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  1. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is the ... stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored ...

  2. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  3. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  4. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... for signing up! engagement en -- Have Type 2 Diabetes? - 2017-03-lwt2d-en.html Have Type 2 Diabetes? ... 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) Copyright 1995-2017. American Diabetes Association. All rights reserved. Use of this website ...

  5. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept.

  6. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications. PMID:21115758

  7. Delaying or Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  8. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  9. Treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. As most subjects are overweighted or obese, the initial treatment is optimization of the meal plan and enhancement of physical activity in order to obtain sustained weight reduction. In case of failure of life-style changes, various oral antihyperglycaemic agents may be used. Some are targeting defective insulin secretion (sulphonylureas, glinides) while others are targeting insulin resistance (metformin, thiazolidinediones). Criteria of drug selection should include both patient's characteristics (body weight, age, degree of hyperglycaemia, comorbidities) and pharmacological properties of the compound (mode of action, safety profile, cost). Monotherapy is usually recommended first, but combined therapy using drugs with additive or synergistic effects may be required to obtain appropriate blood glucose control. As the natural history of the disease is characterized by a progressive exhaustion of beta cells, exogenous insulin may be required in the long term, usually in combination with oral agents. Finally, as patients with type 2 diabetes are insulin-resistant and often have a metabolic syndrome, a multifactorial intervention including aggressive treatment of arterial hypertension and dyslipidaemia is recommended in order to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular complications.

  10. Carnitine and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Randall L

    2009-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that "lipid over supply" causes or worsens insulin resistance via multiple mechanisms involving the accumulation of intracellular lipids in multiple tissues. In particular, the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives/metabolites in muscle inhibits both insulin signaling and glucose oxidation. Therefore agents that ameliorate the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives and/or their metabolites would be beneficial in the treatment or prevention of insulin resistance and T2D. Hyperinsulemic/euglycemic clamp studies in humans and carnitine supplementation studies in rodents provide "proof-of-concept" that carnitine is effective at improving insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and in reversing abnormalities of fuel metabolism associated with T2D. Carefully controlled clinical trials are warranted to determine the efficacy dietary carnitine supplementation as an adjunctive treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  11. Carnitine in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mingrone, Geltrude

    2004-11-01

    Carnitine, the L-beta-hydroxy-gamma-N-trimethylaminobutyric acid, is synthesized primarily in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine. Carnitine covers an important role in lipid metabolism, acting as an obligatory cofactor for beta-oxidation of fatty acids by facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane as acylcarnitine esters. Furthermore, since carnitine behaves as a shuttle for acetyl groups from inside to outside the mitochondrial membrane, it covers also a key role in glucose metabolism and assists in fuel-sensing. A reduction of the fatty acid transport inside the mitochondria results in the cytosolic accumulation of triglycerides, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Acute hypercarnitinemia stimulates nonoxidative glucose disposal during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp in healthy volunteers. Similar results were obtained in type 2 diabetic patients. The above findings were confirmed in healthy volunteers using the minimal modeling of glucose kinetics. The total end-clamp glucose tissue uptake was significantly increased by the administration of doses of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) from 3.8 to 5.2 mg/kg/min, without a significant dose-response effect. In conclusion, both L-carnitine and ALC are effective in improving insulin-mediated glucose disposal either in healthy subjects or in type 2 diabetic patients. Two possible mechanisms might be invoked in the metabolic effect of carnitine and its derivative: the first is a regulation of acetyl and acyl cellular trafficking for correctly meeting the energy demand; the second is a control action in the synthesis of key glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation, Type 2 Diabetes, and Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants: A Review.

    PubMed

    Plitt, Anna; McGuire, Darren K; Giugliano, Robert P

    2017-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with a 5-fold increase in the risk for stroke. Type 2 diabetes is an independent risk factor for both stroke and atrial fibrillation, and in the setting of AF, type 2 diabetes is independently associated with a 2% to 3.5% increase in absolute stroke rate per year. The overlap in the pathophysiologies of AF and type 2 diabetes are not well understood, and current practice guidelines provide few recommendations regarding patients with both conditions. In this article, we review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of the nexus of AF and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we analyze the subgroup of patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in phase 3 clinical trials of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in prevention of arterial thromboembolism in AF, highlighting the greater absolute benefit of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in patients with type 2 diabetes. Finally, we offer recommendations on risk stratification and therapy for patients with concomitant AF and type 2 diabetes. We highlight the increased thromboembolic risk with coexisting AF and type 2 diabetes. We recommend that further studies be done to evaluate the potential benefits of anticoagulation for all patients who have both and the potential for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants to have greater benefits than risks over vitamin K antagonists.

  13. Sugar and Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lean, Michael E J; Te Morenga, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Consumption of sugar, specifically sugar-sweetened beverages, has been widely held responsible by the media for the global rise in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Systematic reviews and dietary guidelines relating dietary sugars to T2DM. Weight gain and T2DM incidence are associated with diet and lifestyle patterns characterized by high consumptions of any sweetened beverages. High sugar intakes impair risk factors for macrovascular complications of T2DM. Much of the association between sugars and T2DM is eliminated by adjusting data for body mass index (BMI). However, BMI adjustment does not fully account for adiposity (r(2)=0.65-0.75). Excess sugar can promote weight gain, thus T2DM, through extra calories, but has no unique diabetogenic effect at physiological levels. Ethical concerns about caffeine added to sweetened beverages, undetectable by consumers, to increase consumption. Evidence needed for limiting dietary sugar below 10% energy intake. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hypoglycaemia in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amiel, S A; Dixon, T; Mann, R; Jameson, K

    2008-03-01

    The primary cause of hypoglycaemia in Type 2 diabetes is diabetes medication-in particular, those which raise insulin levels independently of blood glucose, such as sulphonylureas (SUs) and exogenous insulin. The risk of hypoglycaemia is increased in older patients, those with longer diabetes duration, lesser insulin reserve and perhaps in the drive for strict glycaemic control. Differing definitions, data collection methods, drug type/regimen and patient populations make comparing rates of hypoglycaemia difficult. It is clear that patients taking insulin have the highest rates of self-reported severe hypoglycaemia (25% in patients who have been taking insulin for > 5 years). SUs are associated with significantly lower rates of severe hypoglycaemia. However, large numbers of patients take SUs in the UK, and it is estimated that each year > 5000 patients will experience a severe event caused by their SU therapy which will require emergency intervention. Hypoglycaemia has substantial clinical impact, in terms of mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The cost implications of severe episodes-both direct hospital costs and indirect costs-are considerable: it is estimated that each hospital admission for severe hypoglycaemia costs around pound1000. Hypoglycaemia and fear of hypoglycaemia limit the ability of current diabetes medications to achieve and maintain optimal levels of glycaemic control. Newer therapies, which focus on the incretin axis, may carry a lower risk of hypoglycaemia. Their use, and more prudent use of older therapies with low risk of hypoglycaemia, may help patients achieve improved glucose control for longer, and reduce the risk of diabetic complications.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Internet Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? Print A A A What's in this article? ... pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, ...

  16. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  17. [Chronic nicotinamide overload and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Sun, Wu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Xing; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2010-02-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a major global health problem. It is generally accepted that type 2 diabetes is the result of gene-environmental interaction. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction is unclear. Diet change is known to play an important role in type 2 diabetes. The fact that the global high prevalence of type 2 diabetes has occurred following the spread of food fortification worldwide suggests a possible involvement of excess niacin intake. Our recent study found that nicotinamide overload and low nicotinamide detoxification may induce oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance. Based on the relevant facts, this review briefly summarized the relationship between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the nicotinamide metabolism changes induced by excess niacin intake, aldehyde oxidase inhibitors, liver diseases and functional defects of skin. We speculate that the gene-environmental interaction in type 2 diabetes may be a reflection of the outcome of the association of chronic nicotinamide overload-induced toxicity and the relatively low detoxification/excretion capacity of the body. Reducing the content of niacin in foods may be a promising strategy for the control of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Dietary Sodium Intake in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Laura Ferreira; Stark, Sue; Steenkiste, Ann; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2014-07-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Superimposed hypertension further increases the risk and is associated with increased dietary sodium intake. There are few data available on dietary sodium intake in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to quantify dietary sodium intake in a cohort of self-referred patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with it. Sodium intake in this cohort was far greater than current recommendations. Increased awareness of sodium intake in this population might lead to target interventions to reduce sodium intake and potentially improve long-term outcomes.

  19. Dietary Sodium Intake in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, Laura Ferreira; Stark, Sue; Steenkiste, Ann; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Superimposed hypertension further increases the risk and is associated with increased dietary sodium intake. There are few data available on dietary sodium intake in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to quantify dietary sodium intake in a cohort of self-referred patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with it. Sodium intake in this cohort was far greater than current recommendations. Increased awareness of sodium intake in this population might lead to target interventions to reduce sodium intake and potentially improve long-term outcomes. PMID:26246681

  20. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood sugars can Also called adult onset or non-insulin dependent diabet , es damage the kidneys, heart, and eyes; and predispose type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how diabetics ...

  1. Ethnicity, type 2 diabetes & migrant Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Abate, Nicola; Chandalia, Manisha

    2007-03-01

    The rapid increase of diabetes prevalence in the US population and across all westernized world has been associated with environmental changes that promote obesity. However, studies conducted in various ethnic groups within the US population have pointed out differences in susceptibility to diabetes within the same environmental pressure. Of particular interest is the growing evidence that Asian Indians, i.e., persons originating from the Indian Subcontinent, are at uniquely heightened risk for type 2 diabetes when compared to other populations. The elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for the heterogeneous relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes in various ethnic groups, and particularly in Asian Indians, may give important contributions to better understand the complex mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes. This review examines epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of the interaction between environment and ethnic predisposition to type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians migrated to the US.

  2. [Acatalasemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz; Káplár, Miklós

    2015-03-08

    The catalase enzyme decomposes the toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. Hydrogen peroxide is a highly reactive small molecule and its excessive concentration may cause significant damages to proteins, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and lipids. Acatalasemia refers to inherited deficiency of the catalase enzyme. In this review the authors discuss the possible role of the human catalase enzyme, the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide, and the phenomenon of hydrogen peroxide paradox. In addition, they review data obtained from Hungarian acatalasemic patients indicating an increased frequency of type 2 diabetes mellitus, especially in female patients, and an early onset of type 2 diabetes in these patients. There are 10 catalase gene variants which appear to be responsible for decreased blood catalase activity in acatalasemic patients with type 2 diabetes. It is assumed that low levels of blood catalase may cause an increased concentration of hydrogen peroxide which may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Phenotypic Type 2 Diabetes in Obese Youth

    PubMed Central

    Tfayli, Hala; Bacha, Fida; Gungor, Neslihan; Arslanian, Silva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Some obese youth with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes have evidence of islet cell autoimmunity with positive autoantibodies. In this study, we investigated the differences in insulin sensitivity and secretion between autoantibody-negative (Ab−) and -positive (Ab+) youth with clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes in comparison with control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Sixteen Ab− and 26 Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and 39 obese control youth underwent evaluation of insulin sensitivity (3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), substrate oxidation (indirect calorimetry), first- and second-phase insulin secretion (2-h hyperglycemic clamp), body composition and abdominal adiposity (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography scan, respectively), and glucose disposition index (first-phase insulin secretion × insulin sensitivity). RESULTS— Insulin-stimulated total, oxidative, and nonoxidative glucose disposal, and suppression of fat oxidation during hyperinsulinemia were significantly lower in Ab− compared with Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic and control subjects with no difference between the latter two. First- and second-phase insulin secretion and C-peptide were lower in Ab+ compared with Ab− type 2 diabetes. Glucose disposition index was not different between the Ab− and Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, but both were significantly lower than that in control subjects. Systolic blood pressure and alanine aminotransferase were higher in Ab− versus Ab+ clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, whereas the frequency of ketonuria at diagnosis was higher in Ab+ versus Ab− patients. CONCLUSIONS— Islet-cell Ab− clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic youth are characterized by severe insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency, whereas Ab+ youth have severe insulin deficiency and β-cell failure. The former group has additional features of insulin

  4. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients.

  5. Weight and type 2 diabetes: new recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Most patients with type 2 diabetes have excess adiposity. There is wide consensus that adequate treatment of type 2 diabetes requires a simultaneous approach to overweight/obesity and the remaining cardiovascular risk factors. Non-pharmacological interventions (diet, exercise) represent the cornerstone of the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Weight loss through lifestyle modification has shown clear benefits in these patients, requiring an individualised and multidisciplinary approach with structured programmes endowed with specific resources. The weight gain associated with some antidiabetic drugs (secretagogues, glitazones, insulin) can hamper glycaemic control, compromising treatment adherence, worsening vascular risk profile, and limiting the benefits of treatment. Therefore, the current tendency is to adopt a weight-centred approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes, giving priority to those antidiabetic drugs that have a neutral effect on weight or that favour weight loss (metformin, incretin therapies, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). Metabolic surgery is an effective alternative for patients with type 2 diabetes and a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) and allows remission of diabetes in a large proportion of patients, especially if the disease is not very advanced. A consensus document supported by various Spanish scientific societies has recently been published. This document makes a series of specific recommendations on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations.

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  8. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  9. [Surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Muciño-Bermejo, María Jimena

    2014-01-01

    Sustained remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and significantly improved hyperlipidemia and arterial hypertension, control has been achieves in both lean and obese patient after bariatric surgery procedures or other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in these patients derives not only in reducing weight and caloric intake, but also endocrine changes resulting from surgical manifestation gastrointestinal tract. In this article we review the clinical outcomes of such interventions (collectively called "metabolic surgery") and the perspectives on the role that these surgeries play in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. The relationship between circulating irisin levels and tissues AGE accumulation in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Yan-Juan; Li, Chen-Guang; Tang, Yun-Zhao; Jiang, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Min; Ni, Chang-Lin; Chen, Li-Ming; Niu, Wen-Yan

    2017-06-30

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), measured by skin autofluorescence (AF), are a factor in the development or worsening of many degenerative diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis. Irisin levels have been associated with diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether circulating irisin levels are correlated with skin AF values in type 2 diabetes patients. A total of 362 Chinese type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in the present study. Clinical characteristics, blood biochemistry and circulating irisin levels were measured. Skin AF was measured using an AGE reader. Circulating irisin levels were significantly lower, while skin AF values were increased in type 2 diabetes compared with controls (P<0.05 respectively). By dividing the distribution of skin AF values into tertiles, serum irisin levels gradually lowered with increasing skin AF values (P<0.05). After adjusting for covariates, multivariate stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that serum lower irisin levels were independently associated with skin AF (P=0.009). Circulating irisin levels were lower in type 2 diabetes patients compared with healthy controls. Lower levels of irisin are independently associated with elevated skin AF values, indicating that circulating irisin levels could be associated with AGEs accumulation, which is one of the reasons causing vascular complications in diabetic patients. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. [Zinc and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic β cells contain the highest amount of zinc among cells within the human body, and hence, the relationship between zinc and diabetes has been a topic of great interest. While many studies demonstrating possible involvement of zinc deficiency in diabetes have been reported, precise mechanisms how zinc regulates glucose metabolism are still far from understood. Recent studies revealed that zinc can transmit signals that are driven by a variety of zinc transporters in a tissue and cell-type specific manner and deficiency in some zinc transporters may cause human diseases. Here, we review the role of zinc in metabolism particularly focusing on the emerging role of zinc transporters in diabetes.

  12. Epidemiology of fractures in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects an increasing proportion of older adults, the population that is also at elevated risk of fracture. Type 2 diabetes itself increases the risk of fracture, particularly in African-American and Latino populations. In Western countries, overweight and obesity, associated with reduced fracture risk, are highly prevalent in diabetic patients. Studies in East Asian countries that have a lower prevalence of obesity with diabetes may help to disentangle the effects of diabetes and obesity on the skeleton. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with higher bone density, and as a result standard tools for fracture prediction tend to underestimate fracture risk in this population, an important challenge for risk assessment in the clinical setting. Contributing factors to the increased fracture risk in type 2 diabetes include more frequent falls and deficits in diabetic bone, not captured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), that are as yet not clearly understood. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that poor glycemic control contributes to increased fracture risk although intensive lowering of A1C is not effective in preventing fracture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Bone and diabetes". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  14. [Etiopathogenesis and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Féry, F; Paquot, N

    2005-01-01

    Etiopathogenesis of type 2 diabetes is complex and still partially unknown. Its etiology is determined by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The genetic contribution is important, but has a polygenic origin. Obesity, especially when fat mass is preferably located in the abdomen, is the main predisposing factor for type 2 diabetes, and almost 80% of diabetic patients are overweight or obese. The diabetogenic effect of obesity is due to the capacity of excessive fat mass to induce or aggravate insulin resistance. Increasing lack of physical activity is also a contributing factor as it increases insulin resistance. As far as pathophysiology is concerned, the development of type 2 diabetes results from the coexistence of abnormalities of insulin secretion and insulin action. Insulin secretory dysfunction, whose underlying mechanism remains poorly understood, is characterized by a relative defect in circulating insulin levels of variable severity. Resistance to insulin action is located in the liver (increased hepatic glucose production), in the skeletal muscle (decreased muscular glucose uptake) and in the adipose tissue (exaggerated lipolysis with elevated plasma free fatty acids). Changes in life-style habits (weight reduction, regular physical activity) are able to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes.

  15. [Therapeutic decisions in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Attali, J R

    1999-01-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic decisions in type 2 diabetes are considered here in terms of both the individual and public health policy. They lead to the recommendation which has proved to be the most effective: early, intensive, global care, first for glycemic control, then, according to the case, for the other risk factors of atheromatosis.

  16. Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lips, Paul; Eekhoff, Marelise; van Schoor, Natasja; Oosterwerff, Mirjam; de Jongh, Renate; Krul-Poel, Yvonne; Simsek, Suat

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a decreased insulin release, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. Animal studies show that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) stimulates the pancreatic β-cell to secrete insulin. The relationship between vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance could develop through inflammation, as vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased inflammatory markers. In addition, genetic polymorphisms of vitamin D -related genes may predispose to impaired glycemic control and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiologic studies showed an association between low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentration and an increased risk for the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. This may be partly explained by an increased fat mass. A possible causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes should be proven by randomized clinical trials showing that either type 2 diabetes can be prevented or insulin release and insulin sensitivity can be improved by vitamin D supplements. The results of randomized clinical trials on the effect of vitamin D versus placebo, sometimes combined with calcium, in patients with impaired glucose tolerance ("prediabetes") or type 2 diabetes are inconsistent. Some studies showed a slight decrease of fasting plasma glucose or improvement of insulin resistance, but often only in posthoc analyses. These effects are mainly visible in patients with vitamin D deficiency and impaired glucose tolerance at baseline. Meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials in general did not show significant effects of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control. Currently, several large scale randomized clinical trials with vitamin D supplementation in doses of 1600-4000IU/d are ongoing with glycemic control or incidence of diabetes mellitus as outcome. Vitamin D deficiency needs to be prevented or cured, but until the results of these trials are published, high

  17. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Shoji, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Terumasa; Suzuki, Akira; Shimizu, Morihiro; Mitsumoto, Kensuke; Kawabata, Hiroaki; Niihata, Kakuya; Okada, Noriyuki; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There is now growing evidence that magnesium (Mg) deficiency is implicated in type 2 diabetes and its complications. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether hypomagnesemia is a predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in type 2 diabetic nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This retrospective cohort study included 455 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (144 with type 2 diabetic nephropathy and 311 with nondiabetic CKD) who were hospitalized at Osaka General Medical Center for a CKD educational program between April 2001 and December 2007. The primary outcome was progression to renal replacement therapy. Participants were categorized based on serum Mg level into Low-Mg (serum Mg level ≤1.8 mg/dL) and High-Mg (serum Mg level >1.8 mg/dL) groups with the previously published normal lower limit chosen as the cutoff point. RESULTS Of the subjects with type 2 diabetic nephropathy, 102 progressed to ESRD during follow-up (median, 23 months). A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model showed that after adjustment for various demographic factors and laboratory data, the Low-Mg group had a 2.12-fold higher risk of ESRD than the High-Mg group (95% CI 1.28–3.51; P = 0.004). In contrast, 135 of the nondiabetic CKD subjects progressed to ESRD during follow-up (median, 44 months). No significant difference in outcome was found between the Low- and High-Mg groups of this population (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI 0.70–1.90; P = 0.57). CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia is a novel predictor of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22498805

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Dede, Anastasia D; Tournis, Symeon; Dontas, Ismene; Trovas, George

    2014-12-01

    Increased fracture risk, traditionally associated with type 1 diabetes, has lately been of great concern in patients with type 2 diabetes. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported, ranging from 20% to 3-fold, depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration and study design. Longer disease duration, the presence of diabetic complications, inadequate glycemic control, insulin use and increased risk for falls are all reported to increase fracture risk. Patients with type 2 diabetes display a unique skeletal phenotype with either normal or more frequently increased, bone mineral density and impaired structural and geometric properties. Recently, alterations in bone material properties seem to be the predominant defect leading to increased bone fragility. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products and changes in collagen cross-linking along with suppression of bone turnover seem to be significant factors impairing bone strength. FRAX score has been reported to underestimate fracture risk and lumbar spine BMD is inadequate in predicting vertebral fractures. Anti-diabetic medications, apart from thiazolidinediones, appear to be safe for the skeleton, although more data are needed. Optimal strategies to reduce skeletal fragility in type 2 diabetic patients are yet to be determined.

  19. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  20. Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Augustin, Livia S A; Ludwig, David S; Barnard, Neal D; Anderson, James W

    2003-09-01

    Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  1. Green tea and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Im, Sung-Soon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    Green tea and coffee consumption have been widely popular worldwide. These beverages contain caffeine to activate the central nervous system by adenosine receptor blockade, and due to the caffeine, addiction or tolerance may occur. In addition to this caffeine effect, green tea and coffee consumption have always been at the center of discussions about human health, disease, and longevity. In particular, green tea catechins are involved in many biological activities such as antioxidation and modulation of various cellular lipid and proteins. Thus, they are beneficial against degenerative diseases, including obesity, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and various inflammatory diseases. Some reports also suggest that daily consumption of tea catechins may help in controlling type 2 diabetes. However, other studies have reported that chronic consumption of green tea may result in hepatic failure, neuronal damage, and exacerbation of diabetes, suggesting that interindividual variations in the green tea effect are large. This review will focus on the effect of green tea catechins extracted from the Camellia sinensis plant on type 2 diabetes and obesity, and the possible mechanistic explanation for the experimental results mainly from our laboratory. It is hoped that green tea can be consumed in a suitable manner as a supplement to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  2. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bowden, Donald W; Collins, Francis S; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C; Spector, Timothy D; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L; Wilson, James G; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M; Meigs, James B; Cox, Nancy J; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P; Mohlke, Karen L; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C; Scott, Laura J; Morris, Andrew P; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2016-08-04

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes.

  3. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Tajes, Juan Fernandez; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stančáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bowden, Donald W; Collins, Francis S; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C; Spector, Timothy D; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L; Wilson, James G; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M; Meigs, James B; Cox, Nancy J; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P; Mohlke, Karen L; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C; Scott, Laura J; Morris, Andrew P; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of heritability. To test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole genome sequencing in 2,657 Europeans with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in a total of 12,940 subjects from five ancestral groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support a major role for lower-frequency variants in predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:27398621

  4. Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  5. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents For ... million Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes." "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for ...

  6. Early Menopause May Be Tied to Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 167305.html Early Menopause May Be Tied to Type 2 Diabetes When periods stop before 40, risk is 4 ... were almost four times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as women whose menopause was late -- at 55 ...

  7. Heart Health Ignored by Many with Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 167670.html Heart Health Ignored by Many With Type 2 Diabetes New evidence review reconfirms patient guidelines To use ... prevent heart disease is crucial for people with type 2 diabetes. But most diabetic adults in the United States ...

  8. Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164100.html Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes Up to 40 percent experienced temporary remission, ... 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Instead of managing type 2 diabetes as a chronic condition, what if people ...

  9. Metformin Still Best as First Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162835.html Metformin Still Best as First Type 2 Diabetes Treatment American College of Physicians updated diabetes guidelines, ... is the first-line drug for people with type 2 diabetes, and that several other medications -- including newer ones -- ...

  10. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  11. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, S; Edelman, S V

    2001-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder often accompanied by numerous metabolic abnormalities leading to a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results from the UKPDS have confirmed that intensive glucose control delays the onset and retards the progression of microvascular disease and possibly of macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the early stages of the disease, insulin resistance plays a major role in the development of hyperglycemia and other metabolic abnormalities, and patients with type 2 diabetes often benefit from measures to improve insulin sensitivity such as weight loss, dietary changes, and exercise. Later, the use of oral insulin secretagogues and insulin sensitizers as monotherapy and in combination helps maintain glycemia for varying periods of time. Ultimately, because of the progressive nature of the disease and the progressive decline in pancreatic beta-cell function, insulin therapy is almost always obligatory to achieve optimal glycemic goals. Not all patients are candidates for aggressive insulin management; therefore, the goals of therapy should be modified, especially in elderly individuals and those with co-morbid conditions. Candidates for intensive management should be motivated, compliant, and educable, without other major medical conditions and physical limitations that would preclude accurate and reliable HGM and insulin administration. In selected patients, combination therapy with insulin and oral antidiabetic medications can be an effective method for normalizing glycemia without the need for rigorous multiple-injection regimens. The patients for whom combination therapy is most commonly successful are those who do not achieve adequate glycemic control using daytime oral agents but who still show some evidence of responsiveness to the medications. Bedtime intermediate-acting or predinner premixed intermediate- and rapid-acting insulin is administered and progressively increased until the FPG

  12. Self-management in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mulvaney, Shelagh A.; Mudasiru, Eniola; Schlundt, David G.; Baughman, Cara L.; Fleming, Mary; VanderWoude, Ann; Russell, William E.; Elasy, Tom A.; Rothman, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document barriers and facilitators of self-management as perceived by adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Methods Focus groups were conducted with adolescents diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Adolescents aged 13 to 19 years were recruited from an academic medical center diabetes clinic. Between 2003 and 2005, 6 focus groups were used to elicit responses from the adolescents related to self-management of their diabetes. Questions were asked by trained group facilitators. Transcripts were coded by 3 reviewers. Qualitative analyses were conducted using NVIVO software. Results A total of 24 adolescents participated in 6 focus groups. Coding resulted in 4 common domains affecting self-management: adolescent psychosocial development; the role of others with diabetes; environmental influences; and adolescents’ problem-solving/coping skills. Adolescents identified both barriers to and facilitators of self-management within each domain. Barriers often related to social situations, embarrassment, seeking acceptance or perceived normalcy, and balancing competing interests. Adolescents viewed having another family member with diabetes as both a positive and a negative influence. Environmental influences, including school and family situations, had a large impact on self-management behaviors. Making sensible food choices was a common challenge. Descriptions of problem-solving or coping skills were limited, but cognitive techniques, such as reframing, were described. Conclusion Adolescents with type 2 diabetes identified many barriers to self-management, particularly related to inter-personal interactions, the influence of others with diabetes, and environmental influences. Results suggest that improving self-management in adolescents may require multimodal interventions to address individual, family, and social processes. PMID:18669809

  13. Momordica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cheow Peng; Yassin, Zaitun; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan

    2012-08-15

    Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) is not only a nutritious vegetable but it is also used in traditional medical practices to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental studies with animals and humans suggested that the vegetable has a possible role in glycaemic control. To assess the effects of mormodica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several electronic databases were searched, among these were The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2012), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SIGLE and LILACS (all up to February 2012), combined with handsearches. No language restriction was used. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared momordica charantia with placebo or a control intervention, with or without pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of the trials was evaluated using the parameters of randomisation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting and other potential sources of bias. A meta-analysis was not performed given the quality of data and the variability of preparations of momordica charantia used in the interventions (no similar preparation was tested twice). Four randomised controlled trials with up to three months duration and investigating 479 participants met the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias of these trials (only two studies were published as a full peer-reviewed publication) was generally high. Two RCTs compared the effects of preparations from different parts of the momordica charantia plant with placebo on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. There was no statistically significant difference in the glycaemic control with momordica charantia preparations compared to placebo. When momordica charantia was compared to metformin or glibenclamide, there was also no significant change in reliable parameters of glycaemic control. No serious adverse effects were reported in any trial. No trial investigated death from any cause

  14. Momordica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cheow Peng; Yassin, Zaitun; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan

    2010-02-17

    Momordica charantia is not only a nutritious vegetable, but is also used in traditional medical practices to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental studies with animals and humans suggested that the vegetable has a possible role in glycaemic control. To assess the effects of mormodica charantia for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several electronic databases were searched, among these The Cochrane Library (issue 4, 2009), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SIGLE and LILACS (all up to November 2009), combined with handsearches. No language restriction was used. Randomized controlled trials that compared momordica charantia with a placebo or a control intervention with or without pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions were included. Two authors independently extracted the data. Risk of bias of trials was evaluated using the parameters of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting and other potential sources of bias. A meta-analysis was not performed given the quality of data and the variability of preparations of momordica charantia used in interventions (no similar preparation was tested twice). Three randomised controlled trials with up to three months duration and investigating 350 participants met the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias of these trials (only one study was published as a full peer-reviewed publication) was generally high. Two RCTs compared the effect of preparations from different parts of the momordica charantia plants and placebo on the glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. There was no statistically significant difference compared to placebo. The effects of preparation from the leaves of the plant and glibenclamide were comparable in the third trial. No serious adverse effects were reported in all the trials. There were no documentations of death from any cause, morbidity, (health-related) quality of life and costs. There is insufficient evidence to recommend momordica charantia

  15. Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-wei; Sun, Guang-dong; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shu-jun; Wang, Ji; Xu, Xiao-hong; Miao, Li-ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM), is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23671868

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study.

  17. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  18. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics is postulated as a risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that fluoroquinolones induce an intracellular magnesium deficit that can lead to insulin resistance. A temporal correlation is reported between the rate of outpatient prescription of quinolones and the incidence of diabetes during the period 1980-2011 with a lag of approximately two years (R(2)=0.86, P<10(-9)). The increase in incidence of diabetes after 1990 and the recent decrease in the number of new cases are both reflected in the fluoroquinolone prescription rates. A geographical correlation is reported (adj. R(2)=0.7, P<0.0001) between rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes in each U.S. state and a model using only local rates of outpatient fluoroquinolone prescription, local rates of increase in the prevalence of obesity, and local rates of population growth as predictor variables. Prescription rates of non-quinolone antibiotics correlated less well with the local rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes. The data are consistent with fluoroquinolone exposure predisposing an individual to develop diabetes with a probability that strongly depends upon factors that also lead to an increase in obesity. According to the hypothesis, much of the increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 to the present can be attributed to fluoroquinolone exposure. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventive pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Neeraj; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Ajish, T. P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades certain demographic changes have been observed worldwide, which have led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular disease are major contributors to this disease burden leading to rising morbidity and mortality. It is worrisome to see that type 2 diabetes with its micro- and macrovascular complications is occurring in younger populations where it was hitherto unseen. Prevention appears to be an important strategy to reduce the burden of disease. Along with inculcating healthy lifestyle habits across populations, it may be suitable to use preventive pharmacotherapy in those with pre-diabetes and / or other risk factors like obesity, hypertension, and on the like. Metformin, alpha glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose, and pioglitazone have all been used with success. The issues of compliance and adverse effects during long-term use have tempered the use of these drugs. The best approach would be to motivate the patient for effective lifestyle changes, and pharmacological management if the lifestyle changes are not successful in achieving their goals. PMID:22276251

  20. Weight management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siram, Amulya T; Yanagisawa, Robert; Skamagas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at risk for weight gain as a result of multiple influences, including sedentary lifestyle, high-calorie diet, diabetes medications, sociocultural factors, chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, and a dysregulated enteroendocrine axis. Because both diabetes mellitus and obesity predispose patients to abnormal cardiometabolic profiles and increased cardiovascular disease, management of diabetes mellitus should focus on weight management and optimizing cardiometabolic parameters, concomitant with glycemic control. Lifestyle modification incorporating healthy, calorie-appropriate diets and increased physical activity, in addition to metformin, are central components to diabetes management and weight management. These interventions have been shown to improve body weight, glycemic control, and overall cardiometabolic profile. The weight-neutral and weight-losing diabetes medications include metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and amylin analogs. It is essential that providers understand the metabolic and weight effects of diabetes medications in order to develop strategies for managing diabetes mellitus while helping patients maintain or lose weight in order to improve their overall health outcomes.

  1. Type 2 diabetes and bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Kendall F

    2012-04-01

    To discuss current literature and hypotheses pertaining to the pathophysiology of increased bone fragility and fracture in men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite high bone mineral density, studies have shown that men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk for fracture. Complications of T2DM including retinopathy and autonomic dysfunction may contribute to bone fracture by increasing fall risk. Nephropathy may lead to renal osteodystrophy. Lean mass and potentially fat mass, may additionally contribute to skeletal health in diabetes. There is increasing acknowledgement that the marrow microenvironment is critical to efficient bone remodeling. Medications including thiazolidinediones and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may also impair bone remodeling by acting on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and osteoblastogenesis. T2DM is associated with significant alterations in systemic inflammation, advanced glycation end-product accumulation and reactive oxygen species generation. These systemic changes may also directly and adversely impact the remodeling cycle and lead to bone fragility in T2DM, though more research is needed. Fracture is a devastating event with dismal health consequences. Identifying the extrinsic and intrinsic biochemical causes of bone fracture in T2DM will speed the discovery of effective strategies for fracture prevention and treatment in this at-risk population.

  2. Vitamins and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Guadarrama-López, Ana Laura; Martínez-Carrillo, Beatriz Elina; Benítez-Arciniega, Alejandra Donají

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12.

  3. [Penile dimensions in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Belousov, I I; Kogan, M I; Ibishev, H S; Vorobyev, S V; Khripun, I A; Gusova, Z R

    2015-12-01

    The current literature provides a wide range of publications on the anthropometry of the penis specifying the relationship between penile dimensions and sex hormones, weight, height and erectile function. But most of the studies involved healthy volunteers or young patients with erectile dysfunction. Our study was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes. Penile measurements obtained in the present study were compared those of the average Russian man. The patients were divided into groups with preserved and impaired erectile function. Erectile function was also studied relative to the variability of penile dimensions. The effect of DM duration on erectile function was defined. Comparative analysis revealed the relationship between penile anatomical dimensions and erectile function. We studied the effect of type 2 diabetes on the anatomical dimensions and elasticity of the penis, established the relationship between penile dimensions and elasticity of the penis. The correlation between the severity of erectile dysfunction and serum testosterone levels on one side, and penile dimensions on the other was found. The effect of penile dimensions on erectile function in DM patients was also examined. Determining penile dimensions and their variability due to various pathological conditions or processes, may eventually lead to better result of ED management.

  4. Preventive pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Neeraj; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Ajish, T P

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades certain demographic changes have been observed worldwide, which have led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular disease are major contributors to this disease burden leading to rising morbidity and mortality. It is worrisome to see that type 2 diabetes with its micro- and macrovascular complications is occurring in younger populations where it was hitherto unseen. Prevention appears to be an important strategy to reduce the burden of disease. Along with inculcating healthy lifestyle habits across populations, it may be suitable to use preventive pharmacotherapy in those with pre-diabetes and / or other risk factors like obesity, hypertension, and on the like. Metformin, alpha glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose, and pioglitazone have all been used with success. The issues of compliance and adverse effects during long-term use have tempered the use of these drugs. The best approach would be to motivate the patient for effective lifestyle changes, and pharmacological management if the lifestyle changes are not successful in achieving their goals.

  5. Bartter's syndrome with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    See, Ting-Ting; Lee, Siu-Pak

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patients condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin), oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  6. Fetal determinants of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Reusens, Brigitte; Ozanne, Susan E; Remacle, Claude

    2007-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes, which has dramatically increased during the last decade normally results from a combination of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. One of the most recent risk factors identified for type 2 diabetes is a sub-optimal fetal and neonatal environment. Numerous human epidemiological studies worldwide have highlighted that a disturbed nutritional environment of the fetus, either poor or too abundant will compromise the health of the offspring by increasing the susceptibility to insulin resistance, to glucose intolerance and to diabetes in later life. In addition to adverse intrauterine events, the detrimental role of catch-up growth and of the mismatch between the prenatal and the postnatal metabolic environment in such pathology is now clear. To understand the mechanisms that are responsible for such programming and to be able to design prevention strategies, a number of animal models have been created. This manuscript reviews the data from several rodent models in which maternal or neonatal diet has been altered. These include models of maternal under-nutrition and over-nutrition as well as gestational diabetes. In general, abnormal beta cell mass and beta cell dysfunction are present at birth and insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and diabetes appear in adult offspring. Obesity, pregnancy and ageing exaggerate the phenotype and there is some evidence to suggest that the phenotype can be transmitted to a second generation independently of any further environmental modification. Possible underlying mechanisms are discussed and evidence for potential early intervention strategies are reported.

  7. Cytokine ratios in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, M V; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D

    Chronic periodontitis may influence systemic cytokines in type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine ratios in type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Gingival status, periodontal, glycemic parameters and serum cytokines were evaluated in participants grouped as healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Cytokine ratios showed significant differences in type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, were highest in participants having both type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, with a statistically significant cut-off point and area under curve by receiver operating characteristic. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus with its high morbidity and mortality becomes an important health problem. The multifactorial etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus is relative to many gene and molecule alterations, and increased insulin resistance. Besides these, however, there are still other predisposing and risk factors accounting for type 2 diabetes mellitus not to be identified and recognized. Emerging evidence indicated that defects in galanin function played a crucial role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Galanin homeostasis is tightly relative to insulin resistance and is regulated by blood glucose. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinism, enhanced plasma galanin levels and decreased galanin receptor activities are some of the characters of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The discrepancy between high insulin level and low glucose handling is named as insulin resistance. Similarly, the discrepancy between high galanin level and low glucose handling may be denominated as galanin resistance too. In this review, the characteristic milestones of type 2 diabetes mellitus were condensed as two analogical conceptual models, obesity-hyper-insulin-insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity-hyper-galanin-galanin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both galanin resistance and insulin resistance are correlative with each other. Conceptualizing the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance may inspire a new concept to deepen our knowledge about pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, eventually leading to novel preventive and therapeutic interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Helminths, hygiene hypothesis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, K; Tahapary, D L; Sartono, E; Soewondo, P; Supali, T; Smit, J W A; Yazdanbakhsh, M

    2017-05-01

    Worldwide, there is little overlap between the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Helminth-induced type 2 immune responses and immune regulatory network might modulate the obesity-induced activation of inflammatory pathways that are associated with the development of insulin resistance, a strong predictor of the development of T2D. However, other factors such as helminth-associated changes in adiposity and gut microbiome might also contribute to improved metabolic outcomes. In this review, we summarize epidemiological evidence for the link between helminths and T2D and discuss the potential mechanisms, based on findings from experimental studies as well as the limited number of studies in humans. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Bone damage in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, V; Romagnoli, E; D'Erasmo, L; D'Erasmo, E

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms determining bone fragility in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite bone mineral density (BMD) is usually normal or more often increased in these patients, fracture incidence is high, probably because of altered bone "quality". The latter seems to depend on several, only partly elucidated, mechanisms, such as the increased skeletal content of advanced glycation end-products causing collagen deterioration, the altered differentiation of bone osteogenic cells, the altered bone turnover and micro-architecture. Disease duration, its severity and metabolic control, the type of therapy, the presence or absence of complications, as like as the other known predictors for falls, are all relevant contributing factors affecting fracture risk in T2DM. In these patients the estimate of fracture risk in the everyday clinical practice may be challenging, due to the lower predictive capacity of both BMD and risk factors-based algorithms (e.g. FRAX).

  11. Periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Khawaja, Khadija Irfan; Ataullah, Khurram; Munir, Muhammad Bader; Fatima, Aziz

    2012-08-01

    To determine the periodontal status in well controlled and poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients compared with normal healthy individuals. Cross-sectional comparative study. Diabetes Management Centre, Services Hospital, Lahore, from November 2009 to January 2010. Forty well controlled and forty poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects having good oral hygiene (scored according to simplified oral hygiene index) were compared with a control group of forty normal healthy individuals. Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and attachment loss (AL) were recorded to obtain the periodontal status of each tooth, using a Michigan probe "0" with Williams marking. Glycemic control was evaluated by glycated Hb value. Using ANOVA and independent sample t-test, mean probing depth and attachment loss in each tooth type (incisors, canines, premolars and molars) were compared. Mean age of diabetic subjects was 58.86 ± 6.21 years and that of control group was 56.92 ± 6.91 years; 60% were females. Probing depth was greater in patients with poorly controlled diabetes compared to well controlled diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls (4.21 mm vs. 3.72 mm and 2.93 mm respectively, p < 0.001). Attachment loss also increased in poorly controlled diabetes (p < 0.001) compared to the control group and well controlled diabetes, however, the difference was not statistically significant when comparing well controlled to the control group (p > 0.05). Number of sites and mean percentage of sites with attachment loss of ³ 4 and ³ 6 mm was also significantly higher in poorly controlled diabetes compared to the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). Periodontal status as estimated by probing depth and degree of attachment loss deteriorates significantly with poor glycemic control in diabetes.

  12. Oral Health and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Renata S.; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been described as a new epidemic. Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is predicted to increase by about 50% by year 2030.This article will review oral health manifestations of diabetes, and discuss associations between periodontal disease and diabetes. Although there is a strong body of evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and T2DM, oral health awareness is lacking among patients with diabetes and other health professionals. There is a need for the treating physician to be educated about the various oral manifestations of diabetes so that they can be diagnosed early and timely referrals to oral health specialists can be made. The established link between periodontitis and diabetes calls for an increased need to study ways to control both diseases, particularly among populations with health disparities and limited access to oral and health care. PMID:23531957

  13. Gut microbiota and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Diaz-Perdigones, Cristina; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, many studies have related gut microbiome to development of highly prevalent diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Obesity itself is associated to changes in the composition of gut microbiome, with a trend to an overgrowth of microorganisms more efficiently obtaining energy from diet. There are several mechanisms that relate microbiota to the onset of insulin resistance and diabetes, including changes in bowel permeability, endotoxemia, interaction with bile acids, changes in the proportion of brown adipose tissue, and effects associated to use of drugs like metformin. Currently, use of pro and prebiotics and other new techniques such as gut microbiota transplant, or even antibiotic therapy, has been postulated to be useful tools to modulate the development of obesity and insulin resistance through the diet.

  14. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND DEPRESSION].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A Ya; Esaulenko, I E; Sahnenko, V V; Budnevskyj, A V; Podvygyn, S N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of type 2 diabetes mellitus is not confined to metabolic disorders. A serious problem is also affective pathology that occurs in the majority (30-70%) of patients. However, diagnostics and correction of anxiety and depressive disorders associated with diabetes are often given insufficient attention. Many studies showed relationship between affective disorders and low adherence to the prescribed treatment resulting in general deterioration of clinical prognosis of diabetes. This review article describes the basic mechanisms behind the interrelation of affective disorders and diabetes. The role of persistent subclinical inflammation in diabetes and depression is discussed. The influence of emotional stress on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the overproduction of cortisol is emphasized. The similarity of some structural changes in the brain tissue in diabetes and depression is discussed. Effect of endocrine disruption in the emotional sphere is demonstrated. Mechanisms responsible for the development of diabetes and its complications provoked by depression are considered.

  16. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2015-03-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Type 2 Diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic.

  17. Type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shashank R

    2012-06-01

    India is a global leader in diabetes, currently with second largest pool of diabetes in the world. Asian Indian phenotype is uniquely predisposed to develop type 2 diabetes because of strong familial aggregation as well lifestyle factors of imprudent diet and sedentary physical habit. The typical Asian Indian phenotype is the "thin-fat Indian" which means that Asian Indians have higher body fat composition and lesser muscle mass (sarcopenia) than the white or African counterparts. Aggressive screening and treatment strategies are advocated in this high-risk diabetic race. Prevention is the key for diabetes in Indians, and simple prevention themes like "Eat less, eat on time, eat right, walk more, sleep well, and smile" are needed.

  18. [New therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Pellitero, Silvia

    2015-06-22

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to a growing interest in the investigation of new therapies. Treatment of T2DM has focused on the insulinopenia and insulin resistance. However, in the last 10 years, new lines of research have emerged for the treatment of T2DM and preclinical studies appear promising. The possibility of using these drugs in combination with other currently available drugs will enhance the antidiabetic effect and promote weight loss with fewer side effects. The data provided by post-marketing monitoring will help us to better understand their safety profile and potential long-term effects on target organs, especially the cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation: From mechanisms to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic conditions and its prevalence has increased continuously over the past decades, primarily due to the obesity epidemic. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice and is associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of AF. However, the results about the relationship between diabetes and AF are still conflicting. Mechanisms that are responsible for an association between diabetes and AF, as well as the adequate treatment of AF in patients with diabetes, are still insufficiently studied. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of mechanisms that connect AF and diabetes, the clinical studies that include patients with both conditions, and the treatment options in modern pharmacology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of cigarette smoking in type 2 diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi-tao; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Wakui, Makoto

    2009-06-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are at risk for micro and macro vascular complications, which could be observed in heavy smokers. Cigarette smoking increases the risk for type 2 diabetes incidence. Nicotine, acknowledged as the major pharmacologically active chemical in tobacco, is responsible for the association between cigarette smoking and development of diabetes. This minireview summarized recent studies on nicotine effects on insulin action and insulin secretion, indicating the impact of nicotine on type 2 diabetes development.

  2. Atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes: a role for fibrate therapy?

    PubMed

    Steiner, George

    2007-12-01

    Vascular complications associated with type 2 diabetes confer significant morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis develops much earlier and progresses more rapidly than in subjects without diabetes. The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes is mainly responsible for accelerated atherosclerotic disease. While statins remain the primary lipid-modifying therapy, the pharmacological profile of the fibrates suggests potential as an alternative or additional treatment for reducing the risk of atherosclerotic vascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

  3. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-04

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetic dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yong S K; Kashyap, Moti L

    2004-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have a higher risk for cardiovascular heart disease (CHD) than does the general population, and once they develop CHD, mortality is higher. Good glycemic control will reduce CHD only modestly in patients with diabetes. Therefore, reduction in all cardiovascular risks such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and smoking is warranted. The focus of this article is on therapy for dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance) share similarities with patients with type 2 diabetes and may have a comparable cardiovascular risk profile. Diabetic patients tend to have higher triglyceride, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and similar low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels compared with those levels in nondiabetic patients. However, diabetic patients tend to have a higher concentration of small dense LDL particles, which are associated with higher CHD risk. Current recommendations are for an LDL goal of less than 100 mg/dl (an option of < 70 mg/dl in very high-risk patients), an HDL goal greater than 40 mg/dl for men and greater than 50 mg/dl for women, and a triglyceride goal less than 150 mg/dl. Nonpharmacologic interventions (diet and exercise) are first-line therapies and are used with pharmacologic therapy when necessary. Lowering LDL levels is the first priority in treating diabetic dyslipidemia. Statins are the first drug choice, followed by resins or ezetimibe, then fenofibrate or niacin. If a single agent is inadequate to achieve lipid goals, combinations of the preceding Drugs may be used. For elevated triglyceride levels, hyperglycemia must be controlled first. If triglyceride or HDL levels remain uncontrolled, pharmacologic agents should be considered. Fibrates are slightly more effective than niacin in lowering triglyceride levels, but niacin increases HDL levels appreciably more than do fibrates. Unlike gemfibrozil, niacin selectively increases

  5. Plasma malondialdehyde in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Gallou, G; Ruelland, A; Legras, B; Maugendre, D; Allannic, H; Cloarec, L

    1993-02-28

    Malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, was measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in 117 diabetic patients and 53 controls. Patients were divided into groups and subgroups according to the type of diabetes (type 1 and type 2) and the existence or not of vascular complication (macro- or micro-angiopathy). Results showed that TBARS concentrations were significantly higher in type 1 (P < 0.0001) and type 2 (P < 0.001) diabetic patients than in the control group. The plasma TBARS concentrations in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients did not differ significantly. Among the patients with vascular disease, type 2 diabetic patients with macroangiopathy had significantly higher TBARS concentrations than patients with no vascular complication (P < 0.05). Whichever the type of diabetes, there was no correlation between TBARS concentrations and glycaemic control: glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood glucose. This study confirmed the existence of lipid peroxidation disorders in diabetic patients.

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in African women.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, Julia H; Mtintsilana, Asanda; Dlamini, Siphiwe N; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Compared to global estimates, Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has the highest projected rates of increase in type 2 diabetes (T2D) over the next 25years. This is attributed to the ageing population, increasing urbanisation and the associated lifestyle changes. Although the prevalence does not differ by gender, deaths attributable to T2D in SSA are greater in women, likely due to differences in beliefs and access to care. Women in SSA also have greater risk factor burden for T2D than men, in particular obesity, which is explained in part by sociocultural factors. The pathogenesis of diabetes differs between African and Caucasian women, with implications for risk assessment. African women are more insulin resistant than their Caucasian counterparts, despite a more 'favourable' body fat distribution. Notably, women in SSA face the dual burden of T2D and HIV/AIDS. HIV positive women in SSA are typically young and obese, with the latter being exacerbated by anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Cultural perceptions regarding weight loss and limited financial resources are the major limitations to the management of T2D. Hence prevention is vital. However, there is a paucity of studies examining the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to reduce T2D in SSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dietary behavior and type 2 diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Albarran, Noemi B; Ballesteros, Martha N; Morales, Gloria G; Ortega, Maria I

    2006-05-01

    To explore risk factors modification, as well as barriers and facilitators for behavioral change in Mexican type 2 diabetics and their families. Risk assessment and impact evaluation included measurements on anthropometrics, diet, physical activity, nutrition knowledge, and HbA(1c.) The intervention included discussion groups and promoted behavioral change on dietary risk, physical exercise, and basic diabetic knowledge of 48 urban diabetic patients and 38 relatives. The educational method consisted of cognitive reframing and situational problem solving during five meetings over an 8-month period. Diabetics were older and less educated than their participating relatives (55.8+/-11 and 34.7+/-13.7 years old, and 4.5+/-3.4 and 7.8+/-3.7 years of schooling, respectively). Factors such as diet, degree of obesity, physical activity and HbA(1c), reflected that 92% of diabetic patients and 83% of their relatives were at high health risk. After the intervention, nutritional knowledge and diet-health awareness increased (p=.013 and .001 respectively); however, no significant health-risks reduction was observed. Focus group analysis suggested that lack of support from family and health services, low income, neighborhood insecurity and misleading "popular knowledge" and advice are key barriers to behavioral change. The study supports the understanding of constrains to health promotion campaigns and better health provider-patient interactions in Mexican population. Additionally, the study contributes to the general knowledge of ethnic socio-cultural environment influences over health care issues, primarily to diet modifications.

  8. [Type 2 diabetes: new therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Bouhanick, B; Berrut, G; Fressinaud, P; Marre, M

    1998-12-12

    UKPDS: The results of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) were reported in 1998. This multi-center, prospective, randomized, intervention trial of 5102 newly-diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was aimed at determining whether improved blood glucose control can prevent complications and reduce associated morbidity and mortality. Improved blood glucose control was shown to reduce the number of complications, mainly by reducing the effect of microangiopathy. There was however no reduction in the number of diabetes-related deaths nor in the risk of myocardial infarction or sudden death. Calcium antagonists are suspected of increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. On the basis of published reports, the JNC VI guidelines are recommended: calcium antagonists should not be used as first line treatment in diabetics. Acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, lowers post-prandial blood glucose level. It has marketing approval for single-drug regimens in France. Miglitol, another alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, would have the same therapeutic effect. Orliatort, an gastro-intestinal lipase inhibitor, is indicated in obese patients but long-term results are lacking to evaluate effects in diabetics.

  9. In the clinic. Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vijan, Sandeep

    2010-03-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of type 2 diabetes focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic.

  10. [The incretin effect and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-García, Cristina; Zúñiga-Guajardo, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In the gastrointestinal tract we produce hormones, called incretins, in response to food ingestion with a direct effect on pancreatic β and α cell improving the insulin and glucagon response to glucose. The effect consisting in a greater secretion of insulin with a glucose stimulus from the gut or IV injection is called "the incretin effect." The main incretins are: glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). The action of both incretins is very short due to a rapid inhibition in the circulation by an enzyme dipeptylpeptidase IV (DPP4). In type 2 diabetics, the incretin effect is altered and can be improved by elaboration of a GLP1 resistant to the action of DPP4 (GLP1 analogs) or by direct inhibition of DPP4 producing better effect of native GLP1 and GIP. We have exenatide a derivative from exendin 4, and liraglutide very similar to the native human GLP1. Three inhibitors of DPP4: sitagliptin, and vildagliptin and saxagliptin produce a prolonged inhibition of DPP4 and as a consequence increased effect of native incretins with better control of fasting and postprandial glucose and improve on A1c with a very few hypoglycemic events.

  11. Sitagliptin: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2017-02-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin (Januvia(®); Glactiv(®); Tesavel(®); Xelevia™) is approved in more than 130 countries worldwide as monotherapy and in combination with other antihyperglycaemic drugs for the treatment of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Extensive clinical experience has firmly established the glycaemic efficacy of oral sitagliptin (±other antihyperglycaemic drugs) in a broad spectrum of patients with T2D, including obese, elderly and renally impaired patients and those with established cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Sitagliptin is generally well tolerated, with most adverse events being of mild to moderate intensity and relatively few patients discontinuing treatment because of these events. Sitagliptin treatment was not associated with an increased risk for the known CVD risk factors of hypoglycaemia and bodyweight gain. Of note, in the TECOS CV safety trial in patients with T2D and established CVD, sitagliptin was noninferior to placebo in terms of the risk of the 4-point major adverse cardiac event (MACE) outcome, with no increased risk in hospitalization for heart failure. Albeit discussion is equivocal regarding the potential increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer with incretin-based therapies (including sitagliptin), no causal link between incretin-based drugs and these events has been established to date. With its convenient once-daily oral regimen, low potential for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and good efficacy and safety profiles, including CV safety, sitagliptin remains an important option in the management of patients with T2D.

  12. Insulin management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Petznick, Allison

    2011-07-15

    Insulin therapy is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an initial A1C level greater than 9 percent, or if diabetes is uncontrolled despite optimal oral glycemic therapy. Insulin therapy may be initiated as augmentation, starting at 0.3 unit per kg, or as replacement, starting at 0.6 to 1.0 unit per kg. When using replacement therapy, 50 percent of the total daily insulin dose is given as basal, and 50 percent as bolus, divided up before breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Augmentation therapy can include basal or bolus insulin. Replacement therapy includes basal-bolus insulin and correction or premixed insulin. Glucose control, adverse effects, cost, adherence, and quality of life need to be considered when choosing therapy. Metformin should be continued if possible because it is proven to reduce all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in overweight patients with diabetes. In a study comparing premixed, bolus, and basal insulin, hypoglycemia was more common with premixed and bolus insulin, and weight gain was more common with bolus insulin. Titration of insulin over time is critical to improving glycemic control and preventing diabetes-related complications.

  13. Mechanisms of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Loci.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Kyle J

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) risk loci can greatly inform on disease pathology. This review discusses current knowledge of mechanisms through which genetic variants influence T2DM risk and considerations for future studies. Over 100 T2DM risk loci to date have been identified. Candidate causal variants at risk loci map predominantly to non-coding sequence. Physiological, epigenomic and gene expression data suggest that variants at many known T2DM risk loci affect pancreatic islet regulation, although variants at other loci also affect protein function and regulatory processes in adipose, pre-adipose, liver, skeletal muscle and brain. The effects of T2DM variants on regulatory activity in these tissues appear largely, but not exclusively, due to altered transcription factor binding. Putative target genes of T2DM variants have been defined at an increasing number of loci and some, such as FTO, may entail several genes and multiple tissues. Gene networks in islets and adipocytes have been implicated in T2DM risk, although the molecular pathways of risk genes remain largely undefined. Efforts to fully define the mechanisms of T2DM risk loci are just beginning. Continued identification of risk mechanisms will benefit from combining genetic fine-mapping with detailed phenotypic association data, high-throughput epigenomics data from diabetes-relevant tissue, functional screening of candidate genes and genome editing of cellular and animal models.

  14. Emerging treatment options for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K; Tahrani, Abd A; Barnett, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing in prevalence and is a major public health problem. It is a progressive disease which commonly requires multiple pharmacotherapy. Current options for treatment may have undesirable side effects (particularly weight gain and hypoglycaemia) and contraindications, and little effect on disease progression. Incretin based therapy is one of several newer therapies to improve glycaemia and is available in two different forms, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists. Use of these agents results in a ‘glucose-dependant’ increase in insulin secretion and glucagon suppression resulting in improved glycaemia with low incidence of hypoglycaemia. DPP-4 inhibitors are oral drugs which are weight neutral, while GLP-1 agonists are injected subcutaneously and help promote weight loss while improving glycaemia. GLP-1 agonists have also been shown to increase beta cell mass in rat models. Bariatric surgery is another option for the obese patient with T2DM, with blood glucose normalizing in over half of the patients following surgery. Other therapies in development for the treatment of T2DM include sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, glucagon receptor antagonists, glucokinase activators and sirtuins. In this article, we will review the various existing and emerging treatment options for T2DM. PMID:20831513

  15. Feline models of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Henson, Michael S; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) closely resembles human type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in many respects including clinical, physiological, and pathological features of the disease. These features include age of onset of FDM in middle age, association with obesity, residual but declining insulin secretion, development of islet amyloid deposits, loss of approximately 50% of beta-cell mass, and development of complications in several organ systems including peripheral polyneuropathy and retinopathy. Many of the pathological aspects of the disease are also experimentally inducible, facilitating study of the pathogenesis of these lesions. Physiological aspects of FDM and obesity are also well studied in the cat and provide an excellent basis for comparative studies of human T2DM. The relatively short generation time of cats along with breed predispositions to development of FDM may allow for more rapid screening and identification of genetic markers for diabetes susceptibility. FDM, in both spontaneous and inducible forms, therefore provides a good animal model of human T2DM and may provide additional insights into the pathogenesis of this important condition.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: An unusual association with Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Tripathy, Prabhas Ranjan; Kota, Siva Krishna; Jammula, Sruti

    2013-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is known to be associated with autoimmune disease including type 1 diabetes. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of DS with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the literature. We hereby report two cases of DS with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24339554

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: An unusual association with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Tripathy, Prabhas Ranjan; Kota, Siva Krishna; Jammula, Sruti

    2013-07-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is known to be associated with autoimmune disease including type 1 diabetes. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of DS with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the literature. We hereby report two cases of DS with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians should be aware of the frequent mild or asymptomatic manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Therefore, a screening seems meaningful especially in high risk groups such as children and adolescents with obesity, relatives with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and clinical features of insulin resistance (hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or acanthosis nigricans). Treatment of choice is lifestyle intervention followed by pharmacological treatment (e.g., metformin). New drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors or glucagon like peptide 1 mimetics are in the pipeline for treatment of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, recent reports indicate a high dropout of the medical care system of adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus suggesting that management of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires some remodeling of current healthcare practices. PMID:24379917

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes: interacting epidemics.

    PubMed

    Tasali, Esra; Mokhlesi, Babak; Van Cauter, Eve

    2008-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern with high morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Recent reports have indicated that the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). There is compelling evidence that OSA is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Rapidly accumulating data from both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that OSA is also independently associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and places patients at an increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. Experimental studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that intermittent hypoxia and reduced sleep duration due to sleep fragmentation, as occur in OSA, exert adverse effects on glucose metabolism. Based on the current evidence, clinicians need to address the risk of OSA in patients with type 2 diabetes and, conversely, evaluate the presence of type 2 diabetes in patients with OSA. Clearly, there is a need for further research, using well-designed studies and long-term follow-up, to fully demonstrate a causal role for OSA in the development and severity of type 2 diabetes. In particular, future studies must carefully consider the confounding effects of central obesity in examining the link between OSA and alterations in glucose metabolism. The interactions among the rising epidemics of obesity, OSA, and type 2 diabetes are likely to be complex and involve multiple pathways. A better understanding of the relationship between OSA and type 2 diabetes may have important public health implications.

  20. It's Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicare & Medicaid Services HealthSense Alternate Language URL Español It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes ... a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes? It’s true. You have a greater chance of getting ...

  1. Can Folks with Type 2 Diabetes Forgo the Finger Stick?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166461.html Can Folks With Type 2 Diabetes Forgo the Finger Stick? Self-monitoring of blood ... SATURDAY, June 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 2 diabetes who aren't taking insulin don't necessarily ...

  2. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  3. Early determinants of type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berends, L M; Ozanne, S E

    2012-10-01

    The global prevalence of type-2 diabetes (T2D) has more than doubled in the last 30 years and is predicted to continue to rise at an alarming rate. The associated health and financial burdens are considerable. The aetiology of common forms of T2D is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The influential role of the environment, in particular our diet and sedentary lifestyles, in diabetes risk is well established. Of major concern is the increasing prevalence of early onset T2D or pre-diabetic characteristics in children. In recent years, the role of the early life environment in programming diabetes risk has been the focus of numerous human and animal studies. Historical studies highlighted an association between low birthweight, a proxy for suboptimal in utero growth, and diabetes risk in adulthood. Over more recent years it has become apparent that a variety of expositions, including maternal obesity and/or maternal diabetes, can have a significant effect on offspring health outcomes. Further complicating matters, paternal and transgenerational transmission of T2D can occur thus mediating a perpetuating cycle of disease risk between generations. It is imperative for the underlying mechanisms to be elucidated so that interventions can be introduced. In doing so, it may be possible to prevent, delay or reverse a pre-programmed risk for T2D induced by pre- and/or postnatal environmental factors to improve health outcomes and curb premature metabolic decline. This review presents evidence for how the early life environment may programme T2D risk and suggests some mechanisms by which this may occur.

  4. Muscle fatigability in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giorgio; Balducci, Stefano; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may be subject to premature muscle fatigue. However, the effect of diabetes on muscle fatigability has not yet been thoroughly examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of T2D on muscle fatigability at the upper and lower body. Thirty-three T2D patients (18 men and 15 women; mean age, 59.3 ± 5.3 years) and 34 matched healthy control participants (17 men and 17 women; mean age, 60.1 ± 6.1 years) were recruited. Clinical characteristics of diabetic patients were assessed by considering a wide range of vascular and neurological parameters in order to exclude the presence of micro- and macro-vascular complications. Gender-specific muscle function was evaluated measuring the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and the endurance time at 50% of the MVIC at the shoulder and at the knee extensor muscles. Muscle strength in the upper body was similar among groups, whereas in the lower body, it was significantly reduced in T2D men (-16%) and women (-22%) compared with the controls. Additionally, the endurance time in both upper and lower body was significantly lower in T2D men (-18% and -29%) and women (-19% and -25%, respectively) than controls. Besides the reduction in strength, muscle dysfunction in T2D is characterized by a higher fatigability that affects both upper and lower body muscles. This effect is independent to the presence of diabetic complications and may represent a more sensitive marker of muscular dysfunction than muscle strength. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Insulin Signaling in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Nyman, Elin; Fagerholm, Siri; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Ekstrand, Eva-Maria; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes originates in an expanding adipose tissue that for unknown reasons becomes insulin resistant. Insulin resistance reflects impairments in insulin signaling, but mechanisms involved are unclear because current research is fragmented. We report a systems level mechanistic understanding of insulin resistance, using systems wide and internally consistent data from human adipocytes. Based on quantitative steady-state and dynamic time course data on signaling intermediaries, normally and in diabetes, we developed a dynamic mathematical model of insulin signaling. The model structure and parameters are identical in the normal and diabetic states of the model, except for three parameters that change in diabetes: (i) reduced concentration of insulin receptor, (ii) reduced concentration of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4, and (iii) changed feedback from mammalian target of rapamycin in complex with raptor (mTORC1). Modeling reveals that at the core of insulin resistance in human adipocytes is attenuation of a positive feedback from mTORC1 to the insulin receptor substrate-1, which explains reduced sensitivity and signal strength throughout the signaling network. Model simulations with inhibition of mTORC1 are comparable with experimental data on inhibition of mTORC1 using rapamycin in human adipocytes. We demonstrate the potential of the model for identification of drug targets, e.g. increasing the feedback restores insulin signaling, both at the cellular level and, using a multilevel model, at the whole body level. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in an expanded adipose tissue results from cell growth restriction to prevent cell necrosis. PMID:23400783

  6. Pyridorin in Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Tom; Spitalewiz, Samuel; Blumenthal, Samuel; Berl, Tomas; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Pohl, Marc A.; Rohde, Richard D.; Raz, Itamar; Yerushalmy, Yair; Yagil, Yoram; Herskovits, Tommy; Atkins, Robert C.; Reutens, Anne T.; Packham, David K.; Lewis, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride (Pyridorin, NephroGenex) inhibits formation of advanced glycation end products and scavenges reactive oxygen species and toxic carbonyls, but whether these actions translate into renoprotective effects is unknown. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 317 patients with proteinuric type 2 diabetic nephropathy to twice-daily placebo; Pyridorin, 150 mg twice daily; or Pyridorin, 300 mg twice daily, for 52 weeks. At baseline, the mean age ± SD was 63.9±9.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 17.6±8.5 years; the mean serum creatinine level was 2.2±0.6 mg/dl, and the mean protein-to-creatinine ratio was 2973±1932 mg/g. Regarding the primary end point, a statistically significant change in serum creatinine from baseline to 52 weeks was not evident in either Pyridorin group compared with placebo. However, analysis of covariance suggested that the magnitude of the treatment effect differed by baseline renal function. Among patients in the lowest tertile of baseline serum creatinine concentration, treatment with Pyridorin associated with a lower average change in serum creatinine concentration at 52 weeks (0.28, 0.07, and 0.14 mg/dl for placebo, Pyridorin 150 mg, and Pyridorin 300 mg, respectively; P=0.05 for either Pyridorin dose versus placebo); there was no evidence of a significant treatment effect in the middle or upper tertiles. In conclusion, this trial failed to detect an effect of Pyridorin on the progression of serum creatinine at 1 year, although it suggests that patients with less renal impairment might benefit. PMID:22034637

  7. Type 2 diabetes: the genetic conflict hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Denic, S; Emerald, S; Nicholls, M G

    2013-04-01

    We propose that conflict between paternally and maternally derived genes in the fetus explains three apparently unrelated observations in epidemiological studies of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2): (i) low birth weight is a risk factor for the development of DM2, (ii) there is a high prevalence of low birth weight among babies of fathers who develop DM2, and (iii) an exceptionally high prevalence of DM2 exists in modern day Arabs. Genetic conflict is caused by a particular relationship between the parents, their genes and their offspring: (i) mothers are sometimes polyandrous i.e. have children with more than one man, (ii) mothers provide more biological resources to the fetus than fathers, and (iii) the genes that regulate fetal growth come from both parents and both sets of genes determine the use of resources which are only those of the mother. There is a tendency for maternally derived genes (that promote fetal growth) to be suppressed, in order to spare use of mother's resources, while the same paternally derived genes tend to be expressed (to enhance use of the mother's resources). These same genes are pleiotropic: they affect not only fetal growth (birth weight) but also insulin resistance and hence the development of DM2. Polyandry increases differences in the expression between two parental alleles in the fetus i.e. increases genetic conflict and results in the production of bigger babies whereas monandry has the opposite effect. Consequently, parent-of-origin-biased expression of pleiotropic developmental genes could explain why smaller babies are more common when the fathers have DM2. Similarly less genetic conflict in Arabs (resulting from the tradition of strict monandry, the practice of levirate, and preference for a paternal cousin as spouse) could explain, at least in part, their exceptionally high prevalence of DM2. This hypothesis links human mate selection with the risk of developing DM2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Amine Farias; Flor, Luísa Sorio; Campos, Mônica Rodrigues; Oliveira, Andreia Ferreira de; Costa, Maria de Fátima Dos Santos; Silva, Raulino Sabino da; Lobato, Luiz Cláudio da Paixão; Schramm, Joyce Mendes de Andrade

    2017-03-30

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus currently ranks high among indicators used in Global Burden of Disease Studies. The current study estimated the burden of disease attributable to type 2 diabetes mellitus and its chronic complications in Brazil, 2008. We calculated disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) stratified by gender, age bracket, and major geographic region. Type 2 diabetes mellitus accounted for 5% of the burden of disease in Brazil, ranking 3rd in women and 6th in men in the composition of DALYs. The largest share of DALYs was concentrated in the 30-59-year age bracket and consisted mainly of YLDs. The highest YLL and YLD rates were in the Northeast and South of Brazil, respectively. Chronic complications represented 80% of YLDs from type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mellitus ranked as a leading health problem in Brazil in 2008, accounting for relevant shares of mortality and morbidity.

  9. Type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lascar, Nadia; Brown, James; Pattison, Helen; Barnett, Anthony H; Bailey, Clifford J; Bellary, Srikanth

    2017-08-25

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults is dramatically increasing. Similar to older-onset type 2 diabetes, the major predisposing risk factors are obesity, family history, and sedentary lifestyle. Onset of diabetes at a younger age (defined here as up to age 40 years) is associated with longer disease exposure and increased risk for chronic complications. Young-onset type 2 diabetes also affects more individuals of working age, accentuating the adverse societal effects of the disease. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating that young-onset type 2 diabetes has a more aggressive disease phenotype, leading to premature development of complications, with adverse effects on quality of life and unfavourable effects on long-term outcomes, raising the possibility of a future public health catastrophe. In this Review, we describe the epidemiology and existing knowledge regarding pathophysiology, risk factors, complications, and management of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maleckas, A; Venclauskas, L; Wallenius, V; Lönroth, H; Fändriks, L

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, and most of the cases are type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity is well established, and surgical treatment is widely used for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim was to present current knowledge about the possible mechanisms responsible for glucose control after surgical procedures and to review the surgical treatment results. Medical literature was searched for the articles presenting the impact of surgical treatment on glycemic control, long-term results, and possible mechanisms of action among obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery depends on the definition of the remission used. Complete remission rate after surgery with the new criteria is lower than was considered before. Randomized controlled studies demonstrate that surgery is superior to best medical treatment for the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The recurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery is observed in up to 40% of cases with ≥ 5 years of follow-up. Despite the recurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in this group, better glycemic control and lower risk of macrovascular complications are present. Incretin effects on glycemic control after bariatric surgery are well described, but the role of other possible mechanisms (bile acids, microbiota, intestinal gluconeogenesis) in humans is unclear. Surgery is an effective treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese patients. The most optimal surgical procedure for the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is still to be established. More research is needed to explore the mechanisms of glycemic control after bariatric surgery. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  11. Type 2 diabetes, glucose homeostasis and incident atrial fibrillation: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Huxley, Rachel R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Lopez, Faye L.; Filion, Kristian B.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; Loehr, Laura R.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pankow, James S.; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes has been inconsistently associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) in previous studies that have frequently been beset by methodological challenges. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Participants Detailed medical histories were obtained on 13025 participants. Individuals were categorized as having no diabetes, pre-diabetes or diabetes based on the 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria at study baseline (1990–92). Main Outcome Measures Diagnoses of incident AF were obtained through 2007. Associations between type 2 diabetes and markers of glucose homeostasis with the incidence of AF were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models after adjusting for possible confounders. Results Type 2 diabetes was associated with a significant increase in risk of AF (HR 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–1.60) after adjustment for confounders. There was no indication that individuals with pre-diabetes or those with undiagnosed diabetes were at increased risk of AF compared to those without diabetes. We observed a positive linear association between HbA1c and risk of AF in those with and without diabetes: 1.13 (1.07–1.20) and 1.05 (0.96–1.15) per 1% point increase, respectively. There was no association between fasting glucose or insulin (p>0.05) in those without diabetes but a significant association with fasting glucose in those with the condition (p=0.0002). Results were similar in whites and African Americans. Conclusions Diabetes, HbA1c level and poor glycemic control are independently associated with increased risk of AF, but the underlying mechanisms governing the relationship are unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:21930722

  12. Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163536.html Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Study ... Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of air pollution may increase some Hispanic children's risk of type ...

  13. Non-invasive Measurement of Skin Autofluorescence as a Beneficial Surrogate Marker for Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temma, Jin; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Horie, Toru; Kuroda, Akio; Mori, Hiroyasu; Tamaki, Motoyuki; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Skin autofluorescence (AF) was recently reported to represent tissue AGEs accumulation with a non-invasive method. The aim of the present study was to evaluate association between AF value and diabetic vascular complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy and cervical atherosclerosis using the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 68 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in a cross-sectional manner. AGEs accumulation was measured with AF reader. Clinical parameters were collected at the time of AF and IMT measurement. Max-IMT was correlated with age and AF (r=0.407, p=0.001), but not with HbA1c, GA, and pentosidine. Also, AF was not correlated with HbA1c, GA and pentosidine, but was correlated with age (r=0.560, p<0.001), duration of diabetes (r=0.256, p<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that AF, but not age, was an independent determinant of max-IMT. In conclusion, AF might be a beneficial surrogate marker for evaluating carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes non-invasively. J. Med. Invest. 62: 126-129, August, 2015.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Syed, Sofia; Kurukulasuriya, L Romayne; Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic renal disease. Factors involved in the pathogenesis of both hypertension and type 2 diabetes include inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress, inflammation, impaired insulin-mediated vasodilatation, augmented sympathetic nervous system activation, altered innate and adaptive immunity, and abnormal sodium processing by the kidney. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is a key therapeutic strategy in the treatment of hypertension in type 2 diabetes. Emerging therapies for resistant hypertension as often exists in patients with diabetes, include renal denervation and carotid body denervation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Bariatric surgery for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Benaiges Boix, David; Goday Arno, Albert; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2012-04-14

    Weight loss can improve metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus but the results of conventional therapy in this respect have been discouraging. Besides achieving significant and sustained weight loss, bariatric surgery can improve or resolve type 2 diabetes mellitus in the majority of patients. Anatomical modifications and changes in the secretion of intestinal hormones can explain the superiority of malabsorptive techniques. Currently, bariatric surgery offers a therapeutic alternative for type 2 diabetes patients with severe obesity and poor metabolic control under conventional therapy. Ongoing research will provide insights regarding the effect of intestinal hormones, new surgery techniques and the possible benefits of bariatric surgery in non-obese patients.

  17. Youth with Type 2 Diabetes Often Face Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... children. People with type 2 diabetes first develop insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body use ... from food as fuel. When the body is insulin-resistant, it doesn't use insulin efficiently. Because ...

  18. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  19. ATP-dependent potassium channels and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Dianne Heloisa; Alcazar, Larissa Pontes; Arakaki, Priscila Akemi; Martins, Laysa Toschi; Agustini, Bruna Carla; de Moraes Rego, Fabiane Gomes; Frigeri, Henrique Ravanhol

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem, which affects a millions worldwide. Most diabetes cases are classified as type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly associated with obesity. Type 2 diabetes is considered a multifactorial disorder, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to its development. An important issue linked with diabetes development is the failure of the insulin releasing mechanism involving abnormal activity of the ATP-dependent potassium channel, KATP. This channel is a transmembrane protein encoded by the KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes. Furthermore, polymorphisms in these genes have been linked to type 2 diabetes because of the role of KATP in insulin release. While several genetic variations have been reported to be associated with this disease, the E23K polymorphism is most commonly associated with this pathology, as well as to obesity. Here, we review the molecular genetics of the potassium channel and discusses its most described polymorphisms and their associations with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Leveraging Genetics to Advance Type 2 Diabetes Prevention.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C

    2016-07-01

    In this Perspective, Jose Florez discusses how information from genetics and genomics may be able to contribute to prevention of type 2 diabetes and predicting individual responses to behavioral and other interventions.

  1. Treating lipid abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Steiner, G

    2001-12-20

    The typical lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus are low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, normal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most common problem confronting those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Some previous large lipid-lowering clinical trials conducted subanalyses of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Although these trials suggested a coronary benefit, questions remained because of (1) the limitations of such subanalyses, (2) the atypical characteristics of the populations, and (3) some inconsistencies in their findings. The Diabetes Atherosclerosis Intervention Study (DAIS), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men and women with type 2 diabetes, has demonstrated by quantitative angiography that treatment with micronized fenofibrate corrected their lipid abnormalities and reduced the progression of coronary disease. Furthermore, this occurred in individuals with lipid levels that many physicians would consider to be normal.

  2. GIP Contributes to Islet Trihormonal Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Odetunde, Juliana O.; Kim, Wook; Carlson, Olga D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research and clinical treatments on type 2 diabetes mainly focus on insulin deficiency with little attention paid to other islet hormones. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is involved in diabetes-associated multiislet hormone dysregulation. Design: This paper included a case-control study involving 92 community-based volunteers from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA): 23 with type 2 diabetes on glucose-lowering agents, 25 with newly diagnosed drug-naïve type 2 diabetes, 19 with prediabetes, and 25 with normal glucose tolerance; a separate intervention study with 13 non-BLSA volunteers with type 2 diabetes treated with diet alone, metformin, and/or metformin/sulfonylurea combination; a rodent study; and an in vitro cell line study. Interventions: An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in the BLSA participants. For the intervention study, saline (0.9% NaCl) or synthetic human GIP (20 ng · kg−1 · min−1) was administered to type 2 diabetes subjects for 180 minutes together with a meal, and plasma samples were obtained at predetermined intervals for 360 minutes. A bolus of GIP or placebo was given to C57BL/6 mice. Main Outcome Measures: Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and GIP were measured. Results: After an oral glucose tolerance test, glucose, glucagon, PP, GLP-1, and GIP levels were significantly elevated in type 2 diabetes groups, compared with normal and prediabetes groups. GIP infusion in type 2 diabetes subjects was associated with significantly elevated PP levels compared with placebo. The GIP bolus given to C57BL/6 mice was followed by increased PP levels. GIP receptors were found in both human and mouse PP cells. Conclusions: Up-regulation of GIP production may play an important role in multihormonal dysregulation in type 2 diabetes, most likely through interaction with GIP receptors on islets

  3. Understanding type 2 diabetes: from genetics to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Longo, Michele; Parrillo, Luca; Ciccarelli, Marco; Mirra, Paola; Ungaro, Paola; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Béguinot, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The known genetic variability (common DNA polymorphisms) does not account either for the current epidemics of type 2 diabetes or for the family transmission of this disorder. However, clinical, epidemiological and, more recently, experimental evidence indicates that environmental factors have an extraordinary impact on the natural history of type 2 diabetes. Some of these environmental hits are often shared in family groups and proved to be capable to induce epigenetic changes which alter the function of genes affecting major diabetes traits. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms may explain the environmental origin as well as the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes much easier than common polymorphisms. In the murine model, exposure of parents to environmental hits known to cause epigenetic changes reprograms insulin sensitivity as well as beta-cell function in the progeny, indicating that certain epigenetic changes can be transgenerationally transmitted. Studies from different laboratories revealed that, in humans, lifestyle intervention modulates the epigenome and reverts environmentally induced epigenetic modifications at specific target genes. Finally, specific human epigenotypes have been identified which predict adiposity and type 2 diabetes with much greater power than any polymorphism so far identified. These epigenotypes can be recognized in easily accessible white cells from peripheral blood, indicating that, in the future, epigenetic profiling may enable effective type 2 diabetes prediction. This review discusses recent evidence from the literature supporting the immediate need for further investigation to uncover the power of epigenetics in the prediction, prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Fetal growth and the ethnic origins of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skilton, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Birthweight is known to differ by ethnicity, with South Asian, black African and Caribbean, and Hispanic ethnic groups having lower birthweight on average, when compared with people of white European ethnicity. Birthweight is the most frequently used proxy of fetal growth, and represents the net effect of a host of genetic, physiological and pathophysiological factors. These same ethnic groups that have lower average birthweight also tend to have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It is not unreasonable to propose that the well-established inverse association between birthweight and risk of type 2 diabetes may at least partially contribute to these differences in prevalence of type 2 diabetes between ethnic groups. This hypothesis would rely on the mechanisms that drive the ethnic differences in birthweight aligning with those that modify the risk of type 2 diabetes. In this issue of Diabetologia (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3474-7), Nightingale et al have furthered this field by determining whether ethnic differences in markers of cardio-metabolic risk are consistent with the differences in birthweight in an ethnically diverse cohort of children. The likely contribution of fetal growth to ethnic differences in risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is discussed, particularly in light of the magnitude of the birthweight differences, as are implications for the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Optimizing the therapeutic benefits of exercise in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Praet, Stephan F E; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-10-01

    Other than diet and medication, exercise is considered one of the three cornerstones of good diabetes treatment. Nevertheless, current clinical guidelines on Type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Based on a review of currently available literature, exercise modalities are being identified to maximize the benefits of exercise intervention in the treatment of different Type 2 diabetes subpopulations. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise have equal therapeutic strength to improve metabolic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes. When applying endurance-type exercise, energy expenditure should be equivalent to approximately 1.7-2.1 MJ/exercise bout on 3 but preferably 5 days/wk. In sarcopenic or severely deconditioned patients with Type 2 diabetes, focus should lie on the implementation of resistance-type exercise to attenuate and/or reverse the decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength. Before choosing the most appropriate exercise modalities, the patient's disease stage should be well characterized, and an ECG-stress test should be considered. Based on baseline aerobic fitness, level of co-morbidities, body composition, and muscle strength, patients should be provided with an individually tailored exercise intervention program to optimize therapeutic value. A multidisciplinary individualized approach and continued exercise training under personal supervision is essential to enhance compliance and allow long-term health benefits of an exercise intervention program.

  6. Age at Menarche and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; Ong, Ken K.; Scott, Robert A.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Brand, Judith S.; Wark, Petra A.; Amiano, Pilar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Franks, Paul W.; Grioni, Sara; Halkjaer, Jytte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Mattiello, Amalia; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rinaldi, Sabina; Rolandsson, Olov; Romieu, Isabelle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez, María-José; Spijkerman, Annemieke M.W.; Tjonneland, Anne; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Younger age at menarche, a marker of pubertal timing in girls, is associated with higher risk of later type 2 diabetes. We aimed to confirm this association and to examine whether it is explained by adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study consists of 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals from 26 research centers across eight European countries. We tested the association between age at menarche and incident type 2 diabetes using Prentice-weighted Cox regression in 15,168 women (n = 5,995 cases). Models were adjusted in a sequential manner for potential confounding and mediating factors, including adult BMI. RESULTS Mean menarcheal age ranged from 12.6 to 13.6 years across InterAct countries. Each year later menarche was associated with 0.32 kg/m2 lower adult BMI. Women in the earliest menarche quintile (8–11 years, n = 2,418) had 70% higher incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with those in the middle quintile (13 years, n = 3,634), adjusting for age at recruitment, research center, and a range of lifestyle and reproductive factors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.70; 95% CI, 1.49–1.94; P < 0.001). Adjustment for BMI partially attenuated this association (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.18–1.71; P < 0.001). Later menarche beyond the median age was not protective against type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Women with history of early menarche have higher risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Less than half of this association appears to be mediated by higher adult BMI, suggesting that early pubertal development also may directly increase type 2 diabetes risk. PMID:24159179

  7. Lifestyle and genetics in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temelkova-Kurktschiev, T; Stefanov, T

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are multifactorial health threats caused by a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and the environment with dramatically increasing worldwide prevalence. The role of heritability in their etiology is well recognized, however, the numerous attempts made in order certain genetic variants determining individual susceptibility to be identified have had limited success, until recently. At present the advancements in human genetics and the utilization of the genome-wide association approach have led to the identification of over 20 genetic loci associated with, respectively obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most of the genes identified to date, however, have modest effect on disease risk suggesting that both diseases are unlikely to develop without the individual being exposed to obesity- and/or type 2 diabetes-promoting environment. Indeed, unhealthy lifestyle, characterized by physical inactivity and food overconsumption is an unequivocally established risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials, on the other hand, have demonstrated that lifestyle modification is effective in obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention. Furthermore, gene-lifestyle interaction studies suggest that genetic susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes may be partially or totally kept under control by healthy lifestyle or lifestyle modification and that lifestyle determines whether an individual is likely to develop the disease. Inherited factors, however, seem to influence individual response to a lifestyle intervention program and even the motivation for lifestyle change. Personalized interventions according to genotype may be, therefore, considered in the future. By then lifestyle modification targeting dietary change and increased physical activity may be recommended for successful obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention irrespectively of genetic susceptibility.

  8. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects.

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Plíhalová, Andrea; Westlake, Kateřina; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA) is a disease very frequently occurring in people with type 2 diabetes, that significantly increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In a number of studies, OSA has been identified as an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Disorders of glucose homeostasis in patients with OSA are probably mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and/or sleep fragmentation through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, pro-inflammatory paths or oxidative stress. Despite the high prevalence of OSA among patients with type 2 diabetes as well as the proven benefit of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on reduction of mortality, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. Active OSA screening should therefore be performed in all patients with type 2 diabetes, ideally through home monitoring of oxygen saturation and breathing during sleep. Although the effect of CPAP therapy on the improvement in diabetes control (decrease in glycated hemoglobin) has not been clearly proven in patients with type 2 diabetes so far, promising outcomes have been observed during the treatment of patients with prediabetes.Key words: CPAP - diabetes mellitus - glycemic control - intermittent hypoxia - obstructive sleep apnoea - screening - sleep fragmentation.

  10. Origin and therapy for hypertriglyceridaemia in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jing; Chan, Dick C; Watts, Gerald F

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes and is caused by the interaction of genes and non-genetic factors, specifically poor glycaemic control and obesity. In spite of statin treatment, residual risk of CVD remains high in type 2 diabetes, and this may relate to HTG and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Treatment of HTG emphasises correcting secondary factors and adverse lifestyles, in particular, diet and exercise. Pharmacotherapy is also required in most type 2 diabetic patients. Statins are the first-line therapy to achieve recommended therapeutic targets of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Fibrates, ezetimibe and n-3 fatty acids are adjunctive treatment options for residual and persistent HTG. Evidence for the use of niacin has been challenged by non-significant CVD outcomes in two recent large clinical trials. Further investigation is required to clarify the use of incretin-based therapies for HTG in type 2 diabetes. Extreme HTG, with risk of pancreatitis, may require insulin infusion therapy or apheresis. New therapies targeting HTG in diabetes need to be tested in clinical endpoint trials. The purpose of this review is to examine the current evidence and provide practical guidance on the management of HTG in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24748930

  11. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  12. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Erika Paniago; Hohl, Alexandre; de Melo, Thais Gomes; Lauand, Felipe

    2013-05-22

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients.

  13. Linagliptin: farmacology, efficacy and safety in type 2 diabetes treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a high prevalence and incidence around the world. The complex pathophysiology mechanism is among the barriers for diabetes treatment. Type 2 diabetes patients have dysfunction in incretin hormones (as glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). By inhibiting the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme, it is possible to slow the inactivation of GLP-1 and GIP, promoting blood glucose level reduction in a glucose-dependent manner. Linagliptin is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of DPP-4 that is currently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies with linagliptin demonstrated efficacy in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in type 2 diabetes patients, while maintaining a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile. Linagliptin has an interesting pharmacokinetic profile in terms of its predominantly non-renal elimination and the main implication of this characteristic is that no dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal disease. Also, no dose adjustment is required in patients with hepatic insufficiency, as well in elderly or obese patients. This article will review the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy data and safety aspects of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23697612

  14. Origin and therapy for hypertriglyceridaemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jing; Chan, Dick C; Watts, Gerald F

    2014-04-15

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes and is caused by the interaction of genes and non-genetic factors, specifically poor glycaemic control and obesity. In spite of statin treatment, residual risk of CVD remains high in type 2 diabetes, and this may relate to HTG and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Treatment of HTG emphasises correcting secondary factors and adverse lifestyles, in particular, diet and exercise. Pharmacotherapy is also required in most type 2 diabetic patients. Statins are the first-line therapy to achieve recommended therapeutic targets of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Fibrates, ezetimibe and n-3 fatty acids are adjunctive treatment options for residual and persistent HTG. Evidence for the use of niacin has been challenged by non-significant CVD outcomes in two recent large clinical trials. Further investigation is required to clarify the use of incretin-based therapies for HTG in type 2 diabetes. Extreme HTG, with risk of pancreatitis, may require insulin infusion therapy or apheresis. New therapies targeting HTG in diabetes need to be tested in clinical endpoint trials. The purpose of this review is to examine the current evidence and provide practical guidance on the management of HTG in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes and TZDs (Thiazolidinediones)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ...

  16. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  17. [The possibility of prevention of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Strus, Adam; Szepietowska, Barbara; Zonenberg, Anna; Nikołajuk, Agnieszka; Górska, Maria; Szelachowska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine usefulness of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in clinical evaluation of different glucose metabolism disturbances in subjects with at least one risk factor of type 2 diabetes. We compared the effectiveness of non-pharmacological and pharmacological prevention and treatment regiments on metabolic control in these individuals. The study involved 130 patients, with the following characteristics: age between 18 to 76 years, mean body mass index (BMI) - 31.82 +/- 7.24 kg/m(2), and presence of at least one of the risk factor of type 2 diabetes. Glucose metabolism disturbances were diagnosed according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Non-pharmacological regiments were applied for 3 months for patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes. Patients, whose still met criteria for type 2 diabetes during OGTT after non-pharmacological treatment were scheduled for pharmacological interventions. These patients were assigned at random to two groups, that were treated with either metformin or acarbose. The measurements of total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol , LDL-cholesterol, trigliceryde (TG), glucose, HbA(1c) and/or OGGT were performed during each visit. We also assessed risk factors for type 2 diabetes in these subjects. The prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance in subjects with at least one of the risk factor of diabetes type 2 was near 40%. OGTT in these subjects increased the possibility of diagnosis diabetes type 2 and IGT. Hypertension (81%), hypercholesterolemia (71.4%), hypertriglicerydemia (71.4%) and obesity (66.7%) were the most frequent risk factors observed. There were no differences in biochemical measurements between these groups of patients. Individuals with at least one risk factor of type 2 diabetes should have screening test to diagnose glucose intolerance. Both non-pharmacological and pharmacological intervention was effective in normalization of glucose OGTT in patients with

  18. Toll-like receptor 2 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Zahra; Kiani, Zohre; Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Kohan, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and related complications. Since the toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central to innate immunity, it appears that they are important participants in the development and pathogenesis of the disease. Previous investigations demonstrated that TLR2 homodimers and TLR2 heterodimers with TLR1 or TLR6 activate innate immunity upon recognition of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Several DAMPs are released during type 2 diabetes, so it may be hypothesized that TLR2 is significantly involved in its progression. Here, we review recent data on the important roles and status of TLR2 in type 2 diabetes and related complications.

  19. Oral antihyperglycemic therapy for type 2 diabetes: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Eric S

    2002-01-16

    Oral agents are the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for type 2 diabetes, and physicians now have a number of agents to choose from. However, more choices translate into more complex decision making. Many patients with diabetes have associated comorbidities, and most diabetic patients will require more than 1 agent to achieve good glycemic control. This article illustrates several of the pharmacologic approaches to type 2 diabetes through 4 situations that use principles of evidence-based medicine. The scenarios also highlight some of the difficulties in choosing the optimal pharmacologic treatment regimen for individual patients. Physicians should also recognize that type 2 diabetes is a multisystem disorder that requires multidisciplinary care, including education and ongoing counseling for effective patient self-management of the disease. Finally, patient preferences are a vital component of informed decision making for pharmacologic treatment of diabetes.

  20. Developmental aspects in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ong, K K; Dunger, D B

    2001-12-20

    Low birthweight is linked to increased risk of adulthood type 2 diabetes and this risk may be secondary to adaptive metabolic/endocrine mechanisms in the fetus which ensure survival during undernutrition. Thrifty genotypes, which enhance these adaptations to undernutrition may further protect survival from fetal life to reproductive age, but at the expense of longer-term disease risk. Potential fetal thrifty genotypes include the insulin gene variable number of tandem repeats class III/III genotype which is associated with larger size at birth and type 2 diabetes in adults and these effects may relate to paternally inherited genotypes. In contrast, mechanisms, which restrain fetal growth and protect maternal survival may be inherited on mitochondrial DNA or maternally expressed imprinted genes such as IGF2R. Finally, larger early postnatal size is also important for survival and some genotypes may promote infancy growth, but in affluent societies may predispose to obesity and increased risks for adulthood type 2 diabetes.

  1. Practical combination therapy based on pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex, chronic, and progressive condition that often necessitates the use of multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Clinical guidelines generally recommend intensifying pharmacotherapy if glycemic goals are not achieved after 3 months of treatment. However, for many patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment intensification is delayed or does not occur. Initiating combination therapy early in the disease course has the potential to delay disease progression and improve patient outcomes. Guidelines generally provide a list of agents that may be used in combination regimens and emphasize individualization of treatment. The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale for combination therapy, considering treatment effects on pathophysiologic aspects of type 2 diabetes and individual drug profiles. The combination of newer antidiabetes therapies with complementary mechanisms of action provides the opportunity to target multiple sites of tissue, organ, and cellular dysfunction. PMID:27826204

  2. Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... some as young as 10 years old. Weight Matters People who are overweight—especially if they have ... High cholesterol. [281 KB] Polycystic ovary syndrome . Activity Matters Being physically active lowers the risk for type ...

  3. Antidiabetogenic action of cholecystokinin-8 in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahrén, B; Holst, J J; Efendic, S

    2000-03-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gut hormone and a neuropeptide that has the capacity to stimulate insulin secretion. As insulin secretion is impaired in type 2 diabetes, we explored whether exogenous administration of this peptide exerts antidiabetogenic action. The C-terminal octapeptide of CCK (CCK-8) was therefore infused i.v. (24 pmol/kg x h) for 90 min in six healthy postmenopausal women and in six postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. At 15 min after start of infusion, a meal was served and ingested during 10 min. On a separate day, saline was infused instead of CCK-8. In both healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes, CCK-8 reduced the increase in circulating glucose after meal ingestion and potentiated the increase in circulating insulin. The ratio between the area under the curves for serum insulin and plasma glucose during the 15- to 75-min period after meal ingestion was increased by CCK-8 by 198 +/- 18% in healthy subjects (P = 0.002) and by 474 +/- 151% (P = 0.038) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, the increase in the circulating levels of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), or glucagon after meal ingestion was not significantly affected by CCK-8. The study therefore shows that CCK-8 exerts an antidiabetogenic action in both healthy subjects and type 2 diabetes through an insulinotropic action that most likely is exerted trough a direct islet effect. As at the same time, CCK-8 was infused without any adverse effects, the study suggests that CCK is a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  4. Association between sleeping difficulty and type 2 diabetes in women

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Gao, Xiang; Winkelman, John W.; Cespedes, Elizabeth M.; Jackson, Chandra L.; Walters, Arthur S.; Schernhammer, Eva; Redline, Susan; Hu, Frank B.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS Sleeping difficulty has been associated with type 2 diabetes in some prior studies. Whether the observed associations are independent of health behaviors, other cardiovascular risk factors, or other sleep disorders are unclear. METHODS We analyzed data from 133,353 women without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 2000–2010) and the NHSII (2001–2011). Sleeping difficulty was assessed as having difficulty falling or staying asleep “all of the time” or “most of the time” at baseline (2000 in NHS and 2001 in NHSII). RESULTS We documented 6,407 incident cases of type 2 diabetes during up to 10 years of follow-up. After adjustment for lifestyle factors at baseline, comparing women with and without sleeping difficulty, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 95% confidence interval (CI)) for type 2 diabetes was 1.45 (95% CI 1.33, 1.58), which changed to 1.22 (95% CI 1.12, 1.34) after further adjustment for hypertension, depression and body mass index (BMI) based on the updated repeated measurements. Women who reported all four sleep conditions (sleeping difficulty, frequent snoring, sleep duration ≤6 hours, and sleep apnea in NHS or rotating shift work in NHSII) had more than 4-fold increased likelihood of type 2 diabetes (HR: 4.17, 95% CI 2.93, 5.91). CONCLUSIONS Sleeping difficulty was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes. This association was partially explained by associations with hypertension, BMI and depression symptoms, and was particularly strong when combined with other sleep disorders. Our findings highlight the importance of sleep disturbance in the development and prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26818148

  5. [Genetic causes of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Malm, D

    1998-03-10

    The characterisation of the intracellular signal transmission regulating the secretion of insulin from the beta cells of the pancreatic islets has enabled the initiation of massive effort to find the genetic causes of beta cell dysfunction in Type II diabetes. The search for genetic determinants began when several genes involved in the mechanisms of insulin secretion were cloned in the human genoma, and when informative polymorphism was described within or in the vicinity of these genes. The rational approach to identify the putative genes causing diabetes would be to examine genes which encode for proteins likely to be important in the beta cell control of insulin secretion. A large number of mutations which cause Type II diabetes have been found recently. Type II diabetes is therefore probably a heterogenous disease, with a polygenic inheritance of a combination of major and minor genes affecting obesity, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Thus, a genotypic classification of Type II diabetes will eventually be possible, and it might also be possible to explain the sometimes puzzling observations made in diabetes research by the heterogeneity of Type II diabetes and the interaction between environmental and genetic factors.

  6. Screening for type 2 diabetes in children with acanthosis nigricans.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Dana S

    2006-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans is a physical finding of the skin that appears to be a marker for insulin resistance. Because of the association of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, acanthosis nigricans may also be a marker for type 2 diabetes. Some states have recommended statewide screening for acanthosis nigricans. However, this has led to a large referral of children to pediatric endocrinologists. Presented is a schema for primary care physicians and school nurses to use as a guideline for referral of children with acanthosis nigricans.

  7. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk’s lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique. PMID:27347419

  8. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  9. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk's lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes in Han Chinese in Hubei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo Saif Dehwah, Mustafa; Shuang, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Chan, Peng; Huang, Qing-Yang

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese in Hubei. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptorγ2 (PPARγ2) is a nuclear receptor plays a key role in regulation of adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are various studies have provided evidence for the association between common Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the results are controversial and depend on ethnicity. So we conducted a case-control association study among 330 T2DM patients and 212 controls with family-based and random case-control designs. The genotypes of the PPARγ2 Pro12Ala polymorphism were detected by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFL) method. The result indicated that the Pro12 allele was associated with type 2 diabetes in this study population.

  11. [Type 2 Diabetes mellitus-screening and prevention: Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Stadler, Marietta; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Prager, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in westernized countries. In addition, about half of all patients suffering from diabetes are not diagnosed. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes, based on currently available evidence.

  12. Male gonadal axis function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Pablo R; Knoblovits, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have lower serum testosterone levels and a higher prevalence of hypogonadism than non-diabetic patients, independently of the metabolic control of disease. The mechanisms underlying a decrease in testosterone might be related to age, obesity and insulin resistance, often present in patients with type 2 diabetes. The increase in estrogens due to higher aromatase enzyme activity in increased adipose tissue might exert negative-feedback inhibition centrally. Insulin stimulates gonadal axis activity at all three levels and therefore insulin resistance might account for the lower testosterone production. Leptin exerts a central stimulatory effect but inhibits testicular testosterone secretion. Thus, resistance to leptin in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes determines lower central effects of leptin with lower gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, on the other hand, hyperleptinemia secondary to leptin resistance inhibits testosterone secretion at the testicular level. However, lower testosterone levels in patients with diabetes are observed independently of age, weight and body mass index, which leads to the assumption that hyperglycemia per se might play a role in the decrease in testosterone. Several studies have shown that an overload of glucose results in decreased serum testosterone levels. The aim of this review is to assess changes in the male gonadal axis that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Nocturnal hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes with sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fendri, Salha; Rose, Dominique; Myambu, Sonia; Jeanne, Sandrine; Lalau, Jean-Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We assessed glycaemic status in 26 overweight or obese people with type 2 diabetes suspected of having sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS). In people with SAS (n=13), nocturnal glycaemia was 38% higher, independent of body mass index (particularly during rapid eye movement sleep) compared with non-SAS subjects (p<0.008).

  14. Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes: evidence and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Gentile, Sandro; Candido, Riccardo; De Micheli, Alberto; Gallo, Marco; Medea, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio

    2013-05-30

    The panoply of treatment algorithms, periodically released to improve guidance, is one mean to face therapeutic uncertainty in pharmacological management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, especially after metformin failure. Failure of recent guidelines to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity may generate further uncertainty, given the frequent association of type 2 diabetes with common comorbidity, including, although not limited to obesity, cardiovascular disease, impaired renal function, and frailty. The Italian Association of Diabetologists (Associazione Medici Diabetologi, AMD) recognized the need to develop personalized treatment plans for people with type 2 diabetes, taking into account the patients' individual profile (phenotype), with the objective of the safest possible glycemic control. As not every subject with type 2 diabetes benefits from intensive glycemic control, flexible regimens of treatment with diabetes drugs (including insulin) are needed for reaching individualized glycemic goals. Whether personalized diabetology will improve the quality healthcare practice of diabetes management is unknown, but specific research has been launched.

  15. Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes: evidence and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The panoply of treatment algorithms, periodically released to improve guidance, is one mean to face therapeutic uncertainty in pharmacological management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, especially after metformin failure. Failure of recent guidelines to give advice on the use of specific antidiabetic drugs in patients with co-morbidity may generate further uncertainty, given the frequent association of type 2 diabetes with common comorbidity, including, although not limited to obesity, cardiovascular disease, impaired renal function, and frailty. The Italian Association of Diabetologists (Associazione Medici Diabetologi, AMD) recognized the need to develop personalized treatment plans for people with type 2 diabetes, taking into account the patients' individual profile (phenotype), with the objective of the safest possible glycemic control. As not every subject with type 2 diabetes benefits from intensive glycemic control, flexible regimens of treatment with diabetes drugs (including insulin) are needed for reaching individualized glycemic goals. Whether personalized diabetology will improve the quality healthcare practice of diabetes management is unknown, but specific research has been launched. PMID:23721170

  16. Botulinum toxin for meralgia paresthetica in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Pawan; Tewari, A K; Upreti, Vimal; Prakash, M S; Hari Kumar, K V S

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin has been used for a variety of neuropathic conditions in diabetes mellitus. Meralgia paresthetica is a mononeuropathy of femoral nerve seen in diabetes and obesity with an unclear etiopathogenesis. We studied the role of botulinum toxin in resistant cases of meralgia paresthetica in type 2 diabetes.

  17. Metabolomics: Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) develops over many years, providing an opportunity to consider early prognostic tools that guide interventions to thwart disease. Advancements in analytical chemistry enable quantitation of hundreds of metabolites in biofluids and tissues (metabolomics), providing in...

  18. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  19. [Formula diets as baseline therapy for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Kempf, K

    2014-05-01

    Case 1: 59-year-old man with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. Case 2: 69-year-old woman with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Case 1: BMI 36,8 kg/m2. Biochemical evaluation were normal except elevated transaminases. Case 2: BMI 37,0 kg/m2. Abdominal ultrasound showed a fatty liver. THERAPY AND FOLLOW UP: Both patients underwent a 12-week interven tion with a formula diet. In the first week the three principle meals were replaced by the formular diet. The three following weeks the patients received 2 meals of formular diet and a low-carb lunch. In the last 8 weeks only the dinner was replaced by the formular diet. In both patients HbA1c and body weight improved after 3, 6 and 12 months. Using formula diets a fast weight loss and improvement of metabolic control can be achieved. Formula diets can be used as baseline therapy for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes as well as to regain treatability in case of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Update: Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Paresh; Dhindsa, Sandeep

    2011-09-01

    Studies over the last few years have clearly established that at least 25% of men with type 2 diabetes have subnormal free testosterone concentrations in association with inappropriately low LH and FSH concentrations. Another 4% have subnormal testosterone concentrations with elevated LH and FSH concentrations. The Endocrine Society, therefore, now recommends the measurement of testosterone in patients with type 2 diabetes on a routine basis. The subnormal testosterone concentrations are not related to glycosylated hemoglobin or duration of diabetes, but are associated with obesity, very high C-reactive protein concentrations, and mild anemia. In addition, subnormal testosterone concentrations in these men are associated with a two to three times elevated risk of cardiovascular events and death in two early studies. Short-term studies of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes have demonstrated an increase in insulin sensitivity and a decrease in waist circumference. However, the data on the effect of testosterone replacement on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors such as cholesterol and C-reactive protein concentrations are inconsistent. As far as sexual function is concerned, testosterone treatment increases libido but does not improve erectile dysfunction and thus, phosphodiesterase inhibitors may be required. Trials of a longer duration are clearly required to definitively establish the benefits and risks of testosterone replacement in patients with type 2 diabetes and low testosterone.

  1. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  2. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Basal ...

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease severity.

    PubMed

    Al-Khabbaz, Areej K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether type 2 diabetes is coupled with increased severity of periodontal destruction. A total of 80 subjects with type 2 diabetes and 78 healthy control subjects underwent a fullmouth periodontal examination. The study included dentate subjects with a minimum of 7 remaining teeth in each dental arch. Plaque score, bleeding on probing and clinical attachment loss were assessed. Diabetic patients showed a significantly lower percent of plaque-positive surfaces (P = 0.02) with a significant increase in the number and the percent of sites with clinical attachment loss ≥ 3 mm compared to controls. In the logistic regression analysis, age and diabetes were found to be associated with having > 15% sites with clinical attachment loss > 5 mm. There was a significant correlation between diabetes duration and the severity of periodontal attachment loss. Patients with type 2 diabetes were at higher risk of having severe forms of periodontal disease compared with non-diabetic subjects. The results highlight the need for frequent supportive periodontal care for patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Thyroid dysfunction among type 2 diabetic female Egyptian subjects.

    PubMed

    Elebrashy, Ibrahim N; El Meligi, Amr; Rashed, Laila; Salam, Randa F; Youssef, Elham; Fathy, Shaimaa A

    2016-01-01

    High prevalence of thyroid disorders is more common in type 1 diabetes compared to type 2 diabetes, due to associated autoimmunity. Hypothyroidism is the most common disorder. The objective was to assess the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among type 2 diabetic Egyptian females and to find the correlation between metabolic syndrome components and autoimmune thyroid dysfunction. The study included 62 type 2 diabetic Egyptian females and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. All patients in the study were subjected to anthropometric measures, including HbA1c, lipid profile, serum uric acid, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and thyroid ultrasound. Hypothyroidism was found in 45.2% of patients (5.49±3.37 μIU/mL) versus 11.1% of controls (1.79±1.21 μIU/mL) (P<0.001). Anti-TPO was found in 75.8% (347.15±244.87 IU/mL) of patients versus 7.4% (32.89±33.26 IU/mL) of controls (P<0.001). Anti-Tg was found in 61.3% (508.03±369.16 IU/mL) of patients versus 0 (51.26±35.53 IU/mL) controls (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between TSH and antithyroid antibodies (anti-Tg, anti-TPO; P=0.002 and P=0.043, respectively) and between TSH and thyroid-gland volume (P=0.002) in diabetic patients. No correlation was found between any components of metabolic syndrome and thyroid antibodies in diabetic patients. Autoimmune thyroid disease is more common in Egyptian women with type 2 diabetes than nondiabetic women, and thus points to a role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in northern populations of Siberia.

    PubMed

    Dogadin, S A; Mashtakov, B P; Taranushenko, T E

    2001-04-01

    In the first part of the study the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed Type 2 diabetes among adult rural populations of southern, central and northern areas of the Krasnoyarsk region of Siberia is compared. The six-year mean incidence of diabetes in the southern area was 0.86 per 1000 (95% CI: 0.66-1.06), in the central area this incidence was 0.79 (0.57-1.01). In contrast, in the northern area the mean Type 2 incidence among indigenous population was 0.16 per 1000 (0-0.43) and among aliens it was 0.38 (0.22-0.54). The age-standardised Type 2 diabetes prevalence in the population of southern and central areas were 10.23 (9.55-10.-92) and 10.77 (9.99-11.55), respectively. In the northern area among aliens it was 8.98 (8.18-9.78) and among indigenous peoples only 2.54 per 1000 (1.46-3.62). The second part of this study consists of a population based survey to determine the prevalence rate of Type 2 diabetes among 596 Evenks and 306 alien inhabitants in Evenkia (82% eligible participants of Baikit district). No cases of glucose intolerance were found among Evenks in this study and one case of Type 2 diabetes was confirmed among aliens (prevalence rate 3.27 per 1000). These data indicate that Type 2 diabetes is still rare among northern indigenous populations of Siberia and that diabetes in northern alien populations is less prevalent than among peoples of central and southern areas of Siberia.

  6. Nutritional status in type 2 diabetic patients requiring haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Biesenbach, G; Debska-Slizien, A; Zazgornik, J

    1999-03-01

    Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease are often overweight (BMI > 24) at the start of dialysis therapy. However, there are very few reports in the literature concerning the nutritional status of these patients after prolonged haemodialysis treatment. Therefore, we compared nutritional parameters in type 2 diabetic patients and age-matched non-diabetic patients after at least 18 months of renal replacement therapy with haemodialysis. In a cross-sectional study, we measured BMI, serum albumin, total protein, serum cholesterol and interdialytic weight gain (IWG), and performed a subjective global assessment (SGA) in 14 patients with type 2 diabetes and 16 non-diabetic patients (aged > or = 50 years, haemodialysis therapy > or = 18 months). Protein intake was estimated using the protein catabolic rate (PCR) and Kt/V was calculated to compare the dose of dialysis. BMI was significantly higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (30+/-7 vs 24+/-3, P<0.01). In contrast, the concentration of serum albumin was significantly lower (3180+/-499 mg/dl vs 3576+/-431 mg/dl, P<0.05), but six of the diabetic patients had signs of chronic inflammation. All other nutritional parameters did not differ between the two groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in the intake of protein (PCR 0.93+/-0.19 vs 0.92+/-0.22) and the dose of dialysis (Kt/V 1.13+/-0.19 vs 1.2+/-0.2). After > or = 18 months of haemodialysis therapy, the majority of type 2 diabetic patients (9/14) were still overweight (BMI > 24). The nutritional status of diabetic patients was similar to that of age-matched non-diabetic patients on prolonged haemodialysis, but serum albumin levels were significantly lower in diabetics. The lower albumin levels in the diabetic patients may be explained by a state of subclinical chronic inflammation.

  7. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, I; Cadier, E; Beulens, J W J; van der A, D L; Spijkerman, A M W; van der Schouw, Y T

    2015-04-01

    Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes associate with reduced type 2 diabetes risk. Data from 37,846 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition- Netherlands study were analyzed. Dietary intakes of β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin and the sum of these carotenoids were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Incident type 2 diabetes was mainly self-reported, and verified against general practitioner information. Mean ±SD total carotenoid intake was 10 ± 4 mg/day. During a mean ±SD follow-up of 10 ± 2 years, 915 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained. After adjustment for age, sex, diabetes risk factors, dietary intake, waist circumference and BMI, higher β-carotene intakes associated inversely with diabetes risk [Hazard Ratio quartile 4 versus quartile 1 (HR(Q4)): 0.78 (95%CI:0.64,0.95), P-linear trend 0.01]. For α-carotene, a borderline significant reduced risk was observed, with a HR(Q4) of 0.85 (95%CI:0.70,1.03), and P-linear trend 0.05. β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin, and the sum of all carotenoids did not associate with diabetes risk. This study shows that diets high in β-carotene and α-carotene are associated with reduced type 2 diabetes in generally healthy men and women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Periodontal disease in Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Novak, M John; Potter, Richard M; Blodgett, Janet; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for the development of periodontal disease in certain populations. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increased in Hispanic Americans, but its impact on the extent and severity of periodontal disease in this population has not been determined. Sixty-three Hispanic Americans, aged 33 to 72 years, from South Texas were grouped based on the presence or absence of type 2 diabetes. Past medical histories, including smoking, were obtained. Periodontal status was evaluated by measuring probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque, bleeding on probing, visual gingival inflammation, and calculus. Type 2 diabetes was associated frequently with major medical complications in this population. Diabetes was associated with significantly more calculus formation and tooth loss and an increased extent and severity of periodontitis. Subjects with diabetes had nearly three times the mean CAL and frequency of PD >6 mm than subjects without diabetes and nearly twice the frequency of moderate to advanced attachment loss (> or =3 mm). Smoking and diabetes had significant independent effects on mean CAL and the frequency of deep pockets. Diabetes and smoking combined were associated with a significantly higher frequency of sites with CAL > or =3 mm compared to healthy non-smokers, healthy smokers, and non-smokers with diabetes. Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes had more supra- and subgingival calculus, an increased extent and severity of periodontal destruction, and an increased frequency of tooth loss due to periodontitis. An additive/synergistic contribution of type 2 diabetes and smoking for increasing the extent of periodontal disease was observed.

  9. FTO, Type 2 Diabetes, and Weight Gain Throughout Adult Life

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jens K.; Johansson, Stefan; Sonestedt, Emily; Jonsson, Anna; Lie, Rolv T.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Rukh, Gull; Midthjell, Kristian; Hveem, Kristian; Melander, Olle; Groop, Leif; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Molven, Anders; Orho-Melander, Marju; Njølstad, Pål R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE FTO is the most important polygene identified for obesity. We aimed to investigate whether a variant in FTO affects type 2 diabetes risk entirely through its effect on BMI and how FTO influences BMI across adult life span. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Through regression models, we assessed the relationship between the FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609, type 2 diabetes, and BMI across life span in subjects from the Norwegian population-based HUNT study using cross-sectional and longitudinal perspectives. For replication and meta-analysis, we used data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer (MDC) and Malmö Preventive Project (MPP) cohorts, comprising a total sample of 41,504 Scandinavians. RESULTS The meta-analysis revealed a highly significant association for rs9939609 with both type 2 diabetes (OR 1.13; P = 4.5 × 10−8) and the risk to develop incident type 2 diabetes (OR 1.16; P = 3.2 × 10−8). The associations remained also after correction for BMI and other anthropometric measures. Furthermore, we confirmed the strong effect on BMI (0.28 kg/m2 per risk allele; P = 2.0 × 10−26), with no heterogeneity between different age-groups. We found no differences in change of BMI over time according to rs9939609 risk alleles, neither overall (∆BMI = 0.0 [−0.05, 0.05]) nor in any individual age stratum, indicating no further weight gain attributable to FTO genotype in adults. CONCLUSIONS We have identified that a variant in FTO alters type 2 diabetes risk partly independent of its observed effect on BMI. The additional weight gain as a result of the FTO risk variant seems to occur before adulthood, and the BMI difference remains stable thereafter. PMID:21398525

  10. A Study of Vitiligo in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raveendra, Leena; Hemavathi, Rekha N; Rajgopal, Sushma

    2017-01-01

    Context: Diabetes mellitus is associated with many skin manifestations including vitiligo. Vitiligo occurs more commonly in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A few recent studies have shown its increased occurrence in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aims: This study aims to study the prevalence of vitiligo in Type 2 diabetic patients and to compare the prevalence of vitiligo in age- and sex-matched group of nondiabetic population. Settings and Design: The present study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Dermatology in a tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods: Six hundred consecutive consenting patients of Type 2 diabetes were included in the study group and age- and sex-matched controls were healthy nondiabetic adult volunteers attending the Department of Dermatology. Fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels were done. A complete history, physical examination, and wood's lamp examination to detect vitiligo were conducted. In all those with vitiligo, the type of vitiligo was noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 20.0. Comparison between the presence of vitiligo in cases and controls was done using Chi-square test with P = 0.05 for significance. Results: Vitiligo was seen in 12% of cases and 6% of control group which was statistically significant (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between cases and controls with respect to type of vitiligo. Conclusions: Vitiligo can occur in Type 2 diabetics as seen in our study and few other recent studies. The exact pathogenesis is not very clear and needs further consideration. PMID:28400636

  11. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Heshka, Stanley; Ruggiero, Andrea; Bray, George A.; Foreyt, John; Kahn, Stephen E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Saad, Mohammed; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Design Overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI≥25 kg/m2) Black, White and Hispanic men (490) and women (825) with type 2 diabetes ([mean±SD] age 58.5±6.6; BMI 35.3±5.3) who had a baseline dual energy x-ray absorptiometry whole body scan at the time of enrollment in the Look Ahead clinical trial, and 242 healthy controls, 91 males and 151 females (age 55.3±8.6 y, BMI 30.7±4.2 kg/m2) who were participating in unrelated research and were scanned on the same densitometers. Results Adjusted for covariates, total fat mass was smaller in persons with type 2 diabetes than in controls (−1.4±0.3[SE]; 34.5 vs 35.8 kg, p<0.001) while trunk fat was larger (1.3±0.2[SE]; 19.9 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001) and leg fat was smaller (−1.5±0.2[SE]; 10.7 vs 12.3 kg, p<0.001). The arms of subjects with type 2 diabetes did not have significantly less fat compared to controls. Adjusted trunk lean mass was larger in type 2 diabetes by 0.6 kg (28.4 vs 27.8 kg, p<0.001) while leg lean was smaller by 0.5 kg (18.1 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001). Conclusions Type 2 diabetes is associated with less total fat, leg fat and leg lean mass and more truncal fat and lean mass than controls. The physiological processes producing these deviations in tissue distribution and their metabolic significance warrant further investigation. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953) PMID:18227843

  12. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  13. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Khazrai, Y M; Defeudis, G; Pozzilli, P

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the fastest growing diseases; the number of people affected by diabetes will soon reach 552 million worldwide, with associated increases in complications and healthcare expenditure. Lifestyle and medical nutrition therapy are considered the keystones of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment, but there is no definite consensus on how to treat this disease with these therapies. The American Diabetes Association has made several recommendations regarding the medical nutrition therapy of diabetes; these emphasize the importance of minimizing macrovascular and microvascular complications in people with diabetes. Four types of diets were reviewed for their effects on diabetes: the Mediterranean diet, a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet, a vegan diet and a vegetarian diet. Each of the four types of diet has been shown to improve metabolic conditions, but the degree of improvement varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate a patient's pathophysiological characteristics in order to determine the diet that will achieve metabolic improvement in each individual. Many dietary regimens are available for patients with type 2 diabetes to choose from, according to personal taste and cultural tradition. It is important to provide a tailor-made diet wherever possible in order to maximize the efficacy of the diet on reducing diabetes symptoms and to encourage patient adherence. Additional randomized studies, both short term (to analyse physiological responses) and long term, could help reduce the multitude of diets currently recommended and focus on a shorter list of useful regimens.

  14. Exploring the pharmacotherapeutic options for treating type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Davida F

    2008-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of the most common form of diabetes, with approximately 14.6 million diagnosed and 6.2 million undiagnosed cases of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes in the United States since 2005. If diabetes is not diagnosed early and managed properly, patients are at greater risk for microvascular and macrovascular complications, such as nerve damage, heart disease, blindness, and kidney damage. The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes includes impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic and muscle/fat insulin resistance, and increased glucagon secretion. Problems commonly associated with type 2 diabetes and consequent hyperglycemia are weight gain, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The natural progression of type 2 diabetes involves increased insulin deficiency as a result of decreased beta cell function over time, which can raise glycosylated hemoglobin to dangerous levels and consequently increase the risk of death. Lifestyle modifications (eg, diet changes and increased physical activity) remain the cornerstone of early treatment, but glycemic control may worsen despite behavior changes and treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents. Historically, upon failure to maintain glucose levels with exercise and oral medication, insulin was the second-line treatment option. Current treatment algorithms include a new class of agents, incretin mimetics, such as the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exenatide. Exenatide mimics the actions of the hormone GLP-1 that occurs naturally in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged as an efficacious therapy adjunct to 1 or more oral hypoglycemic agent(s).

  15. [Intensive insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2012-09-23

    In the last couple of years, the intensive conservative insulin treatment (basal-bolus regime) became more and more popular even in patients with type 2 diabetes. Using this insulin treatment, continuous patient education, co-operation between the medical team (diabetologist, dietician and diabetes-nurses) and the patient as well as the availability of modern insulins, pens and glucometers are of great importance. Clearly, the basal-bolus treatment with human insulin has advantages over the conservative (conventional) treatment with twice daily premix insulins. Moreover, the basal-bolus treatment with insulin-analogues proved to be superior in some aspects as compared to human insulins. The intensive insulin treatment (basal-bolus regime with insulin-analogues) approaches the optimal insulin substitution and, with its use the adequate correction of each element of the glucose triad (fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, HbA1c) should be considered feasible even in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in Sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Mbanya, Jean Claude; Assah, Felix K; Saji, Jude; Atanga, Emmanuella N

    2014-07-01

    There is a mounting body of evidence regarding the challenge posed by diabetes and obesity on the health systems of many Sub-Sahara African countries. This trend has been linked to the changing demographic profile together with rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles in both rural and urban settings in Africa. Africa is expected to witness the greatest increase in the number of people with diabetes from 19.8 million in 2013 to 41.4 million in 2035 if current trends persist. Excess weight alone currently accounts for at least 2.8 million deaths globally each year through increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications. This review highlights recent literature on the problem of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Sub-Sahara Africa. It exposes the need for concrete interventions based on the now available wealth of evidence.

  17. Prevention of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Potential of pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Samson, Susan L; Garber, Alan J

    2016-06-01

    People with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, or "pre-diabetes", are at high risk for progression to type 2 diabetes, as are those with metabolic syndrome or a history of gestational diabetes. Both glucose-lowering and anti-obesity pharmacotherapies have been studied to determine if the onset of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented. Here we review the available data in the field. The most common theme is the reduction in insulin resistance, such as with weight loss, decreasing demands on the beta cell to improve insulin secretion and prolong its function. Overall, therapies which decrease diabetes incidence in high-risk populations delay the onset of diabetes but do not correct the underlying beta cell defect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Triplitt, Curtis L.; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Cersosimo, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic glucose production, and decreased peripheral glucose utilization are the core defects responsible for the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiology of this disease also includes adipocyte insulin resistance (increased lipolysis), reduced incretin secretion/sensitivity, increased glucagon secretion, enhanced renal glucose reabsorption, and brain insulin resistance/neurotransmitter dysfunction. Although current diabetes management focuses on lowering blood glucose, the goal of therapy should be to delay disease progression and eventual treatment failure. Recent innovative treatment approaches target the multiple pathophysiological defects present in type 2 diabetes. Optimal management should include early initiation of combination therapy using multiple drugs with different mechanisms of action. This review examines novel therapeutic options that hold particular promise. PMID:26246766

  19. Management of hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients are associated with adverse outcomes including increased rates of infection, longer hospital length of stay, and even death. Clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus proved that by improving glycemic control, we can reduce all of them. Insulin is the preferred treatment for glycemic control in most cases, but alternative treatment options that can normalize blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia are being sought. Moreover, hospitalized patients are particularly vulnerable to severe, prolonged hypoglycemia since they may be unable to sense or respond to the early warning signs and symptoms of low blood glucose. Finally, nutritional support, corticosteroid therapy, and surgery increase the risk of hyperglycemia that leads to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We review the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who are admitted to the general medical wards of the hospital for a procedure of intercurrent illness. PMID:28191539

  20. The changing world demography of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Green, Anders; Christian Hirsch, Niels; Pramming, Stig Krøger

    2003-01-01

    In recent years it has been estimated that the current global prevalence of type 2 diabetes amounts to about 150 million patients. Projections suggest that by the year 2025 the number of prevalent patients in the world will reach approximately 300 million. It is assumed that the increase in the number of patients will be most pronounced in nations currently undergoing socio-economic development including increasing urbanization. The technique used to provide these estimates is based on results from available, contemporary survey results, combined with expected future trends in demographic indicators. We suggest that the currently available methods for the estimation of the future global burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus yield underestimates. Further modifications and validity tests of the modelling techniques are necessary in order to develop a reliable instrument to globally monitor the effects of the struggle against the diabetes problem.

  1. Early use of insulin in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Eldor, Roy; Stern, Erwin; Milicevic, Zvonko; Raz, Itamar

    2005-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease characterised by peripheral insulin resistance, as well as by pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. This process is in part due to elevated blood glucose and free fatty acids--termed glucolipotoxicity. The traditional pathway of treating type 2 diabetes in a stepwise manner, beginning with life style modifications and continuing with oral hypoglycaemic agents leads to a protracted period of unnecessary hyperglycaemia. A new approach, targeted at alleviating the deleterious effects of hyperglycaemia and elevated free fatty acids by acutely lowering both with intensive insulin therapy, has yielded prolonged remissions in therapy in which only diet was necessary to maintain normoglycaemia. This new approach, its rationale, benefits and misgivings are discussed in this review.

  2. Individualizing insulin therapy in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, Etie; King, Allen B

    2014-10-01

    It is recognized that reducing hyperglycemia early on in disease progression has long-term benefits for patients with diabetes. Insulin therapy has greater potential to reduce hyperglycemia than other therapies; however, there is often a significant delay in insulin initiation and intensification. Insulin replacement therapy in type 2 diabetes should no longer be viewed as the treatment of last resort. With the development of modern insulin analogs, the field has evolved. Large clinical trials have improved our understanding of the potential benefits and risks associated with intensive glycemic control in different patient populations and highlighted the need for individualization of glycemic targets and treatment strategies. Current treatment guidelines recognize the important role of insulin therapy both early on and throughout the progression of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Insulin action and resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Czech, Michael P

    2017-07-11

    Nutritional excess is a major forerunner of type 2 diabetes. It enhances the secretion of insulin, but attenuates insulin's metabolic actions in the liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. However, conflicting evidence indicates a lack of knowledge of the timing of these events during the development of obesity and diabetes, pointing to a key gap in our understanding of metabolic disease. This Perspective reviews alternate viewpoints and recent results on the temporal and mechanistic connections between hyperinsulinemia, obesity and insulin resistance. Although much attention has addressed early steps in the insulin signaling cascade, insulin resistance in obesity seems to be largely elicited downstream of these steps. New findings also connect insulin resistance to extensive metabolic cross-talk between the liver, adipose tissue, pancreas and skeletal muscle. These and other advances over the past 5 years offer exciting opportunities and daunting challenges for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Omarigliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xueying

    2016-10-01

    Omarigliptin is a new once-weekly dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is indicated to have favorable effects on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting and postmeal plasma glucose. It potently but reversibly inhibits DPP-4 enzyme, which prolongs the circulating half-life of glucagon-like peptide-1 that increases insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. Benefiting from glucose-dependent insulin secretion, omarigliptin is associated with low risk of hypoglycemia. In contrast to the once-daily dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (e.g., alogliptin, linagliptin, sitagliptin), once-weekly omarigliptin can improve patients' adherence and thus achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. Herein, I review the pharmacological and clinical profile of omarigliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes based on the available clinical data.

  5. Canagliflozin: a novel treatment option for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Eric; Powell, Jason; Taylor, James R

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes continues to be a challenging disease to manage. The addition of new agents with a positive risk–benefit ratio could potentially assist clinicians and patients in achieving adequate diabetes control. Canagliflozin, the first sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor presently available on the market, offers a unique mechanism of action: it inhibits renal reabsorption of glucose, thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. It reduces hemoglobin A1c by approximately 0.37%–1.16%; it also reduces the patient’s weight and systolic blood pressure and has a low risk for hypoglycemia. Adverse effects include an increased risk of urinary tract infections and genital mycotic infections. In this manuscript we review canagliflozin and its potential role in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24285921

  6. Insulin therapy and type 2 diabetes: management of weight gain.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Samy I

    2009-10-01

    The potential for insulin-related weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes presents a therapeutic dilemma and frequently leads to delays in the initiation of insulin therapy. It also poses considerable challenges when treatment is intensified. Addressing insulin-related weight gain is highly relevant to the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular consequences in this high-risk population with type 2 diabetes. In addition to lifestyle changes (eg, diet and exercise) and available medical interventions to minimize the risk of weight gain with insulin treatment, familiarity with the weight gain patterns of different insulins may help deal with this problem. The use of basal insulin analogs may offer advantages over conventional human insulin preparations in terms of more physiologic time-action profiles, reduced risk of hypoglycemia, and reduced weight gain.

  7. Do we need new treatments for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gomez-Peralta, Fernando; Abreu Padín, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus encompasses multiple pathophysiological and clinical situations. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a long and changing natural history. Personal circumstances and preferences also condition the actual effectiveness and safety of drugs used. In recent decades, modern drugs have markedly expanded and improved therapeutic options. However, their effectiveness remains limited in clinical practice. The main objective of decreasing macrovascular complications is not fully proven. Adverse events, especially hypoglycemia and weight gain, are still frequent and decrease treatment adherence. The constant loss of endogenous islet cell reserve is the main determinant of the need for intensified therapies. Current treatments have failed to improve long-term beta cell mass/function. It is desirable to move forward to obtain new drugs that offer solutions sustainable in the long term. These drugs should be able to fit the individual circumstances and preferences of patients with diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of type 2 diabetes: the strategic approach for implementation.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, P E H; Albright, A L

    2011-12-01

    A growing need exists to deliver effective and affordable prevention programs and to take urgent action to address the major public health challenge that diabetes represents. Achieving prevention of type 2 diabetes requires moving through a series of steps from basic science discovery to widespread distribution of effective interventions. Understanding the cellular level influences on diabetes prevention will help target particular interventions to those who may be most responsive. Several randomized controlled trials conducted throughout the world have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. Subsequent real-world translation studies have provided important information necessary to reduce cost and increase access. Ultimately achieving a population impact in diabetes prevention requires widespread distribution of effective interventions, which is supported by policies that help achieve sustainability and reach. The use of a global stakeholder network can help to share experiences and build on partner knowledge gained. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes: The Strategic Approach for Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, P.E.H.; Albright, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    A growing need exists to deliver effective and affordable prevention programs and to take urgent action to address the major public health challenge that diabetes represents. Achieving prevention of type 2 diabetes requires moving through a series of steps from basic science discovery to widespread distribution of effective interventions. Understanding the cellular level influences on diabetes prevention will help target particular interventions to those who may be most responsive. Several randomized controlled trials conducted throughout the world have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. Subsequent real-world translation studies have provided important information necessary to reduce cost and increase access. Ultimately achieving a population impact in diabetes prevention requires widespread distribution of effective interventions, which is supported by policies that help achieve sustain-ability and reach. The use of a global stakeholder network can help to share experiences and build on partner knowledge gained. PMID:22161250

  10. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy.

  11. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Management of hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    Both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients are associated with adverse outcomes including increased rates of infection, longer hospital length of stay, and even death. Clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus proved that by improving glycemic control, we can reduce all of them. Insulin is the preferred treatment for glycemic control in most cases, but alternative treatment options that can normalize blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia are being sought. Moreover, hospitalized patients are particularly vulnerable to severe, prolonged hypoglycemia since they may be unable to sense or respond to the early warning signs and symptoms of low blood glucose. Finally, nutritional support, corticosteroid therapy, and surgery increase the risk of hyperglycemia that leads to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We review the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who are admitted to the general medical wards of the hospital for a procedure of intercurrent illness.

  13. Molecular clocks, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Madhu J; George, Jyothis T; Scott, Eleanor M

    2008-06-01

    The westernised world is in the midst of an epidemic of type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular disease. These closely interlinked conditions have a common pathophysiological basis underpinned by insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Contemporary changes in environmental factors on a background of genetic susceptibility are thought to account for the increases seen. Life on earth is governed by the 24-hour environment of light and darkness cycling with the rotation of the earth. Numerous metabolic and physiological pathways are coordinated to this 24-hour cycle by an endogenous clock. Recent epidemiological evidence and animal data suggest that disturbance of circadian rhythms through genetic and environmental influences on the molecular clock is pivotal in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This review describes current knowledge on the topic.

  14. Genetic risk profiling for prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mihaescu, Raluca; Meigs, James; Sijbrands, Eric; Janssens, A. Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a common disease caused by a complex interplay between many genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene studies and recent collaborative genome-wide association efforts revealed at least 38 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk of T2D. Genetic testing of multiple SNPs is considered a potentially useful tool for early detection of individuals at high diabetes risk leading to improved targeting of preventive interventions. PMID:21278902

  15. Plasma bicarbonate and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Ernest I.; Curhan, Gary C.; Hu, Frank B.; Taylor, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several biomarkers of metabolic acidosis, including lower plasma bicarbonate and higher anion gap, have been associated with greater insulin resistance in cross-sectional studies. We sought to examine whether lower plasma bicarbonate is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a prospective study. Methods: We conducted a prospective, nested case–control study within the Nurses’ Health Study. Plasma bicarbonate was measured in 630 women who did not have type 2 diabetes mellitus at the time of blood draw in 1989–1990 but developed type 2 diabetes mellitus during 10 years of follow-up. Controls were matched according to age, ethnic background, fasting status and date of blood draw. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes by category of baseline plasma bicarbonate. Results: After adjustment for matching factors, body mass index, plasma creatinine level and history of hypertension, women with plasma bicarbonate above the median level had lower odds of diabetes (OR 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60–0.96) compared with women below the median level. Those in the second (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.67–1.25), third (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97) and fourth (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.54–1.05) quartiles of plasma bicarbonate had lower odds of diabetes compared with those in the lowest quartile (p for trend = 0.04). Further adjustment for C-reactive protein did not alter these findings. Interpretation: Higher plasma bicarbonate levels were associated with lower odds of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus among women in the Nurses’ Health Study. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding in different populations and to elucidate the mechanism for this relation. PMID:22825995

  16. Gender aspects in type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Naveed

    2013-08-01

    Men are well known to have a higher risk than women for cardiovascular disease. In recent years, however, studies show adult men also have higher risk for type 2 diabetes, an observation which has important clinical implications, particularly in the public health arena. This chapter explores the relevant data underlying this observation, examines potential mechanisms including life course changes in insulin resistance and role of adiposity, and discusses relevant clinical implications and solutions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The increase of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Brandon M

    2007-11-01

    Communities around the world have seen a dramatic rise in the incidence of childhood obesity and pediatric type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although significant advancement has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis and risk factors for T2DM in children during the past 15 years, we have yet to find the safest and most effective ways to prevent and treat this disease. This review highlights our understanding of T2DM in children and outlines treatment strategies.

  18. [Organization of treatment and control of type 2 diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Drivsholm, Thomas Bo; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-09-10

    The organization of treatment and control of type 2 diabetic patients in Denmark has undergone a major development within the last decade. From being based on local hospital guidelines, treatment and control have moved towards a more organized collaboration between primary and secondary care based on common national guidelines. Quality indicators from primary and secondary care are collected routinely, and gradually an increasingly precise depiction is documented in the National Indicator Project.

  19. Mediterranean diet for type 2 diabetes: cardiometabolic benefits.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Giugliano, Dario

    2017-04-01

    Dietary patterns influence various cardiometabolic risk factors, including body weight, lipoprotein concentrations, and function, blood pressure, glucose-insulin homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial health. The Mediterranean diet can be described as a dietary pattern characterized by the high consumption of plant-based foods, olive oil as the main source of fat, low-to-moderate consumption of fish, dairy products and poultry, low consumption of red and processed meat, and low-to-moderate consumption of wine with meals. The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while the results of randomized controlled trials show that Mediterranean diet reduces glycosylated hemoglobin levels by 0.30-0.47 %, and is also associated with a 28-30 % reduced risk for cardiovascular events. The mechanisms by which Mediterranean diet produces its cardiometabolic benefits in type 2 diabetes are, for the most, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative: increased consumption of high-quality foods may cool down the activation of the innate immune system, by reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing that of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may favor the generation of an anti-inflammatory milieu, which in turn may improve insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and endothelial function at the vascular level and ultimately act as a barrier to the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and development of atherosclerosis.

  20. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus management in Canada: is it improving?

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Berard, Lori; Bowering, C Keith; Cheng, Alice Y; Dawson, Keith G; Ekoé, Jean-Marie; Fournier, Carl; Goldin, Lianne; Harris, Stewart B; Lin, Peter; Ransom, Thomas; Tan, Mary; Teoh, Hwee; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Whitham, Dana; Woo, Vincent; Yale, Jean-François; Langer, Anatoly

    2013-04-01

    To gain insight into the current management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by Canadian primary care physicians. A total of 479 primary care physicians from across Canada submitted data on 5123 type 2 diabetes patients whom they had seen on a single day on or around World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2012. Mean glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was 7.4%, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) was 2.1 mmol/L and blood pressure (BP) was 128/75 mm Hg. A1C ≤7.0% was met by 50%, LDL-C ≤2.0 mmol/L by 57%, BP <130/80 mm Hg by 36% and the composite triple target by 13% of patients. Diet counselling had been offered to 38% of patients. Of the 87% prescribed antihyperglycemic agents, 18% were on 1 non-insulin antihyperglycemic agent (NIAHA) (85% of which was metformin), 15% were on 2 NIAHAs, 6% were on ≥3 NIAHAs, 19% were on insulin only and 42% were on insulin + ≥1 NIAHA(s). Amongst the 81% prescribed lipid-lowering therapy, 88% were on monotherapy (97% of which was a statin). Among the 83% prescribed antihypertensive agents, 39%, 34%, 21% and 6% received 1, 2, 3 and >3 drugs, respectively, with 59% prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 35% angiotensin II receptor blockers. The Diabetes Mellitus Status in Canada survey highlights the persistent treatment gap associated with the treatment of type 2 diabetes and the challenges faced by primary care physicians to gain glycemic control and global vascular protection in these patients. It also reveals a higher use of insulin therapy in primary care practices relative to previous surveys. Practical strategies aimed at more effectively managing type 2 diabetes patients are urgently needed. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pre-β1 HDL in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shiu, S W; Wong, Y; Tan, K C

    2017-08-01

    Pre-β1 HDL, being a major acceptor of free cholesterol from cells, plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport. This study was performed to determine whether abnormalities in pre-β1 HDL concentration were present in type 2 diabetes irrespective of their HDL-cholesterol levels, and the impact on cholesterol efflux. 640 type 2 diabetic patients with or without cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 360 non-diabetic controls matched for serum HDL-cholesterol levels were recruited. Plasma pre-β1 HDL was measured by ELISA, and cholesterol efflux to serum, mediated by ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), was determined by measuring the transfer of [3H]cholesterol from cultured cells expressing ABCA1 to the medium containing the tested serum. Despite the diabetic subjects having matched HDL-cholesterol and total apoA1 as controls, plasma pre-β1 HDL was significantly reduced in both male (p < 0.01) and female diabetic patients (p < 0.05), and patients with CVD had the lowest pre-β1 HDL level. Serum capacity to induce ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux was impaired in the diabetic group (p < 0.01) and cholesterol efflux correlated with pre-β1 HDL (Pearson's r = 0.38, p < 0.01), and this association remained significantly even after controlling for age, gender, body mass index, diabetes status, smoking, apoA1, triglyceride and LDL. Plasma pre-β1 HDL level was significantly decreased in type 2 diabetes and was associated with a reduction in cholesterol efflux mediated by ABCA1. Our data would suggest that low pre-β1 HDL might cause impairment in reverse cholesterol transport in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jackie F; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Mitchell, Rory J; Williamson, Rachel M; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Deary, Ian J; Lee, Amanda J; Frier, Brian M; Hayes, Peter C; Strachan, Mark WJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Risk factors underlying the development and progression of some of the less well-recognised complications of type 2 diabetes, including cognitive impairment and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, are poorly understood. The Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study was established in 2006 in order to investigate the role of potential risk factors in these complications, as well as to further investigate mechanisms underlying the development and progression of micro and macrovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Methods and design The study is designed as a prospective cohort study. Participants recruited at baseline (2006–2007) constitute 1066 men and women aged 60 to 75 years with established type 2 diabetes, living in the Lothian region of central Scotland. Subjects underwent detailed cognitive and physical examination, the latter including measures of micro- and macro-vascular disease, glycaemic control, body fat composition and plasma inflammatory markers, cortisol, lipids and liver function tests. Participants were re-examined after one year with hepatic ultrasonography and additional measures of vascular disease. This paper reports the methods of recruitment to the study and examinations performed at baseline and one year. Follow-up cognitive, vascular and liver assessments are scheduled for 2010–2011 when subjects will have been in the study for 4 years. Discussion This study will provide a wealth of epidemiological and biomarker data that should be invaluable in the identification of potentially modifiable, causal risk factors for diabetes-related cognitive impairment, liver dysfunction and vascular disease, which can be targeted for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:19077235

  4. Nutrition in Type 2 Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Via, Michael A; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2016-11-01

    For individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus or the metabolic syndrome, adherence to an idealized dietary pattern can drastically alter the risk and course of these chronic conditions. Target levels of carbohydrate intake should approximate 30% of consumed calories. Healthy food choices should include copious fruits, vegetables, and nuts while minimizing foods with high glycemic indices, especially processed foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds.

  6. Improving the adverse cardiovascular prognosis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, J H; Miles, J M; Harris, W H; Moe, R M; McCallister, B D

    1999-02-01

    Approximately 80% of all patients with diabetes die of cardiovascular disease. The traditional management of type 2 diabetes has been ineffective in altering this dismal prognosis. Insulin resistance is the fundamental defect of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance often leads to hyperinsulinemia, which is associated with hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, impaired fibrinolysis, visceral obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Although all these conditions are associated with atherosclerosis and adverse cardiovascular events, the therapeutic efforts in patients with diabetes have focused predominantly on normalizing glucose levels. Improved insulin sensitivity through lifestyle modifications or pharmacologic therapy (troglitazone and metformin) will lower both insulin and glucose levels as well as diminish dyslipidemia and hypertension. In contrast, sulfonylurea agents lower glucose by increasing insulin levels and may increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Therapy including aspirin, lipid agents (for example, statins), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-adrenergic blockers, postmenopausal estrogen replacement, and vitamin E should be considered for patients with type 2 diabetes. In most patients with diabetes who have multivessel coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass grafting is superior to coronary angioplasty for improving long-term cardiovascular prognosis. This superiority is mediated in part by the use of a left internal mammary graft to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Urgent coronary angioplasty or thrombolytic therapy should be considered for all patients with diabetes who have acute myocardial infarction.

  7. Influence of Bisphenol A on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Provvisiero, Donatella Paola; Pivonello, Claudia; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Negri, Mariarosaria; de Angelis, Cristina; Simeoli, Chiara; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic synthetic compound employed to produce plastics and epoxy resins. It is used as a structural component in polycarbonate beverage bottles and as coating for metal surface in food containers and packaging. The adverse effects of BPA on human health are widely disputed. BPA has been recently associated with a wide variety of medical disorders and, in particular, it was identified as potential endocrine-disrupting compound with diabetogenic action. Most of the clinical observational studies in humans reveal a positive link between BPA exposure, evaluated by the measurement of urinary BPA levels, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical studies on humans and preclinical studies on in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro models indicate that BPA, mostly at low doses, may have a role in increasing type 2 diabetes mellitus developmental risk, directly acting on pancreatic cells, in which BPA induces the impairment of insulin and glucagon secretion, triggers inhibition of cell growth and apoptosis, and acts on muscle, hepatic, and adipose cell function, triggering an insulin-resistant state. The current review summarizes the available evidences regarding the association between BPA and type 2 diabetes mellitus, focusing on both clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27782064

  8. SGLT2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monica Reddy, R P; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-lowering pharmacopeia continues to grow for patients with type 2 diabetes. The latest drug category, the SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin concentrations by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. They are used mainly in combination with metformin and other antihyperglycemic agents, including insulin. Their glucose-lowering potency is modest. Advantages include lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect, and mild reduction in blood pressure and body weight. Side effects include increased urinary frequency, owing to their mild diuretic action, symptoms of hypovolemia, genitourinary infections. There are also recent reports of rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring in insulin-treated patients. Recently, a large cardiovascular outcome trial reported that a specific SGLT2 inhibitor, empagliflozin, led to a reduction in the primary endpoint of major cardiovascular events. This effect was mainly the result of a surprising 38 % reduction in cardiovascular death, and the drug was also associated with nearly as large a reduction in heart failure hospitalization. These findings were notable because most drugs used in type 2 diabetes have not been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, there is growing interest in empagliflozin and the entire SGLT2 inhibitor class as drugs that could potentially change the manner in which we approach the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  9. [Prevalence of type 2 diabetes and factors associated in depression].

    PubMed

    Sebbani, M; Dali Sahi, M; Amine, M; Aouar, A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients with depression and to describe its associated factors. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted over a period of three months (from May to August 2012) in a hospital in Tlemcen, Algeria. The sample study had included 73 consecutive depressed patients who had attended the unit for assessment, education or treatment of depression or its complications. Data collection was conducted using a questionnaire. Blood sampling was performed in all patients to measure glycemic levels. Data analysis was performed using the spss version 10 software. P-value was considered significant when ≤ 0.05. Means age was 53 ± 15 years. Sex-ratio female/male was 1.35. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 69.9% with 95% CI [57.9; 79.8]. Heredity and collective lifestyle were significantly associated with diabetes (P<0.0001). We have not found an association of diabetes with the factors studied: gender, presence of remaining associated diseases, smoking, and treatment regime. In the absence of national epidemiological data, the results of our study provide the frequency of type 2 diabetes during depression. This requires planning strategies for diagnosis and appropriate care for this population. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin Glargine/Lixisenatide: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2017-08-01

    Subcutaneous insulin glargine/lixisenatide (Suliqua™) is a titratable, fixed-ratio combination of a long-acting basal insulin analogue and a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for the treatment of adult patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Once-daily insulin glargine/lixisenatide, in combination with metformin, provided effective glycaemic control and was generally well tolerated in the 30-week, multinational, phase 3 LixiLan-O and LixiLan-L trials in insulin-naive and -experienced adult patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Although long-term clinical experience with this fixed-ratio combination is currently lacking, given its convenient once-daily regimen and beneficial effects on glycaemic control and bodyweight loss in the absence of an increase in the incidence of hypoglycaemia, insulin glargine/lixisenatide is an emerging option for the treatment of adult patients with type 2 diabetes to improve glycaemic control when this has not been provided by metformin alone or metformin combined with another OAD or basal insulin.

  11. Interaction of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Verderese, John Paul; Younossi, Zobair

    2013-07-01

    Evauation of: Kasturiratne A, Weerasinghe S, Dassanayake A et al. Influence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease on the development of diabetes mellitus. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 28(1), 142-147 (2013). It has been a few decades that Type 2 diabetes has been clearly linked to the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In a recent study reported by Kastuiratne et al., the reverse scenario is also reported. In this study, a cohort of Sri Lankan adults were evaluated for NAFLD by ultrasound and for the presence of Type 2 diabetes. Those without diabetes at baseline were followed prospectively for 3 years and assessed for incident diabetes. On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for a number of factors (age, impaired fasting glucose, BMI, waist circumference, elevated ALT, family history of diabetes and presence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia), NAFLD was the only predictor of incident diabetes in those with and without impaired fasting glucose at baseline. This study adds to the growing evidence connecting NAFLD to Type 2 diabetes and highlights the importance of its recognition in an effort to target those at the highest risk of diabetes for lifestyle and pharmacologic intervention.

  12. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Binbin; Zheng, Yuxi; Coursey, Terry G.; Zhao, Yinying; Li, Junhua; Fu, Yana; Chen, Xuewen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate meibomian gland and tear film function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods This prospective study compared changes in meibomian gland and tear film function in type 2 diabetic patients with nondiabetic patients. Meibomian gland function was evaluated by measuring lipid layer thickness (LLT), grading of meibomian gland loss, lid margin abnormalities, and expression of meibum. Tear film function was assessed by measuring tear breakup time (TBUT), the Schirmer I test, noninvasive breakup time (NIBUT), tear meniscus height (TMH), and corneal fluorescein staining. Results Meibography scores were significantly higher in the diabetic group compared with the nondiabetic group (p = 0.004). The number of expressible glands was significantly lower in the diabetic group in temporal, central, and nasal third of the lower eyelid (nasal: p = 0.002; central: p = 0.040; and temporal: p = 0.039). The lid margin abnormality score was significantly higher in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the tear film function parameters between the two groups. Conclusions Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) in type 2 diabetic patients is more severe compared with nondiabetic patients. Overall, most of the diabetic patients manifest as having asymptomatic MGD. PMID:28593054

  13. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaolei; Xu, Binbin; Zheng, Yuxi; Coursey, Terry G; Zhao, Yinying; Li, Junhua; Fu, Yana; Chen, Xuewen; Zhao, Yun-E

    2017-01-01

    To investigate meibomian gland and tear film function in patients with type 2 diabetes. This prospective study compared changes in meibomian gland and tear film function in type 2 diabetic patients with nondiabetic patients. Meibomian gland function was evaluated by measuring lipid layer thickness (LLT), grading of meibomian gland loss, lid margin abnormalities, and expression of meibum. Tear film function was assessed by measuring tear breakup time (TBUT), the Schirmer I test, noninvasive breakup time (NIBUT), tear meniscus height (TMH), and corneal fluorescein staining. Meibography scores were significantly higher in the diabetic group compared with the nondiabetic group (p = 0.004). The number of expressible glands was significantly lower in the diabetic group in temporal, central, and nasal third of the lower eyelid (nasal: p = 0.002; central: p = 0.040; and temporal: p = 0.039). The lid margin abnormality score was significantly higher in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the tear film function parameters between the two groups. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) in type 2 diabetic patients is more severe compared with nondiabetic patients. Overall, most of the diabetic patients manifest as having asymptomatic MGD.

  14. Gastric stimulation in treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zonca, P; Hoppe, C; Cambal, M; Jacobi, C A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic surgery is a dynamic field providing a wide range of new techniques. The aim of our paper is to inform about gastric electrostimulation in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Gastric electrostimulation in type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment is performed by means of implanting Tantalus system (Metacure). When triggered by food intake, the Tantalus system generates signals for the stomach to contract. Early after the food intake, thus before the stomach distends completely, the system increases spontaneous stomach contractions. Via afferent vagal signals, these increased contractions are evaluated by the central nervous system as a sign that satiety has been reached. Three pairs of electrodes connected with a stimulator are implanted laparoscopically. The system comes equipped with a battery as well. Laparoscopically implanted system of stomach electrostimulation presents a simple and easily regulated system without disturbing the integrity of gastrointestinal tract. It is a reversible system. In accord with preliminary results, Tantalus offers a safe and effective treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus by reducing other cardiometabolical risky factors. The operation safety is comparable with that of similar minimally invasive surgical techniques. In order to improve our understanding of diabetes mellitus pathophysiology as well as of effects of gastric electrostimulation, more trials need to be performed. The surgical diabetes treatment represents an interesting chance for patients and it might become a common technique in the future (Fig. 1, Ref. 29). diabetes mellitus, obesity, gastric stimulation, pacemaker.

  15. The new type 2 diabetes gene TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C

    2007-07-01

    Common variants in the gene that encodes the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) have been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes. This highly reproducible association may uncover novel mechanisms of glycemic pathophysiology. The initial publication of an association of common variants in TCF7L2 with type 2 diabetes in people of European descent has been followed by an avalanche of replication reports. These papers not only confirm the original finding, but also extend it to other populations, fine map the source of the association signal, describe its effect on metabolic parameters in humans, open the door to a more precise molecular characterization, and provide an insight into its possible impact on diabetes therapy. The discovery of TCF7L2 as a diabetes gene illustrates that novel true diabetes genes can be found, their association with type 2 diabetes replicated and their effect incorporated into risk prediction models. It is hoped that the detection of other such genes in genome-wide association scans will help elucidate the genetic architecture of this disease.

  16. Optimizing combination treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Sibilla, Salvadeo

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining the suggested glycemic control is the most important achievement in order to prevent cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Monotherapy often fails after a period of treatment, so that multiple drugs are needed to achieve effective glycemic control. A number of oral glucose lowering drugs is now available such as metformin, sulfonylureas, non-sulfonylureas secretagogues (metiglinides derivatives), alpha-glucosidases inhibitors, and the newest agent: thiazolidinediones (TZD). The possible associations of oral glucose lowering drugs for optimal treatment of type 2 diabetes are briefly reviewed. In particular, the effects of different classes of drugs on cardiovascular risk factors (and particular hypertension and dyslipidemia) and well recognized cardiovascular disease markers in type 2 diabetes are analyzed: in this context TZD appear the more innovative drugs and have been shown to play a key role in the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and endothelial disfunction in diabetic patients. The possible adverse effects derived from the association of different drug classes are also considered. PMID:18078018

  17. [Important epidemiological features of the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Seguí Díaz, M

    2014-07-01

    According to the various clinical practice guidelines, the recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes are well-established, thus leading to homogenization of clinical practice and avoiding variability. However, it is well known that, depending on factors such as effectiveness, physiopathology, cost, adverse effects, preferences, and comorbidities, each patient will, in the long-term, receive different treatment of type 2 diabetes. The consensus document published last year and approved by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommends distinct targets for each patient with type 2 diabetes and argues for the individualization of the management and treatment of this disease. In other words, the document advocates a patient-centered approach, in which the various therapeutic alternatives are related mainly to distinct physiopathological factors, adverse effects, and the patient's comorbidities, as well as the patient's preferences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  18. Type-2 diabetes: Current understanding and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ankita; Chawla, Sheetal; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2015-07-01

    The rapid outbreak of type-2 diabetes is one of the largest public health problems around the globe. Particularly, the developing nations are becoming the epicenters of cardiometabolic disorders owing to the change in lifestyle and diet preference besides genetic predisposition. Diabetes has become a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in South Asian countries including India. The pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes primarily initiates with inadequacy of pancreatic islet β-cells to respond to chronic fuel surfeit and hence causing glycemic load, insulin resistance, and obesity. Urban Indian life is threatened with unhealthy high calorie diet and sedentary habits, and thus impairing the metabolic status of "thin-fat Indians" and rendering them more vulnerable to metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the metabolic dysfunction may be triggered off quite early in life due to poor maternal health and impairment in intrauterine programming and, particularly in rural India. The impaired fetal development affects the health status in later stage of life by promoting obesity, insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular complications. Therefore, the preventive and therapeutic approaches focus on a holistic strategy to improve maternal and child health, promote balanced diet and physical exercise in combination with pharmacological intervention of reducing/checking hyperglycemia, obesity, and cardiovascular complications. This review summarizes the epidemiology, mechanisms, and risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disorders with a focus on the Indian subcontinent. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. The ZONE Diet and Metabolic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stulnig, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue, which contributes to obesity-associated complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The increased inflammatory response seems to be directly related to modern nutrition, particularly aspects of fat quality and macronutrient composition. We have recently published an observational study investigating the practicability and effects of a combined dietary intervention with increased relative protein content and low-glycemic-index carbohydrates, supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on metabolic control and inflammatory parameters in real-life situations in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary efficacy parameter was the change in HbA1c, and secondary parameters included change in systemic inflammation (measured by ultrasensitive C-reactive protein), body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Counseling a protein-enriched and low-glycemic-index diet supplemented with long-chain omega-3 PUFAs in a real-life clinical setting improved glycemic control, waist circumference, and silent inflammation in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, F O

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education.

  1. Thyroid dysfunction among type 2 diabetic female Egyptian subjects

    PubMed Central

    Elebrashy, Ibrahim N; El Meligi, Amr; Rashed, Laila; Salam, Randa F; Youssef, Elham; Fathy, Shaimaa A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High prevalence of thyroid disorders is more common in type 1 diabetes compared to type 2 diabetes, due to associated autoimmunity. Hypothyroidism is the most common disorder. The objective was to assess the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among type 2 diabetic Egyptian females and to find the correlation between metabolic syndrome components and autoimmune thyroid dysfunction. Materials and methods The study included 62 type 2 diabetic Egyptian females and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. All patients in the study were subjected to anthropometric measures, including HbA1c, lipid profile, serum uric acid, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and thyroid ultrasound. Results Hypothyroidism was found in 45.2% of patients (5.49±3.37 μIU/mL) versus 11.1% of controls (1.79±1.21 μIU/mL) (P<0.001). Anti-TPO was found in 75.8% (347.15±244.87 IU/mL) of patients versus 7.4% (32.89±33.26 IU/mL) of controls (P<0.001). Anti-Tg was found in 61.3% (508.03±369.16 IU/mL) of patients versus 0 (51.26±35.53 IU/mL) controls (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between TSH and antithyroid antibodies (anti-Tg, anti-TPO; P=0.002 and P=0.043, respectively) and between TSH and thyroid-gland volume (P=0.002) in diabetic patients. No correlation was found between any components of metabolic syndrome and thyroid antibodies in diabetic patients. Conclusion Autoimmune thyroid disease is more common in Egyptian women with type 2 diabetes than nondiabetic women, and thus points to a role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27920545

  2. Which insulin, regimen and device in type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    Around 4% of the UK population have diabetes mellitus.1 Around 90% have type 2 disease and many of these people will need insulin therapy for effective control of their diabetes. The different types of insulin (animal, human or analogue), regimen (timing of doses and duration of action of insulin) and device (syringes, prefilled or disposable pens) present various advantages and disadvantages that can affect adherence, quality of life and glycaemic control.2 Here we provide an overview of the various treatment options available, and offer practical advice on how to choose the appropriate approach for adults with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Population genetics in minority children with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Non-insulin dependent (type 2) diabetes mellitus (DM) is a rapidly emerging health threat in minority populations in the United States, with the African-American, Hispanic, and Native American populations at greatest risk. Clearly, environmental factors play a role in this disorder, but the ethnic predilection suggests a significant genetic component. Type 2 DM is a condition not well understood on a genetic basis. Familial clustering and ethnic variation have been documented. The populations of Africans living in diverse environments provide a unique opportunity to study type 2 DM as the mechanism is becoming more clear.

  4. A case study of type 2 diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-i

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been established that careful diabetes self-management is essential in avoiding chronic complications that compromise health. Disciplined diet control and regular exercise are the keys for the type 2 diabetes self-management. An ability to maintain one's blood glucose at a relatively flat level, not fluctuating wildly with meals and hypoglycemic medical intervention, would be the goal for self-management. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c) is a measure of a long-term blood plasma glucose average, a reliable index to reflect one's diabetic condition. A simple regimen that could reduce the elevated A1c levels without altering much of type 2 diabetic patients' daily routine denotes a successful self-management strategy. Methods A relatively simple model that relates the food impact on blood glucose excursions for type 2 diabetes was studied. Meal is treated as a bolus injection of glucose. Medical intervention of hypoglycaemic drug or injection, if any, is lumped with secreted insulin as a damping factor. Lunch was used for test meals. The recovery period of a blood glucose excursion returning to the pre-prandial level, the maximal reach, and the area under the excursion curve were used to characterize one's ability to regulate glucose metabolism. A case study is presented here to illustrate the possibility of devising an individual-based self-management regimen. Results Results of the lunch study for a type 2 diabetic subject indicate that the recovery time of the post-prandial blood glucose level can be adjusted to 4 hours, which is comparable to the typical time interval for non-diabetics: 3 to 4 hours. A moderate lifestyle adjustment of light supper coupled with morning swimming of 20 laps in a 25 m pool for 40 minutes enabled the subject to reduce his A1c level from 6.7 to 6.0 in six months and to maintain this level for the subsequent six months. Conclusions The preliminary result of this case study is encouraging. An individual life

  5. Choosing a Type 2 Diabetes Drug: Why Generic Metformin is Often the Best Choice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Notes Stories Patients’ Stories Providers’ Stories Choosing a Type 2 Diabetes Drug Why generic metformin is often the best ... iabetes makes your blood sugar get too high. Type 2 diabetes is the most common kind of diabetes. If ...

  6. Cardiovascular effects of intensive lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wing, Rena R; Bolin, Paula; Brancati, Frederick L; Bray, George A; Clark, Jeanne M; Coday, Mace; Crow, Richard S; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Egan, Caitlin M; Espeland, Mark A; Evans, Mary; Foreyt, John P; Ghazarian, Siran; Gregg, Edward W; Harrison, Barbara; Hazuda, Helen P; Hill, James O; Horton, Edward S; Hubbard, Van S; Jakicic, John M; Jeffery, Robert W; Johnson, Karen C; Kahn, Steven E; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Knowler, William C; Lewis, Cora E; Maschak-Carey, Barbara J; Montez, Maria G; Murillo, Anne; Nathan, David M; Patricio, Jennifer; Peters, Anne; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Pownall, Henry; Reboussin, David; Regensteiner, Judith G; Rickman, Amy D; Ryan, Donna H; Safford, Monika; Wadden, Thomas A; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; West, Delia S; Williamson, David F; Yanovski, Susan Z

    2013-07-11

    Weight loss is recommended for overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of short-term studies, but long-term effects on cardiovascular disease remain unknown. We examined whether an intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss would decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among such patients. In 16 study centers in the United States, we randomly assigned 5145 overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes to participate in an intensive lifestyle intervention that promoted weight loss through decreased caloric intake and increased physical activity (intervention group) or to receive diabetes support and education (control group). The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or hospitalization for angina during a maximum follow-up of 13.5 years. The trial was stopped early on the basis of a futility analysis when the median follow-up was 9.6 years. Weight loss was greater in the intervention group than in the control group throughout the study (8.6% vs. 0.7% at 1 year; 6.0% vs. 3.5% at study end). The intensive lifestyle intervention also produced greater reductions in glycated hemoglobin and greater initial improvements in fitness and all cardiovascular risk factors, except for low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The primary outcome occurred in 403 patients in the intervention group and in 418 in the control group (1.83 and 1.92 events per 100 person-years, respectively; hazard ratio in the intervention group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.09; P=0.51). An intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on weight loss did not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; Look AHEAD ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953.).

  7. Chronomedicine and type 2 diabetes: shining some light on melatonin.

    PubMed

    Forrestel, Andrew C; Miedlich, Susanne U; Yurcheshen, Michael; Wittlin, Steven D; Sellix, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    In mammals, the circadian timing system drives rhythms of physiology and behaviour, including the daily rhythms of feeding and activity. The timing system coordinates temporal variation in the biochemical landscape with changes in nutrient intake in order to optimise energy balance and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Circadian disruption (e.g. as a result of shift work or jet lag) can disturb this continuity and increase the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Obesity and metabolic disease can also disturb the timing and amplitude of the clock in multiple organ systems, further exacerbating disease progression. As our understanding of the synergy between the timing system and metabolism has grown, an interest has emerged in the development of novel clock-targeting pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction. Recently, the pineal hormone melatonin has received some attention as a potential chronotherapeutic drug for metabolic disease. Melatonin is well known for its sleep-promoting effects and putative activity as a chronobiotic drug, stimulating coordination of biochemical oscillations through targeting the internal timing system. Melatonin affects the insulin secretory activity of the pancreatic beta cell, hepatic glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus have lower night-time serum melatonin levels and increased risk of comorbid sleep disturbances compared with healthy individuals. Further, reduced melatonin levels, and mutations and/or genetic polymorphisms of the melatonin receptors are associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Herein we review our understanding of molecular clock control of glucose homeostasis, detail the influence of circadian disruption on glucose metabolism in critical peripheral tissues, explore the contribution of melatonin signalling to the aetiology of type 2 diabetes, and discuss the pros and cons of melatonin chronopharmacotherapy in

  8. Personalized glucose forecasting for type 2 diabetes using data assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Albers, David J.; Gluckman, Bruce; Ginsberg, Henry; Hripcsak, George; Mamykina, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes leads to premature death and reduced quality of life for 8% of Americans. Nutrition management is critical to maintaining glycemic control, yet it is difficult to achieve due to the high individual differences in glycemic response to nutrition. Anticipating glycemic impact of different meals can be challenging not only for individuals with diabetes, but also for expert diabetes educators. Personalized computational models that can accurately forecast an impact of a given meal on an individual’s blood glucose levels can serve as the engine for a new generation of decision support tools for individuals with diabetes. However, to be useful in practice, these computational engines need to generate accurate forecasts based on limited datasets consistent with typical self-monitoring practices of individuals with type 2 diabetes. This paper uses three forecasting machines: (i) data assimilation, a technique borrowed from atmospheric physics and engineering that uses Bayesian modeling to infuse data with human knowledge represented in a mechanistic model, to generate real-time, personalized, adaptable glucose forecasts; (ii) model averaging of data assimilation output; and (iii) dynamical Gaussian process model regression. The proposed data assimilation machine, the primary focus of the paper, uses a modified dual unscented Kalman filter to estimate states and parameters, personalizing the mechanistic models. Model selection is used to make a personalized model selection for the individual and their measurement characteristics. The data assimilation forecasts are empirically evaluated against actual postprandial glucose measurements captured by individuals with type 2 diabetes, and against predictions generated by experienced diabetes educators after reviewing a set of historical nutritional records and glucose measurements for the same individual. The evaluation suggests that the data assimilation forecasts compare well with specific glucose measurements

  9. Clinical Inertia in People With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Wolden, Michael L.; Thorsted, Brian Larsen; Andersen, Marc; Davies, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine time to treatment intensification in people with type 2 diabetes treated with one, two, or three oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) and associated levels of glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study based on 81,573 people with type 2 diabetes in the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink between January 2004 and December 2006, with follow-up until April 2011. RESULTS In people with HbA1c ≥7.0, ≥7.5, or ≥8.0% (≥53, ≥58, or ≥64 mmol/mol), median time from above HbA1c cutoff to intensification with an additional OAD was 2.9, 1.9, or 1.6 years, respectively, for those taking one OAD and >7.2, >7.2, and >6.9 years for those taking two OADs. Median time to intensification with insulin was >7.1, >6.1, or 6.0 years for those taking one, two, or three OADs. Mean HbA1c at intensification with an OAD or insulin for people taking one, two, or three OADs was 8.7, 9.1, and 9.7%. In patients taking one, two, or three OADs, median time from treatment initiation to intensification with an OAD or insulin exceeded the maximum follow-up time of 7.2 years. The probability of patients with poor glycemic control taking one, two, or three OADs, intensifying at end of follow-up with an OAD, was 21.1–43.6% and with insulin 5.1–12.0%. CONCLUSIONS There are delays in treatment intensification in people with type 2 diabetes despite suboptimal glycemic control. A substantial proportion of people remain in poor glycemic control for several years before intensification with OADs and insulin. PMID:23877982

  10. Strategies to Make Ramadan Fasting Safer in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lee, Jun Yang; Tan, Christina San San; Wong, Chee Piau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ramadan is the holy month for Muslims whereby they fast from predawn to after sunset and is observed by all healthy Muslim adults as well as a large population of type 2 diabetic Muslims. To determine the comparative effectiveness of various strategies that have been used for type 2 diabetic Muslim who fast during Ramadan. A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies (RCT) as well as observational studies for patients with type 2 diabetes who fasted during Ramadan was conducted. Eight databases were searched from January 1980 through October 2015 for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened and assessed study for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. A network meta-analysis for each outcome was fitted separately, combining direct and indirect evidence for each comparison. Twenty-nine studies, 16 RCTs and 13 observational studies each met the inclusion criteria. The most common strategy used was drug changes during the Ramadan period, which found that the use of DPP-4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor -4) inhibitors were associated with a reduction in incidence of experiencing hypoglycemia during Ramadan in both RCTs (pooled relative risk: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.72) as well as in observational studies (pooled relative risk: 0.27; 0.09–0.75). Ramadan-focused education was shown to be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in observational studies but not RCTs (0.25 versus 1.00). Network meta-analyses suggest that incretin mimetics can reduce the risk of hypoglycemia by nearly 1.5 times. The newer antidiabetic agents appear to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control when compared with sulfonylureas. Ramadan-focused education shows to be a promising strategy but more rigorous examination from RCTs are required. PMID:26765440

  11. Learning needs of youth with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Denise; Larkin, Mary; Milaszewski, Kerry; Javier, Elaine; Casey, Terri; Grey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine reports of diabetes learning needs by youth with type 2 diabetes and their family support person (FSP) and to examine correlations of these perceptions with demographic variables. Data were analyzed from the Participant Needs Assessment (PNA), a routinely self-administered questionnaire designed to assess learning needs, in 191 youth (mean age = 14.0 ± 1.9 years, duration 8.78 ± 6.30 months; 36% black, non-Hispanic; 40% Hispanic; 20% white) enrolled in the TODAY (Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth) study. Youth and their FSPs completed the PNA at scheduled study visits, rating their learning needs on a 5-point scale, with higher scores indicating higher needs. Paired t tests and ANOVA were used. There were no differences in reported learning needs by gender, although scores on the Teen Issues scale approached significance, with girls reporting higher needs than boys. Youth and FSPs were similar on their reports of needs on 3 scales (Ordinary Day, Nutrition, and Living With Diabetes), but youth reported higher needs than FSPs on Focus and Teen Issues. Controlling for duration of diabetes, these differences between youth and FSPs persisted. In general, learning needs for both youth and FSPs decreased over time. Youth with type 2 diabetes and their FSPs have high levels of ongoing learning needs despite completion of a standard diabetes education program. Continued assessment of learning needs, follow-up education, and behavioral approaches are warranted for these high-risk youth.

  12. Insulin Degludec/Liraglutide: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; Scott, Lesley J

    2015-09-01

    Insulin degludec/liraglutide (Xultophy(®)), a fixed-ratio combination of an ultra-long-acting insulin analogue and a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is available in the EU for the management of inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Once-daily subcutaneous insulin degludec/liraglutide as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetics was effective and generally well tolerated in adults with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes in several well designed 26-week phase III trials. In insulin-naive patients, add-on insulin degludec/liraglutide provided significantly greater improvements in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels than add-on insulin degludec, liraglutide or placebo, or unchanged GLP-1 receptor agonists (i.e. liraglutide or exenatide). In the extension of one of these trials, the efficacy of add-on insulin degludec/liraglutide was maintained for a total of 52 weeks. In insulin-experienced patients, add-on insulin degludec/liraglutide was significantly more effective with regard to improvements in HbA1c levels than add-on insulin degludec (at equivalent doses) or ongoing insulin glargine therapy. Add-on insulin degludec/liraglutide was associated with a lower incidence of confirmed hypoglycaemia than add-on insulin degludec in insulin-naive patients or ongoing insulin glargine in insulin-experienced patients, and a lower initial rate of nausea than add-on liraglutide. Thus, once-daily subcutaneous insulin degludec/liraglutide is a useful add-on therapy option for adult patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes.

  13. Lupin and soya reduce glycaemia acutely in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dove, Emma R; Mori, Trevor A; Chew, Gerard T; Barden, Anne E; Woodman, Richard J; Puddey, Ian B; Sipsas, Sofia; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2011-10-01

    Addition of fibre or protein to carbohydrate-rich foods can reduce the glycaemic response to those foods. This may assist with glycaemic management in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Lupin is a legume rich in fibre and protein. We assessed the acute effects of lupin- and soya-based beverages on glucose and insulin responses in type 2 diabetic individuals. We hypothesised that the lupin and soya beverages would lower the acute glycaemic response compared with a control beverage containing no protein or fibre, and that lupin would reduce the postprandial glucose more than soya. In a randomised, controlled, cross-over trial, twenty-four diabetic adults (nineteen men and five women) attended three testing sessions, each 1 week apart. At each session, participants consumed a beverage containing 50 g glucose (control), 50 g glucose plus lupin kernel flour with 12·5 g fibre and 22 g protein (lupin), or 50 g glucose plus 12·5 g fibre and 22 g protein from soya isolates (soya). Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured periodically for 4 h following beverage consumption. Compared with the control beverage, the 4 h post-beverage glucose response was lower (P < 0·001), and the 4 h post-beverage insulin and C-peptide responses were higher (P < 0·001) for lupin and soya. Glucose (P = 0·25) and C-peptide (P = 0·07) responses did not differ significantly between lupin and soya, but lupin resulted in a lower insulin response compared with soya (P = 0·013). Adding lupin or soya to a carbohydrate-rich beverage reduces glycaemia acutely in type 2 diabetic individuals. This may have a beneficial role in glycaemic management.

  14. Heart Failure Considerations of Antihyperglycemic Medications for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-05-27

    Prevalent and incident heart failure (HF) is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with risk directly associated with the severity of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, mortality is increased ≈10-fold in patients with versus without HF. Reducing HF with antihyperglycemic therapies, however, has been unsuccessful until recently. In fact, HF as an important outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be heterogeneously modulated by antihyperglycemic medications, as evidenced by results from cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) and large observational cohort studies. Appropriately powered and executed CVOTs are necessary to truly evaluate cardiovascular safety and efficacy of new antihyperglycemic medications, as reflected by the guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory agencies since 2008. In light of the best available evidence at present, metformin and the sodium-glucose-co-transporter 2-inhibitor empagliflozin seem to be especially advantageous with regard to HF effects, with their use associated with reduced HF events and improved mortality. Acarbose, the dipeptidyl-peptidase 4-inhibitor sitagliptin, the glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist lixisenatide based on presently available CVOT results comprise reasonable additional options, as significant harm in terms of HF has been excluded for those drugs. Additions to this list are anticipated pending results of ongoing CVOTs. Although no HF harm was seen in CVOTs for insulin or sulfonylureas, they should be used only with caution in patients with HF, given their established high risk for hypoglycemia and some uncertainties on their safety in patients with HF derived from epidemiological observations. Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with HF>New York Heart Association I, despite some benefits suggested by CVOT subanalyses.

  15. Effects of combination lipid therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Henry N; Elam, Marshall B; Lovato, Laura C; Crouse, John R; Leiter, Lawrence A; Linz, Peter; Friedewald, William T; Buse, John B; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Grimm, Richard H; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Bigger, J Thomas; Goff, David C; Cushman, William C; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Byington, Robert P

    2010-04-29

    We investigated whether combination therapy with a statin plus a fibrate, as compared with statin monotherapy, would reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease. We randomly assigned 5518 patients with type 2 diabetes who were being treated with open-label simvastatin to receive either masked fenofibrate or placebo. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The mean follow-up was 4.7 years. The annual rate of the primary outcome was 2.2% in the fenofibrate group and 2.4% in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the fenofibrate group, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.08; P=0.32). There were also no significant differences between the two study groups with respect to any secondary outcome. Annual rates of death were 1.5% in the fenofibrate group and 1.6% in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.10; P=0.33). Prespecified subgroup analyses suggested heterogeneity in treatment effect according to sex, with a benefit for men and possible harm for women (P=0.01 for interaction), and a possible interaction according to lipid subgroup, with a possible benefit for patients with both a high baseline triglyceride level and a low baseline level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.057 for interaction). The combination of fenofibrate and simvastatin did not reduce the rate of fatal cardiovascular events, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke, as compared with simvastatin alone. These results do not support the routine use of combination therapy with fenofibrate and simvastatin to reduce cardiovascular risk in the majority of high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00000620.) 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  16. Incretins, insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vilsbøll, T; Holst, J J

    2004-03-01

    When glucose is taken orally, insulin secretion is stimulated much more than it is when glucose is infused intravenously so as to result in similar glucose concentrations. This effect, which is called the incretin effect and is estimated to be responsible for 50 to 70% of the insulin response to glucose, is caused mainly by the two intestinal insulin-stimulating hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Their contributions have been confirmed in mimicry experiments, in experiments with antagonists of their actions, and in experiments where the genes encoding their receptors have been deleted. In patients with Type 2 diabetes, the incretin effect is either greatly impaired or absent, and it is assumed that this could contribute to the inability of these patients to adjust their insulin secretion to their needs. In studies of the mechanism of the impaired incretin effect in Type 2 diabetic patients, it has been found that the secretion of GIP is generally normal, whereas the secretion of GLP-1 is reduced, presumably as a consequence of the diabetic state. It might be of even greater importance that the effect of GLP-1 is preserved whereas the effect of GIP is severely impaired. The impaired GIP effect seems to have a genetic background, but could be aggravated by the diabetic state. The preserved effect of GLP-1 has inspired attempts to treat Type 2 diabetes with GLP-1 or analogues thereof, and intravenous GLP-1 administration has been shown to be able to near-normalize both fasting and postprandial glycaemic concentrations in the patients, perhaps because the treatment compensates for both the impaired secretion of GLP-1 and the impaired action of GIP. Several GLP-1 analogues are currently in clinical development and the reported results are, so far, encouraging.

  17. Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Xing, Huili; Ye, Jianping

    2008-05-01

    Berberine has been shown to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism in vitro and in vivo. This pilot study was to determine the efficacy and safety of berberine in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. In study A, 36 adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to treatment with berberine or metformin (0.5 g 3 times a day) in a 3-month trial. The hypoglycemic effect of berberine was similar to that of metformin. Significant decreases in hemoglobin A1c (from 9.5%+/-0.5% to 7.5%+/-0.4%, P<.01), fasting blood glucose (from 10.6+/-0.9 mmol/L to 6.9+/-0.5 mmol/L, P<.01), postprandial blood glucose (from 19.8+/-1.7 to 11.1+/-0.9 mmol/L, P<.01), and plasma triglycerides (from 1.13+/-0.13 to 0.89+/-0.03 mmol/L, P<.05) were observed in the berberine group. In study B, 48 adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus were treated supplemented with berberine in a 3-month trial. Berberine acted by lowering fasting blood glucose and postprandial blood glucose from 1 week to the end of the trial. Hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.1%+/-0.2% to 7.3%+/-0.3% (P<.001). Fasting plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index were reduced by 28.1% and 44.7% (P<.001), respectively. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were decreased significantly as well. During the trial, 20 (34.5%) patients experienced transient gastrointestinal adverse effects. Functional liver or kidney damages were not observed for all patients. In conclusion, this pilot study indicates that berberine is a potent oral hypoglycemic agent with beneficial effects on lipid metabolism.

  18. Sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients.

  19. Atorvastatin prevents type 2 diabetes mellitus--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Sri Venkata; Aslam, Mohammad; Galav, Vikas; Bhattacharya, Swapan Kumar; Jafri, Aiman Abbas

    2014-04-05

    Recent reports of increased diabetes risk have raised concerns regarding the use of statins. The present study was therefore planned to clarify whether atorvastatin can prevent diabetes development in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eight week old male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups (n = 12 each group). Group A was given standard chow diet, while group B and group C were offered high sucrose diet. In addition to high sucrose diet, group C was given atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) from beginning of study till 26th week. After 26 weeks, a low dose of streptozotocin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to all 3 groups and further followed for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests were done at week 4, 26 and week 30. Development of impaired glucose tolerance at week 26 (16.66% vs 100%, P = <0.001) and diabetes at week 30 (16.66% vs 81.81%, P = 0.002) was significantly lower in rats pretreated with atorvastatin along with high sucrose diet viz group C compared to group B rats who received high sucrose diet only respectively. Also, metabolic indices like body weight, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose area under the curve (Gl-AUC) were significantly lower in group C compared to group B (P = <0.05) while insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also lower in group C (P = 0.05). This study clearly demonstrates for the first time in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus that atorvastatin prevents development of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  2. Challenges associated with insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Steven; Pettus, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Despite advances in treatment for type 2 diabetes in recent decades, many patients are failing to achieve adequate glycemic control. Poor glycemic control has been shown to have a detrimental effect on patients' health and well-being, and to have significant negative financial implications for both patients and healthcare systems. Insulin therapy has been proven to significantly reduce glycated hemoglobin levels; however, both patients and physicians can be reluctant to initiate insulin therapy. Research shows that both patient and provider factors contribute to a delay in initiation of insulin therapy. This review discusses the most common barriers contributing to this delay with potential solutions to overcome them.

  3. Diffuse interstitial skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, B; Kishore, S; Vijay, V; Ramachandran, A

    2004-12-01

    A 58 years type 2 diabetic woman, school teacher by profession, presented with backache, neck pain and generalised weakness since last few months. Pain was mild with stiffness and neck pain was particularly associated with extension of the neck towards back. There was no focal neurological deficit on central nervous system examination. X-ray of lumbo- sacral spine showed prolific osteophytes and new bone formation in the body of lumbar vertebrae. Cervical X-ray showed 'Melting candle-wax' appearance at the anterior to the cervical vertebrae. In view of clinical and radiological association the case was diagnosed as DISH syndrome. It is being presented for its rarity.

  4. [Prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lebherz, Corinna; Lehrke, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The modern life style is often characterized by a lack of physical activity as well as unhealthy diet leading to a worldwide rise in obesity. This goes along with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by an accelerated atherosclerosis. Life style changes and normalization of body weight therefore represent the cornerstones of diabetes prevention. In addition, a multi-factorial approach focusing on cardiovascular risk factors like dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia enables an effective means for the prevention of micro- or macrovascular complications.

  5. [Mobile applications for management of Type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Vitger, Tobias; Hempler, Nana Folmann

    2016-08-15

    This literature review describes Type 2 diabetes applications with regard to purpose, effect, preferences and possibilities. Diabetes apps might have a positive effect on the health of a person with diabetes. Some studies have found improve-ments in HbA1c, body weight and health behaviour. Important is to personalise diabetes apps to the target group and involve the group actively in the development and testing of the app. More research on how diabetes apps can be implemented in the healthcare system is crucial. Current research is characterised by methodological challenges.

  6. Depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus--a brief review.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Samreen

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which has been associated with depression. Depression is more common in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as compared to those without. Both micro- and macro vascular diabetic complications are associated with depression and have shown to increase the risk of mood disorder. Further, poor glycemic control in T2DM patients could lead to more complications of diabetes and such patients are more likely to develop depression. More research is needed in this area to determine the exact relationship between depression and T2DM and to unfold the mystery of mechanism behind this.

  7. [Coma in type 2 diabete mellitus on metformin treatment].

    PubMed

    Renard, C; Tellal, S; Fevre, G; Ragot, C; Vest, P; Foissaud, V; Renaudeau, C

    2003-01-01

    Non traumatic coma in diabete mellitus has two origins : hypo- or hyperglycemia. Coma with hyperglycemia can be due to ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar state or lactic acidosis. The present observation reports on a type 2 diabete mellitus patient presenting with a coma while the patient was on metformin and glibenclamide treatment. On admission, biologicals tests showed major acidosis, hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity. No metformine accumulation was demonstrated by analytical measure. In this case, the association of hyperosmolar state and metabolic acidosis prove the difficulty of the differential diagnosis.

  8. Clinical challenges: Myeloma and concomitant type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed Ahmed; Ahmed, Yasar A; Ibrahim, Abubaker

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematological cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians. PMID:24455664

  9. Clinical Challenges: Myeloma and Concomitant Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Yasar Albushra Abdul Rahiem; Eltayeb, Awad

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians PMID:24505516

  10. Semaglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marso, Steven P; Bain, Stephen C; Consoli, Agostino; Eliaschewitz, Freddy G; Jódar, Esteban; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lingvay, Ildiko; Rosenstock, Julio; Seufert, Jochen; Warren, Mark L; Woo, Vincent; Hansen, Oluf; Holst, Anders G; Pettersson, Jonas; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2016-11-10

    Regulatory guidance specifies the need to establish cardiovascular safety of new diabetes therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes in order to rule out excess cardiovascular risk. The cardiovascular effects of semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue with an extended half-life of approximately 1 week, in type 2 diabetes are unknown. We randomly assigned 3297 patients with type 2 diabetes who were on a standard-care regimen to receive once-weekly semaglutide (0.5 mg or 1.0 mg) or placebo for 104 weeks. The primary composite outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. We hypothesized that semaglutide would be noninferior to placebo for the primary outcome. The noninferiority margin was 1.8 for the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio. At baseline, 2735 of the patients (83.0%) had established cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or both. The primary outcome occurred in 108 of 1648 patients (6.6%) in the semaglutide group and in 146 of 1649 patients (8.9%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.95; P<0.001 for noninferiority). Nonfatal myocardial infarction occurred in 2.9% of the patients receiving semaglutide and in 3.9% of those receiving placebo (hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.08; P=0.12); nonfatal stroke occurred in 1.6% and 2.7%, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.99; P=0.04). Rates of death from cardiovascular causes were similar in the two groups. Rates of new or worsening nephropathy were lower in the semaglutide group, but rates of retinopathy complications (vitreous hemorrhage, blindness, or conditions requiring treatment with an intravitreal agent or photocoagulation) were significantly higher (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.78; P=0.02). Fewer serious adverse events occurred in the semaglutide group, although more patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events

  11. Epigenetics: spotlight on type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, A; Spinelli, R; Ciccarelli, M; Nigro, C; Miele, C; Beguinot, F; Raciti, G A

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity are the major public health problems. Substantial efforts have been made to define loci and variants contributing to the individual risk of these disorders. However, the overall risk explained by genetic variation is very modest. Epigenetics is one of the fastest growing research areas in biomedicine as changes in the epigenome are involved in many biological processes, impact on the risk for several complex diseases including diabetes and may explain susceptibility. In this review, we focus on the role of DNA methylation in contributing to the risk of T2D and obesity.

  12. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  13. Black Women's Recommendations for Developing Effective Type 2 Diabetes Programming.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Tera R; Seawell, Asani H; Cutrona, Carolyn; O'Connor, Margaret C; Camp, Randie D; Duran, Roxanne; Elderts, Reid; Green, Chrishelda; Hara, Vanessa; Pattee, Jenna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn from 29 Black women how to develop effective Type 2 diabetes programming. Three focus groups were held in Des Moines, Iowa, during fall 2012. Results highlighted themes related to diabetes knowledge, diabetes management and prevention, physical activity, diet, and diabetes management programming. Opinions were shared as to whether family members should be included in programs for supporting those diagnosed with diabetes. These results provided guidance and ideas to scholars and health care professionals aiming to improve effectiveness of diabetes programs for Black women and families.

  14. [The prevalence of type 2-diabetes in ethnic minorities].

    PubMed

    Zander, Mette; Hansen, Caroline Raun; Koefoed, Birgitte Gade; Perrild, Hans

    2012-09-10

    In general, type 2 diabetes is more common among immigrants than among the inhabitants with a Western background. The higher prevalence among ethnic minorities is probably due to a complex correlation between genetic factors, diet, exercise, linguistic and cultural obstacles, low birthweight and high catch up weight as well as socio-economic factors. Ethnic minorities are heterogeneous, and individual initiatives within the different groups are needed. The evidence regarding the effect of initiatives targeted at ethnic minorities in Denmark is sparse. In future, clinically controlled studies in this field should be carried out.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  16. Impaired Retinal Vasodilator Responses in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.J.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Shivkumar, Vikram; Smith, Bruce; Quillen, David; Gabbay, Robert A.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and subsequent structural damage to blood vessels can lead to heart attacks, retinopathy and strokes. However, it is unclear whether prediabetic subjects exhibit microvascular dysfunction indicating early stages of arteriosclerosis and vascular risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether retinal reactivity may be impaired early in the hyperglycemic continuum and may be associated with markers of inflammation. Methods Individuals with prediabetes (n = 22), type 2 diabetes (n = 25) and healthy age and body composition matched controls (n = 19) were studied. We used the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer to assess retinal vasoreactivity (percent change in vessel diameter) during a flickering light stimulation. Fasting highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of inflammation, was measured in blood plasma. Results Prediabetic and diabetic individuals had attenuated peak vasodilator and relative amplitude changes in retinal vein diameters to the flickering light stimulus compared to healthy controls (peak dilation: prediabetic subjects 3.3 ± 1.8 %, diabetic subjects 3.3 ± 2.1% controls 5.6 ± 2.6%, p = .001; relative amplitude: prediabetic subjects 4.3 ± 2.2%, diabetic subjects 5.0 ± 2.6% and control subjects 7.2 ± 3.2%, p = .003). Similar findings were observed in retinal arteries. Levels of hs-CRP were not associated with either retinal vessel response parameters. Conclusion Retinal reactivity was impaired in prediabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals in parallel with reduced insulin sensitivity but not associated with levels of hs-CRP. Retinal vasoreactivity measurements may be a sensitive tool to assess early vascular risk. PMID:23742315

  17. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  18. [CROATIAN GUIDELINES FOR THE PHARMACOTHERAPY OF TYPE 2 DIABETES].

    PubMed

    Rahelić, Dario; Altabas, Velimir; Bakula, Miro; Balić, Stjepan; Balint, Ines; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Bicanić, Nenad; Bjelinski, Igor; Bozikov, Velimir; Varzić, Silvija Canecki; Car, Nikica; Berković, Maja Cigrovski; Orlić, Zeljka Crncevic; Deskin, Marin; Sunić, Ema Drvodelić; Tomić, Nives Gojo; Goldoni, Vesna; Gradiser, Marina; Mahecić, Davorka Herman; Balen, Marica Jandrić; Erzen, Dubravka Jurisić; Majanović, Sanja Klobucar; Kokić', Slaven; Krnic, Mladen; Kruljac, Ivan; Liberati-Cizmek, Ana-Marija; Martina, Luksić; Metelko, Zeljko; Mirosević, Gorana; Vrbica, Sanja Mlinaric; Renar, Ivana Pavlić; Petric, Dragomir; Prasek, Manja; Prpić-Kizevać, Ivana; Radman, Maja; Soldo, Dragan; Sarić, Tereza; Tesanović, Sandi; Kurir, Tina Ticinovic; Wensveen, Tamara Turk; Botica, Marija; Vrkljan, Milan; Rotkvic, Vanja Zjacić; Zorić, Cedomir; Krznarić, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    The Croatian Association for Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders of the Croatian Medical Association has issued in 2011 the first national guidelines for the nutrition, education, self-control, and pharmacotherapy of diabetes type 2. According to the increased number of available medicines and new evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of medicines already involved in the therapy there was a need for update of the existing guidelines for the pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes in the Republic of Croatia. as co-authors of the Guidelines there are listed all members of the Croatian Association for Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, as well as other representatives of professional societies within the Croatian Medical Association, who have contributed with comments and suggestions to the development of the Guidelines. These guidelines are evidence-based, according to the GRADE system (eng. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation), which describes the level of evidence and strength of recommendations. An individual patient approach based on physiological principles in blood glucose control is essential for diabetes' patients management. Glycemic targets and selection of the pharmacological agents should be tailored to the patient, taking into account the age, duration of disease, life expectancy, risk of hypoglyce- mia, comorbidities, developed vascular and other complications as well as other factors. Because of all this, is of national interest to have a practical, rational and applicable guidelines for the pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Structural and functional salivary disorders in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Carda, Carmen; Mosquera-Lloreda, Nezly; Salom, Lucas; Gomez de Ferraris, Maria Elsa; Peydró, Amando

    2006-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is the most common metabolic disorder and it causes an important morbimortality. The structural modifications in the parotid gland (sialosis) had already been described in these patients and could result in variations in the salivary composition, as well as an increase in periodontal and dental pathology. To compare the biochemical findings in the saliva and to correlate these biochemical disturbances with the morphologic findings previously described. Clinical information were gathered about 33 patients, 17 had type 2 diabetes. Samples of whole saliva were obtained for biochemical analysis and serum samples to determine metabolic control. In the diabetics saliva we found urea and total proteins increased and reduced levels of microalbumina. Salivary glucose was only augmented in patients with poor metabolic control. Clinical symptoms of xerostomia were present in 76,4% and dental and periodontal disease in 100%. The parotid gland was characterised by the presence of small acini, lipid intracytoplasmic droplets, as well as adipose stroma infiltration. The acinar cytoqueratins expression was heterogeneous and very positive in the hyperplasic ducts. These biochemical disorders in the saliva of the type 2 diabetic patients would be related with the structural changes previously observed in parotid glands.

  20. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera-Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia; Morales-Bozo, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia.

  1. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  2. The endocannabinoid system in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Marzo, V

    2008-08-01

    Endocannabinoids (ECs) are defined as endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2). ECs, EC anabolic and catabolic enzymes and cannabinoid receptors constitute the EC signalling system. This system participates in the control of lipid and glucose metabolism at several levels, with the possible endpoint of the accumulation of energy as fat. Following unbalanced energy intake, however, the EC system becomes dysregulated, and in most cases overactive, in several organs participating in energy homeostasis, particularly, in intra-abdominal adipose tissue. This dysregulation might contribute to excessive visceral fat accumulation and reduced adiponectin release from this tissue, and to the onset of several cardiometabolic risk factors that are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This phenomenon might form the basis of the mechanism of action of CB1 antagonists/inverse agonists, recently developed by several pharmaceutical companies as adjuvants to lifestyle modification for weight reduction, glycaemic control and dyslipidaemia in obese and type 2 diabetes patients. It also helps to explain why some of the beneficial actions of these new therapeutics appear to be partly independent from weight loss.

  3. [Objectives and therapeutic strategy in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Calvo Romero, J M; Lima Rodríguez, E M

    2001-07-01

    United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) has demonstrated definitively that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) benefit from intensive blood glucose control, because it diminishes the risk to develop microvascular complications. The therapeutic targets in the type 2 DM have been modified in order to reduce the risk of these complications. However, aggressive treatment may be disastrous for patients with microvascular complications and/or an increased risk of hypoglycemic unawareness, and neither it would be advised in older patients or with short life expectancy. The available drugs for treatment of type 2 DM offer many options for achieving these therapeutic targets, based on the need of the individual patient. In this job we review the targets in the metabolic control of type 2 DM and their backgrounds, and we describe briefly the therapeutic strategy recommended for reaching these targets, with special attention to the new oral antidiabetic agents (repaglinide and thiazolidinediones).

  4. Type 2 Diabetes in Children: A Growing Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    St. Onge, Erin L.; Motycka, Carol A.; Rose, Renee L.

    2006-01-01

    In the pediatric population, type 2 diabetes has become a growing concern. A correlation appears to exist among type 2 diabetes in children, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. If obesity and diabetes are left untreated, conditions such as cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, and retinopathy may result as well. These conditions indicate the incredible strain on the health care system caused by diabetes and obesity. This strain may be eased by logical treatments such as exercise and healthy eating habits for the child and family. However, these lifestyle changes are not always effective in controlling blood sugar. When lifestyle changes do not yield positive results, the clinician must decide which (if any) pharmacological treatments are safe to use in the pediatric population. Orlistat and sibutramine have been studied in children as treatments for obesity and appear to be safe and effective for this population. Metformin and insulin are among the medications approved to treat diabetes in children and adolescents. Healthcare practitioners must play a role in educating parents and their children about the effects of obesity on the development of diseases like diabetes, as well as various therapies used to manage diabetes. In addition, healthcare practitioners can assist patients and their parents in understanding the benefits and risks of medications used in the treatment of the disease, assistance that may result in them making informed decisions regarding their overall health. PMID:23115537

  5. Low cost sensing technology for type 2 diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant; Free, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Alpha-hydroxybutyrate (2-hydroxybutyrate or α-HB) is becoming more widely recognized as an important metabolic biomarker that has been shown to be highly correlated with prediabetes and other metabolic diseases. In 2012 there were 86 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom are not aware they have prediabetes, but could be diagnosed and treated to prevent type 2 diabetes if a simple, low-cost, convenient test were available. We have developed new, low-cost, accurate α-HB detection methods that can be used for the detection and monitoring of diseases such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction, and early hyperglycemia. The new sensing method utilizes a diol recognition moiety, additives and a photoinitiator to detect α-HB at levels near 1 micro g/l in the presence of serum compounds such as lactic acid, sodium pyruvate, and glucose. The objective of this research is to improve the understanding of the interactions that enhance α-HB detection to enable additional improvements in α-HB detection as well as improvements in other biosensor applications.

  6. Cellular Senescence in Type 2 Diabetes: A Therapeutic Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Tchkonia, Tamara; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Chini, Eduardo N.; Xu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental aging mechanism that has been implicated in many age-related diseases and is a significant cause of tissue dysfunction. Accumulation of senescent cells occurs during aging and is also seen in the context of obesity and diabetes. Senescent cells may play a role in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis through direct impact on pancreatic β-cell function, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)-mediated tissue damage, and involvement in adipose tissue dysfunction. In turn, metabolic and signaling changes seen in diabetes, such as high circulating glucose, altered lipid metabolism, and growth hormone axis perturbations, can promote senescent cell formation. Thus, senescent cells might be part of a pathogenic loop in diabetes, as both a cause and consequence of metabolic changes and tissue damage. Therapeutic targeting of a basic aging mechanism such as cellular senescence may have a large impact on disease pathogenesis and could be more effective in preventing the progression of diabetes complications than currently available therapies that have limited impact on already existing tissue damage. Therefore, senescent cells and the SASP represent significant opportunities for advancement in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. PMID:26106186

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI <30), and 22.6% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30). Waist circumference (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.1; P = 0.03) was significantly related to the presence of OSA. Severe OSA was most likely in individuals with a higher BMI (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Physicians should be particularly cognizant of the likelihood of OSA in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, especially among individuals with higher waist circumference and BMI. PMID:19279303

  8. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  9. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  10. TREATMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES WITH BIPHASIC INSULIN ANALOGUES

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with Type 2 diabetes require insulin therapy for treating hyperglycaemia. There are several regimens available for insulin initiation and maintenance. Insulin analogues have been developed to mimic normal physiology as closely as possible. Biphasic analogues can target both fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia, with the added advantage of being premixed and thus convenient for the patient. A practical and feasible option is to initiate insulin with one or more biphasic preparations at mealtimes, thus providing both basal and prandial coverage. Individual titration of dose and frequency of daily injections with biphasic insulin preparations has the potential for improving glycaemic control with a high degree of patient acceptance. Drawbacks include a more rigid regimen, a relative lack of flexibility, and a somewhat higher degree of glycaemic variability and hypoglycaemia when compared to multiple daily basal-bolus injections. Awareness of the advantages and limitations of biphasic insulin analogues can assist clinicians in their appropriate use for the treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27918600

  11. Pharmacological management of type 2 diabetes: what's new in 2017?

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2017-09-11

    Novelties in the management of type 2 diabetes are dominated by the commercialisation of new glucose-lowering agents, which offer alternatives to older antidiabetic medications, and by the publication of several prospective placebo-controlled outcome trials, which demonstrated not only cardiovascular safety but also cardiovascular and renal protection with some new medications. Areas covered: Updates regarding the use of glucose-lowering agents are discussed from a clinical point of view. Some new viewpoints concern older antidiabetic agents such as metformin, sulfonylureas and glitazones whose benefit-risk balance has been revisited, especially in high risk patients. The recent data regarding DPP-4 inhibitors (gliptins) focused on the safety profile of this pharmacological class, including in patients with impaired renal function. The highlight concerns the cardiovascular (and renal) protection by some GLP-1 receptor agonists (liraglutide, semaglutide) and SGLT2 inhibitors (empagliflozin, canagliflozin) in patients with high cardiovascular risk. Finally, efficacy and safety of new combinations and advances in insulin therapy will be briefly discussed. Expert commentary: The recent data from randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and observational real-life studies should trigger a revision of the algorithm for the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, especially in patients with high cardiovascular and/or renal risk.

  12. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  13. A Risk Assessment Model for Type 2 Diabetes in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Senlin; Han, Longfei; Zeng, Ping; Chen, Feng; Pan, Limin; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Tiemei

    2014-01-01

    Aims To develop a risk assessment model for persons at risk from type 2 diabetes in Chinese. Materials and Methods The model was generated from the cross-sectional data of 16246 persons aged from 20 years old and over. C4.5 algorithm and multivariate logistic regression were used for variable selection. Relative risk value combined with expert decision constructed a comprehensive risk assessment for evaluating the individual risk category. The validity of the model was tested by cross validation and a survey performed six years later with some participants. Results Nine variables were selected as risk variables. A mathematical model was established to calculate the average probability of diabetes in each cluster's group divided by sex and age. A series of criteria combined with relative RR value (2.2) and level of risk variables stratified individuals into four risk groups (non, low, medium and high risk). The overall accuracy reached 90.99% evaluated by cross-validation inside the model population. The incidence of diabetes for each risk group increased from 1.5 (non-risk group) to 28.2(high-risk group) per one thousand persons per year with six years follow-up. Discussion The model could determine the individual risk for type 2 diabetes by four risk degrees. This model could be used as a technique tool not only to support screening persons at different risk, but also to evaluate the result of the intervention. PMID:25101994

  14. Health communication with Chinese Americans about type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Evelyn Y; Chesla, Catherine A; Chun, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Chinese Americans are at high risk for type 2 diabetes and face some health disparities that can be attributed to language barriers, cultural differences, and access to care. The purpose of this article is to review current literature and establish best practices regarding health communication about type 2 diabetes for Chinese Americans. The authors reviewed clinical research literature from January 2000 to April 2011 to assess current knowledge about providing diabetes management guidance to Chinese Americans. To improve health communication and dissemination of health information to Chinese Americans regarding diabetes and diabetes management, research scholars, health care providers, and diabetes educators can analyze current health messages by source, message, audience, channel, and destination characteristics. Extensive research has led to clear guidelines focusing on language-appropriate materials, an understanding of Chinese food beliefs and family practices, and the importance of culturally competent health care providers. However, many Chinese Americans are using Chinese foods and medicinal herbs with little communication between patients and providers about these practices. Although Chinese Americans are not a homogenous group, this article points to a set of cultural considerations that health care providers should address when working with Chinese Americans. By attending to various qualities of health messages, efforts at diabetes prevention and management may be greatly enhanced.

  15. The nonhuman primate as a model for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pound, Lynley D; Kievit, Paul; Grove, Kevin L

    2014-04-01

    Although rodent models provide insight into the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), they are limited in their translatability to humans. The nonhuman primate (NHP) shares important metabolic similarities with the human, making it an ideal model for the investigation of type 2 diabetes and use in preclinical trials. This review highlights the key contributions in the field over the last year using the NHP model. The NHP has not only provided novel insight into the normal and pathological processes that occur within the islet, but has also allowed for the preclinical testing of novel pharmaceutical targets for obesity and T2DM. Particularly, administration of fibroblast growth factor-21 in the NHP resulted in weight loss and improvements in metabolic health, supporting rodent studies and recent clinical trials. In addition, the NHP was used to demonstrate that a novel melanocortin-4 receptor agonist did not cause adverse cardiovascular effects. Finally, this model has been used to provide evidence that glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies do not induce pancreatitis in the healthy NHP. The insight gained from studies using the NHP model has allowed for a better understanding of the processes driving T2DM and has promoted the development of well tolerated and effective treatments.

  16. Cellular Senescence in Type 2 Diabetes: A Therapeutic Opportunity.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Allyson K; Tchkonia, Tamara; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Chini, Eduardo N; Xu, Ming; Kirkland, James L

    2015-07-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental aging mechanism that has been implicated in many age-related diseases and is a significant cause of tissue dysfunction. Accumulation of senescent cells occurs during aging and is also seen in the context of obesity and diabetes. Senescent cells may play a role in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis through direct impact on pancreatic β-cell function, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)-mediated tissue damage, and involvement in adipose tissue dysfunction. In turn, metabolic and signaling changes seen in diabetes, such as high circulating glucose, altered lipid metabolism, and growth hormone axis perturbations, can promote senescent cell formation. Thus, senescent cells might be part of a pathogenic loop in diabetes, as both a cause and consequence of metabolic changes and tissue damage. Therapeutic targeting of a basic aging mechanism such as cellular senescence may have a large impact on disease pathogenesis and could be more effective in preventing the progression of diabetes complications than currently available therapies that have limited impact on already existing tissue damage. Therefore, senescent cells and the SASP represent significant opportunities for advancement in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  17. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  18. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Waqas; Ansari, Tahir; Butt, Nadeem Shafique; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab

    2017-01-01

    Globally, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is considered as one of the most common diseases. The etiology of T2DM is complex and is associated with irreversible risk factors such as age, genetic, race, and ethnicity and reversible factors such as diet, physical activity and smoking. The objectives of this review are to examine various studies to explore relationship of T2DM with different dietary habits/patterns and practices and its complications. Dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle are the major factors for rapidly rising incidence of DM among developing countries. In type 2 diabetics, recently, elevated HbA1c level has also been considered as one of the leading risk factors for developing microvascular and macrovascular complications. Improvement in the elevated HbA1c level can be achieved through diet management; thus, the patients could be prevented from developing the diabetes complications. Awareness about diabetes complications and consequent improvement in dietary knowledge, attitude, and practices lead to better control of the disease. The stakeholders (health-care providers, health facilities, agencies involved in diabetes care, etc.) should encourage patients to understand the importance of diet which may help in disease management, appropriate self-care and better quality of life. PMID:28539866

  19. Attitudes and beliefs among Mexican Americans about type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Thompson, Beti; Tejeda, Silvia; Godina, Ruby

    2004-11-01

    Hispanics in the United States have a disproportionately high risk for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) compared with non-Hispanic whites. Little is known of the attitudes and beliefs about diabetes in this group. Using data from six focus groups of 42 Mexican Americans (14 men and 28 women), we characterized perceptions about the causes of and treatments for type 2 diabetes. Many participants believed diabetes is caused by having a family history of the disease, eating a diet high in fat or sugar, and engaging in minimal exercise. Experiencing strong emotions such as fright (susto), intense anger (coraje), or sadness and depression (tristeza) was also thought to precipitate diabetes. Nearly all participants expressed the belief that it is important to follow doctors' recommendations for diet and exercise, oral medication or insulin; many also cited herbal therapies, such as prickly pear cactus (nopal) and aloe vera (savila) as effective treatments. These findings may be useful in designing interventions to reduce the burden of diabetes in Hispanic populations.

  20. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in youth

    PubMed Central

    Giampatzis, Vassilios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The rising rates of obesity in youth have concurrently led to an increase in the rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in this age group. However, there are limited data on the efficacy of different antidiabetic agents in youth. In this context, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth trial recently reported that the majority of obese children and adolescents 10-17-years old with newly diagnosed T2DM (T2DM duration less than 2 years) could not achieve HbA1c levels < 8% for more than 1 year with metformin monotherapy, metformin plus rosiglitazone combination, or metformin and lifestyle changes. These findings suggest that, in the majority of youth with T2DM, tight long-term glycemic control with oral agents is an elusive goal and that most patients will require treatment with insulin within a few years of diagnosis to achieve HbA1c targets and reduce the risk of macro- and microvascular complications. Therefore, reducing the incidence of T2DM by preventing pediatric obesity through the implementation of lifestyle changes in the community should be the primary objective of healthcare systems. PMID:23301119

  1. The impact of ethnicity on type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abate, Nicola; Chandalia, Manisha

    2003-01-01

    The rapid increase of diabetes prevalence in the US population and across all westernized world has been associated with environmental changes that promote obesity. Although dietary factors, such as total caloric intake, relative excess of dietary saturated fats content and lack of fibers, together with reduced level of physical activity clearly determine the main features of the "obesogenic" environment typical of "western" societies, the impact of lifestyle factors on obesity and diabetes appears to differ in various ethnic groups. Although ethnic-related differences in lifestyle factors may account for some of the predisposition to obesity and diabetes of various ethnic groups, genetic factors may play a more determinant role. These observations pose important public health questions in regard to strategies for treatment and prevention of diabetes both within the multiethnic US population and in the population of origin of various ethnicities. The elucidation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the heterogeneous relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes in various ethnicities may give important contributions to better understand the complex mechanisms involved in the development of this disease. This review examines epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of the interaction between environment and ethnic predisposition to type 2 diabetes.

  2. Genetic Component of Type 2 Diabetes in a Mexican Population.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pozos, Katy; Menjívar, Marta

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. In this regard, it has been demonstrated that Hispanics have a greater susceptibility to developing complex diseases like T2D, which has been attributed to their Amerindian component. Mexico has a wide population variety as a result of Amerindian (56-69%), European (26-41.8%) and African (1.8-6%) ancestral components. The stratification of the population has made difficult the study of T2D in the Mexican population. Despite advances, in Mexico the studies in this field are scarce; 9 of 88 loci associated with type 2 diabetes by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Caucasian populations have been replicated in the Mexican population. Currently, only 19 common variants and two variants of low frequency have been associated with T2D in Mexico. With respect to the private genetic variation in Mexican population, only one haplotype and two genetic variants have been described. This confirms the existence of new genetic variants not yet described, exclusive to the Mexican population, which suggests most likely, that there are more genetic variants to discover. Thus, in the present review we aim to bring together in one place all the studies about T2D in Mexico to understand the contribution of the genetic factors in the susceptibility to developing T2D in a Mexican population. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfonylurea treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on glimepiride.

    PubMed

    Korytkowski, Mary T

    2004-05-01

    Sulfonylureas, which have evolved through two generations since their introduction nearly 50 years ago, remain the most frequently prescribed oral agents for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glyburide, glipizide, and glimepiride, the newest sulfonylureas, are as effective at lowering plasma glucose concentrations as first-generation agents but are more potent, better tolerated, and associated with a lower risk of adverse effects. Differences in their binding affinity to the beta-cell sulfonylurea receptor have been described, with preservation of cardioprotective responses to ischemia with glimepiride. Clinical studies have shown glimepiride to be safe and effective in reducing fasting and postprandial glucose levels, as well as glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations, with dosages of 1-8 mg/day. In comparative trials, glimepiride was as effective in lowering glucose levels as glyburide and glipizide, but glimepiride was associated with a reduced likelihood of hypoglycemia and a smaller increase in fasting insulin and C-peptide levels than glyburide, and a more rapid lowering of fasting plasma glucose levels than glipizide. Glimepiride also improves first-phase insulin secretion, which plays an important role in reducing postprandial hyperglycemia. Insulin secretagogues, specifically glimepiride, merit consideration as first-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Pharmacogenetics in type 2 diabetes: precision medicine or discovery tool?

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, technological and analytical advances have led to an explosion in the discovery of genetic loci associated with type 2 diabetes. However, their ability to improve prediction of disease outcomes beyond standard clinical risk factors has been limited. On the other hand, genetic effects on drug response may be stronger than those commonly seen for disease incidence. Pharmacogenetic findings may aid in identifying new drug targets, elucidate pathophysiology, unravel disease heterogeneity, help prioritise specific genes in regions of genetic association, and contribute to personalised or precision treatment. In diabetes, precedent for the successful application of pharmacogenetic concepts exists in its monogenic subtypes, such as MODY or neonatal diabetes. Whether similar insights will emerge for the much more common entity of type 2 diabetes remains to be seen. As genetic approaches advance, the progressive deployment of candidate gene, large-scale genotyping and genome-wide association studies has begun to produce suggestive results that may transform clinical practice. However, many barriers to the translation of diabetes pharmacogenetic discoveries to the clinic still remain. This perspective offers a contemporary overview of the field with a focus on sulfonylureas and metformin, identifies the major uses of pharmacogenetics, and highlights potential limitations and future directions.

  5. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Díez-Espino, Javier; Formiga, Francesc; Lafita Tejedor, Javier; Rodríguez Mañas, Leocadio; González-Sarmiento, Enrique; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Sangrós, Javier

    2013-02-02

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly represents a major challenge both in terms of clinical management and public health. Aging is causing a marked increase in the pandemic of diabetes in elderly people. However, scientific evidence to support the most appropriate treatment for diabetes in the elderly is scarce. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population, which includes subjects with very different functional and cognitive capacities, co-morbidities, and life expectancy, it is critical to make a comprehensive assessment from a biopsychosocial perspective, to address the vascular risk factors integrally, and to establish individually tailored targets for glycemic control. In frail elderly or individuals with a short life expectancy, it may be reasonable to maintain HbA1c between 7.6%-8.5%. The therapeutic strategy for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes should be individualized and agreed with the patient and their caregivers, according to the objective. Improving quality of life, assuring patient safety and avoiding the adverse effects of antidiabetic treatment should be prioritized. Given the increased susceptibility of the elderly to severe hypoglycemia and its consequences, antidiabetic therapies that minimize the risk of hypoglycemic events should be selected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: A review.

    PubMed

    Sami, Waqas; Ansari, Tahir; Butt, Nadeem Shafique; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab

    2017-01-01

    Globally, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is considered as one of the most common diseases. The etiology of T2DM is complex and is associated with irreversible risk factors such as age, genetic, race, and ethnicity and reversible factors such as diet, physical activity and smoking. The objectives of this review are to examine various studies to explore relationship of T2DM with different dietary habits/patterns and practices and its complications. Dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle are the major factors for rapidly rising incidence of DM among developing countries. In type 2 diabetics, recently, elevated HbA1c level has also been considered as one of the leading risk factors for developing microvascular and macrovascular complications. Improvement in the elevated HbA1c level can be achieved through diet management; thus, the patients could be prevented from developing the diabetes complications. Awareness about diabetes complications and consequent improvement in dietary knowledge, attitude, and practices lead to better control of the disease. The stakeholders (health-care providers, health facilities, agencies involved in diabetes care, etc.) should encourage patients to understand the importance of diet which may help in disease management, appropriate self-care and better quality of life.

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer.

  8. Effects of Intensive Glucose Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels would reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this randomized study, 10,251 patients (mean age, 62.2 years) with a median glycated hemoglobin level of 8.1% were assigned to receive intensive therapy (targeting a glycated hemoglobin level below 6.0%) or standard therapy (targeting a level from 7.0 to 7.9%). Of these patients, 38% were women, and 35% had had a previous cardiovascular event. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The finding higher mortality in the intensive-therapy group led to a discontinuation of intensive therapy after a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up. Results At 1 year, stable median glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.4% and 7.5% were achieved in the intensive-therapy group and the standard-therapy group, respectively. During follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 352 patients in the intensive-therapy group, as compared with 371 in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P = 0.16). At the same time, 257 patients in the intensive-therapy group died, as compared with 203 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.46; P = 0.04). Hypoglycemia requiring assistance and weight gain of more than 10 kg were more frequent in the intensive-therapy group (P<0.001). Conclusions As compared with standard therapy, the use of intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels for 3.5 years increased mortality and did not significantly reduce major cardiovascular events. These findings identify a previously unrecognized

  9. Pharmacologic Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Available Therapies.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, James

    2017-07-01

    Choices for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have multiplied as our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic defects has evolved. Treatment should target multiple defects in T2DM and follow a patient-centered approach that considers factors beyond glycemic control, including cardiovascular risk reduction. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology and the American Diabetes Association recommend an initial approach consisting of lifestyle changes and monotherapy, preferably with metformin. Therapy choices are guided by glycemic efficacy, safety profiles, particularly effects on weight and hypoglycemia risk, tolerability, patient comorbidities, route of administration, patient preference, and cost. Balancing management of hyperglycemia with the risk of hypoglycemia and consideration of the effects of pharmacotherapy on weight figure prominently in US-based T2DM recommendations, whereas less emphasis has been placed on the ability of specific medications to affect cardiovascular outcomes. This is likely because, until recently, specific glucose-lowering agents have not been shown to affect cardiorenal outcomes. The Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients-Removing Excess Glucose (EMPA-REG OUTCOME), the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results (LEADER) trial, and the Trial to Evaluate Cardiovascular and Other Long-term Outcomes with Semaglutide in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes 6 (SUSTAIN-6) recently showed a reduction in overall cardiovascular risk with empagliflozin, liraglutide, and semaglutide treatment, respectively. Moreover, empagliflozin has become the first glucose-lowering agent indicated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with T2DM and established cardiovascular disease. Results from cardiovascular outcomes trials have prompted an update to the 2017 American Diabetes Association

  10. Prevention of Type 2 diabetes: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Chiasson, Jean-Louis

    2007-12-01

    The growing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes with its high morbidity and excess mortality is imposing a heavy burden on healthcare systems. Because of the magnitude of the problem, obviating diabetes has been a long-standing dream. In the last decade, a number of intervention strategies have been shown to be effective for the prevention of diabetes in high-risk populations with prediabetes. Seven studies have now confirmed that lifestyle modifications, including weight-reducing diets and exercise programs, are very effective in precluding or delaying Type 2 diabetes in high-risk populations with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Two major trials are the Diabetes Prevention Study (n = 522) from Finland and the Diabetes Prevention Program (n = 3234) from the US. Both studies have shown that intensive lifestyle intervention could reduce the progression of IGT to diabetes by 58%. Furthermore, four currently-available drugs have been established as being effective in preventing diabetes in subjects with prediabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program revealed that metformin 850 mg b.i.d. reduced the risk of diabetes by 31%. The STOP-NIDDM (Study To Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) trial (n = 1429) showed that acarbose 100 mg t.i.d. with meals decreased the incidence of diabetes by 36% when the diagnosis was based on 2 oral glucose tolerance tests. The XENDOS (Xenical in the Prevention of Diabetes in Obese Subjects) study examined the use of orlistat, an antiobesity drug, as an adjunct to an intensive lifestyle modification program in obese non-diabetic subjects. Orlistat treatment resulted in a 37% decline in the development of diabetes. More recently, the DREAM (Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication) study (n = 5269) demonstrated that rosiglitazone at 8 mg once/day in subjects with prediabetes (IGT and/or impaired fasting glucose) was effective in reducing the risk of diabetes by 60%. It can be concluded that Type 2 diabetes

  11. Effects of intensive glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Hertzel C; Miller, Michael E; Byington, Robert P; Goff, David C; Bigger, J Thomas; Buse, John B; Cushman, William C; Genuth, Saul; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Grimm, Richard H; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Friedewald, William T

    2008-06-12

    Epidemiologic studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels would reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk factors. In this randomized study, 10,251 patients (mean age, 62.2 years) with a median glycated hemoglobin level of 8.1% were assigned to receive intensive therapy (targeting a glycated hemoglobin level below 6.0%) or standard therapy (targeting a level from 7.0 to 7.9%). Of these patients, 38% were women, and 35% had had a previous cardiovascular event. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The finding of higher mortality in the intensive-therapy group led to a discontinuation of intensive therapy after a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up. At 1 year, stable median glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.4% and 7.5% were achieved in the intensive-therapy group and the standard-therapy group, respectively. During follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 352 patients in the intensive-therapy group, as compared with 371 in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P=0.16). At the same time, 257 patients in the intensive-therapy group died, as compared with 203 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.46; P=0.04). Hypoglycemia requiring assistance and weight gain of more than 10 kg were more frequent in the intensive-therapy group (P<0.001). As compared with standard therapy, the use of intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels for 3.5 years increased mortality and did not significantly reduce major cardiovascular events. These findings identify a previously unrecognized harm of intensive glucose lowering in high

  12. Risk Prediction for Early CKD in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peggy; Lee, Shun Fu; Heinze, Georg; Clase, Catherine M.; Tobe, Sheldon; Teo, Koon K.; Gerstein, Hertzel; Mann, Johannes F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Quantitative data for prediction of incidence and progression of early CKD are scarce in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, two risk prediction models were developed for incidence and progression of CKD after 5.5 years and the relative effect of predictors were ascertained. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Baseline and prospective follow-up data of two randomized clinical trials, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN), were used as development and independent validation cohorts, respectively. Individuals aged ≥55 years with type 2 diabetes and normo- or microalbuminuria at baseline were included. Incidence or progression of CKD after 5.5 years was defined as new micro- or macroalbuminuria, doubling of creatinine, or ESRD. The competing risk of death was considered as an additional outcome state in the multinomial logistic models. Results Of the 6766 ONTARGET participants with diabetes, 1079 (15.9%) experienced incidence or progression of CKD, and 1032 (15.3%) died. The well calibrated, parsimonious laboratory prediction model incorporating only baseline albuminuria, eGFR, sex, and age exhibited an externally validated c-statistic of 0.68 and an R2 value of 10.6%. Albuminuria, modeled to depict the difference between baseline urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and the threshold for micro- or macroalbuminuria, was mostly responsible for the predictive performance. Inclusion of clinical predictors, such as glucose control, diabetes duration, number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs, previous vascular events, or vascular comorbidities, increased the externally validated c-statistic and R2 value only to 0.69 and 12.1%, respectively. Explained variation was largely driven by renal and not clinical predictors. Conclusions Albuminuria and eGFR were the most important factors to predict onset and

  13. Liraglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marso, Steven P.; Daniels, Gilbert H.; Brown-Frandsen, Kirstine; Kristensen, Peter; Mann, Johannes F.E.; Nauck, Michael A.; Nissen, Steven E.; Pocock, Stuart; Poulter, Neil R.; Ravn, Lasse S.; Steinberg, William M.; Stockner, Mette; Zinman, Bernard; Bergenstal, Richard M.; Buse, John B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cardiovascular effect of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue, when added to standard care in patients with type 2 diabetes, remains unknown. METHODS In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk to receive liraglutide or placebo. The primary composite outcome in the time-to-event analysis was the first occurrence of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. The primary hypothesis was that liraglutide would be noninferior to placebo with regard to the primary outcome, with a margin of 1.30 for the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio. No adjustments for multiplicity were performed for the prespecified exploratory outcomes. RESULTS A total of 9340 patients underwent randomization. The median follow-up was 3.8 years. The primary outcome occurred in significantly fewer patients in the liraglutide group (608 of 4668 patients [13.0%]) than in the placebo group (694 of 4672 [14.9%]) (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 0.97; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P=0.01 for superiority). Fewer patients died from cardiovascular causes in the liraglutide group (219 patients [4.7%]) than in the placebo group (278 [6.0%]) (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.93; P=0.007). The rate of death from any cause was lower in the liraglutide group (381 patients [8.2%]) than in the placebo group (447 [9.6%]) (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.97; P =0.02). The rates of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and hospitalization for heart failure were nonsignificantly lower in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group. The most common adverse events leading to the discontinuation of liraglutide were gastrointestinal events. The incidence of pancreatitis was nonsignificantly lower in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS In the time-to-event analysis, the rate of the first

  14. Liraglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marso, Steven P; Daniels, Gilbert H; Brown-Frandsen, Kirstine; Kristensen, Peter; Mann, Johannes F E; Nauck, Michael A; Nissen, Steven E; Pocock, Stuart; Poulter, Neil R; Ravn, Lasse S; Steinberg, William M; Stockner, Mette; Zinman, Bernard; Bergenstal, Richard M; Buse, John B

    2016-07-28

    The cardiovascular effect of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue, when added to standard care in patients with type 2 diabetes, remains unknown. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk to receive liraglutide or placebo. The primary composite outcome in the time-to-event analysis was the first occurrence of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. The primary hypothesis was that liraglutide would be noninferior to placebo with regard to the primary outcome, with a margin of 1.30 for the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio. No adjustments for multiplicity were performed for the prespecified exploratory outcomes. A total of 9340 patients underwent randomization. The median follow-up was 3.8 years. The primary outcome occurred in significantly fewer patients in the liraglutide group (608 of 4668 patients [13.0%]) than in the placebo group (694 of 4672 [14.9%]) (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 0.97; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P=0.01 for superiority). Fewer patients died from cardiovascular causes in the liraglutide group (219 patients [4.7%]) than in the placebo group (278 [6.0%]) (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.93; P=0.007). The rate of death from any cause was lower in the liraglutide group (381 patients [8.2%]) than in the placebo group (447 [9.6%]) (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.97; P=0.02). The rates of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and hospitalization for heart failure were nonsignificantly lower in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group. The most common adverse events leading to the discontinuation of liraglutide were gastrointestinal events. The incidence of pancreatitis was nonsignificantly lower in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group. In the time-to-event analysis, the rate of the first occurrence of death from cardiovascular

  15. Megatrials in type 2 diabetes. From excitement to frustration?

    PubMed

    Del Prato, S

    2009-07-01

    Whether glycaemic control may result in a reduction of cardiovascular (CV) risk has been a matter of continuous discussion and investigation. Epidemiological analyses have extensively suggested a relationship between glycaemic control and CV events; however, the results of intervention trials have been less conclusive. The UKPDS reported a 16% reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction, but this reduction was not statistically significant. The results of the Kumamoto and PROactive studies could not allow any firm conclusions to be drawn either, because of limited size and the defined primary endpoint, respectively. The results of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) and Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trials and the Veteran Administration Diabetes Trial (VADT) were published in rapid succession over the second half of 2008 and at the beginning of 2009. A total number of almost 25,000 type 2 diabetic patients were recruited in these three trials, which assessed the effect of intensive glycaemic control vs conventional treatment on well-defined CV endpoints. In spite of the achievement and maintenance of strict glycaemic control (HbA(1c) <7.0%), no beneficial effect of intensive therapy was apparent in any of the studies. At the same time these results were presented, the results of an analysis of the 10 year follow-up of the UKPDS also became available and provided a more optimistic view of the potential benefit of achieving good glycaemic control. The relative risk reductions for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were significantly lower in the patients who initially received the intensive treatment compared with those in the conventional treatment arm. Moreover, the initial benefit in terms of microvascular complications observed at the end of the intervention trial remained unaltered at follow-up. Once again the debate on the importance of

  16. Pharmacologic Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Available Therapies.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, James

    2017-06-01

    Choices for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have multiplied as our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic defects has evolved. Treatment should target multiple defects in T2DM and follow a patient-centered approach that considers factors beyond glycemic control, including cardiovascular risk reduction. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology and the American Diabetes Association recommend an initial approach consisting of lifestyle changes and monotherapy, preferably with metformin. Therapy choices are guided by glycemic efficacy, safety profiles, particularly effects on weight and hypoglycemia risk, tolerability, patient comorbidities, route of administration, patient preference, and cost. Balancing management of hyperglycemia with the risk of hypoglycemia and consideration of the effects of pharmacotherapy on weight figure prominently in US-based T2DM recommendations, whereas less emphasis has been placed on the ability of specific medications to affect cardiovascular outcomes. This is likely because, until recently, specific glucose-lowering agents have not been shown to affect cardiorenal outcomes. The Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients-Removing Excess Glucose (EMPA-REG OUTCOME), the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results (LEADER) trial, and the Trial to Evaluate Cardiovascular and Other Long-term Outcomes with Semaglutide in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes 6 (SUSTAIN-6) recently showed a reduction in overall cardiovascular risk with empagliflozin, liraglutide, and semaglutide treatment, respectively. Moreover, empagliflozin has become the first glucose-lowering agent indicated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with T2DM and established cardiovascular disease. Results from cardiovascular outcomes trials have prompted an update to the 2017 American Diabetes Association

  17. Anaemia and kidney dysfunction in Caribbean Type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ezenwaka, Chidum E; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Nwagbara, Emeka; Seales, Dawn; Okali, Fidelis

    2008-01-01

    Background Anaemia has been shown in previous studies to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disorder. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of anaemia and kidney dysfunction in Caribbean type 2 diabetic patients that have been previously shown to have a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Methods 155 type 2 diabetic patients and 51 non-diabetic subjects of African origin were studied. Anthropometric parameters were measured and fasting blood samples were collected for glucose, creatinine, glycated hemoglobin and complete blood count. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin < 12 g/dl (F) or < 13 g/dl (M). Kidney function was assessed using glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as estimated by the four-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation. Subjects were considered to have chronic kidney disease when the estimated GFR was < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Comparisons for within- and between-gender, between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects were performed using Student's t-test while chi-square test was employed for categorical variables. Results The diabetic patients were older than the non-diabetic subjects. While male non-diabetic subjects had significantly higher red blood cell count (RBC), haemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations than non-diabetic female subjects (p < 0.001), the RBC and hematocrit concentrations were similar in male and female diabetic patients. Furthermore, irrespective of gender, diabetic patients had significantly higher prevalence rate of anemia than non-diabetic subjects (p < 0.05). Anaemic diabetes patients had significantly lower GFR (67.1 ± 3.0 vs. 87.9 ± 5.4 ml/min per 1.73 m2, p < 0.001) than non-anaemic patients. Conclusion A high prevalence of anaemia was identified in this group of type 2 diabetic patients previously shown to have a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. It is therefore recommended that diagnostic laboratories in developing

  18. Association of Advanced Glycation End Products with coronary Artery Calcification in Japanese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes as Assessed by Skin Autofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Mari; Takebe, Noriko; Honma, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Atsumi; Chida, Ai; Nakano, Rieko; Togashi, Hirobumi; Nakagawa, Riyuki; Oda, Tomoyasu; Matsui, Mizue; Yashiro, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Kan; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazuma; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Satoh, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are considered to be among the critical pathogenic factors involved in the progression of diabetic complications. Skin autofluorescence (AF), a noninvasive measurement of AGE accumulation, has been recognized as a useful and convenient marker for diabetic vascular diseases in Caucasians. This study aimed to evaluate the association of tissue AGE, assessed using skin AF, with coronary artery calcification in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In total, 122 Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes enrolled in this cross-sectional study underwent multi-slice computed tomography for total coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) estimation and examination with a skin AF reader. Results: Skin AF positively correlated with age, sex, diabetes duration, pulse wave velocity, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, and CACS. In addition, skin AF results negatively correlated with BMI, eGFR, and serum C-peptide concentration. According to multivariate analysis, age and systolic blood pressure showed strong positive correlation and eGFR showed negative correlation with skin AF values. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between skin AF values and logCACS, independent of age, sex, diabetes duration, HbA1c, BMI, IMT, and blood pressure. However, skin AF showed no association with serum levels of AGE, such as Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine and 3-deoxyglucosone. Conclusion: Skin AF results positively correlated with CACS in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. This result indicates that AGE plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic macrovascular disease. Measurement of skin AF values may be useful for assessing the severity of diabetic complications in Japanese subjects. PMID:26961217

  19. Dopaminergic drugs in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Brie, Belen; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Garcia Tornadu, Isabel; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2016-07-01

    The importance of dopamine in central nervous system function is well known, but its effects on glucose homeostasis and pancreatic β cell function are beginning to be unraveled. Mutant mice lacking dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R) are glucose intolerant and have abnormal insulin secretion. In humans, administration of neuroleptic drugs, which block dopamine receptors, may cause hyperinsulinemia, increased weight gain and glucose intolerance. Conversely, treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA in patients with Parkinson's disease reduces insulin secretion upon oral glucose tolerance test, and bromocriptine improves glycemic control and glucose tolerance in obese type 2 diabetic patients as well as in non diabetic obese animals and humans. The actions of dopamine on glucose homeostasis and food intake impact both the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Different central actions of the dopamine system may mediate its metabolic effects such as: (i) regulation of hypothalamic noradrenaline output, (ii) participation in appetite control, and (iii) maintenance of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. On the other hand, dopamine inhibits prolactin, which has metabolic functions; and, at the pancreatic beta cell dopamine D2 receptors inhibit insulin secretion. We review the evidence obtained in animal models and clinical studies that posited dopamine receptors as key elements in glucose homeostasis and ultimately led to the FDA approval of bromocriptine in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolic consequences of treatment with neuroleptics which target the D2R, that should be monitored in psychiatric patients to prevent the development in diabetes, weight gain, and hypertriglyceridemia.

  20. Screening practices for identifying type 2 diabetes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce M; Eason, Ashley; Nelson, Courtney; Kazzi, Nayla G; Cowan, Anne E; Tarini, Beth A

    2014-02-01

    To characterize pediatrician and family physician (FP) screening practices for type 2 diabetes among adolescents and to examine the impact of the 2010 American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines, recommending use of Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). We conducted a cross-sectional mail survey of a random sample of 1,400 U.S. pediatricians and FPs and we received 604 eligible responses. Our main outcome measure was the types of tests ordered by physicians, particularly HbA1c, when presented with a hypothetical scenario. The overall response rate was 52% (57% for pediatricians and 48% for FPs). Fasting glucose and HbA1c were the most commonly ordered tests. Overall, at least 58% of physicians ordered HbA1c; 35% ordered HbA1c in conjunction with fasting tests; and 22% ordered HbA1c alone or with nonfasting tests. Only 38% of providers were aware of the new ADA recommended HbA1c screening guidelines. However, a majority (67%) said they would change their screening practices. In the context of the guidelines, 84% of physicians would now order HbA1c. Furthermore, there was a large increase in the proportion of physicians who would shift to using HbA1c only or with other nonfasting tests. When screening adolescents for type 2 diabetes, providers are more likely to order HbA1c and order fewer fasting tests in response to the new ADA guidelines. HbA1c has lower sensitivity and higher costs than other testing modalities in children, therefore increasing uptake of this test (HbA1c) in children may have implications for both detection rates and healthcare costs. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  2. Family Interactions Among African Americans Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Randy A.; Utz, Sharon W.; Williams, Ishan C.; Hinton, Ivora; Alexander, Gina; Moore, Cynthia; Blankenship, Jean; Steeves, Rick; Oliver, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of family and friends on the management of persons with diabetes and their willingness to be involved in a culturally tailored program. Methods This qualitative study was based within a larger quasi-experimental study that focused on the impact of a culturally tailored group intervention compared with individual standard diabetes education on the outcomes of self-management and glycemic control among rural African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to an individual education group or a culturally tailored intervention group. Family members/peers (n = 6) attended invited group sessions to obtain information about diabetes and family/peer support. The facilitator of the invited group sessions used a guide to help with group discussions. The investigators used an iterative approach to enhance the examination of the responses from the discussion guide, thus identifying recurring themes within the participants’ responses. Results The data revealed that family and friends made a difference in the diabetes management of individuals with diabetes. Although family and friends may have been helpful at times, they also created moments of problems and an environment that made it more difficult to care for diabetes. The data also revealed that diabetes is hard to manage and control. Participants reported that taking medications and being aware of types of foods to keep a well-maintained glucose level were often challenging. Conclusions These findings confirm that family and peers greatly influence diabetes management among rural African Americans. The study’s results will help health care providers understand the importance of involving family members and friends in the treatment and diabetes management of individuals with type 2 diabetes, particularly within rural African American communities where resources are limited. PMID:18375781

  3. Vascular repair strategies in type 2 diabetes: novel insights

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnerus, Kira; Landmesser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Impaired functions of vascular cells are responsible for the majority of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently a better understanding of mechanisms contributing to development of vascular dysfunction and the role of systemic inflammatory activation and functional alterations of several secretory organs, of which adipose tissue has more recently been investigated, has been achieved. Notably, the progression of vascular disease within the context of T2D appears to be driven by a multitude of incremental signaling shifts. Hence, successful therapies need to target several mechanisms in parallel, and over a long time period. This review will summarize the latest molecular strategies and translational developments of cardiovascular therapy in patients with T2D. PMID:26543824

  4. Behavioral contributions to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; O'Reilly, Gillian A; Cook, Lauren; Page, Kathleen A; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-04-01

    Behavioral contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions, which change each of the lifestyle behaviors, is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies, which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes.

  5. Fractal analysis of circulating platelets in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, G; Tanganelli, I

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of computerized fractal analysis for objective characterization by means of transmission electron microscopy of the complexity of circulating platelets collected from healthy individuals and from type 2 diabetic patients, a pathologic condition in which platelet hyperreactivity has been described. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Local fractal dimension by box counting (measure of geometric complexity) was automatically calculated. The results showed that the platelet boundary observed by electron microscopy is fractal and that the shape of the circulating platelets is significantly more complex in the diabetic patients in comparison to healthy subjects (p <  0.01), with 100% correct classification. In vitro activated platelets from healthy subjects show an analogous increase of geometric complexity. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative, data to study platelet activation in diabetes mellitus.

  6. New insights from monogenic diabetes for "common" type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tallapragada, Divya Sri Priyanka; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between monogenic and complex genetic diseases are becoming increasingly blurred, as a result of better understanding of phenotypes and their genetic determinants. This had a large impact on the way complex disease genetics is now being investigated. Starting with conventional approaches like familial linkage, positional cloning and candidate genes strategies, the scope of complex disease genetics has grown exponentially with scientific and technological advances in recent times. Despite identification of multiple loci harboring common and rare variants associated with complex diseases, interpreting and evaluating their functional role has proven to be difficult. Information from monogenic diseases, especially related to the intermediate traits associated with complex diseases comes handy. The significant overlap between traits and phenotypes of monogenic diseases with related complex diseases provides a platform to understand the disease biology better. In this review, we would discuss about one such complex disease, type 2 diabetes, which shares marked similarity of intermediate traits with different forms of monogenic diabetes.

  7. New developments in insulin therapy for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sorli, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Insulin has classically been considered a treatment of last resort for individuals with type 2 diabetes, delayed until all other efforts by the patient and healthcare provider have failed. Recent treatment guidelines recommend the use of insulin, in particular basal insulin, as part of a treatment regimen earlier in the disease process. Many patients are reticent about initiating insulin, so therapies that allow insulin treatment to be more tailored to individual needs are likely to result in greater acceptance and patient adherence with therapy. To meet this need, a range of insulin products are in development that aim to increase absorption rate or prolong the duration of action, reduce peak variability and weight gain associated with insulin treatment, and offer alternative delivery methods. This review describes insulin products in clinical development, new combination therapies, and new devices for insulin delivery.

  8. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Banerjee, Swati; Kelly, Daniel F; Lee, Phillip D K

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism, a condition of endogenous growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion prior to epiphyseal closure, is a rare condition. In the adult condition of GH excess, acromegaly, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported, with resolution following normalization of GH levels. We report the case of a 16-year-old male with pituitary gigantism due to a large invasive suprasellar adenoma who presented with T2DM and DKA. Despite surgical de-bulking, radiotherapy and medical treatment with cabergoline and pegvisomant, GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels remained elevated. However, the T2DM and recurrent DKA were successfully managed with metformin and low-dose glargine insulin, respectively. We review the pathophysiology of T2DM and DKA in growth hormone excess and available treatment options.

  9. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  10. [What is the natural history of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Ryuzo

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is widely accepted as the progressive disease. It is natural to think, if the newly diagnosed patient does not change the life-style habits and does not receive any medications, the state of T2DM will become more seriously. However, in this article, how to arrest the natural history of T2DM will be discussed by summarizing the recent findings on this topic. Those are; autophagy of pancreatic β cell: a sweet process to diabetes, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on β cell function, zinc, insulin and the liver, and so on. In short, the important things are; people should know the reasons why minor abnormalities have happened, and the practitioners have to try hard to remove such causes triggering T2DM.

  11. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  12. Pediatric drug development programs for type 2 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael L; Franklin, Brandi E; Momper, Jeremiah D; Reed, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Considerable progress has been made in pediatric drug development. Despite these gains there remain certain therapeutic areas where a high percentage of drugs approved for use in adults do not gain approval for use in children. Lack of sufficient US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved labeling correlates with diminished therapeutic efficacy and increased risk for adverse drug reactions. Despite the increasing prevalence and important clinical challenge with pediatric type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), only 1 drug (metformin) of the first 4 T2DM drugs to complete testing in children gained FDA approval. This analysis reviews 4 pediatric drug development programs for orally administered antidiabetic agents that have undergone FDA review and discusses factors influencing failure to meet specified end points for approval. Recommendations to guide future study are also provided. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. MicroRNAs and type 2 diabetes/obesity.

    PubMed

    Dehwah, Mustafa Abdo Saif; Xu, Aimin; Huang, Qingyang

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs belong to a newly identified class of small non-coding RNAs that have been widely implicated in the fine-tuning of many physiological processes such as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Microarray studies have highlighted an altered profile of miRNA expression in insulin target tissues in diabetic and obese models. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play significant roles in insulin production, secretion and actions, as well as in diverse aspects of glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation. The identification of tissue-specific miRNAs implicated in T2D and obesity might be useful for the future development of effective strategies for early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of obesity-related medical complications.

  14. Decoding the Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Little, Matthew; Humphries, Sally; Patel, Kirit; Dewey, Cate

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an escalating public health problem in India, associated with genetic susceptibility, dietary shift, and rapid lifestyle changes. Historically a disease of the urban elite, quantitative studies have recently confirmed rising prevalence rates among marginalized populations in rural India. To analyze the role of cultural and sociopolitical factors in diabetes onset and management, we employed in-depth interviews and focus groups within a rural community of Tamil Nadu. The objectives of the study were to understand sources and extent of health knowledge, diabetes explanatory models, and the impact of illness on individual, social, and familial roles. Several cultural, socioeconomic, and political factors appear to contribute to diabetes in rural regions of India, highlighting the need to address structural inequities and empower individuals to pursue health and well-being on their own terms. PMID:27644458

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and youth.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, S; Tandon, Nikhil

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) which used to be a disease of adults is now seen commonly at an early age in children and adolescents. T2DM is now an important diagnostic consideration in children who present with signs and symptoms of diabetes. The emerging epidemic of obesity in children throughout the world and the resultant insulin resistance contributes to the increasing prevalence of T2DM in this population. The recommended treatment options include metformin and insulin. Optimal glycemic control is essential considering the lifelong nature of the disease and therefore, the increased risk of long term complications - both microvascular and macrovascular. This review article summarizes the classification, diagnosis, pathogenesis, management, complications and screening of T2DM in children, incorporating and contextualizing guidelines from various professional associations.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes among Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Hu, Jie; Chiu, Norman H L

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we explore the genetic variation that may relate to type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Hispanic adults. The genotypes of 36 Hispanic adults were analyzed by using the Cardio-Metabochip. The goal is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated to T2D among Hispanic adults. A total of 26 SNPs were identified to be associated with T2D among Hispanic adults. None of these SNPs have been reported for T2D. By using the principle components analysis to analyze the genotype of 26 SNPs in 36 samples, the samples obtained from diabetic patients could be distinguished from the control samples. The findings support genetic involvement in T2D among Hispanic adults.

  17. Effect of periodontal treatment on adipokines in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Damrongrungruang, Teerasak; Hori, Sayaka; Nouno, Kaname; Minagawa, Kumiko; Sato, Misuzu; Miyazaki, Hideo

    2014-12-15

    The association between adipokines and inflammatory periodontal diseases has been studied over the last two decades. This review was intended to explore the observation that periodontal therapy may lead to an improvement of adipokines in diabetic patients. In summary, substantial evidence suggests that diabetes is associated with increased prevalence, extent and severity of periodontitis. Numerous mechanisms have been elucidated to explain the impact of diabetes on the periodontium. However, current knowledge concerning the role of major adipokines indicates only some of their associations with the pathogenesis of periodontitis in type 2 diabetes. Conversely, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral inflammation may have positive effects on the diabetic condition, although evidence for this remains somewhat equivocal.

  18. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Bob C; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2015-08-01

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to nurse-patient communication and to review potentially effective communication methods. Important communication barriers are lack of skills and self-efficacy, possibly because nurses work in a context where they have to perform biomedical examinations and then perform patient-centered counseling from a biopsychosocial approach. Training in patient-centered counseling does not seem helpful in overcoming this paradox. Rather, patient-centeredness should be regarded as a basic condition for counseling, whereby nurses and patients seek to cooperate and share responsibility based on trust. Nurses may be more successful when incorporating behavior change counseling based on psychological principles of self-regulation, for example, goal setting, incremental performance accomplishments, and action planning.

  19. [Copy number variation: markers and predictors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valverde, Alan Gilberto; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Méndez-Beleche, Alberto; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Cruz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease characterized by a deficiency in production or action of insulin. It is the result mainly of the interaction of the environment, lifestyle, as well as genetic factors. It is considered as one of the major health issues in the world because it affects severely the psychological well-being and overall life quality. Recently it has been shown that DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are associated with several diseases, including obesity and T2D. The CNVs are present from 9 to 18 % of the genome and can modify the expression levels of mRNA and proteins encoded by genes located near their localization. Less is known about their contribution to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, which is necessary to characterize so that these variations can be potentially used as biomarkers of genetic risk CNVs of T2D.

  20. Pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in South Asians.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Leontine E H; Sleddering, Maria A; Schoones, Jan W; Meinders, A Edo; Jazet, Ingrid M

    2013-11-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is exceptionally high among both native and migrant South Asians. T2DM occurs more often and at a younger age and lower BMI, and the risk of coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, and renal complications is higher for South Asians compared with people of White Caucasian descent. The high prevalence of T2DM and its related complications in South Asians, which comprise one-fifth of the total world's population, poses a major health and socioeconomic burden. The underlying cause of this excess risk, however, is still not completely understood. Therefore, gaining insight into the pathogenesis of T2DM in South Asians is of great importance. The predominant mechanism, in this ethnicity seems to be insulin resistance (IR) rather than an impaired β-cell function. In this systematic review, we describe several possible mechanisms that may underlie or contribute to the increased IR observed in South Asians.

  1. The evil axis of obesity, inflammation and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Das, Arghya; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are global problems affecting all age groups and have been characterized as lifestyle disorders. Though no study has clearly proved a direct correlation between obesity and T2D, a number of factors are associated with obesity causing insulin resistance and T2D. The factors such as adipokines and various transcription factors help to maintain a proper metabolic state in the body. Deregulation in any of these signalling balances due to obesity may trigger an inflammatory cascade which could lead to the aforesaid problems of insulin resistance and T2D. In this review, we have discussed the factors that probably link inflammation to obesity-induced insulin resistance and subsequently T2D and the possible therapeutic opportunities to decrease health risk of T2D in future.

  2. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22654403

  3. Type 2 diabetes as a protein misfolding disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Morales-Scheihing, Diego; Butler, Peter C; Soto, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent and chronic metabolic disorder. Recent evidence suggests that formation of toxic aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) might contribute to β-cell dysfunction and disease. However, the mechanism of protein aggregation and associated toxicity remains unclear. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of diverse proteins in various organs is the hallmark of the group of protein misfolding disorders (PMDs), including highly prevalent illnesses affecting the central nervous system (CNS) such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review we discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in the formation of protein aggregates in the endocrine pancreas and associated toxicity in the light of the long-standing knowledge from neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decoding the Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Little, Matthew; Humphries, Sally; Patel, Kirit; Dewey, Cate

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an escalating public health problem in India, associated with genetic susceptibility, dietary shift, and rapid lifestyle changes. Historically a disease of the urban elite, quantitative studies have recently confirmed rising prevalence rates among marginalized populations in rural India. To analyze the role of cultural and sociopolitical factors in diabetes onset and management, we employed in-depth interviews and focus groups within a rural community of Tamil Nadu. The objectives of the study were to understand sources and extent of health knowledge, diabetes explanatory models, and the impact of illness on individual, social, and familial roles. Several cultural, socioeconomic, and political factors appear to contribute to diabetes in rural regions of India, highlighting the need to address structural inequities and empower individuals to pursue health and well-being on their own terms.

  5. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  6. Targeting insulin-degrading enzyme to treat type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) selectively degrades peptides such as insulin, amylin, and amyloid β (Aβ) that form toxic aggregates, to maintain proteostasis. IDE defects are linked to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Structural and biochemical analyses revealed the molecular basis for IDE-mediated destruction of amyloidogenic peptides and this information has been exploited to develop promising inhibitors of IDE to improve glucose homeostasis. However, the inhibition of IDE can also lead to glucose intolerance. This review focuses on recent advances regarding our understanding of the structure and function of IDE and the discovery of IDE inhibitor, as well as challenges in developing IDE-based therapy for human diseases, particularly T2DM. PMID:26651592

  7. Type 2 Diabetes as a Protein Misfolding Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Morales-Scheihing, Diego; Butler, Peter C.; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a highly prevalent and chronic metabolic disorder. Recent evidence suggests that formation of toxic aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) might contribute to β-cell dysfunction and disease. However, the mechanism of protein aggregation and associated toxicity is still unclear. Misfolding, aggregation and accumulation of diverse proteins in different organs is the hallmark in the group of protein misfolding disorders (PMDs), including highly prevalent illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in the formation of protein aggregates in pancreas and associated toxicity in the light of the longstanding knowledge from neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. PMID:25998900

  8. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  9. The methodology of glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    GRIBOVSCHI, MIHAELA

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease and maintaining a tight glycemic control is essential to prevent both microvascular and macrovascular complications, as demonstrated in previous studies. It is essential to monitor the glucose levels in order to achieve the targets. The blood glucose monitoring can be done by different methods: glycated haemoglobin A1c, self-monitoring of blood glucose (before and after meals) with a glucometer and continuous glucose monitoring with a system that measures interstitial glucose concentrations. Even though glycated haemoglobin A1c is considered the “gold standard” of diabetes care, it does not provide complete information about the magnitude of the glycemic disequilibrium. Therefore the self-monitoring and continuous monitoring of blood glucose are considered an important adjunct for achieving and maintaining optimal glycemic control. The three methods of assessing glycemic control: HbA1c, SMBG and CGMS provide distinct but at the same time complementary information, PMID:26527925

  10. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  11. Current view from Alzheimer disease to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qazi, Aamer M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Manan, Abdul; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Asif, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Iqbal, Zafar; Shaik, Munvar M; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory problems. It has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus at both the molecular and biochemical level. Pancreatic cells have molecular similarities to the brain at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. Several genes have been reported to be responsible for both AD and diabetes. Currently, no proper treatment is available but various therapeutic approaches are utilized worldwide for the management of these disorders and may be nanoparticles and herbal treatment of Bacopa monnieri will make promise for the treatment of AD in future. The formation of amyloids in neurons and the formation of amylin in pancreatic cells are potential links between these two disorders, which can be silent killers.

  12. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. The linkage between inflammation and Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nathália G; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Sousa, Marinez O; Pietrani, Nathalia T; Fernandes, Ana P; Gomes, Karina B

    2013-02-01

    The Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is considered nowadays as one of the most important chronic disturbances because of the significant number of people with diabetes and its severe complications, responsible for elevated indexes of morbidity and mortality. DM2 is characterized by several degrees of insulin resistance and relative deficiency in its secretion. Genetic and environmental factors have been described as of major importance in the DM2 development as obesity, which is directly correlated with development of resistance in peripheral tissues and inflammatory state in metabolic activated adipose tissue. Inflammatory responses may have a dual role in DM2, since it may have either a causal relationship leading to resistance to insulin or may be intensified by the hyperglycemic state, resulting in DM2 complications. In this review, we discuss the association of polymorphisms in genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and the increased level of these pro-inflammatory markers, associated to chronic pathologic conditions in DM2.

  14. Innate immunity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Pickup, John C

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence has disclosed previously unrecognized links among insulin resistance, obesity, circulating immune markers, immunogenetic susceptibility, macrophage function and chronic infection. Genetic variations leading to altered production or function of circulating innate immune proteins, cellular pattern-recognition receptors and inflammatory cytokines have been linked with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis. Cellular innate immune associations with obesity and insulin resistance include increased white blood cell count and adipose tissue macrophage numbers. The innate immune response is modulated possibly by both predisposition (genetic or fetal programming), perhaps owing to evolutionary pressures caused by acute infections at the population level (pandemics), and chronic low exposure to environmental products or infectious agents. The common characteristics shared among innate immunity activation, obesity and insulin resistance are summarized.

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly institutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cano Megias, M; Guisado Vasco, P

    2014-12-01

    A 93-year-old woman is admitted to a conventional hospital ward for an acute respiratory infection. The patient has type 2 diabetes mellitus of approximately 15 years evolution and has no other associated comorbidities, except for progressive dependence due to senescence and a previous hospitalization for pneumonia 6 months ago. She is currently in an assisted-living residence. A recent laboratory test revealed an HbA1c level of 7.8%, with a serum creatinine level of 1.3mg/dl (MDRD, 45ml/min). Her standard treatment consists of 5mg of glibenclamide a day and 850mg of metformin every 12hours. What regimen should we follow once she is hospitalized? Does she require any change in her treatment at discharge? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Dias, Monike Lourenço; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Franco, Denise Reis; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. PMID:25609989

  17. Thyroid dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Demitrost, Laloo; Ranabir, Salam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a growing problem in our country and we have observed that many patients are associated with thyroid dysfunction later in their life. However, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in these patients has not been investigated. Aims and Objectives: To find the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in type 2 DM in Manipur, India. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, data of 202 Type 2 DM patients who attended the diabetic clinic of the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal from January 2011 to July 2012, and whose thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was investigated were included. The inclusion criteria are known cases of type 2 DM. Exclusion criteria are patients with previous history of hypothyroidism and those on drugs affecting the thyroid profile. Results: Out the 202 type 2 DM patients for the study of which 61 are males and 141 are females, 139 (68.8%) are euthyroid, 33 (16.3%) have subclinical hypothyroidism (10 males and 23 females), 23 (11.4%) have hypothyroidism (6 males and 17 females), 4 (2%) have subclinical hyperthyroidism and 3 (1.5%) are hyperthyroidism cases. Maximum cases were of hypothyroidism (subclinical and clinical) seen in the age group of 45-64 years. Patients with BMI > 25 were at increased risk of having hypothyroidism (P < 0.016). Conclusion: Prevalence of hypothyroidism is quite high in type 2 DM patients above 45 years and more so if their BMI is over 25. PMID:23565418

  18. Metformin Associated With Lower Cancer Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Gijs W.D.; Kleefstra, Nanne; van Hateren, Kornelis J.J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Rijk O.B.; Bilo, Henk J.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several studies have suggested an association between specific diabetes treatment and cancer mortality. We studied the association between metformin use and cancer mortality in a prospectively followed cohort. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 1998 and 1999, 1,353 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study in the Netherlands. Vital status was assessed in January 2009. Cancer mortality rate was evaluated using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and the association between metformin use and cancer mortality was evaluated with a Cox proportional hazards model, taking possible confounders into account. RESULTS Median follow-up time was 9.6 years, average age at baseline was 68 years, and average A1C was 7.5%. Of the patients, 570 died, of which 122 died of malignancies. The SMR for cancer mortality was 1.47 (95% CI 1.22–1.76). In patients taking metformin compared with patients not taking metformin at baseline, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for cancer mortality was 0.43 (95% CI 0.23–0.80), and the HR with every increase of 1 g of metformin was 0.58 (95% CI 0.36–0.93). CONCLUSIONS In general, patients with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for cancer mortality. In our group, metformin use was associated with lower cancer mortality compared with nonuse of metformin. Although the design cannot provide a conclusion about causality, our results suggest a protective effect of metformin on cancer mortality. PMID:19918015

  19. Quantification of intrapancreatic fat in type 2 diabetes by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Kieren G.; Steven, Sarah; Tiniakos, Dina; Taylor, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Accumulation of intrapancreatic fat may be important in type 2 diabetes, but widely varying data have been reported. The standard quantification by MRI in vivo is time consuming and dependent upon a high level of experience. We aimed to develop a new method which would minimise inter-observer variation and to compare this against previously published datasets. Methods A technique of ‘biopsying’ the image to minimise inclusion of non-parenchymal tissues was developed. Additionally, thresholding was applied to exclude both pancreatic ducts and intrusions of visceral fat, with pixels of fat values of <1% or >20% being excluded. The new MR image ‘biopsy’ (MR-opsy) was compared to the standard method by 6 independent observers with wide experience of image analysis but no experience of pancreas imaging. The effect of the new method was examined on datasets from two studies of weight loss in type 2 diabetes. Results At low levels of intrapancreatic fat neither the result nor the inter-observer CV was changed by MR-opsy, thresholding or a combination of the methods. However, at higher levels the conventional method exhibited poor inter-observer agreement (coefficient of variation 26.9%) and the new combined method improved the CV to 4.3% (p<0.03). Using either MR-opsy alone or with thresholding, the new methods indicated a closer relationship between decrease in intrapancreatic fat and fall in blood glucose. Conclusion The inter-observer variation for quantifying intrapancreatic fat was substantially improved by the new method when pancreas fat levels were moderately high. The method will improve comparability of pancreas fat measurement between research groups. PMID:28369092

  20. [App-based self-monitoring in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Steinert, A; Haesner, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2017-08-01

    The success of self-monitoring in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has already been verified in several studies. To date there are a multitude of smartphone apps which support diabetic patients in systematically recording and analyzing relevant health data; however, most of these smartphone apps are primarily developed for a young target group. As part of this study we examined to what extent a smartphone app for self-monitoring is used by older diabetic patients. In this study 36 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus older than 60 years were included. After a comprehensive training course the participants used the application for 3 months. Reminders for medication, physical activity and diet could be set and recorded health data, such as weight or blood sugar, could be entered into the app. After 3 months the data were analyzed concerning usage behavior and impact on overall health. Data analysis revealed intensive usage of the smartphone app (90 % on a daily basis). Furthermore, according to the patients, after the study period significant improvements in medication adherence and psychological well-being were recorded [t[35] = -2.24, p < 0.05). Additional motivational elements did not influence the usage behavior by older adults. Until now only a small proportion of older adults used smartphone health apps, despite the ubiquitous availability. These apps have to be tailored to the requirements of older adults so that the market will be opened up to them. Using self-monitoring apps can help older adults to structure their daily routine despite their disease.

  1. Targeting nocturnal hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Fleischer, Jesper; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Ebbehøj, Eva; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2014-11-01

    Several studies in different populations have suggested that nighttime blood pressure (BP) is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than daytime BP. Consequently, treatment strategies to target nighttime BP have come into focus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of change of administration time of antihypertensive drugs. We included 41 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension (nighttime systolic BP >120 mm Hg) in an open-label, crossover study. Patients were randomized to 8 weeks of either morning or bedtime administration of all of the individual's once-daily antihypertensive drugs, followed by 8 weeks of switched dosing regimen. Bedtime administration of antihypertensive drugs resulted in a significant reduction in nighttime (7.5 mm Hg; P<0.001) and 24-hour (3.1 mm Hg; P=0.014) systolic BP, with a nonsignificant reduction in daytime (1.3 mm Hg; P=0.336) systolic BP. We did not find morning BP surge to be different between dosing regimens. Levels of C-reactive protein were significantly lower with bedtime administration, which may indicate an effect on low-grade inflammation. We found no difference in urinary albumin excretion, regardless of albuminuria status. Urinary sodium/creatinine was significantly increased and urinary osmolality significantly reduced with bedtime administration, which can be interpreted as increased nocturnal natriuresis. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension, administration of once-daily antihypertensive drugs at bedtime may be favorable. The increased nocturnal natriuresis may reflect increased effect of bedtime-administered thiazides and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, suggesting a potential mechanism of the observed effects on BP with chronotherapeutic intervention. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Type 2 diabetes in Belgians of Turkish and Moroccan origin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adults aged 35 to 74 years of the Turkish and Moroccan communities in Belgium with the prevalence in native Belgians. To examine the determinants and specific mechanisms responsible for differences in diabetes between these communities. Method Both objectives were examined using the Health Interview Surveys of 1997, 2001 and 2004. Stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed with diabetes as the outcome variable. The variables 'age', 'sex', 'ethnic origin', 'body mass index', 'lack of physical activity', 'educational attainment' and 'income' were introduced in the model in consecutive steps. Results In 35- to 74-year-olds, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is higher in Belgians of Tur-kish and Moroccan origin than in native Belgians. In native Belgian men, the prevalence amounts to 5.0%. In 35- to 74-year-old men of Turkish and Moroccan origin, the diabetes prevalence is 5.8% and 6.5% respectively. 4.3%, 18.7% and 11.9% of the women of Belgian, Turkish and Moroccan origin respectively suffer from diabetes. In men, differences in the prevalence of diabetes are strongly reduced after controlling for lack of physical activity and educational attainment. In women, differences remain high, although they become smaller after accounting for BMI and educational attainment. Conclusions In men, the differences in diabetes prevalence are explained by lifestyle factors and educational attainment. In women, the community differences in diabetes prevalence persist, although lifestyle factors and educational attainment play an important part in understanding these differences.

  3. Postmenopausal hormone therapy, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and brain volumes.

    PubMed

    Espeland, Mark A; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Manson, JoAnn E; Yaffe, Kristine; Hugenschmidt, Christina; Vaughan, Leslie; Craft, Suzanne; Edwards, Beatrice J; Casanova, Ramon; Masaki, Kamal; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-09-29

    To examine whether the effect of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on brain volumes in women aged 65-79 years differs depending on type 2 diabetes status during postintervention follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial. The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trials assigned women to HT (0.625 mg/day conjugated equine estrogens with or without 2.5 mg/day medroxyprogesterone acetate) or placebo for an average of 5.6 years. A total of 1,402 trial participants underwent brain MRI 2.4 years after the trials; these were repeated in 699 women 4.7 years later. General linear models were used to assess the interaction between diabetes status and HT assignment on brain volumes. Women with diabetes at baseline or during follow-up who had been assigned to HT compared to placebo had mean decrement in total brain volume of -18.6 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] -29.6, -7.6). For women without diabetes, this mean decrement was -0.4 (95% CI -3.8, 3.0) (interaction p=0.002). This interaction was evident for total gray matter (p<0.001) and hippocampal (p=0.006) volumes. It was not evident for changes in brain volumes over follow-up or for ischemic lesion volumes and was not influenced by diabetes duration or oral medications. For women aged 65 years or older who are at increased risk for brain atrophy due to type 2 diabetes, prescription of postmenopausal HT is associated with lower gray matter (total and hippocampal) volumes. Interactions with diabetes and insulin resistance may explain divergent findings on how estrogen influences brain volume among older women. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. [Type 2 diabetes and depression in Guadalajara , Mexico , 2005].

    PubMed

    Colunga-Rodríguez, Cecilia; García de Alba, Javier E; Salazar-Estrada, José G; Angel-González, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Determining the prevalence of depression and comparing sociodemographic, metabolic and clinical indicators in depressed and non-depressed people suffering from type 2 diabetes. A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 450 people aged over 30 suffering from type 2 diabetes; they had been diagnosed more than one year before and psychopathology had not been determined for them. A modified Zung's scale was applied and a sociodemographic survey carried out. Glucosylated haemoglobin, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and glycemia in fasting were all evaluated. Diagnostic history and clinical state regarding diabetes were recorded. There was 63 % depression prevalence in a 3 to 1 ratio, this being greater in women than in men (2,08-4,82 95 %CI, p=0.00). Differences between depressed and non-depressed people were found in schooling, civil state and occupation (p<0.05); differences were not presented with age, just like metabolic variables, except for IMC, diagnostic history and clinical states 3 and 4. No association was found between socio-demographic and clinical metabolic variables by gender (p>0.05); however, diagnostic history and clinical state were associated with gender, the former being associated just with men and the latter with both sexes. The prevalence of depression was high in people suffering from diabetes and women were at greater risk. No association was revealed between age and people suffering from diabetes who were depressed, unlike schooling, civil state and occupation; depression was presented more amongst people having a longer diagnostic history of diabetes and greater BMI.

  5. Predicting Macro- and Microvascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Iimuro, Satoshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Katayama, Shigehiro; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a risk engine that calculates the risks of macro- and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed pooled data from two clinical trials on 1,748 Japanese type 2 diabetic patients without diabetes complications other than mild diabetic retinopathy with a median follow-up of 7.2 years. End points were coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, noncardiovascular mortality, overt nephropathy defined by persistent proteinuria, and progression of retinopathy. We fit a multistate Cox regression model to derive an algorithm for prediction. The predictive accuracy of the calculated 5-year risks was cross-validated. RESULTS Sex, age, HbA1c, years after diagnosis, BMI, systolic blood pressure, non-HDL cholesterol, albumin-to-creatinine ratio, atrial fibrillation, current smoker, and leisure-time physical activity were risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications and were incorporated into the risk engine. The observed-to-predicted (O/P) ratios for each event were between 0.93 and 1.08, and Hosmer-Lemeshow tests showed no significant deviations between observed and predicted events. In contrast, the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine overestimated CHD risk (O/P ratios: 0.30 for CHD and 0.72 for stroke). C statistics in our Japanese patients were high for CHD, noncardiovascular mortality, and overt nephropathy (0.725, 0.696, and 0.767) but moderate for stroke and progression of retinopathy (0.636 and 0.614). By combining macro- and microvascular risks, the classification of low- and high-risk patients was improved by a net reclassification improvement of 5.7% (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS The risk engine accurately predicts macro- and microvascular complications and would provide helpful information in risk classification and health economic simulations. PMID:23404305

  6. Bone Structure and Predictors of Fracture in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Starup-Linde, Jakob; Lykkeboe, Simon; Gregersen, Søren; Hauge, Ellen-Magrethe; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Handberg, Aase; Vestergaard, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of fracture. The objective of the study was to compare the bone structure and density between type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients and to investigate fracture associations. This was a cross-sectional study. Physician-diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients were included from the outpatient clinics at two university hospitals participated in the study. Bone density and structure were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Blood samples were collected for bone turnover markers. Prevalent vertebral fractures were assessed by vertebral fracture assessment and x-ray, and incident fractures were collected from The Danish National Hospital Discharge Register. Bone mineral density (BMD) was higher in type 2 than type 1 diabetes patients at the hip, femur, and spine; however, only the hip differed in multivariate-adjusted models. Bone tissue stiffness at the tibia was increased in type 2 diabetes patients also in adjusted models. Sclerostin levels were inversely associated with fracture in type 1 diabetes patients. The patients with the highest tertile of sclerostin had an 81% decreased risk of a fracture compared with the lowest tertile. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients differ in BMD of the hip and tissue stiffness at the tibia. Sclerostin may be a marker independent of BMD to predict fractures in type 1 diabetes patients and thus potentially of clinical importance. Studies with longer follow-up are needed.

  7. Patient beliefs and behaviors about genomic risk for type 2 diabetes: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick; King, Heather A; Haga, Susanne B; Orlando, Lori A; Joy, Scott V; Trujillo, Gloria M; Scott, William Michael; Bembe, Marylou; Creighton, Dana L; Cho, Alex H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major health burden in the United States, and population trends suggest this burden will increase. High interest in, and increased availability of, testing for genetic risk of type 2 diabetes presents a new opportunity for reducing type 2 diabetes risk for many patients; however, to date, there is little evidence that genetic testing positively affects type 2 diabetes prevention. Genetic information may not fit patients' illness representations, which may reduce the chances of risk-reducing behavior changes. The present study aimed to examine illness representations in a clinical sample who are at risk for type 2 diabetes and interested in genetic testing. The authors used the Common Sense Model to analyze survey responses of 409 patients with type 2 diabetes risk factors. Patients were interested in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes risk and believed in its importance. Most patients believed that genetic factors are important to developing type 2 diabetes (67%), that diet and exercise are effective in preventing type 2 diabetes (95%), and that lifestyle changes are more effective than drugs (86%). Belief in genetic causality was not related to poorer self-reported health behaviors. These results suggest that patients' interest in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes might produce a teachable moment that clinicians can use to counsel behavior change.

  8. Mitochondrial bioenergetics is not impaired in nonobese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Guhathakurta, Ishita; Behera, Prajna; Ranjan, Kumar Rajeev; Khanna, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2011-12-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been well documented in obese people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, its presence or absence in nonobese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been well studied so far. The aim of the present study was to assess the status of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue of nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects in comparison to control, obese nondiabetic, and obese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects. Mitochondria were isolated from subcutaneous white adipose tissue obtained from the abdominal region of control, obese nondiabetic, nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects. The activities of complex I, I to III, II to III, and IV; transmembrane potential; and inorganic phosphate utilization of mitochondria from different groups were measured. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential, inorganic phosphate utilization, and the activities of respiratory chain complexes were significantly reduced in obese nondiabetic and obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients compared with those in control subjects. No detectable change in mitochondrial functional parameters was observed in case of nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects compared with control subjects. Furthermore, a significant difference was noticed in mitochondrial phosphate utilization and activities of respiratory complexes, for example, I, I to III, and II to III, between obese type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and obese nondiabetic subjects. Obesity modulates mitochondrial dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Skin autofluorescence is inversely related to HDL anti-oxidative capacity in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Douwe J; de Boer, Jan Freark; Graaff, Reindert; de Vries, Rindert; Annema, Wijtske; Lefrandt, Joop D; Smit, Andries J; Tietge, Uwe J F; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2011-09-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles protect apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins from oxidative modification. An impaired anti-oxidative functionality of HDL in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may contribute to enhanced formation of oxidative stress products, such as Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs). We tested whether in T2DM the HDL anti-oxidative capacity is related to the accumulation of AGEs in the skin. Skin autofluorescence (AF), a non-invasive read-out for AGEs, and HDL anti-oxidative capacity, i.e. the ability of HDL to protect against LDL oxidation in vitro, were assessed in 67 non-smoking T2DM patients without complications (median age: 60 (53-65), 60% males, 6.5 (5.2-8.5) years of diabetes duration). In univariate analysis, skin AF correlated inversely with HDL anti-oxidative capacity (r=-0.305, P<0.02), but not with HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein A-I. HDL anti-oxidative capacity correlated inversely with glucose, HbA(1c), triglycerides, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) (P<0.05 to P ≤ 0.001). Multiple linear regression showed that skin AF remained inversely related to HDL anti-oxidative capacity (partial r=-0.314, P=0.015) taking account of age, plasma glucose, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HOMA(ir), and CRP. These findings suggest that skin AF is inversely related to the HDL anti-oxidative capacity rather than to the HDL cholesterol concentration in T2DM. Impaired anti-oxidative functionality of HDL could contribute to tissue accumulation of AGEs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased cancer mortality in type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-3).

    PubMed

    Landman, G W D; Ubink-Veltmaat, L J; Kleefstra, N; Kollen, B J; Bilo, H J G

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether there is a relationship between type two diabetes and cancer mortality. It also is unclear whether obesity and body mass index (BMI) are associated with cancer in type 2 diabetes patients. In 1998, 1,145 patients with type two diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Intergrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study. In this project, general practitioners (GPs) were assisted by hospital-based diabetes specialist nurses. Vital status was assessed in September 2004. The cancer mortality rate was evaluated using standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and its association with BMI (kg/m2) and obesity (>30 kg/m2) with the Cox proportional hazard ratio. The median follow-up time was 5.8 years. A total of 335 patients had died, of whom 70 died from malignancy. The SMR for cancer mortality was 1.38 (95% CI 1.07-1.75). BMI and obesity were not associated with cancer death. An increased cancer mortality rate was found in type two diabetes mellitus patients but there was no significant association between BMI or obesity and cancer mortality.

  11. Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among Nigerian type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, C. O.; Osinupebi, O. A.; Olajubu, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria is a risk factor for symptomatic urinary infection and septicemia among predisposed individuals such as diabetics. We investigated the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among our type 2 diabetics with a view to documenting the prevalence, type of organisms responsible and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. One hundred and twenty-four type 2 Nigerian diabetics (55 males and 69 females) submitted midstream urine specimens for culture. Thirty-three patients had significant bacteriuria (9 males and 24 females), showing the frequency of occurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to be 26.6%. The most common organism isolated was Klebsiella pneumonia at 42.4%. Gram-negative bacilli made up about 23 (69.7%) of the isolates. Isolates were poorly sensitive to the readily available antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole), but a large number of the organisms isolated were sensitive to nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Sensitivity to erythromycin, nalidixic acid and cefuroxime was moderate. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is, thus, more prevalent among the Nigerian diabetic population than in the non-diabetics. A changing pattern of disease is observed with Klebsiella sp. now accounting for the majority of asymptomatic bacteriuria among diabetics. The organisms are not sensitive to the commonly available antibacterial agents. PMID:12793791

  12. Retinal Capillary Rarefaction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jumar, Agnes; Harazny, Joanna M.; Ott, Christian; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kistner, Iris; Striepe, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes mellitus type 2, capillary rarefaction plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of end-organ damage. We investigated retinal capillary density in patients with early disease. Methods This cross-sectional study compares retinal capillary rarefaction determined by intercapillary distance (ICD) and capillary area (CapA), measured non-invasively and in vivo by scanning laser Doppler flowmetry, in 73 patients with type 2 diabetes, 55 healthy controls and 134 individuals with hypertension stage 1 or 2. Results In diabetic patients, ICD was greater (23.2±5.5 vs 20.2±4.2, p = 0.013) and CapA smaller (1592±595 vs 1821±652, p = 0.019) than in healthy controls after adjustment for differences in cardiovascular risk factors between the groups. Compared to hypertensive patients, diabetic individuals showed no difference in ICD (23.1±5.8, p = 0.781) and CapA (1556±649, p = 0.768). Conclusion In the early stage of diabetes type 2, patients showed capillary rarefaction compared to healthy individuals. PMID:27935938

  13. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM.

  14. A Review of the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Children

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Shannon A.; Motycka, Carol; DeBerry, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in children and adolescents has risen at staggering rates. Studies have shown that treating type 2 diabetes with oral medications in children may be more difficult than treating in adults. Compounding this problem is the fact that most of the medications available for treating type 2 diabetes have not been studied in children. Recently, the American Diabetes Association and the Pediatric Endocrine Society have collaborated to create a guideline for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in children. Similar to the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes, metformin remains the mainstay of therapy along with diet and exercise. Adjunctive therapy should be based on the limited clinical evidence available as well as on patient preference. In order to avoid detrimental microvascular and macrovascular complications, patients, clinicians, and family members should work together to ensure adequate treatment of type 2 diabetes in children. PMID:25859165

  15. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Parijat; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Agal, Subhash; Baijal, Rajiv; Kulshrestha, Pramod; Pramanik, Snehansu; Patel, Nikhil; Madan, Aruna; Amarapurkar, Anjali; Hafeezunnisa

    2004-08-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is commonly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Prevalence of NASH in type 2 DM has not been well studied and there is an epidemic rise in type 2 DM in Asian and Western populations. Its association with chronic liver disease in the form of NASH makes it an important health problem. Hence we have studied its prevalence and correlation of biochemical parameters with histological grades of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in otherwise asymptomatic type 2 DM patients. One hundred and forty-eight individuals were screened. Forty-eight individuals were excluded due to history of alcohol intake or liver disease as a result of other causes. One hundred non-alcoholic individuals with type 2 DM underwent abdominal ultrasonography (US abdomen). Forty-nine patients had evidence of fatty liver on US abdomen, and 32 of these 49 patients underwent liver biopsy. Four of 32 (12.5%) individuals had steatosis alone. Mild, moderate and severe NASH was present in 21/32 (65.5%), 4/32 (12.5%) and 3/32 (9.35%), respectively. Fibrosis was present in 7/32 (21.8%) patients (four grade 1 and three grade 3). There was no significant difference in body mass index (BMI), transaminase levels, serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We conclude that the prevalence of NASH is high in type 2 DM patients and liver biopsy is the only investigation to differentiate between non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tieh, Peter; Dreimane, Daina

    2014-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. Previously an adult onset disease, it is now being diagnosed more and more in childhood and adolescence. Lately, Asia has become the epicenter of this epidemic. Childhood T2DM is a new challenge for the pediatrician. Due to similarities in presentation, children may initially be misdiagnosed with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Most oral anti-diabetic agents have not been approved for use in adolescents, and there is a concern for safety of their use. Lifestyle intervention is difficult to conduct, and adherence to recommendations is lower in adolescents than in adults with T2DM. Higher incidence and early onset of co-morbidities, with lack of long term outcomes data make the management problematic. In many communities, due to a shortage of specialists, general practitioners will treat children with T2DM. Guidelines cited in this review are designed to help with the diagnostic process and management.

  17. Update on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    To achieve good metabolic control in diabetes and keep long term, a combination of changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment is necessary. Achieving near-normal glycated hemoglobin significantly, decreases risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. At present there are different treatments, both oral and injectable, available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment algorithms designed to reduce the development or progression of the complications of diabetes emphasizes the need for good glycaemic control. The aim of this review is to perform an update on the benefits and limitations of different drugs, both current and future, for the treatment of T2DM. Initial intervention should focus on lifestyle changes. Moreover, changes in lifestyle have proven to be beneficial, but for many patients is a complication keep long term. Physicians should be familiar with the different types of existing drugs for the treatment of diabetes and select the most effective, safe and better tolerated by patients. Metformin remains the first choice of treatment for most patients. Other alternative or second-line treatment options should be individualized depending on the characteristics of each patient. This article reviews the treatments available for patients with T2DM, with an emphasis on agents introduced within the last decade. PMID:27660695

  18. Onychomycosis incidence in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Méndez-Tovar, Luis Javier; Palacios-Morales, Yanni; Córdova-Martínez, Erika; Bazán-Mora, Elva; López-Martinez, Rubén

    2008-07-01

    The onychomycosis incidence was determined in 250 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients who were registered at the Internal Medicine Service from a Mexico city General Hospital throughout a year (January-December 2006). Out of the total of studied T2DM patients, 93 (37.2%) showed ungual dystrophy and from these, in 75.3% a fungal etiology was corroborated. Out of 70 patients, 34 were men and 36 women, with an average of 63.5 years. Correlation between T2DM evolution time and onychomycosis was significant (P < 0.01). Distal-lateral subungual and total dystrophic onychomycosis were the most frequent clinical types (55.1% and 33.7%, respectively). Fifty-eight fungal isolates were obtained; 48.6% corresponded to dermatophytes, Trichophyton rubrum being the first species (37.1%). All these strains corresponded to two morphological varieties: "yellow" and typical downy. From the yeast-like isolates, 12 corresponded to Candida spp., firstly C. albicans and C. parapsilosis; three to Cryptococcus spp. (C. albidus, C. uniguttulatus and C. laurentii); two Trichosporon asahii; and only one to Pichia ohmeri. Six non-dermatophytic molds were isolated: two Chrysosporium keratinophylus, two Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, one Aspergillus fumigatus, and one Acremonium sp. The fungal mixture corresponded to T. mentagrophytes with C. guilliermondii; T. mentagrophytes with C. glabrata; T. rubrum with C. glabrata; T. rubrum with P. ohmeri.

  19. Dapagliflozin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-02-01

    Dapagliflozin is a selective and reversible inhibitor of sodium-glucose linked transporter type 2 (SGLT2), which mediates approximately 90% of active renal glucose reabsorption in the early proximal tubule of the kidney. Dapagliflozin significantly reduces glucose reabsorption and decreases serum glucose concentration in an insulin-independent manner. The decrease of glucose reabsorption by dapagliflozin has also been associated with a reduction in body weight. Furthermore, the drug modestly reduces blood pressure levels through weight loss and its action as osmotic diuretic. Dapagliflozin has been approved as monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who cannot tolerate metformin or in combination with other antidiabetic drugs, with the exception of pioglitazone due to the theoretical increased risk of bladder cancer. The drug should not be prescribed in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment or in patients at risk for developing volume depletion. Dapagliflozin is associated with increased incidence of genital and lower urinary tract infections, but these infections are usually mild to moderate and respond to standard antimicrobial treatment. Based on current evidence, dapagliflozin is a useful drug for patients with T2DM with a favorable safety profile. However, further research regarding the effects of dapagliflozin on cardiovascular outcomes is needed.

  20. Empagliflozin/Linagliptin: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther S; Deeks, Emma D

    2015-09-01

    Empagliflozin/linagliptin (Glyxambi(®)) is a once-daily sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination product that is approved in the USA as an adjunct to diet and exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) when treatment with both empagliflozin and linagliptin is appropriate. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of oral empagliflozin/linagliptin in patients with T2D and summarizes the pharmacological properties of the agents. Results of two randomized controlled trials of 52 weeks' duration in adults with T2D demonstrated that empagliflozin/linagliptin improved glycaemic control significantly more than linagliptin when administered as initial therapy (whereas results vs. empagliflozin were mixed in this setting) and significantly more than linagliptin or empagliflozin when administered as an add-on therapy to metformin. In addition to glycaemic control, empagliflozin/linagliptin provided significant weight loss compared with linagliptin in both trials. Empagliflozin/linagliptin was generally well tolerated in patients with T2D, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and no reports of exacerbations of, or hospitalizations for, heart failure during the trials. As the first SGLT2 inhibitor/DPP-4 inhibitor fixed-dose combination available, empagliflozin/linagliptin is a useful new option for patients with T2D.

  1. Human cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter T; Smith, Charles D; Abner, Erin A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Scheff, Stephen W; Davis, Gregory J; Keller, Jeffrey N; Jicha, Gregory A; Davis, Daron; Wang-Xia, Wang; Hartman, Adria; Katz, Douglas G; Markesbery, William R

    2009-05-01

    The cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes (CNDM2) has not been positively defined. This review includes a description of CNDM2 research from before the 'Pubmed Era'. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on cerebrovascular and white matter pathology. These and prior studies about cerebrovascular histopathology in diabetes are reviewed. Evidence is also described for and against the link between CNDM2 and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. To study this matter directly, we evaluated data from University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center (UK ADC) patients recruited while non-demented and followed longitudinally. Of patients who had come to autopsy (N = 234), 139 met inclusion criteria. These patients provided the basis for comparing the prevalence of pathological and clinical indices between well-characterized cases with (N = 50) or without (N = 89) the premortem diagnosis of diabetes. In diabetics, cerebrovascular pathology was more frequent and Alzheimer-type pathology was less frequent than in non-diabetics. Finally, a series of photomicrographs demonstrates histopathological features (including clinical-radiographical correlation) observed in brains of persons that died after a history of diabetes. These preliminary, correlative, and descriptive studies may help develop new hypotheses about CNDM2. We conclude that more work should be performed on human material in the context of CNDM2.

  2. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  3. [BO's abdominal acupuncture for obese type-2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Liu, Yunxia

    2015-04-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of BO's abdominal acupuncture for obese type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sixty patients of obese T2DM were randomly divided into an acupuncture group and a medication group, 30 cases in each one. Patients in the medication group were treated with basic treatment combined with oral administration of regular antidiabetics, three weeks as one session. Patients in the acupuncture group, based on the medication group, were treated with abdominal acupuncture at Yinqiguiyuan [Zhongwan (CV 12), Xiawan (CV 10), Qihai (CV 6), Guanguan (CV 4)], Fusiguan [Huaroumen (ST 24), Wailing (TE 5)], Tianshu (ST 25), Daheng (SP 15), Qixue (KI 13), etc.; the treatment was given three times per week, 3 weeks as one session. The systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body weight, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference, body mass index (BI) were observed before and after treatment in the two groups, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), 2-hours postprandial blood glucose by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), HOMA-IR of insulin resistance index were calculated and adverge events were recorded. Compared before the treatment, SBP, WC, body weight, BMI, FPG, OG-TT2hBG, FINS, GTT2h insulin, HOMA-IR, TC and LDL-C in the acupuncture group were all significantly reduced (all P <0. 05), while FPG, OGTT2H insulin and TG were increased in the medication group (all P<0. 05)'. The differences of reducing SBP, WC, FPG, OGTT2H insulin, HOMA-IR, TC, TG and LDL-C were statistically significant between the two groups (all P<0. 05). The total effective rate was 93. 3% (28/30) in the acupuncture group, which was significantly superior to 23. 3% (7/30) in the medication group (P<0. 01). BO's abdominal acupuncture has obvious clinical efficacy for obese type-2 diabetes mellitus

  4. Canagliflozin and Cardiovascular and Renal Events in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Law, Gordon; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R

    2017-08-17

    Background Canagliflozin is a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that reduces glycemia as well as blood pressure, body weight, and albuminuria in people with diabetes. We report the effects of treatment with canagliflozin on cardiovascular, renal, and safety outcomes. Methods The CANVAS Program integrated data from two trials involving a total of 10,142 participants with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. Participants in each trial were randomly assigned to receive canagliflozin or placebo and were followed for a mean of 188.2 weeks. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Results The mean age of the participants was 63.3 years, 35.8% were women, the mean duration of diabetes was 13.5 years, and 65.6% had a history of cardiovascular disease. The rate of the primary outcome was lower with canagliflozin than with placebo (occurring in 26.9 vs. 31.5 participants per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 0.97; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P=0.02 for superiority). Although on the basis of the prespecified hypothesis testing sequence the renal outcomes are not viewed as statistically significant, the results showed a possible benefit of canagliflozin with respect to the progression of albuminuria (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.79) and the composite outcome of a sustained 40% reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the need for renal-replacement therapy, or death from renal causes (hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.77). Adverse reactions were consistent with the previously reported risks associated with canagliflozin except for an increased risk of amputation (6.3 vs. 3.4 participants per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.75); amputations were primarily at the level of the toe or metatarsal. Conclusions In two trials involving patients with type 2 diabetes and an elevated risk of

  5. Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Mayo, Helen; Bailey, Clifford J.; McGuire, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Metformin is widely viewed as the best initial pharmacological option to lower glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the drug is contraindicated in many individuals with impaired kidney function because of concerns of lactic acidosis. OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin use in individuals with impaired kidney function. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION In July 2014, we searched the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for English-language articles pertaining to metformin, kidney disease, and lactic acidosis in humans between 1950 and June 2014. We excluded reviews, letters, editorials, case reports, small case series, and manuscripts that did not directly pertain to the topic area or that met other exclusion criteria. Of an original 818 articles, 65 were included in this review, including pharmacokinetic/metabolic studies, large case series, retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and a clinical trial. RESULTS Although metformin is renally cleared, drug levels generally remain within the therapeutic range and lactate concentrations are not substantially increased when used in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rates, 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The overall incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users varies across studies from approximately 3 per 100 000 person-years to 10 per 100 000 person-years and is generally indistinguishable from the background rate in the overall population with diabetes. Data suggesting an increased risk of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients with chronic kidney disease are limited, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to test the safety of metformin in patients with significantly impaired kidney function. Population-based studies demonstrate that metformin may be prescribed counter to prevailing guidelines suggesting a renal risk in up to 1 in 4 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  6. Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Megson, Ian L.; Treweeke, Andrew T.; Shaw, Andrew; MacRury, Sandra M.; Setford, Steven; Frias, Juan P.; Anhalt, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress is a detrimental feature of diabetes implicated in the progression of the disease and its complications. The relationship between insulin therapy and oxidative stress is complex. This study tested the hypothesis that improved glucose control, rather than insulin dose, is central to reduced oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes following continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Methods: In this 16-week, multicenter study, 54 CSII-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57 ± 10 years, HbA1c 69 ± 15 mmol/mol [8.5 ± 1.4%], diabetes duration 13 ± 6 years) treated with either oral antidiabetic agents (OAD) alone (n = 17), basal insulin ± OAD (n = 17), or multiple daily injections (MDI) ± OAD (n = 20) were the evaluable group. Diabetes medications except metformin were discontinued, and 16 weeks of CSII was initiated. Insulin dose was titrated to achieve optimal glycemic control. A plasma marker of oxidative stress relevant to cardiovascular disease (oxidized low density lipoprotein [ox-LDL]) was assessed at baseline and week 16. Results: CSII improved glycemic control (HbA1c −13 ± 2 mmol/mol [−1.2 ± 0.2%]; fasting glucose −36.6 ± 8.4 mg/dL; mean glucose excursion −23.2 ± 6.5 mg/dL, mean ± SE; all P < .001) and reduced ox-LDL (–10.5%; P < .05). The antioxidant effect was cohort-independent (P > .05), but was significantly more pronounced in patients on statins (P = .019). The effect of CSII was more closely correlated to improvements in glucose excursion (P = .013) than to insulin dose (P > .05) or reduction in HbA1c (P > .05). Conclusions: CSII induces depression of plasma ox-LDL associated with change in glucose control, rather than with change in insulin dose. The effect is augmented in patients receiving statins. PMID:25652563

  7. Pharmacological Treatment of the Pathogenetic Defects in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Jeppe; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Grodum, Ellen; Juhl, Henning; Hansen, Tony Bill; Christiansen, Christian; Yderstræde, Knud; Gjessing, Hans; Hansen, Henrik M.; Vestergaard, Vibe; Hangaard, Jørgen; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of treatment with insulin aspart compared with NPH insulin, together with metformin/placebo and rosiglitazone/placebo. The hypothesis was that combined correction of major pathogenetic defects in type 2 diabetes would result in optimal glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a 2-year investigator-driven randomized partly placebo-controlled multicenter trial in 371 patients with type 2 diabetes on at least oral antiglycemic treatment. Patients were assigned to one of eight treatment groups in a factorial design with insulin aspart at mealtimes versus NPH insulin once daily at bedtime, metformin twice daily versus placebo, and rosiglitazone twice daily versus placebo. The main outcome measurement was change in A1C. RESULTS A1C decreased more in patients treated with insulin aspart compared with NPH (−0.41 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001). Metformin decreased A1C compared with placebo (−0.60 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001), as did rosiglitazone (−0.55 ± 0.10%, P < 0.001). Triple therapy (rosiglitazone, metformin, and any insulin) resulted in a greater reduction in A1C than rosiglitazone plus insulin (−0.50 ± 0.14%, P < 0.001) and metformin plus insulin (−0.45 ± 0.14%, P < 0.001). Aspart was associated with a higher increase in body weight (1.6 ± 0.6 kg, P < 0.01) and higher incidence of mild daytime hypoglycemia (4.9 ± 7.5 vs. 1.7 ± 5.4 number/person/year, P < 0.001) compared with NPH. CONCLUSIONS Insulin treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia results in lower A1C than treatment of fasting hyperglycemia, at the expense of higher body weight and hypoglycemic episodes. However, insulin therapy has to be combined with treatment of both peripheral and liver insulin resistance to normalize blood glucose, and in this case, the insulin regimen is less important. PMID:20929990

  8. Bone quality assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, R; Cibula, D; Ghosh, C; Weinstock, R S; Moses, A M

    2014-07-01

    The increased risk for fractures in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) despite higher average bone density is unexplained. This study assessed trabecular bone quality in T2DM using the trabecular bone score (TBS). The salient findings are that TBS is decreased in T2DM and low TBS associates with worse glycemic control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures despite high average bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to compare BMD with a noninvasive assessment of trabecular microarchitecture, TBS, in women with T2DM. In a cross-sectional study, trabecular microarchitecture was examined in 57 women with T2DM and 43 women without diabetes, ages 30 to 90 years. Lumbar spine BMD was measured by dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and TBS was calculated by examining pixel variations within the DXA images utilizing TBS iNsight software. Mean TBS was lower in T2DM (1.228 ± 0.140 vs. 1.298 ± 0.132, p = 0.013), irrespective of age. Mean BMD was higher in T2DM (1.150 ± 0.172 vs. 1.051 ± 0.125, p = 0.001). Within the T2DM group, TBS was higher (1.254 ± 0.148) in subjects with good glycemic control (A1c ≤ 7.5 %) compared to those (1.166 ± 0.094; p = 0.01) with poor glycemic control (A1c > 7.5 %). In T2DM, TBS is lower and associated with poor glycemic control. Abnormal trabecular microarchitecture may help explain the paradox of increased fractures at a higher BMD in T2DM. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between glycemic control and trabecular bone quality.

  9. Liraglutide and Renal Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mann, Johannes F E; Ørsted, David D; Brown-Frandsen, Kirstine; Marso, Steven P; Poulter, Neil R; Rasmussen, Søren; Tornøe, Karen; Zinman, Bernard; Buse, John B

    2017-08-31

    In a randomized, controlled trial that compared liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue, with placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk who were receiving usual care, we found that liraglutide resulted in lower risks of the primary end point (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes) and death. However, the long-term effects of liraglutide on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes are unknown. We report the prespecified secondary renal outcomes of that randomized, controlled trial in which patients were assigned to receive liraglutide or placebo. The secondary renal outcome was a composite of new-onset persistent macroalbuminuria, persistent doubling of the serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death due to renal disease. The risk of renal outcomes was determined with the use of time-to-event analyses with an intention-to-treat approach. Changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria were also analyzed. A total of 9340 patients underwent randomization, and the median follow-up of the patients was 3.84 years. The renal outcome occurred in fewer participants in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group (268 of 4668 patients vs. 337 of 4672; hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 0.92; P=0.003). This result was driven primarily by the new onset of persistent macroalbuminuria, which occurred in fewer participants in the liraglutide group than in the placebo group (161 vs. 215 patients; hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.91; P=0.004). The rates of renal adverse events were similar in the liraglutide group and the placebo group (15.1 events and 16.5 events per 1000 patient-years), including the rate of acute kidney injury (7.1 and 6.2 events per 1000 patient-years, respectively). This prespecified secondary analysis shows that, when added to usual care, liraglutide resulted in lower rates of the development and

  10. Effect of Sitagliptin on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer B; Bethel, M Angelyn; Armstrong, Paul W; Buse, John B; Engel, Samuel S; Garg, Jyotsna; Josse, Robert; Kaufman, Keith D; Koglin, Joerg; Korn, Scott; Lachin, John M; McGuire, Darren K; Pencina, Michael J; Standl, Eberhard; Stein, Peter P; Suryawanshi, Shailaja; Van de Werf, Frans; Peterson, Eric D; Holman, Rury R

    2015-07-16

    Data are lacking on the long-term effect on cardiovascular events of adding sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, to usual care in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this randomized, double-blind study, we assigned 14,671 patients to add either sitagliptin or placebo to their existing therapy. Open-label use of antihyperglycemic therapy was encouraged as required, aimed at reaching individually appropriate glycemic targets in all patients. To determine whether sitagliptin was noninferior to placebo, we used a relative risk of 1.3 as the marginal upper boundary. The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina. During a median follow-up of 3.0 years, there was a small difference in glycated hemoglobin levels (least-squares mean difference for sitagliptin vs. placebo, -0.29 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.32 to -0.27). Overall, the primary outcome occurred in 839 patients in the sitagliptin group (11.4%; 4.06 per 100 person-years) and 851 patients in the placebo group (11.6%; 4.17 per 100 person-years). Sitagliptin was noninferior to placebo for the primary composite cardiovascular outcome (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.09; P<0.001). Rates of hospitalization for heart failure did not differ between the two groups (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.20; P=0.98). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of acute pancreatitis (P=0.07) or pancreatic cancer (P=0.32). Among patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease, adding sitagliptin to usual care did not appear to increase the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, hospitalization for heart failure, or other adverse events. (Funded by Merck Sharp & Dohme; TECOS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00790205.).

  11. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Aml Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results Red cell distribution width (RDW) was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008). It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7%) than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238). RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in diabetic patients than healthy subjects and is particularly higher in uncontrolled glycemia. None of the studied hypoglycemic agents showed a significant effect on RDW

  12. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Nada, Aml Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Red cell distribution width (RDW) was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008). It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7%) than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238). RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in diabetic patients than healthy subjects and is particularly higher in uncontrolled glycemia. None of the studied hypoglycemic agents showed a significant effect on RDW. Diabetic hypertensive patients receiving

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in minority children and adolescents. An emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Dabelea, D; Pettitt, D J; Jones, K L; Arslanian, S A

    1999-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease of adults and has been considered rare in the pediatric population. Over the last decade, however, there has been a disturbing trend of increasing cases of type 2 diabetes in children, particularly adolescents, and with a greater proportion of minority children being affected. This article reviews the clinical characteristics of youth with type 2 diabetes, presents the risk factors associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, discusses treatment options, and projects future directions in research. The ultimate goal is to raise awareness of this challenging entity among healthcare professionals.

  14. Evidence-based case report: acute diabetic complication risks of Ramadan fasting in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, William J; Handjaja, C T; Salama, N; Anasy, N; Ardianto, M F; Kusumadewi, D

    2013-07-01

    to investigate causal relationship between Ramadan fasting and acute diabetic complications in adult controlled type 2 diabetics. a Pubmed's Clinical Queries and Embase search was conducted and resulted in 2 useful articles: 1 systematic review and 1 cohort study to be critically appraised. the incidence of acute diabetic complications is higher during Ramadan, with the relative risk for adult type 2 diabetics who fast during Ramadan is 1.36 and number needed to harm 50. Ramadan fasting was related with acute diabetic complications in adult controlled type 2 diabetics, but the risk was only slightly higher. It is acceptable for type 2 diabetics to fast during Ramadan.

  15. Behavioral economics survey of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Naoya; Okajima, Fumitaka; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Goto, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to treatment and the metabolic control of diabetes are challenging in many patients with diabetes. The theory of neuroeconomics can provide important clues for understanding unreasonable human behavior concerning decisions between outcomes occurring at different time points. We investigated patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine whether patients who are at a risk of developing complications are less risk averse. We also examined whether patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different behavioral traits in decision making under risk. We conducted a behavioral economics survey of 219 outpatients, 66 with type 1 diabetes and 153 with type 2 diabetes. All patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital. At the time of the survey, levels of hemoglobin A1c were not significantly different between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes showed a lower response rate to the survey compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (71.9% vs 87.9%, P<0.01). Logistic regression analysis indicated that diabetic retinopathy was negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries, myopic time preference, willingness to pay for preventive medicine, and levels of satisfaction with life. Diabetic nephropathy was also negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries. Detailed analysis revealed that a lower proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes (22.7%) were categorized as risk averse compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (43.1%, P<0.05) in hypothetical lottery risk estimation. This is the first report that investigated patients with diabetes in a clinical setting using a method based on behavioral economics. The results suggest that the attitude of patients toward risk plays an important role in the progress of the complications of diabetes. Different educational and psychological approaches may be necessary to assess

  16. Characterization of Vestibulopathy in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Wenzel, Angela; Kalyani, Rita R; Agrawal, Yuri; Feng, Allen L; Polydefkis, Michael; Ying, Howard S; Schubert, Michael C; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Della Santina, Charles C; Carey, John P

    2015-07-01

    Previous observational studies suggest higher rates of vestibular dysfunction among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those without diabetes. This study aims to functionally localize vestibular dysfunction in adults with type 2 DM. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary academic medical center. Adults 50 years of age and older with ≥10-year history of type 2 DM were recruited (December 2011-February 2013, n = 25). Vestibular function was assessed by cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), testing the saccule and utricle, respectively. Head thrust dynamic visual acuity testing assessed semicircular canal (SCC) function in all canal planes. Results were compared with nondiabetic age-matched controls (n = 25). Subjects were 64.7 ± 7.6 years old, were 40% female, and had a mean hemoglobin A1c of 8.3% ± 1.7%. SCC dysfunction was more common than otoconial organ dysfunction, with 70% of subjects with DM demonstrating impaired performance of at least 1 SCC (ΔlogMAR ≥0.18) and 50% demonstrating otoconial organ impairment (absent ocular VEMP and/or cervical VEMP). Adults with type 2 DM had poorer lateral and superior SCC performance (P < .05) but similar posterior SCC performance compared with controls (P = .16). Both cervical VEMP peak-to-peak amplitude and ocular VEMP n1 amplitude were also decreased with diabetes (P < .01). Adults with type 2 DM have poorer performance on tests of vestibular function related to both SCC and otoconial organ function compared with nondiabetic age-matched adults. Future studies are needed to better understand the relationship between vestibular function and functional disability in persons with diabetes. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  17. Cardiovascular fitness and quality of life in adolescents with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2010-10-01

    This descriptive study of adolescents with type 1 or type 2 diabetes examined the relationships between cardiovascular fitness and physical activity (PA) with generic or health-related quality of life (QoL), glycemic control, and lipids. Graded ergometry testing for fitness, fasting assays for lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), and self-reported PA and QoL instruments were completed with 151 adolescents. Adolescents with type 2 diabetes had lower fitness. Fitness was associated with improved lipids, A1C, health perception, and athletic competence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Interventions to encourage active lifestyles are imperative for adolescents with diabetes. © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. CLOCK gene variation is associated with incidence of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in type-2 diabetic subjects: dietary modulation in the PREDIMED randomized trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Circadian rhythms regulate key biological processes influencing metabolic pathways. Dysregulation is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Circadian rhythms are generated by a transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loop involving core clock genes. CLOCK...

  19. A motivational peer support program for type 2 diabetes prevention delivered by people with type 2 diabetes: the UEA-IFG feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nikki J; Gasper, Amy V; Irvine, Lisa; Scarpello, Tracey J; Sampson, Mike J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a peer support program for individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes as part of a novel Diabetes Prevention Programme (The UEA-IFG Study). Lay members of the public with existing type 2 diabetes volunteered as peer supporters (termed type 2 trainers) for participants at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The feasibility of type 2 trainer recruitment, training, and retention was tested. Between January and September 2009, 1500 potential type 2 trainers with existing type 2 diabetes were contacted and 168 (11%) expressed an interest. From this group, 26 type 2 trainers were appointed to begin training. All completed 7 training seminars, covering diabetes prevention, nutrition, physical activity, listening skills, motivation, and goal planning. Motivational calls were made every 12 weeks to each study participant by each type 2 trainer in addition to health care professional-delivered education sessions. Twenty-six type 2 trainers were recruited to enter the program. One type 2 trainer withdrew before beginning their role. The retention rate was high, with 22 (89%) of the type 2 trainers continuing until study end (July 2010; 20 months), with a total of 240 phone calls made. The recruiting and training of lay volunteers with existing type 2 diabetes as type 2 trainers to support study participants at risk of developing the same condition was a cost-effective strategy in comparison to employing salaried health care professionals and warrants further investigation on health outcomes.

  20. Quality of life perception in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Cristian; Stefani, Laura; Bini, Vittorio; Maffulli, Nicola; Frau, Stefania; Mascherini, Gabriele; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Galanti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lifestyle analysis is often used for primary and secondary prevention in many chronic metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Questionnaires are simple and common methods for first investigation risk of factors related to the perception of quality of life (QoL). The present study evaluates the feasibility to use questionnaires for first investigation of risk factors, and ascertain whether the results of such questionnaires are associated with the perception of QoL. Methods Validated questionnaires from the international ACSM guidelines were used to study a cohort of 142 consecutive type 2 diabetes patients (mean age: 66.1 years ± 10.9). Results QoL perception was normal; BMI was compatible with overweight in 79.1% of subjects, and obesity in 20.9%. Cognitive abilities decreased with age and low consumption of dried fruit and legumes. There was evidence of a statistically significant association between BMI and QoL (rho = −0.18; p = 0.03). Conclusions Questionnaires are useful to assess lifestyle habits and highlight risks factors. Poor knowledge of patients’ own chronic disease may contribute to a negative impact in diabetes. PMID:27896232

  1. Managing special populations among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Marquess, Jonathan G

    2011-12-01

    Glycemic goals and the therapies used to achieve them must be individualized for each patient based on several factors, one of the more important being coexisting conditions such as renal disease, liver disease, and cardiovascular disease. The potential to lower hemoglobin A(1c) and the possible long-term benefits of diabetes treatments must be balanced with safety issues, adverse effects, tolerability, ease of use, long-term adherence, and expense. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American Diabetes Association have addressed these concerns by developing treatment guidelines to maximize efficacy and safety in the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes. Other organizations, including the American Medical Directors Association and the American Geriatric Society, have also published guidelines for diabetes management for patients in long-term care facilities. This review discusses the safety profiles of antidiabetic drugs, and the special treatment needs with respect to these drugs for patients with diabetes and comorbidities such as renal disease, liver disease, and cardiovascular disease.

  2. Module Based Differential Coexpression Analysis Method for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Xia, Jun-Feng; Huang, De-Shuang

    2015-01-01

    More and more studies have shown that many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional biological pathway or network and are highly correlated. Differential coexpression analysis, as a more comprehensive technique to the differential expression analysis, was raised to research gene regulatory networks and biological pathways of phenotypic changes through measuring gene correlation changes between disease and normal conditions. In this paper, we propose a gene differential coexpression analysis algorithm in the level of gene sets and apply the algorithm to a publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) expression dataset. Firstly, we calculate coexpression biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we select informative correlation pairs using the “differential coexpression threshold” strategy. Finally, we identify the differential coexpression gene modules using maximum clique concept and k-clique algorithm. We apply the proposed differential coexpression analysis method on simulated data and T2D data. Two differential coexpression gene modules about T2D were detected, which should be useful for exploring the biological function of the related genes. PMID:26339648

  3. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  4. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  5. Lixisenatide in type 2 diabetes: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. The hallmark of T2D is hyperglycemia and, while many treatment modalities exist, achieving and maintaining glycemic control can be challenging. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are an appealing treatment option as they improve glycemic control, reduce weight, and limit the risk of hypoglycemia. Lixisenatide is a once-daily GLP-1 RA that has been evaluated in the GetGoal clinical trial program and has demonstrated efficacy and tolerability across a spectrum of patients. The feature that most distinguishes lixisenatide from other GLP-1 RAs is its ability to substantially reduce postprandial glucose (PPG) for the meal immediately following injection. Because of its positive effects on PPG, lixisenatide is being considered as a replacement for prandial insulin, and a fixed dose combination product containing lixisenatide and basal insulin is in development. Lixisenatide is a promising new addition to the antidiabetic armamentarium, but due to the lack of real-world experience with the drug, its exact place in therapy is unknown.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk.

  7. Association between Type 2 Diabetes Loci and Measures of Fatness

    PubMed Central

    Pecioska, Slavica; Zillikens, M. Carola; Henneman, Peter; Snijders, Pieter J.; Oostra, Ben A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder characterized by disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism and insulin resistance. The majority of T2D patients are obese and obesity by itself may be a cause of insulin resistance. Our aim was to evaluate whether the recently identified T2D risk alleles are associated with human measures of fatness as characterized with Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Methodology/Principal Findings Genotypes and phenotypes of approximately 3,000 participants from cross-sectional ERF study were analyzed. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CDKN2AB, CDKAL1, FTO, HHEX, IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, PPARG, SLC30A8 and TCF7L2 were genotyped. We used linear regression to study association between individual SNPs and the combined allelic risk score with body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), fat percentage (FAT), waist circumference (WC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR). Significant association was observed between rs8050136 (FTO) and BMI (p = 0.003), FMI (p = 0.007) and WC (p = 0.03); fat percentage was borderline significant (p = 0.053). No other SNPs alone or combined in a risk score demonstrated significant association to the measures of fatness. Conclusions/Significance From the recently identified T2D risk variants only the risk variant of the FTO gene (rs8050136) showed statistically significant association with BMI, FMI, and WC. PMID:20049090

  8. Coffee: A Dietary Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Irene; Casal, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Coffee beverages, prepared in a multitude of ways around the world, are increasingly part of our daily lives. Although considered an unhealthy beverage for decades, coffee is increasingly the headline of medical journals in association with a reduced risk for several diseases. What if this beverage could give us pleasure, while modulating mood and lowering the risk for several diseases of the modern society, including type 2 diabetes (T2D)? Based on the most recent epidemiological and research data, long-term consumption of coffee beverages is associated with a lower risk of developing T2D in healthy individuals, probably involving multiple mechanisms, with interventions on glucose homeostasis, antioxidant activity, and inflammatory biomarkers. Several coffee constituents potentially responsible for these effects are described, as well as the factors that make their presence highly variable, with interesting effects associated with chlorogenic acids, trigonelline and norharman. Due to the high number of compounds contained in coffee, we explore the potential synergic effect within the coffee matrix. Moreover, acute coffee consumption shows different health effects from those achieved on a long-term daily consumption, and not all coffee beverages are similar. Still, despite the huge amount or work developed in the last decade, the substances and mechanisms behind these protective effects on T2D are still to be fully elucidated, being therefore soon for dietary interventions based on coffee. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: focus on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical metabolic effects of exercise in T2DM patients with special focus on which parameters to consider for optimizing metabolic improvements. We then discuss the mechanisms whereby exercise exerts its anti-inflammatory and related metabolic effects. Evidence exists that interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in pancreatic β-cell damage, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α appears to be a key molecule in peripheral insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies in humans suggest that moderate acute elevations in IL-6, as provoked by exercise, exert direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), thereby limiting IL-1β signaling. In addition, IL-6 has direct impact on glucose and lipid metabolism. Moreover, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via improvements in, for example, body composition. While waiting for the outcome of long-term randomized clinical training studies with hard end points, it should be emphasized that physical activity represents a natural strong anti-inflammatory and metabolism-improving strategy with minor side effects.

  10. Effects of coffee on type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid; Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    This review provides the epidemiologic and research evidences documenting the effects of coffee consumption on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We summarize the literature concerning the effects of coffee consumption on different mechanistic factors involving in pathogenesis of T2DM, such as glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, insulin resistance, glucose-6-phosphatase, intestinal glucose absorption, antioxidant activity, inflammatory biomarkers, nuclear factor-κB inhibition, glucose uptake, glucose homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin secretion. These factors play a crucial role in influencing the normal levels of glucose in blood. Overall, the experimental and epidemiologic evidences presented here elucidate the protective effects of coffee consumption on T2DM, involving multiple preventive mechanisms. Despite the firm evidences available through a growing literature base, it is still uncertain whether the use of coffee should be recommended to patients with diabetes and/or any patient who might be at the risk of T2DM as a supplementary therapy to prevent further progression of T2DM.

  11. Qigong Exercises for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Putiri, Amy L; Close, Jacqueline R; Lilly, Harold Ryan; Guillaume, Nathalie; Sun, Guan-Cheng

    2017-08-09

    Background: The purpose of this article is to clarify and define medical qigong and to identify an appropriate study design and methodology for a large-scale study looking at the effects of qigong in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), specifically subject enrollment criteria, selection of the control group and study duration. Methods: A comprehensive literature review of English databases was used to locate articles from 1980-May 2017 involving qigong and T2DM. Control groups, subject criteria and the results of major diabetic markers were reviewed and compared within each study. Definitions of qigong and its differentiation from physical exercise were also considered. Results: After a thorough review, it was found that qigong shows positive effects on T2DM; however, there were inconsistencies in control groups, research subjects and diabetic markers analyzed. It was also discovered that there is a large variation in styles and definitions of qigong. Conclusions: Qigong exercise has shown promising results in clinical experience and in randomized, controlled pilot studies for affecting aspects of T2DM including blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, weight, BMI and insulin resistance. Due to the inconsistencies in study design and methods and the lack of large-scale studies, further well-designed randomized control trials (RCT) are needed to evaluate the 'vital energy' or qi aspect of internal medical qigong in people who have been diagnosed with T2DM.

  12. Bone metabolism and fracture risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), both prevalent in aging and westernized societies, adversely affect the health of elderly people by causing fractures and vascular complications, respectively. Recent experimental and clinical studies show that the disorders are etiologically related through the actions of osteocalcin and adiponectin. Meta-analyses of multiple clinical studies show that the hip fracture risk of T2DM patients is increased 1.4-1.7-fold compared with non-DM controls, even though the patients' bone mineral density (BMD) is not diminished. Vertebral fracture risk of the T2DM patients is also increased, and BMD measurement is not sensitive enough to assess this risk. These findings suggest that bone fragility in T2DM patients depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Surrogate markers are therefore needed to supplement the partial effectiveness of BMD testing in assessing the fracture risk of the T2DM patients. Markers related to advanced glycation end products may be candidates. These substances modulate bone quality in DM. Until research establishes the usefulness of surrogate markers, physicians should assess fracture risk in T2DM patients not only by measuring the BMD, but also by taking a fracture history and evaluating prior vertebral fractures using spinal X-rays.

  13. The Genetic Risk of Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of familial aggregation of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 2 diabetes and the heritability of its related traits provide compelling evidence that genetic factors contribute to their susceptibility. Segregation analyses suggest the existence of at least one major DN susceptibility gene as well as multiple other genetic factors with small to moderate effects on its risk. For more than 20 years, these studies have motivated investigators working to identify the causal genes responsible for the development of DN. During this period, advances in genomics and evolving technology have improved our understanding of the genetic basis of DN and revolutionized our ability to identify genes that underlie this disease. In this review, we discuss the major approaches being used to identify DN susceptibility genes in T2D and highlight the salient findings from studies where these approaches have been implemented. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing technology is beginning to impact DN gene mapping strategies. As the field moves forward, family-based approaches should greatly facilitate efforts to identify variants in genes that have a major affect on the risk of DN in T2D. To be successful, the ascertainment and comprehensive study of families with multiple affected members is critical. PMID:23290732

  14. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond's checklist for appraising the quality of studies. The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening.

  15. Type 2 diabetes in family practice. Room for improvement.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stewart B.; Stewart, Moira; Brown, Judith Belle; Wetmore, Stephen; Faulds, Catherine; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Porter, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To further knowledge of diabetes management in family practice. DESIGN Retrospective, observational chart audit study. SETTNG: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANT: A random sample of non-academic family physicians and a random selection of their patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glycemic control as measured by HbA1c and adherence to recommendations in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). RESULTS: Eighty-four percent of patients had at least one HbA1c test ordered in the previous year. Overall mean HbA1c was 0.079 and half-the patients had levels deemed acceptable by 1992 CPGs. Screening for microvascular complications was disappointing; only 28% were tested for microalbuminuria, and 15% were examined for diabetes-related foot conditions. Screening for macrovascular complications was more comprehensive; blood pressure was measured in 88%, and lipid profiles documented in 48%, of patient charts. CONCLUSION: Management of glycemic control and screening for microvascular and macrovascular disease in family practice can be improved. PMID:12836867

  16. Type 2 diabetes and ethnic disparities in cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Noble, James M.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Schupf, Nicole; Tang, Ming-Xing; Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We explored whether ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes (T2D) explain ethnic disparities in cognitive impairment. Design longitudinal study Setting A cohort study of multiethnic community dwelling elderly persons in Northern Manhattan, New York. Participants 941 participants aged ≥ 65 years without prevalent cognitive impairment or dementia (CID) were followed for a median of 7.1 years. Main Outcomes Measures CID was defined by a clinical dementia rating ≥ 0.5. CID risk attributable to T2D was estimated for each ethnic group using the hazard ratio (HR) relating T2D and CID and the ethnic prevalence of T2D. Results 448 participants developed CID (69 (31.4%) Non-Hispanic Whites (Whites), 152 (48.6%) Non-Hispanic-Blacks (Blacks), 227 (55.6%) Hispanics, p<0.001). T2D prevalence was 8.2% in Whites, 20.1% in Blacks, and 19.6 % in Hispanics, p<0.001. Controlling for age, gender, education, and APOEε4, the HR relating T2D and CID was 1.63 (95% CI 1.26, 2.09). CID attributable to T2D was higher in Blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites (11.4% vs. 4.9%; p=0.06). We estimated that reducing the ethnic disparities in diabetes prevalence could reduce the CID ethnic disparities by 17%. Conclusions Reducing ethnic differences in T2D prevalence could partially reduce ethnic differences in incident CID. PMID:22774307

  17. Pulsatile insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Leslie S.; Butler, Peter C.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) results when increases in beta cell function and/or mass cannot compensate for rising insulin resistance. Numerous studies have documented the longitudinal changes in metabolism that occur during the development of glucose intolerance and lead to T2DM. However, the role of changes in insulin secretion, both amount and temporal pattern has been understudied. Most of the insulin secreted from pancreatic beta cells of the pancreas is released in a pulsatile pattern, which is disrupted in T2DM. Here we review the evidence that changes in beta cell pulsatility occur during the progression from glucose intolerance to T2DM in humans, and contribute significantly to the etiology of the disease. We review the evidence that insulin pulsatility improves the efficacy of secreted insulin on its targets, particularly hepatic glucose production, but also examine evidence that pulsatility alters or is altered by changes in peripheral glucose uptake. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms responsible for oscillatory insulin secretion. Understanding how insulin pulsatility contributes to normal glucose homeostasis and is altered in metabolic disease states may help improve the treatment of T2DM. PMID:25637831

  18. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  19. Dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus: bad for the heart.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2017-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. These patients are also more prone to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, coronary interventions performed in such high-risk patients have worse outcomes. In this narrative review, we discuss the role of diabetic dyslipidaemia on the risk of CHD in patients with T2DM. The effects of hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs on lipid and glucose metabolism in T2DM are also considered. Among CHD risk factors, diabetic dyslipidaemia characterized by moderately elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides and small, dense LDL particles as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may contribute to the increased CHD risk associated with T2DM. Hypolipidaemic, antihypertensive and antidiabetic drugs can affect lipid and glucose parameters thus potentially influencing CHD risk. Such drugs may improve not only the quantity, but also the quality of LDL as well as postprandial lipaemia. Current data highlight the importance of treating diabetic dyslipidaemia in order to minimize CHD risk. Both fasting and postprandial lipids are influenced by drugs in patients with T2DM; physicians should take this into consideration in clinical decision making.

  20. Glucagon and heart in type 2 diabetes: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Mannucci, Edoardo; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-08-27

    Increased levels of glucagon in type 2 diabetes are well known and, until now, have been considered deleterious. However, glucagon has an important role in the maintenance of both heart and kidney function. Moreover, in the past, glucagon has been therapeutically used for heart failure treatment. The new antidiabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, are able to decrease and to increase glucagon levels, respectively, while contrasting data have been reported regarding the glucagon like peptide 1 receptors agonists. The cardiovascular outcome trials, requested by the FDA, raised some concerns about the possibility that the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can precipitate the heart failure, while, at least for empagliflozin, a positive effect has been shown in decreasing both cardiovascular death and heart failure. The recent LEADER Trial, showed a significant reduction of cardiovascular death with liraglutide, but a neutral effect on heart failure. A possible explanation of the results with the DPPIV inhibitors and empagliflozin might be related to their divergent effect on glucagon levels. Due to unclear effects of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists on glucagon, the possible role of this hormone in the Leader trial remains unclear.

  1. Identifying groups of nonparticipants in type 2 diabetes mellitus education.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Wiese, Birgitt; Pawels, Marc; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hannah

    2013-06-01

    Patient education is a compulsory element of the nationwide disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany. However, a considerable proportion of patients do not attend diabetes self-management education courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe patient-reported reasons for nonparticipation and to identify typical subgroups of nonparticipants in order to improve recruitment strategies. The authors performed a cross-sectional observational study on 165 participants and 132 nonparticipants in diabetes education using a postal survey and chart review. Participants and nonparticipants were compared using 2-sided t tests and χ2 tests. Nonparticipants were grouped by cluster analysis based on the reasons for nonparticipation. A total of 95% of participants and 36% of nonparticipants reported to have received a recommendation for diabetes education from their physician. The authors identified 4 typical subgroups of nonparticipants: the "informed and responsible," the "unconcerned without desire for more information," the "uninformed but responsible," and the "anxious and burdened with psychosocial problems and functional limitations." The physician's recommendation seems to influence participation in diabetes education and should be used intentionally to increase participation rates. Also, differentiating barriers of nonparticipants can be determined by the degree of feeling informed and responsible for diabetes management. Physicians should more clearly explore patients' perception of their knowledge of diabetes and their attribution of responsibility for diabetes management. Starting from this patient perspective might help physicians motivate patients to participate in diabetes education.

  2. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  3. Type 2 diabetes and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, D; Noble, J; Tang, M X; Schupf, N; Mayeux, R; Luchsinger, J A

    2011-01-01

    To confirm in a cohort recruited in 1999-2001 our finding in a cohort recruited in 1992-1994 relating type 2 diabetes (T2D) to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Participants were 1,488 persons aged 65 years and older without dementia at baseline from New York City. T2D was ascertained by self-report. Dementia and LOAD were ascertained by standard research procedures. Proportional hazard regression was used for analyses relating T2D and LOAD. The prevalence of T2D was 17%. There were 161 cases of dementia and 149 cases of LOAD. T2D was related to dementia (hazard ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-2.9) and LOAD (1.6; 1.0-2.6) after adjustment for age, sex, education, ethnic group and apolipoprotein E ε4. This association was weaker when only AD - excluding cases of mixed dementia - was considered (hazard ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.2). T2D is associated with LOAD. Cerebrovascular disease may be an important mediator. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Scleredema Diabeticorum in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martín, C.; Requena, L.; Manrique, K.; Manzarbeitia, F. D.; Rovira, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Scleredema adultorum, a connective tissue disorder of unknown aetiology, is characterized by a thickening of the reticular dermis in the upper back of the body that may decrease the mobility of the affected tissues. It has been reported in diabetic patients with poor metabolic control. Therapeutic options are limited with generally poor results. Case Report. 53-year-old white male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was referred to our department for evaluation of incipient nephropathy and retinopathy. On examination, he presented erythematous, indurated, painless and ill-defined plaque on the skin of the upper back with limited movement of shoulders. A biopsy was done revealing scleredema. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy were started with the amelioration of mobility and acquiring some elasticity of the upper back. Discussion. The development of scleredema in diabetic patients has been related to prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycaemia. Our patient has had diabetes for 20 years with an acceptable glucose control, however he developed the scleredema 10 years ago. Conclusions. Scleredema is a rare connective disorder that seems to appear most frequently in diabetic subjects. Good metabolic control seems not to preclude its development. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy are therapeutic options that seem to be of some help. PMID:22937286

  5. Depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus: prevalence, impact, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Katherine; Brown, Miriam E; Svrakic, Dragan M; Lustman, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    Clinically significant depression is present in one of every four people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Depression increases the risk of the development of T2DM and the subsequent risks of hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and micro- and macrovascular complications. Conversely, a diagnosis of T2DM increases the risk of incident depression and can contribute to a more severe course of depression. This linkage reflects a shared etiology consisting of complex bidirectional interactions among multiple variables, a process that may include autonomic and neurohormonal dysregulation, weight gain, inflammation, and hippocampal structural alterations. Two recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled depression treatment trials in patients with T2DM concluded that psychotherapy and antidepressant medication (ADM) were each moderately effective for depression and that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) had beneficial effects on glycemic control. However, the number of studies (and patients exposed to randomized treatment) included in these analyses is extremely small and limits the certainty of conclusions that can be drawn from the data. Ultimately, there is no escaping the paucity of the evidence base and the need for additional controlled trials that specifically address depression management in T2DM. Future trials should determine both the effects of treatment and the change in depression during treatment on measures of mood, glycemic control, and medical outcome.

  6. Genes, Diet and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dedoussis, George V.Z.; Kaliora, Andriana C.; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability. While insulin insensitivity is an early phenomenon partly related to obesity, pancreatic β-cell function declines gradually over time even before the onset of clinical hyperglycemia. Several mechanisms have been proposed to be responsible for insulin resistance, including increased non-esterified fatty acids, inflammatory cytokines, adipokines, and mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, and amyloid formation for β-cell dysfunction. Moreover, the disease has a strong genetic component, although only a handful of genes have been identified so far. Diabetic management includes diet, exercise and combinations of antihyperglycemic drug treatment with lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet therapy. Since many persons with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant and overweight, nutrition therapy often begins with lifestyle strategies to reduce energy intake and increase energy expenditure through physical activity. These strategies should be implemented as soon as diabetes or impaired glucose homoeostasis (pre-diabetes) is diagnosed. PMID:17565412

  7. Pancreatic β-Cells and Type 2 Diabetes Development.

    PubMed

    Elizabeth, Miranda-Perez Maria; Alarcon-Aguilar; J, Francisco; Clara, Ortega-Camarillo; Escobar-Villanueva; Del Carmen, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia. In particular, type 2 diabetes (T2D) represents one of the main causes of death in the world, and those suffering from it have a lower quality of life. Although there are multiple hypotheses about the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the development of T2D, the effects of this pathology on pancreatic β-cells are often ignored. We now know that in addition to genetic defects, β-cell organellar dysfunction participates in the earliest stages of the disease; other factors also contribute to this dysfunction, such as excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in cellular volume and mass. These features usually result from increased apoptosis, which is not adequately compensated for by the characteristic regeneration mechanisms of these cells. In this study, we specifically examine the genetic, epigenetic and metabolic defects that contribute to β-cell dysfunction and lead to the establishment of T2D, particularly the dysregulated insulin synthesis and secretion in these cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin.

  9. Forecasting future prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Syria.

    PubMed

    Al Ali, Radwan; Mzayek, Fawaz; Rastam, Samer; M Fouad, Fouad; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon; Maziak, Wasim

    2013-05-25

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasingly becoming a major public health problem worldwide. Estimating the future burden of diabetes is instrumental to guide the public health response to the epidemic. This study aims to project the prevalence of T2DM among adults in Syria over the period 2003-2022 by applying a modelling approach to the country's own data. Future prevalence of T2DM in Syria was estimated among adults aged 25 years and older for the period 2003-2022 using the IMPACT Diabetes Model (a discrete-state Markov model). According to our model, the prevalence of T2DM in Syria is projected to double in the period between 2003 and 2022 (from 10% to 21%). The projected increase in T2DM prevalence is higher in men (148%) than in women (93%). The increase in prevalence of T2DM is expected to be most marked in people younger than 55 years especially the 25-34 years age group. The future projections of T2DM in Syria put it amongst countries with the highest levels of T2DM worldwide. It is estimated that by 2022 approximately a fifth of the Syrian population aged 25 years and older will have T2DM.

  10. Health Beliefs of Marshallese Regarding Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McElfish, Pearl Anna; Hallgren, Emily; Henry, L Jean; Ritok, Mandy; Rubon-Chutaro, Jellesen; Kohlor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Marshallese population suffers from disproportionate rates of type 2 diabetes. This study identifies the underlying beliefs and perceptions that affect diabetes self-management behavior among the US Marshallese population living in Arkansas. Methods The study uses qualitative focus groups with a semi-structured interview guide developed using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach and the Health Belief Model. Data was collected from a total of N = 41 participants and bilingual community co-investigators provided translation as needed. Results The results show high-perceived threat, with most participants describing diabetes as inevitable and a death sentence. Participants are generally unaware of the benefits of diabetes self-management behaviors, and the Marshallese population faces significant policy, environmental, and systems barriers to diabetes self-management. The primary cue to action is a diagnosis of diabetes, and there are varying levels of self-efficacy. Conclusions The research grounded in the Health Belief Model provides important contributions that can help advance diabetes self-management efforts within Pacific Islander communities. PMID:26931757

  11. Osteoarthritis and type 2 diabetes mellitus: What are the links?

    PubMed

    Courties, Alice; Sellam, Jérémie

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent joint disorder and one of the leading cause of disability. During a long time, it was considered as the consequence of aging and mechanical stress on cartilage. Recent advances in the knowledge of OA have highlighted that it is a whole joint disease with early modifications of synovium and subchondral bone but also that it is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome through systemic mechanisms. In the past year, type 2 diabetes has been described in two meta-analyzes as an independent risk factor for OA. In vivo models of diabetes corroborated epidemiological studies. Indeed, diabetic rodents display a spontaneous and a more severe experimental OA than their non-diabetic counterparts, which can be partially prevented by diabetes treatment (insulin, pioglitazone). The negative impact of diabetes on joints could be explain by the induction of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines but also by advanced age products accumulation in joint tissues exposed to chronic high glucose concentration. Insulin resistance might also impair joint tissue because of a local insulin resistance of diabetic synovial membrane but also by the systemic low grade inflammation state related to obesity and insulin resistant state.

  12. Metals in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Rehman; Awan, Fazli Rabbi

    2014-01-08

    Minerals are one of the components of food, though they are not synthesized in the body but they are essential for optimal health. Several essential metals are required for the proper functioning of many enzymes, transcriptional factors and proteins important in various biochemical pathways. For example Zn, Mg and Mn are cofactors of hundreds of enzymes, and Zn is involved in the synthesis and secretion of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Similarly, Cr enhances the insulin receptor activity on target tissues, especially in muscle cells. Insulin is the key hormone required to maintain the blood glucose level in normal range. In case of insulin deficiency or resistance, blood glucose concentration exceeds the upper limit of the normal range of 126 mg/dl. Persistent increase of blood serum glucose level leads to overt chronic hyperglycemia, which is a major clinical symptom of diabetes mellitus. Poor glycemic control and diabetes alters the levels of essential trace elements such as Zn, Mg, Mn, Cr, Fe etc. by increasing urinary excretion and their concomitant decrease in the blood. Hence, the main purpose of this review is to discuss the important roles of essential trace elements in normal homeostasis and physiological functioning. Moreover, perturbation of essential trace elements is also discussed in perspective of type 2 diabetes pathobiology.

  13. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Argentina 1979-2012.

    PubMed

    Barengo, Noël C; Trejo, Ruby; Sposetti, Georgina

    2013-07-16

    The objective of this review was to revise the existing information regarding type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence in the Argentine population during the past 30 years and to see whether the available data and methodology of the studies conducted allow analysis of time trends. The PubMED and LILACS databases were searched using the search terms "diabetes prevalence" and "Argentina". A total of 301 studies were identified and 19 of them remained in the review after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The studies reviewed covered a time period of 30 years (1979-2012). The studies conducted in Argentina during the last 30 years assessing the prevalence of T2D are very heterogeneous. The majority of the studies were conducted in the province of Buenos Aires. As the assessment of T2D varied between the studies in respect of diagnostic criteria and diagnostic tests for T2D, meaningful comparisons are difficult to make, not to mention an analysis of time trends. All in all, the T2D prevalence seems to be at least 10% in the Argentina population. However, the latest large population surveys conducted in Argentina is promising and may offer the most reliable estimates of the T2D prevalence even though the diagnosis of T2D was based on participant self-report. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Type 2 diabetes and obesity: genomics and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Travers, Mary E; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity represent major challenges for global public health. They are at the forefront of international efforts to identify the genetic variation contributing to complex disease susceptibility, and recent years have seen considerable success in identifying common risk-variants. Given the clinical impact of molecular diagnostics in rarer monogenic forms of these diseases, expectations have been high that genetic discoveries will transform the prospects for risk stratification, development of novel therapeutics and personalised medicine. However, so far, clinical translation has been limited. Difficulties in defining the alleles and transcripts mediating association effects have frustrated efforts to gain early biological insights, whilst the fact that variants identified account for only a modest proportion of observed familiarity has limited their value in guiding treatment of individual patients. Ongoing efforts to track causal variants through fine-mapping and to illuminate the biological mechanisms through which they act, as well as sequence-based discovery of lower-frequency alleles (of potentially larger effect), should provide welcome acceleration in the capacity for clinical translation. This review will summarise recent advances in identifying risk alleles for T2D and obesity, and existing contributions to understanding disease pathology. It will consider the progress made in translating genetic knowledge into clinical utility, the challenges remaining, and the realistic potential for further progress.

  15. Numeracy and dietary intake in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Michael E; Cavanaugh, Kerri L; Wolff, Kathleen; Davis, Dianne; Gregory, Becky; Rothman, Russell L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the association between numeracy and self-reported dietary intake in patients with type 2 diabetes. Numeracy and dietary intake were assessed with the validated Diabetes Numeracy Test and a validated food frequency questionnaire in a cross-sectional study of 150 primary care patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial at an academic medical center between April 2008 and October 2009. Associations between numeracy and caloric and macronutrient intakes were examined with linear regression models. Patients with lower numeracy consumed a higher percentage of calories from carbohydrates and lower percentages from protein and fat. However, no differences in energy consumption or the percentage of energy intake owing to carbohydrates, fat, or protein were observed in adjusted analyses. Patients with lower numeracy were significantly more likely to report extremely high or low energy intake inconsistent with standard dietary intake. Numeracy was not associated with dietary intake in adjusted analyses. Low numeracy was associated with inaccurate dietary reporting. Providers who take dietary histories in patients with diabetes may need to consider numeracy in their assessment of dietary intake.

  16. Pathophysiological insights of methylglyoxal induced type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dornadula, Sireesh; Elango, Bhakkiyalakshmi; Balashanmugam, Ponjayanthi; Palanisamy, Rajaguru; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2015-09-21

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder constituting a major health problem whose prevalence has gradually increased worldwide over the past few decades. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains more complex and heterogeneous and arises as a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate functional β-cell mass and comprises about 90% of all diabetic cases. Appropriate experimental animal models are essential for understanding the molecular basis, pathogenesis of complications, and the utility of therapeutic agents to abrogate this multifaceted disorder. Currently, animal models for T2DM are obtained as spontaneously developed diabetes or diabetes induced by chemicals or dietary manipulations or through surgical or genetic methods. The currently used diabetogenic agents have certain limitations. Recently, methylglyoxal (MG), a highly reactive compound derived mainly from glucose and fructose metabolism has been implicated in diabetic complications. MG is a major precursor of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) and promotes impaired functions of insulin signaling, GLUT transporters, anion channels, kinases, and endothelial cells and is finally involved in apoptosis. Recent array of literature also cited that higher concentrations of MG causes rapid depolarization, elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and acidification in pancreatic β-cells. This review henceforth highlights the mechanism of action of MG and its implications in the pathophysiology of experimental diabetes.

  17. Liraglutide for Type 2 diabetes and obesity: a 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Iepsen, Eva Winning; Torekov, Signe Sørensen; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous liraglutide (Victoza(®), Novo Nordisk) was approved for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Europe in 2009 and in the USA in 2010. In December 2014, liraglutide 3.0 mg was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and in March 2015 by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of chronic weight management under the brand name Saxenda(®) Novo Nordisk. Liraglutide causes a glucose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, decreases glucagon secretion and promotes weight loss by inhibiting appetite. Liraglutide probably induces satiety through activation of different areas in the hind brain and possibly by preserving free leptin levels. Recently, liraglutide has been suggested to protect against prediabetes and seems to prevent bone loss by increasing bone formation following diet-induced weight loss in obesity. This article not only covers the major clinical trials evaluating the effects of liraglutide in obesity and T2DM but also provides novel insights into the pharmacological mechanisms of liraglutide.

  18. Is continued weight gain inevitable in type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Tremble, J M; Donaldson, D

    1999-12-01

    Prevention and treatment of obesity are major clinical problems encountered in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM); indeed, up to 90% of such patients are regarded as being overweight. Except for a brief period following diagnosis, when presumably enthusiasm to adopt lifestyle change is at its greatest, weight gain is generally progressive unless severe hyperglycaemia or complications intervene. Even a relatively modest weight loss of 10% can have major benefits in terms not only of reducing the risk of developing DM in the first place, but also in improving metabolic control after the disorder has become established. Behavioural therapy (BT) in combination with hypocaloric diet achieves weight loss in the short-term, but is poorly sustained in the long-term. Exercise has metabolic benefits beyond its rather minimal effects on short-term weight loss in that it may also aid long-term weight control. The difficulties encountered in maintaining lifestyle change do, however, suggest the need for ongoing intervention--perhaps including a regular period on a stricter dietary regimen (800-1000 kcalday-1), possibly a very low calorie diet (VLCD)(< 800 kcalday-1) or even the use of orlistat, a pancreatic lipase inhibitor which reduces the absorption of dietary fat. Realistically, the aim should be for long-term weight stability.

  19. Whole food approach for type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2016-08-01

    Diet is intimately associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, attention has focused on the contributions of individual nutrients, food groups and eating patterns to the outcome of T2D. High consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and nuts are each independently associated with the reduced risk of T2D in high risk, glucose intolerant individuals. Experimental and clinical trials have given insight to the diverse mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed protective effects of certain foods on T2D, including nutrients, phytochemicals and dietary fiber, weight control, enhanced satiety and improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients. Elevated consumption of refined grains and sugar-sweetened beverages has shown to significantly elevate the risk of incident T2D. An overall healthy diet primarily comprising whole plant-based foods, together with regular physical activity and weight manage, could significantly reduce the risk of T2D. The present review consolidates current research and delineates major food groups shown to significantly influence risk of T2D. Documenting and quantifying the effects of diet on the outcome of T2D are of great scientific and public health importance as there is urgent need to implement dietary strategies to prevent and manage the outcome of T2D. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. [Unmet needs in the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Elías

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes represents one of the most important health problems, provided due to its high prevalence and significant morbi-mortality. At present time, we know that an intensive control of all cardiovascular risk factors from the beginning prevents the appearance and progression of micro and macrovascular complications. Nevertheless, only few patients achieve the degree of metabolic control recommended by diabetes therapeutic guidelines. This is due to different reasons such as lack of patients compliance and therapeutic inertia by doctors. Also, the available therapeutic approaches are limited. We still do not have the ideal antidiabetic drug, which should be able to be used in all phases of the disease, have sustained durability, be well tolerated not inducing hypoglycaemia, and promote weight loss, cardiovascular protection and reducing morbi-mortality at a low cost. The launching of new drugs with attractive mechanisms of action and few side effects may help to achieve these goals, though we still should wait for the results of studies demonstrating their effect on cardiovascular endpoints.

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Role of melatonin and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zephy, Doddigarla; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus caused by transfer of susceptible immortal gene from parent to progeny in individuals prone, and/or in contribution of factors such as obesity and physical inactivity results in chronic extracellular hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance. Hyperglycemia leads to increased production of superoxide radical in mitochondrial electron transport chain, consequently, inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, increase the flux of substrates that direct the expression of genes responsible for activation of polyol, hexosamine, advanced glycation end products and protein kinase-C pathways enzymes. Simultaneously, these pathways add-up free radicals in the body, hamper cell redox state, alter genes of insulin sensitivity and are responsible for the diabetic complications like retinopathy, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy and neuropathy. Experimental evidence suggests that the indoleamine hormone melatonin is capable of influencing in development of diabetic complications by neutralizing the unnecessary production of ROS, protection of beta cells, as they possess low antioxidant potential and normalize redox state in the cell. However, studies reported the beneficial effects of pharmacological supplementation of melatonin in humans but it has not been extensively studied in a multicountric, multicentric which should include all ethnic population.

  2. Serum Amyloid A Truncations in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Hussein N.; Trenchevska, Olgica; He, Huijuan; Borges, Chad R.; Nedelkov, Dobrin; Mack, Wendy; Kono, Naoko; Koska, Juraj; Reaven, Peter D.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Serum Amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein complex consisting of several abundant isoforms. The N- terminus of SAA is critical to its function in amyloid formation. SAA is frequently truncated, either missing an arginine or an arginine-serine dipeptide, resulting in isoforms that may influence the capacity to form amyloid. However, the relative abundance of truncated SAA in diabetes and chronic kidney disease is not known. Methods Using mass spectrometric immunoassay, the abundance of SAA truncations relative to the native variants was examined in plasma of 91 participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease and 69 participants without diabetes. Results The ratio of SAA 1.1 (missing N-terminal arginine) to native SAA 1.1 was lower in diabetics compared to non-diabetics (p = 0.004), and in males compared to females (p<0.001). This ratio was negatively correlated with glycated hemoglobin (r = −0.32, p<0.001) and triglyceride concentrations (r = −0.37, p<0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.32, p<0.001). Conclusion The relative abundance of the N-terminal arginine truncation of SAA1.1 is significantly decreased in diabetes and negatively correlates with measures of glycemic and lipid control. PMID:25607823

  3. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Type 2 diabetes and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Whitney, Erin; McCormick, Joseph B.; Crespo, Gonzalo; Smith, Brian; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Restrepo, Blanca I.

    2010-01-01

    The association between tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes is re-emerging with the epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We analyzed retrospective data from 2,878 TB patients across the Texas/Mexico border. Overall 161/2878 (5.6%) patients had MDR TB (resistance to rifampin and isoniazid): Texas 49/1442 (3.4%) and Mexico 112/1436 (7.8%). In Texas MDR TB was significantly associated with T2DM (OR 2.1 95% CI 1.1–4.2) when adjusted for age, gender, drug and alcohol abuse, HIV infection and history of previous episode of TB, and in Mexico (OR 1.80 95% CI 1.1–2.9) when adjusted for age and gender. Patients with T2DM were consistently more likely to be compliant with DOTS therapy (OR 2.4 95% CI 1.1–5.4) than patients without T2DM. In Texas, all but 3 of the T2DM patients with MDR TB were resistant at their first culture at the time of diagnosis. It is possible that impaired immunity in T2DM increases susceptibility to infection with resistant strains. PMID:18728934

  5. Early Life Factors and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinli; Ma, Huijie; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease, and its aetiology involves a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. In recent years, evidences from both human and animal experiments have correlated early life factors with programming diabetes risk in adult life. Fetal and neonatal period is crucial for organ development. Many maternal factors during pregnancy may increase the risk of diabetes of offsprings in later life, which include malnutrition, healthy (hyperglycemia and obesity), behavior (smoking, drinking, and junk food diet), hormone administration, and even stress. In neonates, catch-up growth, lactation, glucocorticoids administration, and stress have all been found to increase the risk of insulin resistance or T2DM. Unfavorable environments (socioeconomic situation and famine) or obesity also has long-term negative effects on children by causing increased susceptibility to T2DM in adults. We also address the potential mechanisms that may underlie the developmental programming of T2DM. Therefore, it might be possible to prevent or delay the risk for T2DM by improving pre- and/or postnatal factors. PMID:24455747

  6. Genetic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; Wang, X; Strizich, G; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem throughout the world and the epidemic is particularly severe in Asian countries. Compared with European populations, Asians tend to develop diabetes at a younger age and at much higher incidence rates given the same amount of weight gain. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with T2D. Although the majority of GWAS results were conducted in populations of European ancestry, recent GWAS in Asians have made important contributions to the identification of T2D susceptibility loci. These studies not only confirmed T2D susceptibility loci initially identified in European populations, but also identified novel susceptibility loci that provide new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases. In this article, we review GWAS results of T2D conducted in East and South Asians and compare them to those of European populations. Currently identified T2D genetic variants do not appear to explain the phenomenon that Asians are more susceptible to T2D than European populations, suggesting further studies in Asian populations are needed. PMID:27583258

  7. Physical exercise as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Stefano; Sacchetti, Massimo; Haxhi, Jonida; Orlando, Giorgio; D'Errico, Valeria; Fallucca, Sara; Menini, Stefano; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have highlighted the importance of physical activity (PA) for health, and recent evidence now points to the positive improvements associated with exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few physicians are willing to prescribe exercise as a therapy for diabetic patients. In addition, there is a lack of information on how to implement exercise therapy especially in long-term exercise regimens. The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize standards of exercise therapy for patients with T2DM, both in terms of prescribing and monitoring, according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We present details of the exercise therapies used in long-term studies, describing how the parameters for exercise prescription were applied in clinical practice. These parameters are described in terms of frequency, intensity, duration, mode and rate of progression in long-term therapeutic prescriptions. Individual responses to exercise dose are discussed, and critical issues to be considered in patients with underlying disease and in T2DM patients are highlighted.

  8. Cardiovascular control during exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel; Baldi, J Chris; Lamberts, Regis; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2015-01-01

    Controlled studies of male and female subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) of short duration (~3-5 years) show that DM reduces peak VO2 (L·min(-1) and mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) by an average of 12-15% and induces a greater slowing of the dynamic response of pulmonary VO2 during submaximal exercise. These effects occur in individuals less than 60 years of age but are reduced or absent in older males and are consistently associated with significant increases in the exercise pressor response despite normal resting blood pressure. This exaggerated pressor response, evidence of exertional hypertension in DM, is manifest during moderate submaximal exercise and coincides with a more constrained vasodilation in contracting muscles. Maximum vasodilation during contractions involving single muscle groups is reduced by DM, and the dynamic response of vasodilation during submaximal contractions is slowed. Such vascular constraint most likely contributes to exertional hypertension, impairs dynamic and peak VO2 responses, and reduces exercise tolerance. There is a need to establish the effect of DM on dynamic aspects of vascular control in skeletal muscle during whole-body exercise and to clarify contributions of altered cardiovascular control and increased arterial stiffness to exertional hypertension.

  9. DNA methylation in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Vanessa Derenji Ferreira; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lalli, Marianne; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms related to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other degenerative diseases at a molecular level, a better understanding of the changes in the chromatin structure and the corresponding functional changes in molecular pathways is still needed. For example, persons with low birth weight are at a high risk for development of T2D later in life, suggesting that the intrauterine environment contributes to the disease. One of the hypotheses is that epigenetic regulation, including changes in DNA methylation leading to modifications in chromatin structure, are behind metabolic alterations, e.g. leading to the phenomenon termed metabolic memory. Altered DNA methylation has been shown to affect healthy aging and also to promote age-related health problems. There is suggestive evidence that lifestyle changes including weight loss can have an impact on DNA methylation and consequently gene expression. In this review we provide an overview of human studies investigating DNA methylation in obesity and T2D and associated risk factors behind these diseases.

  10. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. Methods: We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond’s checklist for appraising the quality of studies. Results: The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. Conclusion: A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening. PMID:27390696

  11. Toe Pinch Force in Male Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Kitayama, Naomi; Murao, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    We compared the toe pinch force in men with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sixty-eight male T2DM patients and 35 apparently healthy men matched for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. We compared the toe pinch force between the subjects with and without T2DM, and we evaluated the effect of diabetic polyneuropathy on toe pinch force in the patients. The toe pinch force of the T2DM patients was significantly lower than that of the subjects without diabetes (3.12±1.22 kg vs. 4.40±1.19 kg, p<0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that T2DM was a determinant of reduced toe pinch force. In addition, the toe pinch force of patients with diabetic polyneuropathy was significantly lower than that of patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (2.31±0.93 kg vs. 3.70±1.07 kg, p<0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that diabetic polyneuropathy was a determinant of the toe pinch force in men with T2DM, even after adjusting for age, BMI, HbA1c, and duration of diabetes. Reduced toe pinch force is a fundamental feature of motor dysfunction in men with T2DM, and diabetic polyneuropathy might be associated with toe pinch force in these patients.

  12. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-05-27

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

  13. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  14. Epigenetic alterations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karachanak-Yankova, S; Dimova, R; Nikolova, D; Nesheva, D; Koprinarova, M; Maslyankov, S; Tafradjiska, R; Gateva, P; Velizarova, M; Hammoudeh, Z; Stoynev, N; Toncheva, D; Tankova, T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetic changes, in particular DNA methylation processes, play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) linking genetic and environmental factors. To clarify this role, we have analyzed in patients with different duration of T2DM: (i) expression levels of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as marker of DNA methylation, and ii) methylation changes in 22 genes connected to cellular stress and toxicity. We have analyzed MBD2 mRNA expression levels in16 patients and 12 controls and the methylation status of stress and toxicity genes in four DNA pools: (i) controls; (ii) newly-diagnosed T2DM patients; (iii) patients with T2DM duration of <5 years and (iv) of >5 years. The MBD2 expression levels were 10.4-times increased on average in T2DM patients compared to controls. Consistent increase in DNA methylation fraction with the increase in T2DM duration was observed in Prdx2 and SCARA3 genes, connected to oxidative stress protection and in BRCA1 and Tp53 tumor-suppressor genes. In conclusion, increased MBD2 expression in patients indicated general dysregulation of DNA methylation in T2DM. The elevated methylation of Prdx2 and SCARA3 genes suggests disturbance in oxidative stress protection in T2DM. The increased methylation of BRCA1 and Tp53 genes unraveled an epigenetic cause for T2DM related increase in cancer risk. PMID:27785392

  15. Serum irisin levels in new-onset type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Bae, Kwi Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Ae; Jeong, Ji-Yun; Lee, Won-Kee; Kim, Jung-Guk; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2013-04-01

    Irisin has been identified as a novel myokine that drives brown-fat-like conversion of white adipose tissue. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether serum irisin levels are decreased in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with control subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), and assessed the association between serum irisin levels and various metabolic parameters. The study population was selected from a population-based study and included 104 subjects with NGT and 104 subjects with new-onset T2D. Serum irisin and adiponectin levels and metabolic parameters were measured. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between irisin levels and newly diagnosed T2D. Serum irisin levels were significantly decreased in the new-onset T2D group compared with the NGT control group (p=0.003). In a multivariable model adjusted for various metabolic parameters, increased irisin levels were associated with reduced odds (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.88, p=0.006) of prevalent newly diagnosed T2D. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis showed that 2 h plasma glucose was an independent variable influencing serum irisin levels (p=0.004). In the present study, we found that serum irisin levels were decreased in T2D patients and inversely associated with newly diagnosed T2D, suggesting that irisin may play a crucial role in glucose intolerance and T2D. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Mestizos

    PubMed Central

    García-Chapa, Eiralí Guadalupe; Leal-Ugarte, Evelia; Peralta-Leal, Valeria; Durán-González, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    There are currently about 415 million people with diabetes worldwide, a figure likely to increase to 642 million by 2040. In 2015, Mexico was the second Latin American country and sixth in the world in prevalence of this disorder with nearly 11.5 million of patients. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the main kind of diabetes and its etiology is complex with environmental and genetic factors involved. Indeed, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with this disease worldwide. To estimate the genetic epidemiology of T2D in Mexican mestizos a systematic bibliographic search of published articles through PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science was conducted. Just case-control studies of candidate genes about T2D in Mexican mestizo inhabitants were included. Nineteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were found. In total, 68 polymorphisms of 41 genes were assessed; 26 of them were associated with T2D risk, which were located in ABCA1, ADRB3, CAPN10, CDC123/CAMK1D, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, CRP, ELMO1, FTO, HHEX, IGF2BP2, IRS1, JAZF1, KCNQ1, LOC387761, LTA, NXPH1, SIRT1, SLC30A8, TCF7L2, and TNF-α genes. Overall, 21 of the 41 analyzed genes were associated with T2D in Mexican mestizos. Such a genetic heterogeneity compares with findings in other ethnic groups. PMID:28607931

  17. Genetic Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes and Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Florez, Jose C.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2000, we have witnessed an explosion of known genetic determinants of type 2 diabetes risk. These findings have seeded the expectation that our ability to make personalized, predictive, therapeutic clinical decisions is imminent. However, the loci discovered to date explain only a small fraction of overall inheritable risk for this disease. In many cases, the reported associations merely signal regions of the genome that are overrepresented in disease versus health but do not identify the causal variants. Well-powered cohort studies have shown that the set of markers detected thus far does not significantly improve individual risk prediction or stratification over common clinical variables, with the possible exception of younger subjects. On the other hand, risk genotypes may help target subgroups for more intensive surveillance or prevention efforts, although whether such a strategy improves patient outcomes and/or is cost-effective should be examined. Similarly, whether genetic information will help guide therapeutic decisions must be tested in adequately designed and rigorously conducted clinical trials. PMID:20144315

  18. Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C

    2009-07-01

    Since 2000, we have witnessed an explosion of known genetic determinants of type 2 diabetes risk. These findings have seeded the expectation that our ability to make personalized, predictive, therapeutic clinical decisions is imminent. However, the loci discovered to date explain only a small fraction of overall inheritable risk for this disease. In many cases, the reported associations merely signal regions of the genome that are overrepresented in disease versus health but do not identify the causal variants. Well-powered cohort studies have shown that the set of markers detected thus far does not significantly improve individual risk prediction or stratification over common clinical variables, with the possible exception of younger subjects. On the other hand, risk genotypes may help target subgroups for more intensive surveillance or prevention efforts, although whether such a strategy improves patient outcomes and/or is cost-effective should be examined. Similarly, whether genetic information will help guide therapeutic decisions must be tested in adequately designed and rigorously conducted clinical trials. Copyright 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  20. Use of traditional medicine among type 2 diabetic Libyans.

    PubMed

    Ashur, Sana Taher; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Bosseri, Soad; Shamsuddin, Khadijah

    2017-07-16

    The use of traditional medicines is common among patients with chronic illnesses and this practice might pose health risks. The use among Libyan patients with diabetes is unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate the prevalence of traditional medicine use in the previous year among Libyans with type 2 diabetes and to examine the association between its use and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a large diabetes centre in Tripoli. A self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. Of the 523 respondents, 28.9% used traditional remedies. Sex was the only variable significantly associated with traditional medicine use; more women used traditional medicines (P = 0.01). A total of 77 traditional medicine items were reported to be used, of which herbs were the most common. The use of traditional medicine for diabetes is prevalent and some of the reported items could pose health risks. Health education programmes are suggested to raise the awareness of the health risks of this practice.

  1. Renal AA Amyloidosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Ramón; Madero, Magdalena; Gamba, Gerardo; Soriano, Juan; Soto, Virgilia

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and a major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Inflammation is closely involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM, and reactive amyloidosis occurs in the presence of chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that patients with T2DM may have a higher prevalence of renal AA amyloidosis (RAAA) and that this could contribute to worse atherosclerosis and CVD. Materials and Methods We analyzed 330 autopsy kidneys from patients with a previous T2DM diagnosis. The kidney tissue was evaluated in order to determine the presence of diabetic nephropathy and RAAA, and systemic vessels were evaluated for the presence of atherosclerosis. Results RAAA was detected in 9% of our study population and was associated with an increased risk for nodular sclerosis [OR (95% CI)] [11 (2.04-59.16)], for chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy [4.59 (2.02-10.42)], for myocardial infarction [3.41 (1.52-7.64)] as well as for aortic [4.75 (1.09-20.69)], coronary [3.22 (1.47-7.04)], and intrarenal atherosclerosis [3.84 (1.46-10.09)]. Conclusions RAAA is prevalent in T2DM and is associated with worse CVD and renal disease, likely because RAAA is a marker of severe chronic inflammation. PMID:25337080

  2. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly - some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D.

  3. [Foot ulceration risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bustos-Saldaña, Rafael; Prieto-Miranda, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factor prevalence for development of foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2). A cross sectional study, of 2067 patients with DM2 from seven primary care units was conducted. A questionnaire exploring age, sex, occupation, time from diabetes mellitus diagnosis (DMD), and data concerning neuropathy, vascular changes, and presence of infections, anthropometry, and gait was applied. We found mean age, 59.96 +/- 11.47 years and time from DMD, 10.2 +/- 8.09 years. From 1360 women, 65.8 % presented the following risk factors: age, 34.7 %; schooling, 49.5 %; time from DMD, 38.8 %; occupation, 20 %; smoking, 24.3 %; alcoholism, 4.6 %; fasting glucose disturbance, 78 %; ulcer history, 10 %. In relation to associated diseases, 67.5 % of patients had one or more antecedent. The presence of risk factors in the sample was 9.716 +/- 2.52, of which 6.259 +/- 1.59 were modifiable. Patients studied presented high risk factor prevalence for development of foot ulcer. The majority of RF is potentially modifiable by adjusting patients' customs and habits.

  4. Glyoxylate, a New Marker Metabolite of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforova, Victoria J.; Giesbertz, Pieter; Wiemer, Jan; Bethan, Bianca; Looser, Ralf; Liebenberg, Volker; Ruiz Noppinger, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore; Rein, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by a variety of metabolic impairments that are closely linked to nonenzymatic glycation reactions of proteins and peptides resulting in advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Reactive aldehydes derived from sugars play an important role in the generation of AGEs. Using metabolite profiling to characterize human plasma from diabetic versus nondiabetic subjects we observed in a recent study that the reactive aldehyde glyoxylate was increased before high levels of plasma glucose, typical for a diabetic condition, could be measured. Following this observation, we explored the relevance of increased glyoxylate in diabetic subjects and in diabetic C57BLKS/J-Leprdb/db−/− mice in the pathophysiology of diabetes. A retrospective study using samples of long-term blood donors revealed that glyoxylate levels unlike glucose levels became significantly elevated up to 3 years prior to diabetes diagnosis (difference to control P = 0.034). Elevated glyoxylate levels impact on newly identified mechanisms linking hyperglycemia and AGE production with diabetes-associated complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Glyoxylate in its metabolic network may serve as an early marker in diabetes diagnosis with predictive qualities for associated complications and as potential to guide the development of new antidiabetic therapies. PMID:25525609

  5. Bipolar disorders, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the brain.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Tomas; McIntyre, Roger; Alda, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) negatively affects brain structure and function. Meta-analytical data show that relative to age and sex matched non-psychiatric controls, patients with bipolar disorders have double the risk of T2DM. We review the evidence for association between T2DM and adverse clinical and brain imaging changes in bipolar disorders and summarize studies investigating effects of diabetes treatment on psychiatric and brain outcomes. Participants with bipolar disorders and T2DM or insulin resistance demonstrate greater morbidity, chronicity and disability, and lower treatment response to Li. Bipolar disorders complicated by insulin resistance/T2DM are associated with smaller hippocampal and cortical gray matter volumes and lower prefrontal N-acetyl aspartate (neuronal marker). Treatment of T2DM yields preservation of brain gray matter and insulin sensitizers, such as pioglitazone, improve symptoms of depression in unipolar or bipolar disorders. T2DM or insulin resistance frequently cooccur with bipolar disorders and are associated with negative psychiatric clinical outcomes and compromised brain health. This is clinically concerning, as patients with bipolar disorders have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome and yet often receive suboptimal medical care. At the same time treatment of T2DM and insulin resistance has positive effects on psychiatric and brain outcomes. These findings create a rich agenda for future research, which could enhance psychiatric pharmacopeia and directly impact patient care.

  6. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus: is it feasible?

    PubMed

    Palermo, Andrea; Maggi, Daria; Maurizi, Anna Rita; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2014-03-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires the implementation of preventive strategies to halt this trend, tailored to the specific needs of individual regions. Risk factors for T2DM are among the main targets for improving health outcomes and curbing the development of diabetes; excessive weight and obesity are two of the most important risk factors that need to be addressed. A growing body of evidence suggests that subjects with pre-diabetes who lose body weight and increase physical activity can delay or prevent the onset of T2DM, and in some cases, blood glucose levels may return to normal. Several studies have shown that moderate to intensive levels of exercise are effective in reducing both intra-abdominal and total adiposity among obese subjects, both improving cardiovascular risk profile and reducing the risk of T2DM development. These consistent observations have given rise to large-scale randomized controlled trials that use lifestyle intervention (including behavioural strategies for the reinforcement of prescribed changes in nutritional intake, physical activity or both), with or without pharmacological treatment, in populations at high risk of developing T2DM. In this review, large-scale national trials that have focused on the prevention of T2DM are critically evaluated.

  7. Early life factors and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinli; Ma, Huijie; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease, and its aetiology involves a complex interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. In recent years, evidences from both human and animal experiments have correlated early life factors with programming diabetes risk in adult life. Fetal and neonatal period is crucial for organ development. Many maternal factors during pregnancy may increase the risk of diabetes of offsprings in later life, which include malnutrition, healthy (hyperglycemia and obesity), behavior (smoking, drinking, and junk food diet), hormone administration, and even stress. In neonates, catch-up growth, lactation, glucocorticoids administration, and stress have all been found to increase the risk of insulin resistance or T2DM. Unfavorable environments (socioeconomic situation and famine) or obesity also has long-term negative effects on children by causing increased susceptibility to T2DM in adults. We also address the potential mechanisms that may underlie the developmental programming of T2DM. Therefore, it might be possible to prevent or delay the risk for T2DM by improving pre- and/or postnatal factors.

  8. Genetic Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    García-Chapa, Eiralí Guadalupe; Leal-Ugarte, Evelia; Peralta-Leal, Valeria; Durán-González, Jorge; Meza-Espinoza, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    There are currently about 415 million people with diabetes worldwide, a figure likely to increase to 642 million by 2040. In 2015, Mexico was the second Latin American country and sixth in the world in prevalence of this disorder with nearly 11.5 million of patients. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the main kind of diabetes and its etiology is complex with environmental and genetic factors involved. Indeed, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with this disease worldwide. To estimate the genetic epidemiology of T2D in Mexican mestizos a systematic bibliographic search of published articles through PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science was conducted. Just case-control studies of candidate genes about T2D in Mexican mestizo inhabitants were included. Nineteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were found. In total, 68 polymorphisms of 41 genes were assessed; 26 of them were associated with T2D risk, which were located in ABCA1, ADRB3, CAPN10, CDC123/CAMK1D, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, CRP, ELMO1, FTO, HHEX, IGF2BP2, IRS1, JAZF1, KCNQ1, LOC387761, LTA, NXPH1, SIRT1, SLC30A8, TCF7L2, and TNF-α genes. Overall, 21 of the 41 analyzed genes were associated with T2D in Mexican mestizos. Such a genetic heterogeneity compares with findings in other ethnic groups.

  9. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 1 All About Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease What does prediabetes have to do with type ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No. 1: All About Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, ...

  10. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Matthew J; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V; Imai, Yumi

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45(+) leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c(+) cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction.

  11. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Matthew J.; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V.; Imai, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Methods Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Results Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45+ leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c+ cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Conclusions/interpretation Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction. PMID:24429578

  12. Cost of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chan, B S W; Tsang, M W; Lee, V W Y; Lee, K K C

    2007-08-01

    Hong Kong (HK) is a special administrative region of China as well as being a metropolitan city. In HK, like in many developed countries, Diabetes mellitus, with over 97% of diabetic patients having Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM), is a growing public health problem but the local financial burden has never been investigated. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate from the social perspective the costs of Type 2 DM, to identify the major cost drivers, and the proportion of the burden shared by the government, patient and the society. The study was carried out in a group of Hong Kong Chinese patients attending a government hospital. The economic impact of Type 2 DM on local and governmental healthcare expenditure was also examined. A retrospective cohort observational study was conducted in Type 2 DM patients attending the Diabetes Mellitus Outpatient Clinic at a public hospital in the period January 2004 to May 2004, in which 204 patients were randomly selected and invited to join this study. A total of 147 patients were subsequently enrolled giving an inclusion rate of 72%. Annual total cost of Type 2 DM in a patient was US$ 1,725 +/- 2,044 (HK$ 13,457 +/- 15,943) with direct costs accounting for > 87.9%. The government was the major payer with over 78.4% of the total costs. Annual total direct medical costs per patient were US$ 1,492 +/- 1,716 (HK$ 11,638 +/- 13,386) of which the government paid 90.6%. Direct medical costs increased markedly if complications were present. In patients with microvascular or macrovascular complications only, the costs increased 1.1-fold compared to those for patients without complications. If both microvascular and macrovascular complications were present in the same patient, the costs were 1.3-fold higher than in patients without complications. Costs of Type 2 DM have a significant impact on the local healthcare budget. It contributed in 2004 up to 3.9% of the total HK healthcare expenditure and 6.4% of the HK

  13. Nepalese patients’ perceptions of treatment modalities for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Perceptions and beliefs about treatment can influence patients’ adherence to treatment regimens. Perceptions, in turn, are often shaped by patients’ sociocultural context. Nepal and the Nepalese have unique sociocultural traditions and beliefs, and their perceptions of diabetes treatment remain largely unexplored. This study explored Nepalese participants’ perceptions of diabetes treatment, and whether perceptions differed between the Nepalese living in Australia and Nepal. Methods Face-to-face qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with Nepalese participants with type 2 diabetes in Sydney and Kathmandu. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Perceptions of diabetes treatment were similar among Nepalese participants in Australia and Nepal. There was a general reluctance to start oral antidiabetic medications and an even greater reluctance to commence parenteral (insulin) therapy. Participants preferred to try lifestyle modifications and alternative treatments such as herbs and “traditional” medicines, particularly as a first step. Unwillingness to take medications was primarily associated with the belief that, once started, these medications needed to be taken for life, and perceptions of long-term harms caused by such medications. Even when commenced on medication, participants were averse to any type of therapy escalation, for example, moving to insulin therapy. Insulin was perceived as the “last option” available for diabetes treatment. Most participants, however, did not find medication taking challenging once they had commenced treatment. Conclusion Antidiabetic medications were perceived to be harmful and unstoppable once initiated. These perceptions significantly impacted participants’ willingness to commence antidiabetic medications and therefore have the potential to adversely affect their medication-taking behavior. This study therefore highlights the need to explore

  14. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  15. Psychological Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sujeet; Panda, Manju; Kumar, Surya; Gupta, Rekha; Neemani, Archana; Jacob, Jenu; Thomas, Nisha M; James, Archana; Waghdhare, Swati; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors associated with psychological insulin resistance (PIR) in Indian type 2 diabetes (T2DM) population. Patients with T2DM, aged 18 years, undergoing treatment with oral hypoglycaemic agents and providing written informed consent were considered eligible for the study. Patient's data was collected by face-to-face interaction using 5 validated diabetes questionnaires--Diabetes Attitude Scale, Diabetes Knowledge Test, Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale, Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey-29, and Barriers to Insulin Treatment scale. Demographic variables, categories of patients based on their annual family income, education, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), occupation and type of healthcare setup were correlated with overall scores of validated questionnaires. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson correlation coefficients, analysis of variance, two-group t-test and hierarchical multiple regression. One hundred ninty-eight patients with T2DM were enrolled where 63% were males, 52% had HbA1c <7% (<53 mmol/mol), 32% were in service, 35% had the annual family income between Rs 100,000-500,000, 50% were graduates and 81% were enrolled from private healthcare set ups. Significant high opposition to use insulin was observed in females, patients based at home, patients with insufficient education, and patients visiting government set-ups compared to males, service-class patients, graduates, and patients approaching private set-ups, respectively. In India, major factors contributing to PIR were fear of injection or fear of pain during injection, fear of hypoglycemia, social stigma and lack of education. Effective interpersonal interactions with healthcare providers could help to counteract PIR, especially in patients who are not sufficiently literate highlighting the need of skilled healthcare staffs in Indian public hospitals.

  16. Color space distortions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Santana, Claudia; Oiwa, Nestor N; Paramei, Galina V; Bimler, David; Costa, Marcelo F; Lago, Marcos; Nishi, Mauro; Ventura, Dora F

    2006-01-01

    Color vision impairment was examined in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) without retinopathy. We assessed the type and degree of distortions of individual color spaces. DM2 patients (n = 32), and age-matched controls (n = 20) were tested using the Farnsworth D-15 and the Lanthony D-15d tests. In addition, subsets of caps from both tests were employed in a triadic procedure (Bimler & Kirkland, 2004). Matrices of inter-cap subjective dissimilarities were estimated from each subject's "odd-one-out" choices, and processed using non-metric multidimensional scaling. Two-dimensional color spaces, individual and group (DM2 patients; controls), were reconstructed, with the axes interpreted as the R/G and B/Y perceptual opponent systems. Compared to controls, patient results were not significant for the D-15 and D-15d. In contrast, in the triadic procedure the residual distances were significantly different compared to controls: right eye, P = 0.021, and left eye, P = 0.022. Color space configurations for the DM2 patients were compressed along the B/Y and R/G dimensions. The present findings agree with earlier studies demonstrating diffuse losses in early stages of DM2. The proposed method of testing uses color spaces to represent discrimination and provides more differentiated quantitative diagnosis, which may be interpreted as the perceptual color system affected. In addition, it enables the detection of very mild color vision impairment that is not captured by the D-15d test. Along with fundoscopy, individual color spaces may serve for monitoring early functional changes and thereby to support a treatment strategy.

  17. Parasitic helminths and their beneficial impact on type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berbudi, Afiat; Ajendra, Jesuthas; Wardani, Ajeng P F; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2035 almost 600 million people will suffer from diabetes. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the strongest increase of diabetes incidence occurs in developing and newly industrialized countries. This increase correlates not only with a progressing sedentary lifestyle and nutritional changes, but also environmental changes. Similarly, the increase of type 1 diabetes incidence in industrialized countries over the past decades cannot be explained by genetic factors alone, suggesting that environmental changes are also involved. One such environmental change is a reduced exposure to pathogens because of improved hygiene. Parasitic helminths modulate the immune system of their hosts and induce type 2 as well as regulatory immune responses. As pro-inflammatory immune responses are crucial for the onset of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, helminth-induced immunomodulation may prevent diabetes onset and ameliorate insulin sensitivity. Several epidemiological studies in human and experimental animal models support such a protective effect of helminths for autoimmune diabetes. Recent studies further suggest that helminths may also provide such a beneficial effect for type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize studies that investigated parasitic helminths and helminth-derived products and their impact on both type 1 and type 2 diabetes highlighting potential protective mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Consensus Report: Current Status, Challenges, and Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Kristen J.; Anderson, Barbara J.; Berg, Erika G.; Chiang, Jane L.; Chou, Hubert; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Hannon, Tamara S.; Huang, Terry T.-K.; Lynch, Jane L.; Powell, Jeff; Sellers, Elizabeth; Tamborlane, William V.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant and increasing burden in adolescents and young adults. Clear strategies for research, prevention, and treatment of the disease in these vulnerable patients are needed. Evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes in children is different not only from type 1 but also from type 2 diabetes in adults. Understanding the unique pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in youth, as well as the risk of complications and the psychosocial impact, will enable industry, academia, funding agencies, advocacy groups, and regulators to collectively evaluate both current and future research, treatment, and prevention approaches. This Consensus Report characterizes type 2 diabetes in children, evaluates the fundamental differences between childhood and adult disease, describes the current therapeutic options, and discusses challenges to and approaches for developing new treatments. PMID:27486237

  19. Bay Leaves Improve Glucose and Lipid Profile of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bay leaves (Laurus nobilis) have been shown to improve insulin function in vitro but the effects on people have not been determined. The objective of this study was to determine if bay leaves may be important in the prevention and/or alleviation of type 2 diabetes. Forty people with type 2 diabet...

  20. Pregnancy outcomes in youth with type 2 diabetes: The TODAY Study experience

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes, maternal and fetal/neonatal, during the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. The TODAY study was a randomized controlled trial comparing three treatment options for youth with type 2 diabetes. Informed consent included the req...

  1. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  2. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI <25 kg/m(2)); obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type