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  1. Find a Massage Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletter Student Experience Newsletter AMTA News Find a Massage Therapist Find a qualified massage therapist near you ... massage therapy school Proprietary Information and Legal Notice Massage is Good Medicine 25 Reasons to Get a ...

  2. American Massage Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... online continuing education courses on body mechanics and injury prevention. Register now for free CE » Online Course Topics Massage for Specific Conditions Sports Massage Self-care for Massage Therapists Ethics Research ...

  3. Stress Management: Massage

    MedlinePlus

    ... ligaments. Massage may range from light stroking to deep pressure. There are many different types of massage, ... form of massage that uses long strokes, kneading, deep circular movements, vibration and tapping to help relax ...

  4. Perineal Massage in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    PERINEAL MASSAGE IN PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN PERINEAL MASSAGE IN PREGNANCY What Is My “Perineum”? Your perineum ... research studies. Several studies have found that perineal massage during the last weeks of pregnancy can reduce ...

  5. Massage Therapy for Health Purposes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Swedish massage, the therapist uses long strokes, kneading, deep circular movements, vibration, and tapping. Sports massage combines techniques of Swedish massage and deep tissue massage to release chronic muscle tension. It’s ...

  6. Benefits of infant massage.

    PubMed

    Day, Jane

    2014-05-01

    After spending three months as a clinical midwifery tutor at a remote hospital in Zambia, where I helped to train student midwives and other students, my interest in infant massage was ignited, having witnessed the benefits of massage to both mother and baby. Once back in the UK, I trained and qualified as a massage instructor with an international infant massage training organisation, which has led me to work extensively with parents and babies, offering one-to-one and group courses. It has been a privilege to be able to teach parents the valuable skill of infant massage, and consequently pass on the benefits both physiological and psychosocial.

  7. Massage therapy research review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2014-11-01

    Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity).Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage.

  8. Massage Therapy Research Review

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity). Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage. PMID:25172313

  9. [Massage and health].

    PubMed

    Sagrera Ferrándiz, Jordi

    2003-05-01

    In this first article, the author, Dr. Sagrera Ferrandiz, introduces us to the most generic aspects of massage and its relationship with health. In order to do so, he carries out a historical review in the use of massage beginning with the Vedas, Hinduism's sacred texts, and ending in our days. In future articles, the author will deal with different types and uses of massage and their relationships with health.

  10. Massage therapy research review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research.

  11. Massage therapy research review

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing Cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. PMID:27502797

  12. Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  13. Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  14. Questions for Your Prospective Massage Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Prospective Massage Therapist Questions for Your Prospective Massage Therapist Searching for a massage therapist? Get the ... questions. Are you a member of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA)? AMTA members commit to the ...

  15. Aquatic sports massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Bell, G W

    1999-04-01

    Athletic trainers are continually bombarded with requests to assist aquatic athletes with the management of musculoskeletal concerns involved with training and overtraining. The trainer has options for initial training management through the administration of massage, cryotherapy, thermotherapy, and injury-preventative strengthening exercises. This article describes and illustrates athletic training techniques such as massage, cryotherapy or cold applications, thermotherapy or heat applications, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation or strengthening exercise.

  16. Massage therapy for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Elaine

    2006-08-01

    Therapeutic massage as a cancer pain intervention appears to be safe and effective. Patients who receive massage have less procedural pain, nausea, and anxiety and report improved quality of life. The use of massage in cancer care centers and hospitals is on the rise. Massage has a positive effect on biochemistry, increasing levels of dopamine, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Specialized training of massage therapists in caring for people with cancer is recommended. Most studies to date are small but promising. Exact methodology and best practices warrant further investigation by the industry. More randomized clinical trials and case studies must be conducted.

  17. Touch massage, a rewarding experience.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Lenita; Jacobsson, Maritha; Lämås, Kristina

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze healthy individuals' expressed experiences of touch massage (TM). Fifteen healthy participants received whole body touch massage during 60 minutes for two separate occasions. Interviews were analyzed by narrative analysis. Four identifiable storyline was found, Touch massage as an essential need, in this storyline the participants talked about a desire and need for human touch and TM. Another storyline was about, Touch massage as a pleasurable experience and the participants talked about the pleasure of having had TM. In the third storyline Touch massage as a dynamic experience, the informants talked about things that could modulate the experience of receiving TM. In the last storyline, Touch massage influences self-awareness, the participants described how TM affected some of their psychological and physical experiences. Experiences of touch massage was in general described as pleasant sensations and the different storylines could be seen in the light of rewarding experiences.

  18. Sports massage. A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Moraska, A

    2005-09-01

    The science of sports massage is of interest to many populations including athletes, athletic trainers, coaches, as well as sports physiologists. While evidence to support or refute the effects of massage on sports performance is insufficient to make definitive statements, new reports and trends within data help formulate an understanding of sports massage. This article will review sports massage research on topics including lactate clearance, delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), muscle fatigue, the psychological effect of massage, and injury prevention and treatment. Articles referenced in Medline, Cochrane Database, the authors library, and references from articles are included in this review. Most studies contain methodological limitations including inadequate therapist training, insufficient duration of treatment, few subjects, or over or under working of muscles that limit a practical conclusion. Muscle soreness associated with DOMS is reduced with massage, although whether force recovers more quickly is still unclear. The research literature to date is insufficient to conclude whether massage facilitates recovery from a fatiguing effort. Both tissue healing and a psychological effect of massage are areas that may prove promising with further research. Results from published literature support a positive trend for massage to benefit athletic recovery and performance; a need for further research into sports massage, especially well-designed studies utilizing therapists specifically trained to administer this type of therapy, is warranted.

  19. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid

    2010-07-01

    Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

  20. Massage therapy and reflexology awareness.

    PubMed

    Mackey, B T

    2001-03-01

    Massage therapy and reflexology are manual therapeutic approaches used to facilitate healing and health and can be used by nurses in almost any setting. Information about massage therapy and reflexology is shared for the purpose of creating awareness about healing modalities and encouraging the use of basic techniques of these manual therapies. A review of a case study illustrates the safe and effective use of massage therapy and reflexology and familiarizes the nurse with the components of assessment and hands-on practice. Holistic nursing principles related to massage therapy and reflexology are woven throughout the text.

  1. Massage and aromatherapy massage: nursing art and science.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jenny

    2002-06-01

    This article begins by reviewing the place of complementary therapies in palliative care from the perspective of UK professional organizations, namely the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) (formerly the United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (UKCC)) and the British Medical Association (BMA). It then reviews recent research on the use of massage and aromatherapy massage in palliative care and comments on their credibility and implications, thereby addressing nursing science. The art of nursing is explored through four case histories where massage was used intuitively when words were difficult or seemed inadequate. To conclude, by focusing on the therapies provided by a UK hospice, there is consideration of the practicalities of implementing massage and aromatherapy massage in a specialist palliative care unit.

  2. Infant Massage: Communicating through Touch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Vivian

    1998-01-01

    Describes the benefits of infant massage, particularly for babies with deafness who have hearing parents. Steps for giving baby massages are provided, including placing a hand on the baby's stomach and making eye contact, starting with the legs, looking for cues, and communicating with the baby. (CR)

  3. Infant Massage: Communicating through Touch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Vivian

    1998-01-01

    Describes the benefits of infant massage, particularly for babies with deafness who have hearing parents. Steps for giving baby massages are provided, including placing a hand on the baby's stomach and making eye contact, starting with the legs, looking for cues, and communicating with the baby. (CR)

  4. Paediatric nurses' attitudes to massage and aromatherapy massage.

    PubMed

    Hunt, V; Randle, J; Freshwater, D

    2004-08-01

    Complementary therapies have continued to increase in popularity in healthcare and it is widely accepted that they can be incorporated into the nursing role. However, this acceptance does not necessarily mean that the introduction of therapies into the nursing arena has been without confusion and without professional and legal implications. Consequently, this small-scale, qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions and lived experiences of paediatric nurses of two therapies, namely massage and aromatherapy massage. There is a dearth of literature exploring nurses' perceptions to the incorporation of these therapies, especially in the arena of paediatric nursing where massage and aromatherapy massage are common practice. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with qualified nurses and revealed the themes of 'benefit', 'family centred care', 'nursing care' and 'being held back'. It was found that at some stage during their professional career each nurse had performed massage and/or aromatherapy massage. All nurses were able to recall certain benefits of the therapies for the children that they had observed and many discussed the importance of involving the family as a way of including them in to the care of their child. However, for the nurses in this study, it was evident that the incorporation of complementary therapies into the nursing role was determined by the context in which they practised. Due to the dominance of the medical model, nurses faced pressures and conflicts in the realities of their nursing work, which meant they were often unable to carry out these therapies.

  5. [Foot reflex zone massage].

    PubMed

    Kesselring, A

    1994-01-01

    Foot reflexology is defined as massage of zones on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. A medline-search yielded no literature in the field of foot reflexology. Indications for and results of foot reflexology have been extrapolated from case-descriptions and two pilot studies with small samples. One study (Lafuente et al.) found foot reflexology to be as helpful to patients with headaches as medication (flunarizine), yet foot reflexology was fraught with less side-effects than medication. In a second study (Eichelberger et al.) foot reflexology was used postoperatively on gynecological patients. The intervention group showed a lesser need for medication to enhance bladder tonus than did the control group. The literature describes foot reflexology as enhancing urination, bowel movements and relaxation.

  6. Clinical Reasoning in Massage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    LeMoon, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning has long been a valuable tool for health care practitioners, but it has been under-researched in the field of massage therapy. Case reports have been a useful method for exploring the clinical reasoning process in various fields of manual therapy and can provide a model for similar research in the field of massage therapy. A diagnostically challenging case concerning a client with low back pain serves as a guideline for examining the clinical reasoning process of a massage therapist. Methods: A two-part methodology was employed: Client profileReflective inquiry The inquiry included questions pertaining to beliefs about health problems; beliefs about the mechanisms of pain; medical conditions that could explain the client’s symptoms; knowledge of the client’s anatomy, assessment, and treatment choices; observations made during treatment; extent of experience in treating similar problems; and ability to recognize clinical patterns. Results: The clinical reasoning process of a massage therapist contributed to a differential diagnosis, which provided an explanation for the client’s symptoms and led to a satisfactory treatment resolution. Conclusion: The present report serves as an example of the value of clinical reasoning in the field of massage therapy, and the need for expanded research into its methods and applications. The results of such research could be beneficial in teaching the clinical reasoning process at both the introductory and the advanced levels of massage therapy education. PMID:21589814

  7. Clinical reasoning in massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Lemoon, Kim

    2008-08-20

    Clinical reasoning has long been a valuable tool for health care practitioners, but it has been under-researched in the field of massage therapy. Case reports have been a useful method for exploring the clinical reasoning process in various fields of manual therapy and can provide a model for similar research in the field of massage therapy. A diagnostically challenging case concerning a client with low back pain serves as a guideline for examining the clinical reasoning process of a massage therapist. A two-part methodology was employed: Client profileReflective inquiry The inquiry included questions pertaining to beliefs about health problems; beliefs about the mechanisms of pain; medical conditions that could explain the client's symptoms; knowledge of the client's anatomy, assessment, and treatment choices; observations made during treatment; extent of experience in treating similar problems; and ability to recognize clinical patterns. The clinical reasoning process of a massage therapist contributed to a differential diagnosis, which provided an explanation for the client's symptoms and led to a satisfactory treatment resolution. The present report serves as an example of the value of clinical reasoning in the field of massage therapy, and the need for expanded research into its methods and applications. The results of such research could be beneficial in teaching the clinical reasoning process at both the introductory and the advanced levels of massage therapy education.

  8. The Power of Touch: Massage for Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Elaine Fogel

    1996-01-01

    The potential benefits of massage for infants are discussed, including the role of touch on attachment and bonding and implications of massage for special needs infants. Research results on the benefits of massage for the infant and caregiver are covered, including increased bonding and enhanced growth and development. Historical information on…

  9. Preschoolers' Cognitive Performance Improves Following Massage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Sybil; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Lundy, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    Effects of massage on preschoolers' cognitive performance were assessed. Preschoolers were given Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised subtests before and after receiving 15-minute massage or spending 15 minutes reading stories with the experimenter. Children's performance on Block Design improved following massage, and…

  10. Integrating Research Competencies in Massage Therapy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    The massage therapy profession is currently engaged in a competency-based education movement that includes an emphasis on promoting massage therapy research competencies (MTRCs). A systems-based model for integrating MTRCs into massage therapy education was therefore proposed. The model and an accompanying checklist describe an approach to…

  11. Bulimic Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Field, Tory; Fierro, Karen; Henteleff, Tanja; Mueller, Cynthia; Yando, Regina; Shaw, Seana; Burman, Iris

    1998-01-01

    Female bulimic inpatients (N=24) were randomly assigned to massage therapy or standard treatment group. Massaged patients showed immediate reductions in anxiety and depression; additional improvements were noted by the last day of therapy. Massage therapy is shown to be effective as an adjunct treatment for bulimia. (Author/EMK)

  12. Preschoolers' Cognitive Performance Improves Following Massage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Sybil; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Lundy, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    Effects of massage on preschoolers' cognitive performance were assessed. Preschoolers were given Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised subtests before and after receiving 15-minute massage or spending 15 minutes reading stories with the experimenter. Children's performance on Block Design improved following massage, and…

  13. The Power of Touch: Massage for Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Elaine Fogel

    1996-01-01

    The potential benefits of massage for infants are discussed, including the role of touch on attachment and bonding and implications of massage for special needs infants. Research results on the benefits of massage for the infant and caregiver are covered, including increased bonding and enhanced growth and development. Historical information on…

  14. Bulimic Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Field, Tory; Fierro, Karen; Henteleff, Tanja; Mueller, Cynthia; Yando, Regina; Shaw, Seana; Burman, Iris

    1998-01-01

    Female bulimic inpatients (N=24) were randomly assigned to massage therapy or standard treatment group. Massaged patients showed immediate reductions in anxiety and depression; additional improvements were noted by the last day of therapy. Massage therapy is shown to be effective as an adjunct treatment for bulimia. (Author/EMK)

  15. A Descriptive Study of the Practice Patterns of Massage New Zealand Massage Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joanna M.; Sullivan, S. John; Baxter, G. David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. Purpose and Setting: The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. Research Design and Participants: A survey questionnaire was mailed to 66 trained massage therapist members of Massage New Zealand who were recruiting massage clients for a concurrent study of massage therapy culture. Results: Most massage therapists were women (83%), NZ European (76%), and holders of a massage diploma qualification (89%). Massage therapy was both a full- (58%) and part-time (42%) occupation, with the practice of massage therapy being the only source of employment for 70% of therapists. Nearly all therapists (94%) practiced massage for more than 40 weeks in the year, providing a median of 16 – 20 hours of direct client care per week. Most massage therapists worked in a “solo practice” (58%) and used a wide and active referral network. Almost all therapists treated musculoskeletal symptoms: the most common client issues or conditions treated were back pain/problem (99%), neck/shoulder pain/problem (99%), headache or migraine (99%), relaxation and stress reduction (96%), and regular recovery or maintenance massage (89%). The most frequent client fee per treatment was NZ$60 per hour in a clinic and NZ$1 per minute at a sports event or in the workplace. Therapeutic massage, relaxation massage, sports massage, and trigger-point therapy were the most common styles of massage therapy offered. Nearly all massage therapists (99%) undertook client assessment; 95% typically provided self-care recommendations; and 32% combined other complementary and alternative medicine therapies with their

  16. Massage and touch for dementia.

    PubMed

    Viggo Hansen, N; Jørgensen, T; Ørtenblad, L

    2006-10-18

    Massage and touch have been suggested as a non-pharmacological alternative or supplement to other treatments offered in order to reduce or manage a range of conditions associated with dementia such as anxiety, agitated behaviour and depression. It has also been suggested that massage and touch may counteract cognitive decline. To assess the effects of a range of massage and touch therapies on conditions associated with dementia, such as anxiety, agitated behaviour and depression, identify any adverse effects, and provide recommendations about future trials. We identified trials from a search of the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group on 12 July 2005 using the terms massage, reflexology, touch and shiatsu. This Register contains records from all major healthcare databases and many ongoing trials databases and is updated regularly. In addition, general and specific literature databases were searched and patient and therapist organizations contacted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which a massage or touch intervention was given to persons suffering from dementia of any type, compared with other treatments or no treatment, and in which effect parameters included measures of behavioural problems, caregiver burden, emotional distress or cognitive abilities, were eligible for inclusion. Furthermore, we employed a set of minimal methodological quality criteria as a selection filter. We identified 34 references in the initial searches. Of these, seven were actual or possible RCTs, but only two were found to meet the requirements of the set of minimal methodological criteria. The very limited amount of reliable evidence available is in favour of massage and touch interventions for problems associated with dementia. However, this evidence addresses only two specific applications: hand massage for the immediate or short-term reduction of agitated behaviour, and the addition of touch to verbal encouragement to eat for the

  17. Does 'Sports Massage' Have a Role in Sports Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Pat

    1987-01-01

    Enthusiasm for massage is increasing among professional and amateur athletes as well as recreational athletes. Most physicians, however, have been slow to endorse massage. This article discusses the benefits of massage and the program by the American Massage Therapy Association to certify massage therapists. (MT)

  18. Does 'Sports Massage' Have a Role in Sports Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Pat

    1987-01-01

    Enthusiasm for massage is increasing among professional and amateur athletes as well as recreational athletes. Most physicians, however, have been slow to endorse massage. This article discusses the benefits of massage and the program by the American Massage Therapy Association to certify massage therapists. (MT)

  19. Touch and Massage for Medically Fragile Infants

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Karen; Beider, Shay; Kant, Alexis J.; Gallardo, Constance C.; Joseph, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigating the efficacy of infant massage has largely focused on premature and low birth weight infants. The majority of investigations have neglected highly acute patients in academic neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The current study was developed with two aims: (Phase 1) to develop, implement and demonstrate the feasibility and safety of a parent-trained compassionate touch/massage program for infants with complex medical conditions and (Phase 2) to conduct a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT) of hand containment/massage versus standard of care in a level III academic Center for Newborn and Infant Critical Care (CNICC). Certified infant massage instructors (CIMIs) taught parents to massage their hospitalized infants. Massage therapy and instruction were performed for seven consecutive days and health outcomes were collected for up to 1 month following treatment. Caregivers, nurses and certified infant massage therapists indicated moderate to high levels of satisfaction and feasibility with the implementation of hand containment/massage in a level III academic center CNICC. In addition, infant behavioral and physiological measures were within safe limits during the massage sessions. All caregivers participating in the massage group reported high levels of satisfaction 7 days into the intervention and at the 1-month follow-up with regards to their relationship with their infant, the massage program's impact on that relationship and the massage program. Due to unequal and small sample sizes, between group analyses (control versus massage) were not conducted. Descriptive infant characteristics of health outcomes are described. Preliminary data from this study indicates feasibility and safety of infant massage and satisfaction among the caregivers, CIMIs and the nurses in the CNICC. An important contribution from this study was the demonstration of the infants’ safety based on physiological stability and no change in agitation/pain scores

  20. A healing touch: massage therapy and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Toups, D M

    1999-01-01

    Massage therapy has many benefits. Several studies have shown that massage can actually improve immune system function. However, massage therapy should be used in conjunction with, and not in place of, other therapies. In addition, different types of massage are appropriate for different ailments. Eastern and western massage philosophies, as well as In Touch, a massage therapy program serving people with HIV/AIDS, are described. Contact information is provided.

  1. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Watanabe, Satoko; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shigemori, Ichiro; Kita, Masakazu; Yoshida, Noriko; Masaki, Daiki; Tadai, Toshiaki; Ozasa, Kotaro; Fukui, Kenji; Imanishi, Jiro

    2005-06-01

    This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD16(+) lymphocytes, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-gamma and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA). Psychological measures including the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) between recipients (n = 11) of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P < 0.01) after treatment with aromatherapy and carrier massage, no difference between the aromatherapy and control massage was observed for STAI and SDS. Aromatherapy, in contrast to control massage, did not significantly reduce RBC count or hematocrit. However, aromatherapy massage showed a significant (P > 0.05) increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8(+) and CD16(+) lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P < 0.01). Consequently, the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.01). The paucity of such differences after carrier oil massage suggests that aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8(+) lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  2. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-γ and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA). Psychological measures including the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) between recipients (n = 11) of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P < 0.01) after treatment with aromatherapy and carrier massage, no difference between the aromatherapy and control massage was observed for STAI and SDS. Aromatherapy, in contrast to control massage, did not significantly reduce RBC count or hematocrit. However, aromatherapy massage showed a significant (P > 0.05) increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P < 0.01). Consequently, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.01). The paucity of such differences after carrier oil massage suggests that aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8+ lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:15937558

  3. Applying Infant Massage Practices: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace; Kretschmer, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    This study explored the dynamic interaction between a mother and her 11-month-old visually impaired infant before and after the mother was taught infant massage. After the mother learned infant massage, she had more appropriate physical contact with her infant, engaged with him within his field of vision, directly vocalized to him, and had a…

  4. Infant Massage: Understand This Soothing Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your baby Help your baby relax and sleep Positively affect infant hormones that control stress Reduce crying Although further research is needed, some studies also suggest that infant massage involving moderate pressure might promote growth for premature babies. Massaging your baby too soon ...

  5. How to Calm Children through Massage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Gilda Rios

    1997-01-01

    Studied the impact of massage three times per week on infants' adjustment to a group care setting. Subjects were infants from at-risk Chilean homes who displayed negative emotional behaviors. Found that massaged infants showed less repetitive crying, more tranquil sleep and muscular relaxation, better social adjustment, and improved feeding…

  6. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  7. Using massage in the care of children.

    PubMed

    Watson, S

    Touch has long been an under-valued aspect of care, but more nurses are now bringing its benefits to patients in the form of massage. Sue Watson reviews the literature and discusses how massage can help in the care of infants and children.

  8. How to Calm Children through Massage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Gilda Rios

    1997-01-01

    Studied the impact of massage three times per week on infants' adjustment to a group care setting. Subjects were infants from at-risk Chilean homes who displayed negative emotional behaviors. Found that massaged infants showed less repetitive crying, more tranquil sleep and muscular relaxation, better social adjustment, and improved feeding…

  9. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  10. Role of massage therapy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nancy C; Sumler, Sat-Siri; Beinhorn, Curtiss M; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-03-01

    The care of patients with cancer not only involves dealing with its symptoms but also with complicated information and uncertainty; isolation; and fear of disease progression, disease recurrence, and death. Patients whose treatments require them to go without human contact can find a lack of touch to be an especially distressing factor. Massage therapy is often used to address these patients' need for human contact, and findings support the positive value of massage in cancer care. Several reviews of the scientific literature have attributed numerous positive effects to massage, including improvements in the quality of patients' relaxation, sleep, and immune system responses and in the relief of their fatigue, pain, anxiety, and nausea. On the basis of these reviews, some large cancer centers in the United States have started to integrate massage therapy into conventional settings. In this paper, we recognize the importance of touch, review findings regarding massage for cancer patients, describe the massage therapy program in one of these centers, and outline future challenges and implications for the effective integration of massage therapy in large and small cancer centers.

  11. Massage therapy plus topical analgesic is more effective than massage alone for hand arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Solien-Wolfe, Lynda

    2014-07-01

    20 adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a massage therapy plus a topical analgesic application group. Both groups received a weekly massage from a therapist and were taught self-massage (same procedure) to be done by each participant once daily over a four-week period. The massage plus topical analgesic group as compared to the massage group had greater improvement in hand function as measured by a digital hand exerciser following the first session and across the four-week period. That group also had a greater increase in perceived grip strength and a greater decrease in hand pain, depressed mood and sleep disturbances over the four-week period. Massage therapy has been effective for several pain syndromes including migraine headaches (Lawle and Cameron, 2006)), lower back pain (Hsieh et al., 2004), fibromyalgia (Kalichman, 2010), neck and shoulder pain (Kong et al., 2013), carpal tunnel syndrome (Elliott and Burkett, 2013), and pain related to upper limb arthritis (Field et al., 2013). The purpose of the current study was to determine whether applying a topical analgesic following massage might be more effective than massage alone in treating pain associated with hand arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An evaluation of aromatherapy massage in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S; Aldridge, J; Salmon, I; Cain, E; Wilson, B

    1999-09-01

    The use of complementary therapies, such as massage and aromatherapy massage, is rising in popularity among patients and healthcare professionals. They are increasingly being used to improve the quality of life of patients, but there is little evidence of their efficacy. This study assessed the effects of massage and aromatherapy massage on cancer patients in a palliative care setting. We studied 103 patients, who were randomly allocated to receive massage using a carrier oil (massage) or massage using a carrier oil plus the Roman chamomile essential oil (aromatherapy massage). Outcome measurements included the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and a semi-structured questionnaire, administered 2 weeks postmassage, to explore patients' perceptions of massage. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety after each massage on the STAI (P < 0.001), and improved scores on the RSCL: psychological (P < 0.001), quality of life (P < 0.01), severe physical (P < 0.05), and severe psychological (P < 0.05) subscales for the combined aromatherapy and massage group. The aromatherapy group's scores improved on all RSCL subscales at the 1% level of significance or better, except for severely restricted activities. The massage group's scores improved on four RSCL subscales but these improvements did not reach statistical significance. Massage with or without essential oils appears to reduce levels of anxiety. The addition of an essential oil seems to enhance the effect of massage and to improve physical and psychological symptoms, as well as overall quality of life.

  13. Aggressive adolescents benefit from massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Diego, Miguel A; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A; Rothe, Eugenio M; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their parents as being less aggressive. Significant differences were not found for the adolescents who were assigned to the relaxation group.

  14. Preterm infant massage therapy research: a review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, preterm infant massage therapy studies are reviewed. Massage therapy has led to weight gain in preterm infants when moderate pressure massage was provided. In studies on passive movement of the limbs, preterm infants also gained significantly more weight, and their bone density also increased. Research on ways of delivering the massage is also explored including using mothers versus therapists and the added effects of using oils. The use of mothers as therapists was effective in at least one study. The use of oils including coconut oil and safflower oil enhanced the average weight gain, and the transcutaneous absorption of oil also increased triglycerides. In addition, the use of synthetic oil increased vagal activity, which may indirectly contribute to weight gain. The weight gain was associated with shorter hospital stays and, thereby, significant hospital cost savings. Despite these benefits, preterm infant massage is only practiced in 38% of neonatal intensive care units. This may relate to the underlying mechanisms not being well understood. The increases noted in vagal activity, gastric motility, insulin and IGF-1 levels following moderate pressure massage are potential underlying mechanisms. However, those variables combined do not explain all of the variance in weight gain, highlighting the need for additional mechanism studies.

  15. Preterm Infant Massage Therapy Research: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, preterm infant massage therapy studies are reviewed. Massage therapy has led to weight gain in preterm infants when moderate pressure massage was provided. In studies on passive movement of the limbs, preterm infants also gained significantly more weight, and their bone density also increased. Research on ways of delivering the massage is also explored including using mothers versus therapists and the added effects of using oils. The use of mothers as therapists was effective in at least one study. The use of oils including coconut oil and safflower oil enhanced the average weight gain, and the transcutaneous absorption of oil also increased triglycerides. In addition, the use of synthetic oil increased vagal activity, which may indirectly contribute to weight gain. The weight gain was associated with shorter hospital stays and, thereby, significant hospital cost savings. Despite these benefits, preterm infant massage is only practiced in 38% of neonatal intensive care units. This may relate to the underlying mechanisms not being well understood. The increases noted in vagal activity, gastric motility, insulin and IGF-1 levels following moderate pressure massage are potential underlying mechanisms. However, those variables combined do not explain all of the variance in weight gain, highlighting the need for additional mechanism studies. PMID:20137814

  16. Massage therapy for preventing pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhong; Sun, Zhongren; Yue, Jinhuan

    2015-06-17

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of patients in hospitals and the elderly are at highest risk. Several studies have suggested that massage therapy may help to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but these results are inconsistent. To assess the evidence for the effects of massage compared with placebo, standard care or other interventions for prevention of pressure ulcers in at-risk populations.The review sought to answer the following questions:Does massage reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers of any grade?Is massage safe in the short- and long-term? If not, what are the adverse events associated with massage? We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (8 January 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 8 January 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 January 2015), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 8 January 2015), and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 January 2015). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (Q-RCTs) that evaluated the effects of massage therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Our primary outcome was the proportion of people developing a new pressure ulcer of any grade. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. No studies (RCTs or Q-RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Therefore, neither a meta-analysis nor a narrative description of studies was possible. There are currently no studies eligible for inclusion in this review. It is, therefore, unclear whether massage therapy can prevent pressure ulcers.

  17. Sleep Problems in Infants Decrease following Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of pre-bedtime massages for infants and toddlers with sleep onset problems. Found that, compared to bedtime stories, massages produced fewer sleep delays and a shortened latency to sleep onset. (Author/DLH)

  18. Biomechanical analysis of the circular friction hand massage.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jeseong; Son, Jongsang; Ahn, Soonjae; Shin, Isu; Kim, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    A massage can be beneficial to relieve muscle tension on the neck and shoulder area. Various massage systems have been developed, but their motions are not uniform throughout different body parts nor specifically targeted to the neck and shoulder areas. Pressure pattern and finger movement trajectories of the circular friction hand massage on trapezius, levator scapulae, and deltoid muscles were determined to develop a massage system that can mimic the motion and the pressure of the circular friction massage. During the massage, finger movement trajectories were measured using a 3D motion capture system, and finger pressures were simultaneously obtained using a grip pressure sensor. Results showed that each muscle had different finger movement trajectory and pressure pattern. The trapezius muscle experienced a higher pressure, longer massage time (duration of pressurization), and larger pressure-time integral than the other muscles. These results could be useful to design a better massage system simulating human finger movements.

  19. [Therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Barquilla Ávila, Carolina; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan

    2015-12-01

    To know the efficacy of therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia. Literature review. The literature search was done in six scientific databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, PEDro, Dialnet, Scopus and CSIC, between 1983 and 2013. The search terms were "massage", "dementia", "therapy", "behavior disorders" and "Alzheimer". Of the 496 articles analyzed, 11 scientific articles have met the selection criteria. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, which had analyzed the effects of massage therapy on altered behaviors in people with dementia. The variables were massage benefits, type of massage and massage lubricant. Their authors use different massage techniques (effleurage, pétrissage, pressures, frictions and kneading), obtain better conduct disorders (aggression, anxiety, agitation, and resistance to care) of elderly. The therapeutic massage can be a complementary treatment in the rehabilitation program for better behavior disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Sleep Problems in Infants Decrease following Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of pre-bedtime massages for infants and toddlers with sleep onset problems. Found that, compared to bedtime stories, massages produced fewer sleep delays and a shortened latency to sleep onset. (Author/DLH)

  1. Moderate pressure is essential for massage therapy effects.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Moderate pressure appears to be necessary for massage therapy effects. Studies comparing moderate and light pressure massage are reviewed and they suggest that growth and development are enhanced in infants and stress is reduced in adults, but only by moderate pressure massage. The stimulation of pressure receptors leads to increased vagal activity which, in turn, seems to mediate the diverse benefits noted for massage therapy.

  2. Thai traditional massage: Issues causing possible adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2015-01-01

    Thai traditional massage is a widely used massage technique in Thailand and is presently accepted by local Thai Ministry of Public Health. The technique is promoted but not well accepted internationally. There is a concern about the effectiveness as well as safety of this local wisdom. After a recent episode of concurrent acute heart attack and Thai traditional massage in a patient, the issue of possible adverse effects of Thai traditional massage is being widely discussed. PMID:26865746

  3. What midwives need to know about baby massage.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Cheryl

    2012-09-01

    Baby massage has become increasingly popular in the West among parents and healthcare practitioners alike, with numerous studies continuing to hail the benefits of taking time to massage and bond with your baby. Newborn and infant massage is of particular interest to midwives in their primary role, helping families to bond and heal the pain of traumatic births, but now many midwives are offering baby massage sessions privately in their spare time also. Here's the low down.

  4. Preschool Children's Sleep and Wake Behavior: Effects of Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Preschool children received twice-weekly massages for five weeks. Compared to control children, the massaged children had better behavior ratings on mood state, vocalization, activity, and cooperation following massage on day one and throughout the study. Teachers rated their behavior more optimally, and their parents rated them as having less…

  5. Temperature Increases in Preterm Infants During Massage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Temperature was assessed in 72 preterm infants randomly assigned to a control or a massage therapy group. A greater increase in temperature was noted for preterm infants receiving massage therapy versus a control group, even though the incubator portholes remained open during the 15-minute massage therapy session but not for the control group over an equivalent time period. PMID:17692385

  6. Preschool Children's Sleep and Wake Behavior: Effects of Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Preschool children received twice-weekly massages for five weeks. Compared to control children, the massaged children had better behavior ratings on mood state, vocalization, activity, and cooperation following massage on day one and throughout the study. Teachers rated their behavior more optimally, and their parents rated them as having less…

  7. An Investigative Study of the Perceptions of Nationally Certified Massage Practitioners toward Entry Level Web Based Massage Therapy Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlahos, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the current status of online education in massage therapy with respect to the development of web based curriculums. Participants are drawn from the public listing of the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The Online Curriculum Survey in Massage Therapy is used as an…

  8. An Investigative Study of the Perceptions of Nationally Certified Massage Practitioners toward Entry Level Web Based Massage Therapy Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlahos, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the current status of online education in massage therapy with respect to the development of web based curriculums. Participants are drawn from the public listing of the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The Online Curriculum Survey in Massage Therapy is used as an…

  9. Massage therapy for dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Corti, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Massage is gaining recognition as a beneficial modality for the treatment of many ailments due to recent scientific research in humans. We can infer that these benefits apply to dogs and cats due to their similar physiology and anatomy. Defined as the therapeutic manipulation of soft tissues, massage has many effects on muscle, the circulatory system, the autonomic nervous system, and the mind. Various techniques are employed to achieve a desired effect in the treatment of many conditions, including but not limited to, swelling and edema, critical illness and prolonged recumbency, osteoarthritis and chronic pain, and palliative and hospice care. This article reviews the above topics and encourages the practitioner to seek out expert advice on massage in the care of companion animals.

  10. Anal self-massage in the treatment of acute anal fissure: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gaj, Fabio; Biviano, Ivano; Candeloro, Laura; Andreuccetti, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    An anal fissure (AF) is a tear in the epithelial lining of the anal canal. This is a very common condition, but the choice of treatment is unclear. The use of anal dilators is effective, economic, and safe. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two conservative treatments, the use of anal dilators or a finger for anal dilatation, in reducing anal pressure and resolving anal fissures. Fifty patients with a clinical diagnosis of AF were randomly assigned to one of the treatments, self-massage of the anal sphincter (group A, 25 patients) or passive dilatation using dilators (group B, 25 patients). All patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after 12 weeks and 6 months. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale. After the treatment, 60% of patients treated with dilators and 80% of patients treated with anal self-massage using a finger showed disappearance of their anal fissures. A comparison between signs and symptoms reported by the patients in the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction in anal pain (group A, P=0.0001; group B, P=0.0001) and bleeding after defecation (group A, P=0.001, group B, P=0.001). At 6 months after treatment, a significantly greater reduction in anal pain was observed in Group A compared to Group B (P=0.02). The use of anal self-massage with a finger appears to induce a better resolution of acute anal fissure than do anal dilators, and in a shorter time.

  11. Anal self-massage in the treatment of acute anal fissure: a randomized prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Fabio; Biviano, Ivano; Candeloro, Laura; Andreuccetti, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    Background An anal fissure (AF) is a tear in the epithelial lining of the anal canal. This is a very common condition, but the choice of treatment is unclear. The use of anal dilators is effective, economic, and safe. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two conservative treatments, the use of anal dilators or a finger for anal dilatation, in reducing anal pressure and resolving anal fissures. Methods Fifty patients with a clinical diagnosis of AF were randomly assigned to one of the treatments, self-massage of the anal sphincter (group A, 25 patients) or passive dilatation using dilators (group B, 25 patients). All patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after 12 weeks and 6 months. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale. Results After the treatment, 60% of patients treated with dilators and 80% of patients treated with anal self-massage using a finger showed disappearance of their anal fissures. A comparison between signs and symptoms reported by the patients in the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction in anal pain (group A, P=0.0001; group B, P=0.0001) and bleeding after defecation (group A, P=0.001, group B, P=0.001). At 6 months after treatment, a significantly greater reduction in anal pain was observed in Group A compared to Group B (P=0.02). Conclusion The use of anal self-massage with a finger appears to induce a better resolution of acute anal fissure than do anal dilators, and in a shorter time. PMID:28655981

  12. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who received massage in the postoperative setting had pain scores evaluated pre and post massage on a rating scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Results: In total, 160 patients completed the pilot study and received massage therapy that was individualized. Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain scores after massage (p ≤ .001), and patients’ comments were very favorable. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with having massage therapy available, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Conclusions: Massage therapy may be an important additional pain management component of the healing experience for patients after thoracic surgery. PMID:21847428

  13. Massage for low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Andrea D; Giraldo, Mario; Baskwill, Amanda; Irvin, Emma; Imamura, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly musculoskeletal problems in modern society. It is experienced by 70% to 80% of adults at some time in their lives. Massage therapy has the potential to minimize pain and speed return to normal function. To assess the effects of massage therapy for people with non-specific LBP. We searched PubMed to August 2014, and the following databases to July 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, LILACS, Index to Chiropractic Literature, and Proquest Dissertation Abstracts. We also checked reference lists. There were no language restrictions used. We included only randomized controlled trials of adults with non-specific LBP classified as acute, sub-acute or chronic. Massage was defined as soft-tissue manipulation using the hands or a mechanical device. We grouped the comparison groups into two types: inactive controls (sham therapy, waiting list, or no treatment), and active controls (manipulation, mobilization, TENS, acupuncture, traction, relaxation, physical therapy, exercises or self-care education). We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures and followed CBN guidelines. Two independent authors performed article selection, data extraction and critical appraisal. In total we included 25 trials (3096 participants) in this review update. The majority was funded by not-for-profit organizations. One trial included participants with acute LBP, and the remaining trials included people with sub-acute or chronic LBP (CLBP). In three trials massage was done with a mechanical device, and the remaining trials used only the hands. The most common type of bias in these studies was performance and measurement bias because it is difficult to blind participants, massage therapists and the measuring outcomes. We judged the quality of the evidence to be "low" to "very low", and the main reasons for downgrading the evidence were risk of bias and imprecision. There was no suggestion of publication bias. For acute LBP, massage

  14. Mechanical Model of Traditional Thai Massage for Integrated Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rattanaphan, Salinee; Srichandr, Panya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a mechanical model was developed, aiming to provide standardized and programmable traditional Thai massage (TTM) therapy to patients. The TTM was modeled and integrated into a mechanical hand (MH) system, and a prototype massage chair was built and tested for user satisfaction. Three fundamental principles of Thai massage were integrated: pull, press, and pin. Based on these principles, the mechanics of Thai massage was studied and a mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamics and conditions for the design and prototyping of an MH. On average, it was found that users were satisfied with the treatment and felt that the treatment was similar to that performed by human hands. According to the interview results, users indicated that they were likely to utilize the MH as an alternative to traditional massage. Therefore, integrated TTM with an MH may help healthcare providers deliver standardized, programmable massage therapy to patients as opposed to variable, inconsistent human massage.

  15. Process for massage therapy practice and essential assessment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann Blair; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-07-01

    Little evidence exists about processes in massage therapy practice. Investigating current frameworks is warranted. This qualitative study is a secondary data analysis using grounded theory to understand how massage therapy experts describe massage therapy practice. 31 massage therapy experts were invited to a 2-day symposium to discuss best practices for the profession. Through qualitative analysis, memoing, and discussion, the data were summarized into themes. Three themes were identified around massage therapy practice: 1) client centered, 2) structure for practice, and 3) influencing factors. Each theme is clarified and expanded. Conceptual models were developed for research and clinical practice and a definition for massage therapy practice was identified. Challenges and limitations are discussed. The goal of providing these models is to give massage therapists tools to deliver the best possible care. The models need testing to see if they help advance the profession. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  17. Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy Massage in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Shigemori, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoko; Aihara, Yuka; Kita, Masakazu; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Yoshida, Noriko; Kunisawa, Masahiro; Kawase, Masanori; Fukui, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total). The results showed that anxiety was reduced in one 30 min aromatherapy massage in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and also reduced in eight sequential aromatherapy massage sessions in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) test. Our results further suggested that aromatherapy massage ameliorated the immunologic state. Further investigations are required to confirm the anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy in breast cancer patients. PMID:18955225

  18. Anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy massage in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Jiro; Kuriyama, Hiroko; Shigemori, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoko; Aihara, Yuka; Kita, Masakazu; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Yoshida, Noriko; Kunisawa, Masahiro; Kawase, Masanori; Fukui, Kenji

    2009-03-01

    We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total). The results showed that anxiety was reduced in one 30 min aromatherapy massage in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and also reduced in eight sequential aromatherapy massage sessions in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) test. Our results further suggested that aromatherapy massage ameliorated the immunologic state. Further investigations are required to confirm the anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy in breast cancer patients.

  19. [Massage and sophrology workshops for haematology professionals].

    PubMed

    Bannier, Christine; Sachot, Claudine; Simon, Armelle

    2014-04-01

    In haematology, the caregivers are confronted with the death of patients and the distress of their families. It is a working environment in which it is essential for the professionals to be taken care of in order to optimise the care provided to patients. At Nantes general hospital, massage and sophrology workshops enable the caregivers to recharge their batteries.

  20. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Therapeutic massager. 890.5660 Section 890.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660...

  1. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Therapeutic massager. 890.5660 Section 890.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660...

  2. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Therapeutic massager. 890.5660 Section 890.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660...

  3. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Therapeutic massager. 890.5660 Section 890.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660...

  4. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Therapeutic massager. 890.5660 Section 890.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660...

  5. Usefulness of ice massage in triggering the swallow reflex.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    In Japan, ice massage is widely used as the prefeeding technique to facilitate dry swallowing, to improve swallowing apraxia for initiating the swallowing action, and in daily swallowing training. In a crossover study, we evaluated the usefulness of ice massage for eliciting the swallowing response. The subjects were 24 dysphagic patients with stroke and cerebrovascular disease. We measured the latency between the command of dry swallowing and the triggering of the swallow reflex by videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing, with and without ice massage. When a subject could not swallow all the 4 trials we recorded whether he or she could swallow or not. And we counted how many times he or she could swallow with and without ice massage. Our results suggest that ice massage significantly shortened the latency to triggering of the swallow reflex and often initiated swallowing even in those subjects who could not swallow without the massage. These results demonstrate that ice massage has an immediate effect on triggering of the swallow reflex. The effect of ice massage was especially remarkable in the 15 subjects who had supranuclear lesions compared with the subjects with nuclear lesions. Thus, ice massage could activate the damaged supranuclear tract and/or the normal nucleus and subnuclear tract for swallowing. Ice massage has proven useful in many clinical dysphagia training sessions. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Massage and Performance Recovery: A Meta-Analytical Review.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Wigand; Wegmann, Melissa; Ferrauti, Alexander; Kellmann, Michael; Pfeiffer, Mark; Meyer, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Post-exercise massage is one of the most frequently applied interventions to enhance recovery of athletes. However, evidence to support the efficacy of massage for performance recovery is scarce. Moreover, it has not yet been concluded under which conditions massage is effective. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available literature on massage for performance recovery. We conducted a structured literature search and located 22 randomized controlled trials. These were analysed with respect to performance effects and various characteristics of the study design (type and duration of massage, type of exercise and performance test, duration of recovery period, training status of subjects). Of the 22 studies, 5 used techniques of automated massage (e.g., vibration), while the other 17 used classic manual massage. A tendency was found for shorter massage (5-12 min) to have larger effects (+6.6%, g = 0.34) than massage lasting more than 12 min (+1.0%, g = 0.06). The effects were larger for short-term recovery of up to 10 min (+7.9%, g = 0.45) than for recovery periods of more than 20 min (+2.4%, g = 0.08). Although after high-intensity mixed exercise, massage yielded medium positive effects (+14.4%, g = 0.61), the effects after strength exercise (+3.9%, g = 0.18) and endurance exercise (+1.3%, g = 0.12) were smaller. Moreover, a tendency was found for untrained subjects to benefit more from massage (+6.5%, g = 0.23) than trained athletes (+2.3%, g = 0.17). The effects of massage on performance recovery are rather small and partly unclear, but can be relevant under appropriate circumstances (short-term recovery after intensive mixed training). However, it remains questionable if the limited effects justify the widespread use of massage as a recovery intervention in competitive athletes.

  7. Massage Efficacy Beliefs for Muscle Recovery from a Running Race

    PubMed Central

    Moraska, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Background Belief in efficacy of CAM therapies has been sparsely reported and may be different than reported use of the therapy. Purpose The aim of this study was to identify efficacy beliefs of massage for muscle recovery following a 10-km running race. Setting Finish zone of a 10-km race. Research Design Participants completed a brief survey regarding running race characteristics, prior use of massage, and belief in efficacy of massage regarding muscle recovery from the race. Participants The subject pool consisted of 745 individuals who completed a running race and were within 60 minutes of race completion. Main Outcome Measures Subjects reported demographic information (age, gender), race information (finish time, perceived exertion, muscle soreness, fatigue), prior use of massage, and belief regarding efficacy of massage for postrace muscle recovery. Results Most study participants believed that massage would benefit muscle recovery following the running race (80.0%), even though only 43.9% had received a massage previously. Those who had received at least one massage were significantly more likely to believe that massage would benefit muscle recovery (91.9% vs. 70.4%, p < .001). Females were more likely than males to have had a massage (52.3% vs. 36.0%, p < .001) and to believe it would benefit recovery (83.1% vs. 77.1%, p = .046). Conclusions Massage is well-accepted as a muscle recovery aid following a running race, but females and those who have used massage were significantly more likely to perceive it as advantageous. Belief in a therapeutic value of massage for muscle recovery exceeds its reported use. PMID:23730395

  8. Massage Therapy and Frequency of Chronic Tension Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Christopher; Chandler, Clint; Moraska, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. The effect of massage therapy on chronic nonmigraine headache was investigated. Methods. Chronic tension headache sufferers received structured massage therapy treatment directed toward neck and shoulder muscles. Headache frequency, duration, and intensity were recorded and compared with baseline measures. Results. Compared with baseline values, headache frequency was significantly reduced within the first week of the massage protocol. The reduction of headache frequency continued for the remainder of the study (P = .009). The duration of headaches tended to decrease during the massage treatment period (P = .058). Headache intensity was unaffected by massage (P = .19). Conclusions. The muscle-specific massage therapy technique used in this study has the potential to be a functional, nonpharmacological intervention for reducing the incidence of chronic tension headache. PMID:12356617

  9. Massage therapy and frequency of chronic tension headaches.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Christopher; Chandler, Clint; Moraska, Albert

    2002-10-01

    The effect of massage therapy on chronic nonmigraine headache was investigated. Chronic tension headache sufferers received structured massage therapy treatment directed toward neck and shoulder muscles. Headache frequency, duration, and intensity were recorded and compared with baseline measures. Compared with baseline values, headache frequency was significantly reduced within the first week of the massage protocol. The reduction of headache frequency continued for the remainder of the study (P =.009). The duration of headaches tended to decrease during the massage treatment period (P =.058). Headache intensity was unaffected by massage (P =.19). The muscle-specific massage therapy technique used in this study has the potential to be a functional, nonpharmacological intervention for reducing the incidence of chronic tension headache.

  10. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Anna-Kaisa

    2017-04-03

    Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  11. Procedural Pain Heart Rate Responses in Massaged Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) responses to the removal of a monitoring lead were assessed in 56 preterm infants who received moderate pressure, light pressure or no massage therapy. The infants who received moderate pressure massage therapy exhibited lower increases in HR suggesting an attenuated pain response. The heart rate of infants who received moderate pressure massage also returned to baseline faster than the heart rate of the other two groups, suggesting a faster recovery rate. PMID:19185352

  12. Realization of Comfortable Massage by Using Iterative Learning Control Based on EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramae, Tatsuya; Kushida, Daisuke; Takemori, Fumiaki; Kitamura, Akira

    Recently the massage chair is used by a lot of people because they are able to use it easily at home. However a present massage chair only realizes the massage motion. Moreover the massage chair can not consider the user’s condition and massage force. On the other hand, the professional masseur is according to presume the mental condition by patient’s reaction. Then this paper proposes the method of applying masseur’s procedure for the massage chair using iterative learning control based on EEG. And massage force is estimated by acceleration sensor. The realizability of the proposed method is verified by the experimental works using the massage chair.

  13. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise.

  14. [Tui-Na, an oriental massage].

    PubMed

    Esteve Torres, Andreu

    2005-05-01

    Tui-Na is an oriental massage whose principles are based on traditional Chinese medicine. This medicine conceives a person as one entire entity giving as much importance to emotional and physical aspects as to everything that surrounds a person, including climate, social relationships, diet. This philosophy believes that an individual will achieve his/her ideal health state when he/she has found interior harmony and is in balance with all his/her environment. From this viewpoint, this philosophy understands pathology as an unbalance or a lack of harmony in an organism. Tui-Na massage is one of the techniques which make use of traditional Chinese medicine to maintain, or to recuperate, an organism's balance.

  15. The effect of massage on localized lumbar muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tim Hideaki; Leisman, Gerry; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nishijo, Kazushi

    2002-01-01

    Background There is not enough evidence to support the efficacy of massage for muscle fatigue despite wide utilization of the modality in various clinical settings. This study investigated the influence of massage application on localized back muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-nine healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (massage and rest conditions). On each test day, subjects were asked to lie in the prone position on a treatment table and perform sustained back extension for 90 seconds. Subjects then either received massage on the lumbar region or rested for a 5 minute duration, then repeated the back extension movement. The median frequency (MDF), mean power frequency (MNF), and root mean square (RMS) amplitude of electromyographic signals during the 90 second sustained lumbar muscle contraction were analyzed. The subjective feeling of fatigue was then evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results MDF and MNF significantly declined with time under all conditions. There was no significant difference in MDF, MNF or RMS value change between before and after massage, or between rest and massage conditions. There was a significant increase in fatigue VAS at the end of the 2nd back extension with rest condition. There was a significant difference in fatigue VAS change between massage and rest condition. Conclusions A significant difference was observed between massage and rest condition on VAS for muscle fatigue. On EMG analysis, there were no significant differences to conclude that massage stimulation influenced the myoelectrical muscle fatigue, which is associated with metabolic and electrical changes. PMID:12377105

  16. Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Medina, Lissette; Delgado, Jeannette; Hernandez, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Eighty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to yoga, massage therapy or standard prenatal care control groups to determine the relative effects of yoga and massage therapy on prenatal depression and neonatal outcomes. Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale. In addition, the yoga and massage therapy groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight, and those groups, in turn, had greater gestational age and birthweight than the control group.

  17. Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Medina, Lissette; Delgado, Jeannette; Hernandez, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to yoga, massage therapy or standard prenatal care control groups to determine the relative effects of yoga and massage therapy on prenatal depression and neonatal outcomes. Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga and massage sessions (20 minutes each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale. In addition, the yoga and massage therapy groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight, and those groups, in turn, had greater gestational age and birthweight than the control group. PMID:22464118

  18. Effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea in Turkish students.

    PubMed

    Apay, Serap Ejder; Arslan, Sevban; Akpinar, Reva Balci; Celebioglu, Ayda

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea. The study used a quasiexperimental design with the subjects as their own control. Every participant applied both aromatherapy massage with lavender oil and placebo massage with odorless liquid petrolatum [soft paraffin]. The population comprised 438 midwifery and nursing students. The 150 students who had declared that they had suffered from dysmenorrhea used a visual analog scale to indicate their level of pain. Higher scores reflected a greater severity of dysmenorrhea. Forty-four students volunteered to participate in the study. When the lavender massage and the placebo massage were compared, the visual analog scale score of the lavender massage was found to decrease at a statistically significant rate. This study showed that massage was effective in reducing dysmenorrhea. In addition, this study showed that the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain was higher than that of placebo massage. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skin cancer education among massage therapists: a survey at the 2010 meeting of the American Massage Therapy Association.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Shannon M; Louie-Gao, Qiong; Hession, Meghan L; Bailey, Elizabeth; Geller, Alan C; Cummins, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    Massage therapists encounter skin on a daily basis and have a unique opportunity to recognize potential skin cancers. The purpose of this study was to describe the skin cancer education provided to massage therapists and to assess their comfort regarding identification and communication of suspicious lesions. An observational retrospective survey study was conducted at the 2010 American Massage Therapy Association Meeting. Sixty percent reported receiving skin cancer education during and 25% reported receiving skin cancer education after training. Massage therapists who examine their own skin are more likely to be comfortable with recognizing a suspicious lesion and are more likely to examine their client's skin. Greater number of clients treated per year and greater frequency of client skin examinations were predictors of increased comfort level with recognizing a suspicious lesion. Massage therapists are more comfortable discussing than identifying a potential skin cancer. Massage therapists may be able to serve an important role in the early detection of skin cancer.

  20. The changing motivation of massage therapy students.

    PubMed

    Finch, P

    2007-05-01

    The study was conducted in order to determine whether the level of motivation related to intrinsic (people-oriented) and extrinsic (external reward) value complexes in a class of massage therapy students changed during their professional education. The research was a quasi-experimental within-subject design, in which survey data was collected from students on their first day in the massage therapy program and again towards the end of their final term. The data were collated and summarized, and the differences in motivation scores were assessed using Fisher's Least Significant Difference procedure. The results support the hypothesis that massage therapy students are motivated more strongly by intrinsic than extrinsic rewards both at the commencement of their studies and as they approach entry to practice. Also evident from the data is the fact that the students' motivation changed during their professional studies. This change involved a significant decrease in the level of intrinsic motivation and significant increase in the level of extrinsic motivation. Thus, although intrinsic motivation reduced while extrinsic motivation increased, the former remained the more powerful influence. Professional programs should consider the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic student motivation and attempt to control influences that might shift this such that the humanistic / altruistic mission of health care is undermined.

  1. Touch massage: a pilot study of a complex intervention.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Lenita; Lehtipalo, Stefan; Winsö, Ola; Karlsson, Marcus; Wiklund, Urban; Brulin, Christine

    2013-11-01

    To report and evaluate a complex touch massage intervention according to the British Medical Research Council framework. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of touch massage on levels of anxiety and physiological stress in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery. The use of touch massage has increased during the past decade but no systematic studies have been implemented to investigate the effectiveness of such treatment. It is important to conduct multidisciplinary investigations into the effects of complex interventions such as touch massage. For this, the British Medical Research Council has provided a useful framework to guide the development, piloting, evaluation and reporting of complex intervention studies. A pilot study with a randomized controlled design including 20 patients (10 + 10) scheduled for elective aortic surgery. Selected outcome parameters included; self-reported anxiety, measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y instrument, and physiological stress, measured by heart rate variability, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, oxygen saturation and concentrations of cortisol, insulin and glucose in serum. There were significant differences in self-reported anxiety levels before and after touch massage (p = 0.007), this was not observed in the control group (p = 0.833). There was a significant difference in self-reported anxiety levels between the touch massage group and the control group after touch massage and rest (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences in physiological stress-related outcome parameters between patients who received touch massage and controls. In our study, touch massage decreased anxiety levels in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery, and the British Medical Research Council framework was a useful guideline for the development, evaluation and reporting of a touch massage intervention. Touch massage can reduce patients' anxiety levels and is thus an important nursing intervention in

  2. The Effect of Upper Limb Massage on Infants' Venipuncture Pain.

    PubMed

    Chik, Yuen-Man; Ip, Wan-Yim; Choi, Kai-Chow

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of upper limb massage on relieving pain among infants undergoing venipuncture in Hong Kong. This study was a crossover, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Eighty infants at the neonatal intensive care unit were randomly assigned to 2 groups in different order to receive interventions. The massage first group (N = 40) received 2-minute massage before venipuncture on the first occasion then received usual care (control) on the second occasion, and vice versa in the massage second group (N = 40). The infants' behavior and physiological responses were recorded on two occasions: (1) right after the intervention and (2) during the first 30 seconds of venipuncture procedure. The mean pain scores (Premature Infant Pain Profile) were significantly lower in infants who received massage (massage first: 6.0 [standard deviation = 3.3]; massage second: 7.30 [standard deviation = 4.4]) versus control (massage first: 12.0 [standard deviation = 4.3]; massage second: 12.7 [standard deviation = 3.1]). The crude and adjusted generalized estimating equations model showed that the infants had significantly lower pain score when receiving massage as compared to receiving the control treatment, and there were no significant time and carryover effects: -6.03 (95% confidence interval: -7.67 to -4.38), p < .001 and -5.96 (95% confidence interval: -7.56 to -4.36), p < .001, respectively. Upper limb massage may be effective in decreasing infants' venipuncture pain perception. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Father-Infant Interactions Are Enhanced by Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Christy; Field, Tiffany; Escalona, Angelica; Hartshorn, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examined the impact of fathers giving massages to their infants, ages 3 to 14 months, for 15 minutes prior to their daily bedtime for 1 month. Found that fathers who had massaged their infants were more expressive and showed more enjoyment and more warmth during floor-play interactions with their infants than did fathers in the wait-list control…

  4. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  5. Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany M.; Quintino, Olga; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Koslovsky, Gabrielle

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-eight adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were provided either massage therapy or relaxation therapy for 10 consecutive school days. The massage therapy group, but not the relaxation therapy group, self-rated as happier, and observers rated them as fidgeting less following the sessions. Teachers reported more time on…

  6. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  7. Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany M.; Quintino, Olga; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Koslovsky, Gabrielle

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-eight adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were provided either massage therapy or relaxation therapy for 10 consecutive school days. The massage therapy group, but not the relaxation therapy group, self-rated as happier, and observers rated them as fidgeting less following the sessions. Teachers reported more time on…

  8. Neural correlates of a single-session massage treatment.

    PubMed

    Sliz, D; Smith, A; Wiebking, C; Northoff, G; Hayley, S

    2012-03-01

    The current study investigated the immediate neurophysiological effects of different types of massage in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Much attention has been given to the default mode network, a set of brain regions showing greater activity in the resting state. These regions (i.e. insula, posterior and anterior cingulate, inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortices) have been postulated to be involved in the neural correlates of consciousness, specifically in arousal and awareness. We posit that massage would modulate these same regions given the benefits and pleasant affective properties of touch. To this end, healthy participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 1. Swedish massage, 2. reflexology, 3. massage with an object or 4. a resting control condition. The right foot was massaged while each participant performed a cognitive association task in the scanner. We found that the Swedish massage treatment activated the subgenual anterior and retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortices. This increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal was maintained only in the former brain region during performance of the cognitive task. Interestingly, the reflexology massage condition selectively affected the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate in the resting state, whereas massage with the object augmented the BOLD response in this region during the cognitive task performance. These findings should have implications for better understanding how alternative treatments might affect resting state neural activity and could ultimately be important for devising new targets in the management of mood disorders.

  9. Father-Infant Interactions Are Enhanced by Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Christy; Field, Tiffany; Escalona, Angelica; Hartshorn, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examined the impact of fathers giving massages to their infants, ages 3 to 14 months, for 15 minutes prior to their daily bedtime for 1 month. Found that fathers who had massaged their infants were more expressive and showed more enjoyment and more warmth during floor-play interactions with their infants than did fathers in the wait-list control…

  10. Effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Hongsuwan, Chanawong; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Thai massage on physical fitness in soccer players. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-four soccer players were randomly assigned to receive either rest (the control group) or three 30-minute sessions of Thai massage over a period of 10 days. Seven physical fitness tests consisting of sit and reach, hand grip strength, 40 yards technical agility, 50-meter sprint, sit-ups, push-ups, and VO2, max were measured before and after Thai massage or rest. [Results] All the physical fitness tests were significantly improved after a single session of Thai massage, whereas only the sit and reach, and the sit-ups tests were improved in the control group. [Conclusion] Thai massage could provide an improvement in physical performance in soccer players. PMID:25729203

  11. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  12. Massage therapy for essential hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X J; Li, S J; Zhang, Y Q

    2015-03-01

    Massage, an ancient Chinese healing art, is widely practiced for symptom relief in hypertensive patients with anxiety, depression, headache, vertigo, chronic pain in neck, shoulder and back. A large number of case series and clinical trials have been published. However, it is still unclear whether massage can be recommended as an effective therapy for essential hypertension (EH). We estimated the current clinical evidence of massage for EH. Articles published before 10 December 2013 were searched using Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang data and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials comparing massage with any type of control intervention were included. Trials testing massage combined with antihypertensive drugs versus antihypertensive drugs were included as well. Meta-analysis was performed on the effects on blood pressure (BP). Twenty-four articles involving 1962 patients with EH were selected. Methodological quality of most trials was evaluated as generally low. Meta-analyses demonstrated that massage combined with antihypertensive drugs may be more effective than antihypertensive drugs alone in lowering both systolic BP (SBP; mean difference (MD): -6.92 (-10.05, -3.80); P<0.0001) and diastolic BP (MD: -3.63 (-6.18, -1.09); P=0.005); massage appears beneficial for reducing SBP (MD: -3.47 (-5.39, -1.56); P=0.0004) for hypertensive patients as compared with antihypertensive drugs. Safety of massage is still unclear. There is some encouraging evidence of massage for EH. However, because of poor methodological quality, the evidence remains weak. Rigorously designed trials are needed to validate the use of massage in future.

  13. Massage and touch therapy in neonates: the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Anjali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Gupta, Piyush; Sharma, Harsh; Agrawal, R K

    2010-09-01

    Infant massage was first introduced in China in 2nd century BC. Massaging the newborn has been a tradition in India and other Asian countries since time immemorial. Various oil-based preparations have been used depending on the regional availability. There has been a recent surge in this ancient art particularly as a therapy among parents and professionals in the Western world. Evidence exists supporting the benefits of touch and massage therapy. We reviewed the literature to look at the various techniques of providing massage, its benefits, possible mechanism of action and adverse effects. The review suggests that massage has several positive effects in terms of weight gain, better sleep-wake pattern, enhanced neuromotor development, better emotional bonding, reduced rates of nosocomial infection and thereby, reduced mortality in the hospitalized patients. Many studies have described the technique and frequency of this procedure. Massage was found to be more useful when some kind of lubricant oil was used. Harmful effects like physical injury and increased risk of infection were encountered when performed inappropriately. The review also discusses the different hypotheses put forward regarding the mechanism of action. As of now there are very few studies describing the long term impact of neonatal massage.

  14. Children with cystic fibrosis benefit from massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Reif, M; Field, T; Krasnegor, J; Martinez, E; Schwartzman, M; Mavunda, K

    1999-04-01

    To measure the effects of parents giving massage therapy to their children with cystic fibrosis to reduce anxiety in parents and their children and to improve the children's mood and peak air flow readings. Twenty children (5-12 years old) with cystic fibrosis and their parents were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a reading control group. Parents in the treatment group were instructed and asked to conduct a 20-minute child massage every night at bedtime for one month. Parents in the reading control group were instructed to read for 20 minutes a night with their child for one month. On days 1 and 30, parents and children answered questions relating to present anxiety levels and children answered questions relating to mood, and their peak air flow was measured. Following the first and last massage session, children and parents reported reduced anxiety. Mood and peak air flow readings also improved for children in the massage therapy group. These findings suggest that parents may reduce anxiety levels by massaging their children with cystic fibrosis and their children may benefit from receiving massage by having less anxiety and improved mood, which in turn may facilitate breathing.

  15. Massage for Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Report

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Sara L.; Lown, E. Anne; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Dunn, Elizabeth A.; Abrams, Donald I.; Horn, Biljana N.; Degelman, Marcia; Cowan, Morton J.; Mehling, Wolf E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child. PMID:22474526

  16. Qualitative study of women's experience after therapeutic massage

    PubMed Central

    Garakyaraghi, Mohammad; Givi, Mahshid; Moeini, Mahin; Eshghinezhad, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension has become a major problem throughout the world, especially in developing countries like Iran. As it is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, even small reductions in the prevalence can have potentially large public health benefits. Among the complementary methods, massage provides an effective means to lower the blood pressure. If nurses perceive the experiences of hypertensive patients receiving massage, they can use massage more effectively in their care plan. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive phenomenological study. Deep interviews were conducted with nine prehypertensive women who received Swedish massage three times a week in a total of 10 sessions, with each session lasting 10-15 min. Then, the researcher conducted an interview using a ‘grand tour question (open ended question) and the participants were then encouraged to speak freely explaining their thoughts and feelings about the experience of massage therapy. Data analysis was done by Colaizzi's method. Validity and reliability were obtained through measures such as real value, applicability, continuity, and authenticity. Results: Women evaluated the massage therapy positively. The findings yielded six themes, including relaxation, sleeping better, reduction of anxiety and tension, reduction of fatigue, invigorating experience, improve connecting. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a body-centered intervention like massage can be valuable in a multidisciplinary approach to women with prehypertension. This method is easy to learn and relatively short (10-15 min) to administer as a suitable complement in nursing care for this group of patients. PMID:25183981

  17. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness.

  18. Massage therapy for cardiac surgery patients--a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Braun, Lesley A; Stanguts, Catherine; Casanelia, Lisa; Spitzer, Ondine; Paul, Eldho; Vardaxis, Nicholas J; Rosenfeldt, Franklin

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether massage significantly reduces anxiety, pain, and muscular tension and enhances relaxation compared with an equivalent period of rest time after cardiac surgery. The feasibility of delivering the treatment, effects on heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate, and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Elective cardiac surgery patients were randomized to receive massage or rest time at 2 points after surgery. Visual analog scales were used to measure pain, anxiety, relaxation, muscular tension, and satisfaction. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure were measured before and after treatment. Focus groups and feedback were used to collect qualitative data about clinical significance and feasibility. A total of 152 patients (99% response rate) participated. Massage therapy produced a significantly greater reduction in pain (P = .001), anxiety (P < .0001), and muscular tension (P = .002) and increases in relaxation (P < .0001) and satisfaction (P = .016) compared to the rest time. No significant differences were seen for heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure. Pain was significantly reduced after massage on day 3 or 4 (P < .0001) and day 5 or 6 (P = .003). The control group experienced no significant change at either time. Anxiety (P < .0001) and muscular tension (P < .0001) were also significantly reduced in the massage group at both points. Relaxation was significantly improved on day 3 or 4 for both groups (massage, P < .0001; rest time, P = .006), but only massage was effective on day 5 or 6 (P < .0001). Nurses and physiotherapists observed patient improvements and helped facilitate delivery of the treatment by the massage therapists on the ward. Massage therapy significantly reduced the pain, anxiety, and muscular tension and improves relaxation and satisfaction after cardiac surgery. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Salicylate toxicity from ingestion of traditional massage oil

    PubMed Central

    Muniandy, Rajesh Kumar; Sinnathamby, Vellan

    2012-01-01

    A 16-month-old child developed a brief generalised tonic–clonic fitting episode and vomiting at home, after accidental ingestion of traditional massage oil. As the patient presented with clinical features of salicylate toxicity, appropriate management was instituted. He was admitted to the intensive care unit for multiorgan support. The child was discharged well 1 week after the incident. Methyl-salicylate is a common component of massage oils which are used for topical treatment of joint and muscular pains. However, these massage oils may be toxic when taken orally. Early recognition of the salicylate toxicity is very important in producing a good patient outcome. PMID:22922924

  20. Health Information in Somali (Af-Soomaali )

    MedlinePlus

    ... Af-Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Lumbar Puncture - Af-Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Neuromuscular Disorders EMG and Nerve Conduction Tests - Af-Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  1. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium†

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Travillian, Ravensara S.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. Purpose To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. Setting A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Participants Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Design Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Results Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. Discussion The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Conclusions Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues. PMID:27648109

  2. Effectiveness of focused structural massage and relaxation massage for chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cherkin, Daniel C; Sherman, Karen J; Kahn, Janet; Erro, Janet H; Deyo, Richard A; Haneuse, Sebastien J; Cook, Andrea J

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic back pain is a major public health problem and the primary reason patients seek massage treatment. Despite the growing use of massage for chronic low back pain, there have been few studies of its effectiveness. This trial will be the first evaluation of the effectiveness of relaxation massage for chronic back pain and the first large trial of a focused structural form of massage for this condition. Methods and Design A total of 399 participants (133 in each of three arms) between the ages of 20 and 65 years of age who have low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from an integrated health care delivery system. They will be randomized to one of two types of massage ("focused structural massage" or "relaxation massage"), or continued usual medical care. Ten massage treatments will be provided over 10 weeks. The primary outcomes, standard measures of dysfunction and bothersomeness of low back pain, will be assessed at baseline and after 10, 26, and 52 weeks by telephone interviewers masked to treatment assignment. General health status, satisfaction with back care, days of back-related disability, perceived stress, and use and costs of healthcare services for back pain will also be measured. Outcomes across assigned treatment groups will be compared using generalized estimating equations, accounting for participant correlation and adjusted for baseline value, age, and sex. For both primary outcome measures, this trial will have at least 85% power to detect the presence of a minimal clinically significant difference among the three treatment groups and 91% power for pairwise comparisons. Secondary analyses will compare the proportions of participants in each group that improve by a clinically meaningful amount. Conclusion Results of this trial will help clarify the value of two types of massage therapy for chronic low back pain. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT 00371384. PMID:19843340

  3. The effectiveness of massage based on the tensegrity principle compared with classical abdominal massage performed on patients with constipation.

    PubMed

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Wilk, Iwona; Brzozowski, Marcin; Voyce, Kamila; Jaworska-Krawiecka, Ewa; Nowak, Barbara; Kurpas, Donata

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of massage based on the tensegrity principle and classical abdominal massage performed on patients with constipation. The study group consisted of 29 subjects with a pre-existing diagnosis of constipation based on the Rome III criteria. The patients were divided into two groups: the first group was made up of 15 patients who underwent tensegrity massage (average age: 59.8 years), and the second was made up of 14 patients who were given classical abdominal massage (average age: 55.7 years). The study consisted of six massage sessions in both groups, with two sessions per week performed over 21 days. The assessment was based on a patient questionnaire, the Rome III questionnaire and a diary of bowel movements. The results were analyzed before therapy, after one week of therapy and after the third (final) week of therapy. Changes in the number of defecations were compared between the two groups; the biggest changes occurred in the first and third week of therapy (P<0.01, calculated by the Mann-Whitey test). As a result of the therapy, tension during defecation dropped from 60% to 20% in Group I, and from 42.8% to 35.7% in Group II. The influence of the applied therapy was evaluated positively by 80% of the tensegrity massage group and 29% of the classical abdominal massage group. Massage based on the tensegrity principle may have a greater positive influence on the quality and quantity of bowel movements than classical abdominal massage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Construction of Intelligent Massage System Based on Human Skin-Muscle Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramae, Tatsuya; Kushida, Daisuke; Takemori, Fumiaki; Kitamura, Akira

    A present massage chair realizes the massage motion and force designed by a professional masseur. However, appropriate massage force to the user cannot be provided by the massage chair in such a method. On the other hand, the professional masseur can realize an appropriate massage force to more than one patient, because, the masseur considers the physical condition of the patient. This paper proposes the method of applying masseur's procedure to the massage chair. Then, the proposed method is composed by estimation of the physical condition of user, decision of massage force based on the physical condition and realization of massage force by the force control. The realizability of the proposed method is verified by the experimental work using the massage chair.

  5. Effect of therapeutic Swedish massage on anxiety level and vital signs of Intensive Care Unit patients.

    PubMed

    Alves da Silva, Tatiana; Stripari Schujmann, Debora; Yamada da Silveira, Leda Tomiko; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Fu, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate how Swedish massage affects the level of anxiety and vital signs of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Quasi-experimental study. ICU patients, 18-50 years old, cooperative, respiratory and hemodynamic stable, not under invasive mechanical ventilation. allergic to massage oil, vascular or orthopedic post-operative, skin lesions, thrombosis, fractures. A 30-min Swedish massage was applied once. arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, S-STAI questionnaire. Timing of evaluation: pre-massage, immediately post-massage, 30 min post-massage. Comparison: T-test, corrected by Bonferroni method, level of significance of 5%, confidence interval of 95%. 48 patients included, 30 (62.5%) female, mean age 55.46 (15.70) years old. Mean S-STAI pre-massage: 42.51 (9.48); immediately post-massage: 29.34 (6.37); 30 min post-massage: 32.62 (8.56), p < 0.001 for all comparison. Mean vital signs achieved statistical significance between pre-massage and immediately post-massage. Swedish massage reduced anxiety of ICU patients immediately and 30 min post-massage. Vital signs were reduced immediately post-massage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 9. THERMOSTAT IN LADIES MASSAGE ROOM. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. THERMOSTAT IN LADIES MASSAGE ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  7. Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review.

    PubMed

    Myers, Cynthia D; Walton, Tracy; Bratsman, Lindsay; Wilson, Jennifer; Small, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The results of several studies on the use of massage therapies for cancer patients have been published in the peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years. The current article provides a summary and critique of published studies in which patient-reported symptom ratings were assessed in relation to massage. Twenty-two studies are discussed. Most studies were on Swedish massage, followed by aromatherapy massage, foot reflexology, and acupressure. Symptoms assessed as outcomes included pain, fatigue, anxiety, nausea, and depression. Study designs included uncontrolled observational studies, crossover designs, and quasiexperimental and randomized controlled studies. Several studies included methodologic limitations such as small sample sizes, lack of blinded assessment, lack of accounting for subject attrition in statistical analyses, and other limitations. The results of the studies reviewed are mixed and vary as a function of several study characteristics. The most consistent symptom reduction was anxiety reduction. Additional well-designed studies are needed. Several recommendations are offered for future studies.

  8. Fibromyalgia benefits from massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, W; Field, T M; Quintino, O; Fierro, K; Kuhn, C; Burman, I; Schanberg, S

    1996-02-01

    Thirty adult fibromyalgia syndrome subjects were randomly assigned to a massage therapy, a transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS), or a transcutaneous electrical stimulation no-current group (Sham TENS) for 30-minute treatment sessions two times per week for 5 weeks. The massage therapy subjects reported lower anxiety and depression, and their cortisol levels were lower immediately after the therapy sessions on the first and last days of the study. The TENS group showed similar changes, but only after therapy on the last day of the study. The massage therapy group improved on the dolorimeter measure of pain. They also reported less pain the last week, less stiffness and fatigue, and fewer nights of difficult sleeping. Thus, massage therapy was the most effective therapy with these fibromyalgia patients.

  9. Adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder benefit from massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Field, T M; Quintino, O; Hernandez-Reif, M; Koslovsky, G

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-eight adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were provided either massage therapy or relaxation therapy for 10 consecutive school days. The massage therapy group, but not the relaxation therapy group, rated themselves as happier and observers rated them as fidgeting less following the sessions. After the 2-week period, their teachers reported more time on task and assigned them lower hyperactivity scores based on classroom behavior.

  10. Concussion Treatment Using Massage Techniques: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Sylvia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Concussion, its recognition, diagnosis, and treatment is a growing public health issue. Massage practitioners who specialize in rehabilitation deal with a variety of injury cases that involve concussion, including those incurred by falls, motor vehicle incidents, and sports injuries. Purpose This case study presents a unique massage therapy approach to concussion trauma treatment. Participant Male 23-year-old intramural soccer player diagnosed with postconcussion syndrome resulting from a fall. Intervention Assessment and treatment were completed in two sessions of 45 minutes spaced two days apart. Massage therapy techniques were applied to injury areas by a Licensed Massage Practitioner. Results Using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) and self-report, the outcome measures showed diminished concussion symptoms and regained ease in range of motion in the cervical area. Conclusion Positive results for this case highlight the potential importance of massage therapy work to reduce headache, dizziness, and nausea in concussion recovery. In the presence of such outcomes, massage therapy may also have a supportive role in a person’s return to function after concussion. PMID:26082825

  11. The effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, J; Sforzo, G; Swensen, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Methods: Eighteen volunteers were randomly assigned to either a massage or control group. DOMS was induced with six sets of eight maximal eccentric contractions of the right hamstring, which were followed 2 h later by 20 min of massage or sham massage (control). Peak torque and mood were assessed at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Range of motion (ROM) and intensity and unpleasantness of soreness were assessed at 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Neutrophil count was assessed at 6 and 24 h postexercise. Results: A two factor ANOVA (treatment v time) with repeated measures on the second factor showed no significant treatment differences for peak torque, ROM, neutrophils, unpleasantness of soreness, and mood (p > 0.05). The intensity of soreness, however, was significantly lower in the massage group relative to the control group at 48 h postexercise (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage administered 2 h after exercise induced muscle injury did not improve hamstring function but did reduce the intensity of soreness 48 h after muscle insult. PMID:12547748

  12. Effect of Rolling Massage on the Vortex Flow in Blood Vessels with Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou Hui

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese Medical Massage, which is a nature therapy in eliminating many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on the cavity flows in blood vessel under the rolling manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the vortex flows are fully disturbed by the rolling massage. The flow behavior depends on the rolling velocity and the rolling depth. Rolling massage has a better effect on the flows in the cavity than that of the flows in a planar blood vessel. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  13. [A comparison between effects of aroma massage and meridian massage on constipation and stress in women college students].

    PubMed

    Chung, Miyoung; Choi, Euysoon

    2011-02-01

    This study was done to compare the effects of abdominal aroma massage and meridian massage on constipation and stress in college women with functional constipation. The participants were 38 college women, 18 were in the aroma group and 20 in the meridian group. The aroma massage was given using aroma oil which was a mixture of lemon, lavender, rosemary, and cyprus. The meridian massage was given at 9 accupoints which influence intestinal functions. The treatment was given 5 days a week for 4 weeks. A constipation severity score, weekly defecation frequency, and a stress response score were measured before and every week of 4 weeks of the experiment. While there was no significant difference between two groups, there was a significant difference within the groups in the constipation severity (aroma group: 1st week, meridian group: except 4th week), defecation frequency (aroma group: 3rd week, meridian group: 2nd and 3rd week), and stress (aroma group: all weeks, meridian group: except 4th week) after different duration of experiment. Based on these results, both abdominal massages relieved constipation and stress. Resorting to either types of massage will contribute to the reduction of use of stool softeners, suppositories, or enemas.

  14. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  15. The force control and path planning of electromagnetic induction-based massage robot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jinzhe; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Shi, Yikai; Jiang, Qinqin; He, Lijing

    2017-07-20

    Massage robot is considered as an effective physiological treatment to relieve fatigue, improve blood circulation, relax muscle tone, etc. The simple massage equipment quickly spread into market due to low cost, but they are not widely accepted due to restricted massage function. Complicated structure and high cost caused difficulties for developing multi-function massage equipment. This paper presents a novel massage robot which can achieve tapping, rolling, kneading and other massage operations, and proposes an improved reciprocating path planning algorithm to improve massage effect. The number of coil turns, the coil current and the distance between massage head and yoke were chosen to investigate the influence on massage force by finite element method. The control system model of the wheeled massage robot was established, including control subsystem of the motor, path algorithm control subsystem, parameter module of the massage robot and virtual reality interface module. The improved reciprocating path planning algorithm was proposed to improve regional coverage rate and massage effect. The influence caused by coil current, the number of coil turns and the distance between massage head and yoke were simulated in Maxwell. It indicated that coil current has more important influence compared to the other two factors. The path planning simulation of the massage robot was completed in Matlab, and the results show that the improved reciprocating path planning algorithm achieved higher coverage rate than the traditional algorithm. With the analysis of simulation results, it can be concluded that the number of coil turns and the distance between the moving iron core and the yoke could be determined prior to coil current, and the force can be controllable by optimizing structure parameters of massage head and adjusting coil current. Meanwhile, it demonstrates that the proposed algorithm could effectively improve path coverage rate during massage operations, therefore

  16. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ≥4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ≤ .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was

  17. Massage for symptom relief in patients with cancer: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Susie; Barnes, Kelly; Storey, Lesley

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a review to assess evidence of the effectiveness of massage for patients with cancer, in terms of reducing physical or psychological symptoms, improving quality of life, or producing unwanted side effects. Patients with cancer may use complementary therapies, including massage and aromatherapy massage. However, their use and provision by state-financed healthcare services is controversial. A systematic review was carried out, using the Cochrane principles. No meta-analysis was appropriate. An initial comprehensive search of electronic databases search was carried out in 2003 and updated in 2006. Eligible trials were randomized controlled trials, controlled before-and-after (pre-post) studies and interrupted time-series studies. Participants were adults with a diagnosis of cancer and receiving care in any healthcare setting. Interventions were limited to massage and/or aromatherapy massage carried out by a qualified therapist. Outcome measures to be included were patient-reported levels of physical and psychological indices of symptom distress and quality of life (measured using validated assessment tools). In the review, 1325 papers were considered. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria and their results suggest that massage might reduce anxiety in patients with cancer in the short term and may have a beneficial effect on physical symptoms of cancer, such as pain and nausea. However, the lack of rigorous research evidence precludes drawing definitive conclusions. Further well-designed large trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy and effectiveness of massage for cancer patients.

  18. Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Y Z Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain Share: © Bob ... study found that multiple 60-minute massages per week were more effective than fewer or shorter sessions ...

  19. Many Benefits, Little Risk: The Use of Massage in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Westman, Kathryn F; Blaisdell, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Since ancient times, massage therapy has been used to promote healing by people of all backgrounds and cultures. Massage therapy was once taught as a core nursing skill, but it gradually lost ground in the United States during the second half of the 20th century with the increased use of technology and documentation in nursing. In recent years, however, there has been a resurgence in the use of massage therapy. Research has provided insight into the mechanisms by which massage supports the healing process, and this has sparked support for including massage therapy in routine hospital care. In this article, the authors touch on the history of massage in nursing care and discuss its emotional and physiologic benefits for both patient and nurse. They describe specific massage techniques and discuss precautions to consider before using massage with certain patients.

  20. The Effects of Massage Therapy to Induce Sleep in Infants Born Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Charlotte C.; Mitchell, Anita J.; Booth, Melissa Y.; Williams, D. Keith; Lowe, Leah M.; Hall, Richard Whit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine if massage therapy can be used as an adjunct intervention to induce sleep in infants born preterm. Methods Thirty infants born at a minimum of 28 weeks gestational age (GA), who were at the time of the study between 32-48 weeks adjusted GA, were randomly assigned to receive massage therapy on 1 day and not receive massage on an alternate day. The Motionlogger® Micro Sleep Watch® Actigraph recorded lower extremity activity on the morning of each day. Results No significant difference was found between groups for sleep efficiency (P=.13) for the time period evaluated. Groups differed significantly during the time period after the massage ended with more infants sleeping on the non-massage day (Χ2= 4.9802, P=.026). Conclusions Massage is well tolerated in infants born preterm and infants do not fall asleep faster after massage than without massage. PMID:25251794

  1. Aromatherapy and massage for symptom relief in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fellowes, D; Barnes, K; Wilkinson, S

    2004-01-01

    Aromatherapy massage is a commonly used complementary therapy, and is employed in cancer and palliative care largely to improve quality of life and reduce psychological distress. To investigate whether aromatherapy and/or massage decreases psychological morbidity, lessens symptom distress and/or improves the quality of life in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. We searched CENTRAL (Cochrane Library Issue 1 2002), MEDLINE (1966 to May week 3 2002), CINAHL (1982 to April 2002), British Nursing Index (1994 to April 2002), EMBASE (1980 to Week 25 2002), AMED (1985 to April 2002), PsycINFO (1887 to April week 4 2002), SIGLE (1980 to March 2002), CancerLit (1975 to April 2002) and Dissertation Abstracts International (1861 to March 2002). Reference lists of relevant articles were searched for additional studies. We sought randomised controlled trials; controlled before and after studies; and interrupted time series studies of aromatherapy and/or massage for patients with cancer, that measured changes in patient-reported levels of physical or psychological distress or quality of life using reliable and valid tools. Two reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion in the review, assessed study quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted where information was unclear. The search strategy retrieved 1322 references. Ten reports met the inclusion criteria and these represented eight RCTs (357 patients). The most consistently found effect of massage or aromatherapy massage was on anxiety. Four trials (207 patients) measuring anxiety detected a reduction post intervention, with benefits of 19-32% reported. Contradictory evidence exists as to any additional benefit on anxiety conferred by the addition of aromatherapy. The evidence for the impact of massage/aromatherapy on depression was variable. Of the three trials (120 patients) that assessed depression in cancer patients, only one found any significant differences in this symptom. Three studies (117

  2. The effect of abdominal massage in reducing malignant ascites symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Wang, Hung-Ming; Yang, Tsai-Sheng; Jane, Sui-Whi; Huang, Tse-Hung; Wang, Chao-Hui; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2015-02-01

    As many as 50% of end-stage cancer patients will develop ascites and associated symptoms, including pain, tiredness, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, loss of appetite, dyspnea, perceived abdominal bloating, and immobility. Abdominal massage may stimulate lymph return to the venous system and reduce ascites-related symptoms. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of abdominal massage in reducing these symptoms and reducing ascites itself as reflected in body weight. For a randomized controlled design using repeated measures, a sample of 80 patients with malignant ascites was recruited from gastroenterology and oncology units of a medical center in northern Taiwan and randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. A 15-minute gentle abdominal massage, using straight rubbing, point rubbing, and kneading, was administered twice daily for 3 days. The control group received a twice-daily 15-minute social interaction contact with the same nurse. Symptoms and body weight were measured in the morning for 4 consecutive days from pre- to post-test. In generalized estimation equation modeling, a significant group-by-time interaction on depression, anxiety, poor wellbeing, and perceived abdominal bloating, indicated that abdominal massage improved these four symptoms, with the greatest effect on perceived bloating. The intervention had no effect on pain, tiredness, nausea, drowsiness, poor appetite, shortness of breath, mobility limitation, or body weight. Abdominal massage appears useful for managing selected symptoms of malignant ascites.

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of massage on nonperturbed skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2013-01-01

    Massage is an ancient manual therapy widely utilized by individuals seeking relief from various musculoskeletal maladies. Despite its popularity, the majority of evidence associated with massage benefits is anecdotal. Recent investigations have uncovered physiological evidence supporting its beneficial use following muscle injury; however, the effects of massage on healthy, unperturbed skeletal muscle are unknown. Utilizing a custom-fabricated massage mimetic device, the purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of various loading magnitudes on healthy skeletal muscle with particular interest in the gene expression profile and modulation of key immune cells involved in the inflammatory response. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (200 g) were subjected to cyclic compressive loading (CCL) over the right tibialis anterior muscle for 30 min, once a day, for 4 consecutive days using four loading conditions: control (0N), low load (1.4N), moderate load (4.5N), and high load (11N). Microarray analysis showed that genes involved with the immune response were the most significantly affected by application of CCL. Load-dependent changes in cellular abundance were seen in the CCL limb for CD68+ cells, CD163+ cells, and CD43+cells. Surprisingly, load-independent changes were also discovered in the non-CCL contralateral limb, suggesting a systemic response. These results show that massage in the form of CCL exerts an immunomodulatory response to uninjured skeletal muscle, which is dependent upon the applied load. PMID:24201707

  4. Massage Changes Babies' Body, Brain and Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Chihiro; Shiga, Takashi

    Tactile stimulation is an important factor in mother-infant interactions. Many studies on both human and animals have shown that tactile stimulation during the neonatal period has various beneficial effects in the subsequent growth of the body and brain. In particular, massage is often applied to preterm human babies as “touch care”, because tactile stimulation together with kinesthetic stimulation increases body weight, which is accompanied by behavioral development and the changes of endocrine and neural conditions. Among them, the elevation of insulin-like growth factor-1, catecholamine, and vagus nerve activity may underlie the body weight gain. Apart from the body weight gain, tactile stimulation has various effects on the nervous system and endocrine system. For example, it has been reported that tactile stimulation on human and animal babies activates parasympathetic nervous systems, while suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenalcortical (HPA) axis, which may be related to the reduction of emotionality, anxiety-like behavior, and pain sensitivity. In addition, animal experiments have shown that tactile stimulation improves learning and memory. Facilitation of the neuronal activity and the morphological changes including the hippocampal synapse may underlie the improvement of the learning and memory. In conclusion, it has been strongly suggested that tactile stimulation in early life has beneficial effects on body, brain structure and function, which are maintained throughout life.

  5. Massage induces an immediate, albeit short-term, reduction in muscle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Crommert, M; Lacourpaille, L; Heales, L J; Tucker, K; Hug, F

    2015-10-01

    Using ultrasound shear wave elastography, the aims of this study were: (a) to evaluate the effect of massage on stiffness of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle and (b) to determine whether this effect (if any) persists over a short period of rest. A 7-min massage protocol was performed unilaterally on MG in 18 healthy volunteers. Measurements of muscle shear elastic modulus (stiffness) were performed bilaterally (control and massaged leg) in a moderately stretched position at three time points: before massage (baseline), directly after massage (follow-up 1), and following 3 min of rest (follow-up 2). Directly after massage, participants rated pain experienced during the massage. MG shear elastic modulus of the massaged leg decreased significantly at follow-up 1 (-5.2 ± 8.8%, P = 0.019, d = -0.66). There was no difference between follow-up 2 and baseline for the massaged leg (P = 0.83) indicating that muscle stiffness returned to baseline values. Shear elastic modulus was not different between time points in the control leg. There was no association between perceived pain during the massage and stiffness reduction (r = 0.035; P = 0.89). This is the first study to provide evidence that massage reduces muscle stiffness. However, this effect is short lived and returns to baseline values quickly after cessation of the massage.

  6. 21 CFR 872.6650 - Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene. 872.6650... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6650 Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene. (a) Identification. A massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene is a rigid, pointed device...

  7. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  8. Development of a taxonomy to describe massage treatments for musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J; Dixon, Marian W; Thompson, Diana; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the challenges in conducting research in the field of massage and bodywork is the lack of consistent terminology for describing the treatments given by massage therapists. The objective of this study was to develop a taxonomy to describe what massage therapists actually do when giving a massage to patients with musculoskeletal pain. Methods After conducting a review of the massage treatment literature for musculoskeletal pain, a list of candidate techniques was generated for possible inclusion in the taxonomy. This list was modified after discussions with a senior massage therapist educator and seven experienced massage therapists participating in a study of massage for neck pain. Results The taxonomy was conceptualized as a three level classification system, principal goals of treatment, styles, and techniques. Four categories described the principal goal of treatment (i.e., relaxation massage, clinical massage, movement re-education and energy work). Each principal goal of treatment could be met using a number of different styles, with each style consisting of a number of specific techniques. A total of 36 distinct techniques were identified and described, many of which could be included in multiple styles. Conclusion A new classification system is presented whereby practitioners using different styles of massage can describe the techniques they employ using consistent terminology. This system could help facilitate standardized reporting of massage interventions. PMID:16796753

  9. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  10. Massage--the scientific basis of an ancient art: Part 2. Physiological and therapeutic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Goats, G C

    1994-01-01

    The physiological and therapeutic effects of massage are frequently questioned. This article reviews previous research into the effects of massage on blood flow and composition, oedema, connective tissue, muscle and the nervous system. Although further investigations are clearly required in certain areas, the discussion demonstrates that the use of massage in sports medicine can be justified according to orthodox scientific criteria. PMID:8000810

  11. A new AF gravitational instanton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Teo, Edward

    2011-09-01

    It has long been conjectured that the Euclidean Schwarzschild and Euclidean Kerr instantons are the only non-trivial asymptotically flat (AF) gravitational instantons. In this Letter, we show that this conjecture is false by explicitly constructing a new two-parameter AF gravitational instanton with a U (1) × U (1) isometry group, using the inverse-scattering method. It has Euler number χ = 3 and Hirzebruch signature τ = 1, and its global topology is CP2 with a circle S1 removed appropriately. Various other properties of this gravitational instanton are also discussed.

  12. The AFS Impact Study: Final Report. AFS Research Report 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansel, Bettina

    The AFS Impact Study, initiated in 1977, is an attempt to document changes in learning and personal development associated with an intercultural "homestay" program. Completed in 1985, the study identifies several areas in which students show greater learning and educational growth than that shown by a group of students who had expressed interest…

  13. Light pressure massage for patients with severe anxiety.

    PubMed

    Billhult, Annika; Määttä, Sylvia

    2009-05-01

    Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in the western world with a lifetime prevalence of 4.3 to 5.9% and is twice as common in women as in men. GAD can have a decisive impact on a patient's everyday life as it is surrounded by unfocused worries and the severe anxiety may interfere with normal social functions. The treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy and/or psychopharmacological drugs. In previous studies the positive effects of massage on anxiety have been shown. The present study described the experience of receiving massage for eight patients with GAD. Findings revealed that the patients were able to rediscover their own capacity during the massage period. This was illuminated by the experience of being relaxed in body and mind, the experience of unconditional attention, the experience of decreased anxiety and the experience of increased self-confidence. The paper ends with a discussion of clinical implications.

  14. The effects of massage in patients with chronic tension headache.

    PubMed

    Puustjärvi, K; Airaksinen, O; Pöntinen, P J

    1990-01-01

    21 female patients suffering from chronic tension headache received 10 sessions of upper body massage consisting of deep tissue techniques in addition to softer techniques in the beginning. When found, trigger points were carefully and forcefully massaged. The range of cervical movements, surface ENMG on mm. frontalis and trapezius, visual analogue scale (VAS) and Finnish Pain Questionnaire (FPQ), and the incidence of neck pain during a two week period before and after the treatment, and at 3 and 6 months during the follow-up period together with Beck depression inventory were taken for evaluation and follow-up. The range of movement in all directions increased, and FPQ, VAS and the number of days with neck pain decreased significantly. There was a significant change in ENMG on the frontalis muscle whereas changes in trapezius remained insignificant. Beck inventory showed an improvement after the treatment. This study confirmed clinical and physiological effects of massage.

  15. Admittance plethysmographic evaluation of undulatory massage for the edematous limb.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Z; Fujimori, Y; Wada, T; Togawa, T; Yamakoshi, K; Shimazu, H

    1979-03-01

    A new apparatus, called Hadomer has been developed for the treatment of peripheral lymphedema and venous disorder. It has cuffs with 5 rooms, through which the air pressure moves from periphery to proximal point, just like surging waves. The peripheral stagnant lymph and venous blood are displaced toward the heart by this pneumatic massage. Hadomer has been applied to more than 400 patients with the edematous limbs, with satisfactory results, such as decrease of swelling, pain and induration. These clinical results have been also confirmed by electrical admittance plethysmography which is useful to measure noninvasively the edematous volume and the blood flow. The admittance of the edematous limbs is high and after massaging with Hadomer it approaches normal range. The blood flow in the diseased limbs is less than the healthy one and it is observed better after pneumatically massaging.

  16. The Development and Validation of the Client Expectations of Massage Scale

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Karen T.; Campo, Shelly; Glanville, Jennifer L.; Lowe, John B; Yang, Jingzhen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although there is evidence that client expectations influence client outcomes, a valid and reliable scale for measuring the range of client expectations for both massage therapy and the behaviors of their massage therapists does not exist. Understanding how client expectations influence client outcomes would provide insight into how massage achieves its reported effects. Purpose: To develop and validate the Client Expectations of Massage Scale (CEMS), a measure of clients’ clinical, educational, interpersonal, and outcome expectations. Setting: Offices of licensed massage therapists in Iowa. Research Design: A practice-based research methodology was used to collect data from two samples of massage therapy clients. For Sample 1, 21 volunteer massage therapists collected data from their clients before the massage. Factor analysis was conducted to test construct validity and coefficient alpha was used to assess reliability. Correlational analyses with the CEMS, previous measures of client expectations, and the Life Orientation Test–Revised were examined to test the convergent and discriminant validity of the CEMS. For Sample 2, 24 massage therapists distributed study materials for clients to complete before and after a massage therapy session. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the construct, discriminant, and predictive validity of the CEMS. Participants: Sample 1 involved 320 and Sample 2 involved 321 adult massage clients. Intervention: Standard care provided by licensed massage therapists. Main Outcomes: Numeric Rating Scale for pain and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule–Revised (including the Serenity subscale). Results: The CEMS demonstrated good construct, convergent, discriminant and predictive validity, and adequate reliability. Client expectations were generally positive toward massage and their massage therapists. Positive outcome expectations had a positive effect on clients’ changes in pain and serenity. High

  17. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  18. Massage as a respite intervention for primary caregivers.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, G

    1998-01-01

    Effective hospice care is dependent upon a caregiver who is able to with-stand the physical and emotional ardors of the experience. Direct support for the family caretaker is as needed and valuable as the direct care hospice agencies provide to patients. Massage was found to be successful in addressing many of the stress of primary caregivers. Nearly all of those who participated in an outreach project that used massage as a respite intervention reported reduced physical and emotional stress, physical pain, and fewer sleep difficulties.

  19. Evaluation of massage with essential oils on childhood atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C; Lis-Balchin, M; Kirk-Smith, M

    2000-09-01

    Childhood atopic eczema is an increasingly common condition in young children. As well as being irritating to the child, it causes sleepless nights for both the child and the family and leads to difficulties in parental relationships and can have severe effects on employment. A group of eight children, born to professional working mothers were studied to test the hypothesis that massage with essential oils (aromatherapy) used as a complementary therapy in conjunction with normal medical treatment, would help to alleviate the symptoms of childhood atopic eczema. The children were randomly allocated to the massage with essential oils group and both counselled and massaged with a mixture of essential oils by the therapist once a week and the mother every day over a period of 8 weeks. The preferred essential oils, chosen by the mothers for their child, from 36 commonly used aromatherapy oils, were: sweet marjoram, frankinsence, German chamomile, myrrh, thyme, benzoin, spike lavender and Litsea cubeba. A control group of children received the counselling and massage without essential oils. The treatments were evaluated by means of daily day-time irritation scores and night time disturbance scores, determined by the mother before and during the treatment, both over an 8 week period; finally general improvement scores were allocated 2 weeks after the treatment by the therapist, the general practitioner and the mother. The study employed a single case experimental design across subjects, such that there were both a within-subject control and between-subjects control, through the interventions being introduced at different times. The results showed a significant improvement in the eczema in the two groups of children following therapy, but there was no significant difference in improvement shown between the aromatherapy massage and massage only group. Thus there is evidence that tactile contact between mother and child benefits the symptoms of atopic eczema but there is no

  20. Recent advances in massage therapy--a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, S-L; Qi, W; Li, H; Wang, Y-F; Yang, X-F; Li, Z-M; Lu, Q; Cong, D-Y

    2015-10-01

    Massage therapy is one of the most widely accepted alternative form of medicine helping patients suffering from varied pathological states including arthritis, anxiety, sleep problems, pain management and injury repair. Besides this, it is one of the safest forms of alternative medicine and has become favorite among various health care professionals. However, there is still a lot of debate is going in medical world pertaining to its certain use in modern medicine. So, the present review shall enlighten all the latest aspects of massage therapy in current medicine.

  1. Massage impairs postexercise muscle blood flow and "lactic acid" removal.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, E Victoria; Poitras, Veronica; Pak, Melissa; Hong, Terence; Rayner, Jay; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that one of the ways sports massage aids muscle recovery from exercise is by increasing muscle blood flow to improve "lactic acid" removal. Twelve subjects performed 2 min of strenuous isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise at 40% maximum voluntary contraction to elevate forearm muscle lactic acid. Forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler and Echo ultrasound of the brachial artery) and deep venous forearm blood lactate and H+ concentration ([La-], [H+]) were measured every minute for 10 min post-IHG under three conditions: passive (passive rest), active (rhythmic exercise at 10% maximum voluntary contraction), and massage (effleurage and pétrissage). Arterialized [La-] and [H+] from a superficial heated hand vein was measured at baseline. Data are presented as mean +/- SE. Venoarterial [La-] difference ([La-]v-a) at 30 s of post-IHG was the same across conditions (passive = 6.1 +/- 0.6 mmol x L(-1), active = 5.7 +/- 0.6 mmol x L(-1), massage = 5.5 +/- 0.6 mmol x L(-1), NS), whereas FBF was greater in passive (766 +/- 101 mL x min(-1)) versus active (614 +/- 62 mL x min(-1), P = 0.003) versus massage (540 +/- 60 mL x min(-1), P < 0.0001). Total FBF area under the curve (AUC) for 10 min after handgrip was significantly higher in passive versus massage (4203 +/- 531 vs 3178 +/- 304 mL, P = 0.024) but not versus active (3584 +/- 284 mL, P = 0.217). La(-)- efflux (FBF x [La-]v-a) AUC mirrored FBF AUC (passive = 20.5 +/- 2.8 mmol vs massage = 14.7 +/- 1.6 mmol, P = 0.03, vs active = 15.4 +/- 1.9 mmol, P = 0.064). H+ efflux (FBF x [H+]v-a) was greater in passive versus massage at 30 s (2.2 +/- 0.4e(-5) vs 1.3 +/- 0.2e(-5) mmol, P < 0.001) and 1.5 min (1.0 +/- 0.2e(-5) vs 0.6 +/- 0.09e(-5) mmol, P = 0.003) after IHG. Massage impairs La(-) and H+ removal from muscle after strenuous exercise by mechanically impeding blood flow.

  2. The Effectiveness of Thai Massage and Joint Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Juntakarn, Chantip; Prasartritha, Thavat; Petrakard, Prapoj

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a common health problem resulting from many risk factors and human behaviors. Some of these may interact synergistically and have been implicated in the cause of low back pain. Massage both traditional Thai massage and joint mobilization as a common practice has been shown to be effective for some subgroup of nonspecific LBP patients. Purpose and Setting The trial compared the effectiveness between traditional Thai massage and joint mobilization for treating nonspecific LBP. Some associated factors were included. The study was conducted at the orthopedic outpatient department, Lerdsin General Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Prospective, randomized study was developed without control group. The required sample size was estimated based on previous comparative studies for effectiveness between techniques. Two primary outcome measures were a 0 to 10 visual analog scale (VAS) of pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were satisfaction of patients and adverse effects of the treatment. The “intention to treat” (ITT) and per protocol approach were used to compare the significance of the difference between treatment groups Participants One hundred and twenty hospital outpatients, 20 (16.7%) male and 100 (83.3%) female, were randomized into traditional Thai massage and joint mobilization therapy. The average age of traditional Thai massage and joint mobilization was 50.7 years and 48.3 years, respectively. Both groups received each treatment for approximately 30 minutes twice per week over a four-week period. Total course did not exceed eight sessions. Result With ITT, the mean VAS of traditional Thai massage group before treatment was 5.3 (SD = 1.7) and ODI was 24.9 (SD = 14.7), while in joint mobilization groups, the mean VAS was 5.0 (SD = 1.6) and ODI was 24.6 (SD = 15). After treatment, the mean VAS and ODI were significantly reduced (VAS = 0.51 (SD = 0.89) and ODI = 8.1 (SD = 10.7) for

  3. Thai traditional massage: efficiency-assessment of three traditional massage methods on office workers: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Yoopat, Pongjan; Maes, Christophe; Poriau, Stefaan; Vanwonterghem, Kamiel

    2015-04-01

    Thai Traditional Massage (TTM) is popular and widely spread in Thailand. This project is aimed at studying the physiological efficiency of three popular TTM methods based on acupressure Meridian basal lines: the Sen Sib(SS) ten lines, Ratchsamnak (RS), Royal style; and Chaloeysak (CS), Folk style. Thirty healthy female administrative employees participated as patients. All were treated for 30 min with the 3 types of massage with a two-week interval between each treatment. Muscle strain was objectified by measuring strength and endurance with surface electromyography of muscle put under stress during office work: the M. Trapezius (static postural load) and the wrist muscles (M. flexors & extensors Carpi-Radialis) (dynamic contractions) as well as measuring the subjective Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after the sessions. An ANOVA-statistical analysis showed that strength in shoulders was not significantly different, but some forearm fatigue was decreased significantly among the three massage techniques.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of aromatherapy massage in a hospice setting.

    PubMed

    Soden, Katie; Vincent, Karen; Craske, Stephen; Lucas, Caroline; Ashley, Sue

    2004-03-01

    Research suggests that patients with cancer, particularly in the palliative care setting, are increasingly using aromatherapy and massage. There is good evidence that these therapies may be helpful for anxiety reduction for short periods, but few studies have looked at the longer term effects. This study was designed to compare the effects of four-week courses of aromatherapy massage and massage alone on physical and psychological symptoms in patients with advanced cancer. Forty-two patients were randomly allocated to receive weekly massages with lavender essential oil and an inert carrier oil (aromatherapy group), an inert carrier oil only (massage group) or no intervention. Outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain intensity, the Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH) sleep scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale and the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL). We were unable to demonstrate any significant long-term benefits of aromatherapy or massage in terms of improving pain control, anxiety or quality of life. However, sleep scores improved significantly in both the massage and the combined massage (aromatherapy and massage) groups. There were also statistically significant reductions in depression scores in the massage group. In this study of patients with advanced cancer, the addition of lavender essential oil did not appear to increase the beneficial effects of massage. Our results do suggest, however, that patients with high levels of psychological distress respond best to these therapies.

  5. Application of Tensegrity Massage to Relive Complications After Mastectomy--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Iwona; Kurpas, Donata; Mroczek, Bozena; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Okręglicka-Forysiak, Ewa; Krawiecka-Jaworska, Ewa; Kassolik, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The case study was to determine the effectiveness of tensegrity massage in a patient after mastectomy. Tensegrity massage was performed in a 50-year-old woman after mastectomy. The purpose of the massage was to normalize the tension of musculo-ligamento-fascial system in the chest, shoulder girdle, and back. The patient was subjected to a series of six massage sessions, 45 minutes each, twice a week. The applied massage therapy contributed to the reduction of the postoperative scar tenderness and painfulness, to the relaxation of the muscular tone within the shoulder girdle, and to the improvement of the patient's general feeling. Tensegrity massage is an effective therapy in the elimination of pain and abnormal tissue tension induced by extensive scarring after mastectomy. The presented massage procedure had a positive effect immediately after the therapy and after 1-month follow-up. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Effects of Anma massage therapy (Japanese massage) for gynecological cancer survivors: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer patients and survivors regularly feel anxious about cancer recurrence or death, even after the conclusion of medical treatment, and they are often highly physiologically and psychologically stressed. Massage therapy is one of the most widely used complementary and alternative therapies used in the hope of alleviating such stress and physical and psychological complaints and to improve health-related quality of life. This randomized phase III, two-armed, parallel group, clinical trial was designed after obtaining positive findings in a preliminary study. The primary objective is to verify the effects of continuous Japanese massage therapy, referred to as Anma therapy, for cancer survivors. The secondary objective is to confirm the immediate effects of a single Anma massage session for cancer survivors. Methods/Design Sixty cancer survivors older than 20 years of age who have had histologically confirmed uterine cervical, endometrial, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in the past, but with no recurrence for more than 3 years since receiving standard medical treatment, are being recruited by gynecologists in medical facilities. In the coordinating office, they are randomly allocated to two groups (n = 30 each): an Anma massage group receiving a 40-min Anma massage session once weekly over a 2-month intervention period (total of eight Anma massage sessions) and a control group being followed by medical doctors and receiving no Anma massage sessions. The primary end point is the severity of physical subjective symptoms that cancer survivors report in daily life, assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale. Secondary end points are urine and saliva analyses, psychological condition and health-related quality-of-life scores as determined on the basis of a self-report questionnaire. Discussion Using the evidence-based findings of this trial, medical professionals should be able to explain the benefits conferred by Anma massage to cancer survivors

  7. Effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Darsareh, Fatemeh; Taavoni, Simin; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Haghani, Hamid

    2012-09-01

    Menopause is a significant event in most women's lives because it marks the end of a woman's natural reproductive life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms. A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at a menopausal clinic at a gynecology hospital in Tehran. The study population comprised 90 women who were assigned to an aromatherapy massage group, a placebo massage group, or a control group. Each participant in the aromatherapy massage group received 30-minute aromatherapy treatment sessions twice a week for 4 weeks with aroma oil, whereas participants in the placebo massage group received the same treatment with plain oil. No treatment was provided to participants in the control group. The outcome measures in this study were menopausal symptoms, as obtained through the Menopause Rating Scale. The mean baseline level of the menopausal score did not differ among all groups. However, after eight sessions of intervention, the Menopause Rating Scale score differed significantly among the three groups (P < 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that women in both the aromatherapy massage group and the placebo massage group had a lower menopausal score than the control group (P < 0.001). When the aromatherapy massage and the placebo massage groups were compared, the menopausal score for the aromatherapy massage group was found to be significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for the placebo group. The results of the study demonstrate that both massage and aromatherapy massage were effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. However, aromatherapy massage was more effective than only massage.

  8. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1 - Records Search AAC-Northern Region, Galena AFS, Campion AFS, Cape Lisburne AFS, Fort Yukon AFS, Indian Mountain AFS, Kotzebue AFS, Murphy Dome AFS, and Tin City AFS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    1976. Murphy Dome AFS Industrial wastes from Murphy Dome shops are similar to other LRR istallations including primarily lubricating oils and some...mn ...am........................ .. . .. FIGURE 6.6 02 mu .. . (DoI0 * 4. .J~ . .... 00- oCL c0Z 6 o2 z xo% . COW 2 N w Z -wo O<W0 V AO~L Ul w L L

  9. Positive Effects of Massage Therapy on a Patient with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robyn; Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the sleep patterns of a woman with narcolepsy. Participant The 23-year-old woman’s primary symptoms included excessive daytime sleepiness and periodic leg movements (PLM), which were associated with her diagnoses of both narcolepsy and cataplexy. Intervention Five 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The patient’s sleep patterns were recorded each week before the treatment. A final measurement was recorded in the sixth week. The sleep patterns were monitored using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, which included ten visual analogue scales. Results The results of this case report included an improvement in getting to sleep by 148%, an improvement in quality of sleep by 1100%, an improvement in awake following sleep by 121%, and an improvement in behaviour following wakening by 28% using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Conclusion This case report suggests that massage therapy had a positive effect on this patient with narcolepsy. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of massage therapy on narcolepsy and sleep patterns. PMID:23730398

  10. Effects of Infant Massage on Attachment Security: An Experimental Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jump, Vonda K.

    The formation of attachments is an important phenomenon occurring in the realm of socioemotional development. This study examined the impact of infant massage on infants' subsequent attachment security. Fifty-seven mother-infant dyads (48 dyads from Head Start, 9 from the community at large) were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group…

  11. 21 CFR 890.5650 - Powered inflatable tube massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered inflatable tube massager. 890.5650 Section 890.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  12. 21 CFR 890.5650 - Powered inflatable tube massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered inflatable tube massager. 890.5650 Section 890.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Christopher A.; Rounds, James; Hannum, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Massage therapy (MT) is an ancient form of treatment that is now gaining popularity as part of the complementary and alternative medical therapy movement. A meta-analysis was conducted of studies that used random assignment to test the effectiveness of MT. Mean effect sizes were calculated from 37 studies for 9 dependent variables. Single…

  14. Advancing Massage Therapy Research Competencies: Dimensions for Thought and Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    Two major developments in the therapeutic massage and bodywork profession have recently brought to the forefront the issue of research competencies. The profession has been called to a potentially heightened level of credibility. One challenge to the profession's development is that of coordinating the various curricular, instructional,…

  15. 21 CFR 890.5650 - Powered inflatable tube massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered inflatable tube massager. 890.5650 Section 890.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5650 - Powered inflatable tube massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered inflatable tube massager. 890.5650 Section 890.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  17. 21 CFR 890.5650 - Powered inflatable tube massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered inflatable tube massager. 890.5650 Section 890.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  18. Massage-like stroking boosts the immune system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Major, Benjamin; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Brod, Samuel; Pilipović, Ivan; Leposavić, Gordana; D’Acquisto, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of massage involves the immune system and that this can be exploited as an adjunct therapy together with standard drug-based approaches. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms behind these effects exploring the immunomodulatory function of stroking as a surrogate of massage-like therapy in mice. C57/BL6 mice were stroked daily for 8 days either with a soft brush or directly with a gloved hand and then analysed for differences in their immune repertoire compared to control non-stroked mice. Our results show that hand- but not brush-stroked mice demonstrated a significant increase in thymic and splenic T cell number (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). These effects were not associated with significant changes in CD4/CD8 lineage commitment or activation profile. The boosting effects on T cell repertoire of massage-like therapy were associated with a decreased noradrenergic innervation of lymphoid organs and counteracted the immunosuppressive effect of hydrocortisone in vivo. Together our results in mice support the hypothesis that massage-like therapies might be of therapeutic value in the treatment of immunodeficiencies and related disorders and suggest a reduction of the inhibitory noradrenergic tone in lymphoid organs as one of the possible explanations for their immunomodulatory function. PMID:26046935

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Christopher A.; Rounds, James; Hannum, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Massage therapy (MT) is an ancient form of treatment that is now gaining popularity as part of the complementary and alternative medical therapy movement. A meta-analysis was conducted of studies that used random assignment to test the effectiveness of MT. Mean effect sizes were calculated from 37 studies for 9 dependent variables. Single…

  20. Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Keck, Juanita F

    2004-06-01

    Physiological responses to pain create harmful effects that prolong the body's recovery after surgery. Patients routinely report mild to moderate pain even though pain medications have been administered. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to supplement postoperative pain relief using pharmacologic management. Foot and hand massage has the potential to assist in pain relief. Massaging the feet and hands stimulates the mechanoreceptors that activate the "nonpainful" nerve fibers, preventing pain transmission from reaching consciousness. The purpose of this pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (5 minutes to each extremity), which was provided 1 to 4 hours after a dose of pain medication, would reduce pain perception and sympathetic responses among postoperative patients. A convenience sample of 18 patients rated pain intensity and pain distress using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. They reported decreases in pain intensity from 4.65 to 2.35 (t = 8.154, p <.001) and in pain distress from 4.00 to 1.88 (t = 5.683, p <.001). Statistically significant decreases in sympathetic responses to pain (i.e., heart rate and respiratory rate) were observed although blood pressure remained unchanged. The changes in heart rate and respiratory rate were not clinically significant. The patients experienced moderate pain after they received pain medications. This pain was reduced by the intervention, thus supporting the effectiveness of massage in postoperative pain management. Foot and hand massage appears to be an effective, inexpensive, low-risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for postoperative pain management.

  1. Neck arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased by massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2014-11-01

    The literature on the effects of massage therapy on neck arthritis pain is mixed depending on the dose level, and it is also based on self-report. In the present study an attempt was made to enhance the effects of weekly massage therapy by having the participants massage themselves daily. And in addition to self-reports on pain, range of motion (ROM) and the associated ROM pain were assessed before and after the first massage session and pre-post the last session one month later. Staff and faculty members at a medical school who were eligible for the study if they had neck arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a massage or a waitlist control group (N = 24 per group). The massage group received moderate pressure massages weekly by a massage therapist plus daily self-massages. The waitlist control group received the same schedule massages one month after being control subjects. The massage group showed significant short-term reductions after the first and last day massages in self-reported pain and in ROM-associated pain as well as an increase in ROM. Comparisons between the massage group (N = 23) and the control group (N = 14) on the last versus the first day data suggested significantly different changes including increased ROM and reduced ROM-associated pain for the massage group and reduced ROM and increased ROM-associated pain for the control group. These changes occurred specifically for flexion and right and left lateral flexion motions. These data highlight the importance of designing massage therapy protocols that target the most affected neck muscle groups and then assessing range of motion and related pain before and after the massage therapy. Comparisons with other studies also suggest that moderate pressure may contribute to the massage effects, and the use of daily self-massages between sessions may sustain the effects and serve as a cost-effective therapy for individuals with neck arthritis pain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Massage and stretching reduce spinal reflex excitability without affecting twitch contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Peach, Ashley; Maddigan, Meaghan; Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; DiSanto, Mario C; Button, Duane C; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2013-10-01

    Both stretching and massage can increase range of motion. Whereas the stretching-induced increases in ROM have been attributed to changes in neural and muscle responses, there is no literature investigating the ROM mechanisms underlying the interaction of stretch and massage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate changes in neural and evoked muscle responses with two types of massage and static stretching. With this repeated measures design, 30s of plantar flexors musculotendinous junction (MTJ) and tapotement (TAP) massage were implemented either with or without 1min of concurrent stretching as well as a control condition. Measures included the soleus maximum H-reflex/M-wave (H/M) ratio, as well as electromechanical delay (EMD), and evoked contractile properties of the triceps surae. With the exception of EMD, massage and stretch did not significantly alter triceps surae evoked contractile properties. Massage with and without stretching decreased the soleus H/M ratio. Both TAP conditions provided greater H/M ratio depression than MTJ massage while the addition of stretch provided the greatest inhibition. Both massage types when combined with stretching increased the duration of the EMD. In conclusion, MTJ and TAP massage as well as stretching decreased spinal reflex excitability, with TAP providing the strongest suppression. While static stretching prolongs EMD, massage did not affect contractile properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Composition of milk obtained from unmassaged versus massaged breasts of lactating mothers.

    PubMed

    Foda, Mervat I; Kawashima, Takaaki; Nakamura, Sadako; Kobayashi, Michiko; Oku, Tsuneyuki

    2004-05-01

    The Oketani method is a program of breast massage and clinical counseling developed by the midwife Satomi Oketani. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the method on the quality of breast milk by determining the chemical composition of the milk before and after massage. Milk samples were obtained immediately before and after massage from healthy, exclusively breast-feeding Japanese mothers at two different periods of lactation one <3 months the other >3 months after parturition. Lipids, whey protein, casein, lactose, ash, and total solids in milk were measured in milk samples. The gross energy content of milk was estimated. Breast massage significantly increased lipids in the late lactating period but not in the early lactating period. In the early lactating period casein was increased by breast massage but was not significantly affected in the late lactating period. Breast massage caused a significant increase in total solids from the first day to 11 months post partum. The gross energy in the late lactating period was significantly increased by breast massage but not in the early lactating period. Lactose was not significantly changed by breast massage. Breast massage improves the quality of human milk by significantly increasing total solids, lipids, and casein concentration and gross energy. The milk of mothers treated by Oketani breast massage may improve the growth and development of infants.

  4. Estimation of Comfortable/Uncomfortable Feeling Based on EEG by Using NN and k-means Algorithm for Massage Chair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramae, Tatsuya; Kushida, Daisuke; Takemori, Fumiaki; Kitamura, Akira

    A present massage chair realizes the massage motion and force designed by a professional masseur. However, appropriate massage force to the user can not be provided by the massage chair in such a method. On the other hand, the professional masseur can realize an appropriate massage force to more than one patient, because, the masseur considers the physical condition of the patient. Our research proposed the intelligent massage system of applying masseur's procedure for the massage chair using estimated skin elasticity and DB to relate skin elasticity and massage force. However, proposed system has a problem that DB does not adjust to unknown user, because user's feeling by massage can not be estimated. Then, this paper proposed the estimation method of comfortable/uncomfortable feeling based on EEG using the neural network and k-means algorithm. The realizability of the proposed method is verified by the experimental works.

  5. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Blood Flow in Blood Vessels with the Rolling Massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Xu, Shi-Xiong; Qian, Yue-Hong; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2005-12-01

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese massage, which is expected to improve the circulation by pushing, pulling and kneading of the muscle. A model for the rolling massage manipulation is proposed and the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the blood flow in the blood vessels. The simulation results show that the blood flux is considerably modified by the rolling massage and the explicit value depends on the rolling frequency, the rolling depth, and the diameter of the vessel. The smaller the diameter of the blood vessel, the larger the enhancement of the blood flux by the rolling massage. The model, together with the simulation results, is expected to be helpful to understand the mechanism and further development of rolling massage techniques.

  7. Preterm Infants Show Reduced Stress Behaviors and Activity after 5 days of Massage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Preterm infants residing in an NICU were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or to a control group. The preterm infants in the massage therapy group received three 15 minute massages each day for 5 consecutive days, with the massages consisting of moderate pressure stroking to the head, shoulders, back, arms and legs and kinesthetic exercises consisting of flexion and extension of the limbs. Infant stress behaviors and activity were recorded on the first and last day of the study. Preterm infants receiving massage therapy showed fewer stress behaviors and less activity from the first to the last day of the study. The findings suggest that massage has pacifying or stress reducing effects on preterm infants, which is noteworthy given that they experience numerous stressors during their hospitalization. PMID:17548111

  8. Softball Petechiae: A Novel Cutaneous Finding in a Patient Participating in Post-Exercise Massage

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old healthy male presenting with an eruption consisting of evenly spaced, well-circumscribed, round, petechial macules over a discrete region on his back. A detailed history revealed that the man participated in a high-intensity combination workout routine and post-exercise massage. He reported using a regulation-sized dimpled softball in order to massage the musculature of his back. A diagnosis of traumatic petechiae was established. A growing fitness culture encouraging high-intensity training and post-exercise massage coupled with the high costs of professional masseuse services has led to the increased use of self-massage techniques using both traditional and non-traditional massage equipment. The topography of this equipment and the rise in post-exercise self-massage may lead to an increase in traumatic rashes of varying clinical and cosmetic significance. PMID:27752403

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in upper limbs benefits from moderate pressure massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Delgado, Jeannette; Garcia, Daniel; Funk, C G

    2013-05-01

    Forty-two adults with rheumatoid arthritis in the upper limbs were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure or a light pressure massage therapy group. A therapist massaged the affected arm and shoulder once a week for a 4-week period and also taught the participant self-massage to be done once daily. The moderate pressure vs. the light pressure massage therapy group had less pain and perceived greater grip strength following the first and last massage sessions. By the end of the one month period the moderate pressure massage group had less pain, greater grip strength and greater range of motion in their wrist and large upper joints (elbows and shoulders). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    PubMed

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas.

  11. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Gao, Ningyang; Wu, Junyi; Xu, Shifen

    2014-01-01

    Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex) or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low. PMID:25197310

  12. Preterm Infant Weight Gain is Increased by Massage Therapy and Exercise Via Different Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of massage therapy (moderate pressure stroking) and exercise (flexion and extension of limbs) on preterm infants’ weight gain and to explore potential underlying mechanisms for those effects. Methods Weight gain and parasympathetic nervous system activity were assessed in 30 preterm infants randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or to an exercise group. Infants received 10 minutes of moderate pressure massage or passive flexion and extension of the limbs 3 times per day for 5 days, and EKGs were collected during the first session to assess vagal activity. Results Both massage and exercise led to increased weight gain. However, while exercise was associated with increased calorie consumption, massage was related to increased vagal activity. Conclusion Taken together, these findings suggest that massage and exercise lead to increased preterm infant weight gain via different underlying mechanisms. PMID:24480603

  13. Effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sut, Necdet; Kahyaoglu-Sut, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Randomized controlled trials were searched by keywords in several databases (Pubmed, ISI Web of Sciences, and Google Scholar). Six randomized controlled trials that included 362 participants with primary dysmenorrhea, comparing abdominal aromatherapy massage (n = 184) with massage with placebo oils (n = 178), were analyzed in the meta-analysis. The change in the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score from the first menstruation cycle to the second cycle at the first menstruation day was used as the primary outcome. Aromatherapy massage with essential oils was superior to massage with placebo oils (standardized mean difference = -1.06 [95% CI: -1.55 to -0.55]). Abdominal aromatherapy massage with essential oils is an effective complementary method to relieve pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Softball Petechiae: A Novel Cutaneous Finding in a Patient Participating in Post-Exercise Massage.

    PubMed

    Buntinx-Krieg, Talayesa; Greenwald, Jeffrey

    2016-09-12

    We report a case of a 39-year-old healthy male presenting with an eruption consisting of evenly spaced, well-circumscribed, round, petechial macules over a discrete region on his back. A detailed history revealed that the man participated in a high-intensity combination workout routine and post-exercise massage. He reported using a regulation-sized dimpled softball in order to massage the musculature of his back. A diagnosis of traumatic petechiae was established. A growing fitness culture encouraging high-intensity training and post-exercise massage coupled with the high costs of professional masseuse services has led to the increased use of self-massage techniques using both traditional and non-traditional massage equipment. The topography of this equipment and the rise in post-exercise self-massage may lead to an increase in traumatic rashes of varying clinical and cosmetic significance.

  15. Effectiveness of aroma massage on advanced cancer patients with constipation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lai, T K T; Cheung, M C; Lo, C K; Ng, K L; Fung, Y H; Tong, M; Yau, C C

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of aroma massage on constipation in advanced cancer patients. This study employed a randomized control group pre- and post test design and included an aroma massage group, plain massage group, and control group. To evaluate the effect of aromatherapy, the degree of constipation was measured using a constipation assessment scale, severity level of constipation and the frequency of bowel movements. Data was analyzed by repeated measures of Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, Spearman's rho and ANOVA using SPSS program. The score of the constipation assessment scale of the aroma massage group was significantly lower than the control group. Apart from the improvement in bowel movements, the results showed significantly improved quality of life in physical and support domains of the aroma massage group. The findings of this study suggest aroma massage can help to relieve constipation in patients with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of aromatherapy massage on elderly patients under long-term hospitalization in Japan.

    PubMed

    Satou, Tadaaki; Chikama, Mizuki; Chikama, Yoshiko; Hachigo, Masato; Urayama, Haruna; Murakami, Shio; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Koikem, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    To verify the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage on elderly patients under long-term hospitalization. Aromatherapy massage was performed twice a week for a total of eight times. Nursing home. Elderly women under long-term hospitalization. Questionnaire and measurement of stress marker levels (salivary amylase activity) before and after the first, fifth, and eighth aromatherapy massages. Questionnaire (Face scale, General Health Questionnaire-12 [GHQ-12]), measurement of salivary amylase activity. A decrease in stress after aromatherapy massage compared to before each massage was confirmed at all measurement times and with the stress marker. No marked reduction was observed in Face scale or saliva amylase activity as a whole over the long term, although decreasing tendencies were seen. Marked reductions in GHQ-12 were observed over the long term. Aroma massage appears likely to prove effective in reducing psychological stress among elderly patients under long-term hospitalization.

  17. Single case evaluation of the effects of aromatherapy and massage on disturbed behaviour in severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Brooker, D J; Snape, M; Johnson, E; Ward, D; Payne, M

    1997-05-01

    Aromatherapy and massage could provide a useful addition to psychological therapeutic interventions with clients suffering from dementia. The effects of aromatherapy and massage on disturbed behaviour in four individuals with severe dementia were evaluated using a single-case research design. Each participant received 10 treatment sessions of aromatherapy, aromatherapy and massage combined, and massage alone. The effects on each individual's behaviour in the hour following treatment were assessed against 10 'no treatment' control sessions. Reliable individualized disturbed behaviour scales were designed. The effects of the treatments were mixed. The opinion of the staff providing treatment was that all participants benefited. On close scrutiny, only one of the participants benefited from the aromatherapy and massage to a degree that reached statistical significance. In two of the cases aromatherapy and massage led to an increase in agitated behaviour. The importance of the single case study approach with this client group is discussed.

  18. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    effects suggesting that like many other interventions (e.g., exercise, diet, etc), for therapy effects to persist, continued massage treatments may be...In this study massage and relaxation therapies were examined for women with early stages of breast cancer for 1) reducing anxiety and stress hormone...16). Women in the massage and relaxation therapies received 3-30 minute sessions a week for 5 weeks. On the first and last days of the 5-week study

  19. The effect of aromatherapy massage on the psychological symptoms of postmenopausal Iranian women.

    PubMed

    Taavoni, S; Darsareh, F; Joolaee, S; Haghani, H

    2013-06-01

    Menopausal symptoms experienced by women vary widely, and while many women transition through menopause with manageable symptoms, others experience severe symptoms, which may impair their quality of life. A randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on psychological symptoms during menopause. The study population comprised 90 women. Each subject in the aromatherapy massage group received 30 min aromatherapy sessions with aroma oil, twice a week, for four weeks; each subject in the massage therapy group received the same treatment with odorless oil, while no treatment was provided to subjects in the control group. The outcome measures were psychological symptoms, as obtained through the psychological subscale of the Menopause Rating Scale. A total of 87 women were evaluated. A statistically significant difference was found between the participants' pre- and post-application psychological score in intervention groups, whereas the score in the control group did not differ significantly. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score MD: -3.49 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -4.52 to -2.47). Massage therapy also decreased the psychological score MD: -1.20 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -2.19 to -0.08). To distinguish the effect of aromatherapy from massage separately, we compared the reduction in the psychological score. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score more than massage therapy MD: -2.29 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -3.01 to -0.47). Both aromatherapy massage and massage were effective in reducing psychological symptoms, but, the effect of aromatherapy massage was higher than massage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the growing popularity of massage, its effectiveness for treating neck pain remains unclear, largely because of the poor quality of research. A major deficiency of previous studies has been their use of low “doses” of massage that massage therapists consider inadequate. Unfortunately, the number of minutes per massage session, sessions per week, or weeks of treatment necessary for massage to have beneficial or optimal effects are not known. This study is designed to address these gaps in our knowledge by determining, for persons with chronic neck pain: 1) the optimal combination of number of treatments per week and length of individual treatment session, and 2) the optimal number of weeks of treatment. Methods/design In this study, 228 persons with chronic non-specific neck pain will be recruited from primary health care clinics in a large health care system in the Seattle area. Participants will be randomized to a wait list control group or 4 weeks of treatment with one of 5 different dosing combinations (2 or 3 30-min treatments per week or 1, 2, or 3 60-min treatments per week). At the end of this 4-week primary treatment period, participants initially receiving each of the 5 dosing combinations will be randomized to a secondary treatment period of either no additional treatment or 6 weekly 60-min massages. The primary outcomes, neck-related dysfunction and pain, will be assessed by blinded telephone interviewers 5, 12, and 26 weeks post-randomization. To better characterize the trajectory of treatment effects, these interview data will be supplemented with outcomes data collected by internet questionnaire at 10, 16, 20 and 39 weeks. Comparisons of outcomes for the 6 groups during the primary treatment period will identify the optimal weekly dose, while comparisons of outcomes during the secondary treatment period will determine if 10 weeks of treatment is superior to 4 weeks. Discussion A broad dosing schedule was included in this trial

  1. Patrons of massage parlors: some facts and figures.

    PubMed

    Simpson, M; Schill, T

    1977-11-01

    A survey of 183 patrons of a massage parlor in Illinois indicated that the typical customer is a 35-year-old married white male from out of town with 13 years of education who is employed in a lower- or middle-class job and goes to church on Sunday. He reports having had a variety of heterosexual experiences in the past, has come to the parlor because of lack of sexual partner at this particular time or because of curiosity, will come to orgasm during the genital massage, and will find it sexually satisfying. He is likely to have high self-esteem, consider himself personally and sexually adjusted, consider his value system liberal, and to be somewhat sympathetic to the goals of the women's rights movement.

  2. [Clinical effectiveness of electrostatic vibration massages in fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gaĭger, G V; Mikus, E V; Reinhold, J

    2011-03-01

    The most frequent symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are pains in the softpart and muscle. The Optimal treatment for management of FMS has not been reported yet. Current pharmacological therapies are often ineffective. The aim of the research is to present the results of treatment for FMS with vibration massage by deep oscillations. 70 patients with FMS were treated with deep oscillation. The efficiency of treatment were evaluated according to the assessment criteria (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Visual Analogous Scale, the Pain Sensation Scale, as well as the Multidimensional Sensitive Questionnaire and the Mainz - Stadium Model Pain Chronification). This study demonstrated improvement of symptoms, quality of life, and reduction in pain during two months after treatment. Vibration massage by deep oscillations shows effectiveness for fibromyalgia.

  3. Electromagnetic interference of implantable cardiac devices from a shoulder massage machine.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saeko; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Kohira, Satoshi; Hirose, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Shoulder massage machines have two pads that are driven by solenoid coils to perform a per cussive massage on the shoulders. There have been concerns that such machines might create electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac devices because of the time-varying magnetic fields produced by the alternating current in the solenoid coils. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential EMI from one such shoulder massage machine on implantable cardiac devices. We measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity around the massage machine. Furthermore, we performed an inhibition test and an asynchronous test on an implantable cardiac pacemaker using the standardized Irnich human body model. We examined the events on an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a pacemaker programmer while the massage machine was in operation. The magnetic field distribution profile exhibited a peak intensity of 212 (A/m) in one of the solenoid coils. The maximal interference distance between the massage machine and the implantable cardiac pacemaker was 28 cm. Ventricular fibrillation was induced when the massage machine was brought near the electrode of the ICD and touched the Irnich human body model. It is necessary to provide a "don't use" warning on the box or the exterior of the massage machines or in the user manuals and to caution patients with implanted pacemakers about the dangers and appropriate usage of massage machines.

  4. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice. PMID:26904144

  5. Investigating the Mechanisms of Massage Efficacy: The Role of Mechanical Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Kitzman, Patrick H.; Butterfield, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Massage has the potential to attenuate the inflammatory process, facilitate early recovery, and provide pain relief from muscular injuries. In this hypothesis-driven paper, we integrate the concept of mechanotransduction with the application of massage to explore beneficial mechanisms. By altering signaling pathways involved with the inflammatory process, massage may decrease secondary injury, nerve sensitization, and collateral sprouting, resulting in increased recovery from damage and reduction or prevention of pain. Our goal is to provide a framework that describes our current understanding of the mechanisms whereby massage therapy activates potentially beneficial immunomodulatory pathways. PMID:24641083

  6. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  7. Efficacy of massage on muscle soreness, perceived recovery, physiological restoration and physical performance in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Lam, Eddie T C; Shariat, Ardalan; Shaw, Ina; Shaw, Brandon S; Tamrin, Shamsul B M

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that sport massage after intensive exercise might improve power and perceptual recovery in athletes. However, few studies have been done in this area. This study aimed to examine the effect of massage on the performance of bodybuilders. Thirty experienced male bodybuilders were randomly assigned to either a massage group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Both groups performed five repetition sets at 75-77% of 1RM of knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The massage group then received a 30-min massage after the exercise protocol while the control group maintained their normal passive recovery. Criteria under investigation included: plasma creatine kinase (CK) level, agility test, vertical jump test, isometric torque test, and perception of soreness. All variables were measured over 6 time periods: baseline, immediately after the DOMS inducing protocol, right after the massage, and 24, 48, and 72 h after the massage. Both groups showed significant (P < .001) decreases in jumping, agility performance, and isometric torque, but significant (P < .001) increases in CK and muscle soreness levels. The massage group in general demonstrated a better recovery rate. As such, a post-exercise massage session can improve the exercise performance and recovery rate in male bodybuilders after intensive exercise.

  8. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  9. The effect of self-aromatherapy massage of the abdomen on the primary dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi Aval Shahr, H; Saadat, M; Kheirkhah, M; Saadat, E

    2015-05-01

    Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) is the most common gynaecological complaint that occurs in women. This study was a randomised controlled trial. The subjects were 75 students whose severity of pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS). Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: massage group with rose oil (n = 25) who applied self-massage with Rose damascene; a placebo group (n = 25) who performed self-massage with unscented almond oil and a no treatment control group (n = 25) who applied just self-massage. All three groups received the intervention in the first day of menstruation in two subsequent cycles. The severity of pain was self-reported by the students before and after intervention. All three groups were matched in demographic characteristics. The baseline pain reduced in the first cycle but this reduction was not significant in the groups (p > 0.05). In the second cycle, the menstrual pain was significantly lower in the rose oil group than in the other two groups after intervention (between massage with rose oil, almond oil p = 0.003 and massage with rose oil and just massage p = 0.000). Massage with aromatherapy reduces the severity of primary dysmenorrhoea, in comparison with massage therapy alone.

  10. Effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeile, Mahnaz; Rasooly, Alehe Seyyed; Farshi, Mahni Rahkar; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the fact that effect of massage with or without oil on the baby's weight gain is not clear, but recent studies have shown that massage with essential oils make lipid absorption through the skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. In this study, infants who met inclusion criteria for the study were divided into two groups by using random numbers table. Newborns in intervention group were under massage for 10 days and 3 times for 15 min daily; the mother of these newborns had been trained already using olive oil. Moreover, the infants of the control group were under massaging without oil same as the above-mentioned method. Researchers weighed babies daily during 10 days and recorded it at the checklist. Data from the study were reviewed and analyzed by descriptive statistics and repeated measure test using the statistical software SPSS/13. Results: This study showed that the neonatal weight gain in the infants with the oil massage was 21 g daily in average, whereas the increase in infant massage without oil was 7 g. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Considering the positive effect of infant massage on weight gain in premature infants with olive oil, it is recommended that nurses use oil in infant massage in the neonatal units. PMID:27397955

  11. The effect of infant massage on weight gain, physiological and behavioral responses in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Kyung

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the premature infants' responses to infant massage (tactile and kinesthetic stimulation). These responses measured by weight, physiological (vagal tone, heart rate, oxygen saturation) and behavioral responses (behavioral states, motor activities, and behavioral distress). This study was conducted using an equivalent control pretest-posttest design. The sample was divided into two groups of 13 infants with gestational age less than 36 weeks at birth, birth weight less than 2000 g, and no congenital anomalies. The experimental group received the massage intervention twice daily for 10 days. The data were collected for 10 minutes prior to and 10 minutes after the massage. The vagal tone was significantly higher after massage than before massage in the experimental group, while no change in the control group. The experimental group had significantly higher scores for awake state and motor activity than the control group. Significantly greater awake state, more fidgeting or crying, and increased motor activity were reported after massage than before massage. The results of this study showed that massage therapy might enhance optimal physiological responses and behavioral organization of premature infants. Nursing staff in the NICU can use massage to promote the infant's capability to respond positively to his environment and to provide developmental support for healthy premature infants.

  12. A mechatronic system for quantitative application and assessment of massage-like actions in small animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zeng, Hansong; Best, Thomas M; Haas, Caroline; Heffner, Ned T; Agarwal, Sudha; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Massage therapy has a long history and has been widely believed effective in restoring tissue function, relieving pain and stress, and promoting overall well-being. However, the application of massage-like actions and the efficacy of massage are largely based on anecdotal experiences that are difficult to define and measure. This leads to a somewhat limited evidence-based interface of massage therapy with modern medicine. In this study, we introduce a mechatronic device that delivers highly reproducible massage-like mechanical loads to the hind limbs of small animals (rats and rabbits), where various massage-like actions are quantified by the loading parameters (magnitude, frequency and duration) of the compressive and transverse forces on the subject tissues. The effect of massage is measured by the difference in passive viscoelastic properties of the subject tissues before and after mechanical loading, both obtained by the same device. Results show that this device is useful in identifying the loading parameters that are most conducive to a change in tissue mechanical properties, and can determine the range of loading parameters that result in sustained changes in tissue mechanical properties and function. This device presents the first step in our effort for quantifying the application of massage-like actions used clinically and measurement of their efficacy that can readily be combined with various quantitative measures (e.g., active mechanical properties and physiological assays) for determining the therapeutic and mechanistic effects of massage therapies.

  13. A Mechatronic System for Quantitative Application and Assessment of Massage-Like Actions in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zeng, Hansong; Best, Thomas M.; Haas, Caroline; Heffner, Ned T.; Agarwal, Sudha; Zhao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Massage therapy has a long history and has been widely believed effective in restoring tissue function, relieving pain and stress, and promoting overall well-being. However, the application of massage-like actions and the efficacy of massage are largely based on anecdotal experiences that are difficult to define and measure. This leads to a somewhat limited evidence-based interface of massage therapy with modern medicine. In this study, we introduce a mechatronic device that delivers highly reproducible massage-like mechanical loads to the hind limbs of small animals (rats and rabbits), where various massage-like actions are quantified by the loading parameters (magnitude, frequency and duration) of the compressive and transverse forces on the subject tissues. The effect of massage is measured by the difference in passive viscoelastic properties of the subject tissues before and after mechanical loading, both obtained by the same device. Results show that this device is useful in identifying the loading parameters that are most conducive to a change in tissue mechanical properties, and can determine the range of loading parameters that result in sustained changes in tissue mechanical properties and function. This device presents the first step in our effort for quantifying the application of massage-like actions used clinically and measurement of their efficacy that can readily be combined with various quantitative measures (e.g., active mechanical properties and physiological assays) for determining the therapeutic and mechanistic effects of massage therapies. PMID:23943071

  14. The effect of massage on heart rate variability in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Smith, SL.; Lux, R.; Haley, S.; Slater, H.; Beechy, J.; Moyer-Mileur, LJ.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that massage would improve autonomic nervous system (ANS) function as measured by heart rate variability (HRV) in preterm infants. Study Design Medically stable, 29- to 32-week preterm infants (17 massage, 20 control) were enrolled in a masked, randomized longitudinal study. Licensed massage therapists provided the massage or control condition twice a day for 4 weeks. Weekly HRV, a measure of ANS development and function, was analyzed using SPSS generalized estimating equations. Results Infant characteristics were similar between groups. HRV improved in massaged infants but not in the control infants (P<0.05). Massaged males had a greater improvement in HRV than females (P<0.05). HRV in massaged infants was on a trajectory comparable to term-born infants by study completion. Conclusion Massage-improved HRV in a homogeneous sample of hospitalized, medically stable, preterm male infants and may improve infant response to exogenous stressors. We speculate that massage improves ANS function in these infants. PMID:22538325

  15. Effectiveness of different styles of massage therapy in fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Susan Lee King; Matsutani, Luciana Akemi; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-04-01

    The systematic review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of massage in fibromyalgia. An electronic search was conducted at MEDLINE, SCiELO, EMBASE, ISI, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL and LILACS (Jan 1990-May 2013). Ten randomized and non-randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of massage alone on symptoms and health-related quality of life of adult patients with fibromyalgia were included. Two reviewers independently screened records, examined full-text reports for compliance with the eligibility criteria, and extracted data. Meta-analysis (pooled from 145 participants) shows that myofascial release had large, positive effects on pain and medium effects on anxiety and depression at the end of treatment, in contrast with placebo; effects on pain and depression were maintained in the medium and short term, respectively. Narrative analysis suggests that: myofascial release also improves fatigue, stiffness and quality of life; connective tissue massage improves depression and quality of life; manual lymphatic drainage is superior to connective tissue massage regarding stiffness, depression and quality of life; Shiatsu improves pain, pressure pain threshold, fatigue, sleep and quality of life; and Swedish massage does not improve outcomes. There is moderate evidence that myofascial release is beneficial for fibromyalgia symptoms. Limited evidence supports the application of connective tissue massage and Shiatsu. Manual lymphatic drainage may be superior to connective tissue massage, and Swedish massage may have no effects. Overall, most styles of massage therapy consistently improved the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients.

  16. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  17. Massage with or without aromatherapy for symptom relief in people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ein-Soon; Seo, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Sun-Hee; Jang, Ji-Eun; Jung, Yu-Min; Kim, Min-Ji; Yeon, Ji-Yun

    2016-06-03

    Massage and aromatherapy massage are used to relieve cancer-related symptoms. A number of claims have been made for these treatments including reduction of pain, anxiety, depression, and stress. Other studies have not shown these benefits. To evaluate the effects of massage with or without aromatherapy on pain and other symptoms associated with cancer. We searched the following databases and trials registries up to August 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), PubMed Cancer Subset, SADCCT, and the World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing studies. Randomised controlled studies (RCTs) reporting the effects of aromatherapy or massage therapy, or both, in people with cancer of any age. We applied no language restrictions. Comparators were massage (using carrier oil only) versus no massage, massage with aromatherapy (using carrier oil plus essential oils) versus no massage, and massage with aromatherapy (using carrier oil plus essential oils) versus massage without aromatherapy (using carrier oil only). At least two review authors selected studies, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data relating to pain and other symptoms associated with cancer, using standardised forms. We assessed the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) and created two 'Summary of findings' tables. We included 19 studies (21 reports) of very low quality evidence with a total of 1274 participants. We included 14 studies (16 reports) in a qualitative synthesis and five studies in a quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). Thirteen studies (14 reports, 596 participants) compared massage with no massage. Six studies (seven reports, 561 participants) compared aromatherapy massage with no massage. Two studies (117 participants) compared massage with aromatherapy and massage without

  18. 78 FR 42975 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Massage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ..., plan, establish, coordinate, and publish voluntary consensus standards applicable to the field of massage therapy. Specifically, AMTA develops plans, establishes, coordinates, and publishes voluntary... competent practice in an early massage career and the number of hours required to teach the...

  19. Evaluating the Influence of Massage on Leg Strength, Swelling, and Pain Following a Half-Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Lance G.; Dawson, Kimberley A.; Tiidus, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female) completed a half marathon (21.1 km) road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control) leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline) and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), and soreness and leg circumference significantly elevated (p < 0.05) relative to pre-race values with no difference between legs. This suggested that exercise-induced muscle disruption did occur. Comparing the rate of return to baseline measures between the massaged and control legs, revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12

  20. The effectiveness of massage therapy in the treatment of infantile colic symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sheidaei, Ali; Abadi, Alireza; Zayeri, Farid; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gazerani, Nafiseh; Mansouri, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infantile colic, cry-fuss and sleep problems are transient in the initial months of life, but they contribute to maternal depression, parenting stress and family mental health problems. In this randomized clinical trial, we aimed to explore the efficacy of massage therapy compared to rocking in reducing infantile colic symptoms including duration and number of cries, sleep duration and severity of infant colic. Methods: This was a single blind RCT study with a one-week follow-up. One hundred colicky infants aged younger than 12 weeks old were randomly assigned into massage and rocking groups. Infants in the massage group received a massage for 15-20 minutes once during a day and once at night before sleeping for a week. In the control group, mothers rocked their infants gently for 5-25 minutes when the symptoms of colic appeared. Parents recorded the details of the colic symptoms in a diary every day. A GEE approach was applied to explore the effect of the intervention. Results: Efficiency of massage therapy was significantly higher than rocking. At the end of the study, the mean number of daily cries was 4.26±1.40 in the massage and 6.9±2.14 the rocking groups (p<0.01). The mean of the severity score was 1.39±0.19 less in the massage group (p<0.01). Moreover, the mean differences of massage and rocking groups were -0.82±0.20 hour (p<0.01) and 0.72±0.35 (p= 0.04) in the duration of cries and duration of sleep, respectively. Conclusion: Massaging significantly improved colic symptoms during a one-week intervention for all outcomes. In addition, significant differences were found between the intervention and control groups in favor of massaging. Therefore, massage therapy is more effective than rocking for treating infant colic symptoms. PMID:27453882

  1. Massage provision by physiotherapists at major athletics events between 1987 and 1998

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, S; Watt, J; Sharp, C

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the amount of their time that physiotherapists devote to massage treatment at major athletics events in an attempt to determine the importance of this treatment modality, and to examine whether the use of massage at athletics events is changing over time. Methods: Data recorded by the head team physiotherapist from 12 major athletics events (national and international events) between 1987 and 1998 were examined. For each event, the data included: total number of treatments administered by the physiotherapist, the treatment modalities used, and the number of attendances for treatment. The amount of massage provided was expressed as a percentage of the total number of treatments for each athletic event, and the pattern of change in use of massage treatment over time was evaluated. Results: The percentage of time spent providing massage treatment ranged from 24.0% to 52.2% of the total number of treatments made. The overall median percentage of total treatments in the form of massage was 45.2%. No significant increase or decrease in the use of massage as a treatment modality was observed between 1987 and 1998 in the athletics events examined (p = 0.95). Conclusions: A significant proportion of physiotherapists' time is devoted to the delivery of massage treatment at athletics events. The demand for massage treatment has been steady over the time period, in the events for which data are available, indicating a consistent use of this treatment modality. Given the popularity of massage among athletes, consideration should be given to the use of specialist sports massage staff at major athletics events. Furthermore, it would seem prudent to further investigate the efficacy of the treatment. PMID:15039270

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Plantar-Massage Techniques on Postural Control in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Song, Kyeongtak; Lea, Ashley; Brown, Nastassia

    2017-07-01

      One of the major concerns after an acute lateral ankle sprain is the potential for development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). The existing research has determined that clinician-delivered plantar massage improves postural control in those with CAI. However, the effectiveness of self-administered treatments and the underlying cause of any improvements remain unclear.   To determine (1) the effectiveness of a self-administered plantar-massage treatment in those with CAI and (2) whether the postural-control improvements were due to the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.   Crossover study.   University setting.   A total of 20 physically active individuals (6 men and 14 women) with self-reported CAI.   All participants completed 3 test sessions involving 3 treatments: a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage, a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball, and a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage.   Postural control was assessed using single-legged balance with eyes open and the Star Excursion Balance Test.   Static postural control improved (P ≤ .014) after each of the interventions. However, no changes in dynamic postural control after any of the interventions were observed (P > .05). No differences were observed between a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage and either a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball or a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage in any postural-control outcome.   In those with CAI, single 5-minute sessions of traditional plantar massage, self-administered massage, and sensory brush massage each resulted in comparable static postural-control improvements. The results also provide empirical evidence suggesting that the mechanism for the postural-control improvements is the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of Plantar-Massage Techniques on Postural Control in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Song, Kyeongtak; Lea, Ashley; Brown, Nastassia

    2017-05-23

      One of the major concerns after an acute lateral ankle sprain is the potential for development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). The existing research has determined that clinician-delivered plantar massage improves postural control in those with CAI. However, the effectiveness of self-administered treatments and the underlying cause of any improvements remain unclear.   To determine (1) the effectiveness of a self-administered plantar-massage treatment in those with CAI as well and (2) whether the postural-control improvements were due to the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.   Crossover study.   University setting.   A total of 20 physically active individuals (6 men and 14 women) with self-reported CAI.   All participants completed 3 test sessions involving 3 treatments: a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage, a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball, and a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage.   Postural control was assessed using single-legged balance with eyes open and the Star Excursion Balance Test.   Static postural control improved (P ≤ .014) after each of the interventions. However, no changes in dynamic postural control after any of the interventions were observed (P > .05). No differences were observed between a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage and either a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball or a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage in any postural-control outcome.   In those with CAI, single 5-minute sessions of traditional plantar massage, self-administered massage, and sensory brush massage each resulted in comparable static postural-control improvements. The results also provide empirical evidence suggesting that the mechanism for the postural-control improvements is the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.

  4. Are personal characteristics of massage therapists associated with their clinical, educational, and interpersonal behaviors?

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Karen; Campo, Shelly

    2013-01-01

    Background Social Cognitive Theory suggests that characteristics of health professionals, such as their beliefs in the effectiveness of their care, influence their behavior. Studying the characteristics of massage therapists may, therefore, provide insight into their clinical, educational and interpersonal behavior, which ultimately affects their client interactions. Purpose To examine the association of three personal factors (outcome expectations, expectancies, and practice experience) of the massage therapist and the practice environment with the frequency of three interventional behaviors (clinical, educational, and interpersonal) using Social Cognitive Theory as a theoretical framework. Methods A random sample of licensed massage therapists in Iowa completed a mailed questionnaire. Questions included training in massage, use of specific massage techniques and practices, 11 outcome expectations, and 17 different behaviors with their respective expectancies for contributing to favorable client outcomes. Factor analyses were conducted on the behavior and expectancy items. Regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of massage therapist characteristics to the different categories of behavior. Results The response rate was 40% (N = 151). The most common techniques employed were Swedish massage, trigger point therapy, and stretching. The most common practices recommended to clients were encouraging water intake, heat application, stretching, stress management, and exercise counseling. Expectancies was the only Social Cognitive Theory variable that significantly predicted the frequency of every category of behavior (clinical, interpersonal, education; all ps < .01). Outcome expectations predicted clinical (p = .03) and educational (p < .01), but not interpersonal behavior. No other associations reached statistical significance. Conclusions Massage therapists’ belief in massage to enact a favorable change in a client is strongly associated with their

  5. Effects of massage therapy and presence of attendant on pain, anxiety and satisfaction during labor.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Hamideh; Khaki, Siavash; Moradi, Rayhaneh; Heidari, Kazem; Vasegh Rahimparvar, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of massage and presenting an attendant on pain, anxiety and satisfaction during labor to clarify some aspects of using an alternative complementary strategy. 120 primiparous women with term pregnancy were divided into massage, attendant and control groups randomly. Massage group received firm and rhythmic massage during labor in three phases. After 30 min massage at each stage, pain, anxiety and satisfaction levels were evaluated. Self-reported present pain intensity scale was used to measure the labor pain. Anxiety and satisfaction were measured with the standard visual analog scale. Massage group had lower pain state in second and third phases (p < 0.05) in comparison with attendant group but reversely, the level of anxiety was lower in attendant group in second and third phases (p < 0.05) and satisfaction was higher in massage group in all four phases (p < 0.001). The massage group had lower pain and anxiety state in three phases in comparison with control group (p < 0.05). Data analysis of satisfaction level showed higher values in four phases in massage group compared with control (p < 0.001) and comparison of attendant and control groups showed higher satisfaction in attendant group in phases 2, 3 and 4 as well (p < 0.001). Duration of active phase was lower in massage group (p < 0.001). Findings suggest that massage is an effective alternative intervention, decreasing pain and anxiety during labor and increasing the level of satisfaction. Also, the supportive role of presenting an attendant can positively influence the level of anxiety and satisfaction.

  6. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  7. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) was created in response to massage therapy and bodywork educators' desire that rigorous standards be applied to institutions of massage therapy and bodywork. COMTA has conducted accrediting activities since 1992. In 1996, an elected commission was seated. Since 1996, COMTA has granted…

  8. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. METHODS In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients’ bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. RESULTS No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. CONCLUSION Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain. PMID:28289612

  9. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients' bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain.

  10. 21 CFR 872.6650 - Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene. 872.6650 Section 872.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... hygiene. (a) Identification. A massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene is a rigid, pointed device...

  11. Efficacy of massage treatment technique in masseter muscle hardness: robotic experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Yuichiro; Ariji, Yoshiko; Kise, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to clarify the masseter muscle hardness in patients with myofascial pain, to examine their changes after massage, and to analyze whether the hardness can be an index for massage treatment. Sixteen patients with myofascial pain (12 with unilateral and 4 with bilateral masseter muscle pain) and 24 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The masseter hardness between patients and the healthy volunteers was compared. The changes in the hardness in patients after massage were examined. The relation of the hardness with massage regimens and efficacies was analyzed. There was a significant right-and-left difference of the hardness in patients, although there was no difference in the healthy volunteers. The hardness decreased after massage. The pretreatment asymmetry index of the hardness showed a significant correlation with the massage pressure. It was concluded that there was a significant difference between the right and left masseter hardness in patients with myofascial pain. After massage treatment, the masseter hardness and right-and-left difference decreased. The hardness may be an index for determining the massage pressure.

  12. Massage therapy as a supportive care intervention for children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Deborah; Ladas, Elena; Rooney, Diane; Kelly, Kara

    2008-05-01

    To review relevant literature about massage therapy to assess the feasibility of integrating the body-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice as a supportive care intervention for children with cancer. PubMed, online references, published government reports, and the bibliographies of retrieved articles, reviews, and books on massage and massage and cancer. More than 70 citations were reviewed. Massage therapy may help mitigate pain, anxiety, depression, constipation, and high blood pressure and may be beneficial during periods of profound immune suppression. Massage techniques light to medium in pressure are appropriate in the pediatric oncology setting. Massage is an applicable, noninvasive, therapeutic modality that can be integrated safely as an adjunct intervention for managing side effects and psychological conditions associated with anticancer treatment in children. Massage may support immune function during periods of immunosuppression. Pediatric oncology nurses are vital in helping patients safely integrate CAM into conventional treatment. Pediatric oncology nurses can help maximize patient outcomes by assessing, advocating, and coordinating massage therapy services as a supportive care intervention.

  13. Massage Therapy Training in South Carolina: What You Should Know before You Enroll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This brochure provides a checklist of information for individuals considering massage therapy training in South Carolina. Areas covered include: (1) Oversight; (2) Requirements to Become a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT); (3) Evaluating a School; (4) How to Decide; (5) While You're Enrolled; (6) After You Graduate; (7) Continuing Education; (8)…

  14. Brief Report: Improvements in the Behavior of Children with Autism Following Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalona, Angelica; Field, Tiffany; Singer-Strunck, Ruth; Cullen, Christy; Hartshorn, Kristen

    2001-01-01

    Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, received either massage therapy or reading attention by their parents for 15 minutes daily for one month. Evaluation suggested that children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they…

  15. Experienced Practitioners’ Beliefs Utilized to Create a Successful Massage Therapist Conceptual Model: a Qualitative Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Anne B.; Munk, Niki

    2017-01-01

    Background The massage therapy profession in the United States has grown exponentially, with 35% of the profession’s practitioners in practice for three years or less. Investigating personal and social factors with regard to the massage therapy profession could help to identify constructs needed to be successful in the field. Purpose This data-gathering exercise explores massage therapists’ perceptions on what makes a successful massage therapist that will provide guidance for future research. Success is defined as supporting oneself and practice solely through massage therapy and related, revenue-generating field activity. Participants and Setting Ten successful massage therapy practitioners from around the United States who have a minimum of five years of experience. Research Design Semistructured qualitative interviews were used in an analytic induction framework; index cards with preidentified concepts printed on them were utilized to enhance conversation. An iterative process of interview coding and analysis was used to determine themes and subthemes. Results Based on the participants input, the categories in which therapists needed to be successful were organized into four main themes: effectively establish therapeutic relationships, develop massage therapy business acumen, seek valuable learning environments and opportunities, and cultivate strong social ties and networks. The four themes operate within specific contexts (e.g., regulation and licensing requirements in the therapists’ state), which may also influence the success of the massage therapist. Conclusions The model needs to be tested to explore which constructs explain variability in success and attrition rate. Limitations and future research implications are discussed. PMID:28690704

  16. Brief Report: Improvements in the Behavior of Children with Autism Following Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalona, Angelica; Field, Tiffany; Singer-Strunck, Ruth; Cullen, Christy; Hartshorn, Kristen

    2001-01-01

    Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, received either massage therapy or reading attention by their parents for 15 minutes daily for one month. Evaluation suggested that children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they…

  17. The effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil on severity of primary dysmenorrhea in Arsanjan students.

    PubMed

    Bakhtshirin, Froozan; Abedi, Sara; YusefiZoj, Parisa; Razmjooee, Damoon

    2015-01-01

    Presently, using complementary therapy such as lavender oil has specific application in medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea in nursing and midwifery students of Islamic Azad University of Arsanjan, Iran. This study was performed using clinical trial method on 80 eligible students whose level of pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) before the intervention. Each participant, in the first days of menstruation, randomly received two types of massage with lavender and placebo oil in two consecutive cycles of menstruation. Their level of pain was measured before and 30 min after the intervention. In this study, each group was considered as their self-control group in the next cycle. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. A significant decrease in VAS score after lavender massage was detected in comparison with placebo massage. There was a statistically significant difference between VAS scores after and before placebo massage. In addition, statistically the effect of lavender massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea was higher than that of placebo massage (P < 0.001). Findings of this study showed that lavender oil massage decreases primary dysmenorrhea and it can be used as an effective herbal drug.

  18. The effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil on severity of primary dysmenorrhea in Arsanjan students

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtshirin, Froozan; Abedi, Sara; YusefiZoj, Parisa; Razmjooee, Damoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Presently, using complementary therapy such as lavender oil has specific application in medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea in nursing and midwifery students of Islamic Azad University of Arsanjan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was performed using clinical trial method on 80 eligible students whose level of pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) before the intervention. Each participant, in the first days of menstruation, randomly received two types of massage with lavender and placebo oil in two consecutive cycles of menstruation. Their level of pain was measured before and 30 min after the intervention. In this study, each group was considered as their self-control group in the next cycle. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: A significant decrease in VAS score after lavender massage was detected in comparison with placebo massage. There was a statistically significant difference between VAS scores after and before placebo massage. In addition, statistically the effect of lavender massage on the severity of primary dysmenorrhea was higher than that of placebo massage (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that lavender oil massage decreases primary dysmenorrhea and it can be used as an effective herbal drug. PMID:25709705

  19. Effect of a Brief Seated Massage on Nursing Student Attitudes Toward Touch for Comfort Care

    PubMed Central

    Yearwood, Edilma L.; Friedmann, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Background: While massage has been removed from nursing curricula, studies have reported massage as safe and effective for stress reduction, relaxation, pain relief, fatigue, and quality of life. Objective: To compare the efficacy of two intensities of touch administered during two seated massages on the attitudes of nursing students toward touch for their self-care and patient care. Participants: Nursing students who volunteered gave institutional review board–approved written informed consent to undergo massage by a licensed massage therapist. Settings/location: A private room adjacent to the nursing lab in a school of nursing. Intervention: Brief seated massages of differing intensities. Each participant received low-intensity and high-intensity touch in a two-block, randomized order, within-subjects design. Linear mixed models nested within subject and random intercept analyses were used to test hypotheses in this two-treatment, two-sequence, two-period crossover design. Outcome measures: Health questionnaires/visual analogue scales pertaining to physical/affective/and attitudinal status were completed before and after each massage. Results: Twenty-nine participants (93% female, 83% single) completed the study. Before massage, the optimal intensity of touch anticipated for self-comfort was 6.6 (0=no pressure;10=most intense pressure imaginable). The mean touch intensities were 6.7 for high-intensity massage and 0.5 for low-intensity (p<0.001). The overall percentage differences (feeling better or worse) following massage were as follows: low intensity, 37.5% better; high intensity, 62.7% better (p<0.001). Significantly more improvement was reported for energy, pain, stress, and feeling physically uptight after high-intensity compared with low-intensity (p<0.03). Participants were more likely to both receive touch for self-care and provide touch for patient care after experiencing high- versus low-intensity massage (p<0.01). Conclusions: High-intensity seated

  20. Comparison of Deep Tissue Massage and Therapeutic Massage for Lower Back Pain, Disease Activity, and Functional Capacity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Špiritović, Maja; Dudek, Adrian; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to compare the effectiveness of deep tissue massage (DTM) and therapeutic massage (TM) in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Methods This was a small, randomized clinical pilot study. Subjects were 27 men with diagnosed AS, randomly assigned to DTM group or TM group. Subjects in each group had 10 sessions of massage. Outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Modified Schober Test, Finger to Floor Test, chest expansion, and pain intensity of lower back. Results There are no statistical significant differences between groups, except for BASDAI and pain intensity of lower back. Conclusions This study suggests that massage may have clinical benefits for treating ankylosing spondylitis patients. Additional scientific research in this area is warranted. PMID:28845185

  1. Differences in practitioners' proficiency affect the effectiveness of massage therapy on physical and psychological states.

    PubMed

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Shibasaki, Masanao

    2010-07-01

    An examination was made of how differences in the proficiency of massage practitioners had different physical and psychological effects on clients. Eight healthy 50-year-old females, suffering from chronic neck and shoulder stiffness, were recruited and four interventions were conducted: three 40-minute massage therapy interventions, one each by a freshman and a sophomore student studying massage therapy, and one by their instructor, and one rest on the massage table. Visual analogue scale score for muscle stiffness in the neck and shoulder, state anxiety score, and salivary cortisol concentration levels and secretory immunoglobulin A, were measured pre- and post- interventions. Visual analogue scale of neck and shoulder stiffness after massage by the instructor was significantly lower than that after the other interventions, and the score of state anxiety was lower than that after resting. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of the application of therapeutic massage in children with cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; González-Sánchez, Blanca; Torres-Piles, Silvia; Martín, Jorge Guerrero; Jiménez-Palomares, María; Bellino, Macarena Núñez

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to learn about the effects of the use of therapeutic massage in children with cancer. Method: systematic review of controlled clinical trials The search was conducted in November 2014 in the following databases: Pubmed, CSIC, Dialnet, Scopus, Cochrane and PEDro. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, analyzing the effects of massage on the different stages and types of childhood cancer (between 1 and 18 years old). Results: of 1007 articles found, 7 met the inclusion criteria. Their authors use different massage techniques (Swedish massage, effleurage, petrissage, frictions, pressures), obtaining benefits in the symptoms present during the illness (decrease of pain, nausea, stress, anxiety and increase of white blood cells and neutrophils). Conclusion: therapeutic massage improves the symptoms of children with cancer, but there is a need for more research that may support the effects attributed to it. PMID:28614430

  3. Brief report: improvements in the behavior of children with autism following massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Escalona, A; Field, T; Singer-Strunck, R; Cullen, C; Hartshorn, K

    2001-10-01

    Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, were randomly assigned to massage therapy and reading attention control groups. Parents in the massage therapy group were trained by a massage therapist to massage their children for 15 minutes prior to bedtime every night for 1 month and the parents of the attention control group read Dr. Seuss stories to their children on the same time schedule. Conners Teacher and Parent scales, classroom and playground observations, and sleep diaries were used to assess the effects of therapy on various behaviors, including hyperactivity, stereotypical and off-task behavior, and sleep problems. Results suggested that the children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they experienced fewer sleep problems at home.

  4. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, relaxation, and tension after colorectal surgery: A randomized study.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Nikol E; Cutshall, Susanne M; Huebner, Marianne; Foss, Diane M; Lovely, Jenna K; Bauer, Brent A; Cima, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effect of postoperative massage in patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive a 20-min massage (n = 61) or social visit and relaxation session (no massage; n = 66) on postoperative days 2 and 3. Vital signs and psychological well-being (pain, tension, anxiety, satisfaction with care, relaxation) were assessed before and after each intervention. The study results indicated that postoperative massage significantly improved the patients' perception of pain, tension, and anxiety, but overall satisfaction was unchanged. In conclusion, massage may be beneficial during postoperative recovery for patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. Further studies are warranted to optimize timing and duration and to determine other benefits in this clinical setting.

  5. A literature review about effectiveness of massage therapy for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Somani, Salima; Merchant, Samima; Lalani, Sharifa

    2013-11-01

    This literature review explores the effectiveness of massage therapy to reduce cancer pain. As part of the review, systematic literature search was carried out on various electronic databases and specialised journals. Included are 19 research-based articles and 8 review articles. The review suggests that cancer has become a common health problem in the world and most of the cancer patients are going through intense and unbearable pain. Studies have reported that most of the cancer patients' pain reduced with therapeutic massage. Seventy-three per cent of cancer patients use massage therapy in the USA. Few studies are available in the context of the developing world related to massage therapy and we could not find any study in the Pakistani context. There is a need to conduct an interventional study about the effectiveness of massage therapy to control cancer pain in developing countries such as Pakistan.

  6. The Application of Tensegrity Massage in a Professionally Active Musician - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Iwona; Kurpas, Donata; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Okręglicka-Forysiak, Ewa; Gworys, Bohdan; Kassolik, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to present options for the application of tensegrity massage to manage pain caused by the overload of soft tissues in musicians. Tensegrity massage was applied to a 34-year-old male violinist. The methodology included a correct positioning and tensegrity massage with individually designed procedure. After therapy, the patient achieved complete pain relief, and relaxation of muscles in the shoulder girdle and free part of the upper arm. The analgesic effect lasted for 6 months after the end of therapy. Massage is an effective method in eliminating pain caused by the overload of soft tissues. If used regularly before physical effort, it can prevent muscle overload. The presented massage procedure is an effective therapy in pain caused by the overload of soft tissues in musicians and it can be one of the elements of complex physiotherapy in active musicians. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  7. Effects of aromatherapy massage on blood pressure and lipid profile in korean climacteric women.

    PubMed

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Oh, Heeyoung; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Chan; Choi, Ae-Na; Shin, Gil-Ran

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on the lipid profile and blood pressure in Korean climacteric women. A wait-listed control group, pretest-posttest design was used. The subjects comprised 58 climacteric women: 30 in the experimental group and 28 in the control group. Aromatherapy massage using lavender, rose geranium, rose, and jasmine was given to the experimental group only. Each massage session lasted 30 minutes, and was performed once weekly for two 8-week periods with self abdominal daily massage at home. The intervention produced significant differences in the systolic blood pressure compare to pretreatment and significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures at posttreatment between the two groups. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage may exert positive effects on blood pressure. However, more objective, clinical measures should be applied in a future study with a randomized placebo-controlled design.

  8. Regional muscle tension and pain ("fibrositis"). Effect of massage on myoglobin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Christiansen, E; Lund, B; Andersen, R B

    1983-01-01

    In thirteen patients, all women, with regional muscle tension and pain ("fibrositis") plasma myoglobin concentration was measured before and after massage. A significant increase was observed in the plasma myoglobin concentration reaching a maximum three hours after the start of massage treatment (median 133 micrograms/l). A positive correlation was found between the degree of muscle tension and the increase in plasma myoglobin concentration. After repeated massage treatment a gradual decline could be demonstrated in the increase of the plasma myoglobin concentration in coincidence with the efficacy of the treatment. Opposed to this only normal levels of myoglobin were found in plasma when muscles without tenderness and pain were treated with massage. The observed increase of myoglobin in plasma after massage indicates a leak of myoglobin from the muscle fibres, which suggests that regional muscle tension and pain is associated with disorders in the muscle fibres.

  9. Fibromyalgia pain and substance P decrease and sleep improves after massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Cullen, Christy; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Sunshine, William; Douglas, Steven

    2002-04-01

    Massage therapy has been observed to be helpful in some patients with fibromyalgia. This study was designed to examine the effects of massage therapy versus relaxation therapy on sleep, substance P, and pain in fibromyalgia patients. Twenty-four adult fibromyalgia patients were assigned randomly to a massage therapy or relaxation therapy group. They received 30-minute treatments twice weekly for 5 weeks. Both groups showed a decrease in anxiety and depressed mood immediately after the first and last therapy sessions. However, across the course of the study, only the massage therapy group reported an increase in the number of sleep hours and a decrease in their sleep movements. In addition, substance P levels decreased, and the patients' physicians assigned lower disease and pain ratings and rated fewer tender points in the massage therapy group.

  10. Reducing perineal trauma through perineal massage with vaseline in second stage of labor.

    PubMed

    Geranmayeh, Mehrnaz; Rezaei Habibabadi, Zahra; Fallahkish, Bijan; Farahani, Mahdi Azizabadi; Khakbazan, Zohreh; Mehran, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining an intact perineum is a highly regarded aim in delivery procedures today. Since perineal massage is a common practice during delivery, the present study aims to investigate the effect of perineal massage with Vaseline on perineal trauma (rate of episiotomy procedures and perineal tears). Ninety primiparous women (aged between 18 and 30 years with gestational age of 38-42 weeks) were selected sequentially in Tehran in 2009. Once participants' characteristics were registered, they were randomly assigned to the intervention (perineal massage with Vaseline) or control groups. In the massage group, perineal massage was performed in the second stage of delivery once the genitalia were treated with sterilized Vaseline. The perineum was examined after the delivery in terms of episiotomy or tear and its severity degree. The two groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic data, weight gain during pregnancy, gestational age, abortion history and fetal weight. The second stage of delivery was significantly shorter in the massage group than the control group and the massage group had significantly more intact perineum (P = 0.004). In addition, lower episiotomy and higher first- and second-degree perineal tears were seen in the massage group in comparison with the control one (P < 0.001). Neither of the groups suffered from third- and fourth-degree tears. The findings showed that the perineal massage with Vaseline in the second stage of labor increases perineal integrity and decreases perineal traumas (episiotomy and tears). So, it seems that the perineal massage could be an effective way to preserve an intact perineum in labor.

  11. Massage reduced severity of pain during labour: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Silva Gallo, Rubneide Barreto; Santana, Licia Santos; Jorge Ferreira, Cristine Homsi; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Polineto, Omero Benedicto; Duarte, Geraldo; Quintana, Silvana Maria

    2013-06-01

    Does massage relieve pain in the active phase of labour? Randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding for some outcomes, and intention-to-treat analysis. 46 women pregnant at ≥ 37 weeks gestation with a single fetus, with spontaneous onset of labour, 4-5cm of cervical dilation, intact ovular membranes, and no use of medication after admission to hospital. Experimental group participants received a 30-min lumbar massage by a physiotherapist during the active phase of labour. A physiotherapist attended control group participants for the same period but only answered questions. Both groups received routine perinatal care. The primary outcome was pain severity measured on a 100mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, pain location, and time to analgesic medication use. After labour, a blinded researcher also recorded duration of labour, route of delivery, neonatal outcomes, and the participant's satisfaction with the physiotherapist during labour. At the end of the intervention, pain severity was 52mm (SD 20) in the experimental group and 72mm (SD 15) in control group, which was significantly different with a mean difference of 20mm (95% CI 10 to 31). The groups did not differ significantly on the other pain-related outcome measures. Obstetric outcomes were also similar between the groups except the duration of labour, which was 6.8hr (SD 1.6) in the experimental group and 5.7hr (SD 1.5) in the control group, mean difference 1.1hr (95% CI 0.2 to 2.0). Patients in both groups were satisfied with the care provided by the physiotherapist. Massage reduced the severity of pain in labour, despite not changing its characteristics and location. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of friction massage of the popliteal fossa on dynamic changes in muscle oxygenation and ankle flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Koji; Mizukami, Masafumi; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Yoshio, Masaharu; Ogaki, Ryo; Takemura, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine whether or not friction massage of the popliteal fossa would be effective for achieving dynamic changes in muscle oxygenation and ankle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy male university students participated. Before and after friction massage, dynamic changes in muscle oxygenation and ankle flexibility were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy to evaluate its efficacy. [Results] Oxygenated hemoglobin was significantly higher after as compared to before massage. The range of ankle dorsiflexion tended to increase after massage. [Conclusion] These results suggest that friction massage of the popliteal fossa stimulates venous return in the lower leg. PMID:27821920

  13. Learning and adherence to baby massage after two teaching strategies.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cláudia Marchetti; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Gonçalves, Lia Lopes; Machado, Thais Gaiad; Voos, Mariana Callil

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about learning/adherence after different baby massage teaching strategies. We compared the learning/adherence after two strategies. Twenty mothers from the group manual-course (GMC) and 20 from the group manual-orientations (GMO) received a booklet. GMC participated in a course during the third trimester. GMO received verbal instructions during the postpartum hospital stay. Multiple-choice and practical tests assessed learning (GMC: performing strokes on a doll; GMO: on the baby). Adherence was measured 3 months after childbirth. No differences were found between the groups in learning/adherence. Both teaching strategies showed similar and positive results. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Massage Therapy Education Online: Student Satisfaction and Achievement, Part I

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, David James

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, providers of massage therapy education have, in growing numbers, started to use online technologies to support the learning processes of their students. Using a narrative review of the existing online learning literature, this paper aims to provide a solid pedagogical foundation for these early explorations. It identifies five key factors—instructional pedagogy, quality of instruction, interaction and communication, individual learner qualities, and the online interface—that contribute to student satisfaction and achievement in the online context. The relationships between those factors and the experience of the online learner are discussed with reference to maximization of student satisfaction and achievement. PMID:21589705

  15. Recording of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and cerebral blood flow during massage of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Jacek; Boberski, Marek; Butrymowicz, Ewa; Niedbalski, Paweł; Ogniewski, Paweł; Niedbalski, Marek; Niedbalski, Zbigniew; Podraza, Wojciech; Podraza, Hanna

    2012-08-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system plays an important role in brain function and psychomotor development of children. Massage can benefit premature infants, but has limitations. The authors conducted a study to verify the direct effects of massage on amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG), oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), and pulse analyzed by color cerebral function monitor (CCFM) and cerebral blood flow assessed by the Doppler technique. The amplitude of the aEEG trend during massage significantly increased. Massage also impacted the dominant frequency δ waves. Frequency significantly increased during the massage and return to baseline after treatment. SaO(2) significantly decreased during massage. In four premature infants, massage was discontinued due to desaturation below 85%. Pulse frequency during the massage decreased but remained within physiological limits of greater than 100 beats per minute in all infants. Doppler flow values in the anterior cerebral artery measured before and after massage did not show statistically significant changes. Resistance index after massage decreased, which might provide greater perfusion of the brain, but this difference was not statistically significant. Use of the CCFM device allows for monitoring of three basic physiologic functions, namely aEEG, SaO(2), and pulse, and increases the safety of massage in preterm infants. Copyright © 2012 by Thieme Medical Publishers

  16. Salivary oxytocin concentrations in seven boys with autism spectrum disorder received massage from their mothers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shuji; Yuhi, Teruko; Furuhara, Kazumi; Ohta, Shogo; Shimizu, Yuto; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Seven male children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), aged 8-12 years, attending special education classrooms for ASD and disabled children, were assigned to receive touch therapy. Their mothers were instructed to provide gentle touch in the massage style of the International Liddle Kidz Association. The mothers gave massages to their child for 20 min every day over a period of 3 months, followed by no massage for 4 months. To assess the biological effects of such touch therapy, saliva was collected before and 20 min after a single session of massage for 20 min from the children and mothers every 3 weeks during the massage period and every 4 weeks during the non-massage period, when they visited a community meeting room. Salivary oxytocin levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay kit. During the period of massage therapy, the children and mothers exhibited higher oxytocin concentrations compared to those during the non-massage period. The changes in oxytocin levels before and after a single massage session were not significantly changed in children and mothers. The results suggested that the ASD children (massage receivers) and their mothers (massage givers) show touch therapy-dependent changes in salivary oxytocin concentrations.

  17. Salivary Oxytocin Concentrations in Seven Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder Received Massage from Their Mothers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shuji; Yuhi, Teruko; Furuhara, Kazumi; Ohta, Shogo; Shimizu, Yuto; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Seven male children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), aged 8–12 years, attending special education classrooms for ASD and disabled children, were assigned to receive touch therapy. Their mothers were instructed to provide gentle touch in the massage style of the International Liddle Kidz Association. The mothers gave massages to their child for 20 min every day over a period of 3 months, followed by no massage for 4 months. To assess the biological effects of such touch therapy, saliva was collected before and 20 min after a single session of massage for 20 min from the children and mothers every 3 weeks during the massage period and every 4 weeks during the non-massage period, when they visited a community meeting room. Salivary oxytocin levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay kit. During the period of massage therapy, the children and mothers exhibited higher oxytocin concentrations compared to those during the non-massage period. The changes in oxytocin levels before and after a single massage session were not significantly changed in children and mothers. The results suggested that the ASD children (massage receivers) and their mothers (massage givers) show touch therapy-dependent changes in salivary oxytocin concentrations. PMID:25954210

  18. Exploring a massage intervention for parents and their children with autism: the implications for bonding and attachment.

    PubMed

    Cullen-Powell, Lesley A; Barlow, Julie H; Cushway, Delia

    2005-12-01

    This exploratory study aimed to address two questions: (1) What does touch mean between parents and their children with autism on completion of a massage intervention? (2) Do parents feel that their relationship with their children has changed on completion of a massage intervention? Fourteen parents agreed to be interviewed. Data were collected before the massage intervention (baseline), immediately after the massage intervention and 16 weeks from baseline and were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. At baseline, parents felt distressed that they felt unable to get 'close' to their children. After the intervention, parents reported feeling physically and emotionally closer to their children. Children expressed a range of cues to initiate massage at home. These benefits were maintained at follow-up for parents who continued to use massage at home. In conclusion, giving massage to children with autism may help to enhance the emotional bond between parent and child.

  19. A qualitative study on urut Melayu: the traditional Malay massage.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Haniza Mohd; Fadzil, Fariza; Sallehuddin, Shaheeda Mohd; Ahmad, Norlaili; Abd Ghani, Norsuria

    2010-11-01

    We conducted this study to gain an insight into the experiences and views of practitioners of urut Melayu, the traditional Malay massage, which will be used in developing a preliminary framework of the urut Melayu process. We adopted a qualitative study design. We carried out a total of five focus group discussions (FGDs) comprising 6-10 urut Melayu practitioners each. We carried out three FGDs at the Traditional and Complementary Medicine Division, Ministry of Health and two FGDs at a district Health Clinic. All participants of the FGDs were urut Melayu practitioners registered with the Ministry of Health. Three (3) FGDs comprised all females while two comprised all males. A total of 12 males and 24 females participated in the study. We identified six themes from the study, namely, indications for urut Melayu, the urut Melayu technique, other treatments in conjunction with urut Melayu, outcome of urut Melayu, ethics of urut Melayu, and practitioners' source of skills and knowledge. Urut Melayu is a unique form of massage carried out for various purposes. Although it is common belief that there are vast differences in the way it is performed from one practitioner to another, this study revealed that similarities do exist and there is potential to develop a standard framework for urut Melayu for regulation and training purposes.

  20. Massage Therapy for Lyme Disease Symptoms: a Prospective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Meghan J.; Moyer, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To study the effects of massage therapy (MT) on Lyme disease (LD) symptoms and affect. Methods A 21-year-old female college student previously diagnosed with LD was recruited for a prospective case study that incorporated alternating periods of treatment and nontreatment across 65 days. Her self-reported symptoms of pain, fatigue, and impairment of concentration were assessed by means of a daily diary with corresponding visual analog scales. Immediate effects of MT on affect were assessed by completion of the Positive and Negative Affect Scales before and after each treatment session. Results LD symptoms decreased during treatment periods and increased during nontreatment periods. Positive affect was increased at every MT session. Conclusions MT is a promising treatment for the symptoms pain, fatigue, and impaired concentration associated with LD. In addition, MT reliably increased positive affect. Massage therapists should consider using light-to-medium pressure MT for treatment of persons who present with a similar pattern of LD symptoms, and further research with this population is warranted. PMID:23429967

  1. The effect of massage with medium-chain triglyceride oil on weight gain in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Saeadi, Reza; Ghorbani, Zahra; Shapouri Moghaddam, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Prematurity and poor weight gaining are important causes for neonatal hospitalization. The present study aimed to investigate the role of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil via massage therapy as a supplementary nutritional method on the weight gain of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU)-hospitalized neonates. This randomized clinical trial performed among 121 stable premature neonates hospitalized in the NICU of Qaem Educational Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. They were randomly divided into three groups: oil-massage, massage alone and control groups. These groups were compared on the basis of weight gain during a one-week interval. The three groups were matched for sex, mean gestational age, birth weight, head circumference, delivery, and feeding type (P>0.05). The mean weight gain on the 7th day in the oil massage group was 105±1.3gr and 52±0.1gr in the massage group; whereas 54±1.3gr weight loss was observed in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the oil-massage group and the other two groups, respectively (P=0.002 and P=0.000). The findings of this study suggest that transcutaneous feeding with MCT oil massage therapy in premature neonates can result in accelerated weight gain in this age group with no risk of NEC.

  2. Moderate Versus Light Pressure Massage Therapy Leads to Greater Weight Gain in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel A.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Deeds, Osvelia; Figuereido, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-eight preterm infants (M GA=3Owks.) were randomly assigned to a moderate or to a light pressure massage therapy group to receive 15 massages 3 times per day for 5 days. Behavior state, stress behaviors and heart rate were recorded for 15 minutes before and during the first 15-minute therapy session. Weight gain was recorded over the 5 day therapy period. The moderate versus light pressure massage group gained significantly more weight per day. During the behavior observations the moderate versus light pressure massage group showed significantly lower increases from the pre-session to the session recording on: 1) active sleep; 2) fussing; 3) crying; 4) movement; and 5) stress behavior (hiccupping). They also showed a smaller decrease in deep sleep, a greater decrease in heart rate and a greater increase in vagal tone. Thus, the moderate pressure massage therapy group appeared to be more relaxed and less aroused than the light pressure massage group which may have contributed to the greater weight gain of the moderate pressure massage therapy group. PMID:17138310

  3. The efficacy of massage on short and long term outcomes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahia; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Hawwari, Mirvat

    2013-12-01

    Premature infants lack the tactile stimulation they would have otherwise experienced in the womb. Infant massage is a developmentally supportive intervention that has been documented for several decades to have a positive effect on both full term and preterm infants. The purpose of this study was to assess the short and long term benefits of massage on stable preterm infants. A quasi experimental design was used, 66 infants were recruited from two university hospitals with tertiary level NICUs; 32 infants received the massage therapy by their mothers. Data collection by a researcher blind to the infants' group assignments included weight at discharge, pain responses on the PIPP scale at discharge, length of stay in hospital, neuro-developmental outcome (Bayley scores) and breastfeeding duration at 12 months corrected age. Infants who were massaged had significantly lower scores on the PIPP after a heel-stick compared to before the massage and had lower PIPP scores at discharge compared to the control group. Massaged infants had higher cognitive scores at 12 months corrected age. Weight gain, length of stay, breastfeeding duration and motor scores did not differ between groups. Stable preterm infants benefit from massage therapy given by their mothers and may be a culturally acceptable form of intervention to improve the outcomes of preterm infants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Multiple Sclerosis Patients' Quality of Life and Leg Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massage therapy is a noninvasive treatment that many individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) use to supplement their conventional treatment. Objective. We hypothesize that massage therapy will improve the leg function and overall quality of life (QoL) of MS patients. Design. A two-period (rest, massage) crossover design was used. Twenty-four individuals with MS ranging from 3.0 to 7.0 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) received Swedish massage treatments for four weeks. Exercise capacity and leg function as well as QoL were assessed using the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and the Hamburg Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis (HAQUAMS) instrument, respectively. Assessments were measured before and after a massage period and a rest period where no massages were employed. Results. The results displayed no significant changes in 6MWT distances or HAQUAMS scores. However, the participants perceived improvement in overall health as expressed in written comments. Conclusions. Massage is a safe, noninvasive treatment that may assist MS patients in managing the stress of their symptoms. Future studies with larger sample size and cortisol measures are warranted. PMID:24949078

  5. Gentle Massage Improves Disease- and Treatment-Related Symptoms in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ann Gill; Snyder, Audrey E; Anderson, Joel G; Brown, Cynthia J; Densmore, John J; Bourguignon, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cancer treatment is reported to be stressful, and patients diagnosed with hematologic cancers often exhibit higher levels of anxiety and emotional distress than individuals with other malignancies. Management of these symptoms in patients with hematologic cancer presents significant challenges, as many of them are in and out of the hospital while undergoing high dose chemotherapy. Oncology patients use complementary modalities such as therapeutic massage in an attempt to alleviate disease and treatment-related symptoms, including anxiety and emotional distress. In the current study, the feasibility of a novel massage intervention delivered over the continuum of care, as well as assessment of the immediate and cumulative effects of massage, was examined in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Methods A mixed-methods, unmasked, prospective, randomized study was conducted with two groups: a usual care alone control group and a massage therapy intervention plus usual care group. Results Significant improvements in levels of stress and health-related quality of life were observed in the massage therapy group versus the usual care alone group, after adjusting for anxiety level, including both immediate and cumulative effects of massage. Conclusions While the findings of the current study regarding acceptability, feasibility, and potential efficacy of therapeutic massage as a complementary health-enhancing intervention in patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia are very promising, the relatively small size of the study sample limits generalizability. PMID:25530922

  6. Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined with Thermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Joergen

    2016-01-01

    Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days, one condition per day: control, massage only, or massage with infrared heating. Physical (trunk extension [TE]; maximum power of erector spinae), physiological (heart-rate variability [HRV]; electroencephalogram [EEG]), and psychological (state-trait anxiety inventory [STAI]; visual analogue scale [VAS]) measurements were evaluated and recorded before and after each treatment condition. The results showed that massage therapy, especially when combined with infrared heating, significantly improved physical functioning, increased parasympathetic response, and decreased psychological stress and anxiety. In the current study, we observed that massage therapy contributes to various physical, physiological, and psychological changes, where the effect increases with thermotherapy. PMID:28074179

  7. Baby massage ameliorates neonatal jaundice in full-term newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Sadakata, Mieko; Ishida, Mayumi; Sekizuka, Naoto; Sayama, Mitsuko

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common physiological problem affecting over half of all full term and most preterm infants. Thus, newborn infants must be monitored for signs of hyperbilirubinemia to prevent acute bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus. Evidence exists supporting the benefits of baby massage as a form of mild hand to skin contact, to increase neonatal physical and mental development. In the present study, the effects of gentle baby massage on neonatal jaundice in full term newborn infants were evaluated by a controlled clinical trial. The inclusion criteria of newborn neonates were as follows: (1) gestational age of 37-41 weeks, (2) birth weight of 2,800-3,600 g, (3) Apgar score at birth of 8-10, and (4) being a healthy neonate without neonatal asphyxia and hemolytic condition. Breastfed newborns without phototherapy were included: 20 in the massage group and 22 in the control group. We found the mean stool frequency of the massaged infants on day 1 and day 2 (4.6 and 4.3) was significantly higher than that of the control group (3.3 and 2.6) (p<0.05). The transcutaneous bilirubin levels on the second to fifth day and serum total bilirubin levels on fourth day were significantly decreased in the massage group, compared to the control group. In conclusion, baby massage at an early stage after birth could reduce neonatal bilirubin levels. We suggest baby massage is beneficial for ameliorating neonatal jaundice.

  8. A Standardized, Evidence-Based Massage Therapy Program for Decentralized Elite Paracyclists: Creating the Model†

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Trilk, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evidence suggests that para-athletes are injured more often than able-bodied athletes. The benefits of massage therapy for these disabled athletes are yet to be explored. This paper documents the process followed for creating a massage program for elite paracycling athletes with the goal to assess effects on recovery, rest, performance, and quality of life both on and off the bike. Setting Massage therapists’ private practices throughout the United States. Participants A United States Paracycling team consisting of 9 elite athletes: 2 spinal cord injury, 2 lower limb amputation, 1 upper limb amputation, 1 transverse myelitis, 1 stroke, 1 traumatic brain injury, and 1 visually impaired. Design The process used to develop a massage therapy program for para-cyclists included meetings with athletes, coaching staff, team exercise physiologist, and sports massage therapists; peer-reviewed literature was also consulted to address specific health conditions of para-athletes. Results Team leadership and athletes identified needs for quicker recovery, better rest, and improved performance in elite paracyclists. This information was used to generate a conceptual model for massage protocols, and led to creation of the intake and exit questionnaires to assess patient health status and recovery. Forms also were created for a general health intake, therapist information, and a therapist’s SOAAP notes. Discussion The conceptual model and questionnaires developed herein will help to operationalize an exploratory study investigating the feasibility of implementing a standardized massage therapy program for a decentralized elite paracycling team. PMID:26388960

  9. Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined with Thermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Dae Woon; Schreiber, Joergen; Im, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hansung

    2016-01-01

    Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days, one condition per day: control, massage only, or massage with infrared heating. Physical (trunk extension [TE]; maximum power of erector spinae), physiological (heart-rate variability [HRV]; electroencephalogram [EEG]), and psychological (state-trait anxiety inventory [STAI]; visual analogue scale [VAS]) measurements were evaluated and recorded before and after each treatment condition. The results showed that massage therapy, especially when combined with infrared heating, significantly improved physical functioning, increased parasympathetic response, and decreased psychological stress and anxiety. In the current study, we observed that massage therapy contributes to various physical, physiological, and psychological changes, where the effect increases with thermotherapy.

  10. Effect of early multisensory massage intervention on visual functions in infants with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purpura, Giulia; Tinelli, Francesca; Bargagna, Stefania; Bozza, Margherita; Bastiani, Luca; Cioni, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    Down syndrome is a frequent cause of intellectual disability, with severe impact on the quality of life of affected individuals and their families, and high social costs. Intervention programs should start soon after birth but no consensus exists on specific types and timing of early interventions in this population. This pilot study explores the effects of an early multi-sensory intervention, based on body massage, on the development of visual function in infants with Down syndrome. Infants were randomly allocated to either a massage or a control group. Intervention consisted of only standard care (Control Group) or standard care plus infant massage (Massaged Group). Visual acuity was assessed by Teller Acuity Cards and stereopsis by the Frisby Stereopsis Screening Test at 5, 6, 9 and 12 months. Massaged Group Infants showed a significantly higher visual acuity at 6 months of age and an accelerated development up to at least 12 months; compared to Controls, stereopsis had an earlier onset in the Massaged Group followed by a faster maturation. Environmental enrichment, in the tested form of infant massage, seems to affect maturation of visual functions in human infants, also in the presence of a genetic disability, when applied during a period of high brain plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of lower limb massage on electromyography and force production of the knee extensors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A M; Watt, J M; Watt, V; Galloway, S D R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of massage on force production and neuromuscular recruitment. Methods Ten healthy male subjects performed isokinetic concentric contractions on the knee extensors at speeds of 60, 120, 180, and 240°/s. These contractions were performed before and after a 30 minute intervention of either rest in the supine position or lower limb massage. Electromyography (EMG) and force data were captured during the contractions. Results The change in isokinetic mean force due to the intervention showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) at 60°/s and a trend for a decrease (p  =  0.08) at 120°/s as a result of massage compared with passive rest. However, there were no corresponding differences in any of the EMG data. A reduction in force production was shown at 60°/s with no corresponding alteration in neuromuscular activity. Conclusions The results suggests that motor unit recruitment and muscle fibre conduction velocity are not responsible for the observed reductions in force. Although experimental confirmation is necessary, a possible explanation is that massage induced force loss by influencing “muscle architecture”. However, it is possible that the differences were only found at 60°/s because it was the first contraction after massage. Therefore muscle tension and architecture after massage and the duration of any massage effect need to be examined. PMID:16431996

  12. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy for Chronic, Non-malignant Pain: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Previous reviews of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain have focused on discrete pain conditions. This article aims to provide a broad overview of the literature on the effectiveness of massage for a variety of chronic, non-malignant pain complaints to identify gaps in the research and to inform future clinical trials. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain. Existing research provides fairly robust support for the analgesic effects of massage for non-specific low back pain, but only moderate support for such effects on shoulder pain and headache pain. There is only modest, preliminary support for massage in the treatment of fibromyalgia, mixed chronic pain conditions, neck pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, research to date provides varying levels of evidence for the benefits of massage therapy for different chronic pain conditions. Future studies should employ rigorous study designs and include follow-up assessments for additional quantification of the longer-term effects of massage on chronic pain. PMID:17549233

  13. Effects of baby massage on neonatal jaundice in healthy Iranian infants: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dalili, Hosein; Sheikhi, Sanaz; Shariat, Mamak; Haghnazarian, Edith

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of baby massage on transcutaneous bilirubin levels and stool frequency of healthy term newborns. This Pilot study was conducted on 50 healthy newborns in Valiasr Hospital of IKHC. The infants were randomly allocated to two treatment (massage) and control group. The massage group received massage therapy (according to Touch Therapy) for four days from the first day postnatal while the control group received routine care. Main variable studied were transcutaneous bilirubin level (TCB) and stool frequency which were compared in two groups. There were 50 newborns in the study 25 in each group (50%). There was a significant difference in the TCB levels between two groups (p=0.000) with those in the massage group having lower bilirubin levels. As for the stool frequency there was a significant difference in two groups on the first day showing more defecation in the control group (p=0.042) which on the consequent days was not significant and the frequencies were almost similar. Massage group had a lower transcutaneous billirubin levels compared to the control group, thus, these pilot results indicate that massaging the newborns can be accompanied by a lower bilirubin level in the healthy term newborn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Foot Bathing and Foot Massage in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ranhee; Park, Chaisoon

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical setting, patients have been observed to complain of discomfort and to discontinue treatment because of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), but few data exist regarding the quality of life in these patients in Korea. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to analyze the effects of foot bathing and massage in patients with CIPN. Subjects included 48 patients with CIPN, who were hospitalized in C University Hospital. The subjects were alternately assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to their registration order. The interventions consisted of 8 treatments of foot bathing or massage over a period of 2 weeks, at 30 minutes per session, every other day. The foot skin temperature increased significantly in the foot bathing group, whereas it decreased significantly in the massage group. Quality of life was significantly increased in the foot bathing group, whereas it was significantly decreased in the massage group. Although foot bathing and foot massage are both supportive care techniques for CIPN patients, foot bathing was more effective than foot massage on skin temperature, grade of neurotoxicity, and quality of life. Additional well-designed studies are recommended, so that the effectiveness of foot bathing and foot massage is confirmed. Foot bathing is more useful as supportive care with respect to nonpharmacologic interventions for alleviating CIPN and promoting the quality of life in cancer patients.

  15. Proximal drainage plus massage of lacrimal sac improves the symptoms of congenital dacryocystoceles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of proximal drainage plus lacrimal sac massage in patients with congenital dacryocystoceles. A retrospective review of 77 patients was performed. Traditional massage was performed in the traditional treatment group (35 patients) first. Proximal lacrimal sac drainage plus massage of the lacrimal sac using a Bangerter lacrimal cannula (defined as modified massage) was performed in the modified group (42 patients). Probing was undertaken if the treatments failed in both groups. Success rates of decompression of lacrimal sac and recovery rate were observed. The χ2 test was used to compare the groups. Success rates of decompression of lacrimal sac were 100% in the modified group and 31% in the traditional group. In the modified group, 34 patients with 37 dacryocystoceles (80%) recovered with the modified treatment within 14 days. However, in the traditional group, only 11 patients with 12 dacryocystoceles (30%) had resolution after conservative treatment. The recovery rate of the modified massage in the modified group was higher than that of massage alone in the traditional group (p<0.001). As to the individuals receiving probing, 8 patients with 9 dacryocystoceles (100%) in the modified group were successful, while 18 patients with 21 dacryocystoceles (78%) in the traditional group had a satisfying effect. Proximal drainage plus massage has the advantage of high efficiency and safety for the treatment of congenital dacryocystoceles.

  16. Effects of massage treatment combined with topical cactus and aloe on puerperal milk stasis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shan; Deng, Qingchun; Feng, Chunyu; Pan, Yinglian; Chang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Puerperal milk stasis is one of the most common puerperal complication that directly affects breastfeeding. Massage treatment with topical cactus and aloe for puerperal milk stasis might be a superior treatment, and it does not affect breastfeeding. The intervention group was treated with massages with cactus and aloe cold compresses, and the control group was treated with massage treatment or cactus and aloe cold compresses alone. We evaluated the efficacies of the treatments through comparisons of the feeding patterns, hardness, and pain after treatment between the three groups. We found that breastfeeding rates were significantly increased in the massage combine with combined with cactus and aloe cold compress group (P < 0.05 for both). Breast hardness and pain were reduced to greater extents in massage combine with combined with cactus and aloe cold compress group than in the massage or cold compress group (P < 0.05). Massage treatment with topical cactus and aloe topical effectively improved the pain status, hard lump of puerperal milk stasis and increase breastfeeding rate.

  17. Anxiety reduction in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization following massage and guided imagery.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Karen; Dixon, Simon; May, Sara; Patricolo, Gail Elliott

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of massage with or without guided imagery in reducing anxiety prior to cardiac catheterization. A total of 55 inpatients and outpatients received massage, guided imagery, or massage with guided imagery prior to cardiac catheterization. Self-reported anxiety levels and blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated in participants and a matched comparison group. Massage with and without guided imagery resulted in significant reductions in self-reported anxiety (p < 0.0001). Patients receiving intervention had lower diastolic BP and HR vs. the comparison group (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.05). Massage with or without guided imagery immediately reduced self-reported anxiety. This pilot study has certain limitations: a non-randomized, convenience sample and a matched control group that was created retrospectively. However, the study indicates a benefit to providing massage or massage with guided imagery prior to anxiety-inducing medical procedures such as cardiac catheterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pilot Study of Massage to Improve Sleep and Fatigue in Hospitalized Adolescents With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Shana; Mowbray, Catriona; Cates, Lauren Muser; Baylor, Allison; Gable, Christopher; Skora, Elizabeth; Estrada, Monica; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jichuan; Lewin, Daniel; Hinds, Pamela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescents with cancer experience many troubling symptoms, including sleep disruptions that can affect mood and quality of life. Massage is a safe and popular intervention that has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a massage intervention to help with sleep in hospitalized adolescent oncology patients. Adolescents ages 12-21 with cancer who were expected to be hospitalized for at least four consecutive nights were recruited from the inpatient unit at Children's National Health System and randomized to either massage intervention or a waitlist control. Patients in the intervention group received one massage per night, for two or three nights. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and patient and proxy reported instruments were used to measure fatigue, mood, and anxiety. The majority (78%) of patients approached for the study consented, and almost all patients in the intervention group (94%) received at least one massage, 69% received two, and rates of completion of instruments among adolescents were high demonstrating feasibility. There were trends toward increased night time and overall sleep in the intervention group compared with standard of care, but no differences between groups in the patient reported outcome measures. Participant and parent feedback on the intervention was positive and was the impetus for starting a clinical massage service at the hospital. Massage for hospitalized adolescents with cancer is feasible, well received, and can potentially improve patients' sleep. A randomized multicenter efficacy study is warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Role of Massage in Sports Performance and Rehabilitation: Current Evidence and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Massage is a popular treatment choice of athletes, coaches, and sports physical therapists. Despite its purported benefits and frequent use, evidence demonstrating its efficacy is scarce. Purpose To identify current literature relating to sports massage and its role in effecting an athlete's psychological readiness, in enhancing sports performance, in recovery from exercise and competition, and in the treatment of sports related musculoskeletal injuries. Methods Electronic databases were used to identify papers relevant to this review. The following keywords were searched: massage, sports injuries, athletic injuries, physical therapy, rehabilitation, delayed onset muscle soreness, sports psychology, sports performance, sports massage, sports recovery, soft tissue mobilization, deep transverse friction massage, pre-event, and post exercise. Results Research studies pertaining to the following general categories were identified and reviewed: pre-event (physiological and psychological variables), sports performance, recovery, and rehabilitation. Discussion Despite the fact clinical research has been performed, a poor appreciation exists for the appropriate clinical use of sports massage. Conclusion Additional studies examining the physiological and psychological effects of sports massage are necessary in order to assist the sports physical therapist in developing and implementing clinically significant evidence based programs or treatments. PMID:21509135

  20. Aromatherapy massage seems to enhance relaxation in children with burns: an observational pilot study.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, Linda-Anne; van Dijk, Monique; Albertyn, Rene; Millar, Alastair; Rode, Heinz

    2012-09-01

    This observational pilot study investigated effects of aromatherapy massage in paediatric burn patients. The setting was a 17 beds level I burn unit in Cape Town, South Africa. Between January and October 2009 heart rates and respiratory rates of patients who underwent aromatherapy massage sessions were read before and after the sessions. Primary outcomes were decline in heart rates and respiratory rates, a sign of relaxation. Behavioural responses (sleep/awake state, facial expression, body posture) were documented as secondary outcomes. A convenience sample of 71 paediatric burn patients (median age 3 years) underwent a total of 126 massage sessions. Mean heart rate decreased significantly from 118 (SD 20) to 109 (SD 21), t=9.8, p<0.001. Mean respiratory rate decreased significantly from 34 (SD 8) to 30 (SD 8), t=10.2, p<0.001. Most massage sessions (92.8%) elicited positive behaviour to the massage, e.g. the child fell asleep, calmed or asked to continue. Nine patients (7.2%) with a median age of 15 months who underwent a single massage session did not show positive behaviour but cried, wriggled or were distressed. Aromatherapy massage seems to be a helpful nonpharmacological approach to reduce hospitalized paediatric burn patients' distress. Future studies with better research designs and validated outcome measures should confirm our findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of lower limb massage on electromyography and force production of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A M; Watt, J M; Watt, V; Galloway, S D R

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of massage on force production and neuromuscular recruitment. Ten healthy male subjects performed isokinetic concentric contractions on the knee extensors at speeds of 60, 120, 180, and 240 degrees /s. These contractions were performed before and after a 30 minute intervention of either rest in the supine position or lower limb massage. Electromyography (EMG) and force data were captured during the contractions. The change in isokinetic mean force due to the intervention showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) at 60 degrees /s and a trend for a decrease (p = 0.08) at 120 degrees /s as a result of massage compared with passive rest. However, there were no corresponding differences in any of the EMG data. A reduction in force production was shown at 60 degrees /s with no corresponding alteration in neuromuscular activity. The results suggests that motor unit recruitment and muscle fibre conduction velocity are not responsible for the observed reductions in force. Although experimental confirmation is necessary, a possible explanation is that massage induced force loss by influencing "muscle architecture". However, it is possible that the differences were only found at 60 degrees /s because it was the first contraction after massage. Therefore muscle tension and architecture after massage and the duration of any massage effect need to be examined.

  2. The Effect of Shiatsu Massage on Underlying Anxiety in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohaddes Ardabili, Fatemeh; Purhajari, Soybeh; Najafi Ghzeljeh, Tahereh; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn patients experience high levels of predictable anxiety during dressing changes while anti-anxiety drugs cannot control these anxieties. The nurses can limit the side effects of medications by undertaking complementary therapies. Hand pressure massage was introduced as a technique that can reduce these anxieties. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hand pressure massage using Shiatsu method on underlying anxiety in burn patients. METHODS In an available randomized study, 60 burn patients with underlying pain were enrolled. They were randomly allocated in two groups of hand massage and the control. The anxiety of underlying burn pain before and after the massage was evaluated using Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale (BSPAS). RESULTS The difference for anxiety scores in the hand Shiatsu massage group before and after massage were statistically significant, but in the control group was not significant. CONCLUSION Based on our findings, 20 minutes of hand Shiatsu massage in conjunction with analgesic medications can be beneficial to control the anxiety of burn patients. PMID:25606475

  3. Effectiveness of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jennie C I

    2007-06-01

    Previous reviews of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain have focused on discrete pain conditions. This article aims to provide a broad overview of the literature on the effectiveness of massage for a variety of chronic, non-malignant pain complaints to identify gaps in the research and to inform future clinical trials. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain. Existing research provides fairly robust support for the analgesic effects of massage for non-specific low back pain, but only moderate support for such effects on shoulder pain and headache pain. There is only modest, preliminary support for massage in the treatment of fibromyalgia, mixed chronic pain conditions, neck pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, research to date provides varying levels of evidence for the benefits of massage therapy for different chronic pain conditions. Future studies should employ rigorous study designs and include follow-up assessments for additional quantification of the longer-term effects of massage on chronic pain.

  4. Massage Therapy Treatment and Outcomes for a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Casciaro, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex neurological disorder. The disease is progressive and, in time, results in severe disability. Many patients turn to massage in an attempt to alleviate symptoms of pain and rigidity, though the effects of massage with respect to PD are not well studied. This case adds one more instance in which massage therapy has provided temporary respite from resting tremor, one unrelenting symptom of PD. Objective To determine if massage therapy can produce favorable outcomes with respect to the severity of rigidity and tremor in a patient with PD. Case Presentation A 63-year-old female patient with idiopathic, long-standing, Hoehn-Yahr Stage 4 PD was treated with massage therapy five times over the course of six weeks. A SPES/SCOPA Motor Impairments rating scale was used to measure rigidity and tremor pre- and post-treatment, to gauge treatment effectiveness. The massage treatments consisted of deep longitudinal stroking, muscle squeezing techniques, passive range of motion movements, and general relaxation techniques to encourage a soothing environment while promoting a decrease in muscular tone and hyperactivity. Massage therapy administration was by a student near the end of her two-year diploma. Results The results obtained indicated that massage therapy treatment had a positive effect on reducing resting and postural tremor in a patient with long-standing PD. The treatment was also effective in temporarily reducing rigidity during treatment, but did not produce a lasting effect. Conclusion Further study is required; however, the results of this case were consistent with the limited research available on the subject of massage therapy and Parkinson’s disease, in that positive change with respect to tremor—and to a lesser degree, rigidity—were achieved with focused, intentional treatment. PMID:26977216

  5. A survey of training and practice patterns of massage therapists in two US states

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Kahn, Janet; Erro, Janet; Hrbek, Andrea; Deyo, Richard A; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    Background Despite the growing popularity of therapeutic massage in the US, little is known about the training or practice characteristics of massage therapists. The objective of this study was to describe these characteristics. Methods As part of a study of random samples of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, we interviewed 226 massage therapists licensed in Connecticut and Washington state by telephone in 1998 and 1999 (85% of those contacted) and then asked a sample of them to record information on 20 consecutive visits to their practices (total of 2005 consecutive visits). Results Most massage therapists were women (85%), white (95%), and had completed some continuing education training (79% in Connecticut and 52% in Washington). They treated a limited number of conditions, most commonly musculoskeletal (59% and 63%) (especially back, neck, and shoulder problems), wellness care (20% and 19%), and psychological complaints (9% and 6%) (especially anxiety and depression). Practitioners commonly used one or more assessment techniques (67% and 74%) and gave a massage emphasizing Swedish (81% and 77%), deep tissue (63% and 65%), and trigger/pressure point techniques (52% and 46%). Self-care recommendations, including increasing water intake, body awareness, and specific forms of movement, were made as part of more than 80% of visits. Although most patients self-referred to massage, more than one-quarter were receiving concomitant care for the same problem from a physician. Massage therapists rarely communicated with these physicians. Conclusion This study provides new information about licensed massage therapists that should be useful to physicians and other healthcare providers interested in learning about massage therapy in order to advise their patients about this popular CAM therapy. PMID:15955245

  6. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  7. Effectiveness of Chinese Hand Massage on Anxiety Among Patients Awaiting Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lijuan; Miao, Xing; Chen, Haiying; Huang, Xiufang; Zheng, Guohua

    Anxiety is the most common negative emotion among the patients awaiting coronary angiography. The increased anxiety may exacerbate coronary heart disease symptoms and possibly contribute to complications during the procedure. Chinese hand massage is a nonpharmaceutical intervention that has been used in several clinical situations in China and might have beneficial effects on reducing anxiety before coronary angiography. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Chinese hand massage care on anxiety among patients awaiting coronary angiography. One hundred eighty-five subjects awaiting coronary angiography in a single hospital in Fuzhou, China, between May 2012 and September 2012 were screened. One hundred eligible participants were recruited and randomly assigned into the control or Chinese hand massage group. The control group received the conventional therapies and care according to the guidelines, and those in the Chinese hand massage group received additional Chinese hand massage care in conjunction with the same conventional therapies and care as the control group. The anxiety scores (evaluated by using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), heart rate, blood pressure, quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey), and the adverse events were recorded at the baseline and after coronary angiography, respectively. The scores of Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale in the Chinese hand massage group (11.78 [SD, 2.9]) had a statistically significant decrease compared with those in the control group (15.96 [SD, 3.4]) at post-procedure (P < .01). There was no statistically significant difference on blood pressure, heart rate, and Short-Form Health Survey at postangiography between the Chinese hand massage group and the control group. No adverse event was reported during the intervention period. Chinese hand massage effectively alleviated anxiety without any adverse effects among patients awaiting coronary angiography. Therefore, it might be recommended

  8. Steps Toward Massage Therapy Guidelines: A First Report to the Profession

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Keith Eric; Balletto, John; Gowan-Moody, Donelda; Healey, Dale; Kincaid, Diana; Lowe, Whitney; Travillian, Ravensara S.

    2008-01-01

    The massage profession has grown rapidly since the late 1980s. As with business startups that begin informally and successfully mature into larger enterprises, growth brings new organizational challenges, together with greater visibility and opportunity. The maturation of massage as a health care profession increases the need for a process to formalize the synthesis of massage therapy knowledge from clinical experience and research—to collect what we know and to make such baseline knowledge widely available to practitioners, consumers, and other health care stakeholders. In short, we need to create a process for setting guidelines. The present paper lays out the motivations and framework for creating massage therapy guidelines that are informed both by research and by clinical experience. It also acts as a report to the massage therapy profession and to other stakeholders about the work of the Best Practices Committee of the Massage Therapy Foundation since 2006. And it has the additional goal of providing a health care literature basis for future academic discussions of massage. The discussion here is based on a definition from the Institute of Medicine and on research into the nature of expertise. Guidelines are targeted for submission to the National Guideline Clearinghouse. Challenges in creating guidelines for massage therapy are discussed. Various stakeholders are considered. Current literature from the wider scope of health care is extensively reviewed. Topics addressed include guideline creation, credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners, definition of competence, and the increasing role of technology (that is, informatics) in managing training and task-necessary competencies. Finally, a process for creation of massage therapy guidelines is proposed. A central feature of the proposal is the use of a “World Café” symposium to elicit knowledge and solutions from diverse experts. The role of transparency and broad and open

  9. STBC AF relay for unmanned aircraft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Fumiyuki; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Endo, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    If a large scale disaster similar to the Great East Japan Earthquake 2011 happens, some areas may be isolated from the communications network. Recently, unmanned aircraft system (UAS) based wireless relay communication has been attracting much attention since it is able to quickly re-establish the connection between isolated areas and the network. However, the channel between ground station (GS) and unmanned aircraft (UA) is unreliable due to UA's swing motion and as consequence, the relay communication quality degrades. In this paper, we introduce space-time block coded (STBC) amplify-and-forward (AF) relay for UAS based wireless relay communication to improve relay communication quality. A group of UAs forms single frequency network (SFN) to perform STBC-AF cooperative relay. In STBC-AF relay, only conjugate operation, block exchange and amplifying are required at UAs. Therefore, STBC-AF relay improves the relay communication quality while alleviating the complexity problem at UAs. It is shown by computer simulation that STBC-AF relay can achieve better throughput performance than conventional AF relay.

  10. The effect of manipulation plus massage therapy versus massage therapy alone in people with tension-type headache. A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Zurriaga-Llorens, Rosario; Monzani, Lucas; Falla, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Manipulative techniques have shown promising results for relief of tension-type headache (TTH), however prior studies either lacked a control group, or suffered from poor methodological quality. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of spinal manipulation combined with massage versus massage alone on range of motion of the cervical spine, headache frequency, intensity and disability in patients with TTH. Randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. University clinic. We enrolled 105 subjects with TTH. Participants were divided into two groups: 1) manipulation and massage; 2) massage only (control). Four treatment sessions were applied over four weeks. The Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and range of upper cervical and cervical motion were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the intervention and at a follow-up, 8 weeks after completing the intervention. Both groups demonstrated a large (ƒ=1.22) improvement on their HDI scores. Those that received manipulation reported a medium-sized reduction (ƒ=0.33) in headache frequency across all data points (P<0.05) compared to the control group. Both groups showed a large within-subject effect for upper cervical extension (ƒ=0.62), a medium-sized effect for cervical extension (ƒ=0.39), and large effects for upper cervical (ƒ=1.00) and cervical (ƒ=0.27) flexion. The addition of manipulation resulted in larger gains of upper cervical flexion range of motion, and this difference remained stable at the follow-up. These findings support the benefit of treating TTH with either massage or massage combined with a manipulative technique. However, the addition of manipulative technique was more effective for increasing range of motion of the upper cervical spine and for reducing the impact of headache. Although massage provided relief of headache in TTH sufferers, when combined with cervical manipulation, there was a stronger effect on range of upper cervical spine motion.

  11. Dynamics of the blood flow in the curved artery with the rolling massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. H.; Wu, X. H.; Yao, Y. L.

    2011-10-01

    Arterial wall shear stress and flow velocity are important factors in the development of some arterial diseases. Here, we aim to investigate the dynamic effect of the rolling massage on the property of the blood flow in the curved artery. The distributions of flow velocity and shear stress for the blood flow are computed by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the dynamic factors under different rolling techniques are studied numerically. The study is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the massage techniques.

  12. [Development of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract].

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Peng, Chenglin; He, Hongmei; Zhu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    In this artical is first reported a survey of the progress in research of MEMS technology. Then, the basic structure, features and the principles of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract are introduced. Special emphasis is laid on the utilization of MSP430F123 microprocessor for producing a kind of period pulse to control the power of massage capsule. In general, the research and development of the massage device in the field of alimentary tract have active support and deep significance to therapy in the clinical and business settings as well as in the development of biomedical engineering and MEMS.

  13. [Transition of the blind acupuncture and massage industry and its impacts in Japan].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    After being introduced to Japan, the Chinese acupuncture and massage therapy has changed a lot, in which the influence aroused by the blind practitioners cannot be ignored. Through analyzing the development and the transition of the blind acupuncture and massage industry in Japan, it is found that the tube needle technique, changeable acupoints concept, technical deviation and the importance on acupoints rather than meridians are still existed commonly today, which are introduced by the blind acupuncture and massage practitioners, the special group in Japan. In the process of development, the interaction with the governmental strategy has played the essential role in the consolidation of the above features.

  14. Practice and research in Australian massage therapy: a national workforce survey

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jonathan L.; Barnett, Rebecca; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background Massage is the largest complementary medicine profession in Australia, in terms of public utilisation, practitioner distribution, and number of practitioners, and is being increasingly integrated into the Australian health care system. However, despite the increasing importance of massage therapists in Australian health care delivery, or the increased practice and education obligations this may entail, there has been little exploration of practice, research, and education characteristics of the Australian massage therapist workforce. Purpose To identify practice, research, and education characteristics among the Australian massage therapist workforce. Settings The Australian massage therapy profession. Participants 301 randomly selected members of the Association of Massage Therapists (Australia). Research Design A 15-item, cross-sectional telephone survey. Main Outcomes Measures Massage therapists’ demographic information, practice characteristics, and education and research characteristics. Results Most respondents (73.8%) worked 20 hours per week or less practising massage, nearly half of all respondents (46.8%) treated fewer than 10 massage clients per week, and over three-quarters (81.7%) of respondents were self-employed. Massage therapy was the sole source of income for just over half (55.0%) of the study respondents. Only 5.7% of respondents earned over the average wage ($50,000) through their massage activities. Nearly half of all respondents (43.3%) reported regularly exceeding their continuing professional education (CPE) quota mandated by their professional association. However, 21.1% reported struggling to achieve their CPE quota each year. Over one-third of respondents (35.6%) were not interested in acquiring further CPE points beyond minimum requirements. Respondents were significantly more likely to have an active approach to research if they had higher income (p = .015). Multivariate analysis showed factors associated with access to

  15. Aromatherapy and massage for antenatal anxiety: its effect on the fetus.

    PubMed

    Bastard, Janet; Tiran, Denise

    2006-02-01

    Antenatal anxiety has been linked to maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis changes which can affect fetal development and may have lasting effects on the child's psychological development. Treatments for anxiety have hitherto focused on psychotherapy techniques or antidepressant drugs but these do not always effect long term improvement. Aromatherapy and massage have successfully been used to produce significantly greater improvement in reduction of anxiety. Midwives may highlight anxiety in some of the mothers in their care and can incorporate the holistic approach of aromatherapy and massage into their practice. However, further research is required to establish the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of aromatherapy and massage in the antenatal period.

  16. [Acupoint Selection Laws for Massage Therapy of Infantile Anorexia: an Analysis Based on Data Mining].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang Jie; Wang, Yan-guo

    2016-06-01

    Massage prescriptions for treating infantile anorexia in Chinese Academic Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, 1979-2012), Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Full-Text Database (VIP, 1989-2012) and Wanfang Database (1990-2012) were collected. By using Chinese Medicine Inheritance Auxiliary Platform (Version 2.0) Software, 286 massage prescriptions for treatment of infantile anorexia were screened involved 76 acupoints, 20 commonly used acupoints, and 57 core acupoint combinations. Infantile Tuina specific points were used as main acupoints in massage therapy for infantile anorexia, and core acupoints covered Jizhu, Pi meridian, abdomen, Nei-Bagua, Zusanli (ST36), and Ban-men.

  17. Effects of thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-04-20

    BACKGROUND Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. RESULTS After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

  18. Mechanisms Underlying AF: Triggers, Rotors, Other?

    PubMed

    Krummen, David E; Hebsur, Shrinivas; Salcedo, Jon; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Lalani, Gautam G; Schricker, Amir A

    2015-04-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the precise mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF). An improved understanding of these mechanisms is urgently needed to improve interventional strategies to suppress and eliminate AF, since the success of current strategies is suboptimal. At present, guidelines for AF ablation focus on pulmonary vein (PV) isolation for the prevention of arrhythmia. Additional targets are presently unclear, and include additional linear ablation and electrogram-guided substrate modification, without clear mechanistic relevance. PV and non-PV triggers are likely central in the first few seconds of AF initiation. Rapid activation from such triggers interacts with transitional mechanisms including conduction velocity slowing, action potential duration (APD) alternans, and steep APD restitution to cause conduction block and initiate functional reentry. However, complete suppression of potential triggers has proven elusive, and the intra-procedural mapping and targeting of transitional mechanisms has not been reported. A growing body of research implicates electrical rotors and focal sources as central mechanisms for the maintenance of AF. In several recent series, they were observed in nearly all patients with sustained arrhythmia. Ablation of rotor and focal source sites, prior to pulmonary vein isolation, substantially modulated atrial fibrillation in a high proportion of patients, and improved ablation outcomes versus pulmonary vein isolation alone. These results have subsequently been confirmed in multicenter series, and the improved outcomes have been found to persist to a mean follow-up of 3 years. Recently, rotors have been observed by multiple groups using diverse technologies. These findings represent a paradigm shift in AF, focusing on sustaining mechanisms, as is currently done with other arrhythmias such as atrioventricular node reentrant tachycardia. Studies are currently underway to assess the optimal strategy for the application

  19. Acute radial neuropathy at the spiral groove following massage: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Cheng; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chou, Chen-Liang; Wang, Jia-Chi

    2017-04-08

    Massage related nerve injury is an uncommon, rarely reported complication. We report an unusual case of radial nerve neuropathy at the spiral groove in a 58 years old woman resulting from a single episode of deep tissue massage. Although the spiral groove is known as the most common site implicated in radial nerve neuropathy, to our knowledge, there have not previously been any reports of massage related spiral groove radial nerve neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic and ultrasound examinations were used to localize the nerve lesion at the spiral groove on the affected side. A near-total recovery was achieved after 6-month conservative treatment. Serial follow-ups demonstrated significant improvement in clinical symptoms and in electrodiagnostic parameters. This case report aims to increase awareness and early recognition of massage related nerve injuries.

  20. The facial massage reduced anxiety and negative mood status, and increased sympathetic nervous activity.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Tomoko; Kitamura, Shingo; Tamura, Chihiro; Nagano, Mayumi; Ohnuki, Koichiro

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of 45 min of facial massage on the activity of autonomic nervous system, anxiety and mood in 32 healthy women. Autonomic nervous activity was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) with spectral analysis. In the spectral analysis of HRV, we evaluated the high-frequency components (HF) and the low- to high-frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio), reflecting parasympathetic nervous activity and sympathetic nervous activity, respectively. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Profile of Mood Status (POMS) were administered to evaluate psychological status. The score of STAI and negative scale of POMS were significantly reduced following the massage, and only the LF/HF ratio was significantly enhanced after the massage. It was concluded that the facial massage might refresh the subjects by reducing their psychological distress and activating the sympathetic nervous system.

  1. Does post-exercise massage treatment reduce delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a frequent problem after unaccustomed exercise. No universally accepted treatment exists. Massage therapy is often recommended for this condition but uncertainty exists about its effectiveness. AIM: To determine whether post-exercise massage alleviates the symptoms of DOMS after a bout of strenuous exercise. METHOD: Various computerised literature searches were carried out and located seven controlled trials. RESULTS: Most of the trials were burdened with serious methodological flaws, and their results are far from uniform. However, most suggest that post-exercise massage may alleviate symptoms of DOMS. CONCLUSIONS: Massage therapy may be a promising treatment for DOMS. Definitive studies are warranted. 


 PMID:9773168

  2. The effect of foot reflexology and back massage on hemodialysis patients' fatigue and sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Unal, Kevser Sevgi; Balci Akpinar, Reva

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of foot reflexology and back massage on optimizing the sleep quality and reducing the fatigue of hemodialysis patients. The study includes 105 volunteer patients who were registered at a private dialysis clinic and were receiving hemodialysis treatment. Foot reflexology and back massage were administered to the patients two times a week for four weeks. The Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index were used to collect data. The differences between the pretest and posttest score averages of the patients on the Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Foot reflexology and back massage were shown to improve the sleep quality and reduce the fatigue of hemodialysis patients. Compared to back massage, foot reflexology was determined to be more effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry: nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Robertz, A-C; Rudolfsson, G

    2016-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: There is little research on the implementation of tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry that describes children's and adolescents' experiences and outcomes. There is also limited knowledge of providing tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper describes 10 nurses' experiences of tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry. The nurses considered tactile massage a non-verbal nursing intervention that could complement other available treatments. It reveals their reflections on the impact of tactile massage on their nursing and on themselves as a person, including the belief that they had developed deepened self-reflection and attentiveness. The nurses highlighted the importance of providing a trusting environment and collaborating with the children and adolescents. They both experienced and observed that tactile massage triggered various physical and mental processes in the children and adolescents, such as improvement in sleep disturbances, an ability to relax in body and mind and a deeper connectedness with their own bodies and feelings. The nurses described instructing next of kin in the use of tactile massage, which they believed could serve as a tool at home, mainly as a way for next of kin to help their children to relax, fall asleep more easily and to deepen connectedness. However, the nurses stressed the need to consider if it was appropriate or desired by the children and adolescents. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Tactile massage addresses the individual's emotional and physiological responses and could therefore bring holistic nursing to child and adolescent psychiatry. It could also help nurses in child and adolescent psychiatry to develop their attentiveness and sensitivity in acknowledging the needs of children and adolescents in psychiatric care. Introduction There is limited research on tactile

  4. Effect of Aromatherapy Massage on Agitation and Depressive Mood in Individuals With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Ping; Wang, Chi-Jane; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of aromatherapy massage on alleviating agitation and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. A randomized controlled trial and repeated measures design was conducted. A total of 59 participants were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The intervention group received aromatherapy massage once per week for 8 weeks. Results indicated no significant changes over time in overall agitation for either group, but agitation decreased from Week 1 to Week 5 for the intervention group. In addition, the overall depressive symptoms decreased significantly over time for the intervention group compared to the control group (p < 0.001). However, changes in agitation within 24 hours following aromatherapy massage showed some significant changes in Weeks 5 and 9. Aromatherapy massage can be an effective and safe intervention to alleviate specific agitated behaviors and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 38-46.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Advancing the Therapeutic Massage Research Agenda(s)

    PubMed Central

    Porcino, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) is now an established field of research with dedicated funding, researchers, and many venues and channels for dissemination of TMB research. Research agendas are a way for a profession to focus the development and funding of research on facets of TMB practice and education that are most needed at a given point of time to best move forward the practice and professionalization of TMB. Of the two TMB research agendas, one is currently being updated, the other is newly developed. Because of the impact on the development of the profession, gaps in research agendas also need to be carefully considered. Three areas that could use further consideration or support within the current agendas include education, methods and methodologies, and underlying assumptions. TMB researchers need to engage with and support the current agendas, and participate in their evolution. PMID:24000302

  6. Physiological Adjustments to Stress Measures Following Massage Therapy: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Boulanger, Karen; Brooks, Marissa Z.; Teitlebaum, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Use of massage therapy by the general public has increased substantially in recent years. In light of the popularity of massage therapy for stress reduction, a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature is important to summarize the effectiveness of this modality on stress-reactive physiological measures. On-line databases were searched for articles relevant to both massage therapy and stress. Articles were included in this review if (i) the massage therapy account consisted of manipulation of soft tissues and was conducted by a trained therapist, and (ii) a dependent measure to evaluate physiological stress was reported. Hormonal and physical parameters are reviewed. A total of 25 studies met all inclusion criteria. A majority of studies employed a 20–30 min massage administered twice-weekly over 5 weeks with evaluations conducted pre-post an individual session (single treatment) or following a series of sessions (multiple treatments). Single treatment reductions in salivary cortisol and heart rate were consistently noted. A sustained reduction for these measures was not supported in the literature, although the single-treatment effect was repeatable within a study. To date, the research data is insufficient to make definitive statements regarding the multiple treatment effect of massage therapy on urinary cortisol or catecholamines, but some evidence for a positive effect on diastolic blood pressure has been documented. While significant improvement has been demonstrated following massage therapy, the general research body on this topic lacks the necessary scientific rigor to provide a definitive understanding of the effect massage therapy has on many physiological variables associated with stress. PMID:18955340

  7. Cyriax's deep friction massage application parameters: Evidence from a cross-sectional study with physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Paula; Simões, Daniela; Paço, Maria; Pinho, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-09-14

    Deep friction massage is one of several physiotherapy interventions suggested for the management of tendinopathy. To determine the prevalence of deep friction massage use in clinical practice, to characterize the application parameters used by physiotherapists, and to identify empirical model-based patterns of deep friction massage application in degenerative tendinopathy. observational, analytical, cross-sectional and national web-based survey. 478 physiotherapists were selected through snow-ball sampling method. The participants completed an online questionnaire about personal and professional characteristics as well as specific questions regarding the use of deep friction massage. Characterization of deep friction massage parameters used by physiotherapists were presented as counts and proportions. Latent class analysis was used to identify the empirical model-based patterns. Crude and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. The use of deep friction massage was reported by 88.1% of the participants; tendinopathy was the clinical condition where it was most frequently used (84.9%) and, from these, 55.9% reported its use in degenerative tendinopathy. The "duration of application" parameters in chronic phase and "frequency of application" in acute and chronic phases are those that diverge most from those recommended by the author of deep friction massage. We found a high prevalence of deep friction massage use, namely in degenerative tendinopathy. Our results have shown that the application parameters are heterogeneous and diverse. This is reflected by the identification of two application patterns, although none is in complete agreement with Cyriax's description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological adjustments to stress measures following massage therapy: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moraska, Albert; Pollini, Robin A; Boulanger, Karen; Brooks, Marissa Z; Teitlebaum, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    Use of massage therapy by the general public has increased substantially in recent years. In light of the popularity of massage therapy for stress reduction, a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature is important to summarize the effectiveness of this modality on stress-reactive physiological measures. On-line databases were searched for articles relevant to both massage therapy and stress. Articles were included in this review if (i) the massage therapy account consisted of manipulation of soft tissues and was conducted by a trained therapist, and (ii) a dependent measure to evaluate physiological stress was reported. Hormonal and physical parameters are reviewed. A total of 25 studies met all inclusion criteria. A majority of studies employed a 20-30 min massage administered twice-weekly over 5 weeks with evaluations conducted pre-post an individual session (single treatment) or following a series of sessions (multiple treatments). Single treatment reductions in salivary cortisol and heart rate were consistently noted. A sustained reduction for these measures was not supported in the literature, although the single-treatment effect was repeatable within a study. To date, the research data is insufficient to make definitive statements regarding the multiple treatment effect of massage therapy on urinary cortisol or catecholamines, but some evidence for a positive effect on diastolic blood pressure has been documented. While significant improvement has been demonstrated following massage therapy, the general research body on this topic lacks the necessary scientific rigor to provide a definitive understanding of the effect massage therapy has on many physiological variables associated with stress.

  9. Analgesic effects of Chinese Tuina massage in a rat model of pain

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, SHICHAO; ZHANG, HAO; FANG, MIN; ZHANG, YUQUI; LU, NING; ZHU, QINGGUANG; CHENG, YANBIN; AI, JIAN; ZHOU, NAN; LI, JIANHUA; FANG, LEI; YAO, FEI

    2016-01-01

    Previous clinical trials have suggested that the Chinese Tuina massage may exert transient analgesic effects. However, further investigation regarding the underlying mechanism has been hindered by the lack of a suitable animal model of pain. The present study established a rat model of hind leg pain by injecting 5.8% hypertonic saline solution (HSS) into the left gastrocnemius muscle. The effects of various Tuina massages on the pain thresholds of the rats were then measured. In addition, the effects of ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massages on C-fiber-evoked field potentials following electrical stimulation of the left sciatic nerve were determined. Alterations in the gastrocnemius muscle tissues following various Tuina applications were investigated using hematoxylin and eosin, and desmin staining, as well as malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase assays. Heavy hand pressure transiently reduced the pain sensitivity of both posterior limbs, despite HSS only being injected into the left hind leg. Tuina massage treatments that lasted for 15 min were associated with the best results and an absence of local tissue changes. The results of electrical sciatic nerve stimulation demonstrated that ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massage may decrease the level of peripheral nociceptive C-fiber activity. In the present study, the Chinese Tuina massage exerted analgesic effects in a rat model of pain, which did not involve tissue damage, following a 15 min massage. Therefore, the rat model of pain used in the present study may provide a novel approach for investigating the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of Tuina massage. PMID:27073451

  10. Preventative effect of massage on gastric volvulus in infants with gastroesophageal reflux-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Suqi; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wan, Qi; Liu, Fan; Tang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Lishan; Yuan, Kai; Xie, Dong

    2015-10-01

    To study the preventative effects of massage on gastric volvulus (GV) in infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-induced pneumonia. One-hundred and eighty GV with GER-induced pneumonia inpatients were divided randomly into four groups: basic treatment 1 (n = 60), basic treatment 2 (n = 30), massage treatment 1 (n = 60) and massage treatment 2 (n = 30). Clinical examinations selected between groups 1 and 2 were different. Radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract using iodine-containing contrast was assessed in group 1 before and after treatment, whereas 24-h pH monitoring of the distal esophagus was assessed in group 2 before and after treatment. Symptom scores and chest radiography were assessed in all groups upon hospital admission and after procedures. Clinical effects were estimated after procedures in all groups. The prevalence of severe pneumonia among the four groups was compared. Massage treatment groups showed a significantly higher percentage of cure and total effect (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and a lower prevalence of recurrence (but with no statistic difference, P > 0.05) than basic treatment groups. Furthermore, massage treatment groups had remarkably lower scores for symptoms and signs (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), especially for choking on milk, than basic treatment groups. There was significant attenuation of chest inflammation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), GV (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and GER (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) in massage treatment groups compared with those in basic treatment groups. Finally, massage treatment groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of severe pneumonia than basic treatment groups (P < 0.05). Massage treatment can prevent GV with GER-induced pneumonia in infants by timely correction of stomach rotation and subsequent attenuation of GER.

  11. The effect of massage on agitated behaviours in older people with dementia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Wendy; Murfield, Jenny E; O'Dwyer, Siobhan; Van Wyk, Sierra

    2013-03-01

    To review the literature on massage used to manage agitated behaviours in older people with dementia, assess its efficacy as a non-pharmacological approach and provide recommendations for future research. Agitation has traditionally been managed with chemical or physical restraint. There has been a growing interest in complementary therapies such as massage. A literature review.  Cooper's five-stage model of synthesising research guided the review process. The search terms 'massage', 'agitation' and 'dementia' were defined, and 10 databases were searched in October 2011. No date limitations were applied, although searches were limited to articles written in English. For relevant records, full-text copies were obtained and assessed in terms of inclusion criteria and methodological quality using the Validity Rating Tool (VRT). Data were extracted using a form constructed with reference to the checklist of items to consider in data extraction, produced by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were assessed on the VRT. One study was considered of adequate methodological quality to be included in the review. This prospective study found that massage significantly reduced levels of agitation in 52 cognitively impaired residents in two long-term care facilities. There is a severe paucity of research that considers the effects of massage on managing agitated behaviours in older people with dementia. Whilst conclusions cannot be drawn from the one study included in this review, it did provide evidence to support the use of massage as a non-pharmacological approach to managing agitation in older people with dementia. More research, of better methodological quality, is needed. There is a need for health practitioners to be aware of the limited evidence for massage as an intervention for agitation and to provide opportunities to validate massage practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Increased Range of Motion and Decreased Strength of the Thumb in Massage Practitioners with Thumb Pain

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Si-hyun; KWON, Oh-yun; AN, Mi-ryung; KIM, Yoon-shin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the range of motion (ROM) and strength of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) and interphalangeal (IP) joints among massage practitioners with and without thumb pain and control subjects. Sixteen massage practitioners with thumb pain, 16 practitioners without thumb pain, and 16 control subjects participated in this study. ROM of flexion, extension, and abduction in the MP joint; ROM of flexion and extension in the IP joint of the thumb; strength of the flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), extensor pollicis brevis (EPB), abductor pollicis brevis, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and extensor pollicis longus measured in all subjects. ROM of extension and abduction in the MP joint were significantly increased in massage practitioners with and without thumb pain compared with control subjects. ROM of extension in the IP joint was significantly increased in massage practitioners with thumb pain compared with those without thumb pain. The strength of the EPB and FPL muscle was significantly decreased in massage practitioners with thumb pain compared with those without thumb pain and control subjects, respectively. In addition, there was significantly increased EPB/FPB strength in massage practitioners without thumb pain compared to those with thumb pain and control subjects. PMID:24739763

  13. Abdominal Massage for the Relief of Constipation in People with Parkinson's: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K.; Aitchison, P.; Jamieson, K.; Dickinson, L.; Paul, L.; Hagen, S.; Cunnington, A.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the experiences of people with Parkinson's (PwP) who suffer from constipation, the impact this has on their lives, and the effect of using lifestyle changes and abdominal massage as a form of constipation management. Method. Fourteen semistructured interviews were completed (8 males and 6 females; mean age 72.2 years) at the end of a care programme, which consisted of either lifestyle advice and abdominal massage (intervention group; n = 7) or lifestyle advice only (control group; n = 7). Data were analysed using constant-comparison techniques and Framework methods. Themes and key quotes were identified to depict major findings. Findings. Four key themes were identified: (i) the adverse impact of bowel problems on quality of life; (ii) positive experience of behaviour adjustments: experimentation; (iii) abdominal massage as a dynamic and relaxing tool: experiential learning (intervention group only); (iv) abdominal massage as a contingency plan: hesitation (control group only). Constipation was reported as having a significant impact on quality of life. Participants in both groups perceived lifestyle advice to relieve symptoms. Specific improvements were described in those who also received the abdominal massage. Conclusions. Both lifestyle advice and abdominal massage were perceived to be beneficial in relieving symptoms of constipation for PwP. PMID:28090363

  14. Mental health and related factors among massage practitioners with visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Takeda, Fumi

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the mental health conditions and related factors among 155 visually impaired massage practitioners chosen from alumni lists of ten schools for the visually impaired in Japan. It was thought massage practitioners with visual impairment did not suffer burnout and depression because their mean scores indicated "no problem". However, their mean score for anxiety was high compared with previous studies. Gender and level of education showed no significant differences on anxiety and depression. Higher scores for anxiety and depression correlated inversely with age. Scores of depersonalization, anxiety, and depression were significantly higher and those of personal accomplishment lower for unmarried subjects compared to those who were married. Scores of emotional exhaustion, anxiety, and depression were significantly higher in persons who were able to read written text compared to those who read Braille only. Massage practitioners with visual impairment working at hospitals, medical clinics, and nursing homes revealed significantly higher daily client turnover, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization compared to those who established their own massage clinics. It was thought that massage practitioners who were young and unmarried, had slight visual impairment, high client turnover, hectic relationships between clients, little autonomy at work, and worked at medical-related workplaces were prone to burnout. It is suggested that this group of massage practitioner requires periodic education about stress management techniques and more social support.

  15. Ice massage and transcutaneous electrical stimulation: comparison of treatment for low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Melzack, R; Jeans, M E; Stratford, J G; Monks, R C

    1980-10-01

    It has recently been shown that ice massage of the web between the thumb and index finger produces significantly greater relief of dental pain than a placebo control procedure. These results indicate that ice massage may be comparable to transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) and acupuncture, and may be mediated by similar neural mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effectiveness of ice massage and TES for the relief of low-back pain. Patients suffering chronic low-back pain were treated with both ice massage and TES. The order of treatments was balanced, and changes in the intensity of pain were measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). The results show that both methods are equally effective: based on the Pain Rating Index of the MPQ, 67-69% of patients obtained pain relief greater than 33% with each method. The results indicate that ice massage is an effective therapeutic tool, and appears to be more effective than TES for some patients. It may also serve as an additional sensory-modulation method to alternate with TES to overcome adaptation effects. Evidence that cold signals are transmitted to the spinal cord exclusively by A-delta fibers and not by C fibers suggests that ice massage provides a potential method for differentiating among the multiple feedback systems that mediate analgesia produced by different forms of intense sensory input.

  16. Intradialytic Massage for Leg Cramps Among Hemodialysis Patients: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mastnardo, Diane; Lewis, Janice M.; Hall, Kristi; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Cain, Katrice; Theurer, Jacqueline; Huml, Anne; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients on hemodialysis often experience muscle cramps that result in discomfort, shortened treatment times, and inadequate dialysis dose. Cramps have been associated with adversely affecting sleep and health-related quality of life, depression and anxiety. There is limited evidence available about massage in dialysis; however, massage in cancer patients has demonstrated decreases in pain, inflammation, and feelings of anxiety. These correlations indicate massage may be an effective treatment modality for hemodialysis-related lower extremity cramping. Purpose To determine the effectiveness of intradialytic massage on the frequency of cramping among hemodialysis patients prone to lower extremity cramping. Participants 26 maintenance hemodialysis patients with frequent lower extremity cramps. Setting three outpatient hemodialysis centers in Northeast Ohio. Research Design randomized controlled trial. Intervention The intervention group received a 20-minute massage of the lower extremities during each treatment (three times per week) for two weeks. The control group received usual care by dialysis center staff. Main Outcome Measure change in frequency of lower leg cramping. Results Patient reported cramping at home decreased by 1.3 episodes per week in the intervention group compared to 0.2 episodes per week in the control group (p=.005). Patient reported cramping during dialysis decreased by 0.8 episodes in the intervention group compared to 0.4 episodes in the control group (p=0.44). Conclusion Intradialytic massage appears to be an effective way to address muscle cramping. Larger studies with longer duration should be conducted to further examine this approach. PMID:27257445

  17. Soft tissue massage: early intervention for relatives whose family members died in palliative cancer care.

    PubMed

    Cronfalk, Berit S; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Strang, Peter

    2010-04-01

    This paper explores how bereaved relatives experienced soft tissue massage during the first four months after the death of a family member who was in palliative cancer care. Death of a close family member or friend is recognised as being an emotional and existential turning point in life. Previous studies emphasise need for various support strategies to assist relatives while they are grieving. Qualitative design. Eighteen bereaved relatives (11 women and seven men) received soft tissue massage (25 minutes, hand or foot) once a week for eight weeks. In-depth interviews were conducted after the end of the eight-week periods. Interviews were analysed using a qualitative descriptive content analysis method. Soft tissue massage proved to be helpful and to generate feelings of consolation in the first four months of grieving. The main findings were organised into four categories: (1) a helping hand at the right time, (2) something to rely on, (3) moments of rest and (4) moments of retaining energy. The categories were then conceptualised into this theme: feelings of consolation and help in learning to restructure everyday life. Soft tissue massage was experienced as a commendable source of consolation support during the grieving process. An assumption is that massage facilitates a transition toward rebuilding identity, but more studies in this area are needed. Soft tissue massage appears to be a worthy, early, grieving-process support option for bereaved family members whose relatives are in palliative care.

  18. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of massage on neonatal jaundice in stable preterm newborn infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Basiri-Moghadam, Mahdi; Basiri-Moghadam, Kokab; Kianmehr, Mojtaba; Jani, Somaye

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of massage therapy on transcutaneous bilirubin of stable preterm infants. The controlled clinical trial was conducted in 2014 at Shahid Hasheminejhad Hospital, Iran, and comprised preterm neonatal children in the neonatal intensive care unit. The newborns were divided into two groups of massage and control via random allocation. The children in the control group received the routine therapy whereas those in the massage group underwent the same four days of routine plus 20 minutes of massage twice a day. The transcutaneous bilirubin and the number of excretions of the newborns were noted from the first to the fourth day of the intervention and results were compared between the two groups. There were 40 newborns in the study l 20(50%) each in the two groups. There was a significant difference in the number of times of defecation (p=0.002) and in the level of bilirubin (p=0.003) between the groups with those in the massage group having a higher number of defecations as well as a lower level of transcutaneous bilirubin. Through massage therapy the bilirubin level in preterm newborns can be controlled and a need for phototherapy can also be delayed.

  20. Effect of perineal massage on the rate of episiotomy and perineal tearing.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Gulbahtiyar; Golbasi, Zehra

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of perineal massage during active labor on the frequency of episiotomy and perineal tearing. A randomized controlled study was conducted at a center in Sivas, Turkey, between January 1, 2010, and May 31, 2011. Healthy pregnant women presenting for their first or second delivery at 37-42 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled during the first stage of labor. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to the massage group (10-minute perineal massage with glycerol four times during the first stage and once during the second stage of labor) or control group (routine care). The frequency of episiotomy and perineal tearing were compared between the groups. Participants and investigators were not masked to group assignment. Both groups contained 142 participants. Episiotomy was performed among 44 (31.0%) women in the massage group and 99 (69.7%) in the control group (P = 0.001). Lacerations were recorded among 13 (4.2%) women in the massage group and 6 (4.2%) in the control group (P = 0.096). Application of perineal massage during active labor decreased the frequency of episiotomy procedures. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT02201615. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Knee arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased following moderate pressure massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2015-11-01

    The literature on massage therapy effects on knee pain suggests that pain was reduced based on self-report, but little is known about range of motion (ROM) effects. Medical School staff and faculty who had knee arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure massage therapy or a waitlist control group (24 per group). Self-reports included the WOMAC (pain, stiffness and function) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. ROM and ROM-related pain were assessed before and after the last sessions. The massage group showed an immediate post-massage increase in ROM and a decrease in ROM-associated pain. On the last versus the first day of the study, the massage group showed greater increases in ROM and decreases in ROM-related pain as well as less self-reported pain and sleep disturbances than the waitlist control group. These data highlight the effectiveness of moderate pressure massage therapy for increasing ROM and lessening ROM-related pain and long-term pain and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating effects of aromatherapy massage on sleep in children with autism: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim I

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months) in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions.

  3. [Effect of aromatherapy massage on abdominal fat and body image in post-menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Ja

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of aromatherapy massage on abdominal fat and body image in post-menopausal women. A Non-equivalent control group pre-post test Quasi-experimental design of random assignment was applied. All subjects received one hour of whole body massage as treatment by the same researcher every week for 6 weeks. Participants also massaged their own abdomen two times everyday for 5 days each week for 6 weeks. The two groups used different kinds of oil. The experimental group used 3% grapefruit oil, cypress and three other kinds of oil. The control group used grapeseed oil. Data was collected before and after the treatment using Siemens Somatom Sensation 4, a tape measure and MBSRQ. Data was analyzed by ANCOVA using the SPSS/PC+Win 12 Version. Abdominal subcutaneous fat and waist circumference in the experimental group significantly decreased after aromatherapy massage compared to the control group. Body image in the experimental group was significantly better after aromatherapy massage than in the control group. These results suggest that Aromatherapy massage could be utilized as an effective intervention to reduce abdominal subcutaneous fat, waist circumference, and to improve body image in post-menopausal women.

  4. Evaluating Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tim I.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months) in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions. PMID:16951722

  5. Massage Therapy Techniques as Pain Management for Erythromelalgia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Krista; Rizek, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Erythromelalgia is characterized by temperature-dependent redness, pain, and warmth in one or more extremities. It may be a primary disease, or it may occur secondarily because of underlying illness. It is a chronic, debilitating condition often resistant to medical treatment. Purpose The present report evaluates massage as a complementary therapy to reduce pain and other symptoms associated with erythromelalgia. Participant A 31-year-old female with a long-standing history of erythromelalgia bilaterally in the lower extremities presented with complaints of acute pain exacerbation, anxiety, decreased quality of sleep, and difficulty with activities of daily living for prolonged periods of time. She had no previous experience with massage therapy or any other complementary therapies. Intervention Massage therapy was introduced over the course of 9 treatments, each 1 hour in duration, using various massage therapy techniques, remedial exercise, and recommended home care. Results In this patient with erythromelalgia, effleurage and petrissage as massage therapy techniques provided temporary pain relief in the lower extremities and long-term benefits that relieved anxiety, which improved restorative sleep and increased the patient’s participation in activities of daily living. Conclusions For this treatment protocol, therapist observation and patient feedback suggest that massage therapy may lead to a state of increased relaxation, decreased stress, decreased muscle tension, and improved sleep. These positive effects may have an indirect role in the ability of the patient to cope with erythromelalgia day to day. PMID:21589683

  6. Abdominal Massage for the Relief of Constipation in People with Parkinson's: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    McClurg, D; Walker, K; Aitchison, P; Jamieson, K; Dickinson, L; Paul, L; Hagen, S; Cunnington, A-L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the experiences of people with Parkinson's (PwP) who suffer from constipation, the impact this has on their lives, and the effect of using lifestyle changes and abdominal massage as a form of constipation management. Method. Fourteen semistructured interviews were completed (8 males and 6 females; mean age 72.2 years) at the end of a care programme, which consisted of either lifestyle advice and abdominal massage (intervention group; n = 7) or lifestyle advice only (control group; n = 7). Data were analysed using constant-comparison techniques and Framework methods. Themes and key quotes were identified to depict major findings. Findings. Four key themes were identified: (i) the adverse impact of bowel problems on quality of life; (ii) positive experience of behaviour adjustments: experimentation; (iii) abdominal massage as a dynamic and relaxing tool: experiential learning (intervention group only); (iv) abdominal massage as a contingency plan: hesitation (control group only). Constipation was reported as having a significant impact on quality of life. Participants in both groups perceived lifestyle advice to relieve symptoms. Specific improvements were described in those who also received the abdominal massage. Conclusions. Both lifestyle advice and abdominal massage were perceived to be beneficial in relieving symptoms of constipation for PwP.

  7. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Lattice Boltzmann simulation of behaviour of particles moving in blood vessels under the rolling massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Cai-Feng; Li, Hua-Bing

    2009-07-01

    The rolling massage is one of the most important manipulations in Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on a pair of particles moving in blood vessels under rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulated results show that the motion of each particle is considerably modified by the rolling massage, and it depends on the relative rolling velocity, the rolling depth, and the distance between particle position and rolling position. Both particles' translational average velocities increase almost linearly as the rolling velocity increases, and obey the same law. The increment of the average relative angular velocity for the leading particle is smaller than that of the trailing one. The result is helpful for understanding the mechanism of the massage and to further develop the rolling techniques.

  8. Massage therapy reduces pain in pregnant women, alleviates prenatal depression in both parents and improves their relationships.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Figueiredo, Barbara; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel; Deeds, Osvelia; Ascencio, Angela

    2008-04-01

    Prenatally depressed women (N=47) were randomly assigned to a group that received massage twice weekly from their partners from 20 weeks gestation until the end of pregnancy or a control group. Self-reported leg pain, back pain, depression, anxiety and anger decreased more for the massaged pregnant women than for the control group women. In addition, the partners who massaged the pregnant women versus the control group partners reported less depressed mood, anxiety and anger across the course of the massage therapy period. Finally, scores on a relationship questionnaire improved more for both the women and the partners in the massage group. These data suggest that not only mood states but also relationships improve mutually when depressed pregnant women are massaged by their partners.

  9. Effectiveness of Anma massage therapy in alleviating physical symptoms in outpatients with Parkinson's disease: a before-after study.

    PubMed

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Suoh, Sachie; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to confirm the physical effects of a single Anma massage session and continuous Anma massage therapy for outpatients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-one PD outpatients (mean age, 64.43 ± 8.39 [SD] years; Hoehn and Yahr stage I-IV) received a single 40-min Anma massage session involving upper and lower limb exercises and some subsequently received seven weekly Anma massage sessions. After a single session, visual analogue scale scores were significantly lower for muscle stiffness, movement difficulties, pain, and fatigue; gait speed and pegboard test time were significantly shortened; stride length was significantly lengthened; and shoulder flexion and abduction were significantly improved. No significant changes occurred in controls. After continuous sessions, we found general improvements in the same outcomes. In conclusion, Anma massage might effectively alleviate various physical PD symptoms; furthermore, because it is given through clothing, Anma massage is accessible for PD patients with movement difficulties.

  10. Choose wisely: the quality of massage education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Menard, Martha Brown

    2014-09-01

    Assessing the quality of postsecondary education remains a difficult task, despite many efforts to do so. No consensus or standard definition of educational quality has yet been agreed upon or developed. This study evaluated the quality of massage education in the United States using three closely-related questions to frame the evaluation: 1) Is accreditation improving the quality of education for massage therapy? If not, then what do we need to do to improve it? 2) Does accreditation by COMTA specifically improve quality of education compared to other vocational accrediting agencies that do not require curriculum competencies specific to massage? 3) Would adding competencies at an "advanced" level, or specific degree levels, be helpful in advancing massage therapy in the eyes of other health professions? United States. Members of a national massage education organization, members affiliated with the educational arm of two national professional associations, and members of two national education organizations in complementary and integrative health care (CIHC). MIXED METHODS EVALUATION USING THREE DATA SOURCES: existing gainful employment data from the US Department of Education, analyzed by type of massage program and accreditation agency to determine average and relative value for cost; numbers of disciplinary actions against massage practitioners reported by state regulatory agencies, and a qualitatively developed survey administered to two different groups of educators. Average tuition cost across all reporting schools/programs was $13,605, with an average graduation rate of 71.9%. Of the schools and programs that reported student loan data, 84% of students received federal financial aid. Median loan amount was $8,052, with an average repayment rate of 43.4%. Programs in corporate-owned schools had the highest average cost, highest median loan amount, and lowest repayment rate, while community college programs had the lowest average cost, lowest graduation rate

  11. Choose Wisely: the Quality of Massage Education in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Martha Brown

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessing the quality of postsecondary education remains a difficult task, despite many efforts to do so. No consensus or standard definition of educational quality has yet been agreed upon or developed. Purpose This study evaluated the quality of massage education in the United States using three closely-related questions to frame the evaluation: 1) Is accreditation improving the quality of education for massage therapy? If not, then what do we need to do to improve it? 2) Does accreditation by COMTA specifically improve quality of education compared to other vocational accrediting agencies that do not require curriculum competencies specific to massage? 3) Would adding competencies at an “advanced” level, or specific degree levels, be helpful in advancing massage therapy in the eyes of other health professions? Setting United States Participants Members of a national massage education organization, members affiliated with the educational arm of two national professional associations, and members of two national education organizations in complementary and integrative health care (CIHC). Research Design Mixed methods evaluation using three data sources: existing gainful employment data from the US Department of Education, analyzed by type of massage program and accreditation agency to determine average and relative value for cost; numbers of disciplinary actions against massage practitioners reported by state regulatory agencies, and a qualitatively developed survey administered to two different groups of educators. Results Average tuition cost across all reporting schools/programs was $13,605, with an average graduation rate of 71.9%. Of the schools and programs that reported student loan data, 84% of students received federal financial aid. Median loan amount was $8,052, with an average repayment rate of 43.4%. Programs in corporate-owned schools had the highest average cost, highest median loan amount, and lowest repayment rate, while community

  12. Enhanced clinical outcome with manual massage following cryolipolysis treatment: a 4-month study of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Boey, Gerald E; Wasilenchuk, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Cryolipolysis procedures have been shown to safely and effectively reduce the thickness of fat in a treated region. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of post-treatment manual massage would improve efficacy while maintaining the safety profile of the original cryolipolysis treatment protocol. The study population consisted of an efficacy group (n = 10) and a safety group (n = 7). Study subjects were treated on each side of the lower abdomen with a Cooling Intensity Factor of 42 (-72.9 mW/cm(2) ) for 60 minutes. One side of the abdomen was massaged post-treatment and the other side served as the control. Immediately post-treatment, the massage side was treated for 1 minute using a vigorous kneading motion followed by 1 minute of circular massage using the pads of the fingers. For the efficacy group, photos and ultrasound measurements were taken at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months post-treatment. For the safety group, histological analysis was completed at 0, 3, 8, 14, 30, 60, and 120 days post-treatment to examine the effects of massage on subcutaneous tissue over time. Post-treatment manual massage resulted in a consistent and discernible increase in efficacy over the non-massaged side. At 2 months post-treatment, mean fat layer reduction was 68% greater in the massage side than in the non-massage side as measured by ultrasound. By 4 months, mean fat layer reduction was 44% greater in the massage side. Histological results showed no evidence of necrosis or fibrosis resulting from the massage. Post-treatment manual massage is a safe and effective technique to enhance the clinical outcome from a cryolipolysis procedure. © 2013 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of immediate vs. delayed massage-like loading on skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Scott K; Haas, Caroline; Butterfield, Timothy A; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yi; Best, Thomas M

    2014-06-01

    This study compared immediate versus delayed massage-like compressive loading on skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties following eccentric exercise. Eighteen rabbits were surgically instrumented with peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of the tibialis anterior muscle. Rabbits were randomly assigned to a massage loading protocol applied immediately post exercise (n=6), commencing 48h post exercise (n=6), or exercised no-massage control (n=6). Viscoelastic properties were evaluated in vivo by performing a stress-relaxation test pre- and post-exercise and daily pre- and post-massage for four consecutive days of massage loading. A quasi-linear viscoelastic approach modeled the instantaneous elastic response (AG0), fast (g1(p)) and slow (g2(p)) relaxation coefficients, and the corresponding relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2. Exercise increased AG0 in all groups (P<0.05). After adjusting for the three multiple comparisons, recovery of AG0 was not significant in the immediate (P=0.021) or delayed (P=0.048) group compared to the control group following four days of massage. However, within-day (pre- to post-massage) analysis revealed a decrease in AG0 in both massage groups. Following exercise, g1(p) increased and g2(p) and τ1 decreased for all groups (P<0.05). Exercise had no effect on τ2 (P>0.05). After four days of massage, there was no significant recovery of the relaxation parameters for either massage loading group compared to the control group. Our findings suggest that massage loading following eccentric exercise has a greater effect on reducing muscle stiffness, estimated by AG0, within-day rather than affecting recovery over multiple days. Massage loading also has little effect on the relaxation response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Immediate vs. Delayed Massage-like Loading on Skeletal Muscle Viscoelastic Properties Following Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Scott K.; Haas, Caroline; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yi; Best, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compared immediate versus delayed massage-like compressive loading on skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties following eccentric exercise. Methods Eighteen rabbits were surgically instrumented with peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of the tibialis anterior muscle. Rabbits were randomly assigned to a massage loading protocol applied immediately post exercise (n=6), commencing 48 hours post exercise (n=6), or exercised no-massage control (n=6). Viscoelastic properties were evaluated in vivo by performing a stress-relaxation test pre- and post-exercise and daily pre- and post-massage for four consecutive days of massage loading. A quasi-linear viscoelastic approach modeled the instantaneous elastic response (AG0), fast ( g1p) and slow ( g2p) relaxation coefficients, and the corresponding relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2. Findings Exercise increased AG0 in all groups (P<0.05). After adjusting for the three multiple comparisons, recovery of AG0 was not significant in the immediate (P=0.021) or delayed (P=0.048) groups compared to the control group following four days of massage. However, within-day (pre- to post-massage) analysis revealed a decrease in AG0 in both massage groups. Following exercise, g1p increased and g2p and τ1 decreased for all groups (P<0.05). Exercise had no effect on τ2 (P>0.05). After four days of massage, there was no significant recovery of the relaxation parameters for either massage loading group compared to the control group. Interpretation Our findings suggest that massage loading following eccentric exercise has a greater effect on reducing muscle stiffness, estimated by AG0, within-day rather than affecting recovery over multiple days. Massage loading also has little effect on the relaxation response. PMID:24861827

  15. Massage therapy services for healthcare: a telephone focus group study of drivers for clients' continued use of services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joanna M; Sullivan, S John; Baxter, G David

    2009-01-01

    To explore opinions of why clients use, value and continue to seek massage therapy as a healthcare option. Telephone focus group methodology was used. Current and repeat users (n = 19) of either relaxation, remedial or sports massage therapy services participated in three telephone focus groups. Audiotaped semi-structured interviews were conducted. Telephone focus group with massage clients from provincial and urban localities in New Zealand. Summary of reported themes of the massage experience and suggested drivers for return to, or continuing with massage therapy. Data were transcribed, categorised (NVivo7) and thematically analysed using the general inductive approach. Key drivers for return to, or continuing with, massage therapy were: positive outcomes, expectations of goals being met, a regular appointment and the massage therapy culture. Massage therapy is perceived and valued as a personalised, holistic and hands-on approach to health management, which focuses on enhancing relaxation in conjunction with effective touch, within a positive client-therapist relationship and a pleasant non-rushed environment. Massage therapy as a health service is result and client driven but is reinforced by the culture of the experience.

  16. Massage therapy alone and in combination with meditation for breast cancer patients undergoing autologous tissue reconstruction: A randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dion, Liza J; Engen, Deborah J; Lemaine, Valerie; Lawson, Donna K; Brock, Charise G; Thomley, Barbara S; Cha, Stephen S; Sood, Amit; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2016-05-01

    This study explored whether massage combined with meditation is more helpful than massage alone for women recovering from autologous tissue reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Forty patients were randomly assigned to either massage therapy or massage plus meditation on postoperative days 1 through 3. Outcome measures were 1) visual analog scale (VAS) scores for stress, anxiety, relaxation, insomnia, alertness, fatigue, tension, pain, mood, and energy, and 2) Perceived Stress Scale-14 scores. Nineteen patients in each group finished the study. Preintervention and postintervention mean total VAS scores improved significantly in both groups (P < .001), but no significant difference occurred between groups.

  17. Effectiveness of massage therapy for subacute low-back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Preyde, M

    2000-06-27

    The effectiveness of massage therapy for low-back pain has not been documented. This randomized controlled trial compared comprehensive massage therapy (soft-tissue manipulation, remedial exercise and posture education), 2 components of massage therapy and placebo in the treatment of subacute (between 1 week and 8 months) low-back pain. Subjects with subacute low-back pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: comprehensive massage therapy (n = 25), soft-tissue manipulation only (n = 25), remedial exercise with posture education only (n = 22) or a placebo of sham laser therapy (n = 26). Each subject received 6 treatments within approximately 1 month. Outcome measures obtained at baseline, after treatment and at 1-month follow-up consisted of the Roland Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), the McGill Pain Questionnaire (PPI and PRI), the State Anxiety Index and the Modified Schober test (lumbar range of motion). Of the 107 subjects who passed screening, 98 (92%) completed post-treatment tests and 91 (85%) completed follow-up tests. Statistically significant differences were noted after treatment and at follow-up. The comprehensive massage therapy group had improved function (mean RDQ score 1.54 v. 2.86-6.5, p < 0.001), less intense pain (mean PPI score 0.42 v. 1.18-1.75, p < 0.001) and a decrease in the quality of pain (mean PRI score 2.29 v. 4.55-7.71, p = 0.006) compared with the other 3 groups. Clinical significance was evident for the comprehensive massage therapy group and the soft-tissue manipulation group on the measure of function. At 1-month follow-up 63% of subjects in the comprehensive massage therapy group reported no pain as compared with 27% of the soft-tissue manipulation group, 14% of the remedial exercise group and 0% of the sham laser therapy group. Patients with subacute low-back pain were shown to benefit from massage therapy, as regulated by the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario and delivered by experienced massage therapists.

  18. SPECIFIC AND CROSS OVER EFFECTS OF MASSAGE FOR MUSCLE SORENESS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D.; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A.; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera‐band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non‐massaged limb. Methods: 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/− 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/− 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/− 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/− 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0‐10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff‐legged dead‐lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. Results: There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non‐massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30

  19. Effectiveness of massage therapy for subacute low-back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of massage therapy for low-back pain has not been documented. This randomized controlled trial compared comprehensive massage therapy (soft-tissue manipulation, remedial exercise and posture education), 2 components of massage therapy and placebo in the treatment of subacute (between 1 week and 8 months) low-back pain. METHODS: Subjects with subacute low-back pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: comprehensive massage therapy (n = 25), soft-tissue manipulation only (n = 25), remedial exercise with posture education only (n = 22) or a placebo of sham laser therapy (n = 26). Each subject received 6 treatments within approximately 1 month. Outcome measures obtained at baseline, after treatment and at 1-month follow-up consisted of the Roland Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), the McGill Pain Questionnaire (PPI and PRI), the State Anxiety Index and the Modified Schober test (lumbar range of motion). RESULTS: Of the 107 subjects who passed screening, 98 (92%) completed post-treatment tests and 91 (85%) completed follow-up tests. Statistically significant differences were noted after treatment and at follow-up. The comprehensive massage therapy group had improved function (mean RDQ score 1.54 v. 2.86-6.5, p < 0.001), less intense pain (mean PPI score 0.42 v. 1.18-1.75, p < 0.001) and a decrease in the quality of pain (mean PRI score 2.29 v. 4.55-7.71, p = 0.006) compared with the other 3 groups. Clinical significance was evident for the comprehensive massage therapy group and the soft-tissue manipulation group on the measure of function. At 1-month follow-up 63% of subjects in the comprehensive massage therapy group reported no pain as compared with 27% of the soft-tissue manipulation group, 14% of the remedial exercise group and 0% of the sham laser therapy group. INTERPRETATION: Patients with subacute low-back pain were shown to benefit from massage therapy, as regulated by the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario and delivered by

  20. Massage therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Jong-In; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-03-01

    We aimed to assess the effectiveness of massage as a treatment option for autism. We searched the following electronic databases using the time of their inception through March 2010: MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health Technology Assessment, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, 6 Korean medical databases (KSI, DBpia, KISTEP, RISS, KoreaMed, and National Digital Library), China Academic Journal (through China National Knowledge Infrastructure), and 3 Japanese medical databases (Journal@rchive, Science Links Japan, and Japan Science & Technology link). The search phrase used was "(massage OR touch OR acupressure) AND (autistic OR autism OR Asperger's syndrome OR pervasive developmental disorder)." The references in all located articles were also searched. No language restrictions were imposed. Prospective controlled clinical studies of any type of massage therapy for autistic patients were included. Trials in which massage was part of a complex intervention were also included. Case studies, case series, qualitative studies, uncontrolled trials, studies that failed to provide detailed results, and trials that compared one type of massage with another were excluded. All articles were read by 2 independent reviewers (M.S.L. and J-I.K.), who extracted data from the articles according to predefined criteria. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane classification. Of 132 articles, only 6 studies met our inclusion criteria. One randomized clinical trial found that massage plus conventional language therapy was superior to conventional language therapy alone for symptom severity (P < .05) and communication attitude (P < .01). Two randomized clinical trials reported a significant benefit of massage for sensory profile (P < .01), adaptive behavior (P < .05), and language and social abilities (P < .01) as compared with

  1. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  2. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  3. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  4. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  5. The Effects of Self-Massage on Osteoarthritis of the Knee: a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dorothea V.; Eichler, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent research has provided a rationale for the efficacy and use of massage therapy in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms. Additionally, research has also implicated the role of the quadriceps muscles in the genesis of knee OA. Although both areas of research have demonstrated strong evidence that the muscles and massage therapy may affect knee OA symptoms, self-massage applied on the quadriceps muscle has received no attention. Methods Conducted at the Lourdes Wellness Center in Collingswood, NJ, the study investigated the outcomes of a self-massage intervention applied to the quadriceps muscle on reported pain, stiffness, physical function, and knee range of motion in adults with diagnosed knee OA. Forty adults with diagnosed knee OA were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 21) or a wait list control (n = 19) group. The participants applied a narrated 20-minute self-massage therapy twice weekly during ten supervised and three unsupervised intervention sessions. The control group had four supervised assessments with no intervention. Outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster’s Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and assessment of knee range of motion. Results Between-groups analyses of WOMAC pain, stiffness, function subscales, and total WOMAC scores indicated significant difference between groups (p < .05), n = 36). No significant differences were seen in range of motion. Conclusions The study demonstrated that participants who have OA of the knee benefit from the self-massage intervention therapy. Further studies are needed to clarify the long-term effects of self-massage on the progression and symptoms of knee OA. PMID:23482239

  6. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius.

  7. Massage Impact on Pain in Opioid-dependent Patients in Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Katharina L.; Asphaug, Victoria J.; Carr, Kathryn E.; Gowen, Emily A.; Hartnett, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain is a common cause of health care utilization and high levels of pain are pronounced in individuals engaged in methadone maintenance treatment. Although massage has been demonstrated to alleviate chronic pain symptoms, its use as an adjunctive therapy to modify pain during opioid-replacement treatment is absent from the literature. Purpose: To consider the efficacy of Swedish massage in reducing pain in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain receiving methadone treatment. Setting: Trial was conducted at a nonprofit methadone treatment center serving low-income patients. Research Design: A randomized clinical trial with randomized to either 1) massage plus treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 27) or 2) TAU (n = 24). Durability of treatment effect was evaluated at Week 12. Intervention: Eight weekly 50-minute Swedish massage sessions plus TAU or TAU alone. Main Outcome Measures: Pain, anxiety, depression, physical functioning, decreased substance use, and improvement in treatment engagement. Results: Randomized participants were comparable at Baseline for demographic, pain, physical, and emotional variables. Massage group reported improved pain scores; worst pain had a clinically significant 2-point improvement while the other pain scores did not. Overall improvements were not observed in treatment engagement or levels of anxiety, depression, or physical functioning. A subgroup of the participants, who felt they could be pain-free, consistently reported improvements in pain from Baseline to Week 8, and this was most pronounced and clinically significant in the massage group. Conclusions: These preliminary findings do not support an overall clinically significant positive effect of Swedish massage on reduction in pain ratings or improvement in anxiety, depression, or treatment engagement in a substance-using, opioid-dependent population with chronic pain. Future nonpharmacologic pain research in marginalized substance-using populations may wish

  8. Developing, Maintaining, and Using a Body of Knowledge for the Massage Therapy Profession

    PubMed Central

    Sefton, JoEllen M.; Shea, Michael; Hines, Chip

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diverse field of massage therapy has lacked a formal body of knowledge to serve as a practice and educational foundation and to guide future development. This deficit has hampered the growth of the profession and its acceptance and recognition by the medical and allied health care community. Purpose: To provide massage therapists, bodyworkers, physicians, educators, and associated allied health care professionals in the United States with a description of the purpose and development of the massage therapy body of knowledge (MTBOK) and recommendations for its future development and utilization. Methods: Professional groups in the massage therapy community came together and established a task force to develop a body of knowledge for the profession. Five groups became the stewards for this effort. A nationwide search produced a task force of eight volunteers from diverse areas of the profession charged with the responsibility of researching and developing the MTBOK document. Review of documents, curricula, state laws and regulations, certification exam content, interviews, and public comment resulted in the development of the MTBOK. During development multiple opportunities for comment and discussion by stakeholders (public) were provided in an effort to create a professional consensus. Results: The resulting MTBOK document establishes professional descriptions of the field; scope of practice; knowledge, skills, and abilities for entry-level massage therapists; and definitions for terminology to insure standardization, in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and growth. Conclusions: The MTBOK fulfills the goal for which it was developed, to serve as a foundation for the growth and development of the massage therapy profession as a whole. A living document, it should continue to evolve and grow with the profession. Maintenance and continued stewardship of this document by the massage therapy community is vital for continued professional

  9. Effect of pre-performance lower-limb massage on thirty-meter sprint running.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jon E; Glaister, Mark; Howatson, Glyn; Lockey, Richard A; McInnes, Gillian

    2007-11-01

    Massage is a commonly utilized therapy within sports, frequently intended as an ergogenic aid prior to performance. However, evidence as to the efficacy of massage in this respect is lacking, and massage may in some instances reduce force production. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of massage on subsequent 30-m sprint running performance. Male university level repeat sprint sports players volunteered for the study (n = 37). After each of 3 treatment conditions, subjects completed a standardized warm-up followed by three 30-m sprint trials in a counterbalanced crossover design. Treatment conditions were 15 minutes of lower-limb massage (M), 15 minutes of placebo ultrasound (PU), and rest (R). Thirty-meter sprint times were recorded (including 10-m split times) for the 3 trials under each condition. Best times at 10 m (M: 1.85 +/- 0.09 seconds, PU: 1.84 +/- 0.11 seconds, R: 1.83 +/- 0.10 seconds) and 30 m (M: 4.41 +/- 0.27 seconds, PU: 4.39 +/- 0.28 seconds, R: 4.39 +/- 0.28 seconds) were not significantly different (p > 0.05). There was no significant treatment, trial, or interaction effect for 10- or 30-m sprint times (p > 0.05). No difference was seen in the location of subjects' best times across the 3 trials (p > 0.05). Relative to placebo or control, the results of this study showed that a controlled 15-minute lower-limb massage administered prior to warm-up had no significant effect on subsequent 30-m sprint performance. Massage remains indicated prior to performance where other benefits, such as reduced muscle spasm and psychological stress, might be served to the athlete.

  10. Effects of infant massage on state anxiety in mothers of preterm infants prior to hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Afand, Nahid; Keshavarz, Maryam; Fatemi, Naiemeh Seyed; Montazeri, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of infant massage on anxiety in mothers of preterm infants who discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit. Birth of preterm infants commonly leads to great levels of distress and anxiety in mothers. Although various methods have been suggested to help mothers cope with such stressful conditions, the effects of infant massage have not been adequately studied in mothers. This was a quasi-experimental clinical trial. Overall, in 70 mothers and their preterm infants who scheduled to be discharged within 24 hours, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scale (Spielberger) was completed for mothers in both groups in the morning of the day before discharge. The experimental group received eight minutes of massage including two standard similar parts (each part four minutes). The massage was repeated in two parts on the day of discharge, and then, state anxiety was re-measured using Spielberg's scale for all mothers. The control group received no intervention. The results showed that on the day of discharge, there was a significant difference in the overall mean score of maternal state anxiety between the two groups (p < 0·002), although not in the severity of maternal state anxiety. In both groups, the mean score of maternal state anxiety was significantly decreased on the day of discharge (p < 0·001). The findings provide evidence that infant massage by mother has an effect on the state anxiety of mothers of preterm infants, so it is recommended that mothers apply massage for preterm infants to improve their mental health. Mothers of preterm infants can promote mental health by continuing massage of their infants at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Pain Management in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. Purpose and Setting This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona—a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. Method A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 – 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Participants Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Result Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t52 = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p < .001. Qualitative data illustrated improvement in all areas, with the most significant areas of impact reported being overall pain level, emotional well-being, relaxation, and ability to sleep. Conclusions This study shows that integration of massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient’s ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation

  12. Aromatherapy massage versus reflexology on female elderly with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Tahereh; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Tadrisi, Seyed Davood; Sieloff, Christina L

    2017-06-02

    Fatigue and abnormalities in cardiovascular parameters are recognized as major problems for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Non-pharmacological nursing interventions are useful for controlling this fatigue and reducing patients' suffering during hospitalization. The present study compared the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on fatigue and cardiovascular parameters in older female patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study was conducted with 135 older female patients with acute coronary syndrome who were hospitalized in a cardiac care unit in 2014. They were invited to participate in the study and then were randomly divided into three groups: 'aromatherapy massage', 'reflexology' and 'control'. The fatigue severity and cardiovascular parameters were assessed using the Rhoten fatigue scale and a checklist. Measurements in the groups were performed before and immediately after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical statistics via the SPSS software. Aromatherapy massage significantly decreased fatigue, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and O2 saturation more than the reflexology intervention. However, reflexology reduced patients' heart rates more than an aromatherapy massage (P < 0·05). Moreover, no significant changes were observed in patients' diastolic blood pressures when compared to the control group (P = 0·37). Implementation of both aromatherapy massage and reflexology has positive effects on the fatigue and cardiovascular parameters of patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, aromatherapy massage can be more beneficial to use as a supportive approach in coronary diseases. The need for reducing fatigue in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in a cardiac care unit is evident. The implementation of aromatherapy massage and reflexology had positive effects on patients' fatigue as related to both physical and mental

  13. The Comparison of the Effects of Massaging and Rocking on Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Fatemah; Gazerani, Nafiseh; Yousefi, Parsa; Abadi, Ali Reza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infantile colic is a painful condition in the first months of infancy. This study was carried out with the aim of testing the hypothesis that massage treatment has a clinically relevant effect on this condition. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted among 100 infants of < 12 weeks of age with infantile colic. They were randomly assigned to either infant massage (n = 50) or rocking groups (n = 50). In the massage group, trained individuals taught the parents of the infants the massage technique and gave them a brochure. Rocking group parents was recommended to rock their infants three times a day for 1 week. Parents recorded the pattern of crying (numbers, length, and severity of crying). After 1 week of intervention, data were analysed using t-test, Chi square test, and repeated measurement analysis of variance (P < 0.05). Results: Significant differences were not observed in infant and mother demographic information. Before intervention, the mean of total number, length, and severity of crying were 6.12 (1.76) time/day, 4.97 (1.37) hour/day, and 6.60 (1.54) in the massage group and 6.96 (2.9) time/day, 3 (1.31) hour/day, and 5.98 (2.22) in the rocking group, respectively. After 1 week of intervention, the mean difference of total number, length, and severity of crying were 4.08 (1.83) time/day, 2.81 (1.77) hour/day, and 2.9 (2.37) in the massage group and 0.56 (2.28) time/day, 0.27 (1.09) hour/day, and 0.02 (1.64) in the rocking group, respectively. Conclusions: This trial of massage treatment for infantile colic showed statistically significant or clinically relevant effect in comparison with the rocking group. PMID:28382062

  14. The effects of massage therapy on pain management in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-03-17

    Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona-a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 - 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t(52) = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p < .001. Qualitative data illustrated improvement in all areas, with the most significant areas of impact reported being overall pain level, emotional well-being, relaxation, and ability to sleep. This study shows that integration of massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient's ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation, sleep, emotions, recovery, and finally, the healing process.

  15. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  16. The effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Isabell, W K; Durrant, E; Myrer, W; Anderson, S

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended.

  17. Comparing the Effects of Rest and Massage on Return to Homeostasis Following Submaximal Aerobic Exercise: a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Portia B

    2016-03-01

    Postexercise massage can be used to help promote recovery from exercise on the cellular level, as well as systemically by increasing parasympathetic activity. No studies to date have been done to assess the effects of massage on postexercise metabolic changes, including excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of massage recovery and resting recovery on a subject's heart rate variability and selected metabolic effects following a submaximal treadmill exercise session. One healthy 24-year-old female subject performed 30 minutes of submaximal treadmill exercise prior to resting or massage recovery sessions. Metabolic data were collected throughout the exercise sessions and at three 10 minute intervals postexercise. Heart rate variability was evaluated for 10 minutes after each of two 30-minute recovery sessions, either resting or massage. Heart rate returned to below resting levels (73 bpm) with 30 and 60 minutes of massage recovery (72 bpm and 63 bpm, respectively) compared to 30 and 60 minutes of resting recovery (77 bpm and 74 bpm, respectively). Heart rate variability data showed a more immediate shift to the parasympathetic state following 30 minutes of massage (1.152 LF/HF ratio) versus the 30-minute resting recovery (6.91 LF/HF ratio). It took 60 minutes of resting recovery to reach similar heart rate variability levels (1.216 LF/HF) found after 30 minutes of massage. Ventilations after 30 minutes of massage recovery averaged 7.1 bpm compared to 17.9 bpm after 30 minutes of resting recovery. No differences in EPOC were observed through either the resting or massage recovery based on the metabolic data collected. Massage was used to help the subject shift into parasympathetic activity more quickly than rest alone following a submaximal exercise session.

  18. Effect of Whole Body Massage by Patient's Companion on the Level of Blood Cortisol in Coronary Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman; Abasi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inconsistent results have been reported on the effect of massage therapy on the blood cortisol levels. Also, no study is available about the effect of massage done by patient's companions on the level of blood cortisol in patients hospitalized at CCU. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of whole body massage performed by patient's companion on the level of blood cortisol among the patients admitted in CCU. Patients and Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 60 patients admitted to a CCU ward. Patients were randomly placed into two groups of massage performed by patient's companion and the control group. In the intervention group, whole body massage was administered. The control group did not receive massage. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS 11.5 software. Independent sample and Paired samples t-test, Chi Square and Fisher's Exact tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean age for the patients was 58.90 ± 15.63 years. None of them had the history of massage therapy. In the group massaged by the patients' companions, the mean of blood cortisol was 323.6 ± 162.6 nanomoles which decreased to 268.4 ± 141.1 after the intervention (P < 0.102). The mean of blood cortisol in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions: Massage therapy lowered the level of cortisol in the group massaged by the patients' companions. It can be recommended that massage therapy be used in patients admitted in CCU. PMID:25414870

  19. Comparing the Effects of Rest and Massage on Return to Homeostasis Following Submaximal Aerobic Exercise: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Portia B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postexercise massage can be used to help promote recovery from exercise on the cellular level, as well as systemically by increasing parasympathetic activity. No studies to date have been done to assess the effects of massage on postexercise metabolic changes, including excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of massage recovery and resting recovery on a subject’s heart rate variability and selected metabolic effects following a submaximal treadmill exercise session. Methods One healthy 24-year-old female subject performed 30 minutes of submaximal treadmill exercise prior to resting or massage recovery sessions. Metabolic data were collected throughout the exercise sessions and at three 10 minute intervals postexercise. Heart rate variability was evaluated for 10 minutes after each of two 30-minute recovery sessions, either resting or massage. Results Heart rate returned to below resting levels (73 bpm) with 30 and 60 minutes of massage recovery (72 bpm and 63 bpm, respectively) compared to 30 and 60 minutes of resting recovery (77 bpm and 74 bpm, respectively). Heart rate variability data showed a more immediate shift to the parasympathetic state following 30 minutes of massage (1.152 LF/HF ratio) versus the 30-minute resting recovery (6.91 LF/HF ratio). It took 60 minutes of resting recovery to reach similar heart rate variability levels (1.216 LF/HF) found after 30 minutes of massage. Ventilations after 30 minutes of massage recovery averaged 7.1 bpm compared to 17.9 bpm after 30 minutes of resting recovery. Conclusions No differences in EPOC were observed through either the resting or massage recovery based on the metabolic data collected. Massage was used to help the subject shift into parasympathetic activity more quickly than rest alone following a submaximal exercise session. PMID:26977215

  20. AF fixer: new incremental OPC method for optimizing assist feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Gon; Kim, Sang-Wook; Suh, Sung-Soo; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Suk-Joo; Choi, Sung-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung; Moon, Joo-Tae; Barnes, Levi D.; Li, Xiaohai; Lugg, Robert M.; Lee, Sooryong; Koo, Kyoil; Do, Munhoe; Amoroso, Frank P.; Painter, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Due to shrinking design nodes and to some limitations of scanners, extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) required and its use and implementation of assist features (AF) to solve depth of focus (DOF) problems for isolated features and specific pitch regions is essential. But unfortunately, the strong periodic character of OAI illumination makes AF's print more easily. Present OPC flows generate AFs before OPC, which is also causes some AF printing problems. At present, mask manufacturers must downsize AF's below 30nm to solve this problem. This is challenging and increases mask cost. We report on an AF-fixer tool which is able to check AF printability and correct weak points with minimal cost in terms of DOF after OPC. We have devised an effective algorithm that removes printing AF's. It can not only search for the best non-printing AF condition to meet the DOF spec, but also reports uncorrectable spots, which could be marked as design errors. To limit correction times and to maximize DOF in full-chip correction, a process window (PW) model and incremental OPC method are applied. This AF fixer, which suggests optimum AF in only weak point region, solves AF printing problems economically and accurately.

  1. Effects of Massage on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, Swelling, and Recovery of Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Zainuddin, Zainal; Newton, Mike; Sacco, Paul; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) describes muscle pain and tenderness that typically develop several hours postexercise and consist of predominantly eccentric muscle actions, especially if the exercise is unfamiliar. Although DOMS is likely a symptom of eccentric-exercise–induced muscle damage, it does not necessarily reflect muscle damage. Some prophylactic or therapeutic modalities may be effective only for alleviating DOMS, whereas others may enhance recovery of muscle function without affecting DOMS. Objective: To test the hypothesis that massage applied after eccentric exercise would effectively alleviate DOMS without affecting muscle function. Design: We used an arm-to-arm comparison model with 2 independent variables (control and massage) and 6 dependent variables (maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness). A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t tests were used to examine differences in changes of the dependent variable over time (before, immediately and 30 minutes after exercise, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days postexercise) between control and massage conditions. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training. Intervention(s): Subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic (90°·s−1) eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm on a dynamometer, separated by 2 weeks. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 3 hours after eccentric exercise; the contralateral arm received no treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic elbow flexor strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness. Results: Delayed-onset muscle soreness was significantly less for the massage condition for peak

  2. WITHDRAWN: Aromatherapy and massage for symptom relief in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fellowes, Deborah; Barnes, Kelly; Wilkinson, Susie Sm

    2008-10-08

    Aromatherapy massage is a commonly used complementary therapy, and is employed in cancer and palliative care largely to improve quality of life and reduce psychological distress. To investigate whether aromatherapy or massage, or both, decreases psychological morbidity, lessens symptom distress and/or improves the quality of life in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002), MEDLINE (1966 to May week 3 2002), CINAHL (1982 to April 2002), British Nursing Index (1994 to April 2002), EMBASE (1980 to Week 25 2002), AMED (1985 to April 2002), PsycINFO (1887 to April week 4 2002), SIGLE (1980 to March 2002), CancerLit (1975 to April 2002) and Dissertation Abstracts International (1861 to March 2002). Reference lists of relevant articles were searched for additional studies. We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs); controlled before and after studies; and interrupted time series studies of aromatherapy or massage, or both, for patients with cancer, that measured changes in patient-reported levels of physical or psychological distress or quality of life using reliable and valid tools. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion in the review, assessed study quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted where information was unclear. The search strategy retrieved 1322 studies. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria and these represented eight RCTs (357 participants). The most consistently found effect of massage or aromatherapy massage was on anxiety. Four trials (207 participants) measuring anxiety detected a reduction post intervention, with benefits of 19 to 32% reported. Contradictory evidence exists as to any additional benefit on anxiety conferred by the addition of aromatherapy. The evidence for the impact of massage/aromatherapy on depression was variable. Of the three trials (120 participants) that assessed depression in cancer patients, only one found any significant

  3. Integrating massage therapy within the palliative care of veterans with advanced illnesses: an outcome study.

    PubMed

    Mitchinson, Allison; Fletcher, Carol E; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Montagnini, Marcos; Hinshaw, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    To describe the integration of massage therapy into a palliative care service and to examine the relationship between massage and symptoms in patients with advanced illnesses. Between April 1, 2009, and July 31, 2010, 153 patients received massage at the VA Ann Arbor Health Care System. Data on pain, anxiety, dyspnea, relaxation, and inner peace were collected pre and post massage. Diagnoses, chronic pain, and social support were also abstracted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine changes over time. All short-term changes in symptoms showed improvement and all were statistically significant. Pain intensity decreased by 1.65 (0-10 scale, P < .001), anxiety decreased by 1.52 (0-10 scale, P < .001), patients' sense of relaxation increased by 2.92 (0-10 scale, P < .001), and inner peace improved by 1.80 (0-10 scale, P < .001). Massage is a useful tool for improving symptom management and reducing suffering in palliative care patients.

  4. Gait analysis of patients with knee osteoarthritis before and after Chinese massage treatment.

    PubMed

    Qingguang, Zhu; Min, Fang; Li, Gong; Shuyun, Jiang; Wuquan, Sun; Jianhua, Li; Yong, Li

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese massage therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by measuring lower-limb gait parameters. We recruited 20 women with knee OA, who then underwent Chinese massage therapy three times per week for 2 weeks. The patients underwent gait evaluation using a six-camera infrared motion analysis system. They completed Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaires before and after treatment. We calculated the forward speed, step width, step length, total support time percentage, initial double support time percentage, and single support time percentage. We also measured the angles at the knee, hip, and ankle during the stance phase of walking. The results showed statistically significant mean differences in knee pain relief, alleviation of stiffness, and physical function enhancement after therapy (P < 0.05). The patients gained significantly faster gait speed, greater step width, and increased total support time percentage after the Chinese massage therapy (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the range of motion or initial contact angles of the knee, hip, or ankle during the stance phase of walking. We concluded that Chinese massage is a beneficial complementary treatment and an alternative therapy choice for patients with knee OA for short-term pain relief. Chinese massage may improve walking ability for these patients.

  5. Massage Therapy in Children with Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Yang, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    To systematically evaluate the efficacy of massage, a traditional treatment method of traditional Chinese medicine on children with asthma. Literatures from 5 databases using the date ranging from 1 January, 1990, to 13 December, 2016, were reviewed, which were all randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy on children with asthma and effect on lung function mainly by massage therapy. 14 researches with 1299 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with control group, a better efficacy was found in treatment group, which focused on massage therapy. Compared with control group, there was remarkable increase on FEV1 as well as PEF in treatment group. All studies have shown that massage therapy has a significantly positive effect on children with asthma, improves the pulmonary function parameters of large airway, reduces the plasma concentrations of PAF and prostaglandin, and increases the levels of PAF-AH and DP1; therefore, it greatly improves pulmonary function. However, the limited research designs of included studies lead to high risk of bias. More randomized controlled trials with better methodological quality are needed to further confirm the effectiveness of massage.

  6. Massage Therapy in Children with Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ji; Yang, Xi-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically evaluate the efficacy of massage, a traditional treatment method of traditional Chinese medicine on children with asthma. Methods Literatures from 5 databases using the date ranging from 1 January, 1990, to 13 December, 2016, were reviewed, which were all randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy on children with asthma and effect on lung function mainly by massage therapy. Results 14 researches with 1299 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with control group, a better efficacy was found in treatment group, which focused on massage therapy. Compared with control group, there was remarkable increase on FEV1 as well as PEF in treatment group. Conclusion All studies have shown that massage therapy has a significantly positive effect on children with asthma, improves the pulmonary function parameters of large airway, reduces the plasma concentrations of PAF and prostaglandin, and increases the levels of PAF-AH and DP1; therefore, it greatly improves pulmonary function. However, the limited research designs of included studies lead to high risk of bias. More randomized controlled trials with better methodological quality are needed to further confirm the effectiveness of massage. PMID:28607574

  7. Massage and ultrasound as therapeutic modalities in exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Tiidus, P M

    1999-06-01

    Although both massage and ultrasound treatment are used in clinical settings to enhance muscle functional recovery following exercise-induced muscle damage, there is a paucity of experimental evidence for their efficacy. Theoretically both massage and ultrasound could affect some physiological factors associated with enhancement of postexercise muscle recovery. However, the actual physiological mechanisms by which massage or ultrasound could influence postexercise muscle damage and repair are unknown. Most experimental evidence suggests that massage has little influence on muscle blood flow, clearance of "noxious" substances, recovery of postexercise muscle strength, or delayed soreness sensation. However, more data is needed before conclusions can be drawn as to the ability of massage to influence postexercise inflammatory response or various other physiological changes that characterize exercise-induced muscle damage and repair. There is even less information on the ability of ultrasound to influence physiological or functional factors associated with postexercise muscle damage. The few experiments that have been done tend to be contradictory and have yet to consider the range of ultrasound treatment parameters for therapeutic effectiveness in treating postexercise damage and influencing repair processes. Much more research is needed to determine whether either treatment modality can have any therapeutic effect on exercise-induced muscle damage and recovery of postexercise muscle function.

  8. Effects of Sport Massage on Limb Girth and Discomfort Associated With Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M; Swanik, C. Buz; Tierney, Ryan T

    2005-01-01

    Context: Sport massage is often used to help prepare for exercise, expedite recovery from muscle soreness, and enhance athletic performance. However, the effect of sport massage on recovery from delayed-onset muscle soreness is unknown. Objective: To determine the effect of a short sport massage treatment on intramuscular swelling and pain in response to eccentric exercise. Design: We used a 2 × 8 (treatment × time) repeated-measures design to compare triceps surae muscle girth and pain ratings over the 72 hours after eccentric exercise. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Nineteen healthy, college-aged subjects. Intervention(s): Delayed-onset muscle soreness was induced with several sets of eccentric triceps surae contractions at 90% of the estimated concentric, 1-repetition maximum weight. Subjects returned on 3 consecutive days after eccentric exercise with a cycle ergometer for active rest treatments. In addition, 1 leg received the sport massage. Main Outcome Measure(s): Girth measurements were taken at 5.08 cm (2 in), 10.16 cm (4 in), 15.24 cm (6 in), and 20.32 cm (8 in) below the knee joint line, and pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before and after all 4 sessions. Results: No interaction was noted between treatment and time for any girth or pain measurements, and no main effect was seen for treatment. Conclusions: Sport massage did not reduce girth or pain in the lower leg after eccentric exercise within 72 hours. PMID:16284638

  9. Evaluating the use of gas discharge visualization to measure massage therapy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Jolie; Patel, Nitin; Schwartz, Gary; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of massage therapy using gas discharge visualization (GDV), a computerized biophysical electrophoton capture (EPC), in tandem with traditional self-report measures to evaluate the use of GDV measurement to assess the bioenergetic whole-person effects of massage therapy. Methods This study used a single treatment group, pre–post-repeated measures design with a sample of 23 healthy adults. This study utilized a single 50-min full-body relaxation massage with participants. GDV measurement method, an EPC, and traditional paper-based measures evaluating pain, stress, muscle tension, and well-being were used to assess intervention outcomes. Results Significant differences were found between pre- and post-measures of well-being, pain, stress, muscle tension, and GDV parameters. Pearson correlations indicate the GDV measure is correlated with pain and stress, variables that impact the whole person. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GDV parameters may be used to indicate significant bioenergetic change from pre- to post-massage. Findings warrant further investigation with a larger diverse sample size and control group to further explore GDV as a measure of whole-person bioenergetic effects associated with massage. PMID:26087069

  10. Comparing the effects of ice massage and acupressure on labor pain reduction.

    PubMed

    Hajiamini, Zahra; Masoud, Sirati Nir; Ebadi, Abbas; Mahboubh, Afzali; Matin, Ali Asgari

    2012-08-01

    Childbirth is arguably one of the most painful experiences women undergo during their lives. This study aimed to compare the effects of ice massage, acupressure and placebo in reducing the intensity of labor pain in pregnant women from selected hospitals in Tehran, Iran. A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 90 pregnant women referred from selected hospitals in Tehran. Mean age of the participants was 27.82 ± 6.20 years. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups (n = 30) to receive ice massage, acupressure or placebo. The intervention was applied at the Hegu point and pain intensity assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) before the intervention, immediately 30 min and 1 h after the intervention. Comparing pain intensity immediately, 30 min and 1 h post-intervention across the three groups showed a significant difference between the groups. At 30 min post-intervention (p < 0.05). A Tukey test showed this difference was related to ice massage. Ice massage and acupressure techniques reduced pain during labor. However, ice massage provided more persistent pain relief. Due to high levels of pain intensity and increased pain experienced by the women during the active phase of labor, it is suggested that repeating these techniques during the first stage of labor could be an effective, accessible, cost-effective and non-invasive technique to help reduce the intensity of labor pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The psychological effects of aromatherapy-massage in healthy postpartum mothers.

    PubMed

    Imura, Masumi; Misao, Hanako; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of aromatherapy-massage in healthy postpartum mothers. A quasi-experimental between-groups design was used. Mothers who received aromatherapy-massage were compared with a control group who received standard postpartum care. Thirty-six healthy, first-time mothers with vaginal delivery of a full-term, healthy infant participated in this study. Sixteen mothers received a 30-minute aromatherapy-massage on the second postpartum day; 20 mothers were in the control group. All mothers completed the following four standardized questionnaires before and after the intervention: 1) Maternity Blues Scale; 2) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; 3) Profile of Mood States (POMS); and 4) Feeling toward Baby Scale. In the aromatherapy-massage group, posttreatment scores significantly decreased for the Maternity Blues Scale, the State-Anxiety Inventory, and all but one of the Profile of Mood States subscales. Posttreatment scores in the intervention group significantly increased in Profile of Mood States-Vigor subscale and the Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Scores in the intervention group significantly decreased in Conflict Index of Avoidance/Approach Feeling toward Baby subscale. Our results suggest that aromatherapy-massage might be an effective intervention for postpartum mothers to improve physical and mental status and to facilitate mother-infant interaction.

  12. Use of aromatherapy products and increased risk of hand dermatitis in massage therapists.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Glen H; Katz, Kenneth A; Ellis, Elliot; James, William D

    2004-08-01

    To determine the 12-month prevalence of hand dermatitis among massage therapists, to investigate a potential association between hand dermatitis and the use of aromatherapy products, and to study potential associations with other known risk factors for hand dermatitis. Mailed survey. Philadelphia, Pa. Members of a national massage therapy organization who live in the greater Philadelphia region. Self-reported and symptom-based prevalences of hand dermatitis. The number of respondents was 350 (57%). The 12-month prevalence of hand dermatitis in subjects was 15% by self-reported criteria and 23% by a symptom-based method. In multivariate analysis, statistically significant independent risk factors for self-reported hand dermatitis included use of aromatherapy products in massage oils, lotions, or creams (odds ratio, 3.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-7.02; P =.002) and history of atopic dermatitis (odds ratio, 8.06; 95% confidence interval, 3.39-19.17; P<.001). The prevalence of hand dermatitis in massage therapists is high. Significant independent risk factors include use of aromatherapy products in massage oils, creams, or lotions and history of atopic dermatitis.

  13. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep Quality of Nurses on Monthly Rotating Night Shifts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ying; Lin, Chao-Ling; Chang, Li-Yin

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shifts. Subjects were enrolled at a medical center in central Taiwan with overall score ≥ 5 of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and randomly assigned to the treatment or control groups. They were validated by pretests during their first graveyard shift in the trial period and the sleep quality information was collected by using the PSQI and sleep detectors. During the second graveyard shift, the treatment group received aromatherapy massage and the control group rested in the same aromatherapy room after work. All subjects filled out the PSQI surveys and the sleep quality information was collected during massage or resting and the following night. We found that the total PSQI was significantly decreased in the treatment group following the aromatherapy massage. Specifically, the components such as subjective sleep quality, sleep disturbance, and daytime dysfunction were significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes of average PSQI scores between the two groups before and after intervention. Taken together, our study suggested that aromatherapy massage could improve sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shift.

  14. Massage in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy reduces serum cortisol and prolactin.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jacqui; Swindell, Ric; Dennis, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The objective is to identify whether single 20 min massage sessions were safe and effective in reducing stress levels of isolated haematological oncology patients. Based on a randomised controlled trial, 39 patients were randomised to aromatherapy, massage or rest (control) arm. The measures were serum cortisol and prolactin levels, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcome measure was the fall in serum cortisol levels. A significant difference was seen between arms in cortisol (P=0.002) and prolactin (p=0.031) levels from baseline to 30 min post-session. Aromatherapy and massage arms showed a significantly greater drop in cortisol than the rest arm. Only the massage arm had a significantly greater reduction in prolactin then the rest arm. The EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a significant reduction in 'need for rest' for patients in both experimental arms compared with the control arm, whereas the semi-structured interviews identified a universal feeling of relaxation in patients in the experimental arms. This pilot study demonstrated that in isolated haematological oncology patients, a significant reduction in cortisol could be safely achieved through massage, with associated improvement in psychological well-being. The implications are discussed. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep Quality of Nurses on Monthly Rotating Night Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shifts. Subjects were enrolled at a medical center in central Taiwan with overall score ≥ 5 of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and randomly assigned to the treatment or control groups. They were validated by pretests during their first graveyard shift in the trial period and the sleep quality information was collected by using the PSQI and sleep detectors. During the second graveyard shift, the treatment group received aromatherapy massage and the control group rested in the same aromatherapy room after work. All subjects filled out the PSQI surveys and the sleep quality information was collected during massage or resting and the following night. We found that the total PSQI was significantly decreased in the treatment group following the aromatherapy massage. Specifically, the components such as subjective sleep quality, sleep disturbance, and daytime dysfunction were significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes of average PSQI scores between the two groups before and after intervention. Taken together, our study suggested that aromatherapy massage could improve sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shift. PMID:28761497

  16. Aromatherapy Massage for Neuropathic Pain and Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Arikan Donmez, Ayse; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Arslan, Ismail Emre

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on neuropathic pain severity and quality of life (QoL) in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. This open-label randomized controlled clinical study was conducted in a university hospital endocrine outpatient clinic in Turkey. The study sample consisted of 46 patients, randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 21) and a control group (n = 25). The intervention group received aromatherapy massage three times per week for a period of 4 weeks. The control group received only routine care. Data were collected from patients using the Douleur Neuropathique questionnaire, the visual analog scale, and the Neuropathic Pain Impact on Quality of Life questionnaire. Neuropathic pain scores significantly decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group in the fourth week of the study. Similarly, QoL scores significantly improved in the intervention group in the fourth week of the study. Aromatherapy massage is a simple and effective nonpharmacological nursing intervention that can be used to manage neuropathic pain and improve QoL in patients with painful neuropathy. Aromatherapy massage is a well-tolerated, feasible, and safe nonpharmacological method that can be readily integrated into clinical settings by nursing staff. The essential oils rosemary, geranium, lavender, eucalyptus, and chamomile can be safely used by nurses in the clinical setting, if applicable. However, training and experience of nurses in aromatherapy massage is critical to achieving positive results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. The effects measurement of hand massage by the autonomic activity and psychological indicators.

    PubMed

    Kunikata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Kumi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Tanioka, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of hand massage on autonomic activity, anxiety, relaxation and sense of affinity by performing it to healthy people before applying the technic in actual clinical practice. Findings were showed below: 1) the significant increase in the pNN50 and the significant decrease in the heart rate meant the intervention of massage increased the autonomic nervous activity, improved the parasympathetic nerve activity and reduced the sympathetic nerve activity. This means the subjects were considered to be in a state of relaxation. 2) Salivary α amylase has been reported as a possible indicator for sympathetic nerve activity. In this study, there was no significant difference in the salivary α amylase despite a decrease after massage. 3) State anxiety score is temporal situational reactions while being in the state of anxiety and this score decreased significantly after massage. 4) The level of willingness to communicate with other person and the sense of affinity toward the massage-performer had a positive change of 70 percent. From this, it can be considered that a comfortable physical contact between a patient and a nursing profession, who are in a supported-supportive relationship, leads to an effect of shortening the gap in their psychological distance.

  18. The Use of Mixed Methods for Therapeutic Massage Research

    PubMed Central

    Porcino, Antony Joseph; Verhoef, Marja J.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed methods research is the integration of quantitative and qualitative components in a research project. Whether you are reading or designing a mixed methods research project, it is important to be familiar with both qualitative and quantitative research methods and the specific purposes for which they are brought together in a study: triangulation, complementarity, expansion, initiation, or development. In addition, decisions need to be made about the sequencing and the priority or importance of each qualitative and quantitative component relative to the other components, and the point or points at which the various qualitative and quantitative components will be integrated. Mixed methods research is increasingly being recognized for its ability to bring multiple points of view to a research project, taking advantage of the strengths of each of the quantitative and qualitative components to explain or resolve complex phenomena or results. This ability becomes critical when complex healing systems such as therapeutic massage are being studied. Complex healing systems may have multiple physiologic effects, often reflected in changes throughout the patient’s body. Additionally, the patient’s experience of the treatment may be an important outcome. PMID:21589698

  19. Stimulating effect of aromatherapy massage with jasmine oil.

    PubMed

    Hongratanaworakit, Tapanee

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage with jasmine oil (Jasminum sambac L., Oleaceae) on humans. Human autonomic parameters, i.e. blood pressure, pulse rate, blood oxygen saturation, breathing rate, and skin temperature, were recorded as indicators of the arousal level of the autonomic nervous system. In addition, subjects had to rate their emotional condition in terms of relaxation, vigor, calmness, attentiveness, mood, and alertness in order to assess subjective behavioral arousal. Forty healthy volunteers participated in the experiments. Jasmine oil was applied topically to the skin of the abdomen of each subject. Compared with placebo, jasmine oil caused significant increases of breathing rate, blood oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which indicated an increase of autonomic arousal. At the emotional level, subjects in the jasmine oil group rated themselves as more alert, more vigorous and less relaxed than subjects in the control group. This finding suggests an increase of subjective behavioral arousal. In conclusion, our results demonstrated the stimulating/activating effect of jasmine oil and provide evidence for its use in aromatherapy for the relief of depression and uplifting mood in humans.

  20. Risk Behaviors among Asian Women Who Work at Massage Parlors in San Francisco: Perspectives from Masseuses and Owners/Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Oh, Hyun Joo; Wong, Serena; Nguyen, Hongmai

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive, cultural, and contextual factors that influence HIV-related risk behaviors among Asian women who engage in sex work at massage parlors in San Francisco. Focus groups and qualitative interviews were conducted for Vietnamese and Thai masseuses and massage parlor owners/managers. Economic pressure as well as…

  1. Improved Speech Following Parent-Delivered Qigong Massage in Young Children with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Schalock, Mark; Williams, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Qigong massage is an eastern form of massage that can be delivered by western parents to their children with appropriate training and support. It has been shown to improve developmental measures in young children with autism when given daily for five months. A recent trial evaluating its effect on motor development in young children with Down…

  2. A Preliminary Evaluation of a Massage Program for Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused and Their Nonabusing Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lesley; Cheshire, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot evaluation of the Mosac Massage Program, a novel program that uses massage to address some of the difficulties faced by children who have been sexually abused and their nonabusing parents. Interviews were conducted with four participating mothers immediately before and after the program. Benefits…

  3. Improved Speech Following Parent-Delivered Qigong Massage in Young Children with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Schalock, Mark; Williams, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Qigong massage is an eastern form of massage that can be delivered by western parents to their children with appropriate training and support. It has been shown to improve developmental measures in young children with autism when given daily for five months. A recent trial evaluating its effect on motor development in young children with Down…

  4. Massage as adjuvant therapy in the management of post-cesarean pain and anxiety: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Saatsaz, Sussan; Rezaei, Rozita; Alipour, Abbas; Beheshti, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of massage on post-cesarean pain and anxiety. The present single-blind clinical trial was conducted on 156 primiparous women undergone elective cesarean section. The participants were randomly divided into three groups, including a hand and foot massage group, a foot massage group and a control group (n = 52 per group). The patients' intensity of pain, vital signs and anxiety level were measured before, immediately after and 90 min after the massage. A significant reduction was observed in the intensity of pain immediately and 90 min after massage (P < 0.001). Moreover, changes in some of the physiological parameters, including blood pressure and respiration rate, were significant after massage (P < 0.001); however, this change was not significant for pulse rate. A significant reduction was also observed in the level of anxiety (P < 0.001) and a significant increase in the frequency of breastfeeding (P < 0.001) after massage. As an effective nursing intervention presenting no side-effects, hand and foot massage can be helpful in the management of postoperative pain and stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk Behaviors among Asian Women Who Work at Massage Parlors in San Francisco: Perspectives from Masseuses and Owners/Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Oh, Hyun Joo; Wong, Serena; Nguyen, Hongmai

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive, cultural, and contextual factors that influence HIV-related risk behaviors among Asian women who engage in sex work at massage parlors in San Francisco. Focus groups and qualitative interviews were conducted for Vietnamese and Thai masseuses and massage parlor owners/managers. Economic pressure as well as…

  6. A Preliminary Evaluation of a Massage Program for Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused and Their Nonabusing Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Lesley; Cheshire, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot evaluation of the Mosac Massage Program, a novel program that uses massage to address some of the difficulties faced by children who have been sexually abused and their nonabusing parents. Interviews were conducted with four participating mothers immediately before and after the program. Benefits…

  7. Microfluidic Pumps Containing Teflon [Trademark] AF Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Peter; White, Victor; Grunthaner, Frank; Ikeda, Mike; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic pumps and valves based on pneumatically actuated diaphragms made of Teflon AF polymers are being developed for incorporation into laboratory-on-a-chip devices that must perform well over temperature ranges wider than those of prior diaphragm-based microfluidic pumps and valves. Other potential applications include implanted biomedical microfluidic devices, wherein the biocompatability of Teflon AF polymers would be highly advantageous. These pumps and valves have been demonstrated to function stably after cycling through temperatures from -125 to 120 C. These pumps and valves are intended to be successors to similar prior pumps and valves containing diaphragms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [commonly known as silicone rubber]. The PDMS-containing valves ae designed to function stably only within the temperature range from 5 to 80 C. Undesirably, PDMS membranes are somwehat porous and retain water. PDMS is especially unsuitable for use at temperatures below 0 C because the formation of ice crystals increases porosity and introduces microshear.

  8. The effectiveness of massage in therapy for obturator nerve dysfunction as complication of hip joint alloplasty-case report.

    PubMed

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Kurpas, Donata; Wilk, Iwona; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Hyży, Jacek; Andrzejewski, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our case presentation was to reveal effectiveness of medical massage in the therapy for obturator nerve dysfunction as a complication of hip joint alloplasty. Medical massage was carried out in a 58-year-old man after hip joint alloplasty. The aim was to normalize tension of muscle-ligament-fascia apparatus within pelvic girdle and reconstruct correct structural conditions in the course of obturator nerve. The methodology included correct positioning and medical massage with individually designed procedures. Full normalization of muscular tone and subsidence of pain complaints were obtained. Massage has a positive influence on subsidence of pain complaints; however, effectiveness of the procedure depends on an appropriate methodology. The presented massage procedure is an effective therapy in obturator nerve dysfunction as complication after alloplasty and it can be one of elements of complex improvement after surgical joint procedures within the scope of nursing rehabilitation. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  9. HIV risk among Asian women working at massage parlors in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tooru; Operario, Don; Takenaka, Mie; Iwamoto, Mariko; Le, Mai Nhung

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe working conditions, health outcomes, social, and psychological factors related to HIV risk among Asian women who work at massage parlors in San Francisco. We conducted environmental mapping to identify communities and massage parlors where Asian women work as masseuses, and conducted survey interviews with 100 masseuses using venue-based snowball sampling. Difficult work conditions contributed to participants' HIV risk, including multiple sex customers each workday, long working hours, physical and verbal abuse from customers, economic pressures, and poor access to health care. Inconsistent condom use for vaginal sex with customers was positively associated with their fatalistic ideas and weak norms toward practicing safe sex with customers. Interventions should address cultural and occupational contexts in which Asian masseuses engage in sex work, and should focus on altering massage parlor policies and work environments.

  10. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  11. Experiences of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simone S M; Kwong, Alice N L; Wan, Karen W S; Ho, Rosita M L; Chow, Ka Ming

    2017-03-02

    To explore the experiences towards aromatherapy massage use, and to examine the perceived benefits and adverse effects of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients. A qualitative research design was used. Fifteen women with cancer were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Sample recruitment was undertaken through cancer self-help groups and referrals of a private aromatherapy clinic by convenience sampling. The interview data were analysed by thematic analysis. All participants had a positive experience towards aromatherapy massage. The perceived benefits of aromatherapy massage included physical and psychological dimensions: overall comfort, relaxation, reduced pain, muscular tension, lymphoedema and numbness, improved sleep, energy level, appetite and mood. Interestingly, a few participants reported that aromatherapy massage helped to enhance self-acceptance and coping with their altered torso. No adverse effects were reported. The findings focused on four main themes that emerged: (i) an immediate effect that brings all-round comfort and reconnection to daily life; (ii) a pleasurable moment to forget the disease with aroma as a booster; (iii) a pampering experience of being cared for with a sense of dignity preserved; and (iv) communicating with the failing body. This study contributed by providing a better understanding in aromatherapy massage from female cancer patients' perspective which adds to the existing body of knowledge. The implications for nursing practice, education and future research were suggested. Aromatherapy massage seems to have both physical and psychological benefits for women with cancer. The findings elucidated a wide range of benefits that are perceived in such complex intervention, and the contextual factors that may influence these perceived benefits. This will inform future nurse-led quantitative research in the clinical setting. The study highlights the importance of touch towards a caring relationship and the

  12. Assessment of techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of breast engorgement by thermography

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Anita Batista dos Santos; de Moura, Marcos Antônio Muniz; de Souza, Mauren Abreu; Nohama, Percy

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of postpartum breast engorgement through thermography. Method the study was conducted in the Human Milk Bank of a hospital in Curitiba, Brazil. We randomly selected 16 lactating women with engorgement with the classification lobar, ampullary and glandular, moderate and intense. We compared the differential patterns of temperature, before and after the treatment by means of massage and pumping. Results we found a negative gradient of 0.3°C of temperature between the pre- and post-treatment in the experimental group. Breasts with intense engorgement were 0.7°C warmer when compared with moderate engorgement. Conclusion massage and electromechanical pumping were superior to manual methods when evaluated by thermography. REBEC: U1111-1136-9027. PMID:26107836

  13. Effects of Thai Foot Massage on Balance Performance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Material/Methods Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. Results After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25892354

  14. Pain pressure threshold of a muscle tender spot increases following local and non-local rolling massage.

    PubMed

    Aboodarda, S J; Spence, A J; Button, Duane C

    2015-09-28

    The aim of the present study was to determine the acute effect of rolling massage on pressure pain threshold (PPT) in individuals with tender spots in their plantar flexor muscles. In a randomized control trial and single blinded study, tender spots were identified in 150 participants' plantar flexor muscles (gastrocnemius or soleus). Then participants were randomly assigned to one of five intervention groups (n = 30): 1) heavy rolling massage on the calf that exhibited the higher tenderness (Ipsi-R), 2) heavy rolling massage on the contralateral calf (Contra-R), 3) light stroking of the skin with roller massager on the calf that exhibited the higher tenderness (Sham), 4) manual massage on the calf that exhibited the higher tenderness (Ipsi-M) and 5) no intervention (Control). PPT was measured at 30 s and up to 15 min post-intervention via a pressure algometer. At 30 s post-intervention, the Ipsi-R (24 %) and Contra-R (21 %) demonstrated higher (p < 0.03) PPT values compared with Control and Sham. During 15 min post-intervention, PPT was higher (p < 0.05) following Ipsi-R (19.2 %), Contra-R (15.9 %) and Ipsi-M (10.9 %) compared with Control. There was no difference between the effects of three deep tissue massages (Ipsi-R, Ipsi-M and Contra-R) on PPT. Whereas the increased PPT following ipsilateral massage (Ipsi-R and Ipsi-M) might be attributed to the release of fibrous adhesions; the non-localized effect of rolling massage on the contralateral limb suggests that other mechanisms such as a central pain-modulatory system play a role in mediation of perceived pain following brief tissue massage. Overall, rolling massage over a tender spot reduces pain perception. ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT02528812 ), August 19(th), 2015.

  15. The Effect of Head Massage on the Regulation of the Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System: A Pilot Randomized Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Mir Sohail; Pourrahmat, Mir-Masoud; Liu, Mailan; Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a single 10-minute session of Chinese head massage on the activity of the cardiac autonomic nervous system via measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). In this pilot randomized crossover trial, each participant received both head massage and the control intervention in a randomized fashion. The study was conducted at Children's & Women's Health Centre of British Columbia between June and November 2014. Ten otherwise healthy adults (6 men and 4 women) were enrolled in this study. The intervention comprised 10 minutes of head massage therapy (HMT) in a seated position compared with a control intervention of sitting quietly on the same chair with eyes closed for an equal amount of time (no HMT). The primary outcome measures were the main parameters of HRV, including total power (TP), high frequency (HF), HF as a normalized unit, pre-ejection period, and heart rate (HR). A single short session (10 minutes) of head massage demonstrated an increase in TP continuing up to 20 minutes after massage and reaching statistical significance at 10 minutes after massage (relative change from baseline, 66% for HMT versus -6.6% for no HMT; p = 0.017). The effect on HF also peaked up to 10 minutes after massage (59.4% for HMT versus 4% for no HMT; p = 0.139). Receiving head massage also decreased HR by more than three-fold compared to the control intervention. This study shows the potential benefits of head massage by modulating the cardiac autonomic nervous system through an increase in the total variability and a shift toward higher parasympathetic nervous system activity. Randomized controlled trials with larger sample size and multiple sessions of massage are needed to substantiate these findings.

  16. The impact of therapeutic massage on adult residents living with complex and high level disabilities: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Marie; Emery, Helen; Brimelow, Rachel; Wollin, Judy

    2016-10-01

    Research into the effects of touch in disabled adults in residential care remains largely unexplored in the current literature. Evidence suggests however, that massage therapy may improve mood state, including anxiety and stress, reduce pain and improve sleep/wake behavior and fatigue. These benefits are of importance as they have substantial impact on quality of life. This pilot study evaluated the effect of therapeutic massage on the quality of life of adults with complex care needs living in residential care. Participants were recruited from three residential homes (Queensland, Australia) for 18-65 year olds with severe disability. 25 participants were recruited and received a massage program consisting of five weeks of twice weekly massages. Structured interviews were conducted pre-post intervention. Additionally, mood was ascertained preceding and following each massage session. Mood of participants improved markedly immediately following massage session (p < 0.05) and pre-massage mood was observed to increase over the study period. However, pre- and post-intervention measures indicated massage did not improve pain, sleepiness, depression or stress levels or sustain positive mood three days post-intervention. Participants' satisfaction with their current health significantly improved (Z = -2.51, p = 0.012), as did their satisfaction with their current happiness (Z = -2.06, p = 0.04), suggesting that massage therapy offered some improvement in quality of life. The results of this pilot indicates that massage may be of benefit to people living with high care needs and represents a practical innovation providing tactile stimulation that may be integrated into care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modulatory effects of aromatherapy massage intervention on electroencephalogram, psychological assessments, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ji; Cui, Yanji; Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kang, Moon-Seok; Jung, Sung-Cherl; Park, Hyeung Keun; Yeun, Hye-Young; Jang, Won Jung; Lee, Sunjoo; Kwak, Young Sook; Eun, Su-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Aromatherapy massage is commonly used for the stress management of healthy individuals, and also has been often employed as a therapeutic use for pain control and alleviating psychological distress, such as anxiety and depression, in oncological palliative care patients. However, the exact biological basis of aromatherapy massage is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated here the effects of aromatherapy massage interventions on multiple neurobiological indices such as quantitative psychological assessments, electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. A control group without treatment (n = 12) and aromatherapy massage group (n = 13) were randomly recruited. They were all females whose children were diagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and followed up in the Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital. Participants were treated with aromatherapy massage for 40 min twice per week for 4 weeks (8 interventions). A 4-week-aromatherapy massage program significantly improved all psychological assessment scores in the Stat-Trait Anxiety Index, Beck Depression Inventory and Short Form of Psychosocial Well-being Index. Interestingly, plasma BDNF levels were significantly increased after a 4 week-aromatherapy massage program. Alpha-brain wave activities were significantly enhanced and delta wave activities were markedly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment, as shown in the meditation and neurofeedback training. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were significantly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage could exert significant influences on multiple neurobiological indices such as EEG pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma BDNF levels as well as psychological assessments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Roller-Massager Application to the Quadriceps and Knee-Joint Range of Motion and Neuromuscular Efficiency During a Lunge

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Noftall, Jennifer C.; Sullivan, Kathleen M.; Behm, David G.; Power, Kevin E.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Roller massagers are used as a recovery and rehabilitative tool to initiate muscle relaxation and improve range of motion (ROM) and muscular performance. However, research demonstrating such effects is lacking. Objective: To determine the effects of applying a roller massager for 20 and 60 seconds on knee-joint ROM and dynamic muscular performance. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten recreationally active men (age = 26.6 ± 5.2 years, height = 175.3 ± 4.3 cm, mass = 84.4 ± 8.8 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 3 randomized experimental conditions separated by 24 to 48 hours. In condition 1 (5 repetitions of 20 seconds) and condition 2 (5 repetitions of 60 seconds), they applied a roller massager to the quadriceps muscles. Condition 3 served as a control condition in which participants sat quietly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Visual analog pain scale, electromyography (EMG) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris during roller massage and lunge, and knee-joint ROM. Results: We found no differences in pain between the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions. During 60 seconds of roller massage, pain was 13.5% (5.7 ± 0.70) and 20.6% (6.2 ± 0.70) greater at 40 seconds and 60 seconds, respectively, than at 20 seconds (P < .05). During roller massage, VL and biceps femoris root mean square (RMS) EMG was 8% and 7%, respectively, of RMS EMG recorded during maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Knee-joint ROM was 10% and 16% greater in the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions, respectively, than the control condition (P < .05). Finally, average lunge VL RMS EMG decreased as roller-massage time increased (P < .05). Conclusions: Roller massage was painful and induced muscle activity, but it increased knee-joint ROM and neuromuscular efficiency during a lunge. PMID:25415414

  19. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009) PMID:23035641

  20. Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Dose-Finding Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Adam I.; Ali, Ather; Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Hom, David; Davidi, Anna; Gould-Fogerite, Susan; Milak, Carl; Katz, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Background In a previous trial of massage for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, we demonstrated feasibility, safety and possible efficacy, with benefits that persisted at least 8 weeks beyond treatment termination. Methods We performed a RCT to identify the optimal dose of massage within an 8-week treatment regimen and to further examine durability of response. Participants were 125 adults with OA of the knee, randomized to one of four 8-week regimens of a standardized Swedish massage regimen (30 or 60 min weekly or biweekly) or to a Usual Care control. Outcomes included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), visual analog pain scale, range of motion, and time to walk 50 feet, assessed at baseline, 8-, 16-, and 24-weeks. Results WOMAC Global scores improved significantly (24.0 points, 95% CI ranged from 15.3–32.7) in the 60-minute massage groups compared to Usual Care (6.3 points, 95% CI 0.1–12.8) at the primary endpoint of 8-weeks. WOMAC subscales of pain and functionality, as well as the visual analog pain scale also demonstrated significant improvements in the 60-minute doses compared to usual care. No significant differences were seen in range of motion at 8-weeks, and no significant effects were seen in any outcome measure at 24-weeks compared to usual care. A dose-response curve based on WOMAC Global scores shows increasing effect with greater total time of massage, but with a plateau at the 60-minute/week dose. Conclusion Given the superior convenience of a once-weekly protocol, cost savings, and consistency with a typical real-world massage protocol, the 60-minute once weekly dose was determined to be optimal, establishing a standard for future trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00970008 PMID:22347369

  1. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic back pain by acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Deyo, Richard A; Erro, Janet H; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2006-01-01

    To describe the diagnostic and therapeutic content of visits for chronic back pain to acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists. Randomly selected acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists in two states were surveyed, and then eligible providers collected data on consecutive patient visits. The authors analyzed information on diagnosis, treatment, and self-care recommendations for chronic back pain patients collected during consecutive patient visits to these complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers. Back pain was the most common reason for visits to each of these providers, with chronic back pain representing about 10% of visits to acupuncturists, 20% of visits to chiropractors, and 12% of visits to massage therapists. Diagnosis by acupuncturists included traditional questioning and inspecting the patient as well as pulse and tongue assessment and palpation of the acupuncture meridians. Treatments usually included acupuncture needling, heat of some sort, and other modalities, such as East Asian massage, herbs, and/or cupping (application of suction cups to the skin). Lifestyle recommendations were common, particularly exercise and dietary counseling. Visits to chiropractors usually included spinal and muscle/soft tissue examinations and spinal manipulation. Soft tissue techniques (eg, "active release"), stretch or strength training, and home exercise recommendations were much less common. Massage therapists usually performed a tissue assessment and commonly assessed range of motion. They emphasized Swedish, deep tissue, and trigger point massage techniques and usually made self-care recommendations, particularly increased water intake, hot/cold therapy, exercise, and body awareness. Information on the care patients routinely receive from CAM providers will help physicians better understand these increasingly popular forms of care.

  2. Massage Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-hui; Wang, Feng-yun; Feng, Chun-qing; Yang, Xia-feng; Sun, Yi-hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM), the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. Objective The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. Methods Electronic databases (up to June 2013) were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I2 statistic. Results Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03), anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01), and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005) in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI −0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52). Conclusion Massage therapy with duration ≥5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings. PMID:24586677

  3. Traditional Massage of Newborns in Nepal: Implications for Trials of Improved Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Luke C.; Darmstadt, Gary L.; Khatry, Subarna K.; Tielsch, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Mustard oil massage of newborns is an integral component of traditional care practices in many communities. Recent evidence suggests that this practice may have detrimental effects, particularly for preterm infants or for those whose skin barrier function is otherwise sub-optimal. Other natural oils such as sunflower, sesame or safflower seed oil may have a beneficial impact on newborn health and survival. Little is known, however, about cultural and other factors related to the acceptance and uptake of alternative, more beneficial oils for massage of the newborn. A questionnaire concerning the usage and reasons for application of mustard and other oils to newborn skin was administered to the caretakers of 8580 newborns in Sarlahi district of rural Nepal. Four focus group discussions among representative groups were conducted to describe the perceived benefits of oil massage and the factors involved in the decision to apply oil. The potential for the introduction of alternative natural oils was explored. Approximately 99 per cent of newborns were massaged at least once with mustard oil in the 2 weeks after birth, and 80 per cent were massaged at least twice daily. Promotion of strength, maintenance of health, and provision of warmth were the most commonly cited reasons for application of mustard oil. Focus group discussion participants noted that smell, oiliness, mode of pre-massage preparation, and perceived absorptive potential on the skin are important contextual factors involved in the practice. Caretakers are willing to consider adaptation of established traditions for the promotion of positive health outcomes if essential contextual criteria are met. An understanding of cultural, social, and economic factors that shape the context of traditional healthcare practices is essential to the design and implementation of intervention trials examining the relative efficacy of application of oils in reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity. PMID:15677372

  4. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-hui; Wang, Feng-yun; Feng, Chun-qing; Yang, Xia-feng; Sun, Yi-hua

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM), the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. Electronic databases (up to June 2013) were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I(2) statistic. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03), anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01), and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005) in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI -0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52). Massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  5. AF-GEOSPACE Version 2.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Ginet, G. P.; Hall, T.; Holeman, E.; Madden, D.; Tautz, M.; Roth, C.

    2004-05-01

    AF-GEOSpace is a graphics-intensive software program with space environment models and applications developed and distributed by the Space Weather Center of Excellence at AFRL. A review of current (Version 2.0) and planned (Version 2.1) AF-GEOSpace capabilities will be given. A wide range of physical domains is represented enabling the software to address such things as solar disturbance propagation, radiation belt configuration, and ionospheric auroral particle precipitation and scintillation. The software is currently being used to aid with the design, operation, and simulation of a wide variety of communications, navigation, and surveillance systems. Building on the success of previous releases, AF-GEOSpace has become a platform for the rapid prototyping of automated operational and simulation space weather visualization products and helps with a variety of tasks, including: orbit specification for radiation hazard avoidance; satellite design assessment and post-event anomaly analysis; solar disturbance effects forecasting; frequency and antenna management for radar and HF communications; determination of link outage regions for active ionospheric conditions; scientific model validation and comparison, physics research, and education. Version 2.0 provided a simplified graphical user interface, improved science and application modules, and significantly enhanced graphical performance. Common input data archive sets, application modules, and 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D visualization tools are provided to all models. Dynamic capabilities permit multiple environments to be generated at user-specified time intervals while animation tools enable displays such as satellite orbits and environment data together as a function of time. Building on the existing Version 2.0 software architecture, AF-GEOSpace Version 2.1 is currently under development and will include a host of new modules to provide, for example, geosynchronous charged particle fluxes, neutral atmosphere densities

  6. Aromatherapy massage for joint pain and constipation in a patient with Guillian Barré.

    PubMed

    Shirreffs, C M

    2001-05-01

    The following case study will look at the efficacy of aromatherapy massage in a patient diagnosed with Guillian Barré Syndrome admitted to an IntensiveTherapy Unit. The pathophysiology of this disorder will be discussed, medical treatment will be outlined and adjuncts to conventional nursing care will be presented. Aromatherapy massage was used to complement the conventional nursing and medical treatment of joint pain and constipation. The Mead Model for nursing care was used for assessment and the plan of care devised from this. Evaluation of outcomes were incorporated into the implementation protocol to ensure positive outcomes were achieved.

  7. Investigating the Short-term Effect of Eyelid Massage on Corneal Topography.

    PubMed

    Riede-Pult, Britta H; Evans, Katharine; Pult, Heiko

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effect of eyelid massage, after the use of warm compresses, on corneal topography. Corneal topography was evaluated on 20 subjects (mean age, 47.0 [SD ±17.3] years) using the Oculus Keratograph (Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany). Corneal eccentricity (Epsilon) was compared between topography measurements before eyelid warming (using warm compresses) (T1), after eyelid warming (T2), directly after eyelid massage (T3), and 30 minutes after eyelid massage (T4). Differences in corneal eccentricity between the enrolment measurement (T1) and consecutive measurements (T1-4) were analyzed. The contralateral eye-treated by warm compresses, but not by eyelid massage-was the control. Visual acuity (decimal), bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal staining (Cornea and Contact Lens Research Unit grading scale) were evaluated at T1 and T4 to assess clinical safety. No significant differences were found between consecutive eccentricity measurements overall and with the central radii (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P > .238 (massaged eyelid: Epsilon T1: 0.48 [95% confidence interval, ±0.07], T2: 0.49 [±0.05], T3: 0.49 [±0.06], T4: 0.48 [±0.06]; horizontal radii T1: 7.76 [±0.13] mm, T2: 7.74 [±0.13] mm, T3: 7.75 [±0.13] mm, T4: 7.76 [±0.13] mm; vertical radii T1: 7.56 [±0.12] mm, T2: 7.55 [±0.10] mm, T3: 7.54 [±0.10] mm, T4: 7.58 [±0.11] mm). Decimal visual acuity significantly improved at the end of the study (massaged eyelid: T1: 1.1 [±0.1]; T4: 1.3 [±0.1]; P < .032). No significant differences were detected between the consecutive evaluation of corneal staining (Wilcoxon test; P > .285). Redness was not significantly different between time points (repeated-measures analysis of variance; P = .187) in the colateral eyes. Hyperemia was significantly reduced in the massaged eyes (T1: 2.0 grade units [±0.3]; T4: 1.9 [±0.3]; P = .021). Eyelid warming followed by eyelid massage appears to be a safe procedure

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Effect of Rolling Massage on Particle Moving Behaviour in Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Fan, Li-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Yan-Yan

    2008-09-01

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here the effect of the rolling massage on the particle moving property in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the particle moving behaviour depends on the rolling velocity, the distance between particle position and rolling position. The average values, including particle translational velocity and angular velocity, increase as the rolling velocity increases almost linearly. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  9. Randomized Controlled Trials of Pediatric Massage: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    The existing reviews of massage therapy (MT) research are either limited to infants, adults, or were conducted prior to the publication of the most recent studies using pediatric samples. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of pediatric MT are reviewed. A literature search yielded 24 RCTs of pediatric MT, defined as the manual manipulation of soft tissue intended to promote health and well-being in recipients between 2 and 19 years of age. Because RCTs of pediatric MT varied considerably in the amount and types of data reported, quantitative and narrative review methods were both used. Single-dose and multiple-dose effects were examined separately. Among single-dose effects, significant reductions of state anxiety were observed at the first session (g = 0.59, P < 0.05) and the last session (g = 1.10, P < 0.01) of a course of treatment. Effects for salivary cortisol (g = 0.28), negative mood (g = 0.52) and behavior (g = 0.37) were non-significant. Three of eleven multiple-dose effects were statistically significant. These were trait anxiety (g = 0.94, P < 0.05), muscle tone (g = 0.90, P < 0.01) and arthritis pain (g = 1.33, P < 0.01). Results of studies not permitting effect size calculation were judged to be generally consistent with quantitative results. MT benefits pediatric recipients, though not as universally as sometimes reported. Numerous weaknesses endemic to MT research (e.g. low statistical power, frequent failure to report basic descriptive statistics) are identified, and recommendations for future pediatric MT research are discussed. PMID:17342238

  10. Exploring the Nature of Therapeutic Massage Bodywork Practice

    PubMed Central

    Porcino, Antony J.; Boon, Heather S.; Page, Stacey A.; Verhoef, Marja J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on therapeutic massage bodywork (TMB) continues to expand, but few studies consider how research or knowledge translation may be affected by the lack of uniformly standardized competencies for most TMB therapies, by practitioner variability from training in different forms of TMB, or from the effects of experience on practice. Purpose This study explores and describes how TMB practitioners practice, for the purpose of improving TMB training, practice, and research. Participants & Setting 19 TMB practitioners trained in multiple TMB therapies, in Alberta, Canada. Research Design Qualitative descriptive sub-analysis of interviews from a comprehensive project on the training and practice of TMB, focused on the delivery of TMB therapies in practice. Results Two broad themes emerged from the data: (1) every treatment is individualized, and (2) each practitioner’s practice of TMB therapies evolves. Individualization involves adapting treatment to the needs of the patient in the moment, based on deliberate and unconscious responses to verbal and nonverbal cues. Individualization starts with initial assessment and continues throughout the treatment encounter. Expertise is depicted as more nuanced and skilful individualization and treatment, evolved through experience, ongoing training, and spontaneous technique exploration. Practitioners consider such individualization and development of experience desirable. Furthermore, ongoing training and experience result in therapy application unique to each practitioner. Most practitioners believed they could not apply a TMB therapy without influence from other TMB therapies they had learned. Conclusions There are ramifications for research design, knowledge translation, and education. Few practitioners are likely able to administer treatments in the same way, and most would not like to practice without being able to individualize treatment. TMB clinical studies need to employ research methods that accommodate

  11. Massage treatment and medial tibial stress syndrome; A commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    As students and practitioners we are taught about the treatment and causative factors of medial shin pain, in particular' shin splints' or the more recent term; medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). During the years there have been many theories, conjecture and misunderstandings about the mechanisms of 'shin splints/medial tibial stress syndrome' however the ramifications of these mechanisms on how massage treatment is delivered have not being discussed. The evidence for the treatment of MTSS is largely clinical with little evidence of any treatment being proven to be effective in treating MTSS. The aim of this article is to present a summary of the mechanisms of MTSS and a commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS based on these mechanisms.

  12. Therapeutic effects of massage therapy and handling touch on caregivers of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Rexilius, Stephanie J; Mundt, Carla; Erickson Megel, Mary; Agrawal, Sangeeta

    2002-04-01

    To examine the effect of massage therapy and Healing Touch on anxiety, depression, subjective caregiver burden, and fatigue experienced by caregivers of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Quasi-experimental repeated measures. Oncology/hematology outpatient clinic in a large midwestern city. 36 caregivers: 13 in the control group, 13 in the massage therapy group, and 10 in the Healing Touch group. Average age was 51.5 years; most participants were Caucasian. All caregivers completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Subjective Burden Scale, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20 before and after treatment consisting of two 30-minute massages or Healing Touch treatments per week for three weeks. Caregivers in the control group received usual nursing care and a 10-minute supportive visit from one of the researchers. Anxiety, depression, subjective burden, fatigue, Healing Touch, massage therapy. Results showed significant declines in anxiety scores, depression, general fatigue, reduced motivation fatigue, and emotional fatigue for individuals in the massage therapy group only. In the Healing Touch group, anxiety and depression scores decreased, and fatigue and subjective burden increased, but these changes did not achieve statistical significance. Caregivers can benefit from massage therapy in the clinic setting. Oncology nurses care for both patients and their caregivers. Although some transplant programs provide services to support lay caregivers, studies indicate that these individuals continue to feel stressed by their situation. Massage might be one intervention that can be used by nurses to decrease feelings of stress in patients' caregivers.

  13. Effects of foot massage applied 2 different methods on symptom control in colorectal cancer patients: Randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Neşe; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç; Uğur, Işıl

    2017-02-07

    This randomized controlled clinical study aimed to determine the effect of 2 foot massage methods on symptom control in people with colorectal cancer who received chemoradiotherapy. Data were collected between June 16, 2015, and February 10, 2016, in the Department of Radiation Oncology of an oncology training and research hospital. The sample comprised 60 participants. Data were collected using an introductory information form, common terminology criteria for adverse events and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires C30 and CR29. Participants were randomly allocated to 3 groups: classical foot massage, reflexology, and standard care control. The classical massage group received foot massage using classical massage techniques, and the reflexology group received foot reflexology focusing on symptom-oriented reflexes twice a week during a 5-week chemoradiotherapy treatment schedule. The control group received neither classical massage nor reflexology. All patients were provided with the same clinic routine care. The classical massage was effective in reducing pain level and distension incidence while foot reflexology was effective in reducing pain and fatigue level, lowering incidence of distension and urinary frequency and improving life quality.

  14. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bervoets, Diederik C; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Alessie, Jeroen J N; Buijs, Martijn J; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-07-01

    Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. People with musculoskeletal disorders. Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues) as a stand-alone intervention. The primary outcomes were pain and function. The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579) per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of the Effect of Massage Therapy and Isometric Exercises on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Azima, Sara; Bakhshayesh, Hajar Rajaei; Kaviani, Maasumeh; Abbasnia, Keramatallah; Sayadi, Mehrab

    2015-12-01

    Dysmenorrhea is the most common cyclic pelvic pain, and it affects the quality of life of many women. We sought to compare the effects of massage and isometric exercises on primary dysmenorrhea. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at the dormitories of Shiraz University among 102 students with primary dysmenorrheal. The student groups were randomly divided into massage, isometric exercises, and control groups. The first group received 2 consecutive cycles of effleurage massage with lavender oil. The second group had 8 weeks of isometric exercises. No intervention was performed for the control group. Pain intensity was measured and recorded by using a visual analog scale. In addition, the duration of pain was measured in hours, and Spielberger's questionnaire was used to measure the anxiety level. Pain intensity had significantly reduced in the massage and exercises groups; the reduction was more significant in the massage group (P < .001). The results revealed a significant difference among the 3 groups in regard to the mean duration of pain after the third cycle (P = .006). However, no significant difference was found among the 3 groups concerning the mean level of anxiety. The results of intragroup comparisons only showed a significant reduction of anxiety level in the massage group after the third cycle (P = .017). Based on the present findings, it seems that massage therapy and isometric exercises were effective in reducing some symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy and Safety of Using Oil Massage to Promote Infant Growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiwen; Zhong, Qingling; Tang, Longhua

    2016-01-01

    The synthesizing evidence on the effectiveness of using oil massage to promote the growth of infants is still lacking. This paper aims to determine whether oil massage can promote the physical and neurobehavioral growth of infants according to variables and to evaluate whether oil massage is safe for infant skin. The randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials and quasi-experimentally designed trials published prior to or in 2014 were searched according to predetermined inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria in Medline, PubMed, Ovid, the Cochran Library, and Chinese databases, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan Fang database and VIP journal integration platform. Besides, the grey lectures were searched as well through Open Grey, GrayLIT Network and Clinical Trials.gov. Eight studies out of 625 retrieved articles were eligible for inclusion. Oil massage increased the infant weights, lengths and head circumferences. However, it did not promote a significant advantage in neurobehavioral scores or cause a significant risk of adverse skin reactions. The core mechanisms and standard procedures of oil massage as well as the preferred oil type should be the focus of future nursing practice and research. Oil massage may effectively improve the physical growth of infants, and it presents a limited risk of adverse skin reactions. However, the relationship between neurodevelopment and oil massage requires further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [The Effectiveness of Abdominal Massage on Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Jung; Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic bowel dysfunction is a common comorbidity in spinal cord injury patients that may result in fecal incontinence. Abdominal massage is one intestinal training method that is used to improve bowel movement and defecation. To review the effectiveness of abdominal massage on neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. A systematic review of Chinese and English-language articles was performed in six databases using the following key words: spinal cord injury, abdominal massage, neurogenic bowel dysfunction, and bowel training. Relevant studies published prior to June 2016 that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected. The Downs and Black scale was used to appraise the quality of each of the included studies. Eight studies were included in the final analysis. Four of these studies indicated that abdominal massage significantly improved bowel functions and the regularity and frequency of bowel movements. Although two of the studies indicated that abdominal massage significantly reduced the use of glycerin and laxatives, the remaining six did not. The eight studies earned respective quality scores ranging between 13 and 25. The current literature lacks consensus on the efficacy of abdominal massage in terms of improving bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injuries. Future studies should use more stringent experimental designs such as randomized controlled studies to explore the correlations among massage time and frequency and bowel function improvements in order to provide guidelines for clinical care applications.

  18. Aromatherapy massage on the abdomen for alleviating menstrual pain in high school girls: a preliminary controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo; Seong, Ka-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the alleviating effects of aromatherapy massage and acetaminophen on menstrual pain in Korean high school girls. Subjects were divided into two groups: the aromatherapy massage (treatment) group (n = 32) and the acetaminophen (control) group (n = 23). Aromatherapy massage was performed on subjects in the treatment group. The abdomen was massaged once using clary sage, marjoram, cinnamon, ginger, and geranium in a base of almond oil. The level of menstrual pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at baseline and twenty-four hours afterward. The reduction of menstrual pain was significantly higher in the aromatherapy group than in the acetaminophen group. Using multiple regression, aromatherapy massage was found to be more highly associated with reduction in the level of menstrual pain than acetaminophen. These finding suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment for menstrual pain in high school girls. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects derived from the aromatherapy, the massage, or both. Further rigorous studies should be conducted using more objective measures.

  19. [Effects of aroma hand massage on pain, state anxiety and depression in hospice patients with terminal cancer].

    PubMed

    Chang, So Young

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of aroma hand massage on pain, state anxiety and depression in hospice patients with terminal cancer. This study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects were 58 hospice patients with terminal cancer who were hospitalized. Twenty eight hospice patients with terminal cancer were assigned to the experimental group (aroma hand massage), and 30 hospice patients with terminal cancer were assigned to the control group (general oil hand massage). As for the experimental treatment, the experimental group went through aroma hand massage on each hand for 5 min for 7 days with blended oil-a mixture of Bergamot, Lavender, and Frankincense in the ratio of 1:1:1, which was diluted 1.5% with sweet almond carrier oil 50 ml. The control group went through general oil hand massage by only sweet almond carrier oil-on each hand for 5 min for 7 days. The aroma hand massage experimental group showed more significant differences in the changes of pain score (t=-3.52, p=.001) and depression (t=-8.99, p=.000) than the control group. Aroma hand massage had a positive effect on pain and depression in hospice patients with terminal cancer.

  20. Does postoperative 'M' technique massage with or without mandarin oil reduce infants' distress after major craniofacial surgery?

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marjan; Lucas, Cees; Bredero, Hansje; van Adrichem, Leon; Tibboel, Dick; van Dijk, Monique

    2012-08-01

    This article is a report of a randomized controlled trial of the effects of 'M' technique massage with or without mandarin oil compared to standard postoperative care on infants' levels of pain and distress, heart rate and mean arterial pressure after major craniofacial surgery. There is a growing interest in non-pharmacological interventions such as aromatherapy massage in hospitalized children to relieve pain and distress but well performed studies are lacking. This randomized controlled trial allocated 60 children aged 3-36 months after craniofacial surgery from January 2008 to August 2009 to one of three conditions; 'M' technique massage with carrier oil, 'M' technique massage with mandarin oil or standard postoperative care. Primary outcome measures were changes in COMFORT behaviour scores, Numeric Rating Scale pain and Numeric Rating Scale distress scores assessed from videotape by an observer blinded for the condition. In all three groups, the mean postintervention COMFORT behaviour scores were higher than the baseline scores, but differences were not statistically significant. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure showed a statistically significant change across the three assessment periods in all three groups. These changes were not related with the intervention. Results do not support a benefit of 'M' technique massage with or without mandarin oil in these young postoperative patients. Several reasons may account for this: massage given too soon after general anaesthesia, young patients' fear of strangers touching them, patients not used to massage. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Aromatherapy Massage on the Abdomen for Alleviating Menstrual Pain in High School Girls: A Preliminary Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo; Seong, Ka-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the alleviating effects of aromatherapy massage and acetaminophen on menstrual pain in Korean high school girls. Subjects were divided into two groups: the aromatherapy massage (treatment) group (n = 32) and the acetaminophen (control) group (n = 23). Aromatherapy massage was performed on subjects in the treatment group. The abdomen was massaged once using clary sage, marjoram, cinnamon, ginger, and geranium in a base of almond oil. The level of menstrual pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at baseline and twenty-four hours afterward. The reduction of menstrual pain was significantly higher in the aromatherapy group than in the acetaminophen group. Using multiple regression, aromatherapy massage was found to be more highly associated with reduction in the level of menstrual pain than acetaminophen. These finding suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment for menstrual pain in high school girls. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects derived from the aromatherapy, the massage, or both. Further rigorous studies should be conducted using more objective measures. PMID:21949670

  2. Coaxially electrospun PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats with superhydrophobic properties.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Palanikkumaran; Hsu, Shu-Hau; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2010-08-03

    This work reports the coaxial electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-Teflon amorphous fluoropolymer (AF) and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath nanofiber mats yielding superhydrophobic properties. The coaxial electrospinning configuration allows for the electrospinning of Teflon AF, a nonelectrospinnable polymer, with the help of an electrospinnable PVDF polymer. PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath fibers have been found to a have mean fiber diameter ranging from 400 nm to less than 100 nm. TEM micrographs exhibit a typical core-sheath fiber structure for these fibers, where the sheath fiber coats the core fiber almost thoroughly. Water contact angle measurements by sessile drop method on these core-sheath nanofiber mats exhibited superhydrophobic characteristics with contact angles close to or higher than 150 degrees. Surprisingly, PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF nanofiber mat surface properties were dominated by the fiber dimensions and less influenced by the type of sheath polymer. This suggests that highly fluorinated polymer Teflon AF does not advance the hydrophobicity beyond what surface physics and slightly fluorinated polymer PVDF can achieve. It is concluded that PVDF-Teflon AF and Teflon AF-PVDF core-sheath electrospun nanofiber mats may be used in lithium (Li)-air batteries.

  3. Leg massage therapy promotes psychological relaxation and reinforces the first-line host defense in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Noto, Yuka; Kitajima, Maiko; Kudo, Mihoko; Okudera, Koichi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Patients with cancer suffer a wide range of physical symptoms coupled with psychological stress. Moreover, cancer chemotherapy induces immunosuppression and consequently causes respiratory infections. Massage therapy has been reported to reduce symptoms in cancer patients via an increase in psychosocial relaxation and to enhance and/or improve immune function. In the present study, we determined whether leg massage could induce psychosocial relaxation and activate the first line of the host defense system. To assess effects of rest and leg massage, 15 healthy volunteers rested on a bed for 20 min on the first day, and 3 days later the subjects received a standardized massage of the legs for 20 min with nonaromatic oil. Twenty-nine cancer patients also received the same standardized massage of the legs. Anxiety/stress was assessed before and just after the rest or the massage using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and visual analogue scale (VAS). To evaluate oral immune function, salivary chromogranin A (CgA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels were measured. In healthy volunteers, rest significantly reduced VAS by 34% and increased sIgA by 61%. In contrast, leg massage significantly reduced both STAI-s and VAS by 24% and 63%, and increased both sIgA and CgA by 104% and 90%, respectively. In cancer patients, leg massage significantly decreased both STAI-s and VAS by 16% and 38%, and increased both salivary CgA and sIgA by 33% and 35%, respectively. Leg massage may promote psychosocial relaxation and reinforce a first-line host defense with an increase in secretion of antimicrobial peptides.

  4. Standardized Scalp Massage Results in Increased Hair Thickness by Inducing Stretching Forces to Dermal Papilla Cells in the Subcutaneous Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Hama, Takanori; Murakami, Kasumi; Ogawa, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we evaluated the effect of scalp massage on hair in Japanese males and the effect of stretching forces on human dermal papilla cells in vitro. Methods: Nine healthy men received 4 minutes of standardized scalp massage per day for 24 weeks using a scalp massage device. Total hair number, hair thickness, and hair growth rate were evaluated. The mechanical effect of scalp massage on subcutaneous tissue was analyzed using a finite element method. To evaluate the effect of mechanical forces, human dermal papilla cells were cultured using a 72-hour stretching cycle. Gene expression change was analyzed using DNA microarray analyses. In addition, expression of hair cycle-related genes including IL6, NOGGIN, BMP4, and SMAD4 were evaluated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Standardized scalp massage resulted in increased hair thickness 24 weeks after initiation of massage (0.085 ± 0.003 mm vs 0.092 ± 0.001 mm). Finite element method showed that scalp massage caused z-direction displacement and von Mises stress on subcutaneous tissue. In vitro, DNA microarray showed gene expression change significantly compared with nonstretching human dermal papilla cells. A total of 2655 genes were upregulated and 2823 genes were downregulated. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated increased expression of hair cycle–related genes such as NOGGIN, BMP4, SMAD4, and IL6ST and decrease in hair loss–related genes such as IL6. Conclusions: Stretching forces result in changes in gene expression in human dermal papilla cells. Standardized scalp massage is a way to transmit mechanical stress to human dermal papilla cells in subcutaneous tissue. Hair thickness was shown to increase with standardized scalp massage. PMID:26904154

  5. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women☆

    PubMed Central

    Hachul, H.; Oliveira, D.S.; Bittencourt, L.R.A.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.

    2014-01-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research. PMID:26483913

  6. Trait Anxiety among Japanese Massage Practitioners with Visual Impairment: What Is Required in Japanese Rehabilitation Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Munakata, Tsunetsugu

    2009-01-01

    This questionnaire-based study of Japanese massage practitioners with visual impairment (n = 155, 126 males, 29 females, mean age = 41 years) found that measures of self-repression, helplessness and "daily hassles" were positively correlated to measures of trait anxiety. Also, trait anxiety was negatively associated with measures of…

  7. Evaluation of the Massage in Schools Programme in One Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Lesley J.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the potential benefits of the Massage in Schools Programme (MISP), a programme originating in Scandinavia, which has been introduced into schools in the United Kingdom (UK) since 2001. Meeting four out of five outcomes of the Every Child Matters agenda, the review of the literature aims to separate anecdotal and media…

  8. Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises for nonspecific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Guangmin; Liu, Yuanmei

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises on nonspecific low back pain. In the prospective study, ninety-two participants with nonspecific low back pain were divided into experimental and control group at random, and 46 in each. The experimental group were treated using Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises, while the control group were treated using Chinese massage alone. The two groups were evaluated using visual analog scale and Oswestry disability index at baseline, immediately after two and eight weeks. In addition, the recurrence rate of nonspecific low back pain was evaluated one year after the last intervention. Two weeks after treatment, both VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in two groups (p<0.05), when compared with the values before treatment, but no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Eight weeks later, the VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in both groups (p<0.05); at the same time, both VAS and ODI scores were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the experimental group than those in the control group. At the final follow-up, five cases recurred in the experimental group and nineteen cases in the control group, the control group has a significantly higher recurrence rate (p<0.05). Core stability exercises can improve the therapeutic effect of Chinese massage in treating nonspecific low back pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; de Souza, Talita Pavarini Borges; Takiguchi, Raymond Sehiji; Kuba, Gisele; Nagumo, Marisa Toshi

    2016-01-01

    ABTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of massage and reiki in the reduction of stress and anxiety in clients at the Institute for Integrated and Oriental Therapy in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Method: clinical tests randomly done in parallel with an initial sample of 122 people divided into three groups: Massage + Rest (G1), Massage + Reiki (G2) and a Control group without intervention (G3). The Stress Systems list and the Trace State Anxiety Inventory were used to evaluate the groups at the start and after 8 sessions (1 month), during 2015. Results: there were statistical differences (p = 0.000) according to the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) for the stress amongst the groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.014) with a 33% reductions and a Cohen of 0.78. In relation to anxiety-state, there was a reduction in the intervention groups compared with the control group (p < 0.01) with a 21% reduction in group 2 (Cohen of 1.18) and a 16% reduction for group 1 (Cohen of 1.14). Conclusion: Massage + Reiki produced better results amongst the groups and the conclusion is for further studies to be done with the use of a placebo group to evaluate the impact of the technique separate from other techniques. RBR-42c8wp PMID:27901219

  10. Massage--the scientific basis of an ancient art: Part 1. The techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Goats, G C

    1994-01-01

    Manual massage is a long established and effective therapy used for the relief of pain, swelling, muscle spasm and restricted movement. Latterly, various mechanical methods have appeared to complement the traditional manual techniques. Both manual and mechanical techniques are described systematically, together with a review of indications for use in sports medicine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8000809

  11. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hachul, H; Oliveira, D S; Bittencourt, L R A; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2014-06-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research.

  12. Benefits of Combining Massage Therapy with Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy in Prenatally Depressed Women

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Deeds, Osvelia; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Gauler, Andy; Sullivan, Susan; Wilson, Donna; Nearing, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    One hundred twelve pregnant women who were diagnosed depressed were randomly assigned to a group who received group Interpersonal Psychotherapy or to a group who received both group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and massage therapy. The group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (one hour sessions) and massage therapy (30 minute sessions) were held once per week for six weeks. The data suggested that the group who received psychotherapy plus massage attended more sessions on average, and a greater percentage of that group completed the six-week program. The group who received both therapies also showed a greater decrease in depression, depressed affect and somatic-vegetative symptom scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a greater decrease in anxiety scale (STAI) scores and a greater decrease in cortisol levels. The group therapy process appeared to be effective for both groups as suggested by the increased expression of both positive and negative affect and relatedness during the group therapy sessions. Thus, the data highlight the effectiveness of group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and particularly when combined with massage therapy for reducing prenatal depression. PMID:19761951

  13. Case Study: The Use of Massage Therapy to Relieve Chronic Low-Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of massage on chronic low-back pain in a patient with four different diagnoses: osteoarthritis, scoliosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. The patient’s goal was to cut down on the amount of pain medication he takes. Methods A 63-year-old man with chronic back pain received four massages across a twenty-day period. Progress was recorded using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale, as he self-reported on levels of pain and interference with his activities of daily living. Results Improvement was noted in 9 out of 10 measurements of self-reported pain and activities of daily living, with the only exception being his ability to lift heavy objects, which remained unchanged. The most dramatic differences were improvements in his ability to walk, and in the changing degrees of pain. The client also self-reported being able to decrease his pain medication and the ability to ride his bicycle for the first time in years. Conclusions Massage therapy is a promising treatment for chronic low-back pain for patients who may have multiple pathologies, any one of which could be responsible for the condition. Further study is encouraged to determine the efficacy of massage therapy as a readily accessible, lower-cost alternative to more invasive therapies and as an adjunct to regular medical care, when appropriate. PMID:27648110

  14. Extracorporeal abdominal massage may help prevent recurrent bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naohito; Hamaya, Sae; Tatsuta, Miwa; Nakatsu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective, but recurrent bile duct stones are a common late complication. Because there are still no effective therapies for preventing this complication, some patients have experienced bile duct stone recurrence many times. We describe herein a method of abdominal massage to treat patients with prior cholecystectomy who have experienced recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:27540575

  15. From Self-Destruction to Self-Awareness: A Massaging Numb Values LSCI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Trevor; Signe, Whitson; Fecser, Frank

    2001-01-01

    In this intervention, Anne, a 15-year-old girl in residential treatment, is helped to sort out her conflicted feelings of anger and attraction to a female staff member. Through the Massaging Numb Values Reclaiming Intervention, she finds more productive ways of expressing emotions and managing her interactions with the staff person. (Author)

  16. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  17. Massage Interventions and Developmental Skills in Infants Born with Low Birth Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, I. A.; Adulas, E. I.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating possible effects of massage interventions on developmental progress in the infants born with low birth weight (LBW). Forty infants (17 boys, 23 girls) who were born in St. Petersburg in 2000 through 2002 and met a conventional definition of LBW (less than 2500 g at birth) entered the study. Of these, 36 (17 boys, 19…

  18. The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

    The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

  19. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  20. Changes in plasma cortisol and catecholamine concentrations in response to massage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Acolet, D; Modi, N; Giannakoulopoulos, X; Bond, C; Weg, W; Clow, A; Glover, V

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical and clinical response to massage in preterm infants was assessed. Eleven stable infants, of 29 weeks' median gestational age, median birth weight 980 g, and median postnatal age 20 days, were studied. Blood samples were obtained for the determination of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol 45 minutes before the start of massage and approximately one hour after completion of massage. Cortisol, but not catecholamine, concentrations decreased consistently after massage (median difference -35.8 nmol/l; 95% confidence interval -0.5 to -94.0, Wilcoxon matched pairs). There was a slight decrease in skin temperature (median difference -0.36 degrees C, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to -0.65) but there was no change in oxygenation or oxygen requirement. This study has shown that it is possible to detect an objective hormonal change following a supposedly 'non-therapeutic' intervention in preterm infants. The development of such methods of assessment are likely to be of particular relevance in the extremely immature or ill neonate in whom behavioural evaluation cannot play more than a limited part. Images PMID:8439193

  1. Massage--the scientific basis of an ancient art: Part 1. The techniques.

    PubMed

    Goats, G C

    1994-09-01

    Manual massage is a long established and effective therapy used for the relief of pain, swelling, muscle spasm and restricted movement. Latterly, various mechanical methods have appeared to complement the traditional manual techniques. Both manual and mechanical techniques are described systematically, together with a review of indications for use in sports medicine.

  2. Massage Interventions and Developmental Skills in Infants Born with Low Birth Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, I. A.; Adulas, E. I.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating possible effects of massage interventions on developmental progress in the infants born with low birth weight (LBW). Forty infants (17 boys, 23 girls) who were born in St. Petersburg in 2000 through 2002 and met a conventional definition of LBW (less than 2500 g at birth) entered the study. Of these, 36 (17 boys, 19…

  3. Change in the nose areas in children with mouth breathing after nasal cleansing and massage.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira Camargo; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Lima, Sandro Júnior Henrique; Lima, Wigna Rayssa Pereira; Cunha, Renata Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the changes occurred in the nasal cavity geometry, before and after nasal cleansing, through nasal aeration and acoustic rhinometry in children with oral breathing. Twenty children aged four to 12 years were included in the study. The gathering of participants was conducted at the Multifunctional Laboratory of the Speech Pathology Department of the Federal University of Pernambuco - UFPE. The following procedures were conducted: Identification Index of Signs and Symptoms of Oral Breathing; marking of nasal expiratory airflow using the graded mirror of Altmann, and examination of the Nasal Geometry by Acoustic Rhinometry. The same procedures were performed after nasal massage and cleansing with saline solution. Significant change was observed in the areas with respect to the nasal airflow on both sides after nasal cleansing and massage. As for nasal geometry, measured by acoustic rhinometry, comparison between the nostrils showed that the effect of cleansing and massage was discrete. Nasal aeration measures showed sensitivity to the cleansing and massage technique and measures of nasal geometry confirmed its effect on respiratory physiology.

  4. Changes in Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Symptoms Following Massage Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melissa Joan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this case report was to describe the effects that massage therapy had on a woman with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Participant The 26-year-old woman’s primary symptoms were pain, decreased range of motion, clicking, and crepitus. These symptoms were reportedly associated with emotional stress and bruxism. Intervention Ten 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The client’s progress was monitored by an initial, midway, and final assessment, using range of motion testing, personal interview, an orthopedic test, and postural analysis. Progress was also evaluated by the use of a daily journal. The client participated in a home care routine consisting of stretches, self-massage, postural training, a proprioception exercise, and hydrotherapy. Results Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress. Conclusion Although the client in this report experienced positive results, more extensive studies are needed to understand the effects of massage on TMD. PMID:22211156

  5. [Hypnosis and touch-massage to relieve pain at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Bioy, Antoine; Moreaux, Thierry; Pasturel, Agnès; Wood, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of pain in palliative care requires specific expertise. "Complementary" methods, such as hypnosis or "Toucher-Massage", for example, not only have an effect on the prevention and treatment of pain, but also contribute to the overall support of the patient.

  6. Massage therapy for cancer patients: a reciprocal relationship between body and mind

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, S.M.; Dryden, T.; Wong, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Some cancer patients use therapeutic massage to reduce symptoms, improve coping, and enhance quality of life. Although a meta-analysis concludes that massage can confer short-term benefits in terms of psychological wellbeing and reduction of some symptoms, additional validated randomized controlled studies are necessary to determine specific indications for various types of therapeutic massage. In addition, mechanistic studies need to be conducted to discriminate the relative contributions of the therapist and of the reciprocal relationship between body and mind in the subject. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques can be used to capture dynamic in vivo responses to biomechanical signals induced by massage of myofascial tissue. The relationship of myofascial communication systems (called “meridians”) to activity in the subcortical central nervous system can be evaluated. Understanding this relationship has important implications for symptom control in cancer patients, because it opens up new research avenues that link self-reported pain with the subjective quality of suffering. The reciprocal body–mind relationship is an important target for manipulation therapies that can reduce suffering. PMID:17576465

  7. The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

    The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

  8. Trait Anxiety among Japanese Massage Practitioners with Visual Impairment: What Is Required in Japanese Rehabilitation Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Munakata, Tsunetsugu

    2009-01-01

    This questionnaire-based study of Japanese massage practitioners with visual impairment (n = 155, 126 males, 29 females, mean age = 41 years) found that measures of self-repression, helplessness and "daily hassles" were positively correlated to measures of trait anxiety. Also, trait anxiety was negatively associated with measures of…

  9. Evaluation of the Massage in Schools Programme in One Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Lesley J.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the potential benefits of the Massage in Schools Programme (MISP), a programme originating in Scandinavia, which has been introduced into schools in the United Kingdom (UK) since 2001. Meeting four out of five outcomes of the Every Child Matters agenda, the review of the literature aims to separate anecdotal and media…

  10. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Yang, Yun Seok

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05). There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05). These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures. PMID:18830459

  11. Is reflexology as effective as aromatherapy massage for symptom relief in an adult outpatient oncology population?

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jeannie; Thomas, Karen; Sandsund, Cathy; Shaw, Clare

    2013-08-01

    To test whether reflexology was inferior to aromatherapy massage for ameliorating self-selected problems or concerns. Non-blinded, randomised study with a 1:1 allocation. Adult outpatients recruited from a UK cancer centre, randomised by the minimisation method to either four aromatherapy massage or four reflexology sessions. MYCaW scores at baseline and completion; VAS (relaxation) pre and post-sessions. Unpaired t-test for the primary outcome; analysis of variance tests for repeated measures for VAS (relaxation); descriptive statistics (means and 95% confidence intervals) and content analysis for patient comments. 115 subjects (58 aromatherapy massage, 57 reflexology) recruited. Reflexology was found to be no less effective than aromatherapy massage for MYCaW first concerns (p = 0.046). There was no statistical difference between groups for MYCaW second concerns or overall well-being scores, proportions of patients gaining clinical benefit, VAS scores over time (p = 0.489) or between groups (p = 0.408) or in the written responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil as a treatment for infantile colic.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Bengü; Başbakkal, Zümrüt

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil as a possible treatment for this condition. This research was carried out on a group of 40 infants between 2 and 6 weeks of age with a gestational age of 38-42 weeks and normal development and growth. All the infants weighed between 2500 and 4000 g at birth and all exhibited the signs of colic. Infants in the treatment group received abdominal massage by their mothers using lavender oil, while those in the control group were not subject to an intervention. The infants in both control and treatment groups were monitored once a week by the researchers, in total five times. The effect of the massage was measured in terms of changes in the length of time the infants cried per week. The use of aromatherapy massage using lavender oil was found to be effective in reducing the symptoms of colic. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Yang, Yun Seok; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05). There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05). These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

  14. The Effect of Abdominal Massage on Constipation and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Turan, Nuray; Aşt, Türkinaz Atabek

    2016-01-01

    This study was a randomized controlled trial aimed to find the impact of abdominal massage application on constipation and quality of life among patients. The sample included 30 intervention (abdominal massage) and 30 control subjects. To collect data, the following were utilized: Patient Information Form, Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, Constipation Severity Instrument, Bristol Scale Stool Form, Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QOL) Scale, and European Quality of Life Instrument (EQ-5D). The data were collected from among patients in the morning and evening on the fourth, fifth, and sixth days postoperatively. No significant findings were discovered between experimental and control groups in terms of individual characteristics and characteristics that might influence constipation (p > .05). It was found that patients who received abdominal massage application defecated more often following their surgery than patients in the control group, which led to a statistically high level of significant difference between the groups (p ≤ .001). It was also found that the experimental group displayed higher average PAC-QOL and EQ-5D scores on discharge. Findings indicated that abdominal massage applied to patients diagnosed with postoperative constipation reduced symptoms of constipation, decreased time intervals between defecation, and increased quality of life.

  15. Massage intervention for promoting mental and physical health in infants aged under six months.

    PubMed

    Underdown, A; Barlow, J; Chung, V; Stewart-Brown, S

    2006-10-18

    Infant massage is increasingly being used in the community for low-risk babies and their primary care givers. Anecdotal claims suggest benefits for sleep, respiration, elimination and the reduction of colic and wind. Infant massage is also thought to reduce infant stress and promote positive parent-infant interaction. The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of infant massage in promoting infant physical and mental health in population samples. Searches were undertaken of CENTRAL 2005 (Issue 3), MEDLINE (1970 to 2005), PsycINFO (1970 to 2005), CINAHL (1982 to 2005), EMBASE (1980 to 2005), and a number of other Western and Chinese databases. Studies in which babies under the age of six months were randomised to an infant massage or a no-treatment control group, and utilising a standardised outcome measuring infant mental or physical development. Weighted and standardised mean differences and 95% confidence intervals are presented. Where appropriate the results have been combined in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. Twenty-three studies were included in the review. One was a follow-up study and thirteen were included in a separate analysis due to concerns about the uniformly significant results and the lack of dropout. The results of nine studies providing primary data suggest that infant massage has no effect on growth, but provides some evidence suggestive of improved mother-infant interaction, sleep and relaxation, reduced crying and a beneficial impact on a number of hormones controlling stress. Results showing a significant impact on number of illnesses and clinic visits were limited to a study of Korean orphanage infants. There was no evidence of effects on cognitive and behavioural outcomes, infant attachment or temperament. The data from the 13 studies regarded to be at high risk of bias show uniformly significant benefits on growth, sleep, crying and bilirubin levels. The only evidence of a significant impact of massage on growth

  16. Massage, reflexology and other manual methods for pain management in labour.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Jones, Leanne

    2012-02-15

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour, and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence supporting the use of manual healing methods including massage and reflexology for pain management in labour. To examine the effects of manual healing methods including massage and reflexology for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 June 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 30 June 2011), CINAHL (1980 to 30 June 2011), the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (30 June 2011), Chinese Clinical Trial Register (30 June 2011), Current Controlled Trials (30 June 2011), ClinicalTrials.gov, (30 June 2011) ISRCTN Register (30 June 2011), National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (30 June 2011) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (30 June 2011). Randomised controlled trials comparing manual healing methods with standard care, no treatment, other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour or placebo. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We attempted to contact study authors for additional information. We included six trials, with data reporting on five trials and 326 women in the meta-analysis. We found trials for massage only. Less pain during labour was reported from massage compared with usual care during the first stage of labour (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.17 to -0.47), four trials, 225 women), and labour pain was reduced in one trial of massage compared with music (risk ratio (RR) 0.40, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.89, 101 women). One trial of massage compared with usual care found reduced anxiety during

  17. Effectiveness of Therapeutic Massage for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J.; Ludman, Evette J.; Cook, Andrea J.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Bentley, Susan; Brooks, Marissa Z.; Cherkin, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although massage is one of the most popular complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatments for anxiety, its effectiveness has never been rigorously evaluated for a diagnosed anxiety disorder. This study evaluates the effectiveness of therapeutic massage for persons with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods Sixty-eight persons with GAD were randomized to therapeutic massage (n=23), thermotherapy (n=22) or relaxing room therapy (n=23) for a total of 10 sessions over 12 weeks. Mean reduction in anxiety was measured by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). Secondary outcomes included 50% reduction in HARS and symptom resolution of GAD, changes in depressive symptoms (PHQ-8), worry and GAD-related disability. We compared changes in these outcomes in the massage and control groups post- treatment and at 6 months using generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression. Results All groups had improved by the end of treatment (adjusted mean change scores for the HARS ranged from −10.0 to −13.0; p< 0.001) and maintained their gains at the 26 week follow-up. No differences were seen between groups (p=0.39). Symptom reduction and resolution of GAD, depressive symptoms, worry and disability showed similar patterns. Conclusions Massage was not superior to the control treatments, and all showed some clinically important improvements, likely due to some beneficial but generalized relaxation response. Because the relaxing room treatment is substantially less expensive than the other treatments, a similar treatment packaged in a clinically credible manner might be the most cost effective option for persons with GAD who want to try relaxation-oriented CAM therapies. PMID:20186971

  18. Effect of massage on DOMS in ultramarathon runners: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Lorenzo; Capra, Gianpiero; Carta, Giacomo; Forni, Corrado; Janin, Denise

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the popularity of ultramarathons has increased. During these competitions, musculoskeletal problems are very common. Among the more frequent of those problems is the onset of muscle pain, which is defined in the literature as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The present study aimed to collect epidemiological data regarding the onset of musculoskeletal problems during the Tor des Geants (International ultramarathon race of 330 km in length and 24,000 m in elevation difference) and to describe the effects of massage on reducing pain and overall perceived improvement in a sample of 25 athletes who complained of DOMS. Two hundred and twenty-one treatments were performed on 220 ultramarathon runners, of which 207 were males and 34 were females; the age group most represented ranged from 40 to 50 years. The most common symptom was pain, which occurred in more than 95% of cases, and the most affected area was the lower extremities (90% of subjects). In the analysed subjects, treatment with massage generated a significant (p < 0.0001) improvement. The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) value was 3.6 points on average (SD 2.1) after massage, and there were no cases of worsening DOMS after massage as determined using the patient global impression of change (PGIC). The values of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in DOMS management were calculated on the basis of the ROC curves and two other anchor-based methods in the PGIC and were 2.8-3.9 points on the NPRS. In the context analysed, massage was an effective treatment to reduce DOMS during the onset of symptoms.

  19. Psychophysiological effects of massage-myofascial release after exercise: a randomized sham-control study.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Olea, Nicolas; Martínez, Marin Manuel; Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Concepción; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of massage on neuromuscular recruitment, mood state, and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) after high-intensity exercise. This was a prospective randomized clinical trial using between-groups design. The study was conducted at a university-based sports medicine clinic. Sixty-two (62) healthy active students age 18-26 participated. Participants, randomized into two groups, performed three 30-second Wingate tests and immediately received whole-body massage-myofascial induction or placebo (sham ultrasound/magnetotherapy) treatment. The duration (40 minutes), position, and therapist were the same for both treatments. Dependent variables were surface electromyography (sEMG) of quadriceps, profile of mood states (POMS) and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) of trapezius and masseter muscles. These data were assessed at baseline and after exercise and recovery periods. Generalized estimating equations models were performed on dependent variables to assess differences between groups. Significant differences were found in effects of treatment on sEMG of Vastus Medialis (VM) (p = 0.02) and vigor subscale (p = 0.04). After the recovery period, there was a significant decrease in electromyographic (EMG) activity of VM (p = 0.02) in the myofascial-release group versus a nonsignificant increase in the placebo group (p = 0.32), and a decrease in vigor (p < 0.01) in the massage group versus no change in the placebo group (p = 0.86). Massage reduces EMG amplitude and vigor when applied as a passive recovery technique after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Massage may induce a transient loss of muscle strength or a change in the muscle fiber tension-length relationship, influenced by alterations of muscle function and a psychological state of relaxation.

  20. The Impact of the Swedish Massage on the Kinesthetic Differentiation in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Kamil; Furmanek, Mariusz Pawel; Knapik, Aleksandra; Bacik, Bogdan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swedish massage is one of the common treatments to provide optimal start and readiness of athletes. The ability of kinesthetic differentiation (KD) is crucial in sport performance. This skill allows to adapt demanded muscle forces to optimize the motor tasks, and it is responsible for the precision. In the literature, there is no evidence how Swedish massage influences the kinesthetic differentiation. Purpose: The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of Swedish massage on the kinesthetic differentiation and muscle strength of hand grip. Methods: Thirty participants took part in this investigation (17 women and 13 men). The assessment consisted of KD tests conducted on the dominant (DH) and nondominant hand (NDH) after 15 minutes of hand and forearm Swedish massage. The procedure consisted of 13 trials for each extremity. The first three were done for 100% of the participants’ capabilities (Fmax), the next five trials were done using 50% of maximum force (50% of Fmax), and in the last five trials, the participants tried to use only 50% of their previous force (1/2 of 50%). Finally, the absolute force production error (FPE) was calculated for 50% (FPE_50%) and 25% (FPE_25%). Results: The two-way repeated measure analysis of variance ANOVA did not reveal any statistically significant changes in maximal strength grip and KD between pre- and postmassage intervention in both DH and NDH hand. Correlations showed strong relationship between pre- and postmassage for maximum force (r = 0.92, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.94, p = .01 for NDH), and only for the FPE_50% (r = 0.67, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.71, p = .01 for NDH). Conclusions: The results obtained indicated that the application of the Swedish massage did not affect the kinesthetic differentiation in this particular young adult group. PMID:25780470

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Massage and Pneumatic Compression for Ultramarathon Recovery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Badowski, Natalie; Chin, Joseph; Stuempfle, Kristin J

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Postexercise recovery techniques are widely used, but little research has examined their effectiveness. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of massage and pneumatic compression on recovery from a 161-km ultramarathon. Methods Participants in the 2015 161-km Western States Endurance Run were randomized to a 20-minute postrace intervention of massage, intermittent sequential pneumatic compression, or supine rest. Each subject completed two 400-m runs at maximum speed before the race and on days 3 and 5 after the race, and also provided muscle pain and soreness ratings and overall muscular fatigue scores before and for 7 days after the race. Results Among the 72 runners who finished the race and completed the study, comparison among intervention groups revealed no significant group or interaction effect on 400-m run time, but there was a significant (P<.0001) time effect. Immediately posttreatment, massage resulted in lower muscle pain and soreness ratings compared with the supine-rest control condition (P<.0001), while both massage (P<.0001) and pneumatic compression (P<.01) resulted in lower overall muscular fatigue scores compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between groups in any outcome 1 to 7 days after the race. Conclusion Single 20-minute sessions of postrace massage and intermittent sequential pneumatic compression provide some immediate subjective benefit. There is no evidence, however, that such treatments provide extended subjective or functional benefits of clinical importance. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02530190). Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):320-326. Epub 23 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6455.

  2. Whole body massage for reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients in cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Abasi, Ali; Rajabi-Beheshtabad, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients admitted in coronary care units face various stressors. Ambiguity of future life conditions and unawareness of caring methods intensifies the patients’ anxiety and stress. This study was conducted to assess the effects of whole body massage on anxiety and vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 patients. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. The intervention group received a session of whole body massage and the control group received routine care. The levels of State, Trait and overall anxiety and vital signs were assessed in both groups before and after intervention. Independent sample t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fischer exact tests were used for data analysis. Results: The baseline overall mean score of anxiety was 79.43±29.34 in the intervention group and was decreased to 50.38±20.35 after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in the overall mean anxiety in the control group during the study. The baseline diastolic blood pressure was 77.05±8.12 mmHg and was decreased to 72.18±9.19 mmHg after the intervention (p=0.004). Also, significant decreases were occurred in heart rate and respiration rate of intervention group after massage therapy (p=0.001). However, no significant changes were occurred in vital signs of the control group during the study. Conclusion: The results suggest that whole body massage was effective in reducing anxiety and stabilizing vital signs of patients with acute coronary disorders. PMID:25405113

  3. Utilizing Chair Massage to Address One Woman's Health in Rural Ghana West Africa: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Meryanos, Cathy J

    2016-12-01

    There is limited access to health care in rural Ghana and virtually no rehabilitative services available. This situation presents a unique opportunity to utilize chair massage in addressing women's health in rural Ghana, particularly when it comes to muscle pain and fatigue from heavy labor. The objective of this case report is to determine the results of chair massage as a strategy to reduce neck, shoulder, and back pain, while increasing range of motion. The patient is a 63-year-old Ghanaian female, who was struck by a public transport van while carrying a 30-50 pound load on her head, two years prior. The accident resulted in a broken right humerus and soft tissue pain. A traditional medicine practitioner set the bone, however there was no post-accident rehabilitation available. At the time of referral, she presented complaints of shoulder, elbow, and wrist pain. In addition, she was unable to raise her right hand to her mouth for food intake. The results of this case report include an increase in range of motion, as well as elimination of pain in the right shoulder, elbow, and hand. Visual assessments showed an approximate increase of ROM within the ranges of 45-65 degrees in the right arm, as well as 10-15 degrees in 4th and 5th fingers. There was also a decrease in muscle hypertonicity in the thoracic and cervical areas, and a profound increase in quality of life for the patient. This case report illustrates how therapeutic chair massage was utilized to address a common health concern for one woman in rural Ghana. It also demonstrates that pre-existing musculoskeletal disorders and pain may be eliminated with massage intervention. Massage therapy may be important to ameliorating certain types of health problems in remote rural villages in low income countries.

  4. Preventive Chair Massage with Algometry to Maintain Psychosomatic Balance in White-Collar Workers.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; Mikicin, Mirosław; Łyp, Marek; Stanisławska, Iwona; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2017-07-19

    People working at computers often suffer from overload-related muscle pain, and physical and mental discomfort. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chair massage, conducted in the workplace among white-collar workers, in relieving symptoms of musculoskeletal strain related to prolonged sitting posture. The study was conducted in 124 white-collar workers, 55 women and 69 men, aged 33.7 ± 7.6 years. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: chair massage program, relaxing music sessions, and a control group, each of four-week duration. Each group was evaluated before and after the program completion. Pain perception was assessed algometrically as a threshold for compression pain of neck muscles, measured in kg/cm(2). The relaxation level was assessed from the heart rate variability. We found that the chair massage increased both the pain threshold in all tested muscles (p < 0.001) and the relaxation level from 31.9% to 41.6% (p < 0.05). In the group with music sessions, muscle pain threshold remained unchanged, except for the trapezoid muscle where it decreased (p < 0.05), while the relaxation level increased from 26.0% to 33.3% (p < 0.05). In both massage and relaxing music groups, there was a significant decrease in muscle tension (p < 0.01). Changes in the control group were inappreciable. We conclude that the chair massage performed in the workplace is an effective method for prevention of musculoskeletal overstrain related to prolonged sitting posture. The program seems worth implementing in various occupational environments.

  5. Therapeutic Massage Provides Pain Relief to a Client with Morton's Neuroma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Davis, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Morton's neuroma is a common cause of pain that radiates from between the third and fourth metatarsals and which, when symptomatic, creates sensations of burning or sharp pain and numbness on the forefoot. Many conservative and surgical interventions are employed to reduce associated pain, but not enough research has been conducted to recommend patients to any one approach as the most reliable source of pain management. The objective of this case report is to describe the effect of massage therapy on one woman with symptomatic Morton's neuroma. A physically active 25-year-old female with diagnosed symptomatic Morton's neuroma who has not found relief with previous conservative intervention. Six session of massage therapy once weekly for 60-75 minutes focused on postural alignment and localized foot and leg treatment. The client also completed an at-home exercise each day. Change was monitored each week by the massage therapist reassessing posture and by the client filling out a pain survey based on a Visual Analog Scale. The client reported progressive change in the character of the pain from burning and stabbing before the first session to a dull, pulsing sensation after the third session. She also recorded a reduction in pain during exercise from a 5/10 to 0/10 (on a scale where 10 is extreme pain). This study describes how massage therapy reduced pain from Morton's neuroma for one client; however, larger randomized control studies need to be done in order to determine the short- and long-term effects of massage therapy on this painful condition.

  6. Biofeedback is superior to electrogalvanic stimulation and massage for treatment of levator ani syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Nardo, Adriana; Vantini, Italo; Romito, Antonella; Whitehead, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Levator ani syndrome (LAS) might be treated using biofeedback to teach pelvic floor relaxation, electrogalvanic stimulation (EGS), or massage of levator muscles. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of these techniques and assess physiological mechanisms for treatment. Methods Inclusion criteria were Rome II symptoms plus weekly pain. Patients were categorized as “highly likely” to have LAS if they reported tenderness with traction on the levator muscles, or as “possible” LAS if they did not. All 157 patients received 9 sessions including psychological counseling plus biofeedback, EGS, or massage. Outcomes were reassessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Among patients with “highly likely” LAS, adequate relief was reported by 87% for biofeedback, 45% for EGS, and 22% for massage. Pain days per month decreased from 14.7 at baseline to 3.3 after biofeedback, 8.9 after EGS, and 13.3 after massage. Pain intensity decreased from 6.8 (0–10 scale) at baseline to 1.8 after biofeedback, 4.7 after EGS, and 6.0 after massage. Improvements were maintained for 12 months. Patients with only a “possible” diagnosis of LAS did not benefit from any treatment. Biofeedback and EGS improved LAS by increasing the ability to relax pelvic floor muscles and evacuate a water-filled balloon, and by reducing the urge and pain thresholds. Conclusions Biofeedback is the most effective of these treatments, and EGS is somewhat effective. Only patients with tenderness on rectal examination benefit. The pathophysiology of LAS is similar to that of dyssynergic defecation. PMID:20044997

  7. Inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in daily life: relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care.

    PubMed

    Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Strang, Peter; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2009-08-01

    This article explores relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a support supplement while caring for a dying family member at home. In palliative home care, relatives play an important role as carers to seriously ill and dying family members. To improve their quality of life, different support strategies are of importance. Complementary methods, such as soft tissue massage have become an appreciated supplement for these patients. However, only few studies focus on relatives experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a supplemental support. Qualitative design Nineteen relatives received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times (25 minutes) in their homes. Open-ended semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were conducted once per relative after the nine times of massage, using qualitative content analysis. Soft tissue massage gave the relatives' feelings of 'being cared for', 'body vitality' and 'peace of mind'. For a while, they put worries of daily life aside as they just experienced 'being'. During massage, it became apparent that body and mind is constituted of an indestructible completeness. The overarching theme was 'inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in their daily lives'. All relatives experienced soft tissue massage positively, although they were under considerable stress. Soft tissue massage could be an option to comfort and support relatives in palliative home care. In palliative nursing care, soft tissue massage could present a worthy supplement in supporting caring relatives.

  8. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Sousan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ajoodanian, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran). The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils). Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP. PMID:25276695

  9. Effects of aromatherapy massage on anxiety and self-esteem in korean elderly women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rho, Kook-Hee; Han, Sun-Hee; Kim, Keum-Soon; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on the anxiety and self-esteem experienced by Korean elderly women. A quasi-experimental, control group, pretest-posttest design was used. The subjects comprised 36 elderly females: 16 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group. Aromatherapy massage using lavender, chamomile, rosemary, and lemon was given to the experimental group only. Each massage session lasted 20 min, and was performed 3 times per week for two 3-week periods with an intervening 1-week break. The intervention produced significant differences in the anxiety and self-esteem and no significant differences in blood pressure or pulse rate between the two groups. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage exerts positive effects on anxiety and self-esteem. However, more objective, clinical measures should be applied in a future study with a randomized placebo-controlled design.

  10. Part III: AFS - A Secure Distributed File System

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsmann, A.; /SLAC

    2005-06-29

    AFS is a secure distributed global file system providing location independence, scalability and transparent migration capabilities for data. AFS works across a multitude of Unix and non-Unix operating systems and is used at many large sites in production for many years. AFS still provides unique features that are not available with other distributed file systems even though AFS is almost 20 years old. This age might make it less appealing to some but with IBM making AFS available as open-source in 2000, new interest in use and development was sparked. When talking about AFS, people often mention other file systems as potential alternatives. Coda (http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/) with its disconnected mode will always be a research project and never have production quality. Intermezzo (http://www.inter-mezzo.org/) is now in the Linux kernel but not available for any other operating systems. NFSv4 (http://www.nfsv4.org/) which picked up many ideas from AFS and Coda is not mature enough yet to be used in serious production mode. This article presents the rich features of AFS and invites readers to play with it.

  11. AF-Shell 1.0 User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    This document serves as a user guide for the AF-Shell 1.0 software, an efficient tool for progressive damage simulation in composite laminates. This guide contains minimal technical material and is meant solely as a guide for a new user to apply AF-Shell 1.0 to laminate damage simulation problems.

  12. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true [Reserved] A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Acquisition of Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 [Reserved] ...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  17. DDX6 transfers P-TEFb kinase to the AF4/AF4N (AFF1) super elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mück, Fabian; Bracharz, Silvia; Marschalek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    AF4/AFF1 and AF5/AFF4 are both backbones for the assembly of “super elongation complexes” (SECs) that exert 2 distinct functions after the recruitment of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP: (1) initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II gene transcription, and (2) modification of transcribed gene regions by distinct histone methylation patterns. In this study we aimed to investigate one of the initial steps, namely how P-TEFb is transferred from 7SK snRNPs to the SECs. In particular, we were interested in the role of DDX6 that we have recently identified as part of the AF4 complex. DDX6 is an evolutionarily conserved member of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family that is known to control miRNA and mRNA biology (translation, storage and degradation). Overexpressed DDX6 is associated with different cancer types and with c-Myc protein overexpression. We could demonstrate that DDX6 binds to 7SK snRNA and causes the release and transfer of P-TEFb to the AF4/AF4N SEC. DDX6 also binds stably to AF4 and AF4N as demonstrated by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. As a consequence, overexpression of either AF4/AF4N or DDX6 resulted in a strong increase of mRNA production (5-6 fold), while their simultaneous expression increased the cellular mRNA production by 11-fold. Conversely, the corresponding knockdown of DDX6 decreased mRNA production by 70%. In conclusion, AF4/AF4N and DDX6 represent key molecules for the elongation process of gene transcription and a model will be proposed for the hand-over process of P-TEFb to SECs. PMID:27679741

  18. Self-Mobilization Using a Foam Roller Versus a Roller Massager: Which Is More Effective for Increasing Hamstrings Flexibility?

    PubMed

    DeBruyne, Danielle M; Dewhurst, Marina M; Fischer, Katelyn M; Wojtanowski, Michael S; Durall, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Scenario: Increasing the length of the muscle-tendon unit may prevent musculotendinous injury. Various methods have been proposed to increase muscle-tendon flexibility, including self-mobilization using foam rollers or roller massagers, although the effectiveness of these devices is uncertain. This review was conducted to determine if the use of foam rollers or roller massagers to improve hamstrings flexibility is supported by moderate- to high-quality evidence.

  19. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future.

  20. The effect of foot plantar massage on balance and functional reach in patients with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tütün Yümin, Eylem; Şimşek, Tülay Tarsuslu; Sertel, Meral; Ankaralı, Handan; Yumin, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of manual foot plantar massage (classic and friction massage) on functional mobility level, balance, and functional reach in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2 DM). A total of 38 subjects diagnosed with T2 DM were included in the study. A healthy control group could not be formed in this study. After the subjects' socio-demographic data were obtained, Timed Up & Go (TUG) Test, functional reach test (FRT), one-leg standing test with eyes open-closed, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) to measure foot pain intensity were performed. The results were also divided and assessed in three groups according to the ages of the individuals (40-54, 55-64, and 65 and over). As a result of statistical analysis, a difference was found in the values obtained from TUG, FRT, and one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed (p < 0.05). Following the massage, TUG values significantly decreased comparison with those before the massage, whereas the values of FRT and one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed significantly increased compared with those before the massage (p > 0.05). According to age groups, there were statistical differences (p < 0.05) between the TUG, one-leg standing test with eyes open and closed test values of the individuals before and after the massage. The results of our study indicated that application of plantar massage to patients with T2 DM caused an improvement in balance, functional mobility, and functional reach values. An increase in body balance and functional mobility may explain the improvement in TUG. Foot massage to be added to rehabilitation exercise programs of DM patients will be important in improving balance and mobility of patients.

  1. Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Pregnant Women's Stress and Immune Function: A Longitudinal, Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pao-Ju; Chou, Cheng-Chen; Yang, Luke; Tsai, Yu-Lun; Chang, Yue-Cune; Liaw, Jen-Jiuan

    2017-08-07

    This study's aims are to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on women's stress and immune function during pregnancy. This longitudinal, prospective, randomized controlled trial recruited 52 healthy pregnant women from a prenatal clinic in Taipei using convenience sampling. The participants were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 24) or control (n = 28) group using Clinstat block randomization. The intervention group received 70 min of aromatherapy massage with 2% lavender essential oil every other week (10 times in total) for 20 weeks; the control group received only routine prenatal care. In both groups, participants' salivary cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels were collected before and after the intervention group received aromatherapy massage (every month from 16 to 36 weeks gestation) and were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pregnant women in the intervention group had lower salivary cortisol (p < 0.001) and higher IgA (p < 0.001) levels immediately after aromatherapy massage than those in the control group, which did not receive massage treatment. Comparing the long-term effects of aromatherapy massage on salivary IgA levels between groups at different times, the study found that the pretest salivary IgA levels at 32 (p = 0.002) and 36 (p < 0.001) weeks gestational age (GA) were significantly higher than the pretest IgA at 16 weeks GA (baseline). This study presented evidence that aromatherapy massage could significantly decrease stress and enhance immune function in pregnant women. The findings can guide clinicians or midwives in providing aromatherapy massage to women throughout the pregnancy.

  2. A pilot study addressing the effect of aromatherapy massage on mood, anxiety and relaxation in adult mental health.

    PubMed

    Edge, Jennifer

    2003-05-01

    This study was carried out with eight subjects specifically referred for aromatherapy; each received a standardised aromatherapy massage weekly for 6 weeks. The subjects' levels of anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale prior to the first massage and after the final massage. The subjects' levels of mood, anxiety and relaxation were recorded using a visual analogue before and after each massage and then again 6 weeks after the last massage. Comparison was made between the HAD Scale results for each client and also the visual analogue scale results for before and after massage and also first massage and 6 weeks postmassage for the sample group. Improvements were shown in six out of eight subjects' HAD Scale results. Improvements were also shown in all areas when comparing the visual analogue scale results. The study was carried out over an 8-month period. To date there have been few studies addressing the effect of aromatherapy massage on mood, anxiety and relaxation (Therapist 9 (1996) 38). It is acknowledged that there may be a number of reasons for this such as factors related to obtaining a sample group, informed consent, the interaction of current medication regimes and so forth. It is acknowledged that whilst this is a small pilot study a number of methodological issues are raised concerning research into the use of aromatherapy in this clinical field. By reporting on this work, it is hoped that this paper will generate reflection, discussion and debate so forwarding the knowledge base in this discipline.

  3. Toward a petabyte-scale AFS service at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Moscicki, Jakub T.; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    AFS is a mature and reliable storage service at CERN, having worked for more than 20 years as the provider of Unix home directories and project areas. Recently, the AFS service has grown at unprecedented rates (200% in the past year); this growth was unlocked thanks to innovations in both the hardware and software components of our file servers. This work presents how AFS is used at CERN and how the service offering is evolving with the increasing storage needs of its local and remote user communities. In particular, we demonstrate the usage patterns for home directories, workspaces and project spaces, as well as show the daily work which is required to rebalance data and maintaining stability and performance. Finally, we highlight some recent changes and optimisations made to the AFS Service, thereby revealing how AFS can possibly operate at all while being subjected to frequent-almost DDOS-like-attacks from its users.

  4. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Topp, Robert; Behm, David G

    2013-12-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral shoulder served as a passive control. Two hours later, the contralateral resting shoulder received the other treatment. The participants rated the intensity of soreness (scale 0-10), and a blinded examiner took measures of pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the upper trapezius immediately before treatment and 0, 10, 20, and 60 minutes after treatment 48 hours posteccentric exercise. Immediately before treatment, the intensity of soreness was 5.0 (SD 2.2) and PPT was 138 (SD 78) kPa. In response to treatment, a significant treatment by time interaction was found for the intensity of soreness (p < 0.001) and PPT (p < 0.05). Compared with control, both active exercise and massage significantly reduced the intensity of soreness and increased PPT (i.e., reduced pain sensitivity). For both types of treatment, the greatest effect on perceived soreness occurred immediately after treatment, whereas the effect on PPT peaked 20 minutes after treatment. In conclusion, active exercise using elastic resistance provides similar acute relief of muscle soreness as compared with that using massage

  5. [Effect of Chinese massage (Tui Na) on isokinetic muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingguang; Li, Jianhua; Fang, Min; Gong, Li; Sun, Wuquan; Zhou, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Chinese massage (Tui Na) is one of the most popular Traditional Chinese Medicine remedies for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Several studies have subjectively evaluated the effect of Chinese massage on knee OA through self-assessment questionnaires; however, very few studies have objectively assessed the effect by measuring knee muscle strength. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of Chinese massage in improving knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in patients with knee OA. Thirty patients with knee OA received Chinese massage therapy three times per week for 2 weeks. Patients completed pre- and post-treatment Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain questionnaires, and pre- and post-treatment knee muscle strength was evaluated using the Biodex Multi-Joint System 3. Isokinetic muscle strength measurements were performed at 60 degrees/s and 180 degrees/s. The peak torque (PT), peak torque/body weight(PT/BW), total work (TW), average power (AP), hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q), and range of motion (ROM) values were recorded separately for flexors and extensors. Chinese massage therapy significantly improved knee pain as assessed by the VAS in patients with knee OA (P < 0.05). Post-treatment values were significantly greater than pre-treatment values in the extensor muscles for PT (right P = 0.013, left P = 0.001), PT/BW (right P = 0.008, left P = 0.001) and TW (right P = 0.036, left P = 0.004) at 60 degrees/s. The AP increased significantly after treatment in the flexor muscles in the right knee (P = 0.009) and the extensor muscles in the left knee (P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in pre- and post-treatment ROM and H/Q at 60 degrees/s and 180 degrees/s. Chinese massage therapy decreased pain and may improve extensor muscle strength in patients with knee OA, but does not appear to improve ROM.

  6. The Concept of "Chair Massage" in the Workplace as Prevention of Musculoskeletal Overload and Pain.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; Kotynia, Przemysław; Banasiński, Marcin; Obmiński, Zbigniew; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-05-05

    Accumulation of musculoskeletal overload experienced daily over a long period, for months or even years may lead to serious health problems. Simple, quick and easy-to-administer prophylactic and therapeutic interventions not involving complicated medical procedures can bring tangible benefits for sufferers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and effects of a massage programme performed during breaks at work among persons exposed to long-term overload of the spinal column and areas around the spine. We studied 50 office workers (20 women and 30 men, mean age 34.04 years). The subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group (massage, 25 people) and a control group (25 people). The study was completed in four weeks, during which 8 massage sessions took place (twice a week for 15 minutes). Subjective assessment tools were used, namely the IPAQ-short version for evaluation of physical activity, Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ) for assessment of musculoskeletal pain and a survey to assess the participants' satisfaction with the massage programme. An objective assessment tool was an algometric evaluation of the pain threshold (kg/cm2) in selected muscle trigger points. Statistical significance of differences was set at p <0.05. The level of physical activity was comparable between the groups, with 42% of the experimental group and 40% in the control group declaring a high level of physical activity. According to the CMDQ, the biggest differences after massage were noted with regard to the reduction of pain in the lower and upper spine and the right arm (p <0.001), while slightly smaller improvements were noted in the right shoulder and left forearm (p <0.05). In other parts of the body and in the control group, the changes were not statistically significant. The pain threshold assessed by algometry increased at all points examined in the experimental group, with pain sensitivity decreasing the most in the trapezius and

  7. Effect of massage on the efficacy of the mental and incisive nerve block.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A; Whitworth, J M; Corbett, I P; Al-Baqshi, B; Jauhar, S; Meechan, J G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this trial was to assess the effect of soft tissue massage on the efficacy of the mental and incisive nerve block (MINB). Thirty-eight volunteers received MINB of 2.2 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 80,000 epinephrine on 2 occasions. At one visit the soft tissue overlying the injection site was massaged for 60 seconds (active treatment). At the other visit the crowns of the mandibular premolar teeth were massaged (control treatment). Order of treatments was randomized. An electronic pulp tester was used to measure pulpal anesthesia in the ipsilateral mandibular first molar, a premolar, and lateral incisor teeth up to 45 minutes following the injection. The efficacy of pulp anesthesia was determined by 2 methods: (a) by quantifying the number of episodes with no response to maximal electronic pulp stimulation after each treatment, and (b) by quantifying the number of volunteers with no response to maximal pulp stimulation (80 reading) on 2 or more consecutive tests, termed anesthetic success. Data were analyzed by McNemar, Mann-Whitney, and paired-samples t tests. Anesthetic success was 52.6% for active and 42.1% for control treatment for lateral incisors, 89.5 and 86.8% respectively for premolars, and 50.0 and 42.1% respectively for first molars (P = .344, 1.0, and .508 respectively). There were no significant differences in the number of episodes of negative response to maximum pulp tester stimulation between active and control massage. A total of 131 episodes were recorded after both active and control massage in lateral incisors (McNemar test, P = 1.0), 329 (active) versus 316 (control) episodes in the premolars (McNemar test, P = .344), and 119 (active) versus 109 (control) episodes respectively for first molars (McNemar test, P = .444). Speed of anesthetic onset and discomfort did not differ between treatments. We concluded that soft tissue massage after MINB does not influence anesthetic efficacy.

  8. Cape Newenham AFS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESION F, ’O.AL 3 - 4 5- 6 8 9- 1 11 12 13 14 𔃿 t 11 1 9 :," 2. 4 :.! 2 2 5 . . I TAL .4’ 373 - .. .. 776 7 7 8 * ... .. H- j4 93 4 5 7...H ;AVETA: PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY; A:Z, %EAT ER SER VCLPI ’ 7 CARUP li i.L -AF -- AM---.- 7-. - _ PAGE 1 2 WET BLLB TEmPEPATURE DEPRESION F, " AL .’ 3

  9. Changes in Psychological Parameters in Patients with Tension-type Headache Following Massage Therapy: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Moraska, Albert; Chandler, Clint

    2009-01-01

    Investigations into complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches to address stress, depression, and anxiety of those experiencing chronic pain are rare. The objective of this pilot study was to assess the value of a structured massage therapy program, with a focus on myofascial trigger points, on psychological measures associated with tension-type headache. Participants were enrolled in an open-label trial using a baseline control with four 3-week phases: baseline, massage (two 3-week periods) and a follow-up phase. Eighteen subjects with episodic or chronic tension-type headache were enrolled and evaluated at 3-week intervals using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and the Perceived Stress Scale. The Daily Stress Inventory was administered over 7-day periods during baseline and the final week of massage. Twice weekly, 45-minute massage therapy sessions commenced following the baseline phase and continued for 6 weeks. A significant improvement in all psychological measures was detected over the timeframe of the study. Post hoc evaluation indicated improvement over baseline for depression and trait anxiety following 6 weeks of massage, but not 3 weeks. A reduction in the number of events deemed stressful as well as their respective impact was detected. This pilot study provides evidence for reduction of affective distress in a chronic pain population, suggesting the need for more rigorously controlled studies using massage therapy to address psychological measures associated with TTH.

  10. Implementation of Matrix Rhythm Therapy and Conventional Massage in Young Females and Comparison of Their Acute Effects on Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Bas Aslan, Ummuhan; Sabir, Nuran; Cavlak, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To examine and compare the effects of massage and matrix rhythm therapy in young women on the peripheral blood circulation. Design Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Setting Pamukkale University in Denizli, Turkey. Patients Fifteen healthy women age 19–23 years. Intervention Matrix rhythm therapy was applied to the left lower extremity for a single 30-minute session. At least 1 week later, massage was applied to the left lower extremity for 30 minutes in a single session. The same physiotherapist applied both sessions. Outcome measures The blood velocity (cm/s), artery diameter (mm), and blood flow (ml/min) of the popliteal and the posterior tibial arteries were measured with color Doppler ultrasonography. All images were evaluated by the same radiologist. Results After matrix rhythm therapy and massage application, blood velocity, artery diameter, and blood flow in arteries increased. However, matrix rhythm therapy caused a more prominent increase in the amount of blood flow in the popliteal and in the posterior tibial artery than did massage. After matrix rhythm therapy application, the average increases in the blood flow rates in the popliteal and the posterior tibial arteries were 25.29%±16.55% and 34.33%±15.66%, respectively; after the massage, the increases were 17.84%±17.23% and 16.07%±10.28%, respectively. Conclusion Matrix rhythm therapy and massage increased peripheral blood flow in young women. Matrix rhythm therapy method resulted in more prominent increases. PMID:23621388

  11. [Acute lumbar sprain treated with massage combined with acupuncture at different distal acupoints: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Yueqiu

    2015-05-01

    To observe treatment efficacy of acupuncture at different distal acupoints for acute lumbar sprain after massage. One hundred and fifty patients with acute lumbar sprain were randomly divided into a Yaotongdian (Extra) group, a Houxi (SI 3) group, a Weizhong (BL 40) group, a Chengshan (BL 57) group and a Shuigou (GV 26) group, total 5 groups, 30 cases in each one. After the same massage treatment and based on groups divided, different distal acupoints above-mentioned were selected to be acupunctured. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, lumbar activity and treatment efficacy of patients in 5 groups were evaluated. With acupuncture at distal acupoints after massage,VAS scores of patients in 5 groups were decreased compared with those after massage treatment (all P<0.05); lumbar activity was all obviously improved (all P<0.01); and cured and markedly effective rates were all increased in comparison with those after massage (all P<0.01). But among 5 groups the differences of VAS scores, lumbar activity and cured and markedly effective rates were not statistically significant(all P>0.05). Based on massage treatment, acupuncture at distal acupoints could further improve the treatment efficacy for acute lumbar sprain, but there is no obvious effective difference among every distal acupoint. As long as choosing acupoints with lower pain threshold and stimulating enough, good efficacy could be acquired for acute lumbar sprain.

  12. Tactile massage and hypnosis as a health promotion for nurses in emergency care-a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study explores nursing personnel's experiences and perceptions of receiving tactile massage and hypnosis during a personnel health promotion project. Nursing in a short term emergency ward environment can be emotionally and physically exhausting due to the stressful work environment and the high dependency patient care. A health promotion project integrating tactile massage and hypnosis with conventional physical activities was therefore introduced for nursing personnel working in this setting at a large university hospital in Sweden. Methods Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with volunteer nursing personnel participants after the health promotion project had been completed. There were 16 participants in the focus groups and there were 57 in the health promotion intervention. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results The findings indicated that tactile massage and hypnosis may contribute to reduced levels of stress and pain and increase work ability for some nursing personnel. The sense of well-being obtained in relation to health promotion intervention with tactile massage and hypnosis seemed to have positive implications for both work and leisure. Self-awareness, contentment and self-control may be contributing factors related to engaging in tactile massage and hypnosis that might help nursing personnel understand their patients and colleagues and helped them deal with difficult situations that occurred during their working hours. Conclusion The findings indicate that the integration of tactile massage and hypnosis in personnel health promotion may be valuable stress management options in addition to conventional physical activities. PMID:21961762

  13. Changes in Psychological Parameters in Patients with Tension-type Headache Following Massage Therapy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moraska, Albert; Chandler, Clint

    2009-01-01

    Investigations into complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches to address stress, depression, and anxiety of those experiencing chronic pain are rare. The objective of this pilot study was to assess the value of a structured massage therapy program, with a focus on myofascial trigger points, on psychological measures associated with tension-type headache. Participants were enrolled in an open-label trial using a baseline control with four 3-week phases: baseline, massage (two 3-week periods) and a follow-up phase. Eighteen subjects with episodic or chronic tension-type headache were enrolled and evaluated at 3-week intervals using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and the Perceived Stress Scale. The Daily Stress Inventory was administered over 7-day periods during baseline and the final week of massage. Twice weekly, 45-minute massage therapy sessions commenced following the baseline phase and continued for 6 weeks. A significant improvement in all psychological measures was detected over the timeframe of the study. Post hoc evaluation indicated improvement over baseline for depression and trait anxiety following 6 weeks of massage, but not 3 weeks. A reduction in the number of events deemed stressful as well as their respective impact was detected. This pilot study provides evidence for reduction of affective distress in a chronic pain population, suggesting the need for more rigorously controlled studies using massage therapy to address psychological measures associated with TTH. PMID:20046550

  14. Massage Therapy for Pain and Function in Patients With Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole L; Churilla, James R

    2017-09-01

    Massage therapy is gaining interest as a therapeutic approach to managing osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. To date, there have been no systematic reviews investigating the effects of massage therapy on these conditions. Systematic review was used. The primary aim of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the current evidence regarding the effects of massage therapy as a stand-alone treatment on pain and functional outcomes among those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Relevant randomized controlled trials were searched using the electronic databases Google Scholar, MEDLINE, and PEDro. The PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was assessed with the GRADE approach. This review found seven randomized controlled trials representing 352 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias ranged from four to seven. Our results found low- to moderate-quality evidence that massage therapy is superior to nonactive therapies in reducing pain and improving certain functional outcomes. It is unclear whether massage therapy is more effective than other forms of treatment. There is a need for large, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of massage therapy as an intervention for individuals with arthritis.

  15. Effects of massage therapy on anxiety, depression, hyperventilation and quality of life in HIV infected patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Reychler; Gilles, Caty; Aude, Arcq; Laurie, Lebrun; Leïla, Belkhir; Jean-Cyr, Yombi; Jean-Christophe, Marot

    2017-06-01

    HIV infection is often preceded or accompanied by psychiatric comorbidities. These disorders improve with complementary therapies. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of massage therapy on anxiety, depression, hyperventilation and quality of life in HIV infected patients. Adult HIV-infected patients were randomized (n=29) in massage therapy group (one hour a week during four weeks) and control group. Anxiety and depression (HADS-A and HADS-D), hyperventilation (Nijmegen questionnaire) and quality of life (WHOQOL-HIV) were evaluated at inclusion and after 4 weeks. At inclusion, 51% and 17% of the patients had a positive HADS-A and HADS-D score respectively. Two facets from WHOQOL-HIV ("Home environment" and "Death and dying" (p=0.04)) were different between groups. After the four week massage therapy, a significant improvement was observed only for Nijmegen questionnaire (p=0.01) and HADS-A (p=0.04) contrarily to WHOQOL-HIV and HADS-D. Domains of the WHOQOL-HIV did not improve following the massage therapy. Only "Pain and discomfort" facet improved after massage therapy (p=0.04). This study highlights the positive impact of a four week massage therapy on anxiety and hyperventilation in HIV infected patients. However, neither benefit of this program was observed on depression and quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Pilot Study Evaluating Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Massage for the Management of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Owens, Justine E; Goodman, Matthew; Wolfe, Pamela; Schorling, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and massage may be useful adjunctive therapies for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objective To evaluate the feasibility of studying MBSR and massage for the management of chronic pain and estimate their effects on pain and mood. Design Randomized trial comparing MBSR or massage with standard care. Participants Thirty patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Measurements Pain was assessed with 0 to 10 numeric rating scales. Physical and mental health status was measured with the SF-12. Results The study completion rate was 76.7%. At week 8, the massage group had average difference scores for pain unpleasantness of 2.9 and mental health status of 13.6 compared with 0.13 (P<.05) and 3.9 (P<.04), respectively, for the standard care group. These differences were no longer significant at week 12. There were no significant differences in the pain outcomes for the MBSR group. At week 12, the mean change in mental health status for the MBSR group was 10.2 compared with −1.7 in the standard care group (P<.04). Conclusions It is feasible to study MBSR and massage in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Mindfulness-based stress reduction may be more effective and longer-lasting for mood improvement while massage may be more effective for reducing pain. PMID:16423104

  17. Tactile massage and hypnosis as a health promotion for nurses in emergency care--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Airosa, Fanny; Andersson, Susanne K; Falkenberg, Torkel; Forsberg, Christina; Nordby-Hörnell, Elisabeth; Ohlén, Gunnar; Sundberg, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    This study explores nursing personnel's experiences and perceptions of receiving tactile massage and hypnosis during a personnel health promotion project. Nursing in a short term emergency ward environment can be emotionally and physically exhausting due to the stressful work environment and the high dependency patient care. A health promotion project integrating tactile massage and hypnosis with conventional physical activities was therefore introduced for nursing personnel working in this setting at a large university hospital in Sweden. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with volunteer nursing personnel participants after the health promotion project had been completed. There were 16 participants in the focus groups and there were 57 in the health promotion intervention. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed with qualitative content analysis. The findings indicated that tactile massage and hypnosis may contribute to reduced levels of stress and pain and increase work ability for some nursing personnel. The sense of well-being obtained in relation to health promotion intervention with tactile massage and hypnosis seemed to have positive implications for both work and leisure. Self-awareness, contentment and self-control may be contributing factors related to engaging in tactile massage and hypnosis that might help nursing personnel understand their patients and colleagues and helped them deal with difficult situations that occurred during their working hours. The findings indicate that the integration of tactile massage and hypnosis in personnel health promotion may be valuable stress management options in addition to conventional physical activities.

  18. Potential clinical application of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot in temporomandibular disorder patients with myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Ogi, Nobumi; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the safety, suitable treatment regimen, and efficacy of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot. Forty-one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with myofascial pain (8 men, 33 women, median age: 46 years) were enrolled. The safety, suitable massage regimen, and efficacy of this treatment were investigated. Changes in masseter muscle thickness were evaluated on sonograms. No adverse events occurred with any of the treatment sessions. Suitable massage was at pressure of 10 N for 16 minutes. Five sessions were performed every 2 weeks. Total duration of treatment was 9·5 weeks in median. Massage treatment was effective in 70·3% of patients. Masseter muscle thickness decreased with treatment in the therapy-effective group. This study confirmed the safety of massage treatment, and established a suitable regimen. Massage was effective in 70·3% of patients and appeared to have a potential as one of the effective treatments for myofascial pain.

  19. The Effect of Massage on Acute Postoperative Pain in Critically and Acutely Ill Adults Post-thoracic Surgery: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Madalina; Gélinas, Céline; Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Thombs, Brett D

    Critical care practice guidelines identify a lack of clear evidence on the effectiveness of massage for pain control. To assess the effect of massage on acute pain in critically and acutely ill adults post-thoracic surgery. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases were searched. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of massage compared to attention control/sham massage or standard care alone on acute pain intensity post-thoracic surgery. Twelve RCTs were included. Of these, nine evaluated massage in addition to standard analgesia, including 2 that compared massage to attention control/sham massage in the intensive care unit (ICU), 6 that compared massage to standard analgesia alone early post-ICU discharge, and 1 that compared massage to both attention control and standard care in the ICU. Patients receiving massage with analgesia reported less pain (0-10 scale) compared to attention control/sham massage (3 RCTs; N = 462; mean difference -0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.25 to -0.35; p < 0.001; I(2) = 13%) and standard care (7 RCTs; N = 1087; mean difference -0.85, 95% CI -1.28 to -0.42; p < 0.001; I(2) = 70%). Massage, in addition to pharmacological analgesia, reduces acute post-cardiac surgery pain intensity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Influence of Practice Standards on Massage Therapists’ Work Experience: A Phenomenological Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Luann D.; Gillespie, Elena

    2010-01-01

    This original research is framed in phenomenological methodology, based on interviews conducted and interpreted using qualitative research methods. The findings suggest that, because of both direct and indirect factors (such as the nebulous nature of the work, general isolation in work conditions, and physical concerns), massage therapists perform their work with multiple sources of ambiguity that are potentially anxiety-causing. Licensing offers potential relief for this anxiety, but also generates a new set of frustrations and work concerns. The new concerns include the potential that practice will change to adapt to non-relevant standards and the difficulty of defining a body of work that frequently defies a “one size fits all” categorization. This pilot study suggests several areas for further exploration and also demonstrates the generativity of phenomenological methodology for research related to massage therapy. PMID:21589709