dogs were studied. Group 1 (10 dogs) received radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) with a fixed power setting (5 or 10 W) while increasing the pulse duration from 10 to 50 seconds for each application. Group 2 (10 dogs) received energy with a fixed pulse duration (20 or 30 seconds) while increasing the power setting from 5 to 10 W or from 10 to 20 W during each energy delivery. Radiofrequency energy was delivered between a chest-patch electrode and the distal electrode of a regular 7F tripolar His bundle catheter. For each application, the energy delivery was interrupted when (1) the PR interval prolonged (greater than 50%) or (2) second-degree or complete AV block occurred and persisted up to 5 seconds. The ablation procedure ended when there was (1) persistent PR prolongation (greater than 50%) or persistent second-degree AV block (lasting greater than 30 minutes) after ablation, (2) occurrence of two consecutive transient (less than 1 minute) complete AV blocks after each energy delivery, or (3) complete AV block (lasting greater than 2 minutes) after ablation. Of seven dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which incomplete AV block was achieved 1 hour after the procedure, six in group 1 and five in group 2 remained in incomplete AV block 2-3 months after ablation. One dog in group 1 progressed into complete AV block. Of the remaining three dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which complete AV block was initially achieved 1 hour after ablation, two in group 1 and four in group 2 continued to have complete AV block, whereas one in each group had AV conduction returned to incomplete at 1-2 months of follow-up.

  17. Toward a petabyte-scale AFS service at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Moscicki, Jakub T.; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    AFS is a mature and reliable storage service at CERN, having worked for more than 20 years as the provider of Unix home directories and project areas. Recently, the AFS service has grown at unprecedented rates (200% in the past year); this growth was unlocked thanks to innovations in both the hardware and software components of our file servers. This work presents how AFS is used at CERN and how the service offering is evolving with the increasing storage needs of its local and remote user communities. In particular, we demonstrate the usage patterns for home directories, workspaces and project spaces, as well as show the daily work which is required to rebalance data and maintaining stability and performance. Finally, we highlight some recent changes and optimisations made to the AFS Service, thereby revealing how AFS can possibly operate at all while being subjected to frequent-almost DDOS-like-attacks from its users.

  18. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  19. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  20. Current results of minimally invasive surgical ablation for isolated atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mack, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    The Cox maze surgical ablation operation is a highly effective treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation, but adoption has been limited by procedure complexity and invasiveness. Minimally invasive approaches using nonsternotomy limited access and eliminating cardiopulmonary bypass have been developed. All published series of minimally invasive surgical ablation for isolated, atrial fibrillation were reviewed. Series were analyzed for method of access, energy source, procedure success, and complications. Outcomes were compiled based on type of atrial fibrillation, method and length of follow-up, and freedom from atrial fibrillation with and without antiarrhythmic drugs. There are 14 published series with outcomes reported in 604 unique patients. Most procedures are performed through bilateral minithoracotomies with video assistance, although in later series a totally thoracoscopic approach is more commonly used. Bipolar radiofrequency is the predominant energy source used, and bilateral pulmonary vein isolation the most common lesion set, with some reports adding ganglionic plexi ablation and more extensive ablation lines. Approximately 53% of the procedures were performed for paroxysmal and 47% for persistent/long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation. Overall freedom from atrial fibrillation at 6-12 months is 84% (59%-91%), with 89% (79%-100%) in paroxysmal and 62% (25%-87%) in persistent/long-standing persistent patients. Overall freedom from atrial fibrillation off of antiarrhythmic drugs is 65% (57%-87%). Results approximating those of the Cox maze procedure are achieved with minimally invasive surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Further developments are necessary to further simplify and standardize the procedure, to replicate the results in larger series from more centers, to standardize the reporting of results, and to define a more effective procedure for persistent and long-standing persistent

  1. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  2. Efficacy comparison between cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-He; Lin, Hui; Xie, Cheng-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    We perform this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of cryoablation versus radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. By searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane electronic databases from March 1986 to September 2014, 7 randomized clinical trials were included. Acute (risk ratio[RR]: 0.93; P = 0.14) and long-term (RR: 0.94; P = 0.08) success rate were slightly lower in cryoablation group than in radiofrequency ablation group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, the fluoroscopy time was nonsignificantly reduced (weighted mean difference[WMD]: -2.83 P = 0.29), whereas procedure time was significantly longer (WMD: 25.95; P = 0.01) in cryoablation group compared with radiofrequency ablation group. Furthermore, Pain perception during the catheter ablation was substantially less in cryoabaltion group than in radiofrequency ablation group (standardized mean difference[SMD]: -2.36 P < 0.00001). Thus, our meta-analysis demonstrated that cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation produce comparable acute and long-term success rate for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. Meanwhile, cryoablation ablation tends to reduce the fluoroscopy time and significantly reduce pain perception in cost of significantly prolonged procedure time.

  3. Rationale and design of the ODIn-AF Trial: randomized evaluation of the prevention of silent cerebral thromboembolism by oral anticoagulation with dabigatran after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Schrickel, Jan W; Linhart, Markus; Bänsch, Dietmar; Thomas, Daniel; Nickenig, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Oral anticoagulation treatment following clinically successful catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is controversial. Recent guidelines recommend continuation of oral anticoagulation in all patients with CHA2DS2VASc score ≥ 2 even if there is no evidence of recurrent atrial fibrillation. Due to lack of prospective data, the net clinical benefit of oral anticoagulation after successful ablation in these patients is unclear. As oral anticoagulation bears the risk of severe bleeding events, the ODIn-AF study aims to evaluate the effect of oral anticoagulation on the incidence of silent cerebral embolic events in patients with a high risk for embolic events, but free from symptomatic atrial fibrillation after successful pulmonary vein ablation. PMID:26514352

  4. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  5. Catheter ablation for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients supported by continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Iyer, Vivek; Whang, William; Mody, Kanika P; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Colombo, Paolo C; Te-Frey, Rosie; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Garan, Hasan; Jorde, Ulrich P; Uriel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are common after implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and in a subset of patients may be refractory to medication. Morbidity from VA in this population includes right ventricular failure (RVF). We sought to evaluate the efficacy of catheter ablation for VA in patients with LVAD. A retrospective analysis of patients supported by continuous-flow LVAD referred for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) between 2008 and the present was performed. Seven patients were referred for VT ablation an average of 236 ± 292 days after LVAD implantation. Three patients (42.9%) developed RVF in the setting of intractable arrhythmias. A transfemoral approach was used for six patients (85.7%) and an epicardial for one patient (14.3%). The clinical VT was inducible and successfully ablated in six patients (85.7%). The location of these arrhythmias was apical in three cases (42.9%). A total of 13 VTs were ablated in seven patients. Although the majority had reduction in VA frequency, recurrent VAs were observed in six patients (85.7%). One patient (14.3%) experienced a bleeding complication after the procedure. For patients with a high VA burden after LVAD implantation, VT ablation is safe and feasible, but VA frequently recurs.

  6. Conjunction of Endocardial and Coronary Venous System Mapping to Ablate Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Hung-Ta; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Chang, Po-Cheng; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) with epicardial or intramural origins is technically challenging. Herein, we have described the successful ablation of left VAs via the coronary venous system (CVS) in conjunction with endocardial map guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical map in six patients. Methods Out of a total consecutive 84 patients with symptomatic idiopathic VAs, radiofrequency ablation via the CVS was performed on six patients (7%). Furthermore, we reviewed patient records and electrophysiologic studies with respect to clinical characteristics. Results Activation map was conducted in 5 patients, and the earliest activation sites were identified within the CVS. The preceding times to the onset of QRS complex were longer than those at the earliest endocardial sites (36.2 ± 5.6 ms vs. 14.2 ± 6.4 ms, p = 0.02, n = 5). Spiky fractionated long-duration potentials were recorded at the successful ablation sites in all 5 patients. The other patient received pacemapping only because of few spontaneous VAs during the procedure, and the best pacemap spot was found within the CVS. Irrigated catheters were required in 4 out of 6 patients because VAs were temporarily suppressed with regular ones. Conclusions Idiopathic VAs can be ablated via the CVS in conjunction with endocardial mapping. Additionally, spiky fractionated long-duration potential can function as a clue to identify the good ablation site. PMID:27274177

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors: How We Do It Safely and Completely

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations. PMID:26576111

  8. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Ablation for Large Subcapsular Hepatic Hemangiomas: Technical and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical outcomes of using laparoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience of treating 124 large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas in 121 patients with laparoscopic RF ablation. Results The mean diameter of the 124 hemangiomas was 9.1 ± 3.2 cm (5.0–16.0 cm). RF ablation was performed successfully in all patients. There were 55 complications related to the ablation in 26 patients, including 5 of 69 (7.3%) patients with hemangioma <10 cm and 21 of 52 (40.4%) patients with hemangiomas ≥10 cm (P < 0.001). No injuries to abdominal viscera occurred in all the 121 patients. According to the Dindo–Clavien classification, all the complications were minor in 26 patients (Grade I). Out of 124 hepatic hemangiomas, 118 (95.2%) were completely ablated, including 70 of 72 (97.2%) lesions < 10 cm and 48 of 52 (92.3%) lesions ≥ 10 cm (P = 0.236). Conclusion Laparoscopic RF ablation therapy is a safe, feasible and effective procedure for large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas, even in the hepatic hemangiomas ≥ 10 cm. Its use avoids thermal injury to the abdominal viscera. PMID:26901132

  9. Palliative Procedures in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Emi; Sista, Akhilesh K.; Pua, Bradley B.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care aims to optimize comfort and function when cure is not possible. Image-guided interventions for palliative treatment of lung cancer is aimed at local control of advanced disease in the affected lung, adjacent mediastinal structures, or distant metastatic sites. These procedures include endovascular therapy for superior vena cava syndrome, bronchial artery embolization for hemoptysis associated with lung cancer, and ablation of osseous metastasis. Pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications of these palliative treatments, procedural techniques, complications, and possible future interventions are discussed in this article. PMID:24436537

  10. An Implicit LU/AF FDTD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Briley, W. Roger

    2001-01-01

    There has been some recent work to develop two and three-dimensional alternating direction implicit (ADI) FDTD schemes. These ADI schemes are based upon the original ADI concept developed by Peaceman and Rachford and Douglas and Gunn, which is a popular solution method in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). These ADI schemes work well and they require solution of a tridiagonal system of equations. A new approach proposed in this paper applies a LU/AF approximate factorization technique from CFD to Maxwell s equations in flux conservative form for one space dimension. The result is a scheme that will retain its unconditional stability in three space dimensions, but does not require the solution of tridiagonal systems. The theory for this new algorithm is outlined in a one-dimensional context for clarity. An extension to two and threedimensional cases is discussed. Results of Fourier analysis are discussed for both stability and dispersion/damping properties of the algorithm. Results are presented for a one-dimensional model problem, and the explicit FDTD algorithm is chosen as a convenient reference for comparison.

  11. The strainrange partitioning behavior of an advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The low-cycle, creep-fatigue characteristics of the advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA have been determined at 1400 F and are presented in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning (SRP). The mean stresses which develop in the PC and CP type SRP cycles at the lowest inelastic strainrange were observed to influence the cyclic lives to a greater extent than the creep effects and hence interfered with a conventional interpretation of the results by SRP. A procedure is proposed for dealing with the mean stress effects on life which is compatible with SRP.

  12. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  13. Making better scar: Emerging approaches for modifying mechanical and electrical properties following infarction and ablation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeffrey W; Laksman, Zachary; Gepstein, Lior

    2016-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), damaged myocytes are replaced by collagenous scar tissue, which serves an important mechanical function - maintaining integrity of the heart wall against enormous mechanical forces - but also disrupts electrical function as structural and electrical remodeling in the infarct and borderzone predispose to re-entry and ventricular tachycardia. Novel emerging regenerative approaches aim to replace this scar tissue with viable myocytes. Yet an alternative strategy of therapeutically modifying selected scar properties may also prove important, and in some cases may offer similar benefits with lower risk or regulatory complexity. Here, we review potential goals for such modifications as well as recent proof-of-concept studies employing specific modifications, including gene therapy to locally increase conduction velocity or prolong the refractory period in and around the infarct scar, and modification of scar anisotropy to improve regional mechanics and pump function. Another advantage of scar modification techniques is that they have applications well beyond MI. In particular, ablation treats electrical abnormalities of the heart by intentionally generating scar to block aberrant conduction pathways. Yet in diseases such as atrial fibrillation (AF) where ablation can be extensive, treating the electrical disorder can significantly impair mechanical function. Creating smaller, denser scars that more effectively block conduction, and choosing the location of those lesions by balancing their electrical and mechanical impacts, could significantly improve outcomes for AF patients. We review some recent advances in this area, including the use of computational models to predict the mechanical effects of specific lesion sets and gene therapy for functional ablation. Overall, emerging techniques for modifying scar properties represents a potentially important set of tools for improving patient outcomes across a range of heart diseases

  14. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura; Baere, Thierry de; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-02-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumour ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of liver malignancies. Among these methods, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RFA is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options [1, 2]. In addition, RFA is considered a viable alternate to surgery (1) for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer, and (2) for patients deemed ineligible for surgical resection because of extent and location of the disease or concurrent medical conditions [3]. These guidelines were written to be used in quality-improvement programs to assess RFA of HCC and liver metastases. The most important processes of care are (1) patient selection, (2) performing the procedure, and (3) monitoring the patient. The outcome measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates.

  15. Robotic navigation for catheter ablation: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Manual radio frequency (RF) ablation to restore a normal cardiac rhythm requires significant skill, manual dexterity and experience. In response to this, ablation methods and technologies have evolved rapidly in the past decade, including the development of remote navigation technologies. Today, two principal methods of remote navigation are available. One utilizes magnetic field vectors to navigate proprietary catheters, the other maneuvers standard catheters robotically. The main advantages of remote navigation include improved catheter stability, reduced fluoroscopy times and decreased total radiation exposure to both the patient and the operator. The main limitations include cost and longer procedure times. Remote magnetic navigation appears to have the best safety profile; however, its efficacy in creating lesions may be lower, which has been attributed to the soft-tip catheter used. Remote robotic navigation on the other hand, which uses regular catheter tips, is associated with a slightly higher overall complication rate, but higher efficacy. This article reviews the pros and cons of remote navigation for ablation of both atrial and ventricular substrates. Finally, it attempts to predict the direction of this field in the coming years.

  16. Transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure and radiofrequency ablation of right atrial tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Manola, Šime; Bernat, Robert; Pavlović, Nikola; Radeljić, Vjekoslav; Bulj, Nikola; Trbušić, Matias

    2014-12-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) can be found in approximately 25% of adult population. Transcatheter closure of PFO is a potential option in selected patients with PFO. We report a case of a female patient that underwent mapping and catheter ablation of atrial tachycardia and PFO closure in the same procedure.

  17. Generalized interactions using virtual tools within the spring framework: probing, piercing, cauterizing and ablating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Kevin; Bruyns, Cynthia D.

    2002-01-01

    We present schemes for real-time generalized interactions such as probing, piercing, cauterizing and ablating virtual tissues. These methods have been implemented in a robust, real-time (haptic rate) surgical simulation environment allowing us to model procedures including animal dissection, microsurgery, hysteroscopy, and cleft lip repair.

  18. Bacterial infections following non-ablative fractional laser treatment: a case series and discussion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisa Y; Kilmer, Suzanne L; Ross, E Victor; Avram, Mathew M

    2015-02-01

    Non-ablative fractional laser procedures have become increasingly popular since their introduction in 2004. The fractional 1,927 nm thulium laser is a non-ablative device that penetrates up to 300 μm in the skin and the 1,550 nm erbium:glass laser penetrates up to 1,400 μm. These procedures are considered minimally invasive with a high safety profile; therefore, infectious complications are exceedingly rare. However, we report five recent cases of bacterial infection with both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms following treatment with the fractional 1550/1927 nm laser approximately 1 day to 1 week post-procedure. One patient had a rapidly progressing pustular eruption with symptoms of sepsis. These patients were seen immediately, cultures were obtained and empiric antibiotic therapy was initiated. They recovered without long-term complications. Rapid-onset bacterial infections following non-ablative laser resurfacing with the 1550/1927 nm laser have not been previously reported in the literature. The infections can progress quickly and lead to serious sequelae, including systemic illness and severe scarring, if not identified and appropriately treated. We present these cases to highlight the importance of close surveillance and when appropriate, rapid intervention, following non-ablative fractional procedures, especially when patients present with atypical symptoms and signs. PMID:25586939

  19. A useful trick for difficult transseptal access during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Conte, Giulio; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Brugada, Pedro

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old man with history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery was referred to our department for cryoballoon ablation of symptomatic drug-resistant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Thick septum can complicate such procedures; we describe a useful maneuver to circumvent this problem.

  20. A calculation of carbon ablation on a reentry body during supersonic/subsonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, L. W.; Perini, L. L.; Conn, D. W.; Brenza, P. T.

    1985-06-01

    A simplified but accurate procedure is presented for calculating carbon recession and temperature histories of reentry bodies designed to slow down to subsonic speeds before impact. The method accounts for finite-rate chemistry and predicts results substantially different from diffusion-limited ablation calculations.

  1. An animal model for learning Nd:YAG laser ablation of the endometrium.

    PubMed

    Gimpelson, R J; Schomburg, M E; Bagby, M L

    1989-07-01

    Gynecologists must have a good model for practice before performing Nd:YAG laser ablation on humans. The New Zealand white rabbit has been used as a teaching model in courses. Knowing the anatomy and technique enables gynecologists to acquire the skill and dexterity needed to perform this useful procedure. PMID:2769653

  2. Tuning the Music: Acoustic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) 2.0.

    PubMed

    Kamsma, Douwe; Creyghton, Ramon; Sitters, Gerrit; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2016-08-01

    AFS is a recently introduced high-throughput single-molecule technique that allows studying structural and mechanochemical properties of many biomolecules in parallel. To further improve the method, we developed a modelling tool to optimize the layer thicknesses, and a calibration method to experimentally validate the modelled force profiles. After optimization, we are able to apply 350pN on 4.5μm polystyrene beads, without the use of an amplifier, at the coverslip side of the AFS chip. Furthermore, we present the use of a transparent piezo to generate the acoustic force and we show that AFS can be combined with high-NA oil or water-immersion objectives. With this set of developments AFS will be applicable to a broad range of single-molecule experiments. PMID:27163865

  3. Radio-frequency ablation of small renal tumors: minimum follow up of 1 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    evidence of tumor recurrence which was corrected surgically. Two masses did show some mild enhancement on CT 6 months post operatively, biopsies showed no evidence of tumor with fibrosis. Of the patients with follow up of greater than 12 months 75% had decreasing size of the lesion, 25% had no change in size. No complications were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors is a feasible alternative for patients that have imperative indication for nephron sparing surgery or those that have significant co-morbidities. The procedure is expedient, efficacious and carries minimal morbidity. It is of extreme importance to follow these patients closely with imaging of the lesion on a frequent basis.

  4. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  5. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  6. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications. PMID:25727222

  7. Anxiolytic-like effect of chlorpheniramine in inhibitory avoidance in goldfish submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, Flávia Roberta; Mattioli, Rosana

    2007-01-30

    The aim of the present study was to verify the consequences of telencephalic ablation on the learning of inhibitory avoidance and anxiety in goldfish. The animals were submitted to telencephalic ablation or sham operations five days prior to the experimental procedure. The inhibitory avoidance procedure was performed in 3 days using a rectangular aquarium divided into two compartments (black and white) with a central door. On the first day, the animals were habituated for 10 min. On the second and third days, they were injected with saline (SAL), 16 mg/kg Chlorpheniramine (CPA), 40% Propylene glycol (PPG) or 1 mg/kg Diazepam (DZP) twenty minutes before training. Then the animals were placed in the white compartment, the central door was opened and the time spent for crossing between compartments was recorded. After the fish crossed the line between the compartments a 45-g weight was dropped. This procedure was performed three times in a row. The groups submitted or not to telencephalic ablation and treated with SAL presented a difference between training sessions; however, the groups treated with CPA, PPG or DZP did not show any differences between them. These results suggest that the treatment with CPA, PPG or DZP impaired the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance conditioning in animals regardless of telecenphalic ablation. In conclusion, telencephalic ablation does not disrupt the animals' capacity to learn the inhibitory avoidance task, and based on the fact that CPA showed similar effects to those of DZP on the animals submitted or not to telencephalic ablation, we suggest that the CPA presents an anxiolytic-like effect mediated by the diencephalon in goldfish.

  8. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  9. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  10. Interventional procedures in the chest.

    PubMed

    Vollmer Torrubiano, I; Sánchez González, M

    2016-05-01

    Many thoracic conditions will require an interventional procedure for diagnosis and/or treatment. For this reason, radiologists need to know the indications and the technique for each procedure. In this article, we review the various interventional procedures that radiologists should know and the indications for each procedure. We place special emphasis on the potential differences in the diagnostic results and complications between fine-needle aspiration and biopsy. We also discuss the indications for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors and review the concepts related to the drainage of pulmonary abscesses. We devote special attention to the management of pleural effusion, covering the indications for thoracocentesis and when to use imaging guidance, and to the protocol for pleural drainage. We also discuss the indications for percutaneous treatment of pericardial effusion and the possible complications of this treatment. Finally, we discuss the interventional management of mediastinal lesions and provide practical advice about how to approach these lesions to avoid serious complications.

  11. Complex Transcriptional Control of the Antibiotic Regulator afsS in Streptomyces: PhoP and AfsR Are Overlapping, Competitive Activators▿

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F.

    2011-01-01

    The afsS gene of several Streptomyces species encodes a small sigma factor-like protein that acts as an activator of several pathway-specific regulatory genes (e.g., actII-ORF4 and redD in Streptomyces coelicolor). The two pleiotropic regulators AfsR and PhoP bind to overlapping sequences in the −35 region of the afsS promoter and control its expression. Using mutated afsS promoters containing specific point mutations in the AfsR and PhoP binding sequences, we proved that the overlapping recognition sequences for AfsR and PhoP are displaced by 1 nucleotide. Different nucleotide positions are important for binding of AfsR or PhoP, as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by reporter studies using the luxAB gene coupled to the different promoters. Mutant promoter M5 (with a nucleotide change at position 5 of the consensus box) binds AfsR but not PhoP with high affinity (named “superAfsR”). Expression of the afsS gene from this promoter led to overproduction of actinorhodin. Mutant promoter M16 binds PhoP with extremely high affinity (“superPhoP”). Studies with ΔafsR and ΔphoP mutants (lacking AfsR and PhoP, respectively) showed that both global regulators are competitive transcriptional activators of afsS. AfsR has greater influence on expression of afsS than PhoP, as shown by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and promoter reporter (luciferase) studies. These two high-level regulators appear to integrate different nutritional signals (particularly phosphate limitation sensed by PhoR), S-adenosylmethionine, and other still unknown environmental signals (leading to AfsR phosphorylation) for the AfsS-mediated control of biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:21378195

  12. Complex transcriptional control of the antibiotic regulator afsS in Streptomyces: PhoP and AfsR are overlapping, competitive activators.

    PubMed

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F

    2011-05-01

    The afsS gene of several Streptomyces species encodes a small sigma factor-like protein that acts as an activator of several pathway-specific regulatory genes (e.g., actII-ORF4 and redD in Streptomyces coelicolor). The two pleiotropic regulators AfsR and PhoP bind to overlapping sequences in the -35 region of the afsS promoter and control its expression. Using mutated afsS promoters containing specific point mutations in the AfsR and PhoP binding sequences, we proved that the overlapping recognition sequences for AfsR and PhoP are displaced by 1 nucleotide. Different nucleotide positions are important for binding of AfsR or PhoP, as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by reporter studies using the luxAB gene coupled to the different promoters. Mutant promoter M5 (with a nucleotide change at position 5 of the consensus box) binds AfsR but not PhoP with high affinity (named "superAfsR"). Expression of the afsS gene from this promoter led to overproduction of actinorhodin. Mutant promoter M16 binds PhoP with extremely high affinity ("superPhoP"). Studies with ΔafsR and ΔphoP mutants (lacking AfsR and PhoP, respectively) showed that both global regulators are competitive transcriptional activators of afsS. AfsR has greater influence on expression of afsS than PhoP, as shown by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and promoter reporter (luciferase) studies. These two high-level regulators appear to integrate different nutritional signals (particularly phosphate limitation sensed by PhoR), S-adenosylmethionine, and other still unknown environmental signals (leading to AfsR phosphorylation) for the AfsS-mediated control of biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

  13. Hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions over an ablating graphite nosetip

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.K.; Henline, W.D.

    1994-09-01

    The general boundary conditions, including mass and energy balances, of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver GASP (General Aerodynamics Simulation Program). A test case with a proposed hypersonic test-vehicle configuration and associated freestream conditions was developed. The solutions of the GASP code with various surface boundary conditions were obtained and compared with those of the ASCC (ABRES Shape Change) code, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. 22 refs.

  14. Hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Henline, W. D.

    1994-09-01

    The general boundary conditions, including mass and energy balances, of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver GASP (General Aerodynamics Simulation Program). A test case with a proposed hypersonic test-vehicle configuration and associated freestream conditions was developed. The solutions of the GASP code with various surface boundary conditions were obtained and compared with those of the ASCC (ABRES Shape Change) code, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined.

  15. History and Technical Approaches and Considerations for Ablative Surgery for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-01-01

    The history of epilepsy surgery is generally noted to have begun in 1886 with Victor Horsley's first report of craniotomies for posttraumatic epilepsy. With increased understanding of brain function and development of electroencephalographic methods, nonlesional epilepsy began to be treated with resection in the 1950s. Methodological improvements and increased understanding of pathophysiology followed, and the advent of stereotaxy and ablative technology in the 1960s and 1970s heralded a new era of minimally invasive, targeted procedures for lesional and nonlesional epilepsy. Current techniques combine stereotactic methods, improved ablative technologies, and electroencephalographic methods for a multidisciplinary approach to the neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

  16. Optical fiber biocompatible sensors for monitoring selective treatment of tumors via thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Daniele; Poeggel, Sven; Dinesh, Duraibabu B.; Macchi, Edoardo G.; Gallati, Mario; Braschi, Giovanni; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-09-01

    Thermal ablation (TA) is an interventional procedure for selective treatment of tumors, that results in low-invasive outpatient care. The lack of real-time control of TA is one of its main weaknesses. Miniature and biocompatible optical fiber sensors are applied to achieve a dense, multi-parameter monitoring, that can substantially improve the control of TA. Ex vivo measurements are reported performed on porcine liver tissue, to reproduce radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Our measurement campaign has a two-fold focus: (1) dual pressure-temperature measurement with a single probe; (2) distributed thermal measurement to estimate point-by-point cells mortality.

  17. Managing Complications Following Nephron-Sparing Procedures for Renal Masses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian J; Durack, Jeremy C

    2016-09-01

    Small renal malignancies are commonly treated with nephron-sparing procedures including partial nephrectomy and percutaneous ablation. Although these procedures offer faster patient recovery and preserve renal function, a variety of complications can occur. Here, we review vascular and nonvascular complications associated with nephron-sparing renal mass treatments and discuss options for minimally invasive image-guided management. PMID:27641453

  18. In vitro assessment of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring catheter for treatment of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Merryman, W David

    2014-03-21

    Percutaneous approaches to mitral valve repair are an attractive alternative to surgical repair or replacement. Radiofrequency ablation has the potential to approximate surgical leaflet resection by using resistive heating to reduce leaflet size, and cryogenic temperatures on a percutaneous catheter can potentially be used to reversibly adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets for reliable application of radiofrequency energy. We tested a combined cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter using excised porcine mitral valves placed in a left heart flow loop capable of reproducing physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Transmitral flow and pressure were monitored during the cryo-anchoring procedure and compared to baseline flow conditions, and the extent of radiofrequency energy delivery to the mitral valve was assessed post-treatment. Long term durability of radiofrequency ablation treatment was assessed using statically treated leaflets placed in a stretch bioreactor for four weeks. Transmitral flow and pressure waveforms were largely unaltered during cryo-anchoring. Parameter fitting to mechanical data from leaflets treated with radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring revealed significant mechanical differences from untreated leaflets, demonstrating successful ablation of mitral valves in a hemodynamic environment. Picrosirius red staining showed clear differences in morphology and collagen birefringence between treated and untreated leaflets. The durability study indicated that statically treated leaflets did not significantly change size or mechanics over four weeks. A cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter can adhere to and ablate mitral valve leaflets in a physiologic hemodynamic environment, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection of mitral valve tissue.

  19. Plasma-mediated radiofrequency ablation followed by percutaneous cementoplasty under fluoro-CT guidance: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Laganà, Domenico; Ianniello, Andrea; Fontana, Federico; Mangini, Monica; Mocciardini, Lucia; Spanò, Emanuela; Piacentino, Filippo; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 81-year-old Caucasian man with colorectal carcinoma, treated by surgery in 1998, referred for palliative treatment of a refractory painful caused by osteolytic metastases of 2.5 cm in back-upper ilium spine. Plasma-mediated radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation, using Fluoroscopic Computer Tomography guidance. After completing the ablation phase of the procedure, a mixture of bone cement and Biotrace sterile barium sulfate was injected into the ablated cavity. Patient was evaluated by using the Brief Pain Inventory and considering pain interference with daily living at day 1 and 3 and week 1, 2, 3, 4 by means of a telephone interview. A post-procedure Computer Tomography scan was performed to examine the distribution of cement deposition few minutes after the procedure. The plasma mediated RFA and cementoplasty were well tolerated by the patient who did not develop any complication. PMID:19918385

  20. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  1. Dynamics of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Dongqing; Li, Yunxuan; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-06-01

    Resonant ablation is beneficial to avoiding uncontrollable subsurface damages in the laser ablation of polymers. In this paper the dynamics of mid-infrared laser resonant ablation of polylactic acid and toluene was calculated by using fluid dynamic equations. The merits and drawbacks of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation of high molecular weight polymers have been discussed.

  2. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-Hui; Feng, Wei-Jian; Gu, Shan-Zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Li, Xiao-Guang; Li, Yu-Liang; Li, Zhen-Jia; Lin, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Bao-Dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-Min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-Wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  3. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  4. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  5. Technologies for Guidance of Radiofrequency Ablation in the Multimodality Interventional Suite of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Locklin, Julia K.; Viswanathan, Anand; Kruecker, Jochen; Haemmerich, Dieter; Cebral, Juan; Sofer, Ariela; Cheng, Ruida; McCreedy, Evan; Cleary, Kevin; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Glossop, Neil; Yanof, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Several new image-guidance tools and devices are being prototyped, investigated, and compared. These tools are introduced and include prototype software for image registration and fusion, thermal modeling, electromagnetic tracking, semiautomated robotic needle guidance, and multimodality imaging. The integration of treatment planning with computed tomography robot systems or electromagnetic needle-tip tracking allows for seamless, iterative, “see-and-treat,” patient-specific tumor ablation. Such automation, navigation, and visualization tools could eventually optimize radiofrequency ablation and other needle-based ablation procedures and decrease variability among operators, thus facilitating the translation of novel image-guided therapies. Much of this new technology is in use or will be available to the interventional radiologist in the near future, and this brief introduction will hopefully encourage research in this emerging area. PMID:17296700

  6. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2016-08-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  7. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias.

  8. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon’s operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis. PMID:26405563

  9. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Konomos, Dorothy K.; Gravanis, Iordanis; Dewey, Stephen L.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heppner, Frank L.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-01-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 hours prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 hours prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation. PMID:20382223

  10. Electrolytic ablation of the rat pancreas: a feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Fosh, Beverley G; Finch, Jonathon Guy; Anthony, Adrian A; Texler, Michael; Maddern, Guy J

    2001-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a biologically aggressive disease with less than 20% of patients suitable for a "curative" surgical resection. This, combined with the poor 5-year survival indicates that effective palliative methods for symptom relief are required. Currently there are no ablative techniques to treat pancreatic cancer in clinical use. Tissue electrolysis is the delivery of a direct current between an anode and cathode to induce localised necrosis. Electrolysis has been shown to be safe and reliable in producing hepatic tissue and tumour ablation in animal models and in a limited number of patients. This study investigates the feasibility of using electrolysis to produce localised pancreatic necrosis in a healthy rat model. Method Ten rats were studied in total. Eight rats were treated with variable "doses" of coulombs, and the systemic and local effects were assessed; 2 rats were used as controls. Results Seven rats tolerated the procedure well without morbidity or mortality, and one died immediately post procedure. One control rat died on induction of anaesthesia. Serum amylase and glucose were not significantly affected. Conclusion Electrolysis in the rat pancreas produced localised necrosis and appears both safe, and reproducible. This novel technique could offer significant advantages for patients with unresectable pancreatic tumours. The next stage of the study is to assess pancreatic electrolysis in a pig model, prior to human pilot studies. PMID:11570977

  11. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  12. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  13. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  14. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections.

    PubMed

    Haase, C; Schäfer, D; Dössel, O; Grass, M

    2014-11-21

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  15. Phase retrieval from a single interferometric pattern to determine the profile caused by laser ablation on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M. I.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Rosales, M. A.; Ibarra, Jorge; Tepichín, E.

    2009-08-01

    We have been working in the interferometric analysis of the ablation profile obtained with different techniques of refractive surgery, applied directly on hard contact lenses. We have demonstrated qualitatively that different ablations produce different fringe patterns; implying different focal shifts1. These results were obtained by means of a Mach- Zehnder type interferometer, where we used a similar unablated contact lens as a reference. Due to the size of each sample, it is difficult to get different fringe patterns with different phase factors. Therefore, the typical phase shifting methods are not suitable in our case. To determine the corresponding profile caused by the different ablation techniques we applied in this work the interpolation method that provide an analysis of static fringe patterns. This method of phase retrieval allows us to obtain the PSF and MTF related to each profile. The advantage of this procedure is that we can obtain a time invariant performance of the resulting ablated surface.

  16. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  17. Ablation response testing of aerospace power supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, S. A.; Chan, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program was performed to assess the aerothermal ablation response of aerospace power supplies. Full-scale General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) test articles, Graphite Impact Shell (GIS) test articles, and Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) test articles were all tested without nuclear fuel in simulated reentry environments at the NASA Ames Research Center. Stagnation heating, stagnation pressure, stagnation surface temperature, stagnation surface recession profile, and weight loss measurements were obtained for diffusion-limited and sublimation ablation conditions. The recession profile and weight loss measurements showed an effect of surface features on the stagnation face. The surface features altered the local heating which in turn affected the local ablation.

  18. Effects of iron depletion on CALM-AF10 leukemias.

    PubMed

    Heath, Jessica L; Weiss, Joshua M; Lavau, Catherine P; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2014-12-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient for cellular growth and proliferation, enters cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid (CALM) protein plays an essential role in the cellular import of iron by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CALM-AF10 leukemias harbor a single copy of the normal CALM gene and therefore may be more sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effect of iron restriction compared with normal hematopoietic cells. We found that CALM heterozygous (CALM(HET)) murine fibroblasts exhibit signs of iron deficiency, with increased surface transferrin receptor levels and reduced growth rates. CALM(HET) hematopoietic cells are more sensitive in vitro to iron chelators than their wild type counterparts. Iron chelation also displayed toxicity toward cultured CALM(HET)CALM-AF10 leukemia cells, and this effect was additive to that of chemotherapy. In mice transplanted with CALM(HET)CALM-AF10 leukemia, we found that dietary iron restriction reduced tumor burden in the spleen. However, dietary iron restriction, used alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy, did not increase survival of mice with CALM(HET)CALM-AF10 leukemia. In summary, although CALM heterozygosity results in iron deficiency and increased sensitivity to iron chelation in vitro, our data in mice do not suggest that iron depletion strategies would be beneficial for the therapy of CALM-AF10 leukemia patients.

  19. Robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Antoine; Guichard, Jean Baptiste; Roméyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Gerbay, Antoine; Isaaz, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency treatment represents the first choice of treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared to antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications such as tamponade. Given this context, the treatment of arrhythmias using robotic magnetic navigation entails a technique well suited to complex arrhythmias on account of its efficacy, reliability, significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, as well as a very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most modern technologies for treating arrhythmias. Based on the literature, this review summarizes the advantages and limitations of robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias.

  20. Preparation And Analysis Of Specimens Of Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Procedure for chemical analysis of specimens of silicone-based ablative thermal-insulation materials SLA-561 and MA25 involves acid digestion of specimens to prepare them for analysis by inductively-coupled-plasma/atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES). In comparison with atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ICP/AES is faster and more accurate than AAS. Results of analyses stored in data base, used to trace variations in concentrations of chemical elements in materials during long-term storage, and used in timely manner in investigations of failures. Acid-digestion portion of procedure applied to other thermal-insulation materials containing room-temperature-vulcanizing silicones and enables instrumental analysis of these materials.

  1. Robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Antoine; Guichard, Jean Baptiste; Roméyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Gerbay, Antoine; Isaaz, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency treatment represents the first choice of treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared to antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications such as tamponade. Given this context, the treatment of arrhythmias using robotic magnetic navigation entails a technique well suited to complex arrhythmias on account of its efficacy, reliability, significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, as well as a very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most modern technologies for treating arrhythmias. Based on the literature, this review summarizes the advantages and limitations of robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias. PMID:27698569

  2. Virtual reality-enhanced ultrasound guidance for atrial ablation: in vitro epicardial study.

    PubMed

    Linte, Cristian A; Wiles, Andrew; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Peters, Terry M

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to reduce morbidity of cardiac interventions, minimizing invasiveness inevitably leads to limited visual access to the surgical targets. To address these limitations, we provide the surgeons with a robust visualization environment that integrates interventional ultrasound imaging augmented with pre-operative anatomical models and virtual surgical instruments within a virtual reality environment. Here we present an in vitro study on a cardiac phantom that mimics an ablation therapy procedure, which allows us to assess the feasibility of our surgical system in comparison to traditional intra-operative ultrasound imaging. Following surgical target identification via an electro-anatomical model, the "ablation procedure" is performed blindly. A 2.8 mm RMS targeting error is achieved using our novel surgical system. This level of accuracy is adequate from both a clinical and engineering perspective, under the inherent procedure requirements and limitations of the system. PMID:18982659

  3. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  4. Risk of Ionizing Radiation in Women of Childbearing Age undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Gomes, Daniel Garcia; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus N.; Pires, Leonardo Martins; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Commission of Radiology recommends a pregnancy screening test to all female patients of childbearing age who will undergo a radiological study. Radiation is known to be teratogenic and its effect is cumulative. The teratogenic potential starts at doses close to those used during these procedures. The prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in patients undergoing electrophysiological studies and/or catheter ablation in our midst is unknown. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in female patients referred for electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Methods Cross-sectional study analyzing 2,966 patients undergoing electrophysiological study and/or catheter ablation, from June 1997 to February 2013, in the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 1490 procedures were performed in women, of whom 769 were of childbearing age. All patients were screened with a pregnancy test on the day before the procedure. Results Three patients tested positive, and were therefore unable to undergo the procedure. The prevalence observed was 3.9 cases per 1,000 women of childbearing age. Conclusion Because of their safety and low cost, pregnancy screening tests are indicated for all women of childbearing age undergoing radiological studies, since the degree of ionizing radiation needed for these procedures is very close to the threshold for teratogenicity, especially in the first trimester, when the signs of pregnancy are not evident. PMID:24061686

  5. [The radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways. The initial experience in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Molina, L; Morales, A; Alvarez, L M; Avila, L

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to an accessory pathway were submitted to an electrophysiological study and radiofrequency ablation of the Kent bundle. There were 9 males and 4 females. The mean age was 22 years. Other than their SVT, none had any structural heart disease. Ten of them had Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and three had concealed accessory pathways. Two different types of radiofrequency devices were used: one generating damped sinusoid waves, and two other generators producing pure continuous sinusoid waves. With the first type, two attempts were made: one patient with a concealed pathway and one with overt preexcitation. The successful ablation was not achieved because this wave type is 100 times more powerful, it desiccates the tissue, and thus does not produce the right kind of lesion. The other eleven patients were divided in three groups: I) With left overt preexcitation (7 pts) II) Concealed left Kent bundles (2 pts) III) Right Kent bundles. Ablation was 100% successful in group I, while in the other two groups, only one patient of each was successfully ablated. The overall successful rate of these 3 groups was 81.8%. Of the two patients that could not be treated, one had an anterior septal Kent bundle and the other had a concealed left Kent bundle. We believe that catheter ablation is a very promising therapeutic procedure for patients with SVT, besides being a extraordinary instrument that will enable us to be able to understand further clinical electrophysiology. PMID:8466363

  6. Selective ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus with a frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1995-05-01

    In a preceding trial the absorption characteristics of subgingival calculus were calculated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy (excitation laser: N2-laser, wavelength 337 nm, pulse duration 4 ns). Subgingival calculus seems to contain chromophores absorbing in the ultraviolet spectral region up to 420 nm. The aim of the actual study was the ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus using a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 100 ns, repetition rate 110 Hz). Extracted human teeth presenting sub- and supragingival calculus were irradiated perpendicular to their axis with a laser fluence of 1 Jcm-2. Using a standard application protocol calculus was irradiated at the enamel surface, at the junction between enamel and root, and at the root surface (located on dentin or on cementum). During the irradiation procedure an effective water cooling-system was engaged. For light microscopical investigations undecalcified histological sections were prepared after treatment. The histological sections revealed that a selective and total removal of calculus is possible at all locations without ablation of healthy enamel, dentin or cementum. Even low fluences provide us with a high effectiveness for the ablation of calculus. Thus, based on different absorption characteristics and ablation thresholds, engaging a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser a fast and, even more, a selective ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus is possible without adverse side effects to the surrounding tissues. Even more, microbial dental plaque can be perfectly removed.

  7. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  8. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25442132

  9. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate. PMID:27587963

  10. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-15

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located {<=}1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  11. Design and Laboratory Validation of a Capacitive Sensor for Measuring the Recession of Thin-Layered Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Bowman, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Flight vehicles are typically instrumented with subsurface thermocouples to estimate heat transfer at the surface using inverse analysis procedures. If the vehicle has an ablating heat shield, however, temperature time histories from subsurface thermocouples no longer provide enough information to estimate heat flux at the surface. In this situation, the geometry changes and thermal energy leaves the surface in the form of ablation products. The ablation rate is required to estimate heat transfer to the surface. A new concept for a capacitive sensor has been developed to measure ablator depth using the ablator's dielectric effect on a capacitor's fringe region. Relying on the capacitor's fringe region enables the gage to be flush mounted in the vehicle's permanent structure and not intrude into the ablative heat shield applied over the gage. This sensor's design allows nonintrusive measurement of the thickness of dielectric materials, in particular, the recession rates of low-temperature ablators applied in thin (0.020 to 0.060 in. (0.05 to 0.15 mm)) layers. Twenty capacitive gages with 13 different sensing element geometries were designed, fabricated, and tested. A two-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed on several candidate geometries. Calibration procedures using ablator-simulating shims are described. A one-to-one correspondence between system output and dielectric material thickness was observed out to a thickness of 0.055 in. (1.4 mm) for a material with a permittivity about three times that of air or vacuum. A novel method of monitoring the change in sensor capacitance was developed. This technical memorandum suggests further improvements in gage design and fabrication techniques.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations. PMID:19405768

  14. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-06-23

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling.

  15. Nanosecond laser ablation of silver nanoparticle film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaewon; Han, Sewoon; Lee, Daeho; Ahn, Sanghoon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Moon, Jooho; Ko, Seung H.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected silver nanoparticle (20 nm diameter) film is studied using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG nanosecond laser (532 nm wavelength, 6 ns full width half maximum pulse width). In the sintered silver nanoparticle film, absorbed light energy conducts well through the sintered porous structure, resulting in ablation craters of a porous dome shape or crown shape depending on the irradiation fluence due to the sudden vaporization of the PVP. In the unsintered silver nanoparticle film, the ablation crater with a clean edge profile is formed and many coalesced nanoparticles of 50 to 100 nm in size are observed inside the ablation crater. These results and an order of magnitude analysis indicate that the absorbed thermal energy is confined within the nanoparticles, causing melting of nanoparticles and their coalescence to larger agglomerates, which are removed following melting and subsequent partial vaporization.

  16. Neocuproine ablates melanocytes in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Pol, Thomas; Johnson, Stephen L

    2008-12-01

    The simplest regeneration experiments involve the ablation of a single cell type. While methods exist to ablate the melanocytes of the larval zebrafish,(1,2) no convenient method exists to ablate melanocytes in adult zebrafish. Here, we show that the copper chelator neocuproine (NCP) causes fragmentation and disappearance of melanin in adult zebrafish melanocytes. Adult melanocytes expressing eGFP under the control of a melanocyte-specific promoter also lose eGFP fluorescence in the presence of NCP. We conclude that NCP causes melanocyte death. This death is independent of p53 and melanin, but can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous copper. NCP is ineffective at ablating larval melanocytes. This now provides a tool for addressing questions about stem cells and the maintenance of the adult pigment pattern in zebrafish.

  17. Photodynamic therapy toward selective endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadir, Yona; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Berns, Michael W.

    1993-05-01

    Potential applications of photodynamic therapy for endometrial disease are discussed. Experimental models that may lead to diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis as well as selective endometrial ablation are summarized.

  18. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  19. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  20. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-01

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  1. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-15

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  2. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  3. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M.; Nehmeh, Sadek A.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  5. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  6. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  7. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  8. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  9. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  10. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  11. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  12. Optical modeling of laser ablated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, M. C.; Davies, E.; Holmes, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    From only an a priori knowledge of the optical parameters of a laser beam, the delivery system together with a substrate's material properties, a ray-tracing model capable of predicting the 3-D topology of micro/nanostructures machined by pulsed laser ablation has been developed. The model includes secondary illumination effects produced by the microstructure created by successive pulses (wall reflections, refraction, wave guiding, shadowing, etc.) as well as the complete optical properties of the beam delivery system. We have used material ablation by pulsed excimer lasers and associated beam delivery systems to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the model. Good agreement is obtained between computations and experimental results in terms of the predicted ablation depth per pulse and the wall taper angle of channels and holes. The model can predict ablated profiles of holes and indicate the most efficient drilling strategy in terms of material removal rates. The model also shows diffraction effects are not required to explain the tapering vertical walls observed when ablating microstructures. Finally, the model has been used to demonstrate aberrations in an optical imaging system limiting the creation of submicron features in an ablated microstructure. Provided photons are absorbed linearly in a substrate according to Beer's law with negligible thermal diffusion effects, the model is equally applicable to using other types of pulsed laser sources and systems with imaged or focused beams.

  13. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  14. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength. PMID:27659953

  15. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  16. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma: local experience.

    PubMed

    Yip, P S C; Lam, Y L; Chan, M K; Shu, J S J; Lai, K C; So, Y C

    2006-08-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a slow-growing tumour with limited growth potential. In the past, treatment comprised open surgery with en-bloc resection or curettage of the tumour. In recent years, various minimally invasive percutaneous treatments have gained popularity. We report on six patients who underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablations of osteoid osteomas between January 2000 and December 2003 in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Technical success was achieved in all procedures, with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range, 18-65 months). Five of the six patients achieved complete pain relief after the procedure and remained pain-free on subsequent follow-up. One patient with persistent symptoms after the first ablation was successfully treated with a second ablation. The mean in-hospital stay was 2.4 days. Progress in radiological healing was observed in all patients. There was one complication of skin burn over the needle entry site. Our experience shows that percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive and cost-effective treatment for osteoid osteoma.

  17. Interest of Electrostimulation of Peripheral Motor Nerves during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Garnon, Julien Ramamurthy, Nitin Buy, Xavier Gangi, Afshin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We present our experience of utilizing peripheral nerve electrostimulation as a complementary monitoring technique during percutaneous thermal ablation procedures; and we highlight its utility and feasibility in the prevention of iatrogenic neurologic thermal injury. Methods: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation was performed in 12 patients undergoing percutaneous image-guided thermal ablations of spinal/pelvic lesions in close proximity to the spinal cord and nerve roots. Electrostimulation was used in addition to existing insulation (active warming/cooling with hydrodissection, passive insulation with CO{sub 2} insufflation) and temperature monitoring (thermocouples) techniques. Impending neurologic deficit was defined as a visual reduction of muscle response or need for a stronger electric current to evoke muscle contraction, compared with baseline. Results: Significant reduction of the muscle response to electrostimulation was observed in three patients during the ablation, necessitating temporary interruption, followed by injection of warm/cool saline. This resulted in complete recovery of the muscle response in two cases, while for the third patient the response did not improve and the procedure was terminated. No patient experienced postoperative motor deficit. Conclusion: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation is a simple, easily accessible technique allowing early detection of impending neurologic injury during percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation. It complements existing monitoring techniques and provides a functional assessment along the whole length of the nerve.

  18. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping angle during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is well regarded as a safe and minimally invasive procedure and an alternative to the gold standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Despite of its greatness, as well aware of, the operative procedure time during the PVP is still prolonged. Such attempts have been tried out in order to shorten the operative time and increase its efficacy. However, scientific study to investigate techniques used during the PVP is still lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate how sweeping angle might affect the PVP performance. Porcine kidneys acquired from a local grocery store were used (N=140). A Q-switched 532-nm GreenLight XPSTM (American Medical Systems, Inc., MN, USA), together with 750- μm core MoXyTM fiber, was set to have power levels of 120 W and 180 W. Treatment speed and sweeping speed were fixed at 2 mm/s and 0.5 sweep/s, respectively. Sweeping angles were varied from 0 (no sweeping motion) to 120 degree. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation zone were measured and quantified. Tissue ablation rate was peaked at 15 and 30 degree for both 120- and 180-W power levels and dramatically decreased beyond 60 degree. At 180 W, ablation rate increased 20% at 30 degree compared to 0 degree. This study demonstrated that ablation rate could be maximized and was contingent upon sweeping angle.

  19. Local Tumor Progression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Microwave Percutaneous Ablation: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Franco; Carucci, Patrizia; Gaia, Silvia; Rolle, Emanuela; Brunocilla, Paola Rita; Castiglione, Anna; Ciccone, Giovannino; Rizzetto, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background Microwaves (MW) technology is an ablative treatment alternative to radiofrequency (RF) for early stages of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients not suitable for surgical resection. It is well known that HCC lesions ≥ 30 mm treated by RF show a high rate of local tumor progression because of residual of unablated neoplastic tissue. Methods Aim of this study was to describe a limited experience of MW ablation (9 cirrhotic patients with medium size HCC: 11 lesions, 31 - 50 mm in diameter) treated from June 2009 to May 2010 by one of currently marketed western MW ablation systems and followed up for 2 years. Primary end-point was the probability of local tumor progression at 24 months; secondary end-point was the safety of the procedure. Results Radiological response after a single session and re-evaluation of local tumor progression along the time were performed by contrast enhanced computed-tomography at months 1-8-12-24. Early effectiveness rate was 90.1 %. The cumulative incidence of local tumor progression at 1 and 2 years were 36.4% (95% CI 11.2 - 62.7) and 57.6% (95% CI 23.6 - 81.0). We observed a single minor complication of the procedure. Conclusions In conclusion, MW ablation system “Amica” has a high rate of primary effectiveness rate but residual of unablated neoplastic tissue induce local tumor progression in about half of the cases during the following 2 years.

  20. Electrophysiological Studies and Radiofrequency Ablations in Children and Adolescents with Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus Nardi; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Pires, Leonardo Martins; SantAnna, Roberto Tofani; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation is the standard non-pharmacological treatment for arrhythmias in pediatric patients. However, arrhythmias and their associated causes have particular features in this population. Objective To analyze the epidemiological characteristics and findings of electrophysiological diagnostic studies and radiofrequency ablations in pediatric patients referred to the Electrophysiology Unit at Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, in order to characterize the particularities of this population. Methods Cross-sectional study with 330 electrophysiological procedures performed in patients aged less than 20 years between June 1997 and August 2013. Results In total, 330 procedures (9.6% of the overall procedures) were performed in patients aged less than 20 years (14.33 ± 3.25 years, age range 3 months to 19 years), 201 of which were males (60.9%). A total of 108 (32.7%) electrophysiological diagnostic studies were performed and of these, 48.1% showed abnormal findings. Overall, 219 radiofrequency ablations were performed (66.3%) with a success rate of 84.8%. The presence of an accessory pathway was the most prevalent finding, occurring in 158 cases (72.1%), followed by atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (16.8%), typical atrial flutter (3.1%) and extrasystoles originating from the right ventricular outflow tract (2.7%). Three patients developed complications during ablation (1.4%). Among congenital heart diseases, which occurred in 51 (15.4%) patients, atrial sept defect was the most frequent (27.4%), followed by ventricular sept defect (25.4%) and Ebstein's anomaly (17.6%). Conclusion Electrophysiological study and radiofrequency ablation are effective tools for diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in the pediatric population. PMID:25372472

  1. MR imaging guidance for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Terence Z.; Kettenbach, Joachim; Silverman, Stuart G.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Morrison, Paul R.; Kacher, Daniel F.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1998-04-01

    Image guidance is one of the major challenges common to all minimally invasive procedures including biopsy, thermal ablation, endoscopy, and laparoscopy. This is essential for (1) identifying the target lesion, (2) planning the minimally invasive approach, and (3) monitoring the therapy as it progresses. MRI is an ideal imaging modality for this purpose, providing high soft tissue contrast and multiplanar imaging, capability with no ionizing radiation. An interventional/surgical MRI suite has been developed at Brigham and Women's Hospital which provides multiplanar imaging guidance during surgery, biopsy, and thermal ablation procedures. The 0.5T MRI system (General Electric Signa SP) features open vertical access, allowing intraoperative imaging to be performed. An integrated navigational system permits near real-time control of imaging planes, and provides interactive guidance for positioning various diagnostic and therapeutic probes. MR imaging can also be used to monitor cryotherapy as well as high temperature thermal ablation procedures sing RF, laser, microwave, or focused ultrasound. Design features of the interventional MRI system will be discussed, and techniques will be described for interactive image acquisition and tracking of interventional instruments. Applications for interactive and near-real-time imaging will be presented as well as examples of specific procedures performed using MRI guidance.

  2. afsS is a target of AfsR, a transcriptional factor with ATPase activity that globally controls secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping-Chin; Umeyama, Takashi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2002-03-01

    AfsR is a pleiotropic, global regulator that controls the production of actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin and calcium-dependent antibiotic in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). AfsR, with 993 amino acids, is phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues by a protein serine/threonine kinase AfsK and contains an OmpR-like DNA-binding fold at its N-terminal portion and A- and B-type nucleotide-binding motifs in the middle of the protein. The DNA-binding domain, in-dependently of the nucleotide-binding domain, contributed the binding of AfsR to the upstream region of afsS that locates immediately 3' to afsR and encodes a 63-amino-acid protein. No transcription of afsS in the DeltaafsR background and restoration of afsS transcription by afsR on a plasmid in the same genetic background indicated that afsR served as a transcriptional activator for afsS. Interestingly, the AfsR binding site overlapped the promoter of afsS, as determined by DNase I protection assay and high-resolution S1 nuclease mapping. The nucleotide-binding domain contributed distinct ATPase and GTPase activity. The phosphorylation of AfsR by AfsK greatly enhanced the DNA-binding activity and modulated the ATPase activity. The DNA-binding ability of AfsR was independent of the ATPase activity. However, the ATPase activity was essential for transcriptional activation of afsS, probably because the energy available from ATP hydrolysis is required for the isomerization of the closed complex between AfsR and RNA polymerase to a transcriptionally competent open complex. Thus, AfsR turns out to be a unique transcriptional factor, in that it is modular, in which DNA-binding and ATPase activities are physically separable, and the two functions are modulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues.

  3. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. Chlorpheniramine facilitates inhibitory avoidance in teleosts submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, F R; Mattioli, R

    2008-05-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of H(1) histaminegic receptor on the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance in Carassius auratus submitted to telencephalic ablation. The fish were submitted to telencephalic ablation 5 days before the experiment. The inhibitory avoidance procedure included 1 day for habituation, 3 days for training composed of 3 trials each (1st day: T1, T2, T3; 2nd day: 2T1, 2T2, 2T3; 3rd day: 3T1, 3T2, 3T3) and 1 day for test. On training days, the fish were placed in a white compartment, after 30 s the door was opened. When the fish crossed to a black compartment, a weight was dropped (aversive stimuli). Immediately after the third trial, on training days, the fish received, intraperitoneally, one of the pharmacological treatments (saline (N = 20), 8 (N = 12) or 16 (N = 13) microg/g chlorpheniramine, CPA). On the test day, the time to cross to the black compartment was determined. The latency of the saline group increased significantly only on the 3rd trial of the 2nd training day (mean +/- SEM, T1 (50.40 +/- 11.69), 2T3 (226.05 +/- 25.01); ANOVA: P = 0.0249, Dunn test: P < 0.05). The group that received 8 microg/g CPA showed increased latencies from the 2nd training day until the test day (T1 (53.08 +/- 17.17), 2T2 (197.75 +/- 35.02), test (220.08 +/- 30.98); ANOVA: P = 0.0022, Dunn test: P < 0.05)). These results indicate that CPA had a facilitating effect on memory. We suggest that the fish submitted to telencephalic ablation were able to learn due to the local circuits of the mesencephalon and/or diencephalon and that CPA interferes in these circuits, probably due an anxiolytic-like effect.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  6. Dust Ablation in Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements by in situ dust detectors onboard the Pioneer and New Horizon spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Kuiper belt can be estimated to be on the order of 5 x 10 ^3 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 micron. These particles slowly migrate inward due to Poynting - Robertson drag and their spatial distribution is shaped by mean motion resonances with the gas giant planets in the outer solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto's atmosphere is on the order of 50 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that, if the particles are rich in volatiles, they can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in a narrow layer. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles, as well as on our newly developed models of Pluto's atmosphere that can be learned by matching the altitude where haze layers could be formed.

  7. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  8. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost.

  9. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  10. Catheter Ablation of Right-Sided Accessory Pathways in Adults Using the Three-Dimensional Mapping System: A Randomized Comparison to the Conventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuedong; Qiu, Jia; Yang, Yang; Tang, Anli

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) mapping and navigation systems have been widely used for the ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia, but the applicability of these systems for the ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to right-sided accessory pathways (RAPs) remains unknown. The goal of this prospective randomized study was to compare the safety, efficiency, and efficacy of nonfluoroscopic and conventional fluoroscopic mapping techniques in guiding catheter ablation of SVT due to RAPs. Of the 393 consecutive patients with SVT who were randomized to receive either conventional fluoroscopic or Ensite NavX mapping-guided ablation, 64 patients with RAPs were included for analysis. Endpoints for ablation were no evidence of RAP conduction and no inducible atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT). The 3D group showed fewer ablation pulses and a shorter total ablation time compared to the conventional group, although the acute procedural success did not differ significantly between the two groups. Total procedure time, electrophysiological study time, total fluoroscopy time, and cumulative radiation doses were also significantly reduced in the 3D group. Patients in the conventional group with a right atrium diameter (RAD) ≥ 47 mm required a longer fluoroscopy time. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rates between the two groups over a follow-up period of 3 to 29 months. There were no permanent complications. The 3D mapping system may be a preferred alternative for patients with AVRT due to RAPs, especially for patients with a large RAD (≥ 47 mm).

  11. Catheter Ablation of Right-Sided Accessory Pathways in Adults Using the Three-Dimensional Mapping System: A Randomized Comparison to the Conventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Anli

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) mapping and navigation systems have been widely used for the ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia, but the applicability of these systems for the ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to right-sided accessory pathways (RAPs) remains unknown. The goal of this prospective randomized study was to compare the safety, efficiency, and efficacy of nonfluoroscopic and conventional fluoroscopic mapping techniques in guiding catheter ablation of SVT due to RAPs. Of the 393 consecutive patients with SVT who were randomized to receive either conventional fluoroscopic or Ensite NavX mapping-guided ablation, 64 patients with RAPs were included for analysis. Endpoints for ablation were no evidence of RAP conduction and no inducible atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT). The 3D group showed fewer ablation pulses and a shorter total ablation time compared to the conventional group, although the acute procedural success did not differ significantly between the two groups. Total procedure time, electrophysiological study time, total fluoroscopy time, and cumulative radiation doses were also significantly reduced in the 3D group. Patients in the conventional group with a right atrium diameter (RAD) ≥ 47 mm required a longer fluoroscopy time. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rates between the two groups over a follow-up period of 3 to 29 months. There were no permanent complications. The 3D mapping system may be a preferred alternative for patients with AVRT due to RAPs, especially for patients with a large RAD (≥ 47 mm). PMID:26083408

  12. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  13. An Empirical Test of Oklahoma's A-F School Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.; Ware, Jordan; Mwavita, Mwarumba; Barnes, Laura L.; Khojasteb, Jam

    2016-01-01

    Oklahoma is one of 16 states electing to use an A-F letter grade as an indicator of school quality. On the surface, letter grades are an attractive policy instrument for school improvement; they are seemingly clear, simple, and easy to interpret. Evidence, however, on the use of letter grades as an instrument to rank and improve schools is scant…

  14. Ornicorrugatin, a new siderophore from Pseudomonas fluorescens AF76.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Schäfer, Mathias; Wathelet, Bernard; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    From a pyoverdin-negative mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens AF76 a new lipopeptidic siderophore (ornicorrugatin) could be isolated. It is structurally related to the siderophore of Pseudomonas corrugata differing in the replacement of one Dab unit by Orn. PMID:18386480

  15. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  16. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, J.; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Lunney, J. G.

    2013-02-28

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at {approx}2 J cm{sup -2} has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation are similar; both show a singly peaked time-of-flight distribution. The angular distribution of ion emission and the deposition are well described by the adiabatic and isentropic model of plume expansion, though distributions for femtosecond ablation are significantly narrower. In this laser fluence regime, the energy efficiency of mass ablation is higher for femtosecond pulses than for nanosecond pulses, but the ion production efficiency is lower.

  17. UV-laser ablation of ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Nils; Thrun, Alexander; Muskat, Tassilo; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    Ionic liquid matrices are a new class of matrices used in MALDI mass spectrometry. The ablation process of several ionic liquid matrices was studied by determining the velocity distribution of ablated neutral matrix molecules. This was done by a postionization approach, where the neutrals were ionized in the ablation plume by a second laser pulse. It was found that a second, time-delayed ablation event occurs consisting completely of neutral molecules. To explain this, the reflected-shockwave model is used, which assumes that the shockwave emerging from the laser ablation is reflected at the sample holder surface. When the shockwave arrives at the sample surface it causes a second ablation.

  18. Zero-fluoroscopy catheter ablation of severe drug-resistant arrhythmia guided by Ensite NavX system during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangzhi; Sun, Ge; Xu, Renfan; Chen, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Bai, Yang; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Chunxia; Wang, Dao Wen; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac arrhythmias can occur during pregnancy. Owing to radiation exposure and other uncertain risks for the mother and fetus, catheter ablation has rarely been performed and is often delayed until the postpartum period. We reported 2 pregnant women who were experiencing severe arrhythmias and were successfully ablated without fluoroscopic guidance. We also carried out a literature review of cases of pregnant women who underwent zero-fluoroscopy ablation. Methods and Results: One woman had drug-resistant and poorly tolerated frequent premature ventricular contraction (PVC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). The other one had persistent and hardly terminated supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) via a right accessory pathway. The 2 patients were successfully underwent zero-fluoroscopy ablation guided by Ensite NavX system. The procedure time was 42 and 71 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: Catheter ablation of SVT or PVC/VT in pregnant patients can be safely and effectively performed with a completely zero-fluoroscopy approach guided by the Ensite NavX system. In the case of a drug refractory, life-threatening arrhythmia during pregnancy, catheter ablation may be considered. PMID:27512864

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley W; Harvey, Harold A; Dye, Charles E; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T

    2014-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  20. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between t