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Sample records for af ablation procedures

  1. Procedural Complications, Rehospitalizations, and Repeat Procedures After Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmee U.; Freeman, James V.; Shilane, David; Wang, Paul J.; Go, Alan S.; Hlatky, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate rates and identify predictors of inpatient complications and 30-day readmissions, as well as repeat hospitalization rates for arrhythmia recurrence following atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Background AF is the most common clinically significant arrhythmia and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Radiofrequency or cryotherapy ablation of AF is a relatively new treatment option, and data on post-procedural outcomes in large general populations are limited. Methods Using data from the California State Inpatient Database, we identified all adult patients who underwent their first AF ablation from 2005 to 2008. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors of complications and/or 30-day readmissions and Kaplan-Meier analyses to estimate rates of all-cause and arrhythmia readmissions. Results Among 4,156 patients who underwent an initial AF ablation, 5% had periprocedural complications, most commonly vascular, and 9% were readmitted within 30 days. Older age, female, prior AF hospitalizations, and less hospital experience with AF ablation were associated with higher adjusted risk of complications and/or 30-day readmissions. The rate of all-cause hospitalization was 38.5% by 1 year. The rate of readmission for recurrent AF, atrial flutter, and/or repeat ablation was 21.7% by 1 year and 29.6% by 2 years. Conclusions Periprocedural complications occurred in 1 of 20 patients undergoing AF ablation, and all-cause and arrhythmia-related rehospitalizations were common. Older age, female sex, prior AF hospitalizations, and recent hospital procedure experience were associated with a higher risk of complications and/or 30-day readmission after AF ablation. PMID:22222078

  2. Atrial Electrogram Discordance During Baseline versus Re-Induced Atrial Fibrillation: Potential Ramifications For Ablation Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Biviano, Angelo B.; Ciaccio, Edward J.; Knotts, Robert; Lawrence, John; Iyer, Vivek; Whang, William; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background There are scant data comparing the electrogram (EGM) signal characteristics of AF in the baseline versus electrically induced states during ablation procedures. Objective The purpose of this study was to use novel intracardiac signal analysis techniques to gain insights into the effects of catheter ablation and AF re-induction on AF EGMs in patients with persistent AF. Methods We collected left atrial EGMs in patients undergoing first ablation for persistent AF at three time intervals: i) AF at baseline; ii) AF after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and; iii) AF after post-PVI cardioversion and subsequent re-induction. We analyzed the following two EGM spectral characteristics: 1a) dominant frequency (DF) and 1b) spectral complexity; and the following two EGM morphologic characteristics: 2a) morphology variation, and 2b) pattern repetitiveness. Results There were no differences in AF dominant frequency, dominant amplitude, spectral complexity, or metrics of EGM morphology or repetitiveness at baseline versus after PVI. However, dominant frequency, dominant amplitude, and spectral complexity differed significantly after DC cardioversion and re-induction of AF. Conclusions The frequency, spectral complexity and local EGM morphologies of AF do not significantly change over the course of a pulmonary vein isolation procedure in patients with persistent AF. However, re-induction of AF after DC cardioversion results in different DF and spectral complexity, consistent with a change in the characteristics of the perpetuating source(s) of the newly induced AF. These data suggest that AF properties can vary significantly between baseline versus re-induced AF, with potential clinical ramifications for outcomes of catheter ablation procedures. PMID:25818256

  3. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: results from the first European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos; Hocini, Melece; Fauchier, Laurent; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Defaye, Pascal; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Estner, Heidi; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-11-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey collecting patient-based data on current clinical practices during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. The participating centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (from September to October 2014). A web-based case report form was employed to collect information of patients and data of procedures. A total of 455 eligible consecutive patients from 13 countries were enrolled (mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 28.8% women). Distinct strategies and endpoints were collected for AF ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was performed in 96.7% and served as the endpoint in 91.3% of procedures. A total of 52 (11.5%) patients underwent ablation as first-line therapy. The cryoballoon technique was employed in 31.4% of procedures. Procedure, ablation, and fluoroscopy times differed among various types of AF ablation. Divergences in patient selection and complications were observed among low-, medium-, and high-volume centres. Adverse events were observed in 4.6% of AF ablation procedures. In conclusion, PVI was still the main strategy for AF ablation. Procedure-related complications seemed not to have declined. The centre volume played an important role in patient selection, strategy choice, and had impact on the rate of periprocedural complication.

  4. Remotely controlled steerable sheath improves result and procedural parameters of atrial fibrillation ablation with magnetic navigation

    PubMed Central

    Errahmouni, Abdelkarim; Latcu, Decebal Gabriel; Bun, Sok-Sithikun; Rijo, Nicolas; Dugourd, Céline; Saoudi, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Aims The magnetic navigation (MN) system may be coupled with a new advancement system that fully controls both the catheter and a robotic deflectable sheath (RSh) or with a fixed-curve sheath and a catheter-only advancement system (CAS). We aimed to compare these approaches for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Methods and results Atrial fibrillation ablation patients (45, 23 paroxysmal and 22 persistent) performed with MN–RSh (RSh group) were compared with a control group (37, 18 paroxysmal and19 persistent) performed with MN–CAS (CAS group). Setup duration was measured from the procedure's start to operator transfer to control room. Ablation step duration was defined as the time from the beginning of the first radiofrequency (RF) pulse to the end of the last one and was separately acquired for the left and the right pulmonary vein (PV) pairs. Clinical characteristics, left atrial size, and AF-type distribution were similar between the groups. Setup duration as well as mapping times was also similar. Ablation step duration for the left PVs was similar, but was shorter for the right PVs in RSh group (46 ± 9 vs. 63 ± 12 min, P < 0.0001). Radiofrequency delivery time (34 ± 9 vs. 40 ± 11 min, P = 0.007) and procedure duration (227 ± 36 vs. 254 ± 62 min, P = 0.01) were shorter in RSh group. No complication occurred in RSh group. During follow-up, there were five recurrences (11%) in RSh group and 11 (29%) in CAS group (P = 0.027). Conclusion The use of the RSh for AF ablation with MN is safe and improves outcome. Right PV isolation is faster, RF delivery time and procedure time are reduced. PMID:25662989

  5. Robust tracking of a virtual electrode on a coronary sinus catheter for atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; Strobel, Norbert; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    Catheter tracking in X-ray fluoroscopic images has become more important in interventional applications for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures. It provides real-time guidance for the physicians and can be used as reference for motion compensation applications. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to track a virtual electrode (VE), which is a non-existing electrode on the coronary sinus (CS) catheter at a more proximal location than any real electrodes. Successful tracking of the VE can provide more accurate motion information than tracking of real electrodes. To achieve VE tracking, we first model the CS catheter as a set of electrodes which are detected by our previously published learning-based approach.1 The tracked electrodes are then used to generate the hypotheses for tracking the VE. Model-based hypotheses are fused and evaluated by a Bayesian framework. Evaluation has been conducted on a database of clinical AF ablation data including challenging scenarios such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), occlusion and nonrigid deformation. Our approach obtains 0.54mm median error and 90% of evaluated data have errors less than 1.67mm. The speed of our tracking algorithm reaches 6 frames-per-second on most data. Our study on motion compensation shows that using the VE as reference provides a good point to detect non-physiological catheter motion during the AF ablation procedures.2

  6. Oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation: results from the First European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA).

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Larsen, Torben B; Deharo, Jean Claude; Rossvoll, Ole; Dagres, Nikolaos; Todd, Derick; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Purefellner, Helmut; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, conducted to collect patient-based data on current clinical practices in AF ablation in context of the latest AF Guidelines and contemporary oral anticoagulant therapies. The EP Research Network Centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (September/October 2014). Data were collected via the web-based case report form. We present the results pertinent to the use of antithrombotic therapies. Thirteen countries prospectively enrolled 455 eligible consecutive patients [mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 131 (28.8%) females]. The mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.12 ± 1.06 [137 patients (30.1%) had a score of ≥2]. Before ablation, 443 patients (97.4%) were on anticoagulant therapy [143 (31.4%) on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and 264 (58.0%) on vitamin K antagonists (VKAs)]. Of the latter, 79.7% underwent ablation without VKA interruption, whilst a variety of strategies were used in patients taking NOAC. After ablation, most patients (89.3%) continued the same anticoagulant as before, and 2 (0.4%) were not prescribed any anticoagulation. At discharge, 280 patients (62.2%) were advised oral anticoagulation for a limited period of mean 3.8 ± 2.2 months. On multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc, AF duration, prior VKA use, and estimated AF ablation success were significantly associated with the decision on short-term anticoagulation. Our results show the increasing use of NOAC in patients undergoing AF ablation and emphasize the need for more information to guide the periprocedural use of both NOACs and VKAs in real-world setting.

  7. Peri-procedural interrupted oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation: comparison of aspirin, warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Roger A.; Mead, R. Hardwin; Engel, Gregory; Kong, Melissa H.; Patrawala, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation ablation requires peri-procedural oral anticoagulation (OAC) to prevent thromboembolic events. There are several options for OAC. We evaluate peri-procedural AF ablation complications using a variety of peri-procedural OACs. Methods and results We examined peri-procedural OAC and groin, bleeding, and thromboembolic complications for 2334 consecutive AF ablations using open irrigated-tip radiofrequency (RF) catheters. Pre-ablation OAC was warfarin in 1113 (47.7%), dabigatran 426 (18.3%), rivaroxaban 187 (8.0%), aspirin 472 (20.2%), and none 136 (5.8%). Oral anticoagulation was always interrupted and intraprocedural anticoagulation was unfractionated heparin (activated clotting time, ACT = 237 ± 26 s). Pre- and post-OAC drugs were the same for 1591 (68.2%) and were different for 743 (31.8%). Following ablation, 693 (29.7%) were treated with dabigatran and 291 (12.5%) were treated with rivaroxaban. There were no problems changing from one OAC pre-ablation to another post-ablation. Complications included 12 (0.51%) pericardial tamponades [no differences for dabigatran (P = 0.457) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.163) compared with warfarin], 12 (0.51%) groin complications [no differences for rivaroxaban (P = 0.709) and fewer for dabigatran (P = 0.041) compared with warfarin]. Only 5 of 2334 (0.21%) required blood transfusions. There were two strokes (0.086%) and no transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) in the first 48 h post-ablation. Three additional strokes (0.13%), and two TIAs (0.086%) occurred from 48 h to 30 days. Only one stroke had a residual deficit. Compared with warfarin, the neurologic event rate was not different for dabigatran (P = 0.684) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.612). Conclusion Using interrupted OAC, low target intraprocedural ACT, and irrigated-tip RF, the rate of peri-procedural groin, haemorrhagic, and thromboembolic complications was extremely low. There were only minimal differences between OACs. Low-risk patients may remain on aspirin

  8. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist: ablation for atrial fibrillation. Part II: regional anatomy of the atria and relevance to damage of adjacent structures during AF ablation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Paula G; Kapa, Suraj; Mears, Jennifer A; Fratianni, Amy; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2010-07-01

    Ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation have become an established and increasingly used option for managing patients with symptomatic arrhythmia. The anatomic structures relevant to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation and ablation procedures are varied and include the pulmonary veins, other thoracic veins, the left atrial myocardium, and autonomic ganglia. Exact regional anatomic knowledge of these structures is essential to allow correlation with fluoroscopy and electrograms and, importantly, to avoid complications from damage of adjacent structures within the chest. We present this information as a series of 2 articles. In a prior issue, we have discussed the thoracic vein anatomy relevant to paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the present article, we focus on the atria themselves, the autonomic ganglia, and anatomic issues relevant for minimizing complications during atrial fibrillation ablation.

  9. Psychosurgery: the past and present of ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    Harat, Marek; Rudas, Marcin; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2008-11-01

    Surgical intervention to the brain has a long history, but contemporary psychosurgery started in the mid-1930s. The first psychosurgical operation was a prefrontal leucotomy. In this chapter, a history of psychosurgery is described with a special focus on so-called "ablation" procedures such as anterior cingulotomy, anterior capsulotomy, subcaudate tractotomy, and limbic leucotomy. The expectations that psychiatrists linked to the surgical intervention have grown along with the progress of diagnostic neuroimaging procedures used in brain research. In recent years, the introduction of neuromodulation techniques seemed to produce a qualitative progress in modern psychosurgery. However, the controversies about these surgical interventions to the brain among psychiatrists still restrict the indications for psychosurgery to highly selected cases.

  10. Microwave Ablation of Porcine Kidneys in vivo: Effect of two Different Ablation Modes ('Temperature Control' and 'Power Control') on Procedural Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Arnegger, F.; Koch, V.; Pap, B.; Holzschuh, M.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Senft, J.; Nickel, F.; Mogler, C.; Zelzer, S.; Meinzer, H. P.; Stampfl, U.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to analyze the effect of two different ablation modes ('temperature control' and 'power control') of a microwave system on procedural outcome in porcine kidneys in vivo. Methods: A commercially available microwave system (Avecure Microwave Generator; MedWaves, San Diego, CA) was used. The system offers the possibility to ablate with two different ablation modes: temperature control and power control. Thirty-two microwave ablations were performed in 16 kidneys of 8 pigs. In each animal, one kidney was ablated twice by applying temperature control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, automatic power set point; group I). The other kidney was ablated twice by applying power control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, ablation power set point at 24 W; group II). Procedural outcome was analyzed: (1) technical success (e.g., system failures, duration of the ablation cycle), and (2) ablation geometry (e.g., long axis diameter, short axis diameter, and circularity). Results: System failures occurred in 0% in group I and 13% in group II. Duration of the ablation cycle was 60 {+-} 0 s in group I and 102 {+-} 21 s in group II. Long axis diameter was 20.3 {+-} 4.6 mm in group I and 19.8 {+-} 3.5 mm in group II (not significant (NS)). Short axis diameter was 10.3 {+-} 2 mm in group I and 10.5 {+-} 2.4 mm in group II (NS). Circularity was 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group I and 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group II (NS). Conclusions: Microwave ablations performed with temperature control showed fewer system failures and were finished faster. Both ablation modes demonstrated no significant differences with respect to ablation geometry.

  11. Catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Calkins, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    Catheter ablation is increasingly offered to patients who suffer from symptoms due to atrial fibrillation (AF), based on a growing body of evidence illustrating its efficacy compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Approximately one-third of AF ablation procedures are currently performed in patients with persistent or long-standing persistent AF. Here, we review the available information to guide catheter ablation in these more chronic forms of AF. We identify the following principles: Our clinical ability to discriminate paroxysmal and persistent AF is limited. Pulmonary vein isolation is a reasonable and effective first approach for catheter ablation of persistent AF. Other ablation strategies are being developed and need to be properly evaluated in controlled, multicentre trials. Treatment of concomitant conditions promoting recurrent AF by life style interventions and medical therapy should be a routine adjunct to catheter ablation of persistent AF. Early rhythm control therapy has a biological rationale and trials evaluating its value are underway. There is a clear need to generate more evidence for the best approach to ablation of persistent AF beyond pulmonary vein isolation in the form of adequately powered controlled multi-centre trials. PMID:27389907

  12. Method for evaluation of predictive models of microwave ablation via post-procedural clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jarrod A.; Brown, Daniel; Kingham, T. Peter; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.; Clements, Logan W.

    2015-03-01

    Development of a clinically accurate predictive model of microwave ablation (MWA) procedures would represent a significant advancement and facilitate an implementation of patient-specific treatment planning to achieve optimal probe placement and ablation outcomes. While studies have been performed to evaluate predictive models of MWA, the ability to quantify the performance of predictive models via clinical data has been limited to comparing geometric measurements of the predicted and actual ablation zones. The accuracy of placement, as determined by the degree of spatial overlap between ablation zones, has not been achieved. In order to overcome this limitation, a method of evaluation is proposed where the actual location of the MWA antenna is tracked and recorded during the procedure via a surgical navigation system. Predictive models of the MWA are then computed using the known position of the antenna within the preoperative image space. Two different predictive MWA models were used for the preliminary evaluation of the proposed method: (1) a geometric model based on the labeling associated with the ablation antenna and (2) a 3-D finite element method based computational model of MWA using COMSOL. Given the follow-up tomographic images that are acquired at approximately 30 days after the procedure, a 3-D surface model of the necrotic zone was generated to represent the true ablation zone. A quantification of the overlap between the predicted ablation zones and the true ablation zone was performed after a rigid registration was computed between the pre- and post-procedural tomograms. While both model show significant overlap with the true ablation zone, these preliminary results suggest a slightly higher degree of overlap with the geometric model.

  13. Steerable sheath technology in the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jubin; Wong, Kelvin C K; Ginks, Matthew R; Bashir, Yaver; Betts, Timothy R; Rajappan, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Steerable sheaths have been shown to reduce procedure time in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), where catheter positioning and stability is typically challenging. This review critically addresses and highlights the recent developments in design of sheaths used to manipulate the ablation catheter and how these developments may impact on the ablation procedure itself, in particular the likelihood of first-time success. Patents relating to steerable sheaths are reviewed and discussed to gauge potential future developments in this area.

  14. Lung radiofrequency and microwave ablation: a review of indications, techniques and post-procedural imaging appearances.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Jennings, P E

    2015-02-01

    Lung ablation can be used to treat both primary and secondary thoracic malignancies. Evidence to support its use, particularly for metastases from colonic primary tumours, is now strong, with survival data in selected cases approaching that seen after surgery. Because of this, the use of ablative techniques (particularly thermal ablation) is growing and the Royal College of Radiologists predict that the number of patients who could benefit from such treatment may reach in excess of 5000 per year in the UK. Treatment is often limited to larger regional centres, and general radiologists often have limited awareness of the current indications and the techniques involved. Furthermore, radiologists without any prior experience are frequently expected to interpret post-treatment imaging, often performed in the context of acute complications, which have occurred after discharge. This review aims to provide an overview of the current indications for pulmonary ablation, together with the techniques involved and the range of post-procedural appearances.

  15. Lung radiofrequency and microwave ablation: a review of indications, techniques and post-procedural imaging appearances

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, P E

    2015-01-01

    Lung ablation can be used to treat both primary and secondary thoracic malignancies. Evidence to support its use, particularly for metastases from colonic primary tumours, is now strong, with survival data in selected cases approaching that seen after surgery. Because of this, the use of ablative techniques (particularly thermal ablation) is growing and the Royal College of Radiologists predict that the number of patients who could benefit from such treatment may reach in excess of 5000 per year in the UK. Treatment is often limited to larger regional centres, and general radiologists often have limited awareness of the current indications and the techniques involved. Furthermore, radiologists without any prior experience are frequently expected to interpret post-treatment imaging, often performed in the context of acute complications, which have occurred after discharge. This review aims to provide an overview of the current indications for pulmonary ablation, together with the techniques involved and the range of post-procedural appearances. PMID:25465192

  16. Repeat ablation and hospitalization following cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation at a single tertiary medical center

    PubMed Central

    East, Cara; Phan, Teresa; Filardo, Giovanni; Franklin, Jay; Donsky, Alan; Wheelan, Kevin R

    2017-01-01

    Cryoablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has rapidly become a mainstream treatment for AF. In this report, 163 patients who had undergone a cryoablation procedure at one clinical center were contacted by telephone 33.1 ± 3.3 months after the procedure. All patients had received cryoablation of the pulmonary vein ostia, although concomitant procedures were performed at the same time in over 50% of the patients, including radiofrequency and/or cryoablation of other areas of the left atrium. Freedom from a repeat ablation procedure was 87%, while freedom from recurrent hospitalization for AF was 89%, as compared to previous reports of 65%. Of the 13 patients who had a repeat ablation procedure, only one was found to have a reconnection of pulmonary veins, while 4 were found to have atrial flutter. Cryoablation for AF produces a durable result in most patients out to 3 years with better outcomes than previously reported. PMID:28127119

  17. Outcomes of Cryoballoon Ablation in High- and Low-Volume Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Centres: A Russian Pilot Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylov, Evgeny N.; Lebedev, Dmitry S.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Davtyan, Karapet V.; Ivanitskii, Eduard A.; Nechepurenko, Anatoly A.; Kosonogov, Alexey Ya.; Kolunin, Grigory V.; Morozov, Igor A.; Termosesov, Sergey A.; Maykov, Evgeny B.; Khomutinin, Dmitry N.; Eremin, Sergey A.; Mayorov, Igor M.; Romanov, Alexander B.; Shabanov, Vitaliy V.; Shatakhtsyan, Victoria; Tsivkovskii, Viktor; Revishvili, Amiran Sh.; Shlyakhto, Evgeny V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The results of cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedure have been mainly derived from studies conducted in experienced atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation centres. Here, we report on CBA efficacy and complications resulting from real practice of this procedure at both high- and low-volume centres. Methods. Among 62 Russian centres performing AF ablation, 15 (24%) used CBA technology for pulmonary vein isolation. The centres were asked to provide a detailed description of all CBA procedures performed and complications, if encountered. Results. Thirteen sites completed interviews on all CBAs in their centres (>95% of CBAs in Russia). Six sites were high-volume AF ablation (>100 AF cases/year) centres, and 7 were low-volume AF ablation. There was no statistical difference in arrhythmia-free rates between high- and low-volume centres (64.6 versus 60.8% at 6 months). Major complications developed in 1.5% of patients and were equally distributed between high- and low-volume centres. Minor procedure-related events were encountered in 8% of patients and were more prevalent in high-volume centres. Total event and vascular access site event rates were higher in women than in men. Conclusions. CBA has an acceptable efficacy profile in real practice. In less experienced AF ablation centres, the major complication rate is equal to that in high-volume centres. PMID:26640789

  18. The Effect of Aggressive Blood Pressure Control on the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation: A Randomized, Open Label, Clinical Trial (Substrate Modification with Aggressive Blood Pressure Control: SMAC- AF).

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ratika; Wells, George A; Sapp, John L; Healey, Jeffrey S; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Greiss, Isabelle; Rivard, Léna; Roux, Jean-Francois; Gula, Lorne; Nault, Isabelle; Novak, Paul G; Birnie, David H; Ha, Andrew C; Wilton, Stephen B; Mangat, Iqwal; Gray, Christopher J; Gardner, Martin J; Tang, Anthony S L

    2017-02-22

    Background -Radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has become an important therapy for AF, however recurrence rates remain high. We proposed to determine whether aggressive blood pressure (BP) lowering prevents recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation in patients with AF and a high symptom burden. Methods -We randomly assigned 184 patients with AF and a BP greater than 130/80 mmHg to aggressive BP (target <120/80 mm Hg) or standard BP treatment (target <140/90 mmHg) prior to their scheduled AF catheter ablation. The primary outcome was symptomatic recurrence of AF/atrial tachycardia/atrial flutter lasting greater than 30 seconds, determined 3 months beyond catheter ablation by a blinded endpoint evaluation. Results -The median follow-up was 14 months. At six months, the mean systolic BP in the aggressive BP treatment group was 123.2±13.2 versus 135.4±15.7mm Hg (p<0.001) in the standard treatment group. The primary outcome occurred in 106 patients, 54 (61.4%) in the aggressive BP treatment group, compared to 52 (61.2%) in the standard treatment group, (Hazard Ratio 0.94, 95% Confidence Interval 0.65-1.38, p=0.763). In the prespecified subgroup analysis of the influence of age, patients aged ≥ 61 years had a lower primary outcome event rate with aggressive BP (Hazard Ratio 0.58, 95% Confidence Interval (0.34, 0.97), p=0.013). There was a higher rate of hypotension requiring medication adjustment in the aggressive BP group (26% versus 0%). Conclusions -In this study, this duration of aggressive BP treatment did not reduce atrial arrhythmia recurrence after catheter ablation for AF, but resulted in more hypotension. Clinical Trial Registration -Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00438113.

  19. Respiratory motion influence on catheter contact force during radio frequency ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation is a common treatment option for atrial fibrillation. A common treatment strategy is pulmonary vein isolation. In this case, individual ablation points need to be placed around the ostia of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium to generate transmural lesions and thereby block electric signals. To achieve a durable transmural lesion, the tip of the catheter has to be stable with a sufficient tissue contact during radio-frequency ablation. Besides the steerable interface operated by the physician, the movement of the catheter is also influenced by the heart and breathing motion - particularly during ablation. In this paper we investigate the influence of breathing motion on different areas of the endocardium during radio frequency ablation. To this end, we analyze the frequency spectrum of the continuous catheter contact force to identify areas with increased breathing motion using a classification method. This approach has been applied to clinical patient data acquired during three pulmonary vein isolation procedures. Initial findings show that motion due to respiration is more pronounced at the roof and around the right pulmonary veins.

  20. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  1. Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byunghoon; Lee, Hun; Choi, Bong Joon; Seo, Kyung Ryul; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Dae Yune

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery. Methods We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. Results Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured. Conclusions The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery. PMID:28243019

  2. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  3. Pheochromocytoma diagnosed after anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation procedure: a giant in disguise.

    PubMed

    Galvão Braga, Carlos; Ribeiro, Sílvia; Martins, Juliana; Arantes, Carina; Ramos, Vítor; Primo, João; Magalhães, Sónia; Correia, Adelino

    2014-04-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-producing tumor, discovered incidentally in 50% of cases. We present the case of a 44-year-old male with a history of paroxysmal palpitations. Baseline ECG, transthoracic echocardiogram and ECG stress test showed no relevant alterations. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was detected on 24-hour Holter ECG. After antiarrhythmic therapy, the patient remained symptomatic, and was accordingly referred for electrophysiological study and atrial fibrillation ablation. Anticoagulation was initiated before the procedure. After ablation and still anticoagulated, he complained of hematospermia. The abdominal and pelvic imaging study showed a 10-cm left adrenal mass, predominantly cystic, compatible with pheochromocytoma, which was confirmed after biochemical tests (increased urine metanephrines and plasma catecholamines). Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy scanning confirmed localized disease in the adrenal gland, excluding other uptake foci. Following appropriate preoperative management, surgical resection of the giant mass was performed successfully and without complications.

  4. The indications for and techniques and outcomes of ablative procedures of the distal ulna. The Darrach resection, hemiresection, matched resection, and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, D M; Ganocy, T K; Kim, D C

    1998-05-01

    Several ablative procedures exist for the treatment of distal radio-ulnar joint arthritis. This article describes the indications, techniques, pitfalls, and outcomes for the four most popular procedures: Darrach, hemiresection-interposition, Sauvé-Kapandji, and matched ulnar resection. The authors explain their personal algorithm for treatment selection, emphasizing patient requirements versus the physiologic characteristics of each procedure.

  5. Analysis of excimer laser radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume at LASIK procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiati, Rima Fitria; Rini Rizki, Artha Bona; Kusumawardhani, Apriani; Setijono, Heru; Rahmadiansah, Andi

    2016-11-01

    LASIK (Laser Asissted In Situ Interlamelar Keratomilieusis) is a technique for correcting refractive disorders of the eye such as myopia and astigmatism using an excimer laser. This procedure use photoablation technique to decompose corneal tissues. Although preferred due to its efficiency, permanency, and accuracy, the inappropriate amount radiant exposure often cause side effects like under-over correction, irregular astigmatism and problems on surrounding tissues. In this study, the radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume has been modelled through several processes. Data collecting results is laser data specifications with 193 nm wavelength, beam diameter of 0.065 - 0.65 cm, and fluence of 160 mJ/cm2. For the medical data, the myopia-astigmatism value, cornea size, corneal ablation thickness, and flap data are taken. The first modelling step is determining the laser diameter between 0.065 - 0.65 cm with 0.45 cm increment. The energy, power, and intensity of laser determined from laser beam area. Number of pulse and total energy is calculated before the radiant exposure of laser is obtained. Next is to determine the parameters influence the ablation volume. Regression method used to create the equation, and then the spot size is substituted to the model. The validation used is statistic correlation method to both experimental data and theory. By the model created, it is expected that any potential complications can be prevented during LASIK procedures. The recommendations can give the users clearer picture to determine the appropriate amount of radiant exposure with the corneal ablation volume necessary.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  7. [Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Health Technology Assessment Report from the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC)].

    PubMed

    Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tritto, Massimo; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Berto, Patrizia; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Catanzariti, Domenico; De Fabrizio, Giuseppe; De Ponti, Roberto; Grimaldi, Massimo; Pandozi, Claudio; Tondo, Claudio; Gulizia, Michele

    2011-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and significantly impact patients' quality of life, morbidity and mortality. The number of affected patients is expected to increase as well as the costs associated with AF management, mainly driven by hospitalizations. Over the last decade, catheter ablation techniques targeting pulmonary vein isolation have demonstrated to be effective in treating AF and preventing AF recurrence. This Health Technology Assessment report of the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC) aims to define the current role of catheter ablation of AF in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and appropriateness. On the basis of an extensive review of the available literature, this report provides (i) an overview of the epidemiology, clinical impact and socio-economic burden of AF; (ii) an evaluation of therapeutic options other than catheter ablation of AF; and (iii) a detailed presentation of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit ratio associated with catheter ablation. The costs of catheter ablation of AF in Italy were obtained using a bottom-up analysis of a resource utilization survey of 52 hospitals that were considered a representative sample, including 4 Centers that contributed with additional unit cost information in a separate questionnaire. An analysis of budget impact was also performed to evaluate the impact of ablation on the management costs of AF. Results of this analysis show that (1) catheter ablation is effective, safe and superior to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in maintaining sinus rhythm; (2) the cost of an ablation procedure in Italy typically ranges from €8868 to €9455, though current reimbursement remains insufficient, covering only about 60% of the costs; (3) the costs of follow-up are modest (about 8% of total costs); (4) assuming an adjustment of reimbursement to the real cost of an ablation procedure and a 5-10% increase in the annual rate of ablation procedures, after

  8. Anatomic approach for ganglionic plexi ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Sougiannis, Demetrios; Goumas, Nicolaos; Paxinos, George; Camm, A John

    2008-08-01

    There is evidence that parasympathetic denervation may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrences. This study aimed at applying an anatomic approach for ablation of atrial ganglionic plexi (GPs) in patients with paroxysmal AF. Nineteen patients with symptomatic, paroxysmal AF underwent anatomically guided radiofrequency ablation at the location of the 4 main left atrial GPs and were prospectively assessed for recurrence of AF or other atrial arrhythmia. This group was compared with 19 age- and gender-matched patients who previously underwent conventional circumferential pulmonary vein ablation. All ablation procedures were uneventful. Circumferential and GP ablations were accomplished with a radiofrequency delivery time of 28 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 3 min (p <0.001) and a fluoroscopy time of 31 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 5 min (p <0.001), respectively. Parasympathetic reflexes during radiofrequency ablation were elicited in 4 patients (21%). Arrhythmia recurred in 7 patients (37%) with circumferential ablation and 14 patients (74%) with GP ablation, during 1-year follow-up (p for log-rank test = 0.017). In 2 patients with GP ablation, left atrial flutters were documented in addition to AF during follow-up. Patients who underwent GP ablation had an almost 2.5 times higher risk of AF recurrence compared with those who underwent circumferential ablation (hazard ratio 2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 6.6, p = 0.038). In conclusion, anatomically guided GP ablation is feasible and safe in the electrophysiology laboratory, but this approach yields inferior clinical results compared with circumferential ablation.

  9. One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Blackwell, Ben F.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2007-01-01

    The development and verification of a one-dimensional material thermal response code with ablation is presented. The implicit time integrator, control volume finite element spatial discretization, and Newton's method for nonlinear iteration on the entire system of residual equations have been implemented and verified for the thermochemical ablation of internally decomposing materials. This study is a continuation of the work presented in "One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure" (AIAA-2006-2910), which described the derivation, implementation, and verification of the constant density solid energy equation terms and boundary conditions. The present study extends the model to decomposing materials including decomposition kinetics, pyrolysis gas flow through the porous char layer, and a mixture (solid and gas) energy equation. Verification results are presented for the thermochemical ablation of a carbon-phenolic ablator which involves the solution of the entire system of governing equations.

  10. Ablation of an atriofascicular accessory pathway with a zero-fluoroscopy procedure

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Riccardo; Abadir, Sylvia; Bernier, Martin L.; Essebag, Vidal

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old patient with recurrent palpitations and documented left bundle branch block superior axis wide complex tachycardia underwent an electrophysiological study and ablation with a zero-fluoroscopy procedure. The electrophysiological study showed a decremental antegrade conducting atriofascicular pathway. Three-dimensional CARTO-guided mapping of the tricuspid annulus in sinus rhythm was performed, and a distinct signal corresponding to the accessory pathway potential of the atriofascicular pathway was found in the posterolateral region. By using an SR0 sheath and a 4-mm-tip catheter, radiofrequency application was delivered at this point on the annulus and successfully eliminated conduction through the accessory pathway. PMID:26550092

  11. Developing patient-specific anatomic models for validation of cardiac ablation guidance procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David, III; Rettmann, Maryam; Cameron, Bruce; Camp, Jon; Robb, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Image-guided cardiac ablation has the potential to decrease procedure times and improve clinical outcome for patients with cardiac arrhythmias. There are several proposed methods for integrating patient-specific anatomy into the cardiac ablation procedure; however, these methods require thorough validation. One of the primary challenges in validation is determining ground truth as a standard for comparison. Some validation protocols have been developed for animals models and even in patients; however, these methods can be costly to implement and may increase the risk to patients. We have developed an approach to building realistic patient-specific anatomic models at a low-cost in order to validate the guidance procedure without introducing additional risk to the patients. Using a pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography scan, the blood pool of the left and right atria of a patient are segmented semi-manually. In addition, several anatomical landmarks are identified in the image data. The segmented atria and landmarks are converted into a polygonalized model which is used to build a thin-walled patient-specific blood pool model in a stereo-lithography system. Thumbscrews are inserted into the model at the landmarks. The entire model is embedded in a platinum silicone material which has been shown to have tissue-mimicking properties relative to ultrasound. Once the pliable mold has set, the blood pool model is extracted by dissolving the rigid material. The resulting physical model correctly mimics a specific patient anatomy with embedded fiducals which can be used for validation experiments. The patient-specific anatomic model approach may also be used for pre-surgical practice and training of new interventionalists.

  12. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  13. Navigation for fluoroscopy-guided cryo-balloon ablation procedures of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourier, Felix; Brost, Alexander; Kleinoeder, Andreas; Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Attila; Schneider, Hans-Juergen; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common arrhythmia, has been identified as a major cause of stroke. The current standard in interventional treatment of AFib is the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). PVI is guided by fluoroscopy or non-fluoroscopic electro-anatomic mapping systems (EAMS). Either classic point-to-point radio-frequency (RF)- catheter ablation or so-called single-shot-devices like cryo-balloons are used to achieve electrically isolation of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium (LA). Fluoroscopy-based systems render overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then merged with fluoroscopic imaging, thereby adding detailed 3-D information to conventional fluoroscopy. EAMS provide tracking and visualization of RF catheters by means of electro-magnetic tracking. Unfortunately, current navigation systems, fluoroscopy-based or EAMS, do not provide tools to localize and visualize single shot devices like cryo-balloon catheters in 3-D. We present a prototype software for fluoroscopy-guided ablation procedures that is capable of superimposing 3-D datasets as well as reconstructing cyro-balloon catheters in 3-D. The 3-D cyro-balloon reconstruction was evaluated on 9 clinical data sets, yielded a reprojected 2-D error of 1.72 mm +/- 1.02 mm.

  14. An augmented reality system for patient-specific guidance of cardiac catheter ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Ector, Joris; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present a system to assist in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias by catheter ablation. A patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical model, constructed from magnetic resonance images, is merged with fluoroscopic images in an augmented reality environment that enables the transfer of electrocardiography (ECG) measurements and cardiac activation times onto the model. Accurate mapping is realized through the combination of: a new calibration technique, adapted to catheter guided treatments; a visual matching registration technique, allowing the electrophysiologist to align the model with contrast-enhanced images; and the use of virtual catheters, which enable the annotation of multiple ECG measurements on the model. These annotations can be visualized by color coding on the patient model. We provide an accuracy analysis of each of these components independently. Based on simulation and experiments, we determined a segmentation error of 0.6 mm, a calibration error in the order of 1 mm and a target registration error of 1.04 +/- 0.45 mm. The system provides a 3-D visualization of the cardiac activation pattern which may facilitate and improve diagnosis and treatment of the arrhytmia. Because of its low cost and similar advantages we believe our approach can compete with existing commercial solutions, which rely on dedicated hardware and costly catheters. We provide qualitative results of the first clinical use of the system in 11 ablation procedures.

  15. Impact of metabolic syndrome on the risk of atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kueiyu Joshua; Cho, Soung Ick; Tiwari, Nidhish; Bergman, Michael; Kizer, Jorge R.; Palma, Eugen C.; Taub, Cynthia C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation remains uncertain. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the relative risks (RR) of AF recurrence after catheter ablation in patients with vs. without MetS and its components. Methods Among 839 articles identified from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, we included 23 studies with a total of 12,924 patients (7,594 with paroxysmal AF and 5,330 with nonparoxysmal AF) for analysis. Five of these had complete information on MetS components. Variables assessed comprised study design and population characteristics, AF ablation methods, use of anti-arrhythmic drugs, AF recurrence ascertainment methods, adjustment variables, and other quality indicators. Results Our meta-analysis found an elevated risk of AF recurrence after ablation in patients with vs. without MetS (pooled RR, 1.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.25–2.12). Among components of MetS, hypertension was a predictor of AF post-ablation recurrence in studies without adjustment for other MetS components (RR, 1.62; 95 % CI, 1.23–2.13) but not in those adjusting for two or more additional MetS components (RR, 1.03; 95 % CI, 0.88–1.20). There was a borderline association between overweight/obesity and AF recurrence after ablation (RR, 1.27; 95 % CI, 0.99–1.64). Conclusions MetS is associated with an increased risk of AF recurrence after catheter ablation. Further study of the MetS and its components as determinants of AF risk could help refine patient selection and improve procedural outcomes. PMID:24346619

  16. [Patient selection for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the program of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients referred to the AF Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology. Specific inclusion criteria are required for RFCA of AF. If the patient fulfills it, then an electrophysiological study is performed. A transseptal approach and special mapping catheters are used to detect abnormal electrical activity (AEA). Pulmonary vein isolation is performed at the ostium/ antrum of those veins with AEA if the patient had paroxysmal AF. Global pulmonary vein isolation with some additional lines guided by electroanatomical mapping is performed in the case of chronic AF. Postoperative follow-up includes consultation, ECG and Holter monitoring at 1, 3, 6 and 12-month. RFCA is a useful and relatively safe procedure for the treatment of AF and the only one with curative potential.

  17. Gender, Race, and Health Insurance Status in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nileshkumar; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Thakkar, Badal; Coffey, James O; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Patel, Achint; Ainani, Nitesh; Nalluri, Nikhil; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Kowalski, Marcin; Hendel, Robert; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Noseworthy, Peter A; Asirvatham, Samuel; Lo, Kaming; Myerburg, Robert J; Mitrani, Raul D

    2016-04-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has emerged as a popular procedure. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there exist differences or disparities in ablation utilization across gender, socioeconomic class, insurance, or race. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000 to 2012), we identified adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of AF by ICD 9 code 427.31 who had catheter ablation (ICD 9 code-37.34). We stratified patients by race, insurance status, age, gender, and hospital characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate mixed-effect model was created to identify the independent predictors of AF ablation. Among an estimated total of 3,508,122 patients (extrapolated from 20% Nationwide Inpatient Sample) hospitalized with a diagnosis of AF in the United States from the year 2000 to 2012, 102,469 patients (2.9%) underwent catheter ablations. The number of ablations was increased by 940%, from 1,439 in 2000 to 15,090 in 2012. There were significant differences according to gender, race, and health insurance status, which persisted even after adjustment for other risk factors. Female gender (0.83 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.87; p <0.001]), black (0.49 [95% CI 0.44 to 0.55; p <0.001]), and Hispanic race (0.64 [95% CI 0.56 to 0.72; p <0.001]) were associated with lower likelihoods of undergoing an AF ablation. Medicare (0.93, 0.88 to 0.98, <0.001) or Medicaid (0.67, 0.59 to 0.76, <0.001) coverage and uninsured patients (0.55, 0.49 to 0.62, <0.001) also had lower rates of AF ablation compared to patients with private insurance. In conclusion we found differences in utilization of catheter ablation for AF based on gender, race, and insurance status that persisted over time.

  18. Diagnostical mistakes in ablation procedures associated with a high placement of the leads V1-V3.

    PubMed

    Longo, Damián; Poliserpi, Claudio; Toscano Quilon, Francisco; Díaz Uberti, Pedro; López, Carlos; García-Niebla, Javier; Ramella, Irma

    2017-02-20

    The misplacement of electrodes for surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording that we use daily as a reference for mapping precise locations in invasive procedures may, besides inducing diagnostical mistakes, greatly increase the duration of the procedure and making more feasible the incidence of complications, especially in ablation of arrhythmic substrates of ventricular outflow tracts such as premature ventricular contractions (PVC's) and accessory pathways, if the right precordial electrodes (V1-V3) are higher positioned.

  19. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  20. Role of Rotors in the Ablative Therapy of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Schricker, Amir A; Zaman, Junaid; Narayan, Sanjiv M

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is increasingly used to maintain sinus rhythm yet its results are sub-optimal, especially in patients with persistent AF or prior unsuccessful procedures. Attempts at improvement have often targeted substrates that sustain AF after it is triggered, yet those mechanisms are debated. Many studies now challenge the concept that AF is driven by self-sustaining disordered wavelets, showing instead that localised drivers (rotors) may drive disorder via a process known as fibrillatory conduction. Novel mapping using wide-area recordings, physiological filtering and phase analysis demonstrates rotors in human AF. Contact mapping with focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) shows that localised ablation at sources can improve procedural success in many populations on long-term follow up and some newer approaches to rotor mapping are qualitatively similar. This review critically evaluates the data on rotor mapping and ablation, which advances our conceptual understanding of AF and holds the promise of substantially improving ablative outcomes in patients with persistent AF. PMID:26835100

  1. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  2. Three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margins based on registration of pre- and post-procedural MRI and distance map

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Soichiro; Tatli, Servet; Hata, Nobuhiko; Garcia-Rojas, Xavier; Olubiyi, Olutayo I.; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tokuda, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Contrast-enhanced MR images are widely used to confirm the adequacy of ablation margin after liver ablation for early prediction of local recurrence. However, quantitative assessment of the ablation margin by comparing pre- and post-procedural images remains challenging. We developed and tested a novel method for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of ablation margin based on non-rigid image registration and 3D distance map. Methods Our method was tested with pre- and post-procedural MR images acquired in 21 patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous liver ablation. The two images were co-registered using non-rigid intensity-based registration. After the tumor and ablation volumes were segmented, target volume coverage, percent of tumor coverage, and Dice Similarity Coefficient were calculated as metrics representing overall adequacy of ablation. In addition, 3D distance map around the tumor was computed and superimposed on the ablation volume to identify the area with insufficient margins. For patients with local recurrences, the follow-up images were registered to the post-procedural image. Three-D minimum distance between the recurrence and the areas with insufficient margins were quantified. Results The percent tumor coverage for all non-recurrent cases was 100%. Five cases had tumor recurrences, and the 3D distance map revealed insufficient tumor coverage or a 0-millimeter margin. It also showed that two recurrences were remote to the insufficient margin. Conclusions Non-rigid registration and 3D distance map allows us to quantitatively evaluate the adequacy of the ablation margin after percutaneous liver ablation. The method may be useful to predict local recurrences immediately following ablation procedure. PMID:27038962

  3. The APPLE Score – A Novel Score for the Prediction of Rhythm Outcomes after Repeat Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kornej, Jelena; Hindricks, Gerhard; Arya, Arash; Sommer, Philipp; Husser, Daniela; Bollmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background Arrhythmia recurrences after catheter ablation occur in up to 50% within one year but their prediction remains challenging. Recently, we developed a novel score for the prediction of rhythm outcomes after single AF ablation demonstrating superiority to other scores. The current study was performed to 1) prove the predictive value of the APPLE score in patients undergoing repeat AF ablation and 2) compare it with the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores. Methods Rhythm outcome between 3–12 months after AF ablation were documented. The APPLE score (one point for Age >65 years, Persistent AF, imPaired eGFR (<60 ml/min/1.73m2), LA diameter ≥43 mm, EF <50%) was calculated in every patient before procedure. Results 379 consecutive patients from The Leipzig Heart Center AF Ablation Registry (60±10 years, 65% male, 70% paroxysmal AF) undergoing repeat AF catheter ablation were included. Arrhythmia recurrences were observed in 133 patients (35%). While the CHADS2 (AUC 0.577, p = 0.037) and CHA2DS2-VASc scores (AUC 0.590, p = 0.015) demonstrated low predictive value, the APPLE score showed better prediction of arrhythmia recurrences (AUC 0.617, p = 0.002) than other scores (both p<0.001). Compared to patients with an APPLE score of 0, the risk (OR) for arrhythmia recurrences was 2.9, 3.0 and 6.0 (all p<0.01) for APPLE scores 1, 2, or ≥3, respectively. Conclusions The novel APPLE score is superior to the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores for prediction of rhythm outcomes after repeat AF catheter ablation. It may be helpful to identify patients with low, intermediate or high risk for recurrences after repeat procedure. PMID:28085921

  4. Retrograde Inversion Stripping as a Complication of the Clarivein® Mechanochemical Venous Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Moore, HM; Franklin, IJ; Davies, AH

    2015-01-01

    The endovenous revolution has accelerated the development of new techniques and devices for the treatment of varicose veins. The ClariVein® mechanochemical ablation device offers tumescentless treatment with a rotating ablation tip that can theoretically become stuck in tissue. We present the first report of retrograde stripping of the small saphenous vein without anaesthesia following attempted use of the ClariVein® device, without adverse sequelae. PMID:25723675

  5. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  6. Management of refractory atrial fibrillation post surgical ablation

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robert K.; Proietti, Riccardo; Barrett, Conor D.; Paoletti Perini, Alessandro; Santangeli, Pasquale; Danik, Stephan B.; Di Biase, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, invasive techniques to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) including catheter-based and surgical procedures have evolved along with our understanding of the pathophysiology of this arrhythmia. Surgical treatment of AF may be performed on patients undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons (concomitant surgical ablation) or as a stand-alone procedure. Advances in technology and technique have made surgical intervention for AF more widespread. Despite improvements in outcome of both catheter-based and surgical treatment for AF, recurrence of atrial arrhythmias following initial invasive therapy may occur.Atrial arrhythmias may occur early or late in the post-operative course after surgical ablation. Early arrhythmias are generally treated with prompt electrical cardioversion with or without antiarrhythmic therapy and do not necessarily represent treatment failure. The mechanism of persistent or late occurring atrial arrhythmias is complex, and these arrhythmias may be resistant to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The characterization and management of recurrent atrial arrhythmias following surgical ablation of AF are discussed below. PMID:24516805

  7. Six year follow-up after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: a palliation more than a true cure.

    PubMed

    Sorgente, Antonio; Tung, Patricia; Wylie, Jack; Josephson, Mark E

    2012-04-15

    Long-term outcomes after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation (AF) remain uncertain. In particular, the influence of rigorous arrhythmia monitoring on outcomes is not yet clear. In this study, 103 patients with symptomatic AF who underwent catheter ablation at a single academic medical center from 2002 to 2006 were evaluated, with a median follow-up time of 6 years. The primary end point was the success rate of catheter ablation, defined as the absence of any atrial arrhythmia recurrence lasting >10 seconds at the clinical visit and electrocardiographic or long-term cardiac rhythm recording after a single procedure and after the last procedure. In all, 153 procedures were performed, with a median of 1 (interquartile range 1 to 2) per patient as follows: 61 had 1, 35 had 2, 6 had 3, and 1 had 4 catheter ablations. Freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was present in 23% of patients at 6 years after a single procedure and in 39% of patients after the last procedure. No clinical predictors of AF recurrence were recognized after a single procedure, whereas after the last procedure, in univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis, only nonparoxysmal AF (hazard ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 3.47, p = 0.02) was a predictor of recurrence. In conclusion, AF recurrence at 6-year follow-up after catheter ablation in a selected group of patients with symptomatic drug-refractory AF was relatively high, with 2/3 of AF relapses occurring in the first year of follow-up. Strict clinical surveillance after catheter ablation should be considered to help guide clinical decisions.

  8. Predictive value of various Doppler-derived parameters of atrial conduction time for successful atrial fibrillation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Valtuille, Lucas; Choy, Jonathan B; Becher, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Various Doppler-derived parameters of left atrial electrical remodeling have been demonstrated to predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after AF ablation. The aim of this study was to compare three Doppler-derived measures of atrial conduction time in patients undergoing AF ablation, and to investigate their predictive value for successful procedure. In 32 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing the first AF ablation, atrial conduction time was estimated by measuring the time delay between the onset of P-wave on the surface ECG to the peak of the a′-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging of the left atrial lateral wall, and to the peak of the A-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler of the mitral inflow. There was a significant difference in the baseline atrial conduction time measured by different echocardiographic techniques. Most (88%) patients had normal or only mildly dilated left atrium. At 6 months, 12 patients (38%) had recurrent AF/atrial tachycardia. The duration of history of AF was the only predictor of AF/atrial tachycardia recurrence following the first AF ablation (P=0.024; OR 1.023, CI 1.003–1.044). A combination of normal left atrial volume and history of paroxysmal AF of ≤48 months was associated with the best outcome. Predictive value of the Doppler derived parameters of atrial conduction time may be reduced in the early stages of left atrial remodeling. Future studies may determine which echocardiographic parameter correlates best with the extent of left atrial remodeling and is most predictive of successful AF ablation. PMID:26795694

  9. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Graham R; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Singal, Rohit K; Jaffer, Iqbal H; Dvirnik, Nazari; An, Kevin R; Fortin, Gabriel; Spence, Jessica; Whitlock, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 10% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality, ischaemic stroke and heart failure. Surgical AF ablation has been shown to significantly improve maintenance of sinus rhythm, however, small to medium size trials conducted to date lack the power required to assess patient-important outcomes such as mortality, stroke, heart failure and health-related quality of life. Moreover, a recent randomised trial (RCT) suggested harm by surgical AF ablation with an almost threefold increase in the requirement for permanent pacemaker postablation. We aim to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate efficacy and safety of surgical AF ablation compared to no surgical ablation. Methods and analysis We will search Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE for RCTs evaluating the use of surgical AF ablation, including any lesion set, versus no surgical AF ablation in adults with AF undergoing any type of cardiac surgery. Outcomes of interest include mortality, embolic events, quality of life, rehospitalisation, freedom from AF and adverse events, including need for pacemaker and worsening heart failure. Independently and in duplicate, reviewers will screen references, assess eligibility of potentially relevant studies using predefined eligibility criteria and collect data using prepiloted forms. We will pool data using a random effects model and present results as relative risk with 95% CIs for dichotomous outcomes and as mean difference with 95% CI for continuous outcomes. We will assess risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration tool, and quality of evidence with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination Our results will help guide clinical practice by providing the most comprehensive analysis of risks and benefits associated with the procedure. Our results will be disseminated through publication in

  10. Entropy at the right atrium as a predictor of atrial fibrillation recurrence outcome after pulmonary vein ablation.

    PubMed

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; García-Quintanilla, Jorge; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence rates after successful ablation procedures are still high and difficult to predict. This work studies the capability of entropy measured from intracardiac recordings as an indicator for recurrence outcome. Intra-atrial recordings from 31 AF patients were registered previously to an ablation procedure. Four electrodes were located at the right atrium (RA) and four more at the left atrium (LA). Sample entropy measurements were applied to these signals, in order to characterize different non-linear AF dynamics at the RA and LA independently. In a 3 months follow-up, 19 of them remained in sinus rhythm, whereas the other 12 turned back to AF. Entropy values can be associated to a proarrhythmic indicator as they were higher in patients with AF recurrence (1.11±0.15 vs. 0.91±0.13), in persistent patients (1.03±0.19 vs. 0.96±0.15), and at the LA with respect to the RA (1.03±0.23 vs. 0.89±0.15 for paroxysmal AF patients). Furthermore, entropy values at the RA arose as a more reliable predictor for recurrence outcome than at the LA. Results suggest that high entropy values, especially at the RA, are associated with high risk of AF recurrence. These findings show the potential of the proposed method to predict recurrences post-ablation, providing additional insights to the understanding of arrhythmia.

  11. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  12. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  13. Morphology and pathophysiology of target anatomical sites for ablation procedures in patients with atrial fibrillation: part II: pulmonary veins, caval veins, ganglionated plexi, and ligament of Marshall.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Domenico; Callegari, Sergio; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lorusso, Roberto; Macchi, Emilio

    2013-10-03

    The inadequate long-term efficacy of anti-arrhythmic therapy has been one of the main reasons for the development of non-pharmacological interventions for patients with atrial fibrillation such as catheter and surgical ablation. This has greatly increased interest in the functional morphology and electrophysiological properties of the atria and related anatomical structures. This article is the second of a two-part review that aims to provide anatomical and functional details concerning some of the principal anatomical sites commonly targeted by ablative procedures for treating atrial fibrillation, and covers pulmonary veins, ganglionated plexi, caval veins, and the ligament of Marshall. It also provides some general information about site-specific ablation procedures.

  14. Designing Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Surgical Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Parides, Michael K.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Geller, Nancy L.; Acker, Michael A.; Gelijns, Annetine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternate energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of AF patients treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this as an effective clinical therapy. Methods and Results This paper describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage (LAA) closure versus LAA closure alone in patients with persistent and longstanding persistent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial, is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and full Maze lesion set. This paper addresses trial design challenges, including how to best characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from AF as a primary endpoint, account for the impact of anti-arrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary endpoints, such as post-operative AF load. Conclusions This paper concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. PMID:21616507

  15. Ablation of Myocardial Tissue With Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Varghese, Frency; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Philpott, Jonathan; Zemlin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue is an essential tool for the treatment of arrhythmias, particularly of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technologies suffer from substantial recurrence rates, thermal side effects, and long procedure times. We demonstrate that ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can potentially overcome these limitations. Methods We used optical mapping to monitor electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused New Zealand rabbit hearts (n = 12). We repeatedly inserted two shock electrodes, spaced 2–4 mm apart, into the ventricles (through the entire wall) and applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) (5–20 kV/cm, 350 ns duration, at varying pulse numbers and frequencies) to create linear lesions of 12–18 mm length. Hearts were stained either with tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or propidium iodide (PI) to determine the extent of ablation. Some stained lesions were sectioned to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the ablated volume. Results In all animals (12/12), we were able to create nonconducting lesions with less than 2 seconds of nsPEF application per site and minimal heating (< 0.2°C) of the tissue. The geometry of the ablated volume was smoother and more uniform throughout the wall than typical for RF ablation. The width of the lesions could be controlled up to 6 mm via the electrode spacing and the shock parameters. Conclusions Ablation with nsPEFs is a promising alternative to radiofrequency (RF) ablation of AF. It may dramatically reduce procedure times and produce more consistent lesion thickness than RF ablation. PMID:26658139

  16. 'Ablation' Procedure Helps 3 Out of 4 Patients with Irregular Heartbeat

    MedlinePlus

    ... alleviate the common irregular heart beat called atrial fibrillation in 74 percent of patients. However, the procedure ... there are risks of complications, researchers report. Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of early death by two ...

  17. An overview of energy sources in clinical use for the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Comas, George M; Imren, Yildirim; Williams, Mathew R

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen many developments in the field of alternative energy sources for arrhythmia surgery. The impetus behind these advances is to replace the traditional, "cut-and-sew" Cox maze III procedure with lesion sets that are simpler, shorter, and safer but just as effective. There is demand for technology to make continuous, linear, transmural ablations reliably with a versatile energy source via an epicardial approach. This would make minimally invasive endoscopic surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) without cardiopulmonary bypass and with a closed chest feasible. These advances would shorten cardio-pulmonary bypass and improve outcomes in patients having surgical ablation and concomitant cardiac surgery. This review summarizes the technology behind alternative energy sources used to treat AF. Alternative energy sources include hypothermic sources (cryoablation) and hyperthermic sources (radiofrequency, microwave, laser, ultrasound). For each source, the biophysical background, mode of tissue injury, factors affecting lesion size, and advantages and complications are discussed.

  18. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rettmann, Maryam E. Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A.; Kwartowitz, David M.; Gunawan, Mia; Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L.; Dalegrave, Charles; Kolasa, Mark W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved

  19. Optimization of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Insights Gained from Clinically-Derived Computer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Hansen, Brian J.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  20. Design and rationale of the PRAGUE-12 trial: a large, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial that compares cardiac surgery with left atrial surgical ablation with cardiac surgery without ablation in patients with coronary and/or valvular heart disease plus atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Straka, Zbyněk; Budera, Petr; Osmančík, Pavel; Vaněk, Tomáš; Hulman, Michal; Smíd, Michal; Malý, Marek; Widimský, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ablation procedure can restore sinus rhythm (SR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing cardiac surgery. However, it is not known whether it has any impact on clinical outcomes. There is a need for a randomized trial with long-term follow-up to study the outcome of surgical ablation in patients with coronary and/or valve disease and AF. Patients are prospectively enrolled and randomized either to group A (cardiac surgery with left atrial ablation) or group B (cardiac surgery alone). The primary efficacy outcome is the SR presence (without any AF episode) during a 24-hour electrocardiogram after 1 year. The primary safety outcome is the combined end point of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal failure at 30 days. Long-term outcomes are a composite of total mortality, stroke, bleeding, and heart failure at 1 and 5 years. We finished the enrollment with a total of 224 patients from 3 centers in 2 countries in December 2011. Currently, the incomplete 1-year data are available, and the patients who enrolled first will have their 5-year visits shortly. PRAGUE-12 is the largest study to be conducted so far comparing cardiac surgery with surgical ablation of AF to cardiac surgery without ablation in an unselected population of patients who are operated on for coronary and/or valve disease. Its long-term results will lead to a better recognition of ablation's potential clinical benefits.

  1. Analysis of Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation in Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Among patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD), 45% to 60% present with atrial fibrillation (AF), which is associated with increased rates of thromboembolism, heart failure, and even death. The bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) combining with mitral valve procedure has been adopted in patients of AF associated with RHD, but evaluations about its effectiveness are still limited. Methods A total of 87 patients with RHD and long persistent AF who had accepted mitral valve replacement concomitant with BRFA were studied. Clinical data were collected to analyze the midterm results of BRFA and evaluate its efficiency. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the independent factors associated with late AF recurrence. Results Sixty-six (75.9%) patients maintained sinus rhythm after a mean follow-up of 13.4 ± 5.2 months. Late AF recurrence had been detected in 21 (24.1%) patients, 11 (12.6%) patients were confirmed to be AF, 8 (9.2%) patients were atrial flutter and 2 (2.3%) patients were junctional rhythm. In Multivariate logistic regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.756, 95% CI = 1.289–2.391, p = 0.000) and early AF recurrence (OR = 5.479, 95% CI = 1.189–25.254, p = 0.029) were independent predictors of late AF recurrence. In addition, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and New York Heart Association class showed a greater improvement in patients who maintained sinus rhythm than those who experienced late AF recurrence. Conclusion BRFA is an effective technique for the treatment of long persistent AF associated with RHD during mitral valve replacement. The BMI and early AF recurrence are independent predictors for late AF recurrence. Patients with long-term restoration of sinus rhythm experienced a greater improvement of left ventricular function after BRFA. PMID:26960188

  2. The procedure outcome of laparoscopic resection for ‘small’ hepatocellular carcinoma is comparable to vlaparoscopic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Casaccia, Marco; Santori, Gregorio; Bottino, Giuliano; Diviacco, Pietro; Negri, Antonella De; Moraglia, Eva; Adorno, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation (LRFA) in the treatment of small nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We enrolled 50 cirrhotic patients with similar baseline characteristics that underwent LLR (n = 26) or LRFA (n = 24), in both cases with intraoperative ultrasonography. Operative and peri-operative data were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: LLR included anatomic resection in eight cases and non-anatomic resection in 18. In LRFA patients, a thermoablation of 62 nodules was achieved. Between LLR and LRFA groups, a significant difference was found both for median diameters of treated HCC nodules (30 vs. 17.1 mm; P < 0.001) and the number of treated nodules/patient (1.29 ± 0.62 vs. 2.65 ± 1.55; P < 0.001). A conversion to laparotomy occurred in two LLR patient (7.7%) for bleeding. No deaths occurred in both groups. Morbidity rates were 26.9% in the LLR group versus 16.6% in the LRFA group (P = 0.501). Hospital stay in the LLR and LRFA group was 8.30 ± 6.52 and 6.52 ± 2.69 days, respectively (P = 0.022). The surgical margin was free of tumour cells in all LLR patients, with a margin <5 mm in only one case. In the LRFA group, a complete response was achieved in 90.3% of thermoablated HCC nodules at the 1-month post-treatment computed tomography evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: LLR for small peripheral HCC in patients with chronic liver disease represents a valid alternative to LRFA in terms of patient toleration, surgical outcome of the procedure, and short-term morbidity. PMID:26622111

  3. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  4. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  5. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  6. Pharmacological Tests in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The invasive management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been considerably changed by the identification of major sites of AF initiation and/or maintenance within the pulmonary vein antra. Percutaneous catheter ablation of these targets has become the standard of care for sustained maintenance of sinus rhythm. Long-term failure of ablation is related to an inability to create a durable transmural lesion or to identify all of the non-pulmonary vein arrhythmia triggers. Pharmacological challenges during catheter ablation have been suggested to improve outcomes in both paroxysmal and persistent AF. Herein we review the mechanism and evidence for the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the catheter ablation of AF. PMID:28116081

  7. Stroke prevention following modified endoscopic ablation and appendectomy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Jiang, Zhaolei; Chen, Fei; Yin, Hang; Ding, Fangbao; Mei, Ju

    2016-09-01

    We reported the results of stroke prevention following modified endoscopic procedure for atrial fibrillation. 82 patients underwent modified endoscopic procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF), in whom 47 had paroxysmal, 28 had persistent, and 7 had long-standing atrial fibrillation. CHA2DS2VASC median score was 3 (range from 0 to 8). The procedure was performed on the beating heart, through 3 ports on the left chest wall. Pulmonary vein isolation and ablation of the left atrium were achieved by bipolar radiofrequency ablation. Left atrial appendage (LAA) was excluded by stapler. Brain CT, cardiac CT and 24-h Holter monitoring were performed following the procedure. The procedure was successfully completed for all patients. The mean duration was 122 ± 40.1 min. LAA was excluded after appendectomy and checked by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. The mean follow-up duration was 24.3 ± 3.5 months. No patients showed signs and symptoms of transient ischemic attack or stroke. No new positive findings were demonstrated by recurring brain CT scan performed after the procedure. Cardiac CT confirmed the absence of LAA and thrombosis in the left atrium. 87.8 % (72/82) of all patients were in sinus rhythm. Our results demonstrate that the modified endoscopic procedure is a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for AF, which restores sinus rhythm and may be associated with the prevention of AF-related stroke.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors in Swine Assisted by a Navigation Device with Pre-procedural Volumetric Planning

    PubMed Central

    Banovac, Filip; Cheng, Patrick; Campos-Nanez, Enrique; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Popa, Teo; Wilson, Emmanuel; Abeledo, Hernan; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to develop an image guidance system that incorporates volumetric planning of spherical ablations and electromagnetic tracking of radiofrequency electrodes during insertion. Methods Simulated tumors were created in 3 live swine by percutaneously injecting agar nodules into the lung. A treatment plan was devised for each tumor using our optimization software to solve the planning problem. The desired output was the minimum number of overlapping ablation spheres necessary to ablate each tumor and the margin. The insertion plan was executed using the electromagnetic tracking system that guided the insertion of the probe into pre-computed locations. After a 72 hour survival, histopathologic sections of the tissue were examined for cell viability and burn pattern analysis. Results A planning algorithm to spherically cover the tumors and the margin was computed. Electromagnetic tracking allowed successful insertion of the instrument and impedance roll-off was reached in all ablations. Depending on their size, the tumors and the tumor margins were successfully covered with 2 to 4 ablation spheres. The image registration error was 1.0 ± 0.64mm. The overall error of probe insertion was 9.4 ± 3.0mm (n=8). Histopathologic sections confirmed successful ablations of the tissue. Conclusions Computer assisted RF ablation planning and electromagnetically tracked probe insertion were successful in 3 swine, thus validating the feasibility of electromagnetic tracking assisted tumor targeting. Image mis-registration due to respiratory motion and tissue deformation contributed to the overall error of probe insertion. PMID:19939704

  9. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association (AHA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and the Society ... Rhythm Association, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society, and the Heart Rhythm ...

  10. The Effectiveness of Surgical Ablation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Sinn, Laurie A.; Miller, Jacob R.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Moon, Marc R.; Melby, Spencer J.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with atrial fibrillation(AF), the addition of surgical ablation to aortic valve replacement(AVR) does not increase procedural morbidity or mortality. However, efficacy in this population has not been carefully evaluated. This study compared outcomes between patients undergoing stand-alone Cox-Maze IV to those undergoing surgical ablation and concomitant AVR. Methods From January 2002 to May 2014, 188 patients received a stand-alone Cox-maze IV(n=113) or surgical ablation with concomitant AVR(n=75). In the concomitant AVR group, patients underwent Cox-maze IV(n=58), left-sided Cox-maze IV(n=3), or pulmonary vein isolation(n=14). Thirty-one perioperative variables were compared. Freedoms from AF on and off antiarrhythmic drugs were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Follow up was available in 97% of patients. Freedom from AF on and off antiarrhythmic drugs in patients receiving a stand-alone Cox-maze IV vs. concomitant AVR was not significantly different at any time point. The concomitant AVR group had more comorbidities, paroxysmal AF, pacemaker implantations(24% vs. 5%, p=0.002), and complications(25% vs. 5%, p<0.001). Freedoms from AF off antiarrhythmic drugs for patients receiving an AVR and pulmonary vein isolation at 1 year was only 50%, which was significantly lower than patients receiving an AVR and Cox-maze IV(94%, p=0.001). Conclusions A Cox-maze IV with concomitant AVR is as effective as a stand-alone Cox-maze IV in treating AF, even in an older population with more comorbidities. Pulmonary vein isolation was not as effective and is not recommended in this population. A Cox-maze IV should be considered all in patients undergoing AVR with a history of AF. PMID:26209496

  11. Comparison of the stand-alone Cox-Maze IV procedure to the concomitant Cox-Maze IV and mitral valve procedure for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Christopher P.; Henn, Matthew C.; Miller, Jacob R.; Sinn, Laurie A.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of patients undergoing surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) worldwide receive a concomitant mitral valve (MV) procedure. This study compared outcomes of the Cox-Maze IV (CMIV) in patients with lone AF to those with AF and MV disease. Methods A retrospective review of 335 patients receiving either a stand-alone CMIV for AF (n=151) or a CMIV with a MV procedure (n=184) was performed from January 2002 through December of 2012. Data were obtained at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and patients were evaluated for recurrence of AF. Twenty-four preoperative and perioperative variables were evaluated to identify predictors of AF recurrence at one year. Results The two groups differed in that stand-alone CMIV patients were younger, had AF of longer duration and had more failed catheter ablations, while patients with AF and MV disease had larger left atria and worse New York Heart Association class (P≤0.001). Operative mortality was higher in the concomitant MV group (1% vs. 5%, P=0.015). Freedom from AF and antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 and 24 months were similar between the two groups (73% and 76% at 12 months; 77% vs. 78% at 24 months). Predictors of recurrence included failure to use a box-lesion to isolate the pulmonary veins and posterior left atria, early recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATAs) and the presence of a preoperative pacemaker (P=0.001). Conclusions The efficacy of the CMIV procedure was similar in patients with and without co-existent MV pathology. Patients receiving a concomitant CMIV and MV procedure represented an older and sicker patient population and had higher mortality rates than those receiving a stand-alone CMIV procedure. PMID:24516798

  12. Alternative energy sources for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery: microwave ablation vs cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Cho, Won-Chul; Jung, Sung Ho; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Jae Won

    2010-10-01

    The study aim was to compare maze outcomes using microwave ablation or cryoablation in patients with mitral disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Between 1999 and 2005, 340 patients underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant maze procedure involving either microwave ablation (n=96, MW group) or cryoablation (n=244, Cryo group). Mean age at operation was 50.0±12.5 yr. Follow-up period was 46.1±28.2 months. The Cryo group showed a longer aortic clamping time than the MW group (P=0.005). There were no differences in operative mortality and morbidity rates. The unadjusted 5-yr AF free rate was 61.3±1.2% in the MW group and 79.9±3.2% in the Cryo group (P=0.089). After adjustment, the MW group only showed a tendency toward more frequent AF recurrence than the Cryo group (Hazard ration 1.66, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 3.07). Multivariate analysis revealed that older patient age (P<0.001) and greater left atrial size (P<0.001) were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. Although the use of microwave ablation results in shorter aortic clamping time, it has a tendency toward more frequent late AF recurrence than with cryoablation.

  13. Low Left Atrial Compliance Contributes to the Clinical Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Catheter Ablation in Patients with Structurally and Functionally Normal Heart.

    PubMed

    Park, Junbeom; Yang, Pil-sung; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Joung-Youn; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Hwang, Chun; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Stiff left atrial (LA) syndrome was initially reported in post-cardiac surgery patients and known to be associated with low LA compliance. We investigated the physiological and clinical implications of LA compliance by estimating LA pulse pressure (LApp) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and structurally and functionally normal heart. Among 1038 consecutive patients with LA pressure measurements before AF ablation, we included 334 patients with structurally and functionally normal heart (81.7% male, 54.1±10.6 years, 77.0% paroxysmal AF) after excluding those with hypertension, diabetes, and previous ablation or cardiac surgery. We measured LApp (peak-nadir LA pressure) at the beginning of the ablation procedure and compared the values with clinical parameters and the AF recurrence rate. AF patients with normal heart were younger and more frequently male and had paroxysmal AF, a lower body mass index, and a lower LApp compared to others (all p<0.05). Based on the median value, the low LA compliance group (LApp≥13 mmHg) had a smaller LA volume index and lower LA voltage (all p<0.05) compared to the high LA compliance group. During a mean follow-up of 16.7±11.8 months, low LA compliance was independently associated with two fold-higher risk of clinical AF recurrence (HR:2.202; 95%CI:1.077-4.503; p = 0.031). Low LA compliance, as determined by an elevated LApp, was associated with a smaller LA volume index and lower LA voltage and independently associated with higher clinical recurrence after catheter ablation in AF patients with structurally and functionally normal heart.

  14. Factors related to sinus rhythm at discharge after radiofrequency ablation of permanent atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo; Gelsomino, Sandro; Capecchi, Irene; Rossi, Alessandra; Montesi, Gian Franco; Stefàno, Pier Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Late recovery of sinus rhythm is unusual in patients with permanent AF treated by (radiofrequency) RF maze procedure during mitral valve surgery. Identification of clinical and instrumental preoperative factors predictive of early success of RF ablation in patients with permanent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery may improve selection of subjects to obtain long-term results. Hundred and thirty consecutive patients with permanent AF and mitral valve disease underwent modified RF maze procedure during concomitant mitral valve surgery. Rheumatic valve disease (61 pts) and mitral valve prolapse (41 pts) were the more common aetiology of valve abnormalities. Mitral valve replacement was performed in 54 % of patients and mitral valve repair in the remaining 46 %. Four patients died after surgery. At discharge, 87 patients (69 %) were in sinus rhythm (group 1) and 43 patients in AF persisted (group 2). At an average 24-month follow-up, sinus rhythm was present in 67 % of patients, and 33 % were in atrial fibrillation. In this period, late recovery of sinus rhythm was observed only in five patients, while eight discharged in sinus rhythm developed again atrial fibrillation. Among preoperative parameters at univariate analysis female sex, atrial fibrillation >24 months, left atrial diameter >54 mm, left atrial area >24 cm(2), rheumatic valve disease and NYHA class were associated with persistence of AF. At Cox regression multivariate analysis, increased left atrial area (OR 1.07 per unit increase-95 % CI 1.01-1.131) and rheumatic aetiology of valve disease (OR 4.52, 95 % CI 1.65-12.4) were associated with persistence of AF at hospital discharge. Persistence of AF after RF ablation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery is related to aetiology, e.g. rheumatic valve disease, and to increasing left atrial diameter. Due to low rate of late recovery of sinus rhythm, indication to RF ablation associated with MV surgery should be carefully considered in patients with large

  15. Influence of the concomitant use of heparin on the effects of warfarin during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Inada, Keiichi; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Tokutake, Ken-Ichi; Yokoyama, Ken-Ichi; Hioki, Mika; Narui, Ryohsuke; Ito, Keiichi; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamashita, Seigo; Tokuda, Michifumi; Shibayama, Kenri; Miyanaga, Satoru; Sugimoto, Ken-Ichi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Yamane, Teiichi

    2016-03-01

    Warfarin is widely used to perform catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Heparin is usually administered during this procedure to prevent thromboembolic events, while protamine is used to reduce the incidence of bleeding complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of heparin and protamine administration on the effects of warfarin and its safety. The subjects included 226 AF patients (206 males, 54.9 ± 9.1 years, paroxysmal/persistent AF: 118/108) undergoing AF ablation with the discontinuation of warfarin administration over 2 days. Heparin was administered to achieve an activated clotting time (ACT) above 300 s during the procedure. Several parameters of the coagulation status, including the prothrombin time international normalized ratio (PT-INR) and ACT values, measured immediately before and after protamine infusion were compared. The mean value of PT-INR prior to ablation was 1.9 ± 0.6. At the end of the procedure, the mean ACT and PT-INR values were 348.0 ± 52.9 and 2.9 ± 0.7, respectively. Following the infusion of 30 mg of protamine, both the ACT and PT-INR values significantly decreased, to 159.6 ± 31.0 (p < 0.0001) and 1.6 ± 0.3 (p < 0.0001), respectively. No cases of symptomatic cerebral infarction were observed, although femoral hematomas developed in 17 (7.5 %) of the patients without further consequence. The concomitant use of heparin augments the effect of warfarin. Meanwhile, protamine administration immediately reverses both the ACT and PT-INR, indicating the applicability of protamine for AF ablation in patients under the mixed administration of heparin and warfarin.

  16. Novel Computational Analysis of Left Atrial Anatomy Improves Prediction of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence after Ablation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Marta; Bisbal, Felipe; Zacur, Ernesto; Berruezo, Antonio; Aslanidi, Oleg V; Mont, Lluis; Lamata, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The left atrium (LA) can change in size and shape due to atrial fibrillation (AF)-induced remodeling. These alterations can be linked to poorer outcomes of AF ablation. In this study, we propose a novel comprehensive computational analysis of LA anatomy to identify what features of LA shape can optimally predict post-ablation AF recurrence. To this end, we construct smooth 3D geometrical models from the segmentation of the LA blood pool captured in pre-procedural MR images. We first apply this methodology to characterize the LA anatomy of 144 AF patients and build a statistical shape model that includes the most salient variations in shape across this cohort. We then perform a discriminant analysis to optimally distinguish between recurrent and non-recurrent patients. From this analysis, we propose a new shape metric called vertical asymmetry, which measures the imbalance of size along the anterior to posterior direction between the superior and inferior left atrial hemispheres. Vertical asymmetry was found, in combination with LA sphericity, to be the best predictor of post-ablation recurrence at both 12 and 24 months (area under the ROC curve: 0.71 and 0.68, respectively) outperforming other shape markers and any of their combinations. We also found that model-derived shape metrics, such as the anterior-posterior radius, were better predictors than equivalent metrics taken directly from MRI or echocardiography, suggesting that the proposed approach leads to a reduction of the impact of data artifacts and noise. This novel methodology contributes to an improved characterization of LA organ remodeling and the reported findings have the potential to improve patient selection and risk stratification for catheter ablations in AF.

  17. Novel Computational Analysis of Left Atrial Anatomy Improves Prediction of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence after Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Marta; Bisbal, Felipe; Zacur, Ernesto; Berruezo, Antonio; Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Mont, Lluis; Lamata, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The left atrium (LA) can change in size and shape due to atrial fibrillation (AF)-induced remodeling. These alterations can be linked to poorer outcomes of AF ablation. In this study, we propose a novel comprehensive computational analysis of LA anatomy to identify what features of LA shape can optimally predict post-ablation AF recurrence. To this end, we construct smooth 3D geometrical models from the segmentation of the LA blood pool captured in pre-procedural MR images. We first apply this methodology to characterize the LA anatomy of 144 AF patients and build a statistical shape model that includes the most salient variations in shape across this cohort. We then perform a discriminant analysis to optimally distinguish between recurrent and non-recurrent patients. From this analysis, we propose a new shape metric called vertical asymmetry, which measures the imbalance of size along the anterior to posterior direction between the superior and inferior left atrial hemispheres. Vertical asymmetry was found, in combination with LA sphericity, to be the best predictor of post-ablation recurrence at both 12 and 24 months (area under the ROC curve: 0.71 and 0.68, respectively) outperforming other shape markers and any of their combinations. We also found that model-derived shape metrics, such as the anterior-posterior radius, were better predictors than equivalent metrics taken directly from MRI or echocardiography, suggesting that the proposed approach leads to a reduction of the impact of data artifacts and noise. This novel methodology contributes to an improved characterization of LA organ remodeling and the reported findings have the potential to improve patient selection and risk stratification for catheter ablations in AF. PMID:28261103

  18. Long-term outcomes after ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: an observational study over 6 years

    PubMed Central

    El-Kadri, Moutaz; Haq, Iram; Das, Moloy; Modi, Simon; Snowdon, Richard; Hall, Mark; Waktare, Johan EP; Todd, Derick M; Gupta, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To address the limited long-term outcome data for catheter ablation (CA) of persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), we analysed consecutive ablations performed at our centre from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 and followed patients prospectively until January 2014. Methods Both arrhythmia recurrence and symptom relief were assessed. Follow-up data were collected from hospital records, supplemented by data from general practitioners and referring hospitals. At the end of the follow-up period, all patients were contacted by phone to determine their up-to-date clinical condition. Results 188 consecutive patients with PeAF (157 male, mean age 57.3±9.7 years, 20% with long-standing PeAF) underwent a mean of 1.75 procedures (range 1–4). Telephone follow-up was achieved for 77% of surviving patients. Over a mean follow-up of 46±16 months (range 4–72), 139 (75%) patients experienced arrhythmia recurrence after a single procedure and 90 (48%) after their final procedure. Median time to first recurrence was 210 days (range 91–1850). 71% of recurrences were within the first year following ablation and 91% within 2 years. At final follow-up, 82% of patients reported symptomatic improvement. 7 (2.3%) major complications occurred, and there was no procedure-related death or stroke. Conclusions CA for PeAF is safe with a low rate of complications. Over a follow-up period of up to 6 years, a large majority of patients experience significant symptomatic improvement but recurrence after the initial procedure is the norm rather than the exception. 2 years' follow-up is sufficient to observe 90% of AF recurrences, but recurrence can occur even after 5 years' remission. PMID:27547426

  19. Utility of High-Output His Pacing during Difficult AV Node Ablation. An Underutilized Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kanjwal, Khalil; Grubb, Blair P

    2016-06-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) node ablation is a commonly performed procedure for patients with chronic drug refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) with episodes of rapid ventricular response. We report on a 72-year-old man who had difficulty managing chronic drug refractory AFs with frequent hospitalizations for rapid ventricular rate. The patient was taken to the electrophysiology laboratory for AV node ablation. Extensive mapping and localization techniques of the compact AV node and ablation in the region were unsuccessful. Subsequently, high-output His bundle pacing using 20 mA at 2 ms of output energy was performed in an attempt to localize the His bundle in areas where high-output pacing resulted in a narrower QRS complex. Further ablations in the areas where pacing produced a narrower QRS complex resulted in complete heart block. This case highlights the importance of using this simple pacing maneuver to achieve complete heart block in patients in whom standard strategies to localize and ablate the compact AV node are unsuccessful.

  20. Efficacy and effects on cardiac function of radiofrequency catheter ablation vs. direct current cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojing; Cai, Shanglang; Ding, Wei; Deng, Yujie; Zhao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of catheter ablation vs. direct current synchronized cardioversion (DCC) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to define baseline features of patients that will get more benefit from ablation. Methods From July 2013 to October 2014, 97 consecutive single-center patients with persistent AF and symptomatic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%) underwent DCC followed by amiodarone (n = 40) or circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI; n = 57) according to patient’s preference were recruited in the study. Post-ablation recurrence was treated with atrial roof and mitral isthmus lines ablation with or without PVI based on restoration or not of pulmonary vein (PV) potential conduction. Study outcomes were 12-month rate of sustained sinus rhythm (SR) and cardiac function. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without cardiac function improvement post ablation. Results With similarly distributed characteristics at baseline, ablation (mean 1.8 procedures) relative to DCC yielded significantly higher level of 12-month SR maintenance rate (68.42% vs. 35%, P = 0.001); and better LVEF and New York Heart Association class. with significant effect for DCC only in maintained SR cases. Post ablation LVEF increased (>20% or to over 55%) in 31 (54.39%) patients with worse baseline cardiac function and ventricular rate control. Conclusions Catheter ablation relative to cardioversion of persistent AF with symptomatic heart failure yielded better 12-month SR maintenance and cardiac function. Compared with non-responders, patients with improved LVEF post-ablation had poorer ventricular rate control and cardiac function at baseline, suggesting a significant component of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in this group. PMID:28350861

  1. Rivaroxaban for Periprocedural Anticoagulation Therapy in Japanese Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation of Paroxysmal Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Mihoko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Maeda, Shingo; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Nitta, Junichi; Goya, Masahiko; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-12-02

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been shown to be safe and effective for the prevention of stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients, however, experience with peri-AF ablation management of DOACs is scarce. This study aimed to investigate the safety and feasibility of periprocedural anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban in Japanese patients undergoing paroxysmal non-valvular AF (NVAF) ablation using radiofrequency energy.This study was a multicenter, prospective pilot study. In paroxysmal NVAF patients, rivaroxaban (15 mg or 10 mg once-daily) was started at least 4 weeks prior to AF ablation, discontinued on the day of the procedure, resumed within 24 hours after ablation, and continued at least 3 months afterwards. During the interruption of rivaroxaban, bridging anticoagulation therapy with unfractionated heparin was given. Follow-up of the patients continued for 3 months.A total of consecutive 74 patients (mean age, 62 ± 9 years, 58 [78.4%] male) were enrolled. The mean follow-up period was 108 ± 79 days. Their mean CHADS2 score and CHA2DS2-VASc score were 1.2 ± 1.0 and 0.6 ± 0.7, respectively. Their mean HAS-BLED score was 1.0 ± 0.8. Neither major bleeding nor thromboembolic events, except in a case with bleeding from gastric cancer (1.4%), were observed in the periprocedural period of the AF ablation.The present multicenter study demonstrated the safety and feasibility of periprocedural anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban in Japanese patients undergoing catheter ablation of paroxysmal NVAF.

  2. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Trevor J G; Roberts, Shannon L; Burnham, Robert S; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1-S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1-S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network.

  3. Ablating atrial fibrillation: A translational science perspective for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2016-09-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in developing ablation approaches to cure atrial fibrillation (AF), outcomes are still suboptimal, especially for persistent and long-lasting persistent AF. In this topical review, we review the arrhythmia mechanisms, both reentrant and nonreentrant, that are potentially relevant to human AF at various stages/settings. We describe arrhythmia mapping techniques used to distinguish between the different mechanisms, with a particular focus on the detection of rotors. We discuss which arrhythmia mechanisms are likely to respond to ablation, and the challenges and prospects for improving upon current ablation strategies to achieve better outcomes.

  4. Endometrial Ablation for Menorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is a relatively new treatment for patients with persistent menorrhagia. The procedure can be performed by either laser photocoagulation or electrocoagulation; both have a very low risk of complication. Generally, less than 24 hours of hospitalization is required and return to normal activities, including work, is almost immediate. Endometrial ablation is likely to become a mainstay of treatment for menorrhagia as the technology and training become more readily available. PMID:21229128

  5. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  6. Serum Galectin-3 Levels Predict Recurrences after Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Clementy, Nicolas; Benhenda, Nazih; Piver, Eric; Pierre, Bertrand; Bernard, Anne; Fauchier, Laurent; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Babuty, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a biomarker of fibrosis and atrial remodeling, involved in the mechanisms of initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to study the accuracy of galectin-3 level in predicting recurrences of AF after ablation. Serum concentrations of galectin-3 were determined in a consecutive series of patients addressed for AF ablation in our center. After a 3-month blanking period, recurrences of atrial arrhythmias were collected during the first year in all patients, using Holter monitoring at 3, 6 months and 12 months. A total of 160 patients were included, with a mean galectin-3 rate was 14.4 ± 5.6 ng/mL. At 12-month, 55 patients (34%) had reexperienced sustained atrial arrhythmia. Only higher galectin-3 level (HR = 1.07 [1.01–1.12], p = 0.02) and larger left atrial diameter (HR = 1.07 [1.03–1.12], p = 0.001) independently predicted recurrence. Patients with both galectin-3 level <15 ng/mL and left atrial diameter <40 millimeters had a 1-year arrhythmia-free survival rate − after a single procedure without anti-arrhythmic drug − of 91%, as compared with 41% in patients with galectin-3 ≥ 15 and left trial diameter ≥40 (p < 0.0001), whether AF was paroxysmal or persistent. Galectin-3 and left atrial diameters, rather than clinical presentation of AF, predict recurrences after ablation. PMID:27677964

  7. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  8. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.(1) Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)- American College of Cardiology (ACC)-Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines(2) stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.(3).

  9. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.1 Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)– American College of Cardiology (ACC)–Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines2 stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.3 PMID:26566527

  10. Evaluation of the NovaSure endometrial ablation procedure in women with uterine cavity length over 10 cm.

    PubMed

    Thiel, John A; Briggs, M Martha; Pohlman, Scott; Rattray, Darrien

    2014-06-01

    Objectif : Comparer, chez des femmes ayant subi une ablation de l’endomètre au moyen de la technique NovaSure et présentant une longueur utérine déterminée par hystérométrie de plus de 10 cm ou de 10 cm ou moins, les événements indésirables associés à l’intervention, l’état des saignements menstruels à la suite de l’intervention et la nécessité de procéder à une nouvelle intervention chirurgicale. Méthodes : Nous avons mené une étude de cohorte rétrospective qui portait sur 188 femmes ayant fréquenté une pratique gynécologique communautaire au Canada. Quatre-vingt-sept de ces femmes présentaient une longueur utérine déterminée par hystérométrie de plus de 10 cm, tandis que les 101 autres présentaient une longueur utérine déterminée par hystérométrie de 10 cm ou moins. Les événements indésirables associés à l’intervention, l’état des saignements menstruels à la suite de l’intervention et la nécessité de procéder à une nouvelle intervention chirurgicale sont les paramètres qui ont été comparés chez ces deux groupes de femmes. Résultats : Les longueurs utérines moyennes déterminées par hystérométrie ont été de 11,0 ± 0,6 cm et de 8,9 ± 0,8 cm au sein des groupes « > 10 cm » et « ≤ 10 cm », respectivement. Aucune différence n’a été constatée entre les groupes en matière de caractéristiques démographiques ou d’antécédents gynécologiques, exception faite d’un IMC accru au sein du groupe « > 10 cm » et d’une prévalence accrue de dysménorrhée au sein du groupe « ≤ 10 cm ». De façon globale, 44,1 % de toutes les participantes avaient connu l’échec de l’hormonothérapie et 20,7 % avaient connu l’échec d’un traitement non hormonal avant la tenue de l’ablation. Les participantes composant les autres 35,2 % avaient refusé d’avoir recours à un traitement de rechange et décidé de subir directement une ablation de l

  11. Catheter Ablation in Combination With Left Atrial Appendage Closure for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J.; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno J.W.M.; Post, Martijn C.; Boersma, Lucas V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide 1-3. The rapid, irregular, and disordered electrical activity in the atria gives rise to palpitations, fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain and dizziness with or without syncope 4, 5. Patients with AF have a five-fold higher risk of stroke 6. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin is commonly used for stroke prevention in patients with AF and has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke by 64% 7. Warfarin therapy has several major disadvantages, however, including bleeding, non-tolerance, interactions with other medications and foods, non-compliance and a narrow therapeutic range 8-11. These issues, together with poor appreciation of the risk-benefit ratio, unawareness of guidelines, or absence of an OAC monitoring outpatient clinic may explain why only 30-60% of patients with AF are prescribed this drug 8. The problems associated with warfarin, combined with the limited efficacy and/or serious side effects associated with other medications used for AF 12,13, highlight the need for effective non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. One such approach is catheter ablation (CA), a procedure in which a radiofrequency electrical current is applied to regions of the heart to create small ablation lesions that electrically isolate potential AF triggers 4. CA is a well-established treatment for AF symptoms 14, 15, that may also decrease the risk of stroke. Recent data showed a significant decrease in the relative risk of stroke and transient ischemic attack events among patients who underwent ablation compared with those undergoing antiarrhythmic drug therapy 16. Since the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the source of thrombi in more than 90% of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation 17, another approach to stroke prevention is to physically block clots from exiting the LAA. One method for occluding the LAA is via percutaneous placement of the WATCHMAN

  12. A single apheresis procedure in the donor may be enough to complete an allograft using the “Mexican Method” of non-ablative allografting

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J.; Gutiérrez-Riveroll, Karla I.; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, César H.; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Eyzaguirre-Zapata, Renee; Priesca-Marin, Manuel; González-Carrillo, Martha L.; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1999, in Mexico we have been using a regimen to conduct allografts that involves non-myeloablative conditioning and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and have introduced some changes with the main goal of decreasing the cost of the procedure. Materials and methods We analysed the salient apheresis features of a group of 175 allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplants conducted in two institutions in a 7-year period. The grafts were conducted using the “Mexican” non-myelo ablative conditioning regimen employing oral busulphan, i.v. cyclophosphamide and i.v. fludarabine. In all instances, the apheresis machine employed was the Baxter CS3000 Plus and donors were mobilised with filgrastim. The apheresis procedures were performed on days 0, +1 and +2, the end-point of collection being 5,000 mL of blood/m2 in each procedure. Three apheresis sessions were planned but the number was adjusted according to the cell yield. Results The final number of allografted CD34 cells ranged between 0.5 and 25.4 × 106/Kg of the recipient’s body weight (median, 5.2 × 106/Kg). One to three apheresis procedures were needed to obtain a product containing more than 0.5 × 106 CD34 cells/Kg of the recipient, the median being two procedures; in 72 cases (41%) a single apheresis procedure was sufficient to obtain the target number of CD34 cells. The volumes of apheresis ranged between 50 and 600 mL (median, 400 mL). Conclusions Since the median cost of each apheresis procedure is 900 USD, the fact that two apheresis procedures was spared in 72 cases and one apheresis was spared in another 65 cases, led to a total saving of approximately 188,100 USD. It can be concluded that, in many cases, allogeneic transplants can be completed with a single apheresis session and that there are considerable financial benefits from this practice. PMID:19503634

  13. Is radiation-induced ovarian ablation in breast cancer an obsolete procedure? Results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Tunio, Mutahir A; Abdulmoniem, Reham

    2016-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiation-induced ovarian ablation (RT-OA) on amenorrhea cessation rates, progression-free survival, and overall survival in pre/perimenopausal women with breast cancer. Materials and methods The Medline, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases and search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled studies comparing RT-OA with control for early or metastatic breast cancer. Further, radiotherapy doses, techniques, and associated side effects were evaluated. Results Six controlled trials with a total patient population of 3,317 were identified. Pooled results from these trials showed significant amenorrhea rates (P<0.00001) and increase in progression-free survival in patients treated with RT-OA (P<0.00001). However, there was no difference in overall survival (P=0.37). The majority of patients were treated with larger field sizes with parallel-opposed anteroposterior and posteroanterior pelvic fields. RT-OA was generally well tolerated. Radiotherapy doses of 1,500 cGy in five fractions, 1,500 cGy in four fractions, 1,600 cGy in four fractions, and 2,000 cGy in ten fractions were associated with excellent amenorrhea rates. The resultant funnel plot showed no publication bias (Egger test P=0.16). Conclusion RT-OA is cost-effective and can safely be used in pre/perimenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer, or if luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs are contraindicated, or in patients in whom fertility preservation is not an issue. Radiation dose of 1,500 cGy in five fractions, 1,500 cGy in four fractions, 1,600 cGy in four fractions, and 2,000 cGy in ten fractions showed more efficacies. However, further studies incorporating three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are warranted. PMID:27307764

  14. The mechanism of lesion formation by focused ultrasound ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Y. D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure.

  15. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  16. Initial outcome following invasive cardiac electrophysiologic studies and radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanuruochi, Kelechukwu; Saravanan, Sabari; Ganasekar, Anita; Solomon, Benjamin S; Murugesan, Ravikumar; Shah, Ruchit A; Krishnamoorthy, Jaishankar; Pandurangi, Ulhas M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have become an established mode of treatment for patients with refractory arrhythmias. These procedures are carried out regularly at the cardiac catheterization laboratory of Madras Medical Mission India. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with cardiac electrophysiologic studies (EPS) and RFA catheter of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in the Cardiac Electrophysiology Department of the Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Madras Medical Mission, India. All cases diagnosed to have AF following cardiac EPS between January 2010 and April 2014 was selected for the study. The records, which were obtained from the Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinical Research Office of Madras Medical Mission, were reviewed. Forty-nine cases were chosen for analysis, using SPSS statistical software version 15. Results: There were 49 patients, 23 males and 26 females. The mean age was 57.53 years. Commonly associated diseases were diabetes mellitus 8 (16.3%), hypertension 18 (36.7%), and coronary heart disease 14 (28.5%). The ventricular rate was rapid most cases (91.2%). AF was diagnosed as being paroxysmal in 40 (81.6%), persistent in 5 (10.2%), chronic in 3 (6.1%), and lone in 1 (2.0%). Ablation was carried out in 28 (57.1%), the success rate being 90% for pulmonary vein isolation, and 90.9% for atrioventricular node ablation. Complication rate was 2.04%. Conclusions: Treatment of AF by RFA is highly effective and safe. PMID:27127736

  17. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  18. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  19. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  20. Remote Magnetic versus Manual Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Long-Term, Controlled Data in a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Vandekerckhove, Yves; Tavernier, Rene

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to study long-term outcome after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) guided by remote magnetic navigation (RMN) and provided comparative data to outcome after manual navigation (MAN). Methods. Three hundred thirty-six patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF underwent PVI by irrigated point-by-point radiofrequency (RF) ablation (RMN, n = 114 versus MAN, n = 222). Patients were followed up with symptom guided rhythm monitoring for a period up to 43 months. The end point of the study was freedom from repeat ablation after a single procedure and without antiarrhythmic drug treatment (ADT). Results. At the end of follow-up (median 26.3 months), freedom from repeat ablation was comparable between RMN and MAN (70.9% versus 69.5%, p = 0.61). At repeat, mean number of reconnected veins was 2.4 ± 1.2 in RMN versus 2.6 ± 1.0 in MAN (p = 0.08). The majority of repeat procedures occurred during the first year (82.1% in RMN versus 78.5% in MAN; p = 0.74). Conclusion. On the long term (up to 3 years) and in a large cohort of patients with paroxysmal AF, RMN-guided PVI is as effective as MAN guided PVI. In both strategies the majority of repeat procedures occurred during the first year after index procedure. PMID:28386560

  1. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Atrial Fibrillation and the Outcome after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Feng; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Yeh, Hung-I; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Li, Cheng-Hung; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Tang, Paul Wei Hua; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of gene variants with atrial fibrillation (AF) type and the recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in Taiwan is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationships between gene variants, AF type, and the recurrence of AF. Methods In our investigation, we examined 383 consecutive patients with AF (61.9 ± 14.0 years; 63% men); of these 383 patients, 189 underwent catheter ablation for drug-refractory AF. Thereafter, the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2200733, and rs7193343 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The rs7193343 variant was independently associated with non-paroxysmal AF (non-PAF). In the PAF group, the rs7193343 variant was independently associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. However, the rs2200733 variant was not associated with AF recurrence in this group. The combination of the rs7193343 and rs2200733 risk alleles was associated with a better predictive power in the PAF patients. In contrast, in the non-PAF group, the SNPs were not associated with recurrence. The rs7193343 and rs2200733 variants were not associated with different atrial voltage and activation times. Conclusions The rs7193343 variants were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in PAF patients but not in non-PAF patients. The rs7193343 CC variant was independently associated with non-PAF. PMID:27713600

  2. Concomitant surgical atrial fibrillation ablation and event recorder implantation: better monitoring, better outcome?†

    PubMed Central

    Pecha, Simon; Schäfer, Timm; Hartel, Friederike; Ahmadzade, Teymour; Subbotina, Irina; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Wagner, Florian Matthias

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Concomitant ablation is an established therapy in cardiac surgical patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Post-discharge care seems to be an essential factor for clinical outcome. We analysed the influence of event recorder (ER) implantation and therapy guidance by the results of continuous rhythm monitoring of consecutive postoperative follow-up by our department of electrophysiology. METHODS Between July 2003 and August 2010, 401 cardiac surgical patients underwent concomitant surgical AF ablation therapy. Since August 2009, an ER (REVEAL XT, Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) was implanted in 98 patients intraoperatively. ER interrogation was performed by our department of electrophysiology 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Results and outcomes were compared with a matched cohort of patients with ablation and no ER implantation. In those patients, rhythm follow-up was obtained by 24-h Holter ECG. Primary end-point of the study was sinus rhythm rate after 12 months. RESULTS Mean patient's age was 67.0 ± 9.7 years, and 68.4% were male. No major ablation-related complications occurred. The overall sinus rhythm rate was 65.3% after 1-year follow-up. The sinus rhythm rate off antiarrhythmic drugs was 60.3%. The conversion rate tended to be higher in patients with an implanted ER (69.3 vs 60.1%, respectively; P = 0.098). Also, the sinus rhythm rate of anti-arrhythmic drugs was higher in the ER group (64.3 vs 56.2). Patients with ER were seen more often by a cardiologist in the first postoperative year (3.1 ± 0.8 vs 1.5 ± 0.9; P < 0.05) and received significantly more additional procedures, like electrical cardioversion or additional catheter-based ablation (16.1 vs 4.3%; P < 0.001; 11.2 vs 3.1%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Implantation of an ER with link-up to a cardiology and/or electrophysiology provides optimized anti-arrhythmic drug management and higher rates of consecutive procedures like cardioversion or additional catheter-based ablation. As a

  3. Direct Pulmonary Vein Ablation with Stenosis Prevention Therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Holmes, David R.; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Powers, Joanne; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Gilles, Emily J.; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Hodge, David O.; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dominant location of electrical triggers for initiating atrial fibrillation (AF) originates from the muscle sleeves inside pulmonary veins (PVs). Currently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is performed outside of the PVs to isolate, rather than directly ablate these tissues, due to the risk of intraluminal PV stenosis. Methods In 4 chronic canine experiments, we performed direct PV muscle sleeve RFA ± post-ablation drug-coated balloon (DCB) treatment with paclitaxel/everolimus. Of the 4 PVs, 2 PVs were ablated and treated with DCB, 1 PV was ablated without DCB treatment (positive control), and 1 PV was left as a negative control. Local electrograms were assessed in PVs for near-field signals and were targeted for ablation. After 12-14 weeks survival, PVs were interrogated for absence of near-field PV potentials, and each PV was assessed for stenosis. Results All canines survived the study period without cardiorespiratory complications, and remained ambulatory. In all canines, PVs that were ablated and treated with DCB remained without any significant intraluminal stenosis. In contrast, PVs that were ablated and not treated with DCB showed near or complete intraluminal stenosis. At terminal study, PV potentials remained undetectable. A blinded, histologic analysis demonstrated that ablated PVs without DCB treatment had extensive thrombus, fibrin, mineralization, and elastin disruption. Conclusion Our chronic canine data suggest that direct PV tissue ablation without subsequent stenosis is feasible with the use of post-ablation DCBs. PMID:26075706

  4. Staged hybrid ablation for persistent and longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation effectively restores sinus rhythm in long-term observation

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Oskar; Buchta, Piotr; Niklewski, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Pawel; Koba, Rafał; Gąsior, Mariusz; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hybrid ablation (HABL) of atrial fibrillation combining endoscopic, minimally invasive, closed chest epicardial ablation with endocardial CARTO-guided accuracy was introduced to overcome the limitations of current therapeutic options for patients with persistent (PSAF) and longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the procedural safety and feasibility as well as effectiveness of HABL in patients with PSAF and LSPAF 1 year after the procedure. Material and methods The study is a single-center, prospective clinical registry. From 07/2009 to 12.2014, 90 patients with PSAF (n = 39) and LSPAF (n = 51), at the mean age of 54.8 ±9.8, in mean EHRA class 2.6, underwent HABL. 64.4% of patients had a history of prior cardioversion or catheter ablation. Thirteen patients had LVEF less than 35%. Mean AF duration was 4.5 ±3.7 years. Patients were scheduled for 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up with 7-day Holter monitoring. Results At 6 months after the procedure 78% (54/69) of patients were in SR. At 12 months after the procedure 86% (59/69) were in SR and 62.3% (43/69) in SR and off class I/III antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs). Only 1% (1/69) of patients required a repeat ablation for atrial flutter. A significant decrease in LA dimension and an increase in LVEF were noted. Conclusions A combination of epicardial and endocardial RF ablation should be considered as a treatment option for patients with persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation as it is safe and effective in restoring sinus rhythm. PMID:28144262

  5. Efficacy of circumferential pulmonary vein ablation of atrial fibrillation in endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Naiara; Mont, Lluís; Tamborero, David; Berruezo, Antonio; Viola, Graziana; Guasch, Eduard; Nadal, Mercè; Andreu, David; Vidal, Barbara; Sitges, Marta; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Long-term endurance sport practice has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for lone atrial fibrillation (AF). However, data on the outcome of circumferential pulmonary vein ablation (CPVA) in endurance athletes are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of CPVA in AF secondary to endurance sport practice. Methods and results Patients submitted to CPVA answered a questionnaire about lifetime history of endurance sport practice. Endurance athletes were defined as those who engaged in >3 h per week of high-intensity exercise for at least the 10 years immediately preceding their AF diagnosis. A series of 182 consecutive patients was included (51 ± 11 years, 65% with paroxysmal AF, 81% men, 42 ± 6 mm mean left atrial diameter); 107 (59%) patients had lone AF, and 42 of them (23% of the study population) were classified as endurance athletes (lone AF sport group). Freedom from arrhythmia after a single CPVA was similar in the lone AF sport group compared with the remaining patients (P = 0.446). Left atrial size and long-standing AF were the only independent predictors for arrhythmia recurrence after ablation. Conclusion Circumferential pulmonary vein ablation was as effective in AF secondary to endurance sport practice as in other aetiologies of AF. PMID:19923171

  6. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  7. [Does radiofrequency ablation of the bundle of Kent results in a lower risk of atrial fibrillation?].

    PubMed

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Beurrier, D; Houriez, P

    2002-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of the Bundle of Kent is a common method of treating malignant forms of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and the paroxysmal junctional tachycardia which may complicate this condition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ablation of a latent or patent Bundle of Kent on the prevention of atrial fibrillation. One hundred and thirty eight patients aged 15 to 81 years of age with one or more patent (Group I) (n = 96) or latent Bundles of Kent (Group II) (n = 42) underwent successful ablation of the Bundle of Kent. Five patients in Group I (5%) and 4 in Group II (9.5%) had spontaneous paroxysmal atrial fibrillation before ablation. During electrophysiological investigation, AF was induced in 7 patients, 2 of whom had spontaneous AF in Group I and 3 in Group II. During follow-up (3 +/- 1 years), 3 patients of Group I went on to develop AF: 2 of them had never had the arrhythmia before: 4 patients of Group II, including 2 with previous AF, went on to develop AF. The risk of spontaneous AF was correlated to older ages. The authors conclude that persistence of the risk of spontaneous AF after ablation of a Bundle of Kent should be investigated especially in patients over 45 years of age.

  8. Achieving Bidirectional Long Delays In Pulmonary Vein Antral Lines Prior To Bidirectional Block In Patients With Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (The Bi-Bi Technique For Atrial Fibrillation Ablation).

    PubMed

    Mina Md Facc Fhrs, Adel F; L Warnecke Pa-C, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary Vein Antral isolation (PVAI) is currently the standard of care for both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation ablation. Reconnection to the pulmonary vein is the most common cause of recurrence of atrial fibrillation. Achieving the endpoint of bidirectional block (BDB) for cavotricuspid isthmus dependant flutter has improved our outcomes for atrial flutter ablation. With this we tried to achieve long delays in the pulmonary veins antral lines prior to complete isolation comparable to those delays found in patient with bidirectional block of atrial flutter lines. Study Objective:The objective of this paper was to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of achieving Bidirectional long delays in pulmonary vein antral lines prior to Bidirectional Block in patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Method: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation procedures at Unity Point Methodist from January 2015 to January 2016. 20 consecutive patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who had AF ablation using the Bi-Bi technique were evaluated. Result: Mean age was 63, number of antiarrhythmic used prior to ablation was 1.4, mean left atrial size was 38 mm. Mean chads score was 1.3. Mean EF was 53%. Long delays in the left antral circumferential lines were achieved with mean delay of 142 milliseconds +/-100. Also long delays in the right antral circumferential lines were achieved with mean delay of 150 milliseconds +/-80. 95 % (19/20) of patients were free of any atrial arrhythmias and were off antiarrhythmic medications for AF post procedure. There was only one transient complication in one patient who developed a moderate pericardial effusion that was successfully drained with no hemodynamic changes. The only patient who had recurrence was found to have asymptomatic AF with burden on his device <1%, this patient was also found to have non PV triggers for his AF. In patients with only PV triggered AF

  9. Low incidence of left atrial delayed enhancement with MRI in patients with AF: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bois, John P; Glockner, James; Young, Phillip M; Foley, Thomas A; Sheldon, Seth; Newman, Darrell B; Lin, Grace; Packer, Douglas L; Brady, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained atrial arrhythmia. One potential target for ablation is left atrial (LA) scar (LAS) regions that may be the substrate for re-entry within the atria, thereby sustaining AF. Identification of LAS through LA delayed gadolinium enhancement (LADE) with MRI has been proposed. Objectives We sought to evaluate LADE in patients referred for catheter ablation of AF. Methods Prospective analysis was conducted of consecutive patients who underwent pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) ablation for AF at a single institution. Patients underwent LADE with MRI to determine LAS regions before ablation. MRI data were analysed independently in accordance with prespecified institutional protocol by two staff cardiac radiologists to whom patient outcomes were masked, and reports of LADE were documented. Where no initial consensus occurred regarding delayed enhancement (DE), a third staff cardiac radiologist independently reviewed the case and had the deciding vote. Results Of the 149 consecutive patients (mean (SD) age, 59 (9) years), AF was persistent in 64 (43%) and paroxysmal in 85 (57%); 45 (30%) had prior ablation. Only five patients (3%) had identifiable DE in LA walls (persistent AF, n=1; paroxysmal AF, n=4). LADE was present in two (4%) of the 45 patients with previous left PVAI. The presence of LADE was not associated with a higher recurrence rate of AF. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies, the finding of DE within LA walls was uncommon and, when present, did not correlate with AF type or risk of AF recurrence. It therefore is of unclear clinical significance. PMID:28123766

  10. Cost analysis of radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gorenek, Bulent; Kudaiberdieva, Gulmira

    2013-09-10

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Its management requires high healthcare expenditures; 52%-70% of expenses for AF care are constituted by hospitalization costs. The current management strategies of pharmacological rhythm control and pharmacological or invasive rate control show no difference in impact on major outcomes in patients with AF. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has been shown to reduce the risk of AF recurrence, improve quality of life and reduce hospitalization rate as compared to pharmacological rhythm control and rate control strategies. This review summarizes current knowledge on cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of RFA for patients with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  12. First Case of Automatic His Potential Detection With a Novel Ultra High-density Electroanatomical Mapping System for AV Nodal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Sebastian; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; John, Silke; Hindricks, Gerhard; Bollmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year old was considered for atrioventricular (AV) nodal ablation in view of atrial fibrillation (AF) with poorly controlled ventricular rate despite being on amiodarone. Targeted AV nodal ablation was successfully performed after identifying the target site for ablation by reviewing an ultra high-density map of the His region produced by automatic electrogram annotation. PMID:25852249

  13. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  14. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  15. Novel P Wave Indices to Predict Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Jingzhou; Ma, Yuedong; Tang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) is a widely used treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Several P wave duration (PWD) parameters have been suggested to predict post-ablation recurrence, but their use remains controversial. This study aimed to identify novel P wave indices that predict post-ablation AF recurrence. Material/Methods We selected 171 consecutive patients undergoing CPVI for paroxysmal AF. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were obtained at the beginning and the end of ablation. PWD was measured in all 12 leads. The PWD variation was calculated by subtracting the pre-ablation PWD from the post-ablation PWD. Results PWD was significantly shortened in leads II, III, aVF, and V1 after ablation. During a mean follow-up of 19.96±4.32 months, AF recurrence occurred in 32 (18.7%) patients. No significant differences in baseline characteristics or pre- or post-ablation PWD were observed between the AF recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Patients with AF recurrence exhibited a smaller PWD variation in leads II (1.21(−0.56, 2.40) vs. −5.77(−9.10, −4.06) ms, P<0.001), III (−5.92(−9.87, 3.27) vs. −9.44(−11.89, −5.57) ms, P=0.001) and V1 (−4.43(−6.64, −3.13) vs. −6.33(−8.19,−4.59) ms, P=0.003). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that smaller PWD variations in lead II and III were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. PWD variation ≥−2.21 ms in lead II displayed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (85.29% and 83.94%, respectively) for predicting post-ablation AF recurrence. A PWD variation ≥0 ms displayed the best practical value in predicting AF recurrence. Conclusions PWD variation in lead II is an effective predictor of post-ablation AF recurrence. PMID:27450644

  16. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  17. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  18. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  19. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  20. Lone Atrial Fibrillation Is Associated With Impaired Left Ventricular Energetics That Persists Despite Successful Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S.; Liu, Alexander; Eichhorn, Christian; Ariga, Rina; Levelt, Eylem; Clarke, William T.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Bashir, Yaver; Ginks, Matthew; Rajappan, Kim; Betts, Tim; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lone atrial fibrillation (AF) may reflect a subclinical cardiomyopathy that persists after sinus rhythm (SR) restoration, providing a substrate for AF recurrence. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of restoring SR by catheter ablation on left ventricular (LV) function and energetics in patients with AF but no significant comorbidities. Methods: Fifty-three patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF and without significant valvular disease, uncontrolled hypertension, coronary artery disease, uncontrolled thyroid disease, systemic inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, or obstructive sleep apnea (ie, lone AF) undergoing ablation and 25 matched control subjects in SR were investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging quantified LV ejection fraction (LVEF), peak systolic circumferential strain (PSCS), and left atrial volumes and function, whereas phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluated ventricular energetics (ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP). AF burden was determined before and after ablation by 7-day Holter monitoring; intermittent ECG event monitoring was also undertaken after ablation to investigate for asymptomatic AF recurrence. Results: Before ablation, both LV function and energetics were significantly impaired in patients compared with control subjects (LVEF, 61% [interquartile range (IQR), 52%–65%] versus 71% [IQR, 69%–73%], P<0.001; PSCS, –15% [IQR, –11 to –18%] versus −18% [IQR, –17% to –19%], P=0.002; ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP, 1.81±0.35 versus 2.05±0.29, P=0.004). As expected, patients also had dilated and impaired left atria compared with control subjects (all P<0.001). Early after ablation (1–4 days), LVEF and PSCS improved in patients recovering SR from AF (LVEF, 7.0±10%, P=0.005; PSCS, –3.5±4.3%, P=0.001) but were unchanged in those in SR during both assessments (both P=NS). At 6 to 9 months after ablation, AF burden reduced significantly (from 54% [IQR, 1.5%–100%] to

  1. Silent Cerebral Events after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation - Overview and Current Data.

    PubMed

    Deneke, Thomas; Nentwich, Karin; Krug, Joachim; Müller, Patrick; Grewe, Peter Hubert; Mügge, Andreas; Schade, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Silent cerebral lesions (SCL) have been identified on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in apparently asymptomatic patients after cardiovascular procedures. After atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation incidences range from 1 to over 40% depending upon different factors. MRI definition should include diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) to detect hyperintensities (bright spots) due to acute brain ischemia correlated with a hypointensity in the apparent diffusion coefficient mapping (ADC-map) to rule out artifacts. The genesis of SCL appears to be multifactorial and appears to be a result of embolic events either from gaseous or solid particles. The MRI pattern appears to be comparable not hinting towards a specific mechanism. One may distinguish two different MRI definition: one, more sensitive, for silent ischemic events (SCE) not proven to be related to cell death (DWI positive but FLAIR negative); and one for SCL that are due to edema caused by cell death which will lead to glial cell scar formation (DWI positive and FLAIR positive). For ease of data interpretation, future studies should ensure both definitions, and that DWI and FLAIR data is acquired using identical slice thickness and orientation. Risk factors associated with increased SCL-incidences involve patient-specific, technology-associated and procedural determinants. When using a high-sensitive MRI definition differences in SCE-rates in between technologies appear to be less prominent. Further studies on the effects of different periprocedural anticoagulation regimen, different steps of the ablation procedure and new technologies are needed. For now, SCL incidence may determine the thrombogenic potential of an ablation technology and further studies to reduce or avoid SCL generation are desirable. It appears reasonable, that any SCE should be avoided.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  3. Effect of Surgical Atrial Fibrillation Ablation at the Time of Cardiac Surgery on Risk of Postoperative Pacemaker Implantation.

    PubMed

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Binongo, José Nilo G; Levy, Mathew; Merchant, Faisal M; Halkos, Michael; Thourani, Vinod; Lattouf, Omar; Guyton, Robert; Puskas, John; Leon, Angel R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate whether performing surgical atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation in conjunction with cardiac surgery (CS) increases the risk for postoperative permanent pacemaker (PPM) requirement. The 30-day risk for PPM requirement was analyzed in consecutive patients who underwent CS from January 2007 to August 27, 2013. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who underwent AF ablation concomitant with CS (AF ABL), (2) patients with any history of AF who underwent surgery who did not undergo ablation (AF NO ABL), and (3) those with no histories of AF who underwent surgery (NO AF). Logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, and surgery type. Of 13,453 CS patients, 353 (3%) were in the AF ABL group, 1,701 (12%) in the AF NO ABL group, and 11,399 (85%) in the NO AF group. A total of 7,651 patients (57%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, 4,384 (33%) underwent valve surgery, and 1,418 (10%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery. The overall PPM risk was 1.6% (212 of 13,453); risk was 5.7% (20 of 353) in the AF ABL group, 3.1% (53 of 1,701) in the AF NO ABL group, and 1.2% (139 of 11,399) in the NO AF group. The unadjusted and adjusted odds of PPM were higher in the AF ABL and AF NO ABL groups than in the NO AF group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 4.4, and adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.4, respectively). The unadjusted OR comparing the AF ABL group and the AF NO ABL group was significant (unadjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.2); however, the OR adjusted for surgery type, age, and gender showed a trend toward significance (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.7). In conclusion, in this large cohort of patients who underwent CS, surgical AF ablation appeared to carry an increased risk for postoperative PPM implantation.

  4. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  5. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  6. Current status of thermal ablation treatments for lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Damian E; Shulman, Maria

    2010-09-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques.

  7. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment.

  8. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort. One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation. There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001–27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred. The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  9. EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation of Insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shan-yu; Lu, Xiu-ping; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical resection is a standard treatment for insulinomas; however, it is associated with a high risk of complications and limited to specific suitable candidates. In recent years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas has emerged as a new therapeutic option, especially for elderly patients and candidates unfit for surgery. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique for insulinomas. Four patients diagnosed with insulinomas based on EUS–fine-needle aspiration and immunohistochemistry results underwent EUS-guided 95% ethanol ablation. A comprehensive literature review was performed to understand the current status of the feasibility, safety, and effects of EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas was successfully completed in all the 4 patients. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at 3 days after the procedure. No recurrence of hypoglycemia or tumors was noted during follow-up (range, 3–6 months). Literature review showed 8 patients with insulinomas who underwent EUS-guided ethanol ablation. All the procedures were successful, with no need for further surgical treatment. Among these reviewed cases, 6 patients had no post-procedural complications, while other 2 patients showed a mild increase in the serum levels of lipase and/or pancreatic enzymes within 48 h post-procedure; furthermore, 1 of these 2 patients presented at a later date with medically controllable hematoma and ulceration. During follow-up, 6 patients remained asymptomatic and normoglycemic, while the 2 patients who presented post-procedural complications developed occasional mild confusion. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas is an effective and safe modality, with an acceptable level of post-procedural complications. However, the long-term effects of this new therapeutic option need to be validated in a large randomized controlled

  10. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  11. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  12. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  13. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA. PMID:27647995

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  15. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  16. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; Macleod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-02-23

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  17. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  18. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  19. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  20. Association of SCN10A Polymorphisms with the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Catheter Ablation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiqing; Xu, Juan; Chen, Songwen; Zhou, Genqing; Qi, Baozhen; Wei, Yong; Hu, En; Tang, Dongdong; Chen, Gang; Li, Hongli; Zhao, Liqun; Shi, Yongyong; Liu, Shaowen

    2017-01-01

    The nonsynonymous SCN10A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6795970 has been reported to associate with PR interval and atrial fibrillation (AF) and in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the AF-associated SNP rs6800541. In this study, we investigated whether rs6795970 polymorphisms are associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. A total of 502 consecutive patients with AF who underwent catheter ablation were included. AF recurrence was defined as a documented episode of any atrial arrhythmias lasting ≥30 s after a blanking period of 3 months. AF recurrence was observed between 3 and 12 months after catheter ablation in 24.5% of the patients. There was a significant difference in the allele distribution (p = 7.86 × 10−5) and genotype distribution (p = 1.42 × 10−5) of rs6795970 between the AF recurrence and no recurrence groups. In a multivariate analysis, we identified the following independent predictors of AF recurrence: the rs6795970 genotypes in an additive model (OR 0.36, 95%CI 0.22~0.60, p = 7.04 × 10−5), a history of AF ≥36 months (OR 3.57, 95%CI 2.26~5.63, p = 4.33 × 10−8) and left atrial diameter (LAD) ≥40 mm (OR 1.85, 95%CI 1.08~3.19, p = 0.026). These data suggest that genetic variation in SCN10A may play an important role in predicting AF recurrence after catheter ablation in the Chinese Han population. PMID:28281580

  1. Association of SCN10A Polymorphisms with the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Catheter Ablation in a Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiqing; Xu, Juan; Chen, Songwen; Zhou, Genqing; Qi, Baozhen; Wei, Yong; Hu, En; Tang, Dongdong; Chen, Gang; Li, Hongli; Zhao, Liqun; Shi, Yongyong; Liu, Shaowen

    2017-03-10

    The nonsynonymous SCN10A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6795970 has been reported to associate with PR interval and atrial fibrillation (AF) and in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the AF-associated SNP rs6800541. In this study, we investigated whether rs6795970 polymorphisms are associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. A total of 502 consecutive patients with AF who underwent catheter ablation were included. AF recurrence was defined as a documented episode of any atrial arrhythmias lasting ≥30 s after a blanking period of 3 months. AF recurrence was observed between 3 and 12 months after catheter ablation in 24.5% of the patients. There was a significant difference in the allele distribution (p = 7.86 × 10(-5)) and genotype distribution (p = 1.42 × 10(-5)) of rs6795970 between the AF recurrence and no recurrence groups. In a multivariate analysis, we identified the following independent predictors of AF recurrence: the rs6795970 genotypes in an additive model (OR 0.36, 95%CI 0.22~0.60, p = 7.04 × 10(-5)), a history of AF ≥36 months (OR 3.57, 95%CI 2.26~5.63, p = 4.33 × 10(-8)) and left atrial diameter (LAD) ≥40 mm (OR 1.85, 95%CI 1.08~3.19, p = 0.026). These data suggest that genetic variation in SCN10A may play an important role in predicting AF recurrence after catheter ablation in the Chinese Han population.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  3. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  4. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  5. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  6. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  7. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats.

  8. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  9. Polymorphism rs2200733 at chromosome 4q25 is associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feifei; Yang, Yanzong; Zhang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Shulong; Dong, Yingxue; Yin, Xiaomeng; Chang, Dong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Kejing; Gao, Lianjun; Xia, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    To test polymorphisms rs2200733 (chromosome 4q25) and rs2106261 (ZFHX3) were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in a Chinese Han cohort. A total of 235 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation were recruited consecutively. Two polymorphisms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and genotyped using high resolution melting analysis. Primary endpoints for AF recurrence were defined as the time to the first recurrence of atrial tachycardia/flutter/fibrillation (AT/AF). AT/AF recurrence was observed in 76 patients (35%). Allelic analysis demonstrated that rs2200733 was strongly associated with AF recurrence after ablation (P = 0.011) and the minor allele T increased the risk for recurrence (OR = 1.715). Diameters of the right atrium as well as the left and right superior pulmonary veins (PVs) were associated with rs2200733 in different genetic models (P = 0.040, 0.047 and 0.028, respectively). No significant association was detected between rs2106261 and AT/AF recurrence after ablation or atrial/PV diameters in any models. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only rs2200733 was an independent factor of AF recurrence after ablation (HR = 0.532, P = 0.022). In Chinese Han population, rs2200733 but not rs2106261 is associated with AT/AF recurrence after ablation. The patients with genotype TT have larger size of right atrium and superior PVs than those of CC genotype. The findings suggest that rs2200733 may play a key role in regulating proper development and differentiation of atria/PVs. PMID:27158361

  10. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    PubMed

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  11. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  12. Staged transthoracic approach to persistent atrial fibrillation (TOP-AF): study protocol for a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent atrial fibrillation frequently shows multiple different electrophysiological mechanisms of induction. This heterogeneity causes a low success rate of single procedures of ablation and a high incidence of recurrence. Surgical ablation through bilateral thoracotomy demonstrates better results after a single procedure. Prospective observational studies in inhomogeneous populations without control groups report a remarkable 90% of success with hybrid or staged procedures of surgical ablation coupled with catheter ablation. In this trial, we will examine the hypothesis that a staged approach involving initial minimally invasive surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation, followed by a second percutaneous procedure in case of recurrence, has a higher success rate than repeated percutaneous procedures. Methods/Design This is a controlled (2:1) randomized trial comparing use of a percutaneous catheter with minimally invasive transthoracic surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation. The inclusion and exclusion criteria, definitions, and treatment protocols are those reported by the 2012 Expert Consensus Statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation. Patients will be randomized to either percutaneous catheter (n = 100) or surgical (n = 50) ablation as the first procedure. After 3 months, they are re-evaluated, according to the same guidelines, and receive a second procedure if necessary. Crossover will be allowed and data analyzed on an “intention-to-treat” basis. Primary outcomes are the incidence of sinus rhythm at 6 and 12 months and the proportions of patients requiring a second procedure. Discussion The use of a staged strategy combining surgical and percutaneous approaches might be more favorable in treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation than the controversial single percutaneous ablation. Trial registration ISRCTN08035058 Reg 06.20.2013 PMID:24885377

  13. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  14. Wenxin Keli suppresses atrial substrate remodelling after epicardial ganglionic plexi ablation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinping; Zhao, Qingyan; Kebbati, A Hafid; Deng, Hongping; Wang, Xule; Dai, Zixuan; Yu, Shengbo; Huang, Congxin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chronic effects of ganglionic plexi (GP) ablation on atrial fibrillation (AF) inducibility have not been elucidated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of Wenxin Keli (WK) on the inducibility of AF and atrial substrate remodelling after epicardial GP ablation. METHODS: Twenty dogs were randomly divided into a sham-operated group, a GP ablation group and a WK-treated group. All animals underwent a left thoracotomy at the fourth intercostal space. AF inducibility was assessed by burst rapid pacing at the right atrium. Both the GP ablation group and the WK-treated group received four major GP ablations. In the WK-treated group, dogs were treated with oral WK once per day, and all animals were allowed to recover for eight weeks, after which AF inducibility and AF duration were measured again. RESULTS: After eight weeks of WK treatment, AF inducibility was lower than in the GP ablation group, and was similar to that of the sham-operated group. Compared with the sham-operated group, the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 in right atrial tissues were increased in GP ablation group (143.6±33.7 pg/mg versus 206.2±41.4 pg/mg, P=0.02; 75.3±12.1 pg/mg versus 141.3±64 pg/mg, P=0.03; and 175.1±42.5 pg/mg versus 351.7±101 pg/mg, P<0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in levels of ANP, TNF-α and IL-6 in atrial tissues between the sham-operated group and WK treated group. Expression of connexin 43 in atrial tissues was increased after eight weeks of GP ablation, while WK administration inhibited connexin 43 remodelling. CONCLUSIONS: Epicardial GP ablation can induce atrial substrate remodelling, including Cx43 upregulation and increased levels of ANP, TNF-α and IL-6. These changes may be suppressed by long-term oral WK administration. PMID:23940442

  15. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Hemodynamic Adaptation and Successful Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis is a well-established possible complication following an atrial fibrillation ablation of pulmonary veins. Symptoms of pulmonary vein stenosis range from asymptomatic to severe exertional dyspnea. The number of asymptomatic patients with pulmonary vein stenosis is greater than originally estimated; moreover, only about 22% of severe pulmonary vein stenosis requires intervention. We present a patient with severe postatrial fibrillation (AF) ablation pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis, which was seen on multiple imaging modalities including cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiogram, lung perfusion scan, and pulmonary angiogram. This patient did not have any pulmonary symptoms. Hemodynamic changes within a stenosed pulmonary vein might not reflect the clinical severity of the obstruction if redistribution of pulmonary artery flow occurs. Our patient had an abnormal lung perfusion and ventilation (V/Q) scan, suggesting pulmonary artery blood flow redistribution. The patient ultimately underwent safe repeat atrial fibrillation ablation with successful elimination of arrhythmia. PMID:28105376

  16. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  17. First steps towards initial registration for electrophysiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Yatziv, Liron; Koch, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. The treatment option of choice is radio-frequency catheter ablation, which is performed in electrophysiology labs using C-Arm X-ray systems for navigation and guidance. The goal is to electrically isolate the pulmonary vein-left atrial junction thereby rendering myocardial fibers responsible for induction and maintenance of AF inactive. The use of overlay images for fluoroscopic guidance may improve the quality of the ablation procedure, and can reduce procedure time. Overlay images, acquired using CT, MRI, or C-arm CT, can add soft-tissue information, otherwise not visible under X-ray. MRI can be used to image a wide variety of anatomical details without ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present a method to register a 3-D MRI volume to 2-D biplane X-ray images using the coronary sinus. Current approaches require registration of the overlay images to the fluoroscopic images to be performed after the trans-septal puncture, when contast agent can be administered. We present a new approach for registration to align overlay images before the trans-septal puncture. To this end, we manually extract the coronary sinus from pre-operative MRI and register it to a multi-electorde catheter placed in the coronary sinus.

  18. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  19. A new AF gravitational instanton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Teo, Edward

    2011-09-01

    It has long been conjectured that the Euclidean Schwarzschild and Euclidean Kerr instantons are the only non-trivial asymptotically flat (AF) gravitational instantons. In this Letter, we show that this conjecture is false by explicitly constructing a new two-parameter AF gravitational instanton with a U (1) × U (1) isometry group, using the inverse-scattering method. It has Euler number χ = 3 and Hirzebruch signature τ = 1, and its global topology is CP2 with a circle S1 removed appropriately. Various other properties of this gravitational instanton are also discussed.

  20. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  1. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  2. Post-Ablation Endometrial Carcinoma (PAEC) Following Radiofrequency Endometrial Ablation: A Case Report and Its Implications for Management of Endometrial Ablation Failures.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Morris; Dawkins, Josette C

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial ablation (EA) has become one of the most commonly performed gynecologic procedures in the United States and other developed countries. Global endometrial ablation (GEA) devices have supplanted resectoscopic ablation primarily because they have brought with them technical simplicity and unprecedented safety. These devices, all of which received FDA approval between 1997 and 2001, are typically used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in premenopausal women. Several million women in the US who have undergone a previous EA procedure are about to enter the risk pool for the development of endometrial cancer (EC). Ours is the 18th reported case of post-ablation endometrial carcinoma (PAEC) in the English literature. This case underscores the diagnostic challenges faced in evaluating women with a history of a previous EA who cannot be properly evaluated with conventional techniques such as endometrial biopsy and sonohysterography.

  3. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  4. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  5. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects.

  6. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  7. Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Manifest Different Waveform Characteristics: Implications for Characterizing Tachycardias

    PubMed Central

    Biviano, Angelo B.; Ciaccio, Edward J.; Fleitman, Jessica; Knotts, Robert; Lawrence, John; Haynes, Norrisa; Cyrille, Nicole; Hickey, Kathleen; Iyer, Vivek; Wan, Elaine; Whang, William; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTON Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation patients often manifest atrial tachycardias (AT) with atypical ECG morphologies that preclude accurate localization and mechanism. Diagnostic maneuvers used to define ATs during electrophysiology studies can be limited by tachycardia termination or transformation. Additional methods of characterizing post-AF ablation ATs are required. METHODS AND RESULTS We evaluated the utility of noninvasive ECG signal analytics in post-ablation AF patients for the following features: 1) Localization of ATs (i.e., right versus left atrium), and 2) Identification of common left AT mechanisms (i.e., focal vs. macroreentrant). Atrial waveforms from the surface ECG were used to analyze: 1) Spectral organization, including dominant amplitude (DA) and mean spectral profile (MP), and 2) Temporospatial variability, using temporospatial correlation coefficients. We studied 94 ATs in 71 patients who had undergone prior pulmonary vein isolation for AF and returned for a second ablation: 1) right atrial cavotricuspid-isthmus dependent (CTI) ATs (n=21); 2) left atrial macroreentrant ATs (n=41) and focal ATs (n=32). Right CTI ATs manifested higher DAs and lower MPs than left ATs, indicative of greater stability and less complexity in the frequency spectrum. Left macroreentrant ATs possessed higher temporospatial organization than left focal ATs. CONCLUSIONS Noninvasively recorded atrial waveform signal analyses show that right ATs possess more stable activation properties than left ATs, and left macroreentrant ATs manifest higher temporospatial organization than left focal ATs. Further prospective analyses evaluating the role these novel ECG-derived tools can play to help localize and identify mechanisms of common ATs in AF ablation patients are warranted. PMID:26228873

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Subpleural Lung Malignancy: Reduced Pain Using an Artificially Created Pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward W. Suh, Robert D.; Zeidler, Michelle R.; Tsai, Irene S.; Cameron, Robert B.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Goldin, Jonathan G.

    2009-07-15

    One of the main issues with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the subpleural lung malignancy is pain management during and after RF ablation. In this article, we present a case that utilized a technique to decrease the pain associated with RF ablation of a malignancy located within the subpleural lung. Under CT guidance, we created an artificial pneumothorax prior to the RF ablation, which resulted in minimizing the pain usually experienced during and after the procedure. It also decreased the amount of pain medications usually used in patients undergoing RF ablation of a subpleural lung lesion.

  9. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation: Achieving permanent pulmonary vein isolation by point-by-point radiofrequency lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrote, Alonso; Acosta, Juan; Jáuregui-Garrido, Beatriz; Frutos-López, Manuel; Arana-Rueda, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation by point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation constitutes the cornerstone of catheter ablation strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. However, despite advances in pulmonary vein isolation ablation strategies, long-term success rates after ablation remain suboptimal, which highlights the need to develop techniques to achieve more durable lesions. Strategies proposed to improve the durability of pulmonary vein isolation can be divided into two groups: Those addressed to improving the quality of the lesion and those that optimize the detection of acute PV reconnection during the ablation procedure. This manuscript reviews the role and potential benefits of these techniques according to current clinical evidence.

  10. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  11. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  12. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1 - Records Search AAC-Northern Region, Galena AFS, Campion AFS, Cape Lisburne AFS, Fort Yukon AFS, Indian Mountain AFS, Kotzebue AFS, Murphy Dome AFS, and Tin City AFS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    registered with Defense Technical Information Center should direct requests for copies of this report to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station ...Information Center should direct requests for copies of this report to: Defense Technical Information Center Cameron Station Alexandria, Virginia 22314 U’ B...Contract No. F08637 84 C0070. The locations of these installations are shown in Figure 1. INSTALLATION DESCRIPTION Galena AFS * Galena Air Force Station

  13. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  14. Ablation characteristics of quantum square pulse mode dental erbium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Suhovršnik, Tomaž; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Erbium lasers are by now an accepted tool for performing ablative medical procedures, especially when minimal invasiveness is desired. Ideally, a minimally invasive laser cutting procedure should be fast and precise, and with minimal pain and thermal side effects. All these characteristics are significantly influenced by laser pulse duration, albeit not in the same manner. For example, high cutting efficacy and low heat deposition are characteristics of short pulses, while vibrations and ejected debris screening are less pronounced at longer pulse durations. We report on a study of ablation characteristics on dental enamel and cementum, of a chopped-pulse Er:YAG [quantum square pulse (QSP)] mode, which was designed to reduce debris screening during an ablation process. It is shown that in comparison to other studied standard Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser pulse duration modes, the QSP mode exhibits the highest ablation drilling efficacy with lowest heat deposition and reduced vibrations, demonstrating that debris screening has a considerable influence on the ablation process. By measuring single-pulse ablation depths, we also show that tissue desiccation during the consecutive delivery of laser pulses leads to a significant reduction of the intrinsic ablation efficacy that cannot be fully restored under clinical settings by rehydrating the tooth using an external water spray.

  15. Analysis of illicit drugs by direct ablation of solid samples.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Berdakin, Matias; Tejedor, Jesús M; Alonso, José L

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of illicit drugs arises as an important field of work given the high social impacts presented by drugs in the modern society. Direct laser ablation of solid compounds allows their analysis without sampling or preparation procedures. For that purpose, an experimental set-up that combines laser ablation with time-of- flight mass spectrometry has been constructed very recently to perform studies on the mass spectra of such drugs as 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, commonly known as MDMA or ecstasy. Analysis of the observed fragmentation pattern in mass spectra may elucidate the ablation-induced photofragmentation phenomena produced, which differ from those previously observed with conventional ionization methods.

  16. Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Congenital and Infiltrative Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Wijnmaalen, Adrianus P; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2017-03-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is an important treatment modality to prevent ventricular tachycardia (VT) recurrence in patients with repaired congenital heart disease. Identification and ablation of anatomic isthmuses has improved acute ablation outcome with excellent VT-free survival in those with preserved biventricular function. Reports on RFCA for VT in patients with infiltrative disease are sparse and cardiac sarcoidosis seems to be the most prevalent cause for ventricular arrhythmia. Patients with active and ongoing inflammation are at high risk for VT recurrence. RFCA reduces the number of VT but often multiple procedures are required and long-term VT-free survival is unfavorable in those with left ventricular dysfunction.

  17. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  18. [Microwave ablation of a sarcoma lung metastasis in a patient with a pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Guerra, J M; Gallego, O; Franquet, T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a pacemaker and a sarcoma lung metastasis treated with microwave ablation. Although the treatment of tumours with microwave ablation is a successful and minimally invasive approach, there are concerns about the safety of this procedure for patients with implanted cardiac devices, such as a pacemaker. After careful planning between radiology and cardiology, microwave ablation was indicated in the patient since it is safer and shorter than the radiofrequency technique. The lesion was treated without complications. It is important to communicate the procedures performed, as well as any complications in order to formulate guidelines for the use of microwave ablation in patients with pacemakers.

  19. Coverage planning in computer-assisted ablation based on Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Guo, Weian; Sam Ge, Shuzhi; Lim, Wancheng

    2014-06-01

    An ablation planning system plays a pivotal role in tumor ablation procedures, as it provides a dry run to guide the surgeons in a complicated anatomical environment. Over-ablation, over-perforation or under-ablation may result in complications during the treatments. An optimal solution is desired to have complete tumor coverage with minimal invasiveness, including minimal number of ablations and minimal number of perforation trajectories. As the planning of tumor ablation is a multi-objective problem, it is challenging to obtain optimal covering solutions based on clinician׳s experiences. Meanwhile, it is effective for computer-assisted systems to decide a set of optimal plans. This paper proposes a novel approach of integrating a computational optimization algorithm into the ablation planning system. The proposed ablation planning system is designed based on the following objectives: to achieve complete tumor coverage and to minimize the number of ablations, number of needle trajectories and over-ablation to the healthy tissue. These objectives are taken into account using a Genetic Algorithm, which is capable of generating feasible solutions within a constrained search space. The candidate ablation plans can be encoded in generations of chromosomes, which subsequently evolve based on a fitness function. In this paper, an exponential weight-criterion fitness function has been designed by incorporating constraint parameters that were reflective of the different objectives. According to the test results, the proposed planner is able to generate the set of optimal solutions for tumor ablation problem, thereby fulfilling the aforementioned multiple objectives.

  20. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  1. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  2. Acute success and short-term follow-up of catheter ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter; a comparison of 8 mm tip radiofrequency and cryothermy catheters

    PubMed Central

    Janse, P.; Alings, M.; Scholten, M. F.; Mekel, J. M.; Miltenburg, M.; Jessurun, E.; Jordaens, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To compare the acute success and short-term follow-up of ablation of atrial flutter using 8 mm tip radiofrequency (RF) and cryocatheters. Methods Sixty-two patients with atrial flutter were randomized to RF or cryocatheter (cryo) ablation. Right atrial angiography was performed to assess the isthmus. End point was bidirectional isthmus block on multiple criteria. A pain score was used and the analgesics were recorded. Patients were followed for at least 3 months. Results The acute success rate for RF was 83% vs 69% for cryo (NS). Procedure times were similar (mean 144 ± 48 min for RF, vs 158 ± 49 min for cryo). More applications were given with RF than with cryo (26 ± 17 vs. 18 ± 10, p < 0.05). Fluoroscopy time was longer with RF (29 ± 15 vs. 19 ± 12 min, p < 0.02). Peak CK, CK-MB and CK-MB mass were higher, also after 24 h in the cryo group. Troponin T did not differ. Repeated transient block during application (usually with cryoablation) seemed to predict failure. Cryothermy required significantly less analgesia (p < 0.01), and no use of long sheaths (p < 0.005). The isthmus tended to be longer in the failed procedures (p = 0.117). This was similar for both groups, as was the distribution of anatomic variations. Recurrences and complaints in the successful patients were similar for both groups, with a very low recurrence of atrial flutter after initial success. Conclusions In this randomized study there was no statistical difference but a trend to less favorable outcome with 8 mm tip cryocatheters compared to RF catheters for atrial flutter ablation. Cryoablation was associated with less discomfort, fewer applications, shorter fluoroscopy times and similar procedure times. The recurrence rate was very low. Cryotherapy can be considered for atrial flutter ablation under certain circumstances especially when it has been used previously in the same patient, such as in an AF ablation. PMID:18363087

  3. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), the commonest form of idiopathic left VT, occurs more frequently in young males without structural heart disease and usually presents as paroxysmal palpitations. It is subdivided into two more common subtypes, posterior and anterior. A macro-reentrant circuit involving a considerable and variable extent of the left interventricular septum is presumed to be the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanism. A slow conduction zone with particular sensitivity to verapamil participates in the circuit and it seems that diastolic potentials (DP) represent the electrical activity in or near this zone. The fascicles of the left bundle appear to constitute part of the retrograde pathway and Purkinje potentials (PP) are assumed to represent their activation. In the present retrospective study, the authors review twelve cases of fascicular VT (ten posterior and two anterior) evaluated in the electrophysiology laboratory. Although initial induction was obtained in all patients, reproducibility was poor as a consequence of frequent contact inhibition during endocardial mapping of the left ventricle and this meant that ablation was not possible in two cases. Two cases of associated atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and a case of associated atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by a right posterior accessory pathway were documented, which suggest a correlated anatomic substrate. After ablation of the slow nodal pathway in one of the AVNRTs, fascicular VT was no longer inducible. Ablation of the fascicular VT was attempted in nine patients, at the tachycardia exit site (characterized by an early ventricular electrogram fused with a Purkinje potential) in two patients with anterior fascicular VT and in five patients with the posterior subtype, and near the slow conduction pathway (site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP) in the other two patients. The initial success rate with a single procedure was 78%, two of the ablations

  4. Artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum to facilitate thermal ablation of liver tumors: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Sharath K; Chick, Jeffrey F B; Chauhan, Nikunj R; Shyn, Paul B

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is increasingly utilized in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. Peripherally located hepatic tumors can be difficult to access or located adjacent to critical structures that can be injured. As a result, ablation of peripheral tumors may be avoided or may be performed too cautiously, leading to inadequate ablation coverage. In these cases, separating the tumor from adjacent critical structures can increase the efficacy and safety of procedures. Artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum are techniques that utilize fluid and gas, respectively, to insulate critical structures from the thermal ablation zone. Induction of artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum can enable complete ablation of otherwise inaccessible hepatic tumors, improve tumor visualization, minimize unintended thermal injury to surrounding organs, and reduce post-procedural pain. This pictorial essay illustrates and discusses the proper technique and clinical considerations for successful artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum creation to facilitate safe peripheral hepatic tumor ablation.

  5. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  6. Pulmonary Vein Remodeling Following Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Implications For The Radiographic Diagnosis Of Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Merchant Md, Faisal M; Levy Bs, Mathew R; Iravanian Md, Shahriar; Weragoda Md, Ramal M; Clermont Md, Edward C; Kelli Md, Heval M; Eisner PhD, Robert L; Vadnais Md, David; El-Chami Md, Mikhael F; Leon Md, Angel R; Delurgio Md, David B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary vein (PV) reverse remodeling has been recognized following atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. However, the extent of physiologic reverse remodeling after AF ablation and the potential impact of reverse remodeling on the radiographic diagnosis of PV stenosis have not been well characterized. Methods: From January 2004 to February 2014, 186 patients underwent paired cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate PV orifice dimensions before and after (mean 109 ± 61 days) an initial AF ablation. Results: Negative remodeling of the PV orifice cross sectional area occurred in 67.8% of veins with a mean reduction in area of 21.0 ± 14.1%, and positive remodeling was seen in the remaining PVs with an increase in area of 22.1 ± 23.4% compared to baseline. No PVs demonstrated a reduction in cross-sectional area of > 75% (maximum reduction observed was 58%). Negative remodeling of the PV long axis dimension was observed in 55.2% of veins with a mean reduction of 14.6 ± 9.2% compared to pre-ablation and positive remodeling was observed in 25.3% of PVs with a mean increase in diameter of 14.7 ± 12.6%. Only 1 PV demonstrated a reduction in orifice diameter of > 50%. There were no clinically evident or suspected cases of PV stenosis in this cohort. Conclusions: Negative remodeling of the PV orifice area was noted in the majority of PVs following AF ablation. However, in almost all cases, the extent of negative remodeling was well below commonly used thresholds for the radiographic diagnosis of PV stenosis.

  7. Comparison of Combination Therapies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Transarterial Chemoembolization with Radiofrequency Ablation versus Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Zivin, Sean P.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Doshi, Taral; Vasnani, Raj J.; Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2015-01-01

    management after the procedure (P = 1.00). Conclusions Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, both combination therapies, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation, are effective treatments for HCC. PMID:25534635

  8. Epicardial ablation guidance using coronary arterial models and live fluoroscopic overlay registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzke, R.; Thiagalingam, A.; Movassaghi, B.; d'Avila, A.; Reddy, V. Y.; Chan, R. C.

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge of patient-specific cardiac anatomy is required for catheter-based ablation in epicardial ablation procedures such as ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation interventions. In particular, knowledge of critical structures such as the coronary arteries is essential to avoid collateral damage. In such ablation procedures, ablation catheters are brought in via minimally-invasive subxiphoid access. The catheter is then steered to ablation target sites on the left ventricle (LV). During the ablation and catheter navigation it is of vital importance to avoid damage of coronary structures. Contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray angiography of the coronary arteries delivers a 3D impression of the anatomy during the time of intervention. Vessel modeling techniques have been shown to be able to deliver accurate 3D anatomical models of the coronary arteries. To simplify epicardial navigation and ablation, we propose to overlay coronary arterial models, derived from rotational X-ray angiography and vessel modeling, onto real-time X-ray fluoroscopy. In a preclinical animal study, we show that overlay of intra-operatively acquired 3D arterial models onto X-ray helps to place ablation lesions at a safe distance from coronary structures. Example ablation lesions have been placed based on the model overlay at reasonable distances between key arterial vessels and on top of marginal branches.

  9. 2012 HRS/EHRA/ECAS expert consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, procedural techniques, patient management and follow-up, definitions, endpoints, and research trial design.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Hugh; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Cappato, Riccardo; Brugada, Josep; Camm, A John; Chen, Shih-Ann; Crijns, Harry J G; Damiano, Ralph J; Davies, D Wyn; DiMarco, John; Edgerton, James; Ellenbogen, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Haines, David E; Haissaguerre, Michel; Hindricks, Gerhard; Iesaka, Yoshito; Jackman, Warren; Jalife, Jose; Jais, Pierre; Kalman, Jonathan; Keane, David; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kirchhof, Paulus; Klein, George; Kottkamp, Hans; Kumagai, Koichiro; Lindsay, Bruce D; Mansour, Moussa; Marchlinski, Francis E; McCarthy, Patrick M; Mont, J Lluis; Morady, Fred; Nademanee, Koonlawee; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Natale, Andrea; Nattel, Stanley; Packer, Douglas L; Pappone, Carlo; Prystowsky, Eric; Raviele, Antonio; Reddy, Vivek; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shemin, Richard J; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Wilber, David

    2012-03-01

    This is a report of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Task Force on Catheter and Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, developed in partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), and in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association (AHA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). This is endorsed by the governing bodies of the ACC Foundation, the AHA, the ECAS, the EHRA, the STS, the APHRS, and the HRS.

  10. Functional mitral regurgitation: predictor for atrial substrate remodeling and poor ablation outcome in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Wu, Lingmin; Hou, Bingbo; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Lihui; Ding, Ligang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu; Yao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is not uncommon in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We sought to investigate the association between FMR and atrial substrate remodeling as well as the ablation outcome in paroxysmal AF (PAF) patients. We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively enrolled cohort of 132 patients (age 55.1 ± 9.6 years, 75.8% male) with symptomatic PAF who underwent initial ablation in our institute. Functional mitral regurgitation was defined as regurgitation jet area to left atrium (LA) area ratio ≥ 0.1 without any primary valvular disease. Voltage mapping of LA was performed under sinus rhythm. Low voltage zones (LVZs) were semi-quantitatively estimated and presented as low voltage index. Follow-up for AF recurrence ≥ 12 months was performed. In total, 40 patients (29.6%) were detected with FMR, who were older than the non-FMR patients (P = 0.007) and had larger LA diameters (P = 0.02). Left atrium LVZs were observed in 64.9% of patients with FMR versus 22.1% patients without FMR (P < 0.001). Functional mitral regurgitation independently predicted the presence of LVZs (OR 7.286; 95% CI 3.023–17.562; P < 0.001). During a mean follow-up of 22.9 ± 6.5 months, 38 patients (28.8%) experienced AF recurrence. The recurrence rate was 60.0% and 19.5% in FMR and non-FMR cohort, respectively (log rank P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that FMR was an independent predictor for AF recurrence (HR 2.291; 95% CI 1.062–4.942; P = 0.03). Functional mitral regurgitation was strongly associated with atrial substrate remodeling. Furthermore, patients with FMR have substantial risk for AF recurrence post ablation. PMID:27472715

  11. Noninvasive Assessment of Tissue Heating During Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation Using MRI Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Castro, Valeria; Lardo, Albert C.; Berger, Ronald D.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Failure to achieve properly localized, permanent tissue destruction is a common cause of arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac ablation. Current methods of assessing lesion size and location during cardiac radiofrequency ablation are unreliable or not suited for repeated assessment during the procedure. MRI thermography could be used to delineate permanent ablation lesions because tissue heating above 50°C is the cause of permanent tissue destruction during radiofrequency ablation. However, image artifacts caused by cardiac motion, the ablation electrode, and radiofrequency ablation currently pose a challenge to MRI thermography in the heart. In the current study, we sought to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI thermography during cardiac ablation. Methods and Results An MRI-compatible electrophysiology catheter and filtered radiofrequency ablation system was used to perform ablation in the left ventricle of 6 mongrel dogs in a 1.5-T MRI system. Fast gradient-echo imaging was performed before and during radiofrequency ablation, and thermography images were derived from the preheating and postheating images. Lesion extent by thermography was within 20% of the gross pathology lesion. Conclusions MR thermography appears to be a promising technique for monitoring lesion formation and may allow for more accurate placement and titration of ablation, possibly reducing arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:20657028

  12. Early and comprehensive management of atrial fibrillation: executive summary of the proceedings from the 2nd AFNET-EHRA consensus conference 'research perspectives in AF'.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Bax, Jeroen; Blomstrom-Lundquist, Carina; Calkins, Hugh; Camm, A John; Cappato, Ricardo; Cosio, Francisco; Crijns, Harry; Diener, Hans-Christian; Goette, Andreas; Israel, Carsten W; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lip, Gregory Y H; Nattel, Stanley; Page, Richard L; Ravens, Ursula; Schotten, Ulrich; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Waldo, Albert; Wegscheider, Karl; Willems, Stephan; Breithardt, Günter

    2009-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes important mortality and morbidity on a population-level. So far, we do not have the means to prevent AF or AF-related complications adequately. Therefore, over 70 experts on atrial fibrillation convened for the 2nd AFNET/EHRA consensus conference to suggest directions for research to improve management of AF patients (Appendix 1). The group defined three main areas in need for research in AF: 1. better understanding of the mechanisms of AF; 2. Improving rhythm control monitoring and management; and 3. comprehensive cardiovascular risk management in AF patients. The group put forward the hypothesis that successful therapy of AF and its associated complications will require comprehensive therapy. This applies e.g. to the "old" debate of "rate versus rhythm control", since rhythm control is generally added to underlying (continued) rate control therapy, but also to the emerging debate of "antiarrhythmic drugs versus catheter ablation", of which both may be needed in most patients to maintain sinus rhythm, but also to therapy of conditions that predispose to AF and contribute to cardiovascular complications such as stroke, cognitive decline, heart failure, and acute coronary syndromes. We call for research initiatives aiming at a better understanding of the different causes of AF and its complications, and at development and validation of mechanism-based therapies. The future of AF therapy may require a combination of management of underlying and concomitant conditions, early and comprehensive rhythm control therapy, adequate control of ventricular rate and cardiac function, and continuous therapy to prevent AF-associated complications (e.g. antithrombotic therapy). The reasons for these suggestions are detailed in this paper.

  13. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  14. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  15. Tracked 3D ultrasound in radio-frequency liver ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that radio frequency (RF) ablation is a simple, safe and potentially effective treatment for selected patients with liver metastases. Despite all recent therapeutic advancements, however, intra-procedural target localization and precise and consistent placement of the tissue ablator device are still unsolved problems. Various imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been tried as guidance modalities. Transcutaneous US imaging, due to its real-time nature, may be beneficial in many cases, but unfortunately, fails to adequately visualize the tumor in many cases. Intraoperative or laparoscopic US, on the other hand, provides improved visualization and target imaging. This paper describes a system for computer-assisted RF ablation of liver tumors, combining navigational tracking of a conventional imaging ultrasound probe to produce 3D ultrasound imaging with a tracked RF ablation device supported by a passive mechanical arm and spatially registered to the ultrasound volume.

  16. New endometrial ablation techniques for treatment of menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Linda D

    2004-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is an excellent alternative to hysterectomy in women with menorrhagia and small intramural fibroids. Preoperative evaluation, which includes office hysteroscopy or saline infusion sonography, is critical to patient management and choice of procedure. A vast array of endometrial ablation technology is available currently that includes balloon therapy, cryosurgery hot circulating saline, bipolar impedance technology, and microwave: (1) ThermaChoice UTB System (Gynecare, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA), (2) Uterine Balloon Therapy (UBT) System, HerOption Uterine Cryoblation Therapy System (American Medical Systems, Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA), (3) Hydro ThermAblator HTA System (BEI Medical/Boston Scientific, Natick, MA), (4) NovaSure System (Novacept, Palo Alto, CA, USA), and (5) Microsulis Microwave Endometrial Ablation (MEA) System (Microsulis Medical Ltd., Pompano Beach, FL, USA). Each method is described herein, and Summary of Safety and Effectiveness Data (SSED) data for each product are reviewed.

  17. Clinical experiences with microwave thermal ablation of lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sidoff, Luby; Dupuy, Damian E

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 30% of early stage lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates due to medical co-morbidities, poor cardiopulmonary function and advanced age. These patients are traditionally offered chemotherapy and radiation, which have shown relatively modest improvements in mortality. For over a decade, percutaneous image-guided ablation has emerged as a safe, cost-effective, minimally invasive treatment alternative for patients who would otherwise not qualify for surgery. Although radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently the most extensively studied and widely utilised technique in the treatment of lung malignancies, there is a growing body of evidence that microwave ablation (MWA) has several unique benefits over RFA and cryoablation in the lung. This article reviews our institution's clinical experiences in the treatment of lung malignancies with MWA including patient selection, procedural technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes and comparison of ablation techniques.

  18. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring.

  19. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring†

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  20. Ablation of skeletal metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone metastases is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of pain from metastatic disease. Ablative technologies applied in the treatment of skeletal metastases include radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, ethanol ablation, and, most recently, focused ultrasound. These ablative methods may be performed in combination with percutaneous cementoplasty to provide support and stabilization for metastases in weight-bearing bones at risk for pathologic fracture.

  1. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  2. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  3. Feasibility of Image-Based Simulation to Estimate Ablation Target in Human Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Blake, Robert C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Nazarian, Saman; Zviman, M. Muz; Tandri, Harikrishna; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Herzka, Daniel A.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that MRI with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) may identify slowly conducting tissues in scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). Objective We tested the feasibility of image-based simulation based on LGE to estimate ablation targets in VT. Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 13 patients who had pre-ablation MRI for scar-related VT ablation. We used image-based simulation to induce VT and estimate target regions according to the simulated VT circuit. The estimated target regions were co-registered with the LGE scar map and the ablation sites from the electroanatomical map in the standard ablation approach. Results In image-based simulation, VT was inducible in 12 patients (92.3%). All VTs showed macro-reentrant propagation patterns, and the narrowest width of estimated target region that an ablation line should span to prevent VT recurrence was 5.0 ± 3.4 mm. Out of 11 patients who underwent ablation, the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were consistent in 9 patients (82%), where ablation within the estimated target region was associated with acute success (n=8) and ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with failure (n=1). In one case (9%), the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were inconsistent, where ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with acute success. Conclusions The image-based simulation can be used to estimate potential ablation targets of scar-related VT. The image-based simulation may be a powerful noninvasive tool for pre-procedural planning of ablation procedures to potentially reduce the procedure time and complication rates. PMID:23608593

  4. 'Zero' fluoroscopic exposure for ventricular tachycardia ablation in a patient with situs viscerum inversus totalis.

    PubMed

    Giaccardi, Marzia; Chiodi, Leandro; Del Rosso, Attilio; Colella, Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Situs viscerum inversus totalis (SVIT) is a congenital disorder characterized by mirror reversal of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Different studies have shown that the ablation procedure can be performed without fluoroscopy with safety and effectiveness, in the setting of supraventricular tachycardia. We successfully performed an anatomical map and a radiofrequency catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmia in a patient with SVIT without fluoroscopy.

  5. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  6. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  7. Mechanisms and clinical significance of early recurrences of atrial arrhythmias after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jackson J; Dixit, Sanjay; Santangeli, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Early recurrence of atrial arrhythmias (ERAA) after ablation is common and strongly predicts late recurrences and ablation failure. However, since arrhythmia may eventually resolve in up to half of patients with ERAA, guidelines do not recommend immediate reintervention for ERAA episodes occurring during a 3-mo post-ablation blanking period. Certain clinical demographic, electrophysiologic, procedural, and ERAA-related characteristics may predict a higher likelihood of long-term ablation failure. In this review, we aim to discuss potential mechanisms of ERAA, and to summarize the clinical significance, prognostic implications, and treatment options for ERAA. PMID:27957250

  8. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the

  9. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  10. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  11. Health Information in Somali (af Soomaali): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Wildfires Wildfires - English Dabka duurka - af Soomaali (Somali) Multimedia Healthy Roads Media Wildfires - English Dabka duurka - af Soomaali (Somali) PDF Healthy ...

  12. Use of statins and recurrence of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation or electrical cardioversion. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dentali, Francesco; Gianni, Monica; Squizzato, Alessandro; Ageno, Walter; Castiglioni, Luana; Maroni, Lorenzo; Hylek, Elaine M; Grandi, Anna Maria; Cazzani, Eugenio; Venco, Achille; Guasti, Luigina

    2011-08-01

    Statins have important pleiotropic effects and have been shown to reduce vascular inflammation. Some evidence suggests that statins may have a role in the primary prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF), whereas little is know on the role of statins in patients with existing AF. We performed a meta-analysis of the literature to assess the effect of statins on the recurrence of AF after electrical cardioversion or ablation. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched up to January 2010. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were then calculated and pooled using a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was evaluated through the use of I² statistics. Sixteen studies were included in our systematic review. Statins did not reduce the risk of AF recurrence after ablation (four studies including 750 patients; RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.85-1.28, p=0.71; I² = 34%). Conversely, the use of statins was associated with a significantly reduced risk of AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion (12 studies including 1790 patients; RR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.90, p=0.0003; I² = 34%). This reduction was not statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to randomised controlled trials (RCTs) only (five studies, 458 patients, RR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.48-1.20). In conclusion, statins may lower the risk of AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion, but not ablation. However, this finding should be considered with caution, and larger RCTs are warranted to confirm our preliminary results.

  13. Microwave ablation of renal tumors: state of the art and development trends.

    PubMed

    Floridi, Chiara; De Bernardi, Irene; Fontana, Federico; Muollo, Alessandra; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Agostini, Andrea; Fonio, Paolo; Squillaci, Ettore; Brunese, Luca; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    In the last decades an increased incidence of new renal tumor cases has been for clinically localized, small tumors <2.0 cm. This trend for small, low-stage tumors is the reflection of earlier diagnosis primarily as a result of the widespread and increasing use of non-invasive abdominal imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Renal tumors are often diagnosed in elderly patients, with medical comorbidities whom the risk of surgical complications may pose a greater risk of death than that due to the tumor itself. In these patients, unsuitable for surgical approach, thermal ablation represents a valid alternative to traditional surgery. Thermal ablation is a less invasive, less morbid treatment option thanks to reduced blood loss, lower incidence of complications during the procedure and a less long convalescence. At present, the most widely used thermal ablative techniques are cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation (MWA). MWA offers many benefits of other ablation techniques and offers several other advantages: higher intratumoral temperatures, larger tumor ablation volumes, faster ablation times, the ability to use multiple applicators simultaneously, optimal heating of cystic masses and tumors close to the vessels and less procedural pain. This review aims to provide the reader with an overview about the state of the art of microwave ablation for renal tumors and to cast a glance on the new development trends of this technique.

  14. Idiopathic VPC: Distribution Of FOCI And Tips Of Ablation.

    PubMed

    M Md PhD, Jose C Pachon; Lobo Md, Tasso J; M Md, Enrique I Pachon; P Md, Tomas G Santillana; Tc Pachon Md, Carlos; M Md, Juan C Pachon; V Md, Remy N Albornoz; A Md, Juan C Zerpa; Ortencio Md, Felipe A

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Ventricular Premature Contraction (VPC) is currently more routinely referred for electrophysiology evaluation. Usually it carries a good prognosis but, when symptomatic or suspected to produce ventricular dysfunction, will require treatment. Nowadays, RF ablation has great advantages over antiarrhythmic drugs. Classically the outflow tract (right or left), with the typical inferior axis with left (eventually right) bundle brunch block like ECG morphology, is considered the most frequent site of origin for idiopathic VPC, but with the widespread of EP procedures and advancement of technology making possible to map and ablate difficult locations, it is possible to see a growing and changing population referred for idiopathic VPC ablation, displaying that, almost any region of the heart may be source of this kind of arrhythmia that can be successfully treated. A well-planned procedure, with the presumed region of origin settled and employing the current technology and knowledge (tips), will have a high chance of cure.

  15. [New developments for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hemmer, W; Böhm, J O

    2007-06-01

    The Cox-Maze procedure and less complex modifications have gained widespread use as a treatment modality for patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation. Hypothermic or hyperthermic energy sources play a significant role in rapidly creating linear lesions. Endocardial ablation is easy to perform and effective with different energy sources. Epicardial techniques may simplify the procedure by allowing surgery on a beating heart. But epicardial fat and the heat sink effect of the flowing endocardial blood are obstacles to effective ablation. New devices using bipolar (irrigated) radiofrequency, microwave or laser energy, cryoablation or focused ultrasound are in clinical or pre-clinical stages and permit lesions to be created on a beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass. Minimally invasive or video-assisted surgical techniques and effective devices for epicardial ablation will enable the treatment of patients suffering from lone atrial fibrillation. To facilitate the comparison between different techniques and devices, guidelines for reporting clinical results are necessary.

  16. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  17. Ablation, Thermal Response, and Chemistry Program for Analysis of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2010-01-01

    In previous work, the authors documented the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) and Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response (FIAT) programs. In this work, key features from MAT and FIAT were combined to create the new Fully Implicit Ablation, Thermal response, and Chemistry (FIATC) program. FIATC is fully compatible with FIAT (version 2.5) but has expanded capabilities to compute the multispecies surface chemistry and ablation rate as part of the surface energy balance. This new methodology eliminates B' tables, provides blown species fractions as a function of time, and enables calculations that would otherwise be impractical (e.g. 4+ dimensional tables) such as pyrolysis and ablation with kinetic rates or unequal diffusion coefficients. Equations and solution procedures are presented, then representative calculations of equilibrium and finite-rate ablation in flight and ground-test environments are discussed.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  19. Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Spontaneous Wrinkling of Teflon AF.

    PubMed

    Scarratt, Liam R J; Hoatson, Ben S; Wood, Elliot S; Hawkett, Brian S; Neto, Chiara

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication of both single-scale and hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces, created by exploiting the spontaneous wrinkling of a rigid Teflon AF film on two types of shrinkable plastic substrates. Sub-100 nm to micrometric wrinkles were reproducibly generated by this simple process, with remarkable control over the size and hierarchy. Hierarchical Teflon AF wrinkled surfaces showed extremely high water repellence (contact angle 172°) and very low contact angle hysteresis (2°), resulting in droplets rolling off the surface at tilt angles lower than 5°. The wrinkling process intimately binds the Teflon AF layer with its substrate, making these surfaces mechanically robust, as revealed by macroscale and nanoscale wear tests: hardness values were close to that of commercial optical lenses and aluminum films, resistance to scratch was comparable to commercial hydrophobic coatings, and damage by extensive sonication did not significantly affect water repellence. By this fabrication method the size of the wrinkles can be reproducibly tuned from the nanoscale to the microscale, across the whole surface in one step; the fabrication procedure is extremely rapid, requiring only 2 min of thermal annealing to produce the desired topography, and uses inexpensive materials. The very low roll-off angles achieved in the hierarchical surfaces offer a potentially up-scalable alternative as self-cleaning and drag-reducing coatings.

  20. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  1. Towards patient-specific modelling of lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Soor, Navjeevan; Morgan, Ross; Varela, Marta; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are a first-line method of clinical treatment for atrial fibrillation. However, they suffer from suboptimal success rates and are also prone to potentially serious adverse effects. These limitations can be at least partially attributed to the inter- and intra- patient variations in atrial wall thickness, and could be mitigated by patient-specific approaches to the procedure. In this study, a modelling approach to optimising ablation procedures in subject-specific 3D atrial geometries was applied. The approach enabled the evaluation of optimal ablation times to create lesions for a given wall thickness measured from MRI. A nonliner relationship was revealed between the thickness and catheter contact time required for fully transmural lesions. Hence, our approach based on MRI reconstruction of the atrial wall combined with subject-specific modelling of ablation can provide useful information for improving clinical procedures.

  2. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Martínez-García, M. Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures. PMID:22076258

  3. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Emilio J; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez-García, M Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2011-11-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures.

  4. 78 FR 38617 - Procedures for Establishing That an American Indian Group Exists as an Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Part 83 RIN 1076-AF18 Procedures for Establishing That an American Indian....'' --Email: consultation@bia.gov . Include ``1076-AF18'' in the subject line of the message. --Mail or Hand... Interior, 1849 C Street NW., MS 4141, Washington, DC 20240. Include ``1076-AF18'' on the cover of...

  5. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  6. RX-26-AY/AF rifle bullet tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    A series of rifle bullet tests was performed on two explosives, RX-26-AY and RX-26-AF, using the Pantex version of the Picatinny Arsenal Test (PA-2). With the exception of one test, both explosives displayed a relatively low sensitivity to bullet impact. However, a marked difference was noted in the average burn time duration between the two types of explosives being tested. A minor modification was made on the rifle barrel used at the test site in order to improve the sighting procedure.

  7. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Samuel Arba; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r2=0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r2=0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  8. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r 2 =0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r 2 =0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  9. Percutaneous Renal Tumor Ablation: Radiation Exposure During Cryoablation and Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    McEachen, James C.; Leng, Shuai; Atwell, Thomas D.; Tollefson, Matthew K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Wang, Zhen; Murad, M. Hassan; Schmit, Grant D.

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionOnce reserved solely for non-surgical cases, percutaneous ablation is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for a wider array of patients with small renal masses and the radiation risk needs to be better defined as this transition continues.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of our renal tumor ablation database revealed 425 patients who underwent percutaneous ablation for treatment of 455 renal tumors over a 5-year time period. Imparted radiation dose information was reviewed for each procedure and converted to effective patient dose and skin dose using established techniques. Statistical analysis was performed with each ablative technique.ResultsFor the 331 cryoablation procedures, the mean DLP was 6987 mGycm (SD = 2861) resulting in a mean effective dose of 104.7 mSv (SD = 43.5) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 558 mGy (SD = 439) resulting in a mean skin dose of 563.2 mGy (SD = 344.1). For the 124 RFA procedures, the mean DLP was 3485 mGycm (SD = 1630) resulting in a mean effective dose of 50.3 mSv (SD = 24.0) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 232 mGy (SD = 149) resulting in a mean skin dose of 233.2 mGy (SD = 117.4). The difference in patient radiation exposure between the two renal ablation techniques was statistically significant (p < 0.001).ConclusionBoth cryoablation and RFA imparted an average skin dose that was well below the 2 Gy deterministic threshold for appreciable sequela. Renal tumor cryoablation resulted in a mean skin and effective radiation dose more than twice that for RFA. The radiation exposure for both renal tumor ablation techniques was at the high end of the medical imaging radiation dose spectrum.

  10. Local tumor progression patterns after radiofrequency ablation of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Napoleone, Marc; Kielar, Ania Z.; Hibbert, Rebecca; Saif, Sameh; Kwan, Benjamin Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate patterns of local tumor progression (LTP) after radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) and to highlight the percentage of LTP not attributable to lesion size or RF ablation procedure-related factors (heat sink or insufficient ablation margin). METHODS CRCLM treated by RF ablation at a single tertiary care center from 2004–2012, with a minimum of six months of postprocedure follow-up, were included in this retrospective study. LTP morphology was classified as focal nodular (<90° of ablation margin), circumferential (>270°), or crescentic (90°–270°). Initial metastasis size, minimum ablation margin size, morphology of LTP, presence of a heat sink, and time to progression were recorded independently by two radiologists. RESULTS Thirty-two of 127 RF ablation treated metastases (25%) with a mean size of 23 mm (standard deviation 12 mm) exhibited LTP. Fifteen of 32 LTPs (47%) were classified as focal nodular, with seven having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Ten of 32 LTPs (31%) were circumferential, with four having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Seven of 32 LTPs (22%) were crescentic, with two having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Of the 13 lesions without any obvious procedure-related reason for LTP, six (46%) were <3 cm in size. CONCLUSION Although LTP in RF ablation treated CRCLM can often be explained by procedure-related factors or size of the lesion, in this study up to six (5%) of the CRCLM we treated showed LTP without any reasonable cause. PMID:27705879

  11. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  12. Animal studies of epicardial atrial ablation.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, Richard B; Lee, Anson M; Melby, Spencer J; Voeller, Rochus K; Gaynor, Sydney L; Sakamoto, Shun-Ichiro; Damiano, Ralph J

    2009-12-01

    The Cox maze procedure is an effective treatment of atrial fibrillation, with a long-term freedom from recurrence greater than 90%. The original procedure was highly invasive and required cardiopulmonary bypass. Modifications of the procedure that eliminate the need for cardiopulmonary bypass have been proposed, including use of alternative energy sources to replace cut-and-sew lesions with lines of ablation made from the epicardium on the beating heart. This has been challenging because atrial wall muscle thickness is extremely variable, and the muscle can be covered with an epicardial layer of fat. Moreover, the circulating intracavitary blood acts as a potential heat sink, making transmural lesions difficult to obtain. In this report, we summarize the use of nine different unidirectional devices (four radiofrequency, two microwave, two lasers, one cryothermic) for creating continuous transmural lines of ablation from the atrial epicardium in a porcine model. We define a unidirectional device as one in which all the energy is applied by a single transducer on a single heart surface. The maximum penetration of any device was 8.3 mm. All devices except one, the AtriCure Isolator pen, failed to penetrate 2 mm in some nontransmural sections. Future development of unidirectional energy sources should be directed at increasing the maximum depth and the consistency of penetration.

  13. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  14. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  15. 76 FR 65951 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ...: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420) Flight Technologies and Programs.../6/11 RNAV (GPS) RWY Taylor Field. 18, Amdt 2. 17-Nov-11 VA Norfolk Norfolk Intl..... 1/3530...

  16. 78 FR 18803 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420), Flight Technologies and Programs..., Amdt 2. 2-May-13 AZ Taylor Taylor 3/0203 3/6/2013 GPS RWY 21, Orig-A. 2-May-13 LA Shreveport...

  17. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  18. Thermal ablation for the treatment of abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G

    2011-03-07

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue). Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to underlying coagulopathy and

  19. Improvement in Quality of Life After Catheter Ablation for Paroxysmal Versus Long‐standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: A Prospective Study With 3‐Year Follow‐up

    PubMed Central

    Bulková, Veronika; Fiala, Martin; Havránek, Štěpán; Šimek, Jan; Škňouřil, Libor; Januška, Jaroslav; Špinar, Jindřich; Wichterle, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in quality of life (QoL) after catheter ablation for long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF) are not well described. We sought to compare QoL improvement after catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) versus that after LSPAF. Methods and Results A total of 261 PAF and 126 LSPAF ablation recipients were prospectively followed for arrhythmia recurrence, QoL, hospital stay, and sick leave. In PAF versus LSPAF groups, 1.3±0.6 versus 1.6±0.7 procedures were performed per patient (P<0.00001) during a 3‐year follow‐up. Good arrhythmia control was achieved in 86% versus 87% of patients (P=0.69) and in 69% versus 69% of patients not receiving antiarrhythmic drugs (P=0.99). The baseline QoL was better in the PAF than in the LSPAF group (European Quality of Life Group instrument self‐report questionnaire visual analog scale: 66.4±14.2 versus 61.0±14.2, P=0.0005; European Quality of Life Group 3‐level, 5‐dimensional descriptive system: 71.4±9.2 versus 67.7±13.8, P=0.002). Postablation 3‐year increase in QoL was significant in both groups (all P<0.00001) and significantly lower in PAF versus LSPAF patients (visual analog scale: +5.0±14.5 versus +10.2±12.8, P=0.001; descriptive system: +5.9±14.3 versus +9.3±13.9, P=0.03). In multivariate analysis, LSPAF, less advanced age, shorter history of AF and good arrhythmia control were consistently associated with postablation 3‐year improvement in QoL. Days of hospital stay for cardiovascular reasons and days on sick leave per patient/year were significantly reduced in both groups. Conclusions Patients with LSPAF had worse baseline QoL. The magnitude of QoL improvement after ablation of LSPAF was significantly greater compared with after ablation of PAF, particularly when good arrhythmia control was achieved without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:25037195

  20. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  1. STBC AF relay for unmanned aircraft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Fumiyuki; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Endo, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    If a large scale disaster similar to the Great East Japan Earthquake 2011 happens, some areas may be isolated from the communications network. Recently, unmanned aircraft system (UAS) based wireless relay communication has been attracting much attention since it is able to quickly re-establish the connection between isolated areas and the network. However, the channel between ground station (GS) and unmanned aircraft (UA) is unreliable due to UA's swing motion and as consequence, the relay communication quality degrades. In this paper, we introduce space-time block coded (STBC) amplify-and-forward (AF) relay for UAS based wireless relay communication to improve relay communication quality. A group of UAs forms single frequency network (SFN) to perform STBC-AF cooperative relay. In STBC-AF relay, only conjugate operation, block exchange and amplifying are required at UAs. Therefore, STBC-AF relay improves the relay communication quality while alleviating the complexity problem at UAs. It is shown by computer simulation that STBC-AF relay can achieve better throughput performance than conventional AF relay.

  2. Impact of Impaired Renal Function on the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation following Radiofrequency Ablation of Cavotricuspid Isthmus-Dependent Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Kim, Min Su; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Jin Hee; Jo, Uk; Lee, Woo Seok; Kim, Yoo Ri; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs frequently after successful radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL). Renal impairment has been implicated in the development of AF. The purpose of this study is to clarify the impact of impaired renal function on the incidence of AF after RFA of CTI-AFL. Subjects and Methods Between January 2001 and December 2013, 240 non-dialysis patients with no prior history of AF {mean age 55.9±15.2 years old; male, 192 (80.0%)} who had undergone successful CTI-AFL ablation were included in the present study. The baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated, and patients were divided into those with impaired renal function (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) and those with preserved renal function (≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). The incidence of AF was retrospectively analyzed. Results 69 (28.8%) patients experienced new onset AF during a median follow-up duration of 26 months (inter-quartile, 7-53). The incidence of AF was significantly higher in patients with impaired renal function than in those with preserved renal function {13/25 (52.0%) versus 56/215 (26.0%), log rank p=0.019}. Age, CHADS2 score, impaired renal function, and left atrial diameter were significantly associated with the incidence of AF in univariate Cox regression analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that age was the only significant predictor of AF incidence (hazard ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.044, p=0.020). Conclusion Patients with impaired renal function may require careful attention for the incidence of new onset AF following successful RFA of CTI-AFL. PMID:26617649

  3. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  4. Current role of microwave ablation in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lucchina, Natalie; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Giorlando, Francesca; Macchi, Edoardo; Kehagias, Elias; Duka, Ejona; Fontana, Federico; Livraghi, Lorenzo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be as effective as surgical resection in terms of overall survival and recurrence-free survival rates in patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Effectiveness of RFA is adversely influenced by heat-sink effect. Other ablative therapies could be considered for larger tumors or for tumors located near the vessels. In this regard, recent improvements in microwave energy delivery systems seem to open interesting perspectives to percutaneous ablation, which could become the ablation technique of choice in the near future. Microwave ablation (MWA) has the advantages of possessing a higher thermal efficiency. It has high efficacy in coagulating blood vessels and is a relatively fast procedure. The time required for ablation is short and the shape of necrosis is elliptical with the older systems and spherical with the new one. There is no heat-sink effect and it can be used to ablate tumors adjacent to major vessels. These factors yield a large ablation volume, and result in good local control and fewer complications. This review highlights the most relevant updates on MWA in the treatment of small (<3 cm) HCC. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility of MWA as the first ablative choice, at least in selected cases. PMID:27708511

  5. Comparison of percutaneous cryoablation with microwave ablation in a porcine liver model.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lizhi; Li, Jialiang; Zeng, Jianying; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Song; Zhou, Xulong; Sheng, Lin; Chen, Jibing; Xu, Kecheng

    2014-04-01

    We compared imaging and pathological changes between argon-helium cryosurgical (AH) and microwave (MW) ablation in a porcine liver model. Immediately after ablation, computed tomography (CT) imaging showed that the area affected by MW ablation was considerably greater than that affected by AH ablation; moreover, the surface area of necrotic tissue was considerably greater in the AH group, whereas the depth of the necrotic area was similar. Seven days after ablation, the affected area had not changed much in the AH group, but it had significantly increased in the MW group; similarly, the surface and depth of the necrotic areas had not changed much in the AH group, but they had increased significantly in the MW group. The pathological findings showed similar definitive areas for both groups at both time points. The findings indicated that long time after both therapies, complete tissue necrosis can be achieved, but the extent and depth of necrosis differ: necrosis foci after AH ablation could be predicted by ice ball under CT image, and necrosis foci after MW ablation will increase obviously. MW ablation might therefore be suitable for tumors with a larger volume and simple anatomical structures, and AH ablation might be suitable for tumors with complex anatomical structures or those located near important organs. These two methods could therefore be used in combination in clinical settings, but details of the procedure need to be studied.

  6. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety.

  7. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  8. Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia: Lessons learned from past clinical trials and implications for future clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pokorney, Sean D; Friedman, Daniel J; Calkins, Hugh; Callans, David J; Daoud, Emile G; Della-Bella, Paolo; Jackson, Kevin P; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Saba, Samir; Sapp, John; Stevenson, William G; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2016-08-01

    Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) has evolved in recent years, especially in patients with ischemic heart disease. Data from prospective studies show that VT catheter ablation reduces the risk of recurrent VT; however, there is a paucity of data on the effect of VT catheter ablation on mortality and patient-centered outcomes such as quality of life. Performing randomized clinical trials of VT catheter ablation can be fraught with challenges, and, as a result, several prior trials of VT catheter ablation had to be stopped prematurely. The main challenges are inability to blind the patient to therapy to obtain a traditional control group, high crossover rates between the 2 arms of the study, patient refusal to participate in trials in which they have an equal chance of receiving a "pill" vs an invasive procedure, heterogeneity of mapping and ablation techniques as well as catheters and equipment, rapid evolution of technology that may make findings of any long trial less relevant to clinical practice, lack of consensus on what constitutes acute procedural and long-term success, and presentation of patients to electrophysiologists late in the course of their disease. In this article, a panel of experts on VT catheter ablation and/or clinical trials of VT catheter ablation review challenges faced in conducting prior trials of VT catheter ablation and offer potential solutions for those challenges. It is hoped that the proposed solutions will enhance the feasibility of randomized clinical trials of VT catheter ablation.

  9. Dual-enhancement cardiac computed tomography for assessing left atrial thrombus and pulmonary veins before radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Pak, Hui-Nam; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging that provides anatomic information while excluding intracardiac thrombus would be of significant clinical value for patients referred for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a dual-enhancement single-phase cardiac computed tomography (CT) protocol for thrombus and circulatory stasis detection in AF patients before catheter ablation. We studied 101 consecutive symptomatic AF patients (71 men and 30 women; mean age, 61.8 years) who were scheduled to have catheter ablation. All patients had undergone pre-AF ablation CT imaging and transesophageal echocardiography on the same day. CT was performed with prospective electrocardiographic gating, and scanning began 180 seconds after the test bolus. Mean left atrial appendage (LAA)/ascending aorta Hounsfield unit (HU) ratios were measured on CT images. Among the 101 patients, 9 thrombi and 18 spontaneous echo contrasts were detected by transesophageal echocardiography. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of thrombi in the LAA were 89%, 100%, 100%, and 99%, respectively. The mean LAA/ascending aorta HU ratios were significantly different between thrombus and circulatory stasis (0.17 vs 0.33, p = 0.002). Dual-enhancement single-scan cardiac CT is a sensitive modality for detecting and differentiating LAA thrombus and circulatory stasis.

  10. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A.; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  11. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  12. Local ablative treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Serviddio, Gaetano; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatments currently represent the first-line option for the treatment of early stage unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, they are effective as bridging/downstaging therapies before orthotopic liver transplantation. Contraindications based on size, number, and location of nodules are quite variable in literature and strictly dependent on local expertise. Among ablative therapies, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained a pivotal role due to its efficacy, with a reported 5-year survival rate of 40%-70%, and safety. Although survival outcomes are similar to percutaneous ethanol injection, the lower local recurrence rate stands for a wider application of RFA in hepato-oncology. Moreover, RFA seems to be even more cost-effective than liver resection for very early HCC (single nodule ≤ 2 cm) and in the presence of two or three nodules ≤ 3 cm. There is increasing evidence that combining RFA to transarterial chemoembolization may increase the therapeutic benefit in larger HCCs without increasing the major complication rate, but more robust prospective data is still needed to validate these pivotal findings. Among other thermal treatments, microwave ablation (MWA) uses high frequency electromagnetic energy to induce tissue death via coagulation necrosis. In comparison to RFA, MWA has several theoretical advantages such as a broader zone of active heating, higher temperatures within the targeted area in a shorter treatment time and the lack of heat-sink effect. The safety concerns raised on the risks of this procedure, due to the broader and less predictable necrosis areas, have been recently overcome. However, whether MWA ability to generate a larger ablation zone will translate into a survival gain remains unknown. Other treatments, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation, are less investigated but showed promising results in early HCC patients and could be a valuable therapeutic option in

  13. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  14. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  15. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  16. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources.

    PubMed

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery.

  17. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery. PMID:26934404

  18. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  19. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  20. Rapid dramatic alterations to the tumor microstructure in pancreatic cancer following irreversible electroporation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Weiguo; Procissi, Daniel; Tyler, Patrick; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Aim NanoKnife® (Angiodynamics, Inc., NY, USA) or irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a newly available ablation technique to induce the formation of nanoscale pores within the cell membrane in targeted tissues. The purpose of this study was to elucidate morphological alterations following 30 min of IRE ablation in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Materials & methods Immunohistochemistry markers were compared with diffusion-weighted MRI apparent diffusion coefficient measurements before and after IRE ablation. Results Immunohistochemistry apoptosis index measurements were significantly higher in IRE-treated tumors than in controls. Rapid tissue alterations after 30 min of IRE ablation procedures (structural and morphological alterations along with significantly elevated apoptosis markers) were consistently observed and well correlated to apparent diffusion coefficient measurements. Discussion This imaging assay offers the potential to serve as an in vivo biomarker for noninvasive detection of tumor response following IRE ablation. PMID:24024571

  1. Three-dimension finite-element analyses of multiple electrodes bipolar RF global endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Panhao, Tang; Xiao, Jiahua

    2015-03-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure to thermally ablate the targeted diseased tissue. There have been many finite-element method (FEM) studies of cardiac and hepatic RFA, but hardly find any FEM study on endometrial ablation for abnormal uterine bleeding. In this paper, a FEM model was generated to analyze the temperature distribution of bipolar RF global endometrial ablation with three pairs of bipolar electrodes placed at the perimeter of the uterine cavity. COMSOL was utilized to calculate the RF electric fields and temperature fields by numerically solving the bioheat equation in the triangle uterine cavity range. The 55°C isothermal surfaces show the shape of the ablation dimensions (depth and width), which reasonably matched the experimental results.

  2. Optical properties measurement of the laser-ablated tissues for the combined laser ablation with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    Laser ablation therapy combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is studied for treatment of advanced cancers. The clinical outcome of PDT may be improved by the accurate knowledge about the light distribution within tissue. Optical properties [absorption coefficient (μa), scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g), refractive index, etc.] of tissues help us realizing a light propagation through the tissue. It is important to understand of the effect of laser coagulation formed by laser ablation to PDT. The aim of this study is to estimate of influence of coagulated region to PDT for effective PDT combined laser ablation therapy. We evaluated the optical property of mouse tumor tissue in native and coagulated state using a double integrating sphere system and an inverse Monte Carlo method in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. After laser ablation, the μa and reduced scattering coefficient spectra of coagulated tissues were increased in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The optical penetration depth of coagulated tissues is 1.2-2.9 times lower than the native state in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The intensity of the light energy inside the coagulated tissue falls to about 60% of its original value at the end of coagulated layer. The evaluation of light energy distribution by the determination of the tissues optical properties could be useful for optimization of the treatment procedure in combined laser ablation with PDT.

  3. Catheter ablation vs. antiarrhythmic drug treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation: a multicentre, randomized, controlled trial (SARA study)

    PubMed Central

    Mont, Lluís; Bisbal, Felipe; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Pérez-Castellano, Nicasio; Viñolas, Xavier; Arenal, Angel; Arribas, Fernando; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Bodegas, Andrés; Cobos, Albert; Matía, Roberto; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Guerra, José M.; Ávila, Pablo; López-Gil, María; Castro, Victor; Arana, José Ignacio; Brugada, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation (CA) is a highly effective therapy for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) when compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (ADT). No randomized studies have compared the two strategies in persistent AF. The present randomized trial aimed to compare the effectiveness of CA vs. ADT in treating persistent AF. Methods and results Patients with persistent AF were randomly assigned to CA or ADT (excluding patients with long-standing persistent AF). Primary endpoint at 12-month follow-up was defined as any episode of AF or atrial flutter lasting >24 h that occurred after a 3-month blanking period. Secondary endpoints were any atrial tachyarrhythmia lasting >30 s, hospitalization, and electrical cardioversion. In total, 146 patients were included (aged 55 ± 9 years, 77% male). The ADT group received class Ic (43.8%) or class III drugs (56.3%). In an intention-to-treat analysis, 69 of 98 patients (70.4%) in the CA group and 21 of 48 patients (43.7%) in the ADT group were free of the primary endpoint (P = 0.002), implying an absolute risk difference of 26.6% (95% CI 10.0–43.3) in favour of CA. The proportion of patients free of any recurrence (>30 s) was higher in the CA group than in the ADT group (60.2 vs. 29.2%; P < 0.001) and cardioversion was less frequent (34.7 vs. 50%, respectively; P = 0.018). Conclusion Catheter ablation is superior to medical therapy for the maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with persistent AF at 12-month follow-up. Clinical Trial Registration Information NCT00863213 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00863213). PMID:24135832

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Switching Anticoagulation to Aspirin Three Months after Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Won, Hoyoun; Joung, Boyoung; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Kim, You-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although current guidelines recommend continuing the same antithrombotic strategy regardless of rhythm control after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF), anticoagulation has a risk of major bleeding. We evaluated the safety of switching warfarin to aspirin in patients with successful AF ablation. Materials and Methods Among 721 patients who underwent RFCA of AF, 608 patients (age, 57.3±10.9 years; 77.0% male, 75.5% paroxysmal AF) who had no evidence of AF recurrence at 3 months post-RFCA were included. We compared the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events in patients for whom warfarin was switched to aspirin (ASA group; n=296) and patients who were kept on warfarin therapy (W group; n=312). Results There were no significant differences in CHA2DS2-VASc or HAS-BLED scores between the groups. In 30 patients in the ASA group and 37 patients in W group, AF recurred and warfarin was restarted or maintained during the 18.0±12.2 months of follow-up. There were no significant differences in thromboembolic (0.3% vs. 1.0%, p=0.342) and major bleeding incidences (0.7% vs. 0.6%, p=0.958) between ASA and W groups during the follow-up period. In the 259 patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2, there were no significant differences in thromboembolism (0.8% and 2.2%, p=0.380) or major bleeding incidences (0.8% and 1.4%, p=0.640) between ASA and W groups. Conclusion Switching warfarin to aspirin 3 months after successful RFCA of AF could be as safe and efficacious as long-term anticoagulation even in patients with CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2. However, strict rhythm monitoring cannot be overemphasized. PMID:25048480

  5. We Know What the Cardiac Surgeon Did During Last Hybrid Arrhythmia Procedure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narendra; Pison, Laurent; Gelsomino, Sandro; Aksoy, Ismail; La Meir, Mark; Maessen, Jos

    Superior vena cava (SVC) is an important source of origin of atrial fibrillation (AF) triggers other than a pulmonary vein. Because of the proximity of SVC-aorta ganglionic plexi to the SVC and the extension of myocardium in the SVC from the right atrium, SVC frequently becomes an important source of ectopic beats initiating AF. The potential complications of SVC isolation may include sinus node injury. Sinus node isolation was observed in a patient who had undergone previous surgical isolation of SVC for AF, while attempting to ablate endocardially, near the superior part of interatrial septum for an atrial tachycardia.

  6. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Improves the Quality of Life Measured with a Short Form-36 Questionnaire in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of performing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is to improve the quality of life (QoL) and alleviate AF-related symptoms. We aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of RFCA on the QoL in AF patients. Methods We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis using a random effects model. We searched for the studies that reported the physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) of the short form-36, a validated system to assess and quantify the QoL, before and after RFCA in AF patients. PCS and MCS are T-scores with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. Results Of the 470 studies identified through systematic search, we included 13 studies for pre-RFCA vs. the post-RFCA analysis and 5 studies for treatment success vs. AF recurrence analyses. In the pre-RFCA vs. post-RFCA analysis, RFCA was associated with a significant increase in both the PCS (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 6.33 [4.81–7.84]; p < 0.001) and MCS (WMD = 7.80 [6.15–9.44]; p < 0.001). The ΔPCS (post-RFCA PCS–pre-RFCA PCS) and ΔMCS values were used for the treatment success vs. AF recurrence analysis. Patients with successful ablation had a higher ΔPCS (WMD = 7.46 [4.44–10.49]; p < 0.001) and ΔMCS (WMD = 7.59 [4.94–10.24]; p < 0.001). Conclusions RFCA is associated with a significant increase in the PCS and MCS in AF patients. Patients without AF recurrence after RFCA had a better improvement in the PCS and MCS than patients who had AF recurrence. PMID:27681507

  7. Multiple-antenna microwave ablation: analysis of non-parallel antenna implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Souvick; Curto, Sergio; Albin, Nathan; Natarajan, Bala; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    Microwave ablation is a minimally invasive modality increasingly being used for thermal treatment of cancer in various organs. During ablation procedures, treatment planning is typically restricted to vendor specifications of expected ablation zone volumes based on experiments in unperfused ex vivo tissues, presuming parallel insertion of antennas. However, parallel antenna implants are not always clinically possible due to the restricted control of flexible antennas and presence of intervening organs. This paper aims to quantify the effect of non-parallel antenna implants on the ablation volume. 3D electromagnetic-bioheat transfer models were implemented to analyze ablation zone profiles created by dual antenna arrays. Parallel and non-parallel implants spaced 10-25 mm with antenna tips deviated to create converging or diverging configurations were analyzed. Volumetric Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) were calculated to compare ablation zone volumes for parallel and non-parallel configuration. Antenna tip displacements of 3 mm/antenna yielded an average DSC of 0.78. Tip displacements of 5 mm/antenna yielded a DSC of 0.78 and 0.64 for 15 mm and 20 mm antenna spacing, respectively. For ablation with dipole antennas as the frequency of operation decreases from 2.45 GHz to 915 MHz the similarity between the ablation zones for parallel and angled cases increased significantly. In conclusion, ablation volumes with non-parallel antenna implants may differ significantly from the parallel configuration. Patient-specific treatment planning tools may provide more accurate predictions of 3D-ablation volumes based on imaging data of actual implanted antenna configurations. Methods to compare ablation zone volumes incorporating uncertainty in antenna positions and experimental results to validate the numerical modelling are also presented.

  8. Healthcare Utilization and Clinical Outcomes after Catheter Ablation of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Dewland, Thomas A.; Glidden, David V.; Marcus, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial flutter ablation is associated with a high rate of acute procedural success and symptom improvement. The relationship between ablation and other clinical outcomes has been limited to small studies primarily conducted at academic centers. We sought to determine if catheter ablation of atrial flutter is associated with reductions in healthcare utilization, atrial fibrillation, or stroke in a large, real world population. California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project databases were used to identify patients undergoing atrial flutter ablation between 2005 and 2009. The adjusted association between atrial flutter ablation and healthcare utilization, atrial fibrillation, or stroke was investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Among 33,004 patients with a diagnosis of atrial flutter observed for a median of 2.1 years, 2,733 (8.2%) underwent catheter ablation. Atrial flutter ablation significantly lowered the adjusted risk of inpatient hospitalization (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.84–0.92, p<0.001), emergency department visits (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.54–0.65, p<0.001), and overall hospital-based healthcare utilization (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–0.98, p = 0.001). Atrial flutter ablation was also associated with a statistically significant 11% reduction in the adjusted hazard of atrial fibrillation (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81–0.97, p = 0.01). Risk of acute stroke was not significantly reduced after ablation (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.81–1.45, p = 0.57). In a large, real world population, atrial flutter ablation was associated with significant reductions in hospital-based healthcare utilization and a reduced risk of atrial fibrillation. These findings support the early use of catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial flutter. PMID:24983868

  9. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  10. Experience of robotic catheter ablation in humans using a novel remotely steerable catheter sheath

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel T.; Goldenberg, Alex S.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter has been developed to enable precise manipulation and stable positioning of any eight French (Fr) or smaller electrophysiological catheter within the heart for the purposes of mapping and ablation. Objective To report our initial experience using this system for remotely performing catheter ablation in humans. Methods Consecutive patients attending for routine ablation were recruited. Various conventional diagnostic catheters were inserted through the left femoral vein in preparation for treating an accessory pathway (n = 1), atrial flutter (n = 2) and atrial fibrillation (n = 7). The steerable guide catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein through which various irrigated and non-irrigated tip ablation catheters were used. Conventional endpoints of loss of pathway conduction, bidirectional cavotricuspid isthmus block and four pulmonary vein isolation were used to determine acute procedural success. Results Ten patients underwent remote catheter ablation using conventional and/or 3D non-fluoroscopic mapping technologies. All procedural endpoints were achieved using the robotic control system without manual manipulation of the ablation catheter. There was no major complication. A radiation dosimeter positioned next to the operator 2.7 m away from the X-ray source showed negligible exposure despite a mean cumulative dose area product of 7,281.4 cGycm2 for all ten ablation procedures. Conclusions Safe and clinically effective remote navigation of ablation catheters can be achieved using a novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter in a variety of arrhythmias. The system is compatible with current mapping and ablation technologies Remote navigation substantially reduces radiation exposure to the operator. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10840-007-9184-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. Pulmonary vein isolation using new technologies to improve ablation lesion formation: Initial results comparing enhanced catheter tip irrigation (Surround Flow®) with contact force measurement (Smarttouch®)

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Stephanie; Reents, Tilko; Ammar, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Kathan, Susanne; Dillier, Roger; Buiatti, Alexandra; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vein reconnection after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a significant problem in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We report about patients who underwent contact force (CF) guided PVI using CF catheter and compared them to patients with PVI using an ablation catheter with enhanced tip irrigation. Methods A total of 59 patients were included in the analysis. In 30 patients circumferential PVI was performed using the Thermocool Smarttouch® ablation catheter (ST) whereas in 29 patients circumferential PVI using the Thermocool Surround Flow SF® ablation catheter (SF) was performed. Patients were compared in regard to procedure time, fluoroscopy time/dose as well as RF-application duration and completeness of PVI. Adverse events (pericardial effusion, PV stenosis, stroke, death) were evaluated. The presence of sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication was assessed during 6 months follow-up using multiple 7 day Holter-ECGs. Results In both groups, all PVs were isolated without serious adverse events. Procedure time was 2.15 ± 0.5 h (ST) vs. 2.37 ± 1.13 h (SF) (p = 0.19). Duration of RF-applications was 46.6 ± 18 min (ST) and 49.8 ± 19 min (SF) (p = 0.52). Fluoroscopy time was 25.2 ± 13 min (ST) vs. 29 ± 18 min (SF), fluoroscopy dose 2675.6 ± 1658 versus 3038.3 ± 1997 cGym2 (p = 0.36 and 0.46 respectively). Sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication validated with 7 day Holter ECGs was present in both groups in 72% of patients after 6 months of follow up. Conclusion PVI using the new contact force catheter is safe and effective in patients with paroxysmal AF. PMID:26937108

  12. Training for advanced endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Feurer, Matthew E; Draganov, Peter V

    2016-06-01

    Advanced endoscopy has evolved from diagnostic ERCP to an ever-increasing array of therapeutic procedures including EUS with FNA, ablative therapies, deep enteroscopy, luminal stenting, endoscopic suturing and endoscopic mucosal resection among others. As these procedures have become increasingly more complex, the risk of potential complications has also risen. Training in advanced endoscopy involves more than obtaining a minimum number of therapeutic procedures. The means of assessing a trainee's competence level and ability to practice independently continues to be a matter of debate. The use of quality indicators to measure performance levels may be beneficial as more advanced techniques and procedures become available.

  13. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  14. Novel Radiofrequency Ablation Strategies for Terminating Atrial Fibrillation in the Left Atrium: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Jason D.; Roney, Caroline H.; Pashaei, Ali; Jaïs, Pierre; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) therapy, but few strategies exist for when it fails. To guide RFA, phase singularity (PS) mapping locates reentrant electrical waves (rotors) that perpetuate AF. The goal of this study was to test existing and develop new RFA strategies for terminating rotors identified with PS mapping. It is unsafe to test experimental RFA strategies in patients, so they were evaluated in silico using a bilayer computer model of the human atria with persistent AF (pAF) electrical (ionic) and structural (fibrosis) remodeling. pAF was initiated by rapidly pacing the right (RSPV) and left (LSPV) superior pulmonary veins during sinus rhythm, and rotor dynamics quantified by PS analysis. Three RFA strategies were studied: (i) PVI, roof, and mitral lines; (ii) circles, perforated circles, lines, and crosses 0.5–1.5 cm in diameter/length administered near rotor locations/pathways identified by PS mapping; and (iii) 4–8 lines streamlining the sequence of electrical activation during sinus rhythm. As in pAF patients, 2 ± 1 rotors with cycle length 185 ± 4 ms and short PS duration 452 ± 401 ms perpetuated simulated pAF. Spatially, PS density had weak to moderate positive correlations with fibrosis density (RSPV: r = 0.38, p = 0.35, LSPV: r = 0.77, p = 0.02). RFA PVI, mitral, and roof lines failed to terminate pAF, but RFA perforated circles and lines 1.5 cm in diameter/length terminated meandering rotors from RSPV pacing when placed at locations with high PS density. Similarly, RFA circles, perforated circles, and crosses 1.5 cm in diameter/length terminated stationary rotors from LSPV pacing. The most effective strategy for terminating pAF was to streamline the sequence of activation during sinus rhythm with >4 RFA lines. These results demonstrate that co-localizing 1.5 cm RFA lesions with locations of high PS density is a promising strategy for terminating pAF rotors

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  16. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  17. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  18. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  19. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  20. Real-time calibration of temperature estimates during radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Daniels, M J

    2004-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an interstitial focal ablative therapy that can be used in a percutaneous fashion and permits in situ destruction of hepatic tumors. Recurrence rates after rf therapy are as high as 34-55%, due to difficulties in accurately identifying the zone of necrosis (thermal lesion) because of the low intrinsic acoustic contrast between normal and ablated liver tissue. Our goal is to provide real-time ultrasonic tracking of temperature changes over the large range of temperatures traditionally used (40-100 degrees C) in rfablation procedures using an external ultrasound transducer. Temperature estimates are obtained using a cross-correlation algorithm applied to rf ultrasound echo signal data acquired at discrete intervals during heating. Apparent tissue displacement estimates obtained at these discrete time-intervals are accumulated to obtain a cumulative displacement map, whose gradient provides after appropriate scaling provides a temperature map at the specified elapsed ablation duration. Temperature maps are used to display the initial temperature rise and to continuously update a thermal map of the treated region. In this paper, we develop calibration curves that relate the echo shift due to the change in the speed of sound and thermal expansion to the corresponding temperature increase on in-vitro tissue specimens. These calibration curves can then be utilized for the real time calibration and analysis of temperature estimates obtained from the rf echo signals during ablation. Temperature maps obtained using the calibration curve compare favorably to temperature estimates observed using the invasive thermosensor readings on the ablation electrode and previous results that utilized a linear calibration factor.

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  2. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  3. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  4. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsushima, Shigenori; Tanaka, Osamu; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We describe a 71-year-old woman with a hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RF) with a single internally cooled electrode under computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Nine months after the procedure, CT images showed herniation of the large intestine into the right pleural cavity. To our knowledge this complication of RF performed with a single internally cooled electrode under CT guidance has not been previously reported.

  5. Increasing power versus duration for radiofrequency ablation with a high superfusate flow: implications for pulmonary vein ablation?

    PubMed

    Guy, Duncan J R; Boyd, Anita; Thomas, Stuart P; Ross, David L

    2003-06-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of pulmonary veins (PVs) is a new treatment for atrial fibrillation. Low energy ablation is usually used for this procedure. The effect of superfusate flow on lesion formation in this setting has not been studied previously. We examined lesion dimensions and intramural temperatures with varying powers and duration of RF application in this high flow environment. Ablation of fresh bovine hearts was performed with a 4-mm tip RF catheter in temperature control mode, target temperature 50 degrees C. At power levels of 20 W, 30 W, 40 W, and 50 W, effects of PV flow (no flow or 1 L/min) and 60- and 120-second durations were tested. Tissue temperatures were recorded at depths of 1, 4, 7, and 10 mm. Without flow, no lesions were created. The lowest power setting for lesion creation was 30 W at 60 seconds and 20 W at 120 seconds. Increasing power from 30 W to 50 W for 60 seconds increased lesion depth 0.7 mm (SE 0.3), P = 0.03 and 2.5 mm (SE 0.6), P = 0.003, at 120 seconds. Increasing RF application duration from 60 to 120 seconds increased depth for 30 W by 0.9 mm (SE 0.5), P = NS, 40 W 1.7 mm (SE 0.4), P = 0.002, and 50 W 2.6 mm (SE 0.5), P < 0.001. Power of 50 W for 60 seconds and >30 W for 120 seconds created lesions deeper than the wall thickness of a PV. Flow is necessary for creation of lesions with low power, low tip temperature RF ablation. When a resistant site to ablation is encountered, increasing duration of ablation is best for increasing lesion depth. Higher power has the potential to create lesions deeper than the PV wall and may increase the risk of complications.

  6. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  7. AF fixer: new incremental OPC method for optimizing assist feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Gon; Kim, Sang-Wook; Suh, Sung-Soo; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Suk-Joo; Choi, Sung-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung; Moon, Joo-Tae; Barnes, Levi D.; Li, Xiaohai; Lugg, Robert M.; Lee, Sooryong; Koo, Kyoil; Do, Munhoe; Amoroso, Frank P.; Painter, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Due to shrinking design nodes and to some limitations of scanners, extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) required and its use and implementation of assist features (AF) to solve depth of focus (DOF) problems for isolated features and specific pitch regions is essential. But unfortunately, the strong periodic character of OAI illumination makes AF's print more easily. Present OPC flows generate AFs before OPC, which is also causes some AF printing problems. At present, mask manufacturers must downsize AF's below 30nm to solve this problem. This is challenging and increases mask cost. We report on an AF-fixer tool which is able to check AF printability and correct weak points with minimal cost in terms of DOF after OPC. We have devised an effective algorithm that removes printing AF's. It can not only search for the best non-printing AF condition to meet the DOF spec, but also reports uncorrectable spots, which could be marked as design errors. To limit correction times and to maximize DOF in full-chip correction, a process window (PW) model and incremental OPC method are applied. This AF fixer, which suggests optimum AF in only weak point region, solves AF printing problems economically and accurately.

  8. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  9. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  10. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  11. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  12. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  13. A Questionable Indication For ICD Extraction After Successful VT Ablation.

    PubMed

    Segreti Md, Luca; Di Cori Md, Andrea; Zucchelli Md PhD, Giulio; Soldati Md, Ezio; Coluccia Md, Giovanni; Viani Md, Stefano; Paperini Md, Luca; Grazia Bongiorni Md Fesc, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias represent a kind of complication shared by a number of clinical presentations of heart disease, sometimes leading to sudden cardiac death. Many efforts have been made in the fight against such a complication, mainly being represented by the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). In recent years, catheter ablation has grown as a means to effectively treat patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias, in the contest of different cardiac substrates. Since carrying an ICD is associated with a potential risk deriving from its possible infective or malfunctioning complications, and given the current effectiveness of lead extraction procedures, it has been thought not to be unreasonable to ask ourselves about how to deal with ICD patients who have been successfully treated by means of ablation of their ventricular arrhythmias. To date, no control data have been published on transvenous lead extraction in the setting of VT ablation. In this paper we will review the current evidence about ICD therapy, catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias and lead extraction, trying to outline some considerations about how to face this new clinical issue.

  14. Regional Pericarditis Status Post Cardiac Ablation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Eddin, Moneer; Loli, Akil

    2014-01-01

    Context: Regional pericarditis is elusive and difficult to diagnosis. Healthcare providers should be familiar with post-cardiac ablation complications as this procedure is now widespread and frequently performed. The management of regional pericarditis differs greatly from that of acute myocardial infarction. Case report: A 52 year-old male underwent atrial fibrillation ablation and developed severe mid-sternal chest pain the following day with electrocardiographic findings suggestive of acute myocardial infarction, and underwent coronary angiography, a left ventriculogram, and 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, all of which were unremarkable without evidence of obstructive coronary disease, wall motion abnormalities, or pericardial effusions. Ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with regional pericarditis. After diagnosis, the patient's presenting symptoms resolved with treatment including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and colchicine. Conclusion: This is the first reported case study of regional pericarditis status post cardiac ablation. Electrocardiographic findings were classic for an acute myocardial infarction; however, coronary angiography and left ventriculogram demonstrated no acute coronary occlusion or ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Healthcare professionals must remember that the electrocardiographic findings in pericarditis are not always classic and that pericarditis can occur status post cardiac ablation. PMID:25317395

  15. Visual servoing of a laser ablation based cochleostomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrs, Lüder A.; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Werner, Martin; Knapp, Felix B.; Mehrwald, Markus; Hering, Peter; Schipper, Jörg; Klenzner, Thomas; Wörn, Heinz

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is a defined, visually based and camera controlled bone removal by a navigated CO II laser on the promontory of the inner ear. A precise and minimally traumatic opening procedure of the cochlea for the implantation of a cochlear implant electrode (so-called cochleostomy) is intended. Harming the membrane linings of the inner ear can result in damage of remaining organ functions (e.g. complete deafness or vertigo). A precise tissue removal by a laser-based bone ablation system is investigated. Inside the borehole the pulsed laser beam is guided automatically over the bone by using a two mirror galvanometric scanner. The ablation process is controlled by visual servoing. For the detection of the boundary layers of the inner ear the ablation area is monitored by a color camera. The acquired pictures are analyzed by image processing. The results of this analysis are used to control the process of laser ablation. This publication describes the complete system including image processing algorithms and the concept for the resulting distribution of single laser pulses. The system has been tested on human cochleae in ex-vivo studies. Further developments could lead to safe intraoperative openings of the cochlea by a robot based surgical laser instrument.

  16. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted.

  17. A quality improvement project to optimize patient outcomes following the maze procedure.

    PubMed

    Henry, Linda L; Ad, Niv; Martin, Lisa; Hunt, Sharon; Crippen, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common of all clinically sustained heart arrhythmias with associated morbidities (shortness of breath, fatigue, and stroke). The maze cardiac surgical procedure is a new treatment option available for patients who have medical refractory AF. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a written postdischarge protocol was necessary to improve outcomes following the maze procedure. Only 3 (27%) patients with AF were actively treated by an arrhythmia protocol for restoration of sinus rhythm. Unnecessary pharmacologic management for AF was found in 44 patients with normal sinus rhythm. A postdischarge protocol was developed that improved outcomes.

  18. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  19. Pilot Study to Assess Safety and Clinical Outcomes of Irreversible Electroporation for Partial Gland Ablation in Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie S.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Musser, John; Mashni, Joseph; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Durack, Jeremy C.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Coleman, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Partial prostate gland ablation is a strategy to manage localized prostate cancer. Irreversible electroporation can ablate localized soft tissues. We sought to describe 30- and 90-day complications and intermediate-term functional outcomes in men undergoing prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation. Materials and Methods We reviewed the charts of 25 patients with prostate cancer who underwent prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation as a primary procedure and who were followed for at least 6 months. Results Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Grade 3 complications occurred in 2 patients including epididymitis (1) and urinary tract infection (1). Fourteen patients experienced grade ≤ 2 complications, mainly transient urinary symptoms, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. Of 25 patients, 4 (16%) had cancer in the zone of ablation on routine follow-up biopsy at 6 months. Of those with normal urinary function at baseline, 88% and 94% reported normal urinary function at 6 and 12 months after prostate gland ablation, respectively. By 12 months, only 1 patient with normal erectile function at baseline reported new difficulty with potency and only 2 patients (8%) required a pad for urinary incontinence. Conclusions Prostate gland ablation with irreversible electroporation is feasible and safe in selected men with localized prostate cancer. Intermediate-term urinary and erectile function outcomes appear reasonable. Irreversible electroporation is effective in ablation of tumor-bearing prostate tissue, as a majority of men had no evidence of residual cancer on biopsy 6 months after prostate gland ablation. PMID:27113966

  20. Ablation technology for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Melby, Spencer J; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J

    2013-01-01

    The Cox maze procedure for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has been simplified from its original cut-and-sew technique. Various energy sources now exist which create linear lines of ablation that can be used to replace the original incisions, greatly facilitating the surgical approach. This review article describes the anatomy of the atria that must be considered in choosing a successful energy source. Furthermore the device characteristics, safety profile, mechanism of tissue injury, and ability to create transmural lesions of the various energy sources that have been used in the Cox maze procedure, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each device is discussed.

  1. Interventional MSK procedures: the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Guillaume; Cockenpot, Eric; Chastanet, Patrick; Cotten, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous musculoskeletal procedures are widely accepted as low invasive, highly effective, efficient and safe methods in a vast amount of hip pathologies either in diagnostic or in therapeutic management. Hip intra-articular injections are used for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis. Peritendinous or intrabursal corticosteroid injections can be used for the symptomatic treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and anterior iliopsoas impingement. In past decades, the role of interventional radiology has rapidly increased in metastatic disease, thanks to the development of many ablative techniques. Image-guided percutaneous ablation of skeletal metastases provides a minimally invasive treatment option that appears to be a safe and effective palliative treatment for localized painful lytic lesion. Methods of tumour destruction based on temperature, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy, are performed for the management of musculoskeletal metastases. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery provides a non-invasive alternative to these ablative methods. Cementoplasty is now widely used for pain management and consolidation of acetabular metastases and can be combined with RFA. RFA is also used to treat benign tumours, namely osteoid osteomas. New interventional procedures such as percutaneous screw fixation are also proposed to treat non-displaced or minimally displaced acetabular roof fractures. PMID:26317896

  2. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  3. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  4. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  5. "How we do it" - a practical approach to hepatic metastases ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Sideras, Panagiotis; Petre, Elena N

    2013-12-01

    Secondary liver malignancies are associated with significant mortality and morbidity if left untreated. Colorectal cancer is the most frequent origin of hepatic metastases. A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of hepatic metastases includes medical, surgical, radiation and interventional oncology. The role of interventional oncology in the management of hepatic malignancies continues to evolve and applies to a large and continuous spectrum of metastatic disease, from the relatively small solitary metastasis to larger tumors and multifocal liver disease. Within the past 10 years, several publications of percutaneous image-guided ablation indicated the effectiveness and safety of this minimally invasive therapy for selected patients with limited number (arguably up to 4 metastases) of relatively small (less than 5cm) hepatic metastases. Different image-guided procedures such radiofrequency, microwave, and laser cause thermal ablation and coagulation necrosis or cell death of the target tumor. Cryoablation, causing cell death via cellular freezing, has also been used. Recently, irreversible electroporation, a nonthermal modality, has also been used for liver tumor ablation. In the following section, we review the different liver ablation techniques, as well as indications for ablation, specific patient preparations, and different "tricks of the trade" that we use to achieve safe and effective liver tumor ablation. We also discuss appropriate imaging and clinical patient follow-up and potential complications of liver tumor ablation.

  6. Percutaneous tumor ablation tools: microwave, radiofrequency, or cryoablation--what should you use and why?

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients.

  7. Impact of catheter and surgical ablation on arrhythmia treatment in a tertiary referral centre.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, D; Rowland, E

    1992-01-01

    Invasive cardiac electrophysiology studies began as diagnostic studies. The past decade has seen the introduction of several new treatments which have broadened the scope of invasive electrophysiology studies. In particular, the development of catheter ablation techniques increasingly allows curative treatment to be delivered in the catheter laboratory. The workload of electrophysiological procedures has steadily increased in our tertiary referral centre. Over 1000 patients have been treated in the past 20 years and it is projected that 219 new patients will be treated in 1991 and 342 procedures will be carried out. Over 25% of patients now receive either catheter or surgical ablation and almost 80% of these are cured permanently without the need for further drug treatment. The development of safer techniques for catheter ablation has led to its increased use and a decline in surgical ablations. Because catheter ablation is a much simpler and less traumatic procedure than surgical ablation there are great advantages both for the patient and in terms of cost-effectiveness. Antitachycardia pacing, relatively common in 1985, has now largely been supplanted by ablation and implantation of defibrillators. As the tendency to non-pharmacological treatment increases and evidence mounts that cost-effectiveness is greater for electrophysiological treatments, the implications for the funding of electrophysiology services grow. The initially high cost of curative treatment needs to be balanced against the longer term and potentially higher costs of palliative drug treatment. The potential to cure patients with catheter procedures may lead to a greater demand for this expertise and a need for an increase in training and facilities. PMID:1739536

  8. Delayed cardiac tamponade: A rare but life-threatening complication of catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Yetter, Elizabeth; Brazg, Jared; Del Valle, Diane; Mulvey, Laura; Dickman, Eitan

    2016-11-17

    Delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare and life-threatening complication of catheter ablation performed as a treatment of atrial fibrillation, with few cases described in the medical literature. We present the case of a 57year-old man presenting with DCT 61days following a catheter ablation procedure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most delayed case of cardiac tamponade (CT) following catheter ablation described in the literature. We also discuss the importance of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the diagnosis and treatment of CT. Emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion in making the diagnosis of CT as patients may present with vague symptoms such as neck or back pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness, or altered mental status, often without chest pain. Common risk factors for CT include cancer, renal failure, pericarditis, cardiac surgery, myocardial rupture, trauma, and retrograde aortic dissection. In addition, although rare, both catheter ablation and use of anticoagulation carry risks of developing CT. A worldwide survey of medical centers performing catheter ablation found CT as a complication in less than 2% of cases [1]. Some proposed mechanisms of DCT include small pericardial hemorrhages following post-procedural anticoagulation or rupture of the sealed ablation-induced left atrial wall [2]. Clinical examination and electrocardiography may be helpful. However, the criterion standard for diagnosing CT is echocardiography [3].

  9. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of benign thyroid nodules assisted by a virtual needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Turtulici, Giovanni; Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Sartoris, Riccardo; Derchi, Lorenzo Egildo; Silvestri, Enzo; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility and outcome of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of benign thyroid nodules assisted by a real-time virtual needle tracking (VT) system. Forty-five patients (34 females, mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 44 ± 16 y, range: 29-68 y) with 45 benign non-functioning thyroid nodules (mean volume ± SD: 13.5 ± 6.7 mL, range: 12-22 mL) underwent VT-assisted US-guided RF ablation. Nodule volume was evaluated before treatment and during 6-mo of follow-up. Complication rates and patient satisfaction after treatment were also evaluated. By use of the VT system, the tip of the RF electrode was identified during all ablation procedures. The overall mean volume reduction and complication rate were 72.6 ± 11.3% and 2.5%, respectively. Overall satisfaction at the 6-mo follow-up was rated by patients as positive in 42 cases (93%). The VT system could be useful in thyroid nodule ablation procedures because it is able to track the RF electrode tip even when the tip is obscured by the bubbles produced by the ablative process. VT-assisted RF ablation can be a tolerable, non-surgical treatment for patients with benign non-functioning thyroid nodules.

  10. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  11. Health-related quality of life in different clinical subgroups with typical AFL who have undergone cavo-tricuspid isthmus ablation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in different sub-groups of a cohort of patients with typical atrial flutter (AFL) treated with cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) radiofrequency catheter ablation. Methods 95 consecutive patients due to undergo CTI ablation were enrolled in a study involving their completion of two SF-36 HRQOL questionnaires, before ablation and at one-year follow-up. Results 88 of the initial 95 patients finished the study. Regardless of whether patients experienced atrial fibrillation (AF) during follow-up, a statistically significant improvement in HRQOL was observed, compared with pre-ablation scores and in all dimensions except Bodily Pain. However, patients without AF during follow-up had significantly higher absolute HRQOL scores in most dimensions. No differences were seen in most HRQOL dimensions, with respect to AFL type (paroxysmal, persistent) or duration, whether AFL was first-episode or recurrent, Class I-III drug dependent, sex, or presence of structural heart disease or tachycardiomyopathy. Patients with persistent AFL showed the greatest improvement in HRQOL when they also had a ventricular cycle length ≤500 ms. The combination of recurrent AFL, ventricular cycle length ≤500 ms and structural heart disease led to a significantly greater improvement in physical HRQOL dimensions than did first-episode AFL, no structural heart disease and ventricular cycle >500 ms. The only independent factor associated with a greater improvement was structural cardiopathy. Conclusions CTI-ablation treatment leads to a significant improvement in HRQOL in patients with typical AFL. Patients with AF during follow-up show a significantly lower HRQOL at one-year post-ablation. The only independent risk factor found to be associated with a greater improvement in the physical summary component was structural cardiopathy. PMID:22866671

  12. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  13. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  14. Comparison of transcatheter laser and direct-current shock ablation of endocardium near tricuspid anulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Shi-Wen; Li, Junheng

    1993-03-01

    Forty to eighty percent of the patients with accessory pathways (APs) manifest themselves by tachyarrhythmias. Many of these patients needed either life-long medical therapy or surgery. In order to avoid the discomfort and expenses in surgical procedures, closed chest percutaneous catheter ablation of APs became a potentially desirable therapeutic approach. Many investigations indicated that ablation of right APs by transcatheter direct current (dc) shock could cause life-threatening arrhythmias, right coronary arterical (RCA) spasm, etc. With the development of transcatheter laser technique, it has been used in drug-incurable arrhythmias. The results show that laser ablation is much safer than surgery and electric shock therapy. The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness, advantages, and complications with transcatheter Nd:YAG laser and dc shock in the ablation of right atrioventricular accessory pathways in the atrium near the tricuspid annulus (TA) in 20 dogs.

  15. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  16. Global Endometrial Ablation in the Presence of Essure® Microinserts

    PubMed Central

    Aldape, Diana; Chudnoff, Scott G; Levie, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) affects 30% of women at some time during their reproductive years and is one of the most common reasons a woman sees a gynecologist. Many women are turning to endometrial ablation to manage their AUB. This article reviews the data relating to the available endometrial ablation techniques performed with hysteroscopic sterilization, and focuses on data from patients who had Essure® (Conceptus, San Carlos, CA) coils placed prior to performance of endometrial ablation. Reviewed specifically are data regarding safety and efficacy of these two procedures when combined. Data submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration for the three devices currently approved are reviewed, as well as all published case series. Articles included were selected based on a PubMed search for endometrial ablation (also using the brand names of the different techniques currently available), hysteroscopic sterilization, and Essure. PMID:24358407

  17. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  18. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  19. An optimal sliding choke antenna for hepatic microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Punit; Converse, Mark C; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2009-10-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a minimally invasive technique increasingly used for thermal therapy of liver tumors. Effective MWA requires efficient interstitial antennas that destroy tumors and a margin of healthy tissue, in situ, while minimizing damage to the rest of the organ. Previously, we presented a method for optimizing MWA antenna designs by coupling finite element method models of antennas with a real-coded, multiobjective genetic algorithm. We utilized this procedure to optimize the design of a minimally invasive choke antenna that can be used to create near-spherical ablation zones of adjustable size (radius 1-2 cm) by adjusting treatment durations and a sliding structure of the antenna. Computational results were validated with experiments in ex vivo bovine liver. The optimization procedure yielded antennas with reflection coefficients below -30 dB, which were capable of creating spherical ablation zones up to 2 cm in radius using 100 W input power at 2.45 GHz with treatment durations under 2 min.

  20. Surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation: techniques, indications, and results

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Christopher P.; Henn, Matthew C.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this review is to focus specifically on the indications, evolution of technique, and results of surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation. Recent findings With the introduction of the Cox-Maze IV procedure utilizing bipolar radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, long-term studies have demonstrated a significant decrease in aortic cross-clamp times and major complications with a comparable rate of restoration of sinus rhythm. New hybrid approaches utilizing both catheter-based ablation and minimally invasive surgical approaches have been developed, but have not been standardized. Early studies have demonstrated reasonable success rates of hybrid procedures, with advantages that include confirmation of conduction block, decreased surgical morbidity, and possibly reduced morbidity. However, hybrid approaches have the disadvantage of significantly increased operative times. Summary The Cox-Maze IV is currently the gold standard for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. New hybrid approaches have potential advantages with promising early results, but a standard lesion set, improvement in operative times, and long-term results still need to be evaluated. PMID:25389650

  1. Virtual cardioscopy: interactive endocardial visualization to guide RF cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a debilitating, potentially life threatening condition involving aberrant electrical activity in the heart which results in abnormal heart rhythm. Virtual cardioscopy can play an important role in minimally invasive treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Second and third generation image-guidance systems are now available for the treatment of arrhythmias using RF ablation catheters. While these 3D tools provide useful information to the clinician, additional enhancements to the virtual cardioscopy display paradigm are critical for optimal therapy guidance. Based on input from clinical collaborators, several key visualization techniques have been developed to enhance the use of virtual cardioscopy during cardiac ablation procedures. We have identified, designed and incorporated several visual cues important to successful virtual cardioscopy. These features include the use of global reference maps, parametric mapping, and focused navigation and targeting using abnormal electro-physiologic activity. Our virtual cardioscopy system is designed for real-time use during RF cardiac ablation procedures. Several unique visualizations from our virtual cardioscopy system will be presented. Evaluation of the system with phantom and animal studies will be presented. This research is supported by grant EB002834 from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma: Initial Experience with a New Monopolar Ablation Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H. Bruners, Philipp; Delbrueck, Heide; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to report our initial experience with the 'off-label' use of a new monopolar radiofrequency (RF) probe for percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas. Seventeen patients (12 male and 5 female, mean age 24.8 [range 9-49]) with osteoid osteoma were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation (RFA). All procedures were performed with the patient under general aesthesia. After localization of the nidus, a 13G hollow drill was introduced into the nidus through a 7F introducer sheath. A monopolar 16.5G RF probe with a 9-mm active tip (Soloist; Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) was inserted through the introducer sheath and connected to the RF generator. Energy application was started at 2 W and subsequently increased every 2 min by 1 W to a maximum of 8 W. The procedure ended if impedance increased by 500 Ohm-Sign . Mean duration of energy deposition was 14.2 {+-} 3.3 min. Fourteen of 17 patients (82%) were free of symptoms at 29.9 {+-} 14.8 (range 4 to 47) months of follow-up. The primary and secondary success rates were 83% and 100%, respectively. In 3 patients, recurrence of pain at 6 (n = 1) and 15 (n = 2) months after the initial procedure was successfully treated by reablation. There were no complications. Monopolar RFA using the Soloist probe is effective and safe for the treatment of osteoid osteoma. It results in comparable success rates as other monopolar or bipolar RF systems in the treatment of osteoid osteoma.

  3. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    treatment plan. The RFA procedure involves the introduction of a guide wire into the target vein under ultrasound guidance followed by the insertion of an introducer sheath through which the RFA catheter is advanced. Once satisfactory positioning has been confirmed with ultrasound, a tumescent anaesthetic solution is injected into the soft tissue surrounding the target vein along its entire length. This serves to anaesthetize the vein, insulate the heat from damaging adjacent structures, including nerves and skin and compresses the vein increasing optimal contact of the vessel wall with the electrodes or expanded prongs of the RF device. The RF generator is then activated and the catheter is slowly pulled along the length of the vein. At the end of the procedure, hemostasis is then achieved by applying pressure to the vein entry point. Adequate and proper compression stockings and bandages are applied after the procedure to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism and to reduce postoperative bruising and tenderness. Patients are encouraged to walk immediately after the procedure. Follow-up protocols vary, with most patients returning 1 to 3 weeks later for an initial follow-up visit. At this point, the initial clinical result is assessed and occlusion of the treated vessels is confirmed with ultrasound. Patients often have a second follow-up visit 1 to 3 months following RFA at which time clinical evaluation and ultrasound are repeated. If required, additional procedures such as phlebectomy or sclerotherapy may be performed during the RFA procedure or at any follow-up visits. Regulatory Status The Closure System® radiofrequency generator for endovascular thermal ablation of varicose veins was approved by Health Canada as a class 3 device in March 2005, registered under medical device license 67865. The RFA intravascular catheter was approved by Health Canada in November 2007 for the ClosureFast catheter, registered under medical device license 16574. The Closure System

  4. Emergency Renal Ablation for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage from Multiple Capsular Branches During Renal Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cuneyt Yildirim, Utku M.; Ozyer, Umut; Harman, Ali; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-06-15

    A 55-year-old woman underwent bilateral renal artery stent placement with good angiographic result. After the procedure, the patient complained of left flank pain secondary to subcapsular hematoma. Retrospective evaluation of images taken during stent implantation favored the diagnosis of guidewire perforation. Three hours after the procedure, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and subsequent renal angiography showed multifocal extravasations. We performed emergent renal ablation for the treatment of massive bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first use of transcatheter renal ablation technique for this purpose.

  5. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of a Small Renal Mass Complicated by Appendiceal Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Judith; Bex, Axel; Prevoo, Warner

    2012-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained wide acceptance as nephron-sparing therapy for small renal masses in select patients. Generally, it is a safe procedure with minor morbidity and acceptable short-term oncologic outcome. However, as a result of the close proximity of vital structures, such as the bowel, ureter, and large vessels, to the ablative field, complications regarding these structures may occur. This is the first article describing appendiceal perforation as a complication of computed tomography-guided RFA despite hydrodissection. When performing this innovative and promising procedure one should be aware of the possibility of particular minor and even major complications.

  6. Anatomic Guidance For Ablation: Atrial Flutter, Fibrillation, and Outflow Tract Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Sehar, Nandini; Mears, Jennifer; Bisco, Susan; Patel, Sandeep; Lachman, Nirusha; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2010-01-01

    After initial documentation of excellent efficacy with radiofrequency ablation, this procedure is being performed increasingly in more complex situations and for more difficult arrhythmia. In these circumstances, an accurate knowledge of the anatomic basis for the ablation procedure will help maintain this efficacy and improve safety. In this review, we discuss the relevant anatomy for electrophysiology interventions for typical right atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation, and outflow tract ventricular tachycardia. In the pediatric population, maintaining safety is a greater challenge, and here again, knowing the neighboring and regional anatomy of the arrhythmogenic substrate for these arrhythmias may go a long way in preventing complications. PMID:20811537

  7. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  8. Smyd2 is a Myc-regulated gene critical for MLL-AF9 induced leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bagislar, Sevgi; Sabò, Arianna; Kress, Theresia R.; Doni, Mirko; Nicoli, Paola; Campaner, Stefano; Amati, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The Smyd2 protein (Set- and Mynd domain containing protein 2) is a methyl-transferase that can modify both histones and cytoplasmic proteins. Smyd2 is over-expressed in several cancer types and was shown to be limiting for tumor development in the pancreas. However, genetic evidence for a role of Smyd2 in other cancers or in mouse development was missing to date. Using germ line-deleted mouse strains, we now show that Smyd2 and the related protein Smyd3 are dispensable for normal development. Ablation of Smyd2 did not affect hematopoiesis, but retarded the development of leukemia promoted by MLL-AF9, a fusion oncogene associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in humans. Smyd2-deleted leukemic cells showed a competitive disadvantage relative to wild-type cells, either in vitro or in vivo. The Smyd2 gene was directly activated by the oncogenic transcription factor Myc in either MLL9-AF9-induced leukemias, Myc-induced lymphomas, or fibroblasts. However, unlike leukemias, the development of lymphomas was not dependent upon Smyd2. Our data indicate that Smyd2 has a critical role downstream of Myc in AML. PMID:27655694

  9. Fast and automatic depth control of iterative bone ablation based on optical coherence tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander; Pengel, Steffen; Bergmeier, Jan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Laser surgery is an established clinical procedure in dental applications, soft tissue ablation, and ophthalmology. The presented experimental set-up for closed-loop control of laser bone ablation addresses a feedback system and enables safe ablation towards anatomical structures that usually would have high risk of damage. This study is based on combined working volumes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Er:YAG cutting laser. High level of automation in fast image data processing and tissue treatment enables reproducible results and shortens the time in the operating room. For registration of the two coordinate systems a cross-like incision is ablated with the Er:YAG laser and segmented with OCT in three distances. The resulting Er:YAG coordinate system is reconstructed. A parameter list defines multiple sets of laser parameters including discrete and specific ablation rates as ablation model. The control algorithm uses this model to plan corrective laser paths for each set of laser parameters and dynamically adapts the distance of the laser focus. With this iterative control cycle consisting of image processing, path planning, ablation, and moistening of tissue the target geometry and desired depth are approximated until no further corrective laser paths can be set. The achieved depth stays within the tolerances of the parameter set with the smallest ablation rate. Specimen trials with fresh porcine bone have been conducted to prove the functionality of the developed concept. Flat bottom surfaces and sharp edges of the outline without visual signs of thermal damage verify the feasibility of automated, OCT controlled laser bone ablation with minimal process time.

  10. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  11. Treatment of bone tumours by radiofrequency thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Fernando Ruiz; Del Mar Castellano García, María; Montes, Jose Luis Martínez; García, Manuel Ruiz; Fernández, Juan Miguel Tristán

    2009-03-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is considered the treatment of choice for osteoid osteomas, in which it has long been safely used. Other benign conditions (chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, etc.) can also be treated by this technique, which is less invasive than traditional surgical procedures. RFTA ablation is also an option for the palliation of localized, painful osteolytic metastatic and myeloma lesions. The reduction in pain improves the quality of life of patients with cancer, who often have multiple morbidities and a limited life expectancy. In some cases, these patients are treated with RFTA because conventional therapies (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, etc.) have been exhausted. In other cases, it is combined with conventional therapies or other percutaneous treatments, e.g., cementoplasty, offering faster pain relief and bone strengthening. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is recommended to select the optimal treatment, including orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, medical and radiation oncologists and interventional radiologists.

  12. Bronchopleural Fistula After Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, Mathieu; Cornelis, Francois; Descat, Edouard; Ferron, Stephane; Carteret, Thibault; Castagnede, Hugues; Palussiere, Jean

    2011-02-15

    The present article describes two cases of bronchopleural fistula (BPF) occurring after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors. Both procedures were carried out using expandable multitined electrodes, with no coagulation of the needle track. After both ablations, ground-glass opacities encompassed the nodules and abutted the visceral pleura. The first patient had a delayed pneumothorax, and the second had a recurrent pneumothorax. Both cases of BPF were diagnosed on follow-up computed tomography chest scans (i.e., visibility of a distinct channel between the lung or a peripheral bronchus and the pleura) and were successfully treated with chest tubes alone. Our goal is to highlight the fact that BPF can occur without needle-track coagulation and to suggest that minimally invasive treatment is sufficient to cure BPFs of this specific origin.

  13. Laser-ablation-assisted microparticle acceleration for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V.; Takayama, K.; Ohki, T.; Gopalan, J.

    2005-10-01

    Localized drug delivery with minimal tissue damage is desired in some of the clinical procedures such as gene therapy, treatment of cancer cells, treatment of thrombosis, etc. We present an effective method for delivering drug-coated microparticles using laser ablation on a thin metal foil containing particles. A thin metal foil, with a deposition of a layer of microparticles is subjected to laser ablation on its backface such that a shock wave propagates through the foil. Due to shock wave loading, the surface of the foil containing microparticles is accelerated to very high speeds, ejecting the deposited particles at hypersonic speeds. The ejected particles have sufficient momentum to penetrate soft body tissues, and the penetration depth observed is sufficient for most of the pharmacological treatments. We have tried delivering 1μm tungsten particles into gelatin models that represent soft tissues, and liver tissues of an experimental rat. Sufficient penetration depths have been observed in these experiments with minimum target damage.

  14. Chronic incomplete atrioventricular block induced by radiofrequency catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Bharati, S.; Graham, A.R.; Gorman, G.; Lev, M. )

    1989-10-01

    To determine if catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction with radiofrequency energy can induce chronic incomplete (first- and second-degree) AV block to avoid the need for a permanent pacemaker, 20 closed-chest dogs were studied. Group 1 (10 dogs) received radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) with a fixed power setting (5 or 10 W) while increasing the pulse duration from 10 to 50 seconds for each application. Group 2 (10 dogs) received energy with a fixed pulse duration (20 or 30 seconds) while increasing the power setting from 5 to 10 W or from 10 to 20 W during each energy delivery. Radiofrequency energy was delivered between a chest-patch electrode and the distal electrode of a regular 7F tripolar His bundle catheter. For each application, the energy delivery was interrupted when (1) the PR interval prolonged (greater than 50%) or (2) second-degree or complete AV block occurred and persisted up to 5 seconds. The ablation procedure ended when there was (1) persistent PR prolongation (greater than 50%) or persistent second-degree AV block (lasting greater than 30 minutes) after ablation, (2) occurrence of two consecutive transient (less than 1 minute) complete AV blocks after each energy delivery, or (3) complete AV block (lasting greater than 2 minutes) after ablation. Of seven dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which incomplete AV block was achieved 1 hour after the procedure, six in group 1 and five in group 2 remained in incomplete AV block 2-3 months after ablation. One dog in group 1 progressed into complete AV block. Of the remaining three dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which complete AV block was initially achieved 1 hour after ablation, two in group 1 and four in group 2 continued to have complete AV block, whereas one in each group had AV conduction returned to incomplete at 1-2 months of follow-up.

  15. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  16. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  17. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  18. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  19. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  20. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  1. Coaxially electrospun PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats with superhydrophobic properties.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Palanikkumaran; Hsu, Shu-Hau; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2010-08-03

    This work reports the coaxial electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-Teflon amorphous fluoropolymer (AF) and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats yielding superhydrophobic properties. The coaxial electrospinning configuration allows for the electrospinning of Teflon AF, a nonelectrospinnable polymer, with the help of an electrospinnable PVDF polymer. PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath fibers have been found to a have mean fiber diameter ranging from 400 nm to less than 100 nm. TEM micrographs exhibit a typical core-sheath fiber structure for these fibers, where the sheath fiber coats the core fiber almost thoroughly. Water contact angle measurements by sessile drop method on these core-sheath nanofiber mats exhibited superhydrophobic characteristics with contact angles close to or higher than 150 degrees. Surprisingly, PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF nanofiber mat surface properties were dominated by the fiber dimensions and less influenced by the type of sheath polymer. This suggests that highly fluorinated polymer Teflon AF does not advance the hydrophobicity beyond what surface physics and slightly fluorinated polymer PVDF can achieve. It is concluded that PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath electrospun nanofiber mats may be used in lithium (Li)-air batteries.

  2. Genomic Contributors to Rhythm Outcome of Atrial Fibrillation Catheter Ablation – Pathway Enrichment Analysis of GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Ueberham, Laura; Dinov, Borislav; Sommer, Philipp; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard; Bollmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Left atrial enlargement and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) are well-known predictors for arrhythmia recurrence after AF catheter ablation (LRAF). In this study, by using pathway enrichment analysis of GWAS data, we tested the hypothesis that genetic pathways associated with these phenotypes are also associated with LRAF. Methods Samples from 660 patients with paroxysmal (n = 370) or persistent AF (n = 290) undergoing de-novo AF catheter ablation were genotyped for ~1,000,000 SNPs. SNPs found to be significantly associated with left atrial diameter (LAD) or AF type were used for gene-based association tests in a systematic biological Knowledge-based mining system for Genome-wide Genetic studies (KGG). Associated genes were tested for pathway enrichment using WEB-based Gene SeT AnaLysis Toolkit (WebGestalt), the Gene Annotation Tool to Help Explain Relationships (GATHER) and the databases provided by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). In a second step, the association of consistently enriched pathways and LRAF was tested. Results By using sequential 7-day Holter ECGs, LRAF between 3 and 12 months was observed in 48% and was associated with LAD (B = 1.801, 95% CI 0.760–2.841, p = 1.0E-3) and persistent AF (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.567–2.931, p = 2.0E-6). WebGestalt (adj. p = 2.7E-22) and GATHER (adj. p = 5.2E-3) identified the calcium signaling pathway (hsa04020) as the only consistently enriched pathway for LAD, while the extracellular matrix (ECM) -receptor interaction pathway (hsa04512) was the only consistently enriched pathway for AF type (adj. p = 2.1E-15 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 9.3E-4 in GATHER). Both calcium signaling (adj. p = 2.2E-17 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 2.9E-2 in GATHER) and ECM-receptor interaction (adj. p = 1.2E-10 in WebGestalt; adj. p = 2.9E-2 in GATHER) were significantly associated with LRAF. Conclusions Calcium signaling and ECM-receptor interaction pathways are associated with LAD and AF type and, in turn, with LRAF

  3. Microwave Ablation Compared to Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatic Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microwave (MW) ablation compared with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatic lesions by using meta-analytic techniques. Overall, 16 studies involving 2,062 patients were included. MW ablation was found to have significantly better 6-year overall survival than RF ablation (odds ratio, 1.64, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.35), but this was based on a few articles (n = 3 of 16). MW ablation and RF ablation had similar 1-5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence rate, and adverse events. Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, either MW ablation or RF ablation may be used for effective local hepatic therapy.

  4. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  5. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  6. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  7. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  8. Ablation and carbon deposition induced by UV laser irradiation of polyimide: Application to the metallization of VIAs in high density printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metayer, P.; Davenas, J.; Bureau, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Polyimides are known to exhibit large ablation rates upon irradiation with excimer laser due to their high absorbance in the UV and low fluorescence yield. We have studied different regimes of laser ablation according to the fluence and studied the structures resulting from carbon products deposition. For fluences larger than the polyimide ablation threshold, but lower than the carbon one, the development of one structure is the dominant process, whereas large ablation rates lead to polyimide etching above the carbon ablation threshold. The deposition of a carbon layer on the walls of ablated slits has in particular been investigated using an original experimental technique. Optical microscopy and MEB have shown that this carbon layer covered the main height of the ablated holes whereas a threshold (bare polyimide) for carbon condensation was evidenced at the bottom of the ablated hole. Raman spectroscopy and conductivity measurements have shown that the carbon phase is mainly graphitic. A dependence of the carbon condensation threshold on the slit width has been evidenced and discussed in relation with the angle of ejection of ablation debris. A procedure has been developed to render the bare polyimide of the threshold region conductive. At last the conductive properties of the walls of the ablated holes have been exploited to perform an electrolytic metallization. Implications for the production of interconnection vertical interconnections (VIAs) in high density printed circuits are addressed.

  9. Efficacy comparison between cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-He; Lin, Hui; Xie, Cheng-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    We perform this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of cryoablation versus radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. By searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane electronic databases from March 1986 to September 2014, 7 randomized clinical trials were included. Acute (risk ratio[RR]: 0.93; P = 0.14) and long-term (RR: 0.94; P = 0.08) success rate were slightly lower in cryoablation group than in radiofrequency ablation group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, the fluoroscopy time was nonsignificantly reduced (weighted mean difference[WMD]: -2.83 P = 0.29), whereas procedure time was significantly longer (WMD: 25.95; P = 0.01) in cryoablation group compared with radiofrequency ablation group. Furthermore, Pain perception during the catheter ablation was substantially less in cryoabaltion group than in radiofrequency ablation group (standardized mean difference[SMD]: -2.36 P < 0.00001). Thus, our meta-analysis demonstrated that cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation produce comparable acute and long-term success rate for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. Meanwhile, cryoablation ablation tends to reduce the fluoroscopy time and significantly reduce pain perception in cost of significantly prolonged procedure time.

  10. Insights into energy delivery to myocardial tissue during radiofrequency ablation through application of the first law of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T Jared; Day, John D; Packer, Douglas L

    2009-04-01

    The approach to catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has evolved, and as a consequence, more energy is delivered in the posterior left atrium, exposing neighboring tissue to untoward thermal injury. Simultaneously, catheter technology has advanced to allow more efficient energy delivery into the myocardium, which compounds the likelihood of collateral injury. This review focuses on the basic principles of thermodynamics as they apply to energy delivery during radiofrequency ablation. These principles can be used to titrate energy delivery and plan ablative approaches in an effort to minimize complications during the procedure.

  11. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  12. Percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Justin P; Yamamoto, Shota; Raman, Steven S; Loh, Christopher T; Lee, Edward W; Liu, David M; Kee, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common disease with dismal long-term survival. Percutaneous ablation has gained popularity as a minimally invasive, potentially curative therapy for HCC in nonoperative candidates. The seminal technique of percutaneous ethanol injection has been largely supplanted by newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. A review of these modalities, including technical success, survival rates, and complications, will be presented, as well as considerations for treatment planning and follow-up.

  13. Ablation of liver metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Vincent L; Gervais, Debra A

    2010-08-01

    Local ablative therapy for the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver has been evaluated most extensively in colorectal cancer with 5-year survival rates up to 55% after RF ablation. Recent findings suggest selected patients with other malignant processes may benefit as well, but conclusive evidence is limited. This article reviews the available literature regarding the use of radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver. The published results of each of these modalities in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver are promising, and outcomes continue to be evaluated.

  14. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Ablation for Large Subcapsular Hepatic Hemangiomas: Technical and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical outcomes of using laparoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience of treating 124 large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas in 121 patients with laparoscopic RF ablation. Results The mean diameter of the 124 hemangiomas was 9.1 ± 3.2 cm (5.0–16.0 cm). RF ablation was performed successfully in all patients. There were 55 complications related to the ablation in 26 patients, including 5 of 69 (7.3%) patients with hemangioma <10 cm and 21 of 52 (40.4%) patients with hemangiomas ≥10 cm (P < 0.001). No injuries to abdominal viscera occurred in all the 121 patients. According to the Dindo–Clavien classification, all the complications were minor in 26 patients (Grade I). Out of 124 hepatic hemangiomas, 118 (95.2%) were completely ablated, including 70 of 72 (97.2%) lesions < 10 cm and 48 of 52 (92.3%) lesions ≥ 10 cm (P = 0.236). Conclusion Laparoscopic RF ablation therapy is a safe, feasible and effective procedure for large subcapsular hepatic hemangiomas, even in the hepatic hemangiomas ≥ 10 cm. Its use avoids thermal injury to the abdominal viscera. PMID:26901132

  15. Conjunction of Endocardial and Coronary Venous System Mapping to Ablate Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Hung-Ta; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Chang, Po-Cheng; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) with epicardial or intramural origins is technically challenging. Herein, we have described the successful ablation of left VAs via the coronary venous system (CVS) in conjunction with endocardial map guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical map in six patients. Methods Out of a total consecutive 84 patients with symptomatic idiopathic VAs, radiofrequency ablation via the CVS was performed on six patients (7%). Furthermore, we reviewed patient records and electrophysiologic studies with respect to clinical characteristics. Results Activation map was conducted in 5 patients, and the earliest activation sites were identified within the CVS. The preceding times to the onset of QRS complex were longer than those at the earliest endocardial sites (36.2 ± 5.6 ms vs. 14.2 ± 6.4 ms, p = 0.02, n = 5). Spiky fractionated long-duration potentials were recorded at the successful ablation sites in all 5 patients. The other patient received pacemapping only because of few spontaneous VAs during the procedure, and the best pacemap spot was found within the CVS. Irrigated catheters were required in 4 out of 6 patients because VAs were temporarily suppressed with regular ones. Conclusions Idiopathic VAs can be ablated via the CVS in conjunction with endocardial mapping. Additionally, spiky fractionated long-duration potential can function as a clue to identify the good ablation site. PMID:27274177

  16. Laser ablation for small hepatocellular carcinoma: State of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Giovan Giuseppe; Francica, Giampiero; Pacella, Claudio Maurizio

    2014-10-27

    During the last two decades, various local thermal ablative techniques for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been developed. According to internationally endorsed guidelines, percutaneous thermal ablation is the mainstay of treatment in patients with small HCC who are not candidates for surgical resection or transplantation. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques. In this article, the general principles, technique, image guidance, and patient selection are reported. Primary effectiveness, long-term outcome, and complications are also discussed. A review of published data suggests that LA is equivalent to the more popular and widespread radiofrequency ablation in both local tumor control and long-term outcome in the percutaneous treatment of early HCC. In addition, the LA technique using multiple thin laser fibres allows improved ablative effectiveness in HCCs greater than 3 cm. Reference centres should be equipped with all the available techniques so as to be able to use the best and the most suitable procedure for each type of lesion for each patient.

  17. Radio Frequency Ablation for Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of radio frequency ablation (RFA) compared with other treatments for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ontario. Background Liver cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer globally, although it is most prevalent in Asia and Africa. The incidence of liver cancer has been increasing in the Western world, primarily because of an increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C. Data from Cancer Care Ontario from 1998 to 2002 suggest that the age-adjusted incidence of liver cancer in men rose slightly from 4.5 cases to 5.4 cases per 100,000 men. For women, the rates declined slightly, from 1.8 cases to 1.4 cases per 100,000 women during the same period. Most people who present with symptoms of liver cancer have a progressive form of the disease. The rates of survival in untreated patients in the early stage of the disease range from 50% to 82% at 1 year and 26% to 32% at 2 years. Patients with more advanced stages have survival rates ranging from 0% to 36% at 3 years. Surgical resection and transplantation are the procedures that have the best prognoses; however, only 15% to 20% of patients presenting with liver cancer are eligible for surgery. Resection is associated with a 50% survival rate at 5 years. The Technology: Radio Frequency Ablation RFA is a relatively new technique for the treatment of small liver cancers that cannot be treated with surgery. This technique applies alternating high-frequency electrical currents to the cancerous tissue. The intense heat leads to thermal coagulation that can kill the tumour. RFA is done under general or local anesthesia and can be done percutaneously (through the skin with a small needle), laparoscopically (microinvasively, using a small video camera), or intraoperatively. Percutaneous RFA is usually a day procedure. Methods The leading international

  18. Long term results of fast pathway ablation in atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia using a modified technique.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, D.; Gomes, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess immediate and long term success of "fast" pathway catheter ablation with graded use of radiofrequency energy in patients with classic atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and evaluate clinical, procedure related, and electrophysiological features affecting long term results. DESIGN--31 consecutive patients with classic AVNRT at electrophysiological study, who were candidates for radiofrequency ablation. Patients were followed for an average of 24 months after ablation. SETTING--All studies and ablations were performed in an electrophysiological laboratory under fluoroscopic guidance using standard electrophysiological techniques. INTERVENTION--Radiofrequency application was performed at the site of proximal His bundle electrogram with A:V ratio of > 1. It was started at 10 W with increment of 5 W to a maximum of 25 W at 60 s. With the onset of junctional rhythm, atrial pacing was begun in order to monitor the PR interval. Application was terminated prematurely with a non-conducted P wave, continued prolongation of the PR interval beyond 50% of the baseline, or a threefold rise in impedance. RESULTS--Successful ablation was possible in 30/31 patients (97%) with an average of seven applications (range 1-10). It was associated with significant prolongation of PR interval (P < 0.001) and AV Wenckebach cycle length (P = 0.01). Ventriculo-atrial conduction was abolished in 24/30 patients (82%) with successful ablation. Two patients developed transient complete heart block (3 and 12 min) and one persistent right branch block. Four patients had late recurrence. Presence of ventriculo-atrial block was the only electrophysiological index predictive of long term success (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--Graded use of radiofrequency energy and atrial pacing to monitor PR interval decreases the risk of atrioventricular block in patients undergoing fast pathway ablation for AVNRT. Ventriculo-atrial block is predictive of long term success and should

  19. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  20. Excimer laser surface ablation: a review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    O'Brart, David P S

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to review the recently published literature on excimer laser surface ablation procedures, including photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), laser sub-epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK), microkeratome-assisted PRK (epi-LASIK) and trans-epithelial (laser-assisted) PRK, to help elucidate where and how surface ablation may best fit into current refractive surgical practice. The emphasis was on publications within the last three years and included systemic reviews, meta-analyses and randomised controlled trials. Where such evidence did not exist, selective large series cohort studies, case-controlled studies and case series with follow-up preferably greater than six months were examined and included. Refractive and visual outcomes are excellent and comparable to those after LASIK even in complex cases after previous corneal surgery. Indeed, surface ablation combined with corneal collagen cross-linking may be used in selected eyes with biomechanical instability, where LASIK is contraindicated. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that there may be less induction of higher order aberrations with surface techniques. Long-term stability and safety appear to be extremely satisfactory. The literature supports the use of modern excimer laser surface treatments, with outcomes comparable to those after LASIK and evidence of less induction of higher-order aberrations. Follow-up studies at 10 to 20 years indicate excellent stability and safety.

  1. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura; Baere, Thierry de; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-02-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumour ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of liver malignancies. Among these methods, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RFA is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options [1, 2]. In addition, RFA is considered a viable alternate to surgery (1) for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer, and (2) for patients deemed ineligible for surgical resection because of extent and location of the disease or concurrent medical conditions [3]. These guidelines were written to be used in quality-improvement programs to assess RFA of HCC and liver metastases. The most important processes of care are (1) patient selection, (2) performing the procedure, and (3) monitoring the patient. The outcome measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates.

  2. Results of a comparative study of low energy direct current with radiofrequency ablation in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lemery, R; Talajic, M; Roy, D; Lavoie, L; Coutu, B; Hii, J T; Radzik, D; Lavallee, E; Cartier, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare two new power sources for catheter ablation in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. DESIGN--120 consecutive patients with accessory pathways had catheter ablation. Low energy direct current (DC) was used in the first 60 patients and radio-frequency current in the next 60 patients. SETTING--Electrophysiological laboratory of a large heart institute. PATIENTS--72 men and 48 women (mean (SD) age 35 (14) years (range 9-75)). The accessory pathways were in the left free wall in 73 patients. They were posteroseptal in 35 patients, in the right free wall in five, and anteroseptal in seven. There was no significant difference in the clinical or electrophysiological variables between the two ablation groups. RESULTS--Catheter ablation with low energy direct current was successful in 55/60 patients (92%) and radiofrequency energy was successful in 52/60 patients (87%). Low energy direct current was also successful in four of the eight patients in whom radiofrequency ablation had failed. Radiofrequency ablation was successful in two of the five patients in whom low energy direct current ablation had failed. The mean (SD) procedure and fluoroscopy times for successful ablation were 3.2 (1.5) h and 61 (40) min respectively. These times were similar for both power sources. Accessory pathway conduction recurred in 17 patients (28%) who had low energy direct current and four patients (7%) who received radiofrequency energy (p < 0.004). All patients with recurrence of an accessory pathway had successful re-ablation. CONCLUSIONS--Both new power sources successfully ablated accessory pathways, (overall success rate 94% (113/120 patients)). Radiofrequency ablation, however, did not require general anaesthesia and was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence of accessory pathway conduction. Therefore radiofrequency should be used initially for ablation. Low energy direct current may be most useful as a back-up in patients in whom

  3. A system for advanced real-time visualization and monitoring of MR-guided thermal ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgang, Eva; Gilson, Wesley D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Lorenz, Christine H.

    2010-02-01

    In modern oncology, thermal ablations are increasingly used as a regional treatment option to supplement systemic treatment strategies such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The goal of all thermal ablation procedures is to cause cell death of disease tissue while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Real-time assessment of thermal damage is the key to therapeutic efficiency and safety of such procedures. Magnetic resonance thermometry is capable of monitoring the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of temperature changes during thermal ablations. In this work, we present an advanced monitoring system for MR-guided thermal ablations that includes multiplanar visualization, specialized overlay visualization methods, and additional methods for correcting errors resulting from magnetic field shifts and motion. To ensure the reliability of the displayed thermal data, systematic quality control of thermal maps is carried out on-line. The primary purpose of this work is to provide clinicians with an intuitive tool for accurately visualizing the progress of thermal treatment at the time of the procedure. Importantly, the system is designed to be independent of the heating source. The presented system is expected to be of great value not only to guide thermal procedures but also to further explore the relationship between temperature-time exposure and tissue damage. The software application was implemented within the eXtensible Imaging Platform (XIP) and has been validated with clinical data.

  4. Generalized interactions using virtual tools within the spring framework: probing, piercing, cauterizing and ablating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Kevin; Bruyns, Cynthia D.

    2002-01-01

    We present schemes for real-time generalized interactions such as probing, piercing, cauterizing and ablating virtual tissues. These methods have been implemented in a robust, real-time (haptic rate) surgical simulation environment allowing us to model procedures including animal dissection, microsurgery, hysteroscopy, and cleft lip repair.

  5. Evaluation of the current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Moser, Michael A J; Luo, Yigang; Zhang, Edwin M; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-04-01

    This article evaluates current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory. Due to its minimally invasive procedure, short-time hospital stay, low cost, and tumour metastasis treatment, the radiofrequency ablation technique has been playing an important role in tumour treatment in recent decades. Although the radiofrequency ablation technique has many advantages, some issues still need to be addressed. Among these issues, the two most important are as follows: (1) the size of tumours to be removed (has to be larger than 3 cm in diameter) and (2) cleanness of the removal. Many device solutions have been proposed to address the two issues. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the systematic evaluation of these solutions. This article evaluates these systems in terms of their solution principles (or simply called conceptual design in general product design theory) using a design theory called axiomatic design theory. In addition, with the axiomatic design theory, a better conceptual design in terms of its feasibility to cope with incomplete target tissue necrosis from the large size of tumours has been found. The detailed analysis and simulation of the new conceptual design are conducted using finite element approach. The results in this article are proved by the information of animal experiments and clinical practices obtained from the literature. This study thus contributes to the current knowledge to further developments in radiofrequency ablation systems and procedure guidelines for physicians to perform the radiofrequency ablation operation more effectively.

  6. Ultrasound simulation of real-time temperature estimation during radiofrequency ablation using finite element models.

    PubMed

    Daniels, M J; Jiang, J; Varghese, T

    2008-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is the most common minimally invasive therapy used in the United States to treat hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. The ability to perform real-time temperature imaging while a patient is undergoing ablation therapy may help reduce the high recurrence rates following ablation therapy. Ultrasound echo signals undergo time shifts with increasing temperature due to sound speed and thermal expansion, which are tracked using both 1D cross correlation and 2D block matching based speckle tracking methods. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of the accuracy and precision of temperature estimation using the above algorithms on both simulated and experimental data. A finite element analysis simulation of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue was developed. Finite element analysis provides a method to obtain the exact temperature distribution along with a mapping of the tissue displacement due to thermal expansion. These local displacement maps were combined with the displacement due to speed of sound changes and utilized to generate ultrasound radiofrequency frames at specified time increments over the entire ablation procedure. These echo signals provide an ideal test-bed to evaluate the performance of both speckle tracking methods, since the estimated temperature results can be compared directly to the exact finite element solution. Our results indicate that the 1D cross-correlation (CC) method underestimates the cumulative displacement by 0.20mm, while the underestimation with 2D block matching (BM) is about 0.14 mm after 360 s of ablation. The 1D method also overestimates the size of the ablated region by 5.4% when compared to 2.4% with the 2D method after 720 s of ablation. Hence 2D block matching provides better tracking of temperature variations when compared to the 1D cross-correlation method over the entire duration of the ablation procedure. In addition, results obtained using 1D cross-correlation diverge from

  7. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  8. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  9. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  10. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  12. Part III: AFS - A Secure Distributed File System

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsmann, A.; /SLAC

    2005-06-29

    AFS is a secure distributed global file system providing location independence, scalability and transparent migration capabilities for data. AFS works across a multitude of Unix and non-Unix operating systems and is used at many large sites in production for many years. AFS still provides unique features that are not available with other distributed file systems even though AFS is almost 20 years old. This age might make it less appealing to some but with IBM making AFS available as open-source in 2000, new interest in use and development was sparked. When talking about AFS, people often mention other file systems as potential alternatives. Coda (http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/) with its disconnected mode will always be a research project and never have production quality. Intermezzo (http://www.inter-mezzo.org/) is now in the Linux kernel but not available for any other operating systems. NFSv4 (http://www.nfsv4.org/) which picked up many ideas from AFS and Coda is not mature enough yet to be used in serious production mode. This article presents the rich features of AFS and invites readers to play with it.

  13. Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, C.; Foley, D.P.; Vletter, W.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; Kofflard, M.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) is a new interventional technique to treat patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Small doses of ethanol 96% were injected into a targeted septal artery causing a chemical myocardial infarction. Three patients were evaluated, including a follow-up of three months. Results There were no complications during the procedure LVOT gradient was reduced from 120±140 mmHg. At follow-up, all three patients showed improvement in validity. Conclusion The method requires an echocardiographic contrast determination of the myocardium at risk for ethanol treatment, in addition to haemodynamic monitoring. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3A PMID:25696698

  14. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of “super elongation complexes” (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs. PMID:27679741

  15. Making better scar: Emerging approaches for modifying mechanical and electrical properties following infarction and ablation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeffrey W; Laksman, Zachary; Gepstein, Lior

    2016-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), damaged myocytes are replaced by collagenous scar tissue, which serves an important mechanical function - maintaining integrity of the heart wall against enormous mechanical forces - but also disrupts electrical function as structural and electrical remodeling in the infarct and borderzone predispose to re-entry and ventricular tachycardia. Novel emerging regenerative approaches aim to replace this scar tissue with viable myocytes. Yet an alternative strategy of therapeutically modifying selected scar properties may also prove important, and in some cases may offer similar benefits with lower risk or regulatory complexity. Here, we review potential goals for such modifications as well as recent proof-of-concept studies employing specific modifications, including gene therapy to locally increase conduction velocity or prolong the refractory period in and around the infarct scar, and modification of scar anisotropy to improve regional mechanics and pump function. Another advantage of scar modification techniques is that they have applications well beyond MI. In particular, ablation treats electrical abnormalities of the heart by intentionally generating scar to block aberrant conduction pathways. Yet in diseases such as atrial fibrillation (AF) where ablation can be extensive, treating the electrical disorder can significantly impair mechanical function. Creating smaller, denser scars that more effectively block conduction, and choosing the location of those lesions by balancing their electrical and mechanical impacts, could significantly improve outcomes for AF patients. We review some recent advances in this area, including the use of computational models to predict the mechanical effects of specific lesion sets and gene therapy for functional ablation. Overall, emerging techniques for modifying scar properties represents a potentially important set of tools for improving patient outcomes across a range of heart diseases

  16. CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of pulmonary malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Yee-Fan; Chen, Yi-Chang; Chien, Ning; Huang, Yu-Sen; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background Microwave ablation (MWA) of lung tumors is a new approach for local tumor control. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the preliminary results of safety and efficacy of MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) for local tumor control of thoracic malignancies. Methods From December 1, 2013 to February 1, 2016, there were total 32 lung tumors among 15 patients (7 men, 8 women, age range 43–82 years, mean 57.8±11.1 years of age) receiving MWA of thoracic neoplasms, including lung adenocarcinoma (n=5), metastatic colorectal cancer (n=7), invasive thymoma (n=1), metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma (n=1), and metastatic ampullary carcinoma (n=1). Mean tumor size was 13.5 mm (range, 3.0–32.0 mm). The mean sequential ablation during each MWA was 2.3±1.1 times (range, 1–5 times). The outcomes of ablation were evaluated by follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans and the complications were assessed by medical records and CT scan after ablation. Results The mean follow-up interval of each tumor was 446.8 days (range, 196–902 days). Local tumor recurrence was found in 5 of the 32 tumors resulting in a local control rate 84.4%. No MWA-related mortality was noted. After MWA, the incidence of pneumothorax was 37.5% (12/32). Only one patient with pneumothorax required air evacuation. Third-degree skin burn adjacent to the entry site occurred in one patient and required debridement and closure with flap. Conclusions After appropriate patient selection, MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) is an effective and safe procedure for local tumor control of recurrent and metastatic lung tumors. PMID:28066666

  17. Radio-frequency ablation of small renal tumors: minimum follow up of 1 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    evidence of tumor recurrence which was corrected surgically. Two masses did show some mild enhancement on CT 6 months post operatively, biopsies showed no evidence of tumor with fibrosis. Of the patients with follow up of greater than 12 months 75% had decreasing size of the lesion, 25% had no change in size. No complications were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors is a feasible alternative for patients that have imperative indication for nephron sparing surgery or those that have significant co-morbidities. The procedure is expedient, efficacious and carries minimal morbidity. It is of extreme importance to follow these patients closely with imaging of the lesion on a frequent basis.

  18. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  19. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  20. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  1. Ablative therapies for small renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arturo; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Salas, Nelson; Lorber, Gideon; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-05-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in detection of small renal masses (SRMs). Minimally invasive ablation modalities, including cryoablation, radiofrequencey ablation, microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, are currently being used to treat SRMs in select groups of patients. Cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have been extensively studied. Presently, cryoablation is gaining popularity because the resulting ice ball can be visualized easily using ultrasonography. Tumour size and location are strong predictors of outcome of radiofrequency ablation. One of the main benefits of microwave ablation is that microwaves can propagate through all types of tissue, including desiccated and charred tissue, as well as water vapour, which might be formed during the ablation. Irreversible electroporation has been shown in animal studies to affect only the cell membrane of undesirable target tissues and to spare adjacent structures; however, clinical studies that depict the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality in humans are still sparse. As more experience is gained in the future, ablation modalities might be utilized in all patients with tumours <4 cm in diameter, rather than just as an alternative treatment for high-risk surgical patients.

  2. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications.

  3. Compliance Testing of the Clear AFS Power Plant, Coal-Fired Boiler 1 Clear AFS, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Background On 3 February 1987 Clear AFS requested a permit modification to allow limited burning of waste oil for their power plant shown in Figure 1...The Alaska DEC rescindel Permit to Operate No. 8331-AA003 and issued Permit No. 8731-AA004 (Appendix B) allowing the burning of waste oil. As a...below. 1. Visible Emissions (18 AAC 50.050(a)) Visible emissions, excluding condensed water vapor from an industrial process or fuel burning

  4. Percutaneous transapical access for pulmonary vein mapping and ablation in a porcine model with a new high-density electroanatomical mapping system

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Andreas; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Hilbert, Sebastian; John, Silke; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The porcine model is generally accepted for the development and testing of new forms oftherapy including ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the challenging left atrial (LA) and pulmonary vein (PV) anatomy enables only limited percutaneous catheter-based PV access. Results: Here we present I) an alternative percutaneous transapical access, which enables easy and safe retrograde transmitral LA and PV mapping and ablation; II) early experience of LA mapping and successful circumferential PV isolation with novel mapping system (RhythmiaTM) and new generation of ablation catheter equipped with micro electrodes (IntellaTip MiFi). Conclusion: Although the experience with the transapical approach is limited, the initial results are promising as this may offer an alternative approach for tasting new technologies and translational research. PMID:26550175

  5. [Radiofrequency ablation of atrioventricular conduction during the 5th month of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gras, D; Mabo, P; Kermarrec, A; Bazin, P; Varin, C; Daubert, C

    1992-12-01

    The authors report the case of radiofrequency ablation of atrioventricular conduction in a 5 months pregnant woman who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The indication of this procedure was a poorly tolerated resistant supraventricular tachycardia with foetal distress. A dual-chamber rate-assisted pacemaker programmed in the VVIR mode was implanted during the same procedure normally, with normal delivery of a healthy child at 8 months' gestation.

  6. Anxiolytic-like effect of chlorpheniramine in inhibitory avoidance in goldfish submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, Flávia Roberta; Mattioli, Rosana

    2007-01-30

    The aim of the present study was to verify the consequences of telencephalic ablation on the learning of inhibitory avoidance and anxiety in goldfish. The animals were submitted to telencephalic ablation or sham operations five days prior to the experimental procedure. The inhibitory avoidance procedure was performed in 3 days using a rectangular aquarium divided into two compartments (black and white) with a central door. On the first day, the animals were habituated for 10 min. On the second and third days, they were injected with saline (SAL), 16 mg/kg Chlorpheniramine (CPA), 40% Propylene glycol (PPG) or 1 mg/kg Diazepam (DZP) twenty minutes before training. Then the animals were placed in the white compartment, the central door was opened and the time spent for crossing between compartments was recorded. After the fish crossed the line between the compartments a 45-g weight was dropped. This procedure was performed three times in a row. The groups submitted or not to telencephalic ablation and treated with SAL presented a difference between training sessions; however, the groups treated with CPA, PPG or DZP did not show any differences between them. These results suggest that the treatment with CPA, PPG or DZP impaired the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance conditioning in animals regardless of telecenphalic ablation. In conclusion, telencephalic ablation does not disrupt the animals' capacity to learn the inhibitory avoidance task, and based on the fact that CPA showed similar effects to those of DZP on the animals submitted or not to telencephalic ablation, we suggest that the CPA presents an anxiolytic-like effect mediated by the diencephalon in goldfish.

  7. Imaging Features of Radiofrequency Ablation with Heat-Deployed Liposomal Doxorubicin in Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Cheng William Chow, Lucy; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Lencioni, Riccardo; Libutti, Steven K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-15

    IntroductionThe imaging features of unresectable hepatic malignancies in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in combination with lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) were determined.Materials and MethodsA phase I dose escalation study combining RFA with LTLD was performed with peri- and post- procedural CT and MRI. Imaging features were analyzed and measured in terms of ablative zone size and surrounding penumbra size. The dynamic imaging appearance was described qualitatively immediately following the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. The control group receiving liver RFA without LTLD was compared to the study group in terms of imaging features and post-ablative zone size dynamics at follow-up.ResultsPost-treatment scans of hepatic lesions treated with RFA and LTLD have distinctive imaging characteristics when compared to those treated with RFA alone. The addition of LTLD resulted in a regular or smooth enhancing rim on T1W MRI which often correlated with increased attenuation on CT. The LTLD-treated ablation zones were stable or enlarged at follow-up four weeks later in 69 % of study subjects as opposed to conventional RFA where the ablation zone underwent involution compared to imaging acquired immediately after the procedure.ConclusionThe imaging features following RFA with LTLD were different from those after standard RFA and can mimic residual or recurrent tumor. Knowledge of the subtle findings between the two groups can help avoid misinterpretation and proper identification of treatment failure in this setting. Increased size of the LTLD-treated ablation zone after RFA suggests the ongoing drug-induced biological effects.

  8. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  9. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  10. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  11. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  12. 78 FR 40383 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420... Natchez-Adams County, ILS OR LOC RWY 13, Amdt 2 Natchez, MS, Hardy-Anders Field Natchez-Adams County, RNAV (GPS) RWY 13, Amdt 1 Natchez, MS, Hardy-Anders Field Natchez-Adams County, RNAV (GPS) RWY 18, Amdt...

  13. 78 FR 68702 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741- 6030, or go to.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420), Flight Technologies and Programs Divisions, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation...

  14. 78 FR 78713 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741- 6030, or go to.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420), Flight Technologies and Programs Divisions, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation...

  15. 78 FR 68704 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741- 6030, or go to... Regional Office of the region in which the affected airport is located. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420)Flight Technologies and...

  16. 77 FR 51894 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420...), ILS RWY 20R (SA CAT II), Amdt 24 Fairbanks, AK, Fairbanks Intl, RNAV (GPS) Y RWY 2L, Orig-B Fairbanks...)-A, Orig Apopka, FL, Orlando Apopka, RNAV (GPS)-B, Orig Apopka, FL, Orlando Apopka, Takeoff...

  17. 77 FR 59738 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...: Richard A. Dunham III, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS-420) Flight Technologies and Programs....S.C. 552(a), 1 CFR part 51, and Sec. 97.20 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The large number of SIAPs, their complex nature, and the need for a special format make their verbatim...

  18. Interventional procedures in the chest.

    PubMed

    Vollmer Torrubiano, I; Sánchez González, M

    2016-05-01

    Many thoracic conditions will require an interventional procedure for diagnosis and/or treatment. For this reason, radiologists need to know the indications and the technique for each procedure. In this article, we review the various interventional procedures that radiologists should know and the indications for each procedure. We place special emphasis on the potential differences in the diagnostic results and complications between fine-needle aspiration and biopsy. We also discuss the indications for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors and review the concepts related to the drainage of pulmonary abscesses. We devote special attention to the management of pleural effusion, covering the indications for thoracocentesis and when to use imaging guidance, and to the protocol for pleural drainage. We also discuss the indications for percutaneous treatment of pericardial effusion and the possible complications of this treatment. Finally, we discuss the interventional management of mediastinal lesions and provide practical advice about how to approach these lesions to avoid serious complications.

  19. High Patient Satisfaction with Deep Sedation for Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Münkler, Paula; Attanasio, Philipp; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Huemer, Martin; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    Patients' satisfaction with invasive procedures largely relies on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort. The necessity for intraprocedural sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias for technical reasons is widely accepted, but data on patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with the procedural sedation are scarce. We have assessed patients' pain and discomfort during and after the procedure using a standardized questionnaire. One-hundred seventeen patients who underwent catheter ablation answered a standardized questionnaire on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort after different anesthetic protocols with propofol/midazolam with and without additional piritramide and ketamine/midazolam. Patients report a high level of satisfaction with periprocedural sedation with 83% judging sedation as good or very good. The majority of patients was unconscious of the whole procedure and did not recollect experiencing pain. Procedural pain was reported by 7.7% of the patients and 16% reported adverse effects, e.g. postprocedural nausea and episodes of headache. The results of our study show, that deep sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias is generally well tolerated and patients are satisfied with the procedure. Yet, a number of patients reports pain or adverse events. Therefore, studies comparing different sedation strategies should be conducted in order to optimize sedation and analgesia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling of long term behavior of ablation plumes produced with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Komashko, A M; Rubenchik, A M

    2000-02-10

    Expansion of ablation plumes created by intense ultrashort lasers is determined by various complicated physical processes which have very different spatial and time scales. Since complete simulation by one model is practically impossible, the authors suggest using two models describing initial and final stages that can be matched at an intermediate time. The proposed modeling procedure connects laser parameters to plume properties far away from the ablation spot. Laser material interaction and beginning of the expansion are simulated with a one-dimensional hydrodynamics code and the final stage is modeled using an analytical solution for an expanding three-dimensional ellipsoidal gas cloud.

  1. History and Technical Approaches and Considerations for Ablative Surgery for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-01-01

    The history of epilepsy surgery is generally noted to have begun in 1886 with Victor Horsley's first report of craniotomies for posttraumatic epilepsy. With increased understanding of brain function and development of electroencephalographic methods, nonlesional epilepsy began to be treated with resection in the 1950s. Methodological improvements and increased understanding of pathophysiology followed, and the advent of stereotaxy and ablative technology in the 1960s and 1970s heralded a new era of minimally invasive, targeted procedures for lesional and nonlesional epilepsy. Current techniques combine stereotactic methods, improved ablative technologies, and electroencephalographic methods for a multidisciplinary approach to the neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

  2. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  3. In vitro assessment of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring catheter for treatment of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Merryman, W David

    2014-03-21

    Percutaneous approaches to mitral valve repair are an attractive alternative to surgical repair or replacement. Radiofrequency ablation has the potential to approximate surgical leaflet resection by using resistive heating to reduce leaflet size, and cryogenic temperatures on a percutaneous catheter can potentially be used to reversibly adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets for reliable application of radiofrequency energy. We tested a combined cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter using excised porcine mitral valves placed in a left heart flow loop capable of reproducing physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Transmitral flow and pressure were monitored during the cryo-anchoring procedure and compared to baseline flow conditions, and the extent of radiofrequency energy delivery to the mitral valve was assessed post-treatment. Long term durability of radiofrequency ablation treatment was assessed using statically treated leaflets placed in a stretch bioreactor for four weeks. Transmitral flow and pressure waveforms were largely unaltered during cryo-anchoring. Parameter fitting to mechanical data from leaflets treated with radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring revealed significant mechanical differences from untreated leaflets, demonstrating successful ablation of mitral valves in a hemodynamic environment. Picrosirius red staining showed clear differences in morphology and collagen birefringence between treated and untreated leaflets. The durability study indicated that statically treated leaflets did not significantly change size or mechanics over four weeks. A cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter can adhere to and ablate mitral valve leaflets in a physiologic hemodynamic environment, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection of mitral valve tissue.

  4. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  5. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  6. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  7. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  8. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  9. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  10. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  11. Acute myocardial infarction after radiofrequency catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Yune, Sehyo; Lee, Woo Joo; Hwang, Ji-won; Kim, Eun; Ha, Jung Min; Kim, June Soo

    2014-02-01

    A 53-yr-old man underwent radiofrequency ablation to treat persistent atrial flutter. After the procedure, the chest pain was getting worse, and the electrocardiogram showed ST-segment elevation in inferior leads with reciprocal changes. Immediate coronary angiography showed total occlusion with thrombi at the distal portion of the right coronary artery, which was very close to the ablation site. Intervention with thrombus aspiration and balloon dilatation was successful, and the patient recovered without any kind of sequelae. Although the exact mechanism is obscure, the most likely explanation is a thermal injury to the vascular wall that ruptured into the lumen and formed thrombus. Vasospasm and thromboembolism can also be other possibilities. This case raise the alarm to cardiologists who perform radiofrequency ablation to treat various kinds of cardiac arrhythmias, in that myocardial infarction has been rarely considered one of the complications.

  12. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  13. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree.

    PubMed

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J

    2015-05-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon's operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis.

  14. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon’s operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis. PMID:26405563

  15. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  16. An Implicit LU/AF FDTD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Briley, W. Roger

    2001-01-01

    There has been some recent work to develop two and three-dimensional alternating direction implicit (ADI) FDTD schemes. These ADI schemes are based upon the original ADI concept developed by Peaceman and Rachford and Douglas and Gunn, which is a popular solution method in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). These ADI schemes work well and they require solution of a tridiagonal system of equations. A new approach proposed in this paper applies a LU/AF approximate factorization technique from CFD to Maxwell s equations in flux conservative form for one space dimension. The result is a scheme that will retain its unconditional stability in three space dimensions, but does not require the solution of tridiagonal systems. The theory for this new algorithm is outlined in a one-dimensional context for clarity. An extension to two and threedimensional cases is discussed. Results of Fourier analysis are discussed for both stability and dispersion/damping properties of the algorithm. Results are presented for a one-dimensional model problem, and the explicit FDTD algorithm is chosen as a convenient reference for comparison.

  17. Myocardial tissue ablation by single high-energy laser pulses for ELR and TMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Dirk; Brinkmann, Ralf; Stubbe, Hans-Martin; Birngruber, Reginald

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the ablation sites induced by two different laser and application systems for myocardial laser revascularization. One system used was an 800 W CO2 laser, which is clinically established for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR). The second system was a self-designed Holmium laser emitting single high energy pulses for the minimal invasive approach of endocardial laser revascularization (ELR), whereby the laser light is transmitted via optical fiber into the left ventricle to ablate the myocardial channels from the inside. The laser energy was applied to Polyacrylamide (PAA) as transparent tissue phantom and in water as blood phantom. The ablation dynamics were investigated by high speed flash photography recording a picture series of a single event. Reperfused ex- vivo porcine hearts were treated to quantify differences in the thermal-mechanical damage ranges by polarization light microscopy. Ablation dynamics in water revealed oscillatory changes of the axial length of the steam bubbles between 3 mm and 12 mm during the CO2 laser pulse. For the Holmium laser pulse a maximal axial and lateral length of 5 mm was observed. The lateral dimensions of the bubbles were maximal 1 mm with the CO2- and 3.5 mm with the Holmium laser system. In PAA bubbles also collapse during the laser pulse which affects the size of the ablated channels. Using 12 J Holmium laser pulses for ablation of PAA, channel depths around 7 mm were found. Single Holmium laser pulses demonstrate ablations comparable in size and thermal- mechanical collateral damage to those achieved with the standard CO2 laser. The results are very encouraging for single pulse ELR and demonstrate the potential of a catheter based minimal invasive procedure for laser heart reperfusion.

  18. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  19. Seeing the Invisible: Revealing Atrial Ablation Lesions Using Hyperspectral Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Muselimyan, Narine; Swift, Luther M.; Asfour, Huda; Chahbazian, Tigran; Mazhari, Ramesh; Mercader, Marco A.; Sarvazyan, Narine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, there are limited means for high-resolution monitoring of tissue injury during radiofrequency ablation procedures. Objective To develop the next generation of visualization catheters that can reveal irreversible atrial muscle damage caused by ablation and identify viability gaps between the lesions. Methods Radiofrequency lesions were placed on the endocardial surfaces of excised human and bovine atria and left ventricles of blood perfused rat hearts. Tissue was illuminated with 365nm light and a series of images were acquired from individual spectral bands within 420-720nm range. By extracting spectral profiles of individual pixels and spectral unmixing, the relative contribution of ablated and unablated spectra to each pixel was then displayed. Results of spectral unmixing were compared to lesion pathology. Results RF ablation caused significant changes in the tissue autofluorescence profile. The magnitude of these spectral changes in human left atrium was relatively small (< 10% of peak fluorescence value), yet highly significant. Spectral unmixing of hyperspectral datasets enabled high spatial resolution, in-situ delineation of radiofrequency lesion boundaries without the need for exogenous markers. Lesion dimensions derived from hyperspectral imaging approach strongly correlated with histological outcomes. Presence of blood within the myocardium decreased the amplitude of the autofluorescence spectra while having minimal effect on their overall shapes. As a result, the ability of hyperspectral imaging to delineate ablation lesions in vivo was not affected. Conclusions Hyperspectral imaging greatly increases the contrast between ablated and unablated tissue enabling visualization of viability gaps at clinically relevant locations. Data supports the possibility for developing percutaneous hyperspectral catheters for high-resolution ablation guidance. PMID:27930718

  20. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  1. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  2. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  3. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  4. MR-Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma in an Open High-Field System (1.0 T)

    SciTech Connect

    Streitparth, F. Gebauer, B.; Melcher, I. Schaser, K.; Philipp, C.; Rump, J. Hamm, B. Teichgraeber, U.

    2009-03-15

    Computed tomography is the standard imaging modality to minimize the extent of surgical or ablative treatment in osteoid osteomas. In the last 15 years, since a description of thermal ablation of osteoid osteomas was first published, this technique has become a treatment of choice for this tumor. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with an osteoid osteoma treated with laser ablation in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging scanner (1.0 T). The tumor, located in the right fibula, was safely and effectively ablated under online monitoring. We describe the steps of this interventional procedure and discuss related innovative guidance and monitoring features and potential benefits compared with computed tomographic guidance.

  5. Preparation And Analysis Of Specimens Of Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Procedure for chemical analysis of specimens of silicone-based ablative thermal-insulation materials SLA-561 and MA25 involves acid digestion of specimens to prepare them for analysis by inductively-coupled-plasma/atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES). In comparison with atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ICP/AES is faster and more accurate than AAS. Results of analyses stored in data base, used to trace variations in concentrations of chemical elements in materials during long-term storage, and used in timely manner in investigations of failures. Acid-digestion portion of procedure applied to other thermal-insulation materials containing room-temperature-vulcanizing silicones and enables instrumental analysis of these materials.

  6. Robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Antoine; Guichard, Jean Baptiste; Roméyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Gerbay, Antoine; Isaaz, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency treatment represents the first choice of treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared to antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications such as tamponade. Given this context, the treatment of arrhythmias using robotic magnetic navigation entails a technique well suited to complex arrhythmias on account of its efficacy, reliability, significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, as well as a very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most modern technologies for treating arrhythmias. Based on the literature, this review summarizes the advantages and limitations of robotic magnetic navigation for ablation of human arrhythmias. PMID:27698569

  7. [Overview of ablation devices for atrial fibrillation surgery].

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Atsushi; Nitta, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Since Cox-maze procedure was first reported in 1987, ablation technology has made great progress and revolutionized atrial fibrillation surgery. Various energy sources have been introduced to facilitate creating conduction block within the atria. These sources include radiofrequency, cryothermia, microwave, laser, and high-frequency focused ultrasound( HIFU). They have been utilized both endocardially in the arrested heart and epicardially in the beating heart. The goal of all these sources is to create transmural lesions which enable irreversible conduction block. They have been reported to have clinical efficacy, but each of them have their own advantages and disadvantages, and their ability of creating transmural lesions are also different. It is important for surgeons that they fully understand these differences to make appropriate use of these technologies for achieving safe atrial fibrillation surgery and developing less invasive new procedures.

  8. Strategies for the analysis of coal by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, L; Fink, H; Niessner, R; Panne, U

    2002-09-01

    The potential of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was investigated for the inorganic characterization of different coal samples pressed into pellets. Reference analysis was performed by microwave-assisted digestion of the ground samples followed by ICP-MS analysis of the resulting solutions. Two different laser ablation sampling procedures were compared. For continuous sampling, three sites of the pellet were sampled for approximately one minute, whereas for sequential sampling 15 sites were sampled for two seconds, respectively. The qualitative results of the two procedures were equivalent, but continuous sampling allowed faster analysis and better precision (RSD about 10%) than sequential sampling (RSD 10-20%). Different normalization procedures with internal and extrinsic standards were investigated and allowed a quantitative determination of Al, Ti, Zn, Ni, and V with measurement uncertainties below 10% and Fe, Si, and Sn with measurement uncertainties below 20%.

  9. Tin City AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    GL&bAL CLIMATOLOGY 9 RA14CH T AC NG VERSUS Vi’SIBILITY A .FAT"E S[ PfIC /mAC I .17 TI CITY AFS AK 73-74,77-81 T 1b. 3 19.5 17.S 19.5 19.5...2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER USAFETAC/DS 83017 4. TITLE (d SubtII-)Reised Uniform Summary of Surface 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD...WINDS PART 0 CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY PART F STATION PRESSURE SKYCOVER SEA LEVEL PRESSURE STANDARD 3 -HOUR GROUPS All su-nseri- requiring diurnal

  10. Indian Mountain AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    31 8... . 1B b w., B. 0- r] N I o N.. Ob.. M.., N.. .1 N.-. it% To’p.Wo.- R. .1.__-___ 0 F 322 F *67 F *73 F 60S F *93 F To. 4 .. P , PSYCHROMETRIC...Psychrometrl- summary Surfoc, Worlds Extreme temperature Ceiling versus vis:boloi-; Helative Humidity -Climatological data (over) 20 ABSTRACT ’C- P ,, -1...uSAFETAC A2 4EATR SERVICE/MAC WEATHER CONDITIONS 70173C INDIAN MOUNTAIN AFS AK 73-8? P PEOCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE OF WEATHER CONDITIONS FROP HOURLY

  11. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  12. Use of a circular mapping and ablation catheter for ablation of atypical right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Paxinos, George

    2010-02-01

    A new technique for ablation of persistent ectopic activity with atypical electrocardiographic characteristics at the vicinity of the right ventricular outflow tract is described. A new circular mapping and ablation catheter initially designed for pulmonary vein ablation was used. Abolition of ectopic activity was achieved with minimal fluoroscopy and ablation times.

  13. Improvements of deep vein reflux following radiofrequency ablation for saphenous vein incompetence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suh Min; Jung, In Mok; Chung, Jung Kee

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the changes of deep vein reflux after radiofrequency ablation for great saphenous vein incompetence. Method The data on 139 limbs which were treated with radiofrequency ablation for great saphenous vein incompetence were prospectively collected and reviewed. Results Deep vein reflux was present in 43 of 139 limbs (30.9%). There were no significant differences in the rate of successful closure, the incidence of procedure-related complications, and the improvements of symptoms and quality of life between the limbs with or without deep vein reflux. With a mean follow-up of 5.9 months, the peak reflux velocity and duration of reflux were improved in all limbs with deep vein reflux and it was completely corrected in 13 limbs (30.2%) after radiofrequency ablation. Conclusions The presence of deep vein reflux does not affect the treatment outcomes of radiofrequency ablation for great saphenous vein incompetence and is improved in all patients. Deep vein reflux is not a barrier to performing radiofrequency ablation.

  14. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-10-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article .

  15. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes.

  16. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  17. Tracking Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Delivery by 19F MRI for Precise High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Park, Eun-Joo; Min, Changki; Choi, Sun Il; Jeon, Soyeon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Daehong

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFCNEs) have recently been undergoing rigorous study to investigate their ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). For precise control of PFCNE delivery and thermal ablation, their accumulation and distribution in a tumor should be quantitatively analyzed. Here, we used fluorine-19 (19F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitatively track PFCNE accumulation in a tumor, and analyzed how intra-tumoral PFCNE quantities affect the therapeutic efficacy of HIFU treatment. Ablation outcomes were assessed by intra-voxel incoherent motion analysis and bioluminescent imaging up to 14 days after the procedure. Assessment of PFCNE delivery and treatment outcomes showed that 2-3 mg/mL of PFCNE in a tumor produces the largest ablation volume under the same HIFU insonation conditions. Histology showed varying degrees of necrosis depending on the amount of PFCNE delivered. 19F MRI promises to be a valuable platform for precisely guiding PFCNE-enhanced HIFU ablation of tumors. PMID:28255351

  18. 1.0 T open-configuration magnetic resonance-guided microwave ablation of pig livers in real time

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Liang; Li, Wang; Mao, Siyue; Wang, Yiqi; Wang, Deling; Shen, Lujun; Dong, Annan; Wu, Peihong

    2015-01-01

    The current fastest frame rate of each single image slice in MR-guided ablation is 1.3 seconds, which means delayed imaging for human at an average reaction time: 0.33 seconds. The delayed imaging greatly limits the accuracy of puncture and ablation, and results in puncture injury or incomplete ablation. To overcome delayed imaging and obtain real-time imaging, the study was performed using a 1.0-T whole-body open configuration MR scanner in the livers of 10 Wuzhishan pigs. A respiratory-triggered liver matrix array was explored to guide and monitor microwave ablation in real-time. We successfully performed the entire ablation procedure under MR real-time guidance at 0.202 s, the fastest frame rate for each single image slice. The puncture time ranged from 23 min to 3 min. For the pigs, the mean puncture time was shorted to 4.75 minutes and the mean ablation time was 11.25 minutes at power 70 W. The mean length and widths were 4.62 ± 0.24 cm and 2.64 ± 0.13 cm, respectively. No complications or ablation related deaths during or after ablation were observed. In the current study, MR is able to guide microwave ablation like ultrasound in real-time guidance showing great potential for the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:26315365

  19. 1.0 T open-configuration magnetic resonance-guided microwave ablation of pig livers in real time.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Liang; Li, Wang; Mao, Siyue; Wang, Yiqi; Wang, Deling; Shen, Lujun; Dong, Annan; Wu, Peihong

    2015-08-28

    The current fastest frame rate of each single image slice in MR-guided ablation is 1.3 seconds, which means delayed imaging for human at an average reaction time: 0.33 seconds. The delayed imaging greatly limits the accuracy of puncture and ablation, and results in puncture injury or incomplete ablation. To overcome delayed imaging and obtain real-time imaging, the study was performed using a 1.0-T whole-body open configuration MR scanner in the livers of 10 Wuzhishan pigs. A respiratory-triggered liver matrix array was explored to guide and monitor microwave ablation in real-time. We successfully performed the entire ablation procedure under MR real-time guidance at 0.202 s, the fastest frame rate for each single image slice. The puncture time ranged from 23 min to 3 min. For the pigs, the mean puncture time was shorted to 4.75 minutes and the mean ablation time was 11.25 minutes at power 70 W. The mean length and widths were 4.62 ± 0.24 cm and 2.64 ± 0.13 cm, respectively. No complications or ablation related deaths during or after ablation were observed. In the current study, MR is able to guide microwave ablation like ultrasound in real-time guidance showing great potential for the treatment of liver tumors.

  20. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate. PMID:27587963

  1. Design and Laboratory Validation of a Capacitive Sensor for Measuring the Recession of Thin-Layered Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Bowman, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Flight vehicles are typically instrumented with subsurface thermocouples to estimate heat transfer at the surface using inverse analysis procedures. If the vehicle has an ablating heat shield, however, temperature time histories from subsurface thermocouples no longer provide enough information to estimate heat flux at the surface. In this situation, the geometry changes and thermal energy leaves the surface in the form of ablation products. The ablation rate is required to estimate heat transfer to the surface. A new concept for a capacitive sensor has been developed to measure ablator depth using the ablator's dielectric effect on a capacitor's fringe region. Relying on the capacitor's fringe region enables the gage to be flush mounted in the vehicle's permanent structure and not intrude into the ablative heat shield applied over the gage. This sensor's design allows nonintrusive measurement of the thickness of dielectric materials, in particular, the recession rates of low-temperature ablators applied in thin (0.020 to 0.060 in. (0.05 to 0.15 mm)) layers. Twenty capacitive gages with 13 different sensing element geometries were designed, fabricated, and tested. A two-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed on several candidate geometries. Calibration procedures using ablator-simulating shims are described. A one-to-one correspondence between system output and dielectric material thickness was observed out to a thickness of 0.055 in. (1.4 mm) for a material with a permittivity about three times that of air or vacuum. A novel method of monitoring the change in sensor capacitance was developed. This technical memorandum suggests further improvements in gage design and fabrication techniques.

  2. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-15

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located {<=}1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  3. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  4. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  5. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  6. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  7. Indications and options for endometrial ablation.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Endometrial ablation is an effective therapeutic option for the management of menorrhagia in properly selected patients. Hysteroscopic and non-hysteroscopic techniques offer similar rates of symptom relief and patient satisfaction.

  8. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  9. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  10. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  11. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M.; Nehmeh, Sadek A.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  13. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  14. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  15. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  16. Aneurysm-related ischemic ventricular tachycardia: safety and efficacy of catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Rui; Zheng, Li-Hui; Wu, Ling-Min; Ding, Li-Gang; Yao, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) postmyocardial infarction (MI) might be an arrhythmogenic substrate. We examined the safety and efficacy of catheter ablation of LVA-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). Thirty-three consecutive patients who underwent primary catheter ablation of ischemic VT were divided into LVA group (11 patients, mean age 61.9 years, 10 men) and none LVA group. Acute procedural outcomes, complications, and long-term outcomes were assessed. In LVA group, average number of induced VTs were 3.2 ± 2.6 (range 1–7), clinical VTs were located in the ventricular septum scar zone in 4 (36.4%) patients, acute success was achieved in 7 (63.6%) patients, partial success in 3 (27.3%) and failure in 1 patient, while none LVA group showing a statistically similar distribution of acute procedural outcomes (P = 0.52). There were no major or life-threatening complications. VT-free survival rate at median 19 (1–44) months follow-up was numerically but not significantly lower in LVA versus none LVA group (48.5% vs 62.8%, log-rank P = 0.40). Catheter ablation of ischemic VT in the presence of LVA appears feasible and effective, with about one-third of cases having septal ablation targets. Further studies are warranted. PMID:28353573

  17. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping angle during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is well regarded as a safe and minimally invasive procedure and an alternative to the gold standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Despite of its greatness, as well aware of, the operative procedure time during the PVP is still prolonged. Such attempts have been tried out in order to shorten the operative time and increase its efficacy. However, scientific study to investigate techniques used during the PVP is still lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate how sweeping angle might affect the PVP performance. Porcine kidneys acquired from a local grocery store were used (N=140). A Q-switched 532-nm GreenLight XPSTM (American Medical Systems, Inc., MN, USA), together with 750- μm core MoXyTM fiber, was set to have power levels of 120 W and 180 W. Treatment speed and sweeping speed were fixed at 2 mm/s and 0.5 sweep/s, respectively. Sweeping angles were varied from 0 (no sweeping motion) to 120 degree. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation zone were measured and quantified. Tissue ablation rate was peaked at 15 and 30 degree for both 120- and 180-W power levels and dramatically decreased beyond 60 degree. At 180 W, ablation rate increased 20% at 30 degree compared to 0 degree. This study demonstrated that ablation rate could be maximized and was contingent upon sweeping angle.

  18. Interest of Electrostimulation of Peripheral Motor Nerves during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia Garnon, Julien Ramamurthy, Nitin Buy, Xavier Gangi, Afshin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We present our experience of utilizing peripheral nerve electrostimulation as a complementary monitoring technique during percutaneous thermal ablation procedures; and we highlight its utility and feasibility in the prevention of iatrogenic neurologic thermal injury. Methods: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation was performed in 12 patients undergoing percutaneous image-guided thermal ablations of spinal/pelvic lesions in close proximity to the spinal cord and nerve roots. Electrostimulation was used in addition to existing insulation (active warming/cooling with hydrodissection, passive insulation with CO{sub 2} insufflation) and temperature monitoring (thermocouples) techniques. Impending neurologic deficit was defined as a visual reduction of muscle response or need for a stronger electric current to evoke muscle contraction, compared with baseline. Results: Significant reduction of the muscle response to electrostimulation was observed in three patients during the ablation, necessitating temporary interruption, followed by injection of warm/cool saline. This resulted in complete recovery of the muscle response in two cases, while for the third patient the response did not improve and the procedure was terminated. No patient experienced postoperative motor deficit. Conclusion: Peripheral motor nerve electrostimulation is a simple, easily accessible technique allowing early detection of impending neurologic injury during percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation. It complements existing monitoring techniques and provides a functional assessment along the whole length of the nerve.

  19. MR imaging guidance for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Terence Z.; Kettenbach, Joachim; Silverman, Stuart G.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Morrison, Paul R.; Kacher, Daniel F.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1998-04-01

    Image guidance is one of the major challenges common to all minimally invasive procedures including biopsy, thermal ablation, endoscopy, and laparoscopy. This is essential for (1) identifying the target lesion, (2) planning the minimally invasive approach, and (3) monitoring the therapy as it progresses. MRI is an ideal imaging modality for this purpose, providing high soft tissue contrast and multiplanar imaging, capability with no ionizing radiation. An interventional/surgical MRI suite has been developed at Brigham and Women's Hospital which provides multiplanar imaging guidance during surgery, biopsy, and thermal ablation procedures. The 0.5T MRI system (General Electric Signa SP) features open vertical access, allowing intraoperative imaging to be performed. An integrated navigational system permits near real-time control of imaging planes, and provides interactive guidance for positioning various diagnostic and therapeutic probes. MR imaging can also be used to monitor cryotherapy as well as high temperature thermal ablation procedures sing RF, laser, microwave, or focused ultrasound. Design features of the interventional MRI system will be discussed, and techniques will be described for interactive image acquisition and tracking of interventional instruments. Applications for interactive and near-real-time imaging will be presented as well as examples of specific procedures performed using MRI guidance.

  20. Chlorpheniramine facilitates inhibitory avoidance in teleosts submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, F R; Mattioli, R

    2008-05-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of H(1) histaminegic receptor on the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance in Carassius auratus submitted to telencephalic ablation. The fish were submitted to telencephalic ablation 5 days before the experiment. The inhibitory avoidance procedure included 1 day for habituation, 3 days for training composed of 3 trials each (1st day: T1, T2, T3; 2nd day: 2T1, 2T2, 2T3; 3rd day: 3T1, 3T2, 3T3) and 1 day for test. On training days, the fish were placed in a white compartment, after 30 s the door was opened. When the fish crossed to a black compartment, a weight was dropped (aversive stimuli). Immediately after the third trial, on training days, the fish received, intraperitoneally, one of the pharmacological treatments (saline (N = 20), 8 (N = 12) or 16 (N = 13) microg/g chlorpheniramine, CPA). On the test day, the time to cross to the black compartment was determined. The latency of the saline group increased significantly only on the 3rd trial of the 2nd training day (mean +/- SEM, T1 (50.40 +/- 11.69), 2T3 (226.05 +/- 25.01); ANOVA: P = 0.0249, Dunn test: P < 0.05). The group that received 8 microg/g CPA showed increased latencies from the 2nd training day until the test day (T1 (53.08 +/- 17.17), 2T2 (197.75 +/- 35.02), test (220.08 +/- 30.98); ANOVA: P = 0.0022, Dunn test: P < 0.05)). These results indicate that CPA had a facilitating effect on memory. We suggest that the fish submitted to telencephalic ablation were able to learn due to the local circuits of the mesencephalon and/or diencephalon and that CPA interferes in these circuits, probably due an anxiolytic-like effect.

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  3. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. Temperature distribution during RF ablation on ex vivo liver tissue: IR measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Gallati, Mario; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation is the first therapeutic option for the minimally invasive treatment of liver tumors. This medical procedure employs the Joule heat produced by a RF electromagnetic field to kill tumor cells. The outcome of the procedure is strongly affected by the temperature distribution near the RF applicator, however the measurement of this distribution, even in ex vivo experiments, is not straightforward since most traditional local temperature measurement techniques are not well-suited, due to both electromagnetic interferences and the sensor heat sink effect. Given the importance of the temperature field knowledge, in this paper special care was devoted to its measurement employing both infrared thermal imaging and NTC thermistors. Several RF ablation tests on ex vivo porcine liver tissue were carried out measuring the space-time evolution of temperature during the procedure (with spatial resolution ≤1 mm) and producing useful data for the design and the calibration of a numerical model. Electro-thermal numerical simulations of the experimental tests were performed using a mathematical model suitable for the heating phase of the procedure (up to 95 °C). The simulations results allowed to check the physical consistency of the measured data and suggested that a constant thermal conductivity is satisfactory for modeling the temperature evolution during RF ablation.

  5. Temperature distribution during RF ablation on ex vivo liver tissue: IR measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Gallati, Mario; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation is the first therapeutic option for the minimally invasive treatment of liver tumors. This medical procedure employs the Joule heat produced by a RF electromagnetic field to kill tumor cells. The outcome of the procedure is strongly affected by the temperature distribution near the RF applicator, however the measurement of this distribution, even in ex vivo experiments, is not straightforward since most traditional local temperature measurement techniques are not well-suited, due to both electromagnetic interferences and the sensor heat sink effect. Given the importance of the temperature field knowledge, in this paper special care was devoted to its measurement employing both infrared thermal imaging and NTC thermistors. Several RF ablation tests on ex vivo porcine liver tissue were carried out measuring the space-time evolution of temperature during the procedure (with spatial resolution ≤1 mm) and producing useful data for the design and the calibration of a numerical model. Electro-thermal numerical simulations of the experimental tests were performed using a mathematical model suitable for the heating phase of the procedure (up to 95 °C). The simulations results allowed to check the physical consistency of the measured data and suggested that a constant thermal conductivity is satisfactory for modeling the temperature evolution during RF ablation.

  6. Needle track seeding following percutaneous procedures for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Craxì, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Neoplastic seeding may arise after diagnostic or therapeutic percutaneous procedures for hepatocellular carcinoma. The true incidence of seeding with hepatocellular carcinoma is difficult to assess precisely, but a significant risk of seeding exists and is greater when performing diagnostic biopsy as compared to therapeutic percutaneous procedures [radiofrequency ablation, radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous ethanol injection, Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI)]. Whenever liver transplantation is feasible, diagnostic needle biopsies should be avoided, but RFA and PEI are often needed as “bridge” treatments. The role of adjuvant treatments in reducing the incidence of seeding following RFA or PEI requires further evaluation. PMID:21160966

  7. In vivo study of necrosis on the liver tissue of Wistar rats: a combination of photodynamic therapy and carbon dioxide laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, R. F.; Nicolodelli, G.; Araujo, M. T.; Tirapelli, L. F.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is known to be limited to applications in large volume tumors due to its limited penetration. Therefore, a combination of PDT and carbon dioxide (CO2) laser ablation may constitute a potential protocol to destroy bulk tumors because it involves an association of these two techniques allowing the removal of visible lesions with a high selectivity of destruction of remnant tumors. The main aim of this study is to investigate the most appropriate procedure to combine use of a CO2 laser and PDT on livers of healthy rats, and to analyze different techniques of this treatment using three types of photosensitizers (PSs). Forty eight animals were separated to form six groups: (1) only CO2 laser ablation, (2) drug and CO2 laser ablation, (3) only PDT, (4) drug and light (PDT) followed by CO2 laser ablation, (5) ablated with CO2 laser followed by PDT, and (6) drug followed by CO2 laser ablation and light. For each group, three types of photosensitization were used: topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), intravenous ALA and intravenous Photogem®. Thirty hours after the treatments, the animals were sacrificed and the livers removed. The depth of necrosis was analyzed and measured, considering microscopic and macroscopic aspects. The results show that the effects of the PDT were considerably enhanced when combined with CO2 laser ablation, especially when the PDT was performed before the CO2 laser ablation.

  8. MediGuide-impact on catheter ablation techniques and workflow.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2014-09-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous intervention in modern medical science, specifically cardiovascular medicine fluoroscopy has remained the gold standard for navigation inside the cardiac structures. As the complexity of the procedures continue to increase with advances in interventional electrophysiology, the procedural times and fluoroscopy times have proportionately increased and the risks of radiation exposure both to the patients as well as the operator continue to rise. 3D electroanatomic mapping systems have to some extent complemented fluoroscopic imaging in improving catheter navigation and forming a solid platform for exploring the electroanatomic details of the target substrate. The 3D mapping systems are still limited as they continue to be static representations of a dynamic heart without being completely integrated with fluoroscopy. The field needed a technological solution that could add a dynamic positioning system that can be successfully incorporated into fluoroscopic imaging as well as electroanatomic imaging modalities. MediGuide is one such innovative technology that exploits the geo-positioning system principles. It employs a transmitter mounted on the X-ray panel that emits an electromagnetic field within which sensor-equipped diagnostic and ablation catheters are tracked within prerecorded fluoroscopic images. MediGuide is also integrated with NavX mapping system and helps in developing better 3D images by field scaling-a process that reduces field distortions that occur from impedance mapping alone. In this review, we discuss about the principle of MediGuide technology, the catheter ablation techniques, and the workflow in the EP lab for different procedures.

  9. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  10. Contact pulsed Nd:YAG ablation of human dentin: ablation rates and tissue effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Yessik, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    Dentin from freshly extracted human teeth was exposed to flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG pulses (100 microsecond(s) duration, 50 - 200 mJ/pulse) delivered through a flat cut fiberoptic in contact with the dentin surface. Ablation depth and volume were measured optically and confirmed with electron microscope morphometrics. Ablation depth increased with force applied at the fiber tip up to 5 - 10 g. Above this ablation depths were insensitive to applied force. Craters made in dental stone were deeper and narrower than those made in normal dentin. Ablation depths per pulse and volumes per pulse decrease as the number of pulses increase. This is more prominent for 200 mJ pulses. At 60 mJ the ablation depths are the same from 10 to 100 Hz repetition rates, although qualitative changes (collateral damage) are greater at higher repetition rates. A progressive increase in collateral damage is seen from the 1st through the 200th pulse.

  11. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  12. Cape Newenham AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    OBSERVATIONS) L P- 14 H~N A A-F S .~ 73-F2 ____ JA&,. ALL WI- LAt E -- .. - - 6 7 0 11 16 17 21 22 27 28- 33 34 *0 41 A7 48 5 .7 * . .3 .4 .4 . 1 . i E...PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 4LL . LAT -E- - 10 1 1 i 7 23 22 ’ 2 3 3 A 40 A 3 5 A7 A • ’ .. 5 .t",5...SCOTT A. APR 03 UNCLASSIFIED USAFETAC/DS-83/019 SBI-AD-EB50 397 F/6 4/2 NL SU 2. lii .0 EM *,*,- Ica L- 11111 1.25 s~w ,r- 1 . 11.6 I MiCRQ OPY

  13. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below