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Sample records for af type 2-diabetes

  1. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... which there is a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is the ... stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored ...

  2. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  3. Pomegranate and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem; Swedan, Samer; Alguraan, Ziyad

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade, various studies have linked pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn), a fruit native to the Middle East, with type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. This review focuses on current laboratory and clinical research related to the effects of pomegranate fractions (peels, flowers, and seeds) and some of their active components on biochemical and metabolic variables associated with the pathologic markers of type 2 diabetes. This review systematically presents findings from cell culture and animal studies as well as clinical human research. One key mechanism by which pomegranate fractions affect the type 2 diabetic condition is by reducing oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. This reduction may occur by directly neutralizing the generated reactive oxygen species, increasing certain antioxidant enzyme activities, inducing metal chelation activity, reducing resistin formation, and inhibiting or activating certain transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased significantly by punicic acid, methanolic seed extract, and pomegranate peel extract. Known compounds in pomegranate, such as punicalagin and ellagic, gallic, oleanolic, ursolic, and uallic acids, have been identified as having anti-diabetic actions. Furthermore, the juice sugar fraction was found to have unique antioxidant polyphenols (tannins and anthocyanins), which could be beneficial to control conditions in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the anti-diabetic activity of pomegranate fruit; however, before pomegranate or any of its extracts can be medically recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, controlled, clinical studies, are needed. PMID:23684435

  4. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept. PMID:27052246

  5. Dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a cluster of lipid abnormalities:elevated plasma triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smaller and denser low-density lipoproteins,which have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance may contribute to dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes by increasing hepatic secretion of large,triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoprotein particles and by impairing the clearance of lipoprotein particles from plasma. Lifestyle interventions may be effective in improving the diabetic dyslipidemia syndrome. For patients who do not respond to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapies (lipid-lowering medications and anti-diabetic agents) are available. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of such pharmaceutics to treat diabetic dyslipidemia concomitantly reduces the risk of coronary artery disease.

  6. Research updates on type 2 diabetes children.

    PubMed

    Linder, Barbara; Imperatore, Giuseppina

    2013-05-01

    Major research trials have provided insight into the scope of type 2 diabetes in youth. The National Diabetes Education Program offers resources to help school nurses support children with or at risk for type 2 diabetes.

  7. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... called metabolic syndrome. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes. ... 95th percentile, a person is considered overweight; and obesity occurs when BMI is greater than the 95th ...

  8. Genetics of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of interaction between environmental factors and a strong hereditary component. We review the heritability of T2D as well as the history of genetic and genomic research in this area. Very few T2D risk genes were identified using candidate gene and linkage-based studies, but the advent of genome-wide association studies has led to the identification of multiple genes, including several that were not previously known to play any role in T2D. Highly replicated genes, for example TCF7L2, KCNQ1 and KCNJ11, are discussed in greater detail. Taken together, the genetic loci discovered to date explain only a small proportion of the observed heritability. We discuss possible explanations for this “missing heritability”, including the role of rare variants, gene-environment interactions and epigenetics. The clinical utility of current findings and avenues of future research are also discussed. PMID:23961321

  9. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  10. [Chronic nicotinamide overload and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Sun, Wu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Xing; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2010-02-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a major global health problem. It is generally accepted that type 2 diabetes is the result of gene-environmental interaction. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction is unclear. Diet change is known to play an important role in type 2 diabetes. The fact that the global high prevalence of type 2 diabetes has occurred following the spread of food fortification worldwide suggests a possible involvement of excess niacin intake. Our recent study found that nicotinamide overload and low nicotinamide detoxification may induce oxidative stress associated with insulin resistance. Based on the relevant facts, this review briefly summarized the relationship between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the nicotinamide metabolism changes induced by excess niacin intake, aldehyde oxidase inhibitors, liver diseases and functional defects of skin. We speculate that the gene-environmental interaction in type 2 diabetes may be a reflection of the outcome of the association of chronic nicotinamide overload-induced toxicity and the relatively low detoxification/excretion capacity of the body. Reducing the content of niacin in foods may be a promising strategy for the control of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Pedal Away from Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... biking late in life, Danish researchers said. "Because cycling can be included in everyday activities, it may ... diabetes. And, the more time the participants spent cycling, the lower their risk for type 2 diabetes, ...

  12. [Acatalasemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz; Káplár, Miklós

    2015-03-01

    The catalase enzyme decomposes the toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. Hydrogen peroxide is a highly reactive small molecule and its excessive concentration may cause significant damages to proteins, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and lipids. Acatalasemia refers to inherited deficiency of the catalase enzyme. In this review the authors discuss the possible role of the human catalase enzyme, the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide, and the phenomenon of hydrogen peroxide paradox. In addition, they review data obtained from Hungarian acatalasemic patients indicating an increased frequency of type 2 diabetes mellitus, especially in female patients, and an early onset of type 2 diabetes in these patients. There are 10 catalase gene variants which appear to be responsible for decreased blood catalase activity in acatalasemic patients with type 2 diabetes. It is assumed that low levels of blood catalase may cause an increased concentration of hydrogen peroxide which may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25726767

  13. [Acatalasemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz; Káplár, Miklós

    2015-03-01

    The catalase enzyme decomposes the toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. Hydrogen peroxide is a highly reactive small molecule and its excessive concentration may cause significant damages to proteins, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and lipids. Acatalasemia refers to inherited deficiency of the catalase enzyme. In this review the authors discuss the possible role of the human catalase enzyme, the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide, and the phenomenon of hydrogen peroxide paradox. In addition, they review data obtained from Hungarian acatalasemic patients indicating an increased frequency of type 2 diabetes mellitus, especially in female patients, and an early onset of type 2 diabetes in these patients. There are 10 catalase gene variants which appear to be responsible for decreased blood catalase activity in acatalasemic patients with type 2 diabetes. It is assumed that low levels of blood catalase may cause an increased concentration of hydrogen peroxide which may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations. PMID:26530207

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  16. Conceptualizing type 2 diabetes and its management.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Wu, Jianhong; An, Aijun; Wong, Hannah J; An, Xiandong; Mei, Zhen; Hains, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is growing worldwide due to population growth, increased rates of obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Risk assessment methods can effectively evaluate the risk of diabetes, and a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce risk or prevent complications of type 2 diabetes. However, risk assessment alone has not significantly improved poor adherence to recommended medical interventions and lifestyle changes. This paper focuses on the challenge of nonadherence and posits that improving adherence requires tailoring interventions that explicitly consider the social determinants of health. PMID:27099510

  17. [Surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Muciño-Bermejo, María Jimena

    2014-01-01

    Sustained remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and significantly improved hyperlipidemia and arterial hypertension, control has been achieves in both lean and obese patient after bariatric surgery procedures or other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in these patients derives not only in reducing weight and caloric intake, but also endocrine changes resulting from surgical manifestation gastrointestinal tract. In this article we review the clinical outcomes of such interventions (collectively called "metabolic surgery") and the perspectives on the role that these surgeries play in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  19. [Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Dores, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a growing prevalent disease, usually symptomless, with devastating chronic complications for the individual, family and society. Its progressive nature leads to the dose escalating and the association of different drugs which will rapidly become insufficient to achieve the glycemic goals established individually. Insulin is the most effective drug to control diabetes but there is frequently a silent contract to resist to its implementation between the healthcare team and people with type 2 diabetes. This publication aims to share information about this therapeutic option, eliminating old myths and giving an understandable teaching about all the process of insulin therapy centered on the person with type 2 diabetes. Sharing knowledge with different groups of healthcare professionals regarding the glycemic goals and how to reach them with distinct kinds of available insulins, will allow the release by multiprofessional teams of a homogeneous and non contradictory information to the people with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, a good engagement between physicians and nurse educators in the same team is the cornerstone to the initiation and intensification of insulin therapy. The decision of starting insulin therapy is not the end of the process. The progressive nature of the disease compels to empower the patient to adjust its dose of insulin according to the self monitoring blood glucose data and to realize that the decision of a single therapeutic scheme is not definitive, being adapted upon the clinical condition of the person along the diabetes evolution.

  20. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the body can't use glucose for energy properly. previous continue Complications of Diabetes Sometimes, kids and teens with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, or obesity might develop thick, dark, velvet-like skin around the neck, armpits, groin, ...

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... be able to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by cutting calories and increasing your physical activity to lose a modest amount of weight. A major study of people with pre-diabetes showed that lifestyle changes leading to a 5- ...

  2. [Smoking, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Magis, D; Geronooz, I; Scheen, A J

    2002-09-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is associated with endothelial dysfunction and lipid disorders similar to those found in the insulin resistance syndrome. Studies have thus tried to demonstrate a relationship between smoking and insulin resistance, and between smoking and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Even if their results may sometimes differ, smoking does seem to be associated with an impaired insulin sensitivity that is proportional to tobacco consumption. Nicotine replacement therapies seem also to generate a certain, though lower, degree of insulin resistance. If there is no major weight gain after smoking cessation, the latter is accompanied by a progressive return to normal insulin sensitivity. Several large epidemiological studies recently demonstrated that smoking could increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a relative risk between 1.5 and 3.0. Finally, among type 2 diabetic patients, smoking has a harmful effect on metabolic control and long-term complications of the disease, at least partially by increasing the components of the insulin resistance syndrome. All these observations represent further argument to promote smoking cessation in the general population, and more particularly in individuals at risk to develop type 2 diabetes, as well as in the diabetic population. PMID:12440345

  3. [Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Hinneburg, Iris

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is one of the main risk factors for developing impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the youth. The patients are at high risk for cardiovascular complications. Yet, meeting therapeutical goals is hard to achieve in many children and adolescents.

  4. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  5. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  6. Insulin release in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Efendic, S; Khan, A; Ostenson, C G

    1994-01-01

    Impaired insulin response is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Overt diabetes develops when beta-cells fail to release enough insulin to compensate for decreased insulin sensitivity. However, a subgroup of normal weight patients demonstrates a pronounced beta-cell secretory defect and a normal insulin sensitivity. The molecular basis behind the impaired insulin response in Type 2 diabetes is not clear. Our studies in two animal models of this disease (GK rat and ob/ob mouse) suggest that an impaired glucose metabolism may be a primary defect in the stimulus-secretion coupling in the beta-cells in Type 2 diabetes. In the GK rat, three major alterations in the islet metabolism of glucose have been demonstrated: 1) increased glucose utilization but unchanged glucose oxidation; 2) increased glucose cycling and 3) decreased activity of the glycerol phosphate shuttle. In ob/ob animals we have found an increased rate of glucose cycling. These derangements might result in an incomplete closure of ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels with a decreased insulin response as a consequence.

  7. Prevention of type 2 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Claussen, B; Ramachandran, A; Williams, R

    2007-06-01

    One of the major public health challenges of the 21st century is type 2 diabetes. WHO estimates that by 2025 as many as 200-300 million people worldwide will have developed the disease. A distressing increase in children is perhaps the most alarming sign of something going wrong. Roughly half of the risk of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to environmental exposure and the other half to genetics. Central themes for prevention are the risk factors overweight, sedentary lifestyle, certain dietary components and perinatal factors. Overweight is the most critical risk factor, and should be targeted for prevention of type 2 diabetes especially among children and youths. Ethnicity and perinatal factors are also worth considering. Today we know that prevention helps. In the US Diabetes Prevention Programme for high risk individuals, there was a 58% relative reduction in the progression to diabetes in the lifestyle group compared with the controls. Within the lifestyle group, 50% achieved the goal of more than 7% weight reduction, and 74% maintained at least 150 min of moderately intense activity each week. This review discusses different forms of prevention, and proposes first of all to target people with Impaired Glucose Tolerance with increasing activity and altering dietary factors. And secondly, population-based measures to encourage increased physical activity and decreased consumption of energy-dense foods are important, and may target school children and young people, certain ethnic groups and women with gestational diabetes.

  8. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bowden, Donald W; Collins, Francis S; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C; Spector, Timothy D; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L; Wilson, James G; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M; Meigs, James B; Cox, Nancy J; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P; Mohlke, Karen L; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C; Scott, Laura J; Morris, Andrew P; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes.

  9. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M; Mahajan, Anubha; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J; Ma, Clement; Fontanillas, Pierre; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J; Rivas, Manuel A; Perry, John R B; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W; Robertson, Neil R; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E; Fernandez Tajes, Juan; Highland, Heather M; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M; Gamazon, Eric R; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A; Below, Jennifer E; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C J; Varga, Tibor V; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Balkau, Beverley; Stancáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D; Neale, Benjamin M; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K L; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H T; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E; Rybin, Denis; Farook, Vidya S; Fowler, Sharon P; Freedman, Barry I; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A; Doney, Alex S F; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R; Chan, Juliana C N; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Lehman, Donna M; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; Pollin, Toni I; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J F; Small, Kerrin S; Ried, Janina S; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R; Gloyn, Anna L; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bowden, Donald W; Collins, Francis S; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C; Spector, Timothy D; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L; Wilson, James G; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M; Meigs, James B; Cox, Nancy J; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S; Gabriel, Stacey; Burtt, Noël P; Mohlke, Karen L; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Florez, Jose C; Scott, Laura J; Morris, Andrew P; Kang, Hyun Min; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of this disease. Here, to test the hypothesis that lower-frequency variants explain much of the remainder, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia performed whole-genome sequencing in 2,657 European individuals with and without diabetes, and exome sequencing in 12,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:27398621

  10. Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Augustin, Livia S A; Ludwig, David S; Barnard, Neal D; Anderson, James W

    2003-09-01

    Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  11. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    In the UK, diabetes mellitus affects around 3 million people, of whom over 90% have type 2 diabetes. Aims of treatment include minimising long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, blindness, chronic kidney disease, premature mortality) and avoiding unwanted effects of treatment (e.g. severe hypoglycaemia, weight gain). Management of diabetes includes patient support and education; addressing symptoms; lifestyle modification; targeting associated risk factors for cardiovascular disease; and surveillance for, and management of, complications including treatment-related hypoglycaemia. Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) belongs to a new class of oral glucose-lowering drugs that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glycosuria. It is licensed in the UK in adults with type 2 diabetes as monotherapy when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control and who are unable to tolerate metformin; or, as add-on therapy, with other glucose-lowering agents including insulin, when these, with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycaemic control. The company's advertising materials claim that dapagliflozin provides a "novel method of controlling excess glucose" with "secondary benefit of weight loss". Here, we review the evidence for the use of dapagliflozin in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24030968

  12. [Intestinal microflora, obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Maleev, V V; Likhoded, V G

    2014-01-01

    The review of data of the literature on a role of intestinal microflora, genetic features of a macroorganism, exogenic factors and character of a food is presented at obesity and a type 2 diabetes. Researches establish, that development in experimental animals of the induced obesity and the type 2 diabetes, depends on a diet and presence of intestinal microflora. The factors increasing permeability mucous intestines, promote a translocation of intestinal automicroflora and its toxins into macroorganism and a system blood-circulation. Long introduction LPS (endotoxin) of gram-negative bacteria to the special laboratory animals led to development of inflammatory reaction, adiposity and resistance to insulin. The specified phenomena did not develop at LPS introduction to the animals, who have lost receptor CD14 which is necessary for linkage and endotoxin action. Data about change of intestinal microflora and a role of immune infringements are discussed at obesity and the type 2 diabetes occurring into background of low-grade chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders.

  13. Saxagliptin: A Review in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sohita

    2015-10-01

    Saxagliptin (Onglyza(®)) is a highly potent, reversible, competitive dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Numerous well-designed clinical studies and their extensions showed that saxagliptin as monotherapy or as dual or triple combination therapy with other antihyperglycaemics improved glycaemic control and was generally well tolerated in patients with type 2 diabetes during ≤2 years' therapy. Saxagliptin was generally weight-neutral and had a low risk of hypoglycaemia (unless coadministered with agents that may be associated with hypoglycaemia, such as sulfonylureas or insulin). In addition, at a median follow-up of 2.1 years in the large SAVOR-TIMI 53 study, with the exception of a 27 % greater risk of hospitalization for heart failure, the addition of saxagliptin to standard of care neither reduced nor increased the rate of ischemic cardiovascular events in at-risk patients. Although further long-term data will be beneficial, current evidence indicates that saxagliptin is a useful option for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26403305

  14. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Small Steps, Big Rewards": Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Fall ... These are the plain facts in "Small Steps. Big Rewards: Prevent Type 2 Diabetes," an education campaign ...

  15. "Small Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Steps, Big Rewards": You Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents For ... million Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes." "Fifty four million Americans are at risk for ...

  16. Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  17. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  18. [Type 2 diabetes: what therapeutic strategy?].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Hartemann-Heurtier, A

    2001-02-17

    GOAL OF TREATMENT: Prevention of diabetic micro and macroangiopathy is the goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A well-controlled glucose level is the key to prevention of microangiopathy; there is no threshold level. Antihypertensive treatment, with the goal of blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg is also beneficial in preventing aggravation of microangiopathy. For macroangiopathy, prevention is based in priority on treatment of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the threshold level for drug treatment and the therapeutic objective are those defined for secondary prevention in non-diabetic patients, i.e. blood pressure below 140/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol under 1.30 g/l. The beneficial effect of lower glucose levels on preventing macrovascular risk was not formally demonstrated by the UKPDS, probably because the difference between the control and the treatment group HbA1c levels was minimal, 0.9 points. REVISITING STRATEGY: It is thus time to revisit the preventive strategy for type 2 diabetes mellitus, i.e. step-by-step increments, as currently proposed for worsening glucose levels. Metformine should be prescribed if the HbA1c is above normal in order to achieve the demonstrated benefit in prevention of microangiopathy and in the hope, motivated by pathophysiology data, of preventing insulin failure. Slow-release insulin at bedtime should be added to the oral hypoglycemiants if fasting glucose exceeds 1.60 or 1.80 g/l, even if the HbA1c remains below 8%. NEW HYPOGLYCEMIANTS: The role of these new agents in this more "aggressive" strategy remains to be defined. Glinides will have to demonstrate their superiority over sulfamides (fewer episodes of hypoglycemia with comparable efficacy) to justify their high cost. Glitazones will have to demonstrate a beneficial effect in second intention combination with metformine on cardiovascular morbidity mortality in type 2 diabetes patients with a metabolic insulin-resistance syndrome and visceral obesity

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in youth.

    PubMed

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L; Evans, Barbara J; Kerrigan, James R

    2003-08-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended screening guidelines to identify youth at high risk for type 2 DM and in implementing student health programs that focus positively on the importance of physical activity and healthy eating habits. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as the recommended screening guidelines for type 2 DM in the pediatric age group. The information provided will enhance awareness, promote screening, and empower the school nurse to more effectively promote healthy lifestyle education.

  20. Weight management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siram, Amulya T; Yanagisawa, Robert; Skamagas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at risk for weight gain as a result of multiple influences, including sedentary lifestyle, high-calorie diet, diabetes medications, sociocultural factors, chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, and a dysregulated enteroendocrine axis. Because both diabetes mellitus and obesity predispose patients to abnormal cardiometabolic profiles and increased cardiovascular disease, management of diabetes mellitus should focus on weight management and optimizing cardiometabolic parameters, concomitant with glycemic control. Lifestyle modification incorporating healthy, calorie-appropriate diets and increased physical activity, in addition to metformin, are central components to diabetes management and weight management. These interventions have been shown to improve body weight, glycemic control, and overall cardiometabolic profile. The weight-neutral and weight-losing diabetes medications include metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and amylin analogs. It is essential that providers understand the metabolic and weight effects of diabetes medications in order to develop strategies for managing diabetes mellitus while helping patients maintain or lose weight in order to improve their overall health outcomes. PMID:20960555

  1. Bartter's syndrome with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    See, Ting-Ting; Lee, Siu-Pak

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patients condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin), oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  2. The reality of type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Richard; Davidson, Mayer B

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes include attempts to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. Landmark clinical trials have shown that lifestyle modification programs focused on weight loss can delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in subjects at high risk of developing the disease. Building on this knowledge, many community-based studies have attempted to replicate the trial results and, simultaneously, payers have begun to cover diabetes prevention services. This article focuses on the evidence supporting the premise that community prevention efforts will be successful. Unfortunately, no study has shown that diabetes can be delayed or prevented in a community setting, and efforts to replicate the weight loss achieved in the trials have been mostly disappointing. Furthermore, both the clinical trials and the community-based prevention studies have not shown a beneficial effect on any diabetes-related clinical outcome. While the goal of diabetes prevention is extremely important, the absence of any persuasive evidence for the effectiveness of community programs calls into question whether the use of public funds or national prevention initiatives should be supported at this time.

  3. Vitamins and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Guadarrama-López, Ana Laura; Martínez-Carrillo, Beatriz Elina; Benítez-Arciniega, Alejandra Donají

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12.

  4. Vitamins and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ramos, Roxana; Ana Laura, Guadarrama-López; Elina, Martínez-Carrillo Beatriz; Donají, Benítez-Arciniega Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present review evaluates the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and individual or combined vitamins. Antioxidant vitamins A, C and E are found decreased in diabetic subjects, possibly due to an increased need to control the excessive oxidative stress produced by abnormalities in glucose metabolism. On the other hand, retinol binding protein exerts a modulating effect, as it has adipokine functions. With respect to the B group vitamins, thiamin, pyridoxine and biotin have been found decreased but the mechanisms are not clear, however supplementation has shown some improvement of the metabolic control in diabetic patients. The absorption of folic acid and vitamin B12 is importantly decreased by the prolongued use of metformin, which is the first choice drug in uncomplicated diabetes, thus these two nutrients have been found deficient in the disease and most probably need to be supplemented regularly. On the other hand, vitamin D is considered a risk factor for the development of diabetes as well as its complications, particularly cardiovascular ones. Although some studies have found an association of vitamin K intake with glucose metabolism further research is needed. Studies on the use of multivitamin supplements have shown unconclusive results. After reviewing the evidence, no real recommendation on the use of vitamin supplements in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be issued, however patients using metformin during prolongued periods may need folic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25388747

  5. Preventive pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Neeraj; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Ajish, T P

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades certain demographic changes have been observed worldwide, which have led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular disease are major contributors to this disease burden leading to rising morbidity and mortality. It is worrisome to see that type 2 diabetes with its micro- and macrovascular complications is occurring in younger populations where it was hitherto unseen. Prevention appears to be an important strategy to reduce the burden of disease. Along with inculcating healthy lifestyle habits across populations, it may be suitable to use preventive pharmacotherapy in those with pre-diabetes and / or other risk factors like obesity, hypertension, and on the like. Metformin, alpha glucosidase inhibitors like acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose, and pioglitazone have all been used with success. The issues of compliance and adverse effects during long-term use have tempered the use of these drugs. The best approach would be to motivate the patient for effective lifestyle changes, and pharmacological management if the lifestyle changes are not successful in achieving their goals.

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus with its high morbidity and mortality becomes an important health problem. The multifactorial etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus is relative to many gene and molecule alterations, and increased insulin resistance. Besides these, however, there are still other predisposing and risk factors accounting for type 2 diabetes mellitus not to be identified and recognized. Emerging evidence indicated that defects in galanin function played a crucial role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Galanin homeostasis is tightly relative to insulin resistance and is regulated by blood glucose. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinism, enhanced plasma galanin levels and decreased galanin receptor activities are some of the characters of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The discrepancy between high insulin level and low glucose handling is named as insulin resistance. Similarly, the discrepancy between high galanin level and low glucose handling may be denominated as galanin resistance too. In this review, the characteristic milestones of type 2 diabetes mellitus were condensed as two analogical conceptual models, obesity-hyper-insulin-insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity-hyper-galanin-galanin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both galanin resistance and insulin resistance are correlative with each other. Conceptualizing the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance may inspire a new concept to deepen our knowledge about pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, eventually leading to novel preventive and therapeutic interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  8. Bariatric surgery, safety and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent major health concerns in the USA. Weight loss is the most important aspect in T2D management, as it reduces both morbidity and mortality. Available lifestyle, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies provide just mild to moderate weight loss. The greatest degree of T2D prevention or T2D amelioration in obese subjects has been reported in subjects who underwent bariatric surgery. In the current review, we will describe various types of bariatric surgery, related safety profiles, and their effect on T2D, as well as the potential mechanisms involved in the remission of T2D. Finally, we hereby examine whether bariatric surgery may be considered a treatment for T2D in pregnant women, children, adolescents and subjects at least 65 years old. PMID:18830788

  9. Psychoneuroimmune implications of type 2 diabetes: redux.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jason C; Johnson, Daniel R; Freund, Gregory G

    2009-05-01

    A sizable body of knowledge has arisen demonstrating that type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with alterations in the innate immune system. The resulting proinflammatory-leaning imbalance is implicated in the development of secondary disease complications and comorbidities, such as delayed wound healing, accelerated progress of atherosclerosis, and retinopathy, in people who have T2D. New experimental data and the results of recently published health-related quality-of-life surveys indicate that individuals who have T2D experience diminished feelings of happiness, well being, and satisfaction with life. These emotional and psychological consequences of T2D point to altered neuroimmunity as a previously unappreciated complication of T2D. This article discusses recent data detailing the impact of T2D on a person's PNI response. PMID:19389586

  10. [New therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Pellitero, Silvia

    2015-06-22

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to a growing interest in the investigation of new therapies. Treatment of T2DM has focused on the insulinopenia and insulin resistance. However, in the last 10 years, new lines of research have emerged for the treatment of T2DM and preclinical studies appear promising. The possibility of using these drugs in combination with other currently available drugs will enhance the antidiabetic effect and promote weight loss with fewer side effects. The data provided by post-marketing monitoring will help us to better understand their safety profile and potential long-term effects on target organs, especially the cardiovascular risk.

  11. [TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND DEPRESSION].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A Ya; Esaulenko, I E; Sahnenko, V V; Budnevskyj, A V; Podvygyn, S N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of type 2 diabetes mellitus is not confined to metabolic disorders. A serious problem is also affective pathology that occurs in the majority (30-70%) of patients. However, diagnostics and correction of anxiety and depressive disorders associated with diabetes are often given insufficient attention. Many studies showed relationship between affective disorders and low adherence to the prescribed treatment resulting in general deterioration of clinical prognosis of diabetes. This review article describes the basic mechanisms behind the interrelation of affective disorders and diabetes. The role of persistent subclinical inflammation in diabetes and depression is discussed. The influence of emotional stress on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the overproduction of cortisol is emphasized. The similarity of some structural changes in the brain tissue in diabetes and depression is discussed. Effect of endocrine disruption in the emotional sphere is demonstrated. Mechanisms responsible for the development of diabetes and its complications provoked by depression are considered. PMID:27459757

  12. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of <140/90 mmHg, which is a similar target to that proposed for individuals without diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the functional importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that performs folding, modification, and trafficking of secretory and membrane proteins to the Golgi compartment, the maintenance of ER homeostasis in insulin-secreting β-cells is very important. When ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER generates adaptive signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to maintain homeostasis of this organelle. However, if homeostasis fails to be restored, the ER initiates death signaling pathways. New observations suggest that both chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, known as important causative factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt ER homeostasis to induce unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review examines how the UPR pathways, induced by high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), interact to disrupt ER function and cause β-cell dysfunction and death. PMID:22443930

  14. Psychological stress measure in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Trovato, G M; Catalano, D; Martines, G F; Spadaro, D; Di Corrado, D; Crispi, V; Garufi, G; Di Nuovo, S

    2006-01-01

    Psychological stress has been implicated as a cause of several psychosomatic disorders, but also as a factor that can unfavourably influence many diseases including diabetes mellitus. Measure of psychological stress in diabetes was performed by Psychological Stress Measure (PSM), a validated instrument, designed using 49 items drawn from descriptors generated by focus groups on stress. Clinical and psychological framework was assessed in a cohort of 100 type 2 diabetic patients (30 m, 70 f), aged 66.99 +/- 13.68 years considering disease grade, complications and level of instruction. Three other questionnaires were administered concurrently to all patients: Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Functional Living Index (FLI) and SF-36 QOL. ANOVA statistical testing and Spearman correlation matrix were used also vs socio-cultural and clinical profile. Gender, obesity, diet compliance, smoking do not affect PSM response. Hypertensive patients and those with family history of diabetes show lower PSM scores, according to a sort of moderator effect on stress of concurrent and/or previous experience with chronic disease. Neuromuscular ailments are more prevalent in women; men vs women experience severe limitations of their working capacities and relational possibilities, with severe discomfort. In the whole, higher scores of PSM (greater stress p < 0.01) and lower scores of FLI (fair well-being perception; p < 0.01) are reciprocally related inside any school instruction level. Despite the great reciprocal association of the PSM vs FLI and SIP, no significant correlation is found between PSM vs SF-36 QOL. Socio-cultural elements interfere, and particularly instruction level quantified as school grades achieved, with the manner of living their disease. Interventions on psychological distress of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients is warranted, specially in the groups with lower levels of instruction which may need an attentive strategy for achieving a satisfactory coping with this

  15. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation: From mechanisms to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic conditions and its prevalence has increased continuously over the past decades, primarily due to the obesity epidemic. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice and is associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of AF. However, the results about the relationship between diabetes and AF are still conflicting. Mechanisms that are responsible for an association between diabetes and AF, as well as the adequate treatment of AF in patients with diabetes, are still insufficiently studied. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of mechanisms that connect AF and diabetes, the clinical studies that include patients with both conditions, and the treatment options in modern pharmacology.

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Mario; Dominguez, Ligia J

    2014-12-15

    Epidemiological and biological evidences support a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Persons with diabetes have a higher incidence of cognitive decline and an increased risk of developing all types of dementia. Cognitive deficits in persons with diabetes mainly affect the areas of psychomotor efficiency, attention, learning and memory, mental flexibility and speed, and executive function. The strong epidemiological association has suggested the existence of a physiopathological link. The determinants of the accelerated cognitive decline in DM2, however, are less clear. Increased cortical and subcortical atrophy have been evidenced after controlling for diabetic vascular disease and inadequate cerebral circulation. Most recent studies have focused on the role of insulin and insulin resistance as possible links between diabetes and AD. Disturbances in brain insulin signaling mechanisms may contribute to the molecular, biochemical, and histopathological lesions in AD. Hyperglycemia itself is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Hypoglycemia may also have deleterious effects on cognitive function. Recurrent symptomatic and asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes have been suggested to cause sub-clinical brain damage, and permanent cognitive impairment. Future trials are required to clarify the mechanistic link, to address the question whether cognitive decline may be prevented by an adequate metabolic control, and to elucidate the role of drugs that may cause hypoglycemic episodes.

  18. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-01

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  19. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus: new treatments].

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan F

    2014-08-01

    The benefits and problems associated with traditional hypoglycemic drugs, such as failure of beta cells, hypoglycemia and weight gain, that lead to a worsening of diabetes, are reviewed. New hypoglycemic drugs with incretin effect (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors), achieve, in a glucose dependent manner, an glycosylated hemoglobin reduction without hypoglycemia or increase in body weight. Recently, another group of oral hypoglycemic drugs, sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors, have demonstrated efficacy in diabetes control by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. However, long-term effects and cardiovascular prevention remain to be demonstrated. We have more and better drugs nowadays. Hypoglycemic treatment should be customized (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, risk-benefit, risk of hypoglycemia, weight changes, cardiovascular risk), with a combination of drugs being necessary in most cases. However, we do not have yet an ideal hypoglycemic drug. Moreover we must remember that an early and intensive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23937815

  20. [Etiopathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kubát, K; Zboril, M

    1999-12-01

    In the genesis and development of type 2 diabetes in the great majority of subjects the contemporary lifestyle characterized by inadequate physical activity and an excessive energy intake is of basic importance. The majority of abnormalities and defects revealed by laboratory tests is probably secondary and caused by the above mentioned factors. Contemporary views of the etiopathogenesis of the disease are demotivating for patients: if the cause of their disease were an inborn disorder at the level of transmission of a signal on membranes then probably nothing else can be done than to take prescribed drugs. If the mistake involves the lifestyle, the latter can be changed and the disease avoided. Any medicamentous treatment is associated with the risk of undesirable effects--the complication of hyperinsulinism in treatment with sulphonyl urea derivatives and insulin or lactate acidosis after treatment with biguanides. This risk is not influenced by early prevention: dietary restraint and adequate physical exercise. Diabetes type 2 and 1--despite the common sign of hyperglycaemia--are characterized by a fundamental difference: (not influenced by treatment) DM type 1 is characterized by enhanced catabolic processes, starvation at the cellular level. Type 2 is characterized by enhanced anabolic processes, excessive amounts of nutrients in cells. The authors submit recommendations which respect the secondary character of deviations for the development of DM 2 which can be detected by laboratory methods: The following are the basic etiopathogenetic mechanism for the development of DM 2: 1. Chronic excessive intake and inadequate output of energy a) increased nutrient supply to the liver with secondary increase of gluconeogenesis in the liver, b) chronic increased supply of glucose to peripheral tissues, in particular muscles and adipose tissue, inadequate physical exercise, with secondary restriction of nutrient supplies to these tissues. 2. Secondary affection of

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Genetics: Beyond GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Blackett, Piers R.

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is one of the most challenging problems of the 21st century leading cause of and the fifth death worldwide. Substantial evidence suggests that T2D is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified and replicated nearly 75 susceptibility loci associated with T2D and related metabolic traits, mostly in Europeans, and some in African, and South Asian populations. The GWAS serve as a starting point for future genetic and functional studies since the mechanisms of action by which these associated loci influence disease is still unclear and it is difficult to predict potential implication of these findings in clinical settings. Despite extensive replication, no study has unequivocally demonstrated their clinical role in the disease management beyond progression to T2D from impaired glucose tolerance. However, these studies are revealing new molecular pathways underlying diabetes etiology, gene-environment interactions, epigenetic modifications, and gene function. This review highlights evolving progress made in the rapidly moving field of T2D genetics that is starting to unravel the pathophysiology of a complex phenotype and has potential to show clinical relevance in the near future. PMID:23243555

  2. Teneligliptin: a review in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-11-01

    Oral teneligliptin [Teneglucon® (Argentina)], a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, is indicated for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This article reviews the pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of teneligliptin in the treatment of adults with T2DM. In 12- or 16-week, placebo-controlled phase 2 and 3 trials, oral teneligliptin 20 or 40 mg once daily, as monotherapy or in combination with metformin, glimepiride or pioglitazone improved glycaemic control, including in patients with end-stage renal disease, and was generally well tolerated. Most treatment-emergent adverse events were of mild intensity and relatively few patients discontinued treatment because of these events. Improvements in glycaemic control observed in short-term trials were maintained at 52 weeks in extension phases of these trials and in 52-week interventional studies, with no new safety concerns identified during this period. In the absence of direct head-to-head clinical trials, the position of teneligliptin relative to other antidiabetic agents in the management of T2DM remains to be determined. In the meantime, teneligliptin is a useful treatment option for adults with T2DM who have not responded adequately to diet and exercise regimens, or the addition of antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26475720

  3. Brain imaging in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brundel, Manon; Kappelle, L Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Brain imaging may provide important clues about underlying processes. This review focuses on the relationship between T2DM and brain abnormalities assessed with different imaging techniques: both structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, as well as positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Compared to people without diabetes, people with T2DM show slightly more global brain atrophy, which increases gradually over time compared with normal aging. Moreover, vascular lesions are seen more often, particularly lacunar infarcts. The association between T2DM and white matter hyperintensities and microbleeds is less clear. T2DM has been related to diminished cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity, particularly in more advanced disease. Diffusion tensor imaging is a promising technique with respect to subtle white matter involvement. Thus, brain imaging studies show that T2DM is associated with both degenerative and vascular brain damage, which develops slowly over the course of many years. The challenge for future studies will be to further unravel the etiology of brain damage in T2DM, and to identify subgroups of patients that will develop distinct progressive brain damage and cognitive decline.

  4. Managing dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Szalat, Auryan; Durst, Ronen; Leitersdorf, Eran

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-control has a modest beneficial effect on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus, managing other atherogenic risk factors including hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol and moderately elevated LDL-cholesterol levels with increased small dense LDL-cholesterol fraction, is crucial. Insulin resistance is a key pathophysiologic factor in this population. Treatment starts with lifestyle modifications, but current best programmes have not translated into positive cardiovascular outcomes. Lowering LDL-cholesterol with statins is currently the main treatment strategy, but significant residual risk remains. Attempts to elevate HDL-cholesterol and to reduce triglycerides levels, with niacin or fibrates have not improved cardiovascular prognosis, but addition of ezetimibe, or fibrates in specific patients subgroups, have shown modest benefit. Some glucose-lowering medications and bariatric surgery may also improve diabetic dyslipidemia. Results of three major cardiovascular outcome trials evaluating the effect of lowering LDL-cholesterol with PCSK9 inhibitors in large cohorts that include thousands of diabetic patients are pending. PMID:27432076

  5. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  6. Children have type 2 diabetes too: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Dean, Heather J; Sellers, Elizabeth A C

    2015-10-01

    Prior to 1985, type 2 diabetes was a disease of adults. Simultaneously with the global epidemic of childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes has increased in children. Initially, the presentation of small case series of type 2 diabetes in children was met with skepticism. As the number and size of the case series grew and the first long-term outcomes of end-stage complications in young adults appeared in the literature, the international community took notice with guarded interest. Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects the children of specific ethnic groups and from disadvantaged socioeconomic environments, especially Indigenous populations. The past decade has seen unprecedented intense global interest in the etiology, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes in children.

  7. The Changing Shape of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Context Type 2 diabetes is primarily a disease that affects late-middle-aged and elderly individuals. Due to increasing affluence, lifestyle changes, and obesity, however, it is also affecting younger age groups. Therefore, treatment recommendations may need to be revised to reflect these changes. Fortunately, various new treatment options, including insulin analogs with more physiologic time-action profiles and drugs that target the incretin system, are now available. Evidence acquisition This review was based on a PubMed literature search done in August 2007, using relevant search terms. Evidence synthesis Improving diet and increasing physical activity are important therapeutic interventions in diabetes and associated conditions. However, many people find it difficult to maintain lifestyle changes, which is why the American Diabetes Association recommends lifestyle intervention plus metformin following initial diagnosis. Current guidelines recommend a stepwise approach, with additional oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) being added as the disease progresses. Insulin therapy should be initiated once OADs fail to control hyperglycemia, as there is good evidence that intensive therapy, with strict glycemic targets, can reduce the long-term microvascular complications that are associated with poorly controlled diabetes. In addition, while the evidence is less conclusive, intensive therapy may also improve long-term macrovascular comorbidities. Conclusions It is important that patients with diabetes receive the most effective therapy for maintaining glycemic control and that treatment is modified or augmented in those who are not achieving appropriate glycemic goals. Only by maintaining long-term, effective glycemic control can the microvascular and macrovascular comorbidities associated with diabetes be minimized. PMID:18679554

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  9. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with early pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    In the U.S., ∼ 21 × 10(6) individuals have type 2 diabetes, and twice as many have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Approximately 40-50% of individuals with IGT will progress to type 2 diabetes over their lifetime. Therefore, treatment of high-risk individuals with IGT to prevent type 2 diabetes has important medical, economic, social, and human implications. Weight loss, although effective in reducing the conversion of IGT to type 2 diabetes, is difficult to achieve and maintain. Moreover, 40-50% of IGT subjects progress to type 2 diabetes despite successful weight reduction. In contrast, pharmacological treatment of IGT with oral antidiabetic agents that improve insulin sensitivity and preserve β-cell function--the characteristic pathophysiological abnormalities present in IGT and type 2 diabetes--uniformly have been shown to prevent progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. The most consistent results have been observed with the thiazolidinediones (Troglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [TRIPOD], Pioglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes [PIPOD], Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication [DREAM], and Actos Now for the Prevention of Diabetes [ACT NOW]), with a 50-70% reduction in IGT conversion to diabetes. Metformin in the U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) reduced the development of type 2 diabetes by 31% and has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for treating high-risk individuals with IGT. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, which augment insulin secretion, preserve β-cell function, and promote weight loss, also would be expected to be efficacious in preventing the progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes. Because individuals in the upper tertile of IGT are maximally/near-maximally insulin resistant, have lost 70-80% of their β-cell function, and have an ∼ 10% incidence of diabetic retinopathy, pharmacological intervention, in combination with diet plus exercise, should be instituted. PMID

  10. Non-invasive Measurement of Skin Autofluorescence as a Beneficial Surrogate Marker for Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temma, Jin; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Horie, Toru; Kuroda, Akio; Mori, Hiroyasu; Tamaki, Motoyuki; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Skin autofluorescence (AF) was recently reported to represent tissue AGEs accumulation with a non-invasive method. The aim of the present study was to evaluate association between AF value and diabetic vascular complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy and cervical atherosclerosis using the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 68 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in a cross-sectional manner. AGEs accumulation was measured with AF reader. Clinical parameters were collected at the time of AF and IMT measurement. Max-IMT was correlated with age and AF (r=0.407, p=0.001), but not with HbA1c, GA, and pentosidine. Also, AF was not correlated with HbA1c, GA and pentosidine, but was correlated with age (r=0.560, p<0.001), duration of diabetes (r=0.256, p<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that AF, but not age, was an independent determinant of max-IMT. In conclusion, AF might be a beneficial surrogate marker for evaluating carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes non-invasively. J. Med. Invest. 62: 126-129, August, 2015.

  11. Non-invasive Measurement of Skin Autofluorescence as a Beneficial Surrogate Marker for Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temma, Jin; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Horie, Toru; Kuroda, Akio; Mori, Hiroyasu; Tamaki, Motoyuki; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Skin autofluorescence (AF) was recently reported to represent tissue AGEs accumulation with a non-invasive method. The aim of the present study was to evaluate association between AF value and diabetic vascular complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy and cervical atherosclerosis using the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 68 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in a cross-sectional manner. AGEs accumulation was measured with AF reader. Clinical parameters were collected at the time of AF and IMT measurement. Max-IMT was correlated with age and AF (r=0.407, p=0.001), but not with HbA1c, GA, and pentosidine. Also, AF was not correlated with HbA1c, GA and pentosidine, but was correlated with age (r=0.560, p<0.001), duration of diabetes (r=0.256, p<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that AF, but not age, was an independent determinant of max-IMT. In conclusion, AF might be a beneficial surrogate marker for evaluating carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes non-invasively. J. Med. Invest. 62: 126-129, August, 2015. PMID:26399335

  12. Increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Janson, Juliette; Laedtke, Thomas; Parisi, Joseph E; O'Brien, Peter; Petersen, Ronald C; Butler, Peter C

    2004-02-01

    Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes are characterized by increased prevalence with aging, a genetic predisposition, and comparable pathological features in the islet and brain (amyloid derived from amyloid beta protein in the brain in Alzheimer disease and islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes). Evidence is growing to link precursors of amyloid deposition in the brain and pancreas with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Given these similarities, we questioned whether there may be a common underlying mechanism predisposing to islet and cerebral amyloid. To address this, we first examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in a community-based controlled study, the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Patient Registry (ADPR), which follows patients with Alzheimer disease versus control subjects without Alzheimer disease. In addition to this clinical study, we performed a pathological study of autopsy cases from this same community to determine whether there is an increased prevalence of islet amyloid in patients with Alzheimer disease and increased prevalence of cerebral amyloid in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients who were enrolled in the ADPR (Alzheimer disease n = 100, non-Alzheimer disease control subjects n = 138) were classified according to fasting glucose concentration (FPG) as nondiabetic (FPG <110 mg/dl), impaired fasting glucose (IFG, FPG 110-125 mg/dl), and type 2 diabetes (FPG >126 mg/dl). The mean slope of FPG over 10 years in each case was also compared between Alzheimer disease and non-Alzheimer disease control subjects. Pancreas and brain were examined from autopsy specimens obtained from 105 humans (first, 28 cases of Alzheimer disease disease vs. 21 non-Alzheimer disease control subjects and, second, 35 subjects with type 2 diabetes vs. 21 non-type 2 diabetes control subjects) for the presence of islet and brain amyloid. Both type 2 diabetes (35% vs. 18%; P < 0

  13. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  14. [Management of Type 2 Diabetes: a Practical Approach].

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years, the therapeutic aims for patients with type 2 diabetes have changed and several novel drugs have been introduced. In this Mini-Review we discuss these aims and how to achieve them. PMID:27269776

  15. Global Team Taps into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159810.html Global Team Taps Into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes Many common gene variations ... the researchers assessed the influence of rare, "private" DNA differences along with common DNA differences that many ...

  16. Type 2 diabetes: Mediterranean diet delays need for drug therapy.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    According to a trial in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes, adopting a "Mediterranean" diet seems to delay the need for glucose-lowering drugs by several years compared with a low-fat diet.

  17. Spare the Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meat, Skip the Type 2 Diabetes? A mostly plant-based diet may help lower risk of the ... June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a mainly plant-based diet -- especially one with lots of healthy ...

  18. Lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes. Relevance for clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stewart B.; Petrella, Robert J.; Leadbetter, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review evidence from literature on type 2 diabetes pertinent to physical activity and diet and lifestyle modification, and to determine the relevance of this evidence to clinical practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Direct (level I) evidence supports interventions for physical activity and diet modification for primary prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Few studies examine the effectiveness of primary health care providers' making such interventions. MAIN MESSAGE: Family physicians have an important role in identifying people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes and managing those diagnosed with the disease, yet they struggle to deliver practice-based interventions that promote sustainable behaviour change among their patients. CONCLUSION: It is evident that supporting patients to make changes in their physical activity and dietary habits can prevent onset of type 2 diabetes. Translating this finding into effective recommendations for clinical practice requires further effort and evaluation. PMID:14708927

  19. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diet (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tailored to a person's medical needs, lifestyle, and personal preferences. TYPE 2 DIABETES AND MEAL TIMING — Consistently eating at the same times every day is important for some people, especially those who take long- ...

  20. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rabøl, Rasmus

    2011-04-01

    Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has been proposed to lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. It has been known for several years that oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle is reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to weight matched controls. The reduction in oxidative capacity supposedly leads to the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid which inhibits insulin signalling and causes insulin resistance. It is not known whether this reduction in mitochondrial capacity is the cause or the effect of type 2 diabetes. This PhD-thesis describes the effect of different pharmacological interventions on mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes and describe whether mitochondrial function is uniformly distributed to both upper and lower extremities. Furthermore, a hypothesis on the molecular mechanism for weight gain observed with anthyperglycaemic treatment will be presented.

  1. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  2. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  3. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools.

  4. Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159814.html Study Suggests Type 2 Diabetes-Cancer Link It hints ... screening tests following a diagnosis of diabetes," said study author Dr. Iliana Lega, of the University of ...

  5. Ethnicity and type 2 diabetes: focus on Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Abate, N; Chandalia, M

    2001-01-01

    Though the overall prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in US and in all other westernized countries, significant differences are noted among different ethnic groups. The reasons for ethnic differences in the risk of type 2 diabetes are not entirely understood. For example, Asian Indians (people from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh) have remarkably high prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared to Caucasians. However, the incidence of obesity, an important risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, is significantly lower in Asian Indians compared to Caucasians. Though westernization of lifestyle with dietary changes and lack of exercise may play a role in increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes in migrant Asian Indians, various epidemiological studies have shown that these factors alone are not sufficient to explain this trend. One important factor contributing to increased type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians is excessive insulin resistance compared to Caucasians. This difference in the degree of insulin resistance may be explained by either an environmental or a genetic factor or by combination of both. The understanding of the etiology and mechanisms causing increased insulin resistance in Asian Indians will provide clues to more effective prevention and treatment of diabetes in this ethnic group. Furthermore, the information may help in understanding the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in other ethnic groups and improve methods of treatment and prevention in all ethnic groups. Since the ethnic mix of the US population is changing rapidly and it is estimated that by the year 2020, over 50% of US population will include non-Caucasian ethnicity, the identification of the mechanism involved in the excessive development of type 2 diabetes in non-Caucasians becomes important. In this review, possible etiology of excessive insulin resistance and role of free fatty acids (FFA) in insulin resistance in Asian Indians is discussed. Finally, the role of

  6. Correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Sriharibabu, Manne; Alekhya, Katamreddy; Saisumanth, Kandula; Lakshmanrao, Nambaru; Komali, Kanagala

    2013-01-01

    Over a period of time, anthropometric parameters have evolved into reliable indicators for predicting the incidence of diabetes mellitus. A number of studies have shown correlations between anthropometry and lipid profiles in healthy volunteers. This study examined correlations between anthropometry and lipid profile in type 2 diabetics. The limited observations made in this study reveal that anthropometric parameters are not ideal for predicting lipid profile abnormalities in type 2 diabetics. PMID:23961494

  7. The relationship between exercise,nutrition and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Erin J; Smiles, William; Hawley, John A

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and its precursor, insulin resistance, are metabolic disease states characterized by impaired regulation in the delivery, transport, and/or storage of energy substrates (primarily carbohydrate- and fat-based fuels). A hallmark feature of patients with type 2 diabetes is prolonged periods of hyperglycemia due to a decreased responsiveness of metabolically active peripheral tissues to the actions of insulin (i.e., metabolic inflexibility). Accordingly, efforts to modify skeletal muscle substrate handling in type 2 diabetes patients so that the capacity for fat oxidation and metabolic flexibility is improved should be a primary goal for the treatment of these disorders. Two potent interventions for improving whole-body glucose homeostasis are exercise and diet. A single bout of either resistance or endurance exercise reduces the prevalence and duration of hyperglycemic excursions in patients with type 2 diabetes, an effect lasting well into the next day. With regard to diet, the carbohydrate content of a meal and the glycemic index (GI) of the carbohydrate consumed are both major determinants of the postprandial glycemic response. Diets containing high-GI carbohydrates have been shown to be independent risk factors for type 2 diabetes onset, while in obese insulin-resistant individuals, low-GI diets are effective for inducing both weight loss and improving insulin action and glucose tolerance. The implementation of physical activity and dietary modifications are effective low-cost treatment options for controlling hyperglycemic episodes in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25226796

  8. Micronutrient status in type 2 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by significant losses of important micronutrients due to metabolic basis of the disease and its complications. Evidence of changes in trace mineral and vitamin metabolism as a consequence of type 2 diabetes is reviewed in this chapter. This review is not a meta-analysis but an overview of the micronutrient status, metabolic needs, and potential micronutrient requirements in type 2 diabetics. This chapter will not concentrate on vitamin D and type 2 diabetes as this is a topic that has been extensively reviewed before. The less well-known micronutrients notably zinc, magnesium, chromium, copper, manganese, iron, selenium, vanadium, B-group vitamins, and certain antioxidants are assessed. While some evidence is available to demonstrate the positive influence of micronutrient supplementation on glycemic control, much remains to be investigated. Additional research is necessary to characterize better biomarkers of micronutrient status and requirements in type 2 diabetics. The optimal level of micronutrient supplementation to achieve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetics remains a challenge.

  9. Fetal growth and the ethnic origins of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skilton, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Birthweight is known to differ by ethnicity, with South Asian, black African and Caribbean, and Hispanic ethnic groups having lower birthweight on average, when compared with people of white European ethnicity. Birthweight is the most frequently used proxy of fetal growth, and represents the net effect of a host of genetic, physiological and pathophysiological factors. These same ethnic groups that have lower average birthweight also tend to have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It is not unreasonable to propose that the well-established inverse association between birthweight and risk of type 2 diabetes may at least partially contribute to these differences in prevalence of type 2 diabetes between ethnic groups. This hypothesis would rely on the mechanisms that drive the ethnic differences in birthweight aligning with those that modify the risk of type 2 diabetes. In this issue of Diabetologia (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3474-7), Nightingale et al have furthered this field by determining whether ethnic differences in markers of cardio-metabolic risk are consistent with the differences in birthweight in an ethnically diverse cohort of children. The likely contribution of fetal growth to ethnic differences in risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is discussed, particularly in light of the magnitude of the birthweight differences, as are implications for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25567103

  10. Lifestyle and genetics in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temelkova-Kurktschiev, T; Stefanov, T

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are multifactorial health threats caused by a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and the environment with dramatically increasing worldwide prevalence. The role of heritability in their etiology is well recognized, however, the numerous attempts made in order certain genetic variants determining individual susceptibility to be identified have had limited success, until recently. At present the advancements in human genetics and the utilization of the genome-wide association approach have led to the identification of over 20 genetic loci associated with, respectively obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most of the genes identified to date, however, have modest effect on disease risk suggesting that both diseases are unlikely to develop without the individual being exposed to obesity- and/or type 2 diabetes-promoting environment. Indeed, unhealthy lifestyle, characterized by physical inactivity and food overconsumption is an unequivocally established risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials, on the other hand, have demonstrated that lifestyle modification is effective in obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention. Furthermore, gene-lifestyle interaction studies suggest that genetic susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes may be partially or totally kept under control by healthy lifestyle or lifestyle modification and that lifestyle determines whether an individual is likely to develop the disease. Inherited factors, however, seem to influence individual response to a lifestyle intervention program and even the motivation for lifestyle change. Personalized interventions according to genotype may be, therefore, considered in the future. By then lifestyle modification targeting dietary change and increased physical activity may be recommended for successful obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention irrespectively of genetic susceptibility.

  11. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects. PMID:24222606

  12. Origin and therapy for hypertriglyceridaemia in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jing; Chan, Dick C; Watts, Gerald F

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes and is caused by the interaction of genes and non-genetic factors, specifically poor glycaemic control and obesity. In spite of statin treatment, residual risk of CVD remains high in type 2 diabetes, and this may relate to HTG and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Treatment of HTG emphasises correcting secondary factors and adverse lifestyles, in particular, diet and exercise. Pharmacotherapy is also required in most type 2 diabetic patients. Statins are the first-line therapy to achieve recommended therapeutic targets of plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Fibrates, ezetimibe and n-3 fatty acids are adjunctive treatment options for residual and persistent HTG. Evidence for the use of niacin has been challenged by non-significant CVD outcomes in two recent large clinical trials. Further investigation is required to clarify the use of incretin-based therapies for HTG in type 2 diabetes. Extreme HTG, with risk of pancreatitis, may require insulin infusion therapy or apheresis. New therapies targeting HTG in diabetes need to be tested in clinical endpoint trials. The purpose of this review is to examine the current evidence and provide practical guidance on the management of HTG in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24748930

  13. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  14. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  15. Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

    2013-01-08

    Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. β Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their β cell function.

  16. Type 2 Diabetes and TZDs (Thiazolidinediones)

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  17. Contrasting patient and practitioner perspectives in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L M; Arar, N H; Larme, A C

    1998-12-01

    Studies of self-care behaviors in the management of type 2 diabetes often focus on patient knowledge and motivation, without considering the role of practitioner orientations. Using an exploratory descriptive design, we conducted open-ended interviews with 51 type 2 diabetes patients and 35 practitioners from clinics in San Antonio and Laredo, Texas. We found critical differences between patient and practitioner goals, evaluations, and strategies in diabetes management, especially regarding such key concepts as "control" and "taking care of self". Practitioners' perspectives are rooted in a clinical context, emphasizing technical considerations, whereas patients' perspectives exist within a life-world context and foreground practical and experiential considerations. These result in very different approaches to treatment. Practitioners, presuming failed treatment indicates uncooperativeness, try to inform and motivate patients. The patients we interviewed, however, understood and were committed to type 2 diabetes self-care, but lacked full access to behavioral options due to their poverty and limited social power. PMID:9842286

  18. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  19. [Important epidemiological features of the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Seguí Díaz, M

    2014-07-01

    According to the various clinical practice guidelines, the recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes are well-established, thus leading to homogenization of clinical practice and avoiding variability. However, it is well known that, depending on factors such as effectiveness, physiopathology, cost, adverse effects, preferences, and comorbidities, each patient will, in the long-term, receive different treatment of type 2 diabetes. The consensus document published last year and approved by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommends distinct targets for each patient with type 2 diabetes and argues for the individualization of the management and treatment of this disease. In other words, the document advocates a patient-centered approach, in which the various therapeutic alternatives are related mainly to distinct physiopathological factors, adverse effects, and the patient's comorbidities, as well as the patient's preferences.

  20. Combatting type 2 diabetes by turning up the heat.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Patrick; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-11-01

    In our westernised society, the level of physical activity is low. Interventions that increase energy expenditure are generally associated with an improvement in metabolic health. Exercise and exercise training increase energy metabolism and are considered to be among the best strategies for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus. More recently, cold exposure has been suggested to have a therapeutic value in type 2 diabetes. At a cellular level, there is evidence that increasing the turnover of cellular substrates such as fatty acids is associated with preventive effects against lipid-induced insulin resistance. Cellular energy sensors may underlie the effects linking energy turnover with metabolic health effects. Here we review data supporting the hypothesis that increasing energy and substrate turnover has beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and should be considered a target for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27591854

  1. Renal and hepatic transporter expression in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Michael T; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Sawant, Sharmilee P; Dnyanmote, Ankur V; Mehendale, Harihara M; Manautou, José E

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transporters are critical for the uptake as well as elimination of chemicals and by-products of metabolism from the liver and kidneys. Since these proteins are important determinants of chemical disposition, changes in their expression in different disease states can modulate drug pharmacokinetics. The present study investigated alterations in the renal and hepatic expression of organic anion and cation transporters (Oats/Octs), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), P-glycoprotein (Pgp), and hepatic Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) in type 2 diabetic rats. For this purpose, type 2 diabetes was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats a high fat diet followed by a single dose of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg, i.p., in 0.01 M citrate buffer pH 4.3) on day 14. Controls received normal diet and vehicle. Kidney and liver samples were collected on day 24 for generation of crude plasma membrane fractions and Western blot analysis of Oat, Oct, Mrp, Bcrp, Pgp, and Ntcp proteins. With regards to renal uptake transporters, type 2 diabetes increased levels of Oat2 (2.3-fold) and decreased levels of Oct2 to 50% of control kidneys. Conversely, efflux transporters Mrp2, Mrp4, and Bcrp were increased 5.4-fold, 2-fold, and 1.6-fold, respectively in type 2 diabetic kidneys with no change in levels of Mrp1, Mrp5, or Pgp. Studies of hepatic transporters in type 2 diabetic rats reveal that the protein level of Mrp5 was reduced to 4% of control livers with no change in levels of Bcrp, Mrp1, Mrp2, Mrp4, Ntcp, or Pgp. The changes reported in this study may have implications in type 2 diabetic patients.

  2. Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: an update.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin; Silverstein, Janet; Kaufman, Francine; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth

    2007-09-01

    Although type 1 diabetes historically has been more common in patients eight to 19 years of age, type 2 diabetes is emerging as an important disease in this group. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 8 to 45 percent of new childhood diabetes. This article is an update from the National Diabetes Education Program on the management of type 2 diabetes in youth. High-risk youths older than 10 years have a body mass index greater than the 85th percentile for age and sex plus two additional risk factors (i.e., family history, high-risk ethnicity, acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, or dyslipidemia). Reducing overweight and impaired glucose tolerance with increased physical activity and healthier eating habits may help prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk youths. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend population-based screening of high-risk youths; however, physicians should closely monitor these patients because early diagnosis may be beneficial. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening high-risk youths every two years with a fasting plasma glucose test. Patients diagnosed with diabetes should receive self-management education, behavior interventions to promote healthy eating and physical activity, appropriate therapy for hyperglycemia (usually metformin and insulin), and treatment of comorbidities.

  3. [New targets in pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Verspohl, Eugen J

    2016-02-01

    The number of people with diabetes is expected to increase worldwide to 360 million within the next 15 years of which 90% will have type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Established therapies mainly focus on the following principles: increase in plasma insulin, improving insulin sensitivity of tissues, reducing the rate of carbohydrate absorption and gluconeogenesis. The demand on compounds with new mechanisms of action is obvious. This articles summarizes new targets and compounds under development for pharmacotherapy of typ 2 diabetes; at present approx. 180 compounds are going to be developed worldwide. PMID:26983332

  4. [Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nutrition, a paradigm shift].

    PubMed

    Bourcelot, Emilie; Combes, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are two complex and multifactorial chronic diseases. Nutritional management is based on an educational and bio-psycho-sensory approach centred on the patient using cognitive-behavioural and emotionally-focused therapy tools. PMID:27157552

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and skeletal muscle metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Phielix, Esther; Mensink, Marco

    2008-05-23

    Type 2 diabetic patients are characterized by a decreased fat oxidative capacity and high levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs). The latter is known to cause insulin resistance, in particularly in skeletal muscle, by reducing insulin stimulated glucose uptake, most likely via accumulation of lipid inside the muscle cell. A reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity can exaggerate this. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired metabolic flexibility, i.e. an impaired switching from fatty acid to glucose oxidation in response to insulin. Thus, a reduced fat oxidative capacity and metabolic inflexibility are important components of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The cause of these derangements in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients remains to be elucidated. An impaired mitochondrial function is a likely candidate. Evidence from both in vivo and ex vivo studies supports the idea that an impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial function is related to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle was revealed in diabetic patients, using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS). However, quantification of mitochondrial function using ex vivo high-resolution respirometry revealed opposite results. Future (human) studies should challenge this concept of impaired mitochondrial function underlying metabolic defects and prove if mitochondria are truly functional impaired in insulin resistance, or low in number, and whether it represents the primary starting point of pathogenesis of insulin resistance, or is just an other feature of the insulin resistant state. PMID:18342897

  6. Cardiac abnormalities in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We h...

  7. Type 2 diabetes express highway, where is the 'U' turn?

    PubMed

    Iyer, S R

    2003-05-01

    The 'U' turn in Type 2 Diabetes Express Highway probably lies in lifestyle modifications--going back to traditional lifestyle with use of modern technology to achieve happiness. There is a difference between technology for comfort and technology for happiness. PMID:12974434

  8. [Type 2 Diabetes mellitus-screening and prevention: Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Stadler, Marietta; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Prager, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in westernized countries. In addition, about half of all patients suffering from diabetes are not diagnosed. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes, based on currently available evidence. PMID:27052220

  9. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The styd objectives were to identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in a cross-sectional study of subjects with and without type 2 diabetes, and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Participants were overweight and obese (bod...

  10. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk’s lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique. PMID:27347419

  11. Hierarchical clusters in families with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Solano, Beatriz; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gómez-Meza, Marco V; García-Madrid, Guillermina; Flores-Merlo, Marcela; García-Solano, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Families represent more than a set of individuals; family is more than a sum of its individual members. With this classification, nurses can identify the family health-illness beliefs obey family as a unit concept, and plan family inclusion into the type 2 diabetes treatment, whom is not considered in public policy, despite families share diet, exercise, and self-monitoring with a member who suffers type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the characteristics, functionality, routines, and family and individual health in type 2 diabetes describes the differences and similarities between families to consider them as a unit. We performed an exploratory, descriptive hierarchical cluster analysis of 61 families using three instruments and a questionnaire, in addition to weight, height, body fat percentage, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The analysis produced three groups of families. Wilk's lambda demonstrated statistically significant differences provided by age (Λ = 0.778, F = 2.098, p = 0.010) and family health (Λ = 0.813, F = 2.650, p = 0.023). A post hoc Tukey test coincided with the three subsets. Families with type 2 diabetes have common elements that make them similar, while sharing differences that make them unique.

  12. Understanding the role of diet in type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Wyness, Laura

    2009-09-01

    The number of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate. Almost 4% of the UK population currently have diagnosed diabetes. Non-modifiable risk factors for diabetes include genetic predisposition, some black and ethnic minority groups and increasing age. Type 2 diabetes, (formally known as maturity onset diabetes), used to be a condition affecting adults only, although due to the increasing levels of obesity, it is now being diagnosed in young people and children. A healthy diet and lifestyle can help to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. In particular, strategies to reduce obesity will have a beneficial effect on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, as excess adiposity (particularly central adiposity) is a strong risk factor for the condition. Dietary measures to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease will also help prevent diabetes. Diets low in fat (particularly saturated fat), and high in fibre and complex carbohydrates are effective in reducing the risk of developing diabetes. Good quality evidence from trials is required to determine the role of specific micronutrients in diabetes prevention.

  13. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  14. Type 2 Diabetes in Han Chinese in Hubei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo Saif Dehwah, Mustafa; Shuang, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Chan, Peng; Huang, Qing-Yang

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese in Hubei. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptorγ2 (PPARγ2) is a nuclear receptor plays a key role in regulation of adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are various studies have provided evidence for the association between common Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ2 gene and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the results are controversial and depend on ethnicity. So we conducted a case-control association study among 330 T2DM patients and 212 controls with family-based and random case-control designs. The genotypes of the PPARγ2 Pro12Ala polymorphism were detected by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFL) method. The result indicated that the Pro12 allele was associated with type 2 diabetes in this study population.

  15. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Basal ...

  16. Metabolomics: Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) develops over many years, providing an opportunity to consider early prognostic tools that guide interventions to thwart disease. Advancements in analytical chemistry enable quantitation of hundreds of metabolites in biofluids and tissues (metabolomics), providing in...

  17. Using Drosophila to discover mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Kim, Seung K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms of glucose homeostasis are remarkably well conserved between the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. From the initial characterization of insulin signaling in the fly came the identification of downstream metabolic pathways for nutrient storage and utilization. Defects in these pathways lead to phenotypes that are analogous to diabetic states in mammals. These discoveries have stimulated interest in leveraging the fly to better understand the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin insufficiency in the context of ongoing insulin resistance. Although genetic susceptibility is thought to govern the propensity of individuals to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus under appropriate environmental conditions, many of the human genes associated with the disease in genome-wide association studies have not been functionally studied. Recent advances in the phenotyping of metabolic defects have positioned Drosophila as an excellent model for the functional characterization of large numbers of genes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we examine results from studies modeling metabolic disease in the fruit fly and compare findings to proposed mechanisms for diabetic phenotypes in mammals. We provide a systematic framework for assessing the contribution of gene candidates to insulin-secretion or insulin-resistance pathways relevant to diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27053133

  18. Altered body composition in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Heshka, Stanley; Ruggiero, Andrea; Bray, George A.; Foreyt, John; Kahn, Stephen E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Saad, Mohammed; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify differences in amount and distribution of fat and lean soft tissue in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether any differences are affected by race/ethnicity or sex. Design Overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI≥25 kg/m2) Black, White and Hispanic men (490) and women (825) with type 2 diabetes ([mean±SD] age 58.5±6.6; BMI 35.3±5.3) who had a baseline dual energy x-ray absorptiometry whole body scan at the time of enrollment in the Look Ahead clinical trial, and 242 healthy controls, 91 males and 151 females (age 55.3±8.6 y, BMI 30.7±4.2 kg/m2) who were participating in unrelated research and were scanned on the same densitometers. Results Adjusted for covariates, total fat mass was smaller in persons with type 2 diabetes than in controls (−1.4±0.3[SE]; 34.5 vs 35.8 kg, p<0.001) while trunk fat was larger (1.3±0.2[SE]; 19.9 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001) and leg fat was smaller (−1.5±0.2[SE]; 10.7 vs 12.3 kg, p<0.001). The arms of subjects with type 2 diabetes did not have significantly less fat compared to controls. Adjusted trunk lean mass was larger in type 2 diabetes by 0.6 kg (28.4 vs 27.8 kg, p<0.001) while leg lean was smaller by 0.5 kg (18.1 vs 18.6 kg, p<0.001). Conclusions Type 2 diabetes is associated with less total fat, leg fat and leg lean mass and more truncal fat and lean mass than controls. The physiological processes producing these deviations in tissue distribution and their metabolic significance warrant further investigation. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00017953) PMID:18227843

  19. Effect of diet on type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Khazrai, Y M; Defeudis, G; Pozzilli, P

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the fastest growing diseases; the number of people affected by diabetes will soon reach 552 million worldwide, with associated increases in complications and healthcare expenditure. Lifestyle and medical nutrition therapy are considered the keystones of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment, but there is no definite consensus on how to treat this disease with these therapies. The American Diabetes Association has made several recommendations regarding the medical nutrition therapy of diabetes; these emphasize the importance of minimizing macrovascular and microvascular complications in people with diabetes. Four types of diets were reviewed for their effects on diabetes: the Mediterranean diet, a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet, a vegan diet and a vegetarian diet. Each of the four types of diet has been shown to improve metabolic conditions, but the degree of improvement varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate a patient's pathophysiological characteristics in order to determine the diet that will achieve metabolic improvement in each individual. Many dietary regimens are available for patients with type 2 diabetes to choose from, according to personal taste and cultural tradition. It is important to provide a tailor-made diet wherever possible in order to maximize the efficacy of the diet on reducing diabetes symptoms and to encourage patient adherence. Additional randomized studies, both short term (to analyse physiological responses) and long term, could help reduce the multitude of diets currently recommended and focus on a shorter list of useful regimens.

  20. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  1. Mouse Models of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Baribault, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a fast-growing epidemic in industrialized countries, associated with obesity, lack of physical exercise, aging, family history, and ethnic background. Diagnostic criteria are elevated fasting or postprandial blood glucose levels, a consequence of insulin resistance. Early intervention can help patients to revert the progression of the disease together with lifestyle changes or monotherapy. Systemic glucose toxicity can have devastating effects leading to pancreatic beta cell failure, blindness, nephropathy, and neuropathy, progressing to limb ulceration or even amputation. Existing treatments have numerous side effects and demonstrate variability in individual patient responsiveness. However, several emerging areas of discovery research are showing promises with the development of novel classes of antidiabetic drugs.The mouse has proven to be a reliable model for discovering and validating new treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We review here commonly used methods to measure endpoints relevant to glucose metabolism which show good translatability to the diagnostic of type 2 diabetes in humans: baseline fasting glucose and insulin, glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity index, and body type composition. Improvements on these clinical values are essential for the progression of a novel potential therapeutic molecule through a preclinical and clinical pipeline.

  2. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to treat type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paige V; Duca, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The rising global rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity present a significant economic and social burden, underscoring the importance for effective and safe therapeutic options. The success of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, along with the potent glucose-lowering effects of bariatric surgery, highlight the gastrointestinal tract as a potential target for diabetes treatment. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that the gut plays a prominent role in the ability of metformin to lower glucose levels. As such, the current review highlights some of the current and potential pathways in the gut that could be targeted to improve glucose homeostasis, such as changes in nutrient sensing, gut peptides, gut microbiota and bile acids. A better understanding of these pathways will lay the groundwork for novel gut-targeted antidiabetic therapies, some of which have already shown initial promise. PMID:27496374

  3. Genetics of drug response in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    The introduction of several new drug groups into the treatment of type 2 diabetes in the past few decades leads to an increased requirement for an individualized treatment approach. A personalized treatment is important from the point of view of both efficacy and safety. Recent guidelines are based mainly on entirely phenotypic characteristics such as diabetes duration, presence of macrovascular complications, or risk of hypoglycemia with the use of individual drugs. So far, genetic knowledge is used to guide treatment in the monogenic forms of diabetes. With the accumulating pharmacogenetic evidence in type 2 diabetes, there are reasonable expectations that genetics might help in the adjustment of drug doses to reduce severe side effects, as well as to make better therapeutic choices among the drugs available for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25975599

  4. Vegetarian and vegan diets in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Katcher, Heather I; Jenkins, David J A; Cohen, Joshua; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

    2009-05-01

    Vegetarian and vegan diets offer significant benefits for diabetes management. In observational studies, individuals following vegetarian diets are about half as likely to develop diabetes, compared with non-vegetarians. In clinical trials in individuals with type 2 diabetes, low-fat vegan diets improve glycemic control to a greater extent than conventional diabetes diets. Although this effect is primarily attributable to greater weight loss, evidence also suggests that reduced intake of saturated fats and high-glycemic-index foods, increased intake of dietary fiber and vegetable protein, reduced intramyocellular lipid concentrations, and decreased iron stores mediate the influence of plant-based diets on glycemia. Vegetarian and vegan diets also improve plasma lipid concentrations and have been shown to reverse atherosclerosis progression. In clinical studies, the reported acceptability of vegetarian and vegan diets is comparable to other therapeutic regimens. The presently available literature indicates that vegetarian and vegan diets present potential advantages for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Do we need new treatments for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gomez-Peralta, Fernando; Abreu Padín, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus encompasses multiple pathophysiological and clinical situations. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a long and changing natural history. Personal circumstances and preferences also condition the actual effectiveness and safety of drugs used. In recent decades, modern drugs have markedly expanded and improved therapeutic options. However, their effectiveness remains limited in clinical practice. The main objective of decreasing macrovascular complications is not fully proven. Adverse events, especially hypoglycemia and weight gain, are still frequent and decrease treatment adherence. The constant loss of endogenous islet cell reserve is the main determinant of the need for intensified therapies. Current treatments have failed to improve long-term beta cell mass/function. It is desirable to move forward to obtain new drugs that offer solutions sustainable in the long term. These drugs should be able to fit the individual circumstances and preferences of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Triplitt, Curtis L.; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Cersosimo, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic glucose production, and decreased peripheral glucose utilization are the core defects responsible for the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiology of this disease also includes adipocyte insulin resistance (increased lipolysis), reduced incretin secretion/sensitivity, increased glucagon secretion, enhanced renal glucose reabsorption, and brain insulin resistance/neurotransmitter dysfunction. Although current diabetes management focuses on lowering blood glucose, the goal of therapy should be to delay disease progression and eventual treatment failure. Recent innovative treatment approaches target the multiple pathophysiological defects present in type 2 diabetes. Optimal management should include early initiation of combination therapy using multiple drugs with different mechanisms of action. This review examines novel therapeutic options that hold particular promise. PMID:26246766

  7. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy.

  8. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds.

  9. Adherence to therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Luis-Emilio; Alvarez, María; Dilla, Tatiana; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo

    2013-12-01

    Adherence to therapy is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior in taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a healthcare provider. Patients presenting with type 2 diabetes mellitus are initially encouraged to maintain a healthy diet and exercise regimen, followed by early medication that generally includes one or more oral hypoglycemic agents and later may include an injectable treatment. To prevent the complications associated with type 2 diabetes, therapy frequently also includes medications for control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and other disorders, since patients often have more than three or four chronic conditions. Despite the benefits of therapy, studies have indicated that recommended glycemic goals are achieved by less than 50% of patients, which may be associated with decreased adherence to therapies. As a result, hyperglycemia and long-term complications increase morbidity and premature mortality, and lead to increased costs to health services. Reasons for nonadherence are multifactorial and difficult to identify. They include age, information, perception and duration of disease, complexity of dosing regimen, polytherapy, psychological factors, safety, tolerability and cost. Various measures to increase patient satisfaction and increase adherence in type 2 diabetes have been investigated. These include reducing the complexity of therapy by fixed-dose combination pills and less frequent dosing regimens, using medications that are associated with fewer adverse events (hypoglycemia or weight gain), educational initiatives with improved patient-healthcare provider communication, reminder systems and social support to help reduce costs. In the current narrative review, factors that influence adherence to different therapies for type 2 diabetes are discussed, along with outcomes of poor adherence, the economic impact of nonadherence, and strategies aimed at improving

  10. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  11. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis.

  12. Markers of Antioxidant Defense in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gawlik, K.; Naskalski, J. W.; Fedak, D.; Pawlica-Gosiewska, D.; Grudzień, U.; Dumnicka, P.; Małecki, M. T.; Solnica, B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Diabetes is considered a state of increased oxidative stress. This study evaluates blood concentrations of selected markers of antioxidant defense in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. The study included 80 type 2 diabetes patients and 79 apparently healthy controls. Measured markers included ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and uric acid serum, and plasma and/or hemolysate levels. Results. FRAP, uric acid, CRP, and GGT levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetes. Plasma and hemolysate GR was significantly higher whereas GPx activity was significantly lower in patients with diabetes. There were no significant differences in antioxidant defense markers between patients with and without chronic diabetes complications. Fasting serum glucose correlated with plasma GPx, plasma and hemolysate GR, FRAP, and serum GGT, and HbA1c correlated with serum GGT. Only FRAP and serum uric acid were significantly higher in obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) patients with diabetes than in nonobese patients. Conclusions. Some components of antioxidant defense such as GR, uric acid, and GGT are increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the whole system cannot compensate for an enhanced production of ROS as reflected by the trend toward decreased erythrocytes GSH. PMID:26640613

  13. Optimizing combination treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Sibilla, Salvadeo

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining the suggested glycemic control is the most important achievement in order to prevent cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Monotherapy often fails after a period of treatment, so that multiple drugs are needed to achieve effective glycemic control. A number of oral glucose lowering drugs is now available such as metformin, sulfonylureas, non-sulfonylureas secretagogues (metiglinides derivatives), alpha-glucosidases inhibitors, and the newest agent: thiazolidinediones (TZD). The possible associations of oral glucose lowering drugs for optimal treatment of type 2 diabetes are briefly reviewed. In particular, the effects of different classes of drugs on cardiovascular risk factors (and particular hypertension and dyslipidemia) and well recognized cardiovascular disease markers in type 2 diabetes are analyzed: in this context TZD appear the more innovative drugs and have been shown to play a key role in the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and endothelial disfunction in diabetic patients. The possible adverse effects derived from the association of different drug classes are also considered. PMID:18078018

  14. Influence of Bisphenol A on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Provvisiero, Donatella Paola; Pivonello, Claudia; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Negri, Mariarosaria; de Angelis, Cristina; Simeoli, Chiara; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic synthetic compound employed to produce plastics and epoxy resins. It is used as a structural component in polycarbonate beverage bottles and as coating for metal surface in food containers and packaging. The adverse effects of BPA on human health are widely disputed. BPA has been recently associated with a wide variety of medical disorders and, in particular, it was identified as potential endocrine-disrupting compound with diabetogenic action. Most of the clinical observational studies in humans reveal a positive link between BPA exposure, evaluated by the measurement of urinary BPA levels, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical studies on humans and preclinical studies on in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro models indicate that BPA, mostly at low doses, may have a role in increasing type 2 diabetes mellitus developmental risk, directly acting on pancreatic cells, in which BPA induces the impairment of insulin and glucagon secretion, triggers inhibition of cell growth and apoptosis, and acts on muscle, hepatic, and adipose cell function, triggering an insulin-resistant state. The current review summarizes the available evidences regarding the association between BPA and type 2 diabetes mellitus, focusing on both clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27782064

  15. Type-2 diabetes: Current understanding and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ankita; Chawla, Sheetal; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2015-07-01

    The rapid outbreak of type-2 diabetes is one of the largest public health problems around the globe. Particularly, the developing nations are becoming the epicenters of cardiometabolic disorders owing to the change in lifestyle and diet preference besides genetic predisposition. Diabetes has become a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in South Asian countries including India. The pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes primarily initiates with inadequacy of pancreatic islet β-cells to respond to chronic fuel surfeit and hence causing glycemic load, insulin resistance, and obesity. Urban Indian life is threatened with unhealthy high calorie diet and sedentary habits, and thus impairing the metabolic status of "thin-fat Indians" and rendering them more vulnerable to metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the metabolic dysfunction may be triggered off quite early in life due to poor maternal health and impairment in intrauterine programming and, particularly in rural India. The impaired fetal development affects the health status in later stage of life by promoting obesity, insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes, and cardiovascular complications. Therefore, the preventive and therapeutic approaches focus on a holistic strategy to improve maternal and child health, promote balanced diet and physical exercise in combination with pharmacological intervention of reducing/checking hyperglycemia, obesity, and cardiovascular complications. This review summarizes the epidemiology, mechanisms, and risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disorders with a focus on the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26177573

  16. The ZONE Diet and Metabolic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stulnig, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue, which contributes to obesity-associated complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The increased inflammatory response seems to be directly related to modern nutrition, particularly aspects of fat quality and macronutrient composition. We have recently published an observational study investigating the practicability and effects of a combined dietary intervention with increased relative protein content and low-glycemic-index carbohydrates, supplemented with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on metabolic control and inflammatory parameters in real-life situations in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary efficacy parameter was the change in HbA1c, and secondary parameters included change in systemic inflammation (measured by ultrasensitive C-reactive protein), body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Counseling a protein-enriched and low-glycemic-index diet supplemented with long-chain omega-3 PUFAs in a real-life clinical setting improved glycemic control, waist circumference, and silent inflammation in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists in type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-12-01

    Type-2 diabetes is closely related to abdominal obesity and is generally associated with other cardiometabolic risk factors, resulting in a risk of major cardiovascular disease. Several animal and human observations suggest that the endocannabinoid system is over-active in the presence of abdominal obesity and/or diabetes. Both central and peripheral endocannabinoid actions, via the activation of CB1 receptors, promote weight gain and associated metabolic changes. Rimonabant, the first selective CB(1) receptor blocker in clinical use, has been shown to reduce body weight, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood pressure, insulin resistance index and C-reactive protein levels, and to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and adiponectin concentrations in both non-diabetic and diabetic overweight/obese patients. In addition, a 0.5-0.7% reduction in HbA1c levels was observed in metformin- or sulphonylurea-treated patients with type-2 diabetes and in drug-naïve diabetic patients. Almost half of the metabolic changes, including HbA1c reduction, could not be explained by weight loss, suggesting that there are direct peripheral effects. Rimonabant was generally well-tolerated, and the safety profile was similar in diabetic and non-diabetic patients, with a higher incidence of depressed mood disorders, nausea and dizziness. In conclusion, the potential role of rimonabant in overweight/obese patients with type-2 diabetes and at high risk of cardiovascular disease deserves much consideration.

  18. Nutritional Management of the overweight child with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Yauckoes, Kattia M; Higgins, Laurie A

    2005-09-01

    In light of the strong association between excess weight and type 2 diabetes, the nutritional management of the child with type 2 diabetes often focuses on changing dietary and physical activity habits to normalize weight, instill long-term healthy habits, and provide glycemic control. A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of childhood obesity should include the child's family and caregivers to be most effective. Weight goals in children should be based on the age of the child, the extent of overweight, and the presence of complications. Likewise, physical activity is an important component of treatment and should be titrated to the child's age, ability and overweight status. Efforts to avoid the development of obesity, and potentially type 2 diabetes, should be started early in the child's life. Education and fostering a healthy lifestyle during childhood is the best defense to slow down or reverse the obesity epidemic in our society that is now affecting even the youngest of children, setting them up for potentially life-threatening diseases in the future.

  19. Exercise for hepatic fat accumulation in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Elisabetta; Moghetti, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by frequent ectopic fat accumulation in several tissues and organs. In particular, a number of studies showed that these subjects frequently have hepatic fat accumulation, which may play a role in the metabolic abnormalities typical of diabetes and has been also linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In the last decade, the effect of exercise on ectopic fat content of type 2 diabetic patients has raised growing interest. However, there are only a few small randomized controlled trials on this topic. Results from these intervention studies indicate that exercise training, independent of dietary modifications, may reduce hepatic fat content and serum transaminases in these patients, suggesting that exercise per se may be an effective strategy to be combined with the traditional dietary interventions. As regards the different training modalities, there is recent evidence that both aerobic and resistance exercise may equally reduce hepatic fat accumulation in type 2 diabetic subjects. However, information regarding the effect of exercise on liver histology and fat accumulation in other ectopic sites is still very limited.

  20. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  1. Lipids and lipoproteins in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M

    2004-06-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a clustering of interrelated plasma lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities, which include reduced HDL cholesterol, a predominance of small dense LDL particles, and elevated triglyceride levels. Each of these dyslipidemic features is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased hepatic secretion of large triglyceride-rich VLDL and impaired clearance of VLDL appears to be of central importance in the pathophysiology of this dyslipidemia. Small dense LDL particles arise from the intravascular processing of specific larger VLDL precursors. Typically, reduced plasma HDL levels in type 2 diabetes are manifest as reductions in the HDL(2b) subspecies and relative or absolute increases in smaller denser HDL(3b) and HDL(3c). Although behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise can improve diabetic dyslipidemia, for most patients, pharmacological therapy is needed to reach treatment goals. There are several classes of medications that can be used to treat lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, including statins, fibrates, niacin, and thiazolidinediones. Clinical trials have shown significant improvement in coronary artery disease after diabetic dyslipidemia treatment.

  2. Clinical efficacy of Mehamudgara vati in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Ila; Chandola, H. M.; Joshi, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance is the main problem that is associated with a cluster of conditions such as obesity and hyperlipidemia. The present study was designed with the objective to evaluate the role of Mehamudgara vati (MMV), which was expected to work at the level of Medodhatwagni due to its Medohara properties, to have an effective control on type 2 diabetes. To fulfill the objective, known patients of type 2 diabetes attending the OPD and IPD of Kayachikitsa Department, IPGT and RA, were selected and were divided in two groups. In Group A, MMV was given 3 tab. thrice a day with lukewarm water for 3 months and in Group B, the patients who were already taking modern antidiabetic treatment, although their blood sugar level was not well under control, were additionally given MMV in the same manner. The formulation has shown a highly significant decrease in the fasting and post-prandial blood sugar level. The formulation has also shown a synergistic action when combined with the modern antidiabetic drugs due to its known hypolipidemic, hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective, antihyperglycemic, antistress, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. PMID:22131755

  3. Pharmacotherapy of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Navigating Current and New Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lew, Kelley Newlin; Wick, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The keys to optimal glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes are early diagnosis and interventions that include lifestyle changes and pharmacotherapy. This review discusses therapeutic goals and current options for treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26863705

  4. Management of progressive type 2 diabetes: role of insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chemitiganti, Ramachandra Rahul V; Spellman, Craig W

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is an effective treatment for achieving tight glycemic control and improving clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes. While insulin therapy is required from the onset of diagnosis in type 1 disease, its role in type 2 diabetes requires consideration as to when to initiate and advance therapy. In this article, we review a case study that unfolds over 5 years and discuss the therapeutic decision points, initiation and advancement of insulin regimens, and analyze new data regarding the advantages and disadvantages of tight management of glucose levels. PMID:19573240

  5. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D may modify risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes is uncertain. To determine prospectively the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and risk of incident type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity and other known diabet...

  6. Hemoglobin concentration in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Harusato, Ichiko; Fukui, Michiaki; Tanaka, Muhei; Shiraishi, Emi; Senmaru, Takafumi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2010-06-01

    Anemia is a common but often overlooked complication of diabetes. We investigated the relationship between hemoglobin concentration and various factors as well as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hemoglobin concentration was measured in 319 men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We evaluated the relationship between hemoglobin concentration and various factors including age, body mass index, and glycemic control, as well as between hemoglobin concentration and pulse wave velocity or ankle-brachial index (n = 209) and between hemoglobin concentration and carotid intima-media thickness or plaque score (n = 125). Mean hemoglobin concentration was 14.2 +/- 0.80 g/dL. Body mass index (r = 0.340, P < .0001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.219, P = .0011) were positively associated with hemoglobin concentration, whereas age (r = -0.388, P < .0001), glycated albumin (r = -0.148, P = .0121), serum creatinine concentration (r = -0.206, P = .0019), and log (urinary albumin excretion) (r = -0.188, P = .0010) were negatively associated with hemoglobin concentration. Multiple regression analysis identified age (beta = -0.222, P = .0019), body mass index (beta = 0.145, P = .0432), systolic blood pressure (beta = 0.214, P = .0015), total cholesterol concentration (beta = 0.170, P = .0077), and serum creatinine concentration (beta = -0.181, P = .0045) as independent determinants of hemoglobin concentration. No significant association was observed between hemoglobin concentration and serum erythropoietin concentration (r = -0.079, P = .2980). Negative correlations were found between hemoglobin concentration and pulse wave velocity (r = -0.289, P < .0001) and between hemoglobin concentration and plaque score (r = -0.275, P = .0024). In conclusion, hemoglobin concentration was associated with various factors; and decreased hemoglobin concentration was associated with subclinical markers of atherosclerosis in men with type 2

  7. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  8. Strategies to Make Ramadan Fasting Safer in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lee, Jun Yang; Tan, Christina San San; Wong, Chee Piau

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ramadan is the holy month for Muslims whereby they fast from predawn to after sunset and is observed by all healthy Muslim adults as well as a large population of type 2 diabetic Muslims. To determine the comparative effectiveness of various strategies that have been used for type 2 diabetic Muslim who fast during Ramadan. A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies (RCT) as well as observational studies for patients with type 2 diabetes who fasted during Ramadan was conducted. Eight databases were searched from January 1980 through October 2015 for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently screened and assessed study for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. A network meta-analysis for each outcome was fitted separately, combining direct and indirect evidence for each comparison. Twenty-nine studies, 16 RCTs and 13 observational studies each met the inclusion criteria. The most common strategy used was drug changes during the Ramadan period, which found that the use of DPP-4 (Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor -4) inhibitors were associated with a reduction in incidence of experiencing hypoglycemia during Ramadan in both RCTs (pooled relative risk: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.44–0.72) as well as in observational studies (pooled relative risk: 0.27; 0.09–0.75). Ramadan-focused education was shown to be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in observational studies but not RCTs (0.25 versus 1.00). Network meta-analyses suggest that incretin mimetics can reduce the risk of hypoglycemia by nearly 1.5 times. The newer antidiabetic agents appear to lower the risk of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control when compared with sulfonylureas. Ramadan-focused education shows to be a promising strategy but more rigorous examination from RCTs are required. PMID:26765440

  9. Pharmacogenetics: Implications for Modern Type 2 Diabetes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Harald; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical treatment studies have reported remarkable interindividual variability in the response to pharmaceutical drugs, and uncovered the existence of inadequate treatment response, non-response, and even adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenetics addresses the impact of genetic variants on treatment outcome including side-effects. In recent years, it has also entered the field of clinical diabetes research. In modern type 2 diabetes therapy, metformin is established as first-line drug. The latest pharmaceutical developments, including incretin mimetics, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (gliptins), and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (gliflozins), are currently experiencing a marked increase in clinical use, while the prescriptions of α-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas, meglitinides (glinides), and thiazolidinediones (glitazones) are declining, predominantly because of reported side-effects. This review summarizes the current knowledge about gene-drug interactions observed in therapy studies with the above drugs. We report drug interactions with candidate genes involved in the pharmacokinetics (e.g., drug transporters) and pharmacodynamics (drug targets and downstream signaling steps) of the drugs, with known type 2 diabetes risk genes and previously unknown genes derived from hypothesis-free approaches such as genome-wide association studies. Moreover, some new and promising candidate genes for future pharmacogenetic assessment are highlighted. Finally, we critically appraise the current state of type 2 diabetes pharmacogenetics in the light of its impact on therapeutic decisions, and we refer to major problems, and make suggestions for future efforts in this field to help improve the clinical relevance of the results, and to establish genetically determined treatment failure. PMID:27111121

  10. Atorvastatin prevents type 2 diabetes mellitus--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Sri Venkata; Aslam, Mohammad; Galav, Vikas; Bhattacharya, Swapan Kumar; Jafri, Aiman Abbas

    2014-04-01

    Recent reports of increased diabetes risk have raised concerns regarding the use of statins. The present study was therefore planned to clarify whether atorvastatin can prevent diabetes development in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eight week old male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups (n = 12 each group). Group A was given standard chow diet, while group B and group C were offered high sucrose diet. In addition to high sucrose diet, group C was given atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) from beginning of study till 26th week. After 26 weeks, a low dose of streptozotocin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to all 3 groups and further followed for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests were done at week 4, 26 and week 30. Development of impaired glucose tolerance at week 26 (16.66% vs 100%, P = <0.001) and diabetes at week 30 (16.66% vs 81.81%, P = 0.002) was significantly lower in rats pretreated with atorvastatin along with high sucrose diet viz group C compared to group B rats who received high sucrose diet only respectively. Also, metabolic indices like body weight, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose area under the curve (Gl-AUC) were significantly lower in group C compared to group B (P = <0.05) while insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also lower in group C (P = 0.05). This study clearly demonstrates for the first time in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus that atorvastatin prevents development of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Heart Failure Considerations of Antihyperglycemic Medications for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; McGuire, Darren K

    2016-05-27

    Prevalent and incident heart failure (HF) is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with risk directly associated with the severity of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, mortality is increased ≈10-fold in patients with versus without HF. Reducing HF with antihyperglycemic therapies, however, has been unsuccessful until recently. In fact, HF as an important outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be heterogeneously modulated by antihyperglycemic medications, as evidenced by results from cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) and large observational cohort studies. Appropriately powered and executed CVOTs are necessary to truly evaluate cardiovascular safety and efficacy of new antihyperglycemic medications, as reflected by the guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory agencies since 2008. In light of the best available evidence at present, metformin and the sodium-glucose-co-transporter 2-inhibitor empagliflozin seem to be especially advantageous with regard to HF effects, with their use associated with reduced HF events and improved mortality. Acarbose, the dipeptidyl-peptidase 4-inhibitor sitagliptin, the glucagon-like peptide 1-receptor agonist lixisenatide based on presently available CVOT results comprise reasonable additional options, as significant harm in terms of HF has been excluded for those drugs. Additions to this list are anticipated pending results of ongoing CVOTs. Although no HF harm was seen in CVOTs for insulin or sulfonylureas, they should be used only with caution in patients with HF, given their established high risk for hypoglycemia and some uncertainties on their safety in patients with HF derived from epidemiological observations. Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with HF>New York Heart Association I, despite some benefits suggested by CVOT subanalyses. PMID:27230644

  12. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area. PMID:25960181

  13. A proteomic approach to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    López-Villar, Elena; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Chowen, Julie A; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type diabetes 2 has increased dramatically resulting in an increased interest in its biomedical relevance. However, the mechanisms that trigger the development of diabetes type 2 in obese patients remain largely unknown. Scientific, clinical and pharmaceutical communities are dedicating vast resources to unravel this issue by applying different omics tools. During the last decade, the advances in proteomic approaches and the Human Proteome Organization have opened and are opening a new door that may be helpful in the identification of patients at risk and to improve current therapies. Here, we briefly review some of the advances in our understanding of type 2 diabetes that have occurred through the application of proteomics. We also review, in detail, the current improvements in proteomic methodologies and new strategies that could be employed to further advance our understanding of this pathology. By applying these new proteomic advances, novel therapeutic and/or diagnostic protein targets will be discovered in the obesity/Type 2 diabetes area.

  14. Falls risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Vinik, Etta J; Colberg, Sheri R; Morrison, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a major health issue for older adults, especially for those who develop type 2 diabetes who must contend with age-related declines in balance, muscle strength, and walking ability. They must also contend with health-related issues specific to the disease process. Given the general association between these variables and falls, being able to identify which measures negatively impact on balance in older diabetic persons is a critical step. Moreover, designing specific interventions to target these physiologic functions underlying balance and gait control will produce the greatest benefit for reducing falls in older persons with diabetes.

  15. [Primary combined oral antidiabetic therapy in type-2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gábor; Baranyi, Eva

    2002-10-27

    New target values of the metabolic control and recent directions in the therapeutic strategies of type 2 diabetes mellitus are overviewed. Attention is called to the atherogenic effect of blood glucose elevations exceeding physiological level, even when only post-prandial and with short duration. The significance of early phase prandial insulin secretion in the metabolic state is underlined, and the related new therapeutic possibilities are discussed. Practical guidelines are given to the introduction of oral antidiabetic therapy, and the importance of the early, aggressive, combined treatment with a complex mechanism of action is emphasized.

  16. [Prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lebherz, Corinna; Lehrke, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The modern life style is often characterized by a lack of physical activity as well as unhealthy diet leading to a worldwide rise in obesity. This goes along with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by an accelerated atherosclerosis. Life style changes and normalization of body weight therefore represent the cornerstones of diabetes prevention. In addition, a multi-factorial approach focusing on cardiovascular risk factors like dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia enables an effective means for the prevention of micro- or macrovascular complications. PMID:25924043

  17. Impaired Retinal Vasodilator Responses in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.J.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Shivkumar, Vikram; Smith, Bruce; Quillen, David; Gabbay, Robert A.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes, endothelial dysfunction and subsequent structural damage to blood vessels can lead to heart attacks, retinopathy and strokes. However, it is unclear whether prediabetic subjects exhibit microvascular dysfunction indicating early stages of arteriosclerosis and vascular risk. The purpose of this study was to examine whether retinal reactivity may be impaired early in the hyperglycemic continuum and may be associated with markers of inflammation. Methods Individuals with prediabetes (n = 22), type 2 diabetes (n = 25) and healthy age and body composition matched controls (n = 19) were studied. We used the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer to assess retinal vasoreactivity (percent change in vessel diameter) during a flickering light stimulation. Fasting highly sensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of inflammation, was measured in blood plasma. Results Prediabetic and diabetic individuals had attenuated peak vasodilator and relative amplitude changes in retinal vein diameters to the flickering light stimulus compared to healthy controls (peak dilation: prediabetic subjects 3.3 ± 1.8 %, diabetic subjects 3.3 ± 2.1% controls 5.6 ± 2.6%, p = .001; relative amplitude: prediabetic subjects 4.3 ± 2.2%, diabetic subjects 5.0 ± 2.6% and control subjects 7.2 ± 3.2%, p = .003). Similar findings were observed in retinal arteries. Levels of hs-CRP were not associated with either retinal vessel response parameters. Conclusion Retinal reactivity was impaired in prediabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals in parallel with reduced insulin sensitivity but not associated with levels of hs-CRP. Retinal vasoreactivity measurements may be a sensitive tool to assess early vascular risk. PMID:23742315

  18. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  19. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  20. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  1. Adipose tissue angiogenesis: impact on obesity and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Silvia; Gealekman, Olga

    2014-03-01

    The growth and function of tissues are critically dependent on their vascularization. Adipose tissue is capable of expanding many-fold during adulthood, therefore requiring the formation of new vasculature to supply growing and proliferating adipocytes. The expansion of the vasculature in adipose tissue occurs through angiogenesis, where new blood vessels develop from those pre-existing within the tissue. Inappropriate angiogenesis may underlie adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity, which in turn increases type-2 diabetes risk. In addition, genetic and developmental factors involved in vascular patterning may define the size and expandability of diverse adipose tissue depots, which are also associated with type-2 diabetes risk. Moreover, the adipose tissue vasculature appears to be the niche for pre-adipocyte precursors, and factors that affect angiogenesis may directly impact the generation of new adipocytes. Here we review recent advances on the basic mechanisms of angiogenesis, and on the role of angiogenesis in adipose tissue development and obesity. A substantial amount of data points to a deficit in adipose tissue angiogenesis as a contributing factor to insulin resistance and metabolic disease in obesity. These emerging findings support the concept of the adipose tissue vasculature as a source of new targets for metabolic disease therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  2. Attitudes and beliefs among Mexican Americans about type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Thompson, Beti; Tejeda, Silvia; Godina, Ruby

    2004-11-01

    Hispanics in the United States have a disproportionately high risk for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) compared with non-Hispanic whites. Little is known of the attitudes and beliefs about diabetes in this group. Using data from six focus groups of 42 Mexican Americans (14 men and 28 women), we characterized perceptions about the causes of and treatments for type 2 diabetes. Many participants believed diabetes is caused by having a family history of the disease, eating a diet high in fat or sugar, and engaging in minimal exercise. Experiencing strong emotions such as fright (susto), intense anger (coraje), or sadness and depression (tristeza) was also thought to precipitate diabetes. Nearly all participants expressed the belief that it is important to follow doctors' recommendations for diet and exercise, oral medication or insulin; many also cited herbal therapies, such as prickly pear cactus (nopal) and aloe vera (savila) as effective treatments. These findings may be useful in designing interventions to reduce the burden of diabetes in Hispanic populations. PMID:15531816

  3. [Management of type 2 diabetes: from guidelines to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Rupa; Vora, Jiten

    2010-09-01

    The current era is seeing an unprecedented rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, related to increasing adiposity levels. In addition, the complex nature of the disease with a much younger patient group than before makes prescribing a challenging task for physicians today. The advent of incretin based agents makes therapeutics exciting but warrants judicious use given the higher prescription costs and limited safety data. At the same time, mounting evidence not only supports a "treat early" approach but also cautions against achieving tight glycaemic control too quickly in certain patient groups particularly those of long disease duration and evidence of cardiovascular disease. In this conundrum, guidelines help to bring the best clinical evidence closer to practise. In this chapter, we discuss the latest clinical guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes based on recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (UK). At the same time we highlight the limitations of guidelines as they are unable to provide options for all "real life" scenarios. Though guidelines are instrumental in bringing evidence closer to practise, it is ultimately up to the clinician to rationalise therapy as per the needs of the individual patient. At the same time, it is also crucial to achieve meaningful outcomes in patients' lives especially in the current "pay for performance" culture in health care with the aim of providing world class care to each and every patient with diabetes. PMID:21420532

  4. Sphingolipids in Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S.B.; Ross, J.S.; Cowart, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disease, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, constitutes a major emerging health crisis in Western nations. Although the symptoms and clinical pathology and physiology of these conditions are well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease process have largely remained obscure. Sphingolipids, a lipid class with both signaling and structural properties, have recently emerged as key players in most major tissues affected by diabetes and are required components in the molecular etiology of this disease. Indeed, sphingolipids have been shown to mediate loss of insulin sensitivity, to promote the characteristic diabetic pro-inflammatory state, and to induce cell death and dysfunction in important organs such as the pancreas and heart. Furthermore, plasma sphingolipid levels are emerging as potential biomarkers for the decompensation of insulin resistance to frank type 2 diabetes. Despite these discoveries, the roles of specific sphingolipid species and sphingolipid metabolic pathways remain obscure, and newly developed experimental approaches must be employed to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms necessary for rational drug development and other clinical applications. PMID:23563667

  5. Total Antioxidant Status in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M; Akkawi, Mutaz A; Ashareef, Abdelkareem A; Almasri, Zaher A; Bader, Khaldoun A; Khammash, Umaiyeh M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in type 2 diabetic and normal Palestinian subjects as well as the major factors influencing TAS levels. A sample of convenience composed of 212 type 2 diabetic and 208 normal subjects above the age of 40 were recruited. Only 9.8% of the subjects had normal body mass index (BMI) levels (<25), 29% were overweight (≥25 to <30), and 61.2% were obese (≥30). The mean levels of TAS were significantly higher in diabetic compared to control subjects (2.18 versus 1.84 mM Trolox, P = 0.001) and in hypertensive subjects compared to subjects with normal blood pressure (BP). Mean TAS levels were higher in obese compared to nonobese subjects (2.12 versus 1.85 mM Trolox, P = 0.001). Mean TAS levels were similarly higher in subjects with high fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to normal FPG (2.19 versus 1.90 mM Trolox) and high HbA1c (≥6.5%) compared to HbA1c < 6.5% (2.14 versus 1.91 mM Trolox). Multivariate analysis revealed that only diabetic status (P = 0.032) and the level of education (P = 0.036) were significantly associated with TAS. In conclusion diabetic patients had 18.5% increase in TAS levels compared to control subjects. PMID:26090472

  6. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  7. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Díez-Espino, Javier; Formiga, Francesc; Lafita Tejedor, Javier; Rodríguez Mañas, Leocadio; González-Sarmiento, Enrique; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Sangrós, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly represents a major challenge both in terms of clinical management and public health. Aging is causing a marked increase in the pandemic of diabetes in elderly people. However, scientific evidence to support the most appropriate treatment for diabetes in the elderly is scarce. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population, which includes subjects with very different functional and cognitive capacities, co-morbidities, and life expectancy, it is critical to make a comprehensive assessment from a biopsychosocial perspective, to address the vascular risk factors integrally, and to establish individually tailored targets for glycemic control. In frail elderly or individuals with a short life expectancy, it may be reasonable to maintain HbA1c between 7.6%-8.5%. The therapeutic strategy for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes should be individualized and agreed with the patient and their caregivers, according to the objective. Improving quality of life, assuring patient safety and avoiding the adverse effects of antidiabetic treatment should be prioritized. Given the increased susceptibility of the elderly to severe hypoglycemia and its consequences, antidiabetic therapies that minimize the risk of hypoglycemic events should be selected.

  8. Dulaglutide (LY-2189265) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-01-01

    Dulaglutide is a new once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the management of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. It stimulates dose-dependent insulin secretion and reduces glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner. Efficacy on blood glucose control and safety were demonstrated in the large AWARD program in type 2 diabetic patients treated with diet, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin lispro with or without metformin, confirming findings of pilot studies in Caucasian patients and data in Japanese patients. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly was superior to metformin, sitagliptin, insulin glargine and exenatide twice daily, and non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily regarding the reduction in glycated hemoglobin. A modest but significant weight loss was consistently observed. Most frequent adverse events were transient and generally mild gastrointestinal disturbances. Clinical outcomes of dulaglutide will not be known until the large prospective cardiovascular outcome trial REWIND is complete.

  9. Dulaglutide (LY-2189265) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-01-01

    Dulaglutide is a new once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for the management of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. It stimulates dose-dependent insulin secretion and reduces glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner. Efficacy on blood glucose control and safety were demonstrated in the large AWARD program in type 2 diabetic patients treated with diet, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin lispro with or without metformin, confirming findings of pilot studies in Caucasian patients and data in Japanese patients. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg once weekly was superior to metformin, sitagliptin, insulin glargine and exenatide twice daily, and non-inferior to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily regarding the reduction in glycated hemoglobin. A modest but significant weight loss was consistently observed. Most frequent adverse events were transient and generally mild gastrointestinal disturbances. Clinical outcomes of dulaglutide will not be known until the large prospective cardiovascular outcome trial REWIND is complete. PMID:26761217

  10. Low cost sensing technology for type 2 diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarswat, Prashant; Free, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Alpha-hydroxybutyrate (2-hydroxybutyrate or α-HB) is becoming more widely recognized as an important metabolic biomarker that has been shown to be highly correlated with prediabetes and other metabolic diseases. In 2012 there were 86 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom are not aware they have prediabetes, but could be diagnosed and treated to prevent type 2 diabetes if a simple, low-cost, convenient test were available. We have developed new, low-cost, accurate α-HB detection methods that can be used for the detection and monitoring of diseases such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction, and early hyperglycemia. The new sensing method utilizes a diol recognition moiety, additives and a photoinitiator to detect α-HB at levels near 1 micro g/l in the presence of serum compounds such as lactic acid, sodium pyruvate, and glucose. The objective of this research is to improve the understanding of the interactions that enhance α-HB detection to enable additional improvements in α-HB detection as well as improvements in other biosensor applications.

  11. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-06-25

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  12. Homocysteine Metabolism in ZDF (Type 2) Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wijekoon, Enoka P.; Hall, Beatrice; Ratnam, Shobhitha; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Brosnan, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. We determined the effects of insulin resistance and of type 2 diabetes on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism using Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF/Gmi fa/fa and ZDF/Gmi fa/?). Plasma total Hcy was reduced in ZDF fa/fa rats by 24% in the pre-diabetic insulin-resistant stage, while in the frank diabetic stage there was a 59% reduction. Hepatic activities of several enzymes that play a role in the removal of Hcy: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase, and betaine:Hcy methyltransferase (BHMT) were increased as was methionine adenosyltransferase. CBS and BHMT mRNA levels and the hepatic level of S-adenosylmethionine were also increased in the ZDF fa/fa rats. Studies with primary hepatocytes showed that Hcy export and the transsulfuration flux in cells from ZDF fa/fa rats were particularly sensitive to betaine. Interestingly, liver betaine concentration was found to be significantly lower in the ZDf fa/fa rats at both 5 and 11 weeks. These results emphasize the importance of betaine metabolism in determining plasma Hcy levels in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16249451

  13. Type 2 diabetes in children: a growing epidemic.

    PubMed

    St Onge, Erin L; Motycka, Carol A; Rose, Renee L

    2006-10-01

    In the pediatric population, type 2 diabetes has become a growing concern. A correlation appears to exist among type 2 diabetes in children, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. If obesity and diabetes are left untreated, conditions such as cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, and retinopathy may result as well. These conditions indicate the incredible strain on the health care system caused by diabetes and obesity. This strain may be eased by logical treatments such as exercise and healthy eating habits for the child and family. However, these lifestyle changes are not always effective in controlling blood sugar. When lifestyle changes do not yield positive results, the clinician must decide which (if any) pharmacological treatments are safe to use in the pediatric population. Orlistat and sibutramine have been studied in children as treatments for obesity and appear to be safe and effective for this population. Metformin and insulin are among the medications approved to treat diabetes in children and adolescents. Healthcare practitioners must play a role in educating parents and their children about the effects of obesity on the development of diseases like diabetes, as well as various therapies used to manage diabetes. In addition, healthcare practitioners can assist patients and their parents in understanding the benefits and risks of medications used in the treatment of the disease, assistance that may result in them making informed decisions regarding their overall health.

  14. Renal histopathology of a baboon model with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Choles, Hernan; Abboud, Hanna E; Lee, Shuko; Shade, Robert E; Rice, Karen S; Carey, K Dee; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Barnes, Jeffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Naturally occurring type 2 diabetes has been found in a colony of baboons. Ongoing characterization of the baboon colony maintained at the Southwest National Primate Research Center has revealed a significant range of glucose sensitivity with some animals clearly diabetic.   Seven baboons, four with diabetes and three without diabetes, underwent histopathological investigation. Three diabetic animals were diagnosed using fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C, and intravenous glucose tolerance test, and a fourth one was known to have hyperglycemia. One control baboon and three baboons with diabetes had microalbuminuria. On kidney biopsy, diabetic baboons had thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix expansion compared to controls. Immunohistochemistry showed the diabetic animals had increased mesangial expression of cellular fibronectin ED-A. Two diabetic animals with microalbuminuria had evidence of mesangiolysis with the formation of an early nodule. One diabetic animal had a Kimmestiel-Wilson nodule. We conclude that the baboon represents a useful primate model of diabetes and nephropathy that resembles the nephropathy associated with type 2 diabetes in humans.

  15. Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was extremely limited regarding other daily physical activities such as gardening and housework in patients with T2D. Recent studies have suggested daily physical activity, including non-exercise activity thermogenesis, to be favorably associated with metabolic risks and mortality. However, well-designed longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate its effects on overall health. PMID:27350847

  16. Cardioprotective effects of magnesium valproate in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhoomika M; Raghunathan, Suchi; Porwal, Urvashi

    2014-04-01

    We have evaluated the effect of magnesium valproate (210 mg/kg/day, p.o.) in type 2 diabetes induced cardiovascular complications induced by streptozotocin (STZ, 90 mg/kg, i.p.) in neonatal wistar rats. Various biochemical, cardiovascular and hemodynamic parameters were measured at the end of 8 weeks of treatment. STZ produced significant hyperglycaemia, hypoinsulinemia and dyslipidemia, which was prevented by magnesium valproate treatment. STZ produced increase in Creatinine Kinase, C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase levels and treatment with magnesium valproate produced reduction in these levels. STZ produced increase in cardiac and LV hypertrophy index, LV/RV ratio, LV collagen deposition and LV cardiomyocyte diameter which were decreased by magnesium valproate treatment. Magnesium valproate also prevented STZ induced hemodynamic alterations and oxidative stress. These results were further supported by histopathological studies in which magnesium valproate showed marked reduction in fibrosis and cardiac fiber disarray. In conclusion, our data suggests that magnesium valproate is beneficial as an anti-diabetic agent in type-2 diabetes mellitus and also prevents its cardiac complications.

  17. Following in the Footsteps of the North Karelia Project: Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Peltonen, Markku

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence as well as actual number of people with type 2 diabetes has been increasing in Finland during the past decades, in parallel with an increase in overweight and obesity. Besides obesity, population aging is among the main drivers of increasing numbers of diabetic patients. Type 2 diabetes brings along complications, most importantly cardiovascular diseases, and increasing type 2 diabetes prevalence has also been suggested to lead to a new upward turn in cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, it is important to implement activities to prevent type 2 diabetes. We present the trial evidence for the prevention of type 2 diabetes with emphasis on the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study findings. Furthermore, we discuss the practical implementation of screening of individuals for high type 2 diabetes risk and prevention of type 2 diabetes in Finland at the population level and describe how they have contributed to European level initiatives.

  18. Effects of Intensive Glucose Lowering in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels would reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who had either established cardiovascular disease or additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods In this randomized study, 10,251 patients (mean age, 62.2 years) with a median glycated hemoglobin level of 8.1% were assigned to receive intensive therapy (targeting a glycated hemoglobin level below 6.0%) or standard therapy (targeting a level from 7.0 to 7.9%). Of these patients, 38% were women, and 35% had had a previous cardiovascular event. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The finding higher mortality in the intensive-therapy group led to a discontinuation of intensive therapy after a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up. Results At 1 year, stable median glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.4% and 7.5% were achieved in the intensive-therapy group and the standard-therapy group, respectively. During follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 352 patients in the intensive-therapy group, as compared with 371 in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.04; P = 0.16). At the same time, 257 patients in the intensive-therapy group died, as compared with 203 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.46; P = 0.04). Hypoglycemia requiring assistance and weight gain of more than 10 kg were more frequent in the intensive-therapy group (P<0.001). Conclusions As compared with standard therapy, the use of intensive therapy to target normal glycated hemoglobin levels for 3.5 years increased mortality and did not significantly reduce major cardiovascular events. These findings identify a previously unrecognized

  19. Risk Prediction for Early CKD in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peggy; Lee, Shun Fu; Heinze, Georg; Clase, Catherine M.; Tobe, Sheldon; Teo, Koon K.; Gerstein, Hertzel; Mann, Johannes F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Quantitative data for prediction of incidence and progression of early CKD are scarce in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, two risk prediction models were developed for incidence and progression of CKD after 5.5 years and the relative effect of predictors were ascertained. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Baseline and prospective follow-up data of two randomized clinical trials, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN), were used as development and independent validation cohorts, respectively. Individuals aged ≥55 years with type 2 diabetes and normo- or microalbuminuria at baseline were included. Incidence or progression of CKD after 5.5 years was defined as new micro- or macroalbuminuria, doubling of creatinine, or ESRD. The competing risk of death was considered as an additional outcome state in the multinomial logistic models. Results Of the 6766 ONTARGET participants with diabetes, 1079 (15.9%) experienced incidence or progression of CKD, and 1032 (15.3%) died. The well calibrated, parsimonious laboratory prediction model incorporating only baseline albuminuria, eGFR, sex, and age exhibited an externally validated c-statistic of 0.68 and an R2 value of 10.6%. Albuminuria, modeled to depict the difference between baseline urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and the threshold for micro- or macroalbuminuria, was mostly responsible for the predictive performance. Inclusion of clinical predictors, such as glucose control, diabetes duration, number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs, previous vascular events, or vascular comorbidities, increased the externally validated c-statistic and R2 value only to 0.69 and 12.1%, respectively. Explained variation was largely driven by renal and not clinical predictors. Conclusions Albuminuria and eGFR were the most important factors to predict onset and

  20. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Stephanie T.; Hsia, Daniel S.; Chacko, Shaji K.; Rodriguez, Luisa M.; Haymond, Morey W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Methods Basal rates (μmol kgFFM−1 min−1) of gluconeogenesis (2H20), glycogenolysis and glycerol production ([2H5] glycerol) were measured in 18 adolescents (nine treatment naive diabetic and nine normal-glucose-tolerant obese adolescents). Results Type 2 diabetes was associated with higher gluconeogenesis (9.2±0.6 vs 7.0±0.3 μmol kgFFM−1 min−1, p < 0.01), plasma fasting glucose (7.0±0.6 vs 5.0±0.2 mmol/l, p = 0.004) and insulin (300±30 vs 126±31 pmol/l, p = 0.001). Glucose production and glycogenolysis were similar between the groups (15.4±0.3 vs 12.4±1.4 μmol kgFFM−1 min−1, p = 0.06; and 6.2±0.8 vs 5.3±0.7 μmol kgFFM−1 min−1, p = 0.5, respectively). After controlling for differences in adiposity, gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose production were higher in diabetic youth (p ≤ 0.02). Glycerol concentration (84±6 vs 57±6 μmol/l, p = 0.01) and glycerol production (5.0±0.3 vs 3.6±0.5 μmol kgFFM−1 min−1, p =0.03) were 40% higher in youth with diabetes. The increased glycerol production could account for only ~1/3 of substrate needed for the increased gluconeogenesis in diabetic youth. Conclusion/interpretations Increased gluconeogenesis was a major contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia and hepatic insulin resistance in newly diagnosed untreated adolescents and was an early pathological feature of type 2 diabetes. Increased glycerol availability may represent a significant source of new carbon substrates for increased gluconeogenesis but would not account for all the carbons required to sustain the increased rates. PMID:25447079

  1. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review of current trends.

    PubMed

    Olokoba, Abdulfatai B; Obateru, Olusegun A; Olokoba, Lateefat B

    2012-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder in which prevalence has been increasing steadily all over the world. As a result of this trend, it is fast becoming an epidemic in some countries of the world with the number of people affected expected to double in the next decade due to increase in ageing population, thereby adding to the already existing burden for healthcare providers, especially in poorly developed countries. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include type 2 diabetes mellitus, prevalence, current diagnosis, and current treatment. Only articles in English were included. Screening and diagnosis is still based on World Health Organization (WHO) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria which include both clinical and laboratory parameters. No cure has yet been found for the disease; however, treatment modalities include lifestyle modifications, treatment of obesity, oral hypoglycemic agents, and insulin sensitizers like metformin, a biguanide that reduces insulin resistance, is still the recommended first line medication especially for obese patients. Other effective medications include non-sulfonylurea secretagogues, thiazolidinediones, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and insulin. Recent research into the pathophysiology of type 2 DM has led to the introduction of new medications like glucagon-like peptide 1 analogoues: dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, inhibitors of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, insulin-releasing glucokinase activators and pancreatic-G-protein-coupled fatty-acid-receptor agonists, glucagon-receptor antagonists, metabolic inhibitors of hepatic glucose output and quick-release bromocriptine. Inhaled insulin was licensed for use in 2006 but has been withdrawn from the market because of low patronage.

  3. Falls and Balance Impairments in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Thinking Beyond Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hewston, Patricia; Deshpande, Nandini

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with type 2 diabetes have significantly higher incidence of falls than those without type 2 diabetes. The devastating consequences of falls include declines in mobility, activity avoidance, institutionalization and mortality. One of the most commonly identified risk factors associated with falls is impaired balance. Balance impairments and subsequent increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes are most commonly associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Consequently, DPN has been the central focus of falls prevention research and interventions for older adults with type 2 diabetes. However, isolated studies have identified adults with type 2 diabetes without overt complications of DPN to also be at increased fall risk. It is known that the ability to maintain balance is a complex skill that requires the integration of multiple sensorimotor and cognitive processes. Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes-related subtle declines in sensory functions (somatosensory, visual and vestibular), metabolic muscle function and executive functions may also contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Knowledge of these type 2 diabetes-related sensorimotor and cognitive deficits may help to broaden approaches to falls prevention in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this mini review is to describe the impact of type 2 diabetes on sensorimotor and cognitive systems that may contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Patient beliefs and behaviors about genomic risk for type 2 diabetes: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick; King, Heather A; Haga, Susanne B; Orlando, Lori A; Joy, Scott V; Trujillo, Gloria M; Scott, William Michael; Bembe, Marylou; Creighton, Dana L; Cho, Alex H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major health burden in the United States, and population trends suggest this burden will increase. High interest in, and increased availability of, testing for genetic risk of type 2 diabetes presents a new opportunity for reducing type 2 diabetes risk for many patients; however, to date, there is little evidence that genetic testing positively affects type 2 diabetes prevention. Genetic information may not fit patients' illness representations, which may reduce the chances of risk-reducing behavior changes. The present study aimed to examine illness representations in a clinical sample who are at risk for type 2 diabetes and interested in genetic testing. The authors used the Common Sense Model to analyze survey responses of 409 patients with type 2 diabetes risk factors. Patients were interested in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes risk and believed in its importance. Most patients believed that genetic factors are important to developing type 2 diabetes (67%), that diet and exercise are effective in preventing type 2 diabetes (95%), and that lifestyle changes are more effective than drugs (86%). Belief in genetic causality was not related to poorer self-reported health behaviors. These results suggest that patients' interest in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes might produce a teachable moment that clinicians can use to counsel behavior change. PMID:25844569

  5. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  6. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Bob C; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2015-08-01

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to nurse-patient communication and to review potentially effective communication methods. Important communication barriers are lack of skills and self-efficacy, possibly because nurses work in a context where they have to perform biomedical examinations and then perform patient-centered counseling from a biopsychosocial approach. Training in patient-centered counseling does not seem helpful in overcoming this paradox. Rather, patient-centeredness should be regarded as a basic condition for counseling, whereby nurses and patients seek to cooperate and share responsibility based on trust. Nurses may be more successful when incorporating behavior change counseling based on psychological principles of self-regulation, for example, goal setting, incremental performance accomplishments, and action planning.

  7. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  8. Air pollution as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM.

  9. Biological mechanisms linking Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Khan, Jalaluddin A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    The emerging data suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can contribute significantly to the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) either directly or as a cofactor. Various in vitro and in vivo animal and human clinical studies have provided evidence that T2DM is a major risk factor in the pathology of AD and the two diseases share common biological mechanisms at the molecular level. The biological mechanisms that are common in the pathology of both T2DM and AD include insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, β-amyloid formation, oxidative stress, and the presence of advanced glycation end products. With better understanding of the degree of association between AD and T2DM and the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining this relationship, it is hoped that researchers will be able to develop effective therapeutic interventions to treat or control T2DM and, as a consequence, delay the onset or progression of AD.

  10. Current view from Alzheimer disease to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qazi, Aamer M; Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Manan, Abdul; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood H; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Asif, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Iqbal, Zafar; Shaik, Munvar M; Gan, Siew H; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory problems. It has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus at both the molecular and biochemical level. Pancreatic cells have molecular similarities to the brain at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. Several genes have been reported to be responsible for both AD and diabetes. Currently, no proper treatment is available but various therapeutic approaches are utilized worldwide for the management of these disorders and may be nanoparticles and herbal treatment of Bacopa monnieri will make promise for the treatment of AD in future. The formation of amyloids in neurons and the formation of amylin in pancreatic cells are potential links between these two disorders, which can be silent killers.

  11. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug-drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists' understanding of canagliflozin.

  12. The evil axis of obesity, inflammation and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Das, Arghya; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are global problems affecting all age groups and have been characterized as lifestyle disorders. Though no study has clearly proved a direct correlation between obesity and T2D, a number of factors are associated with obesity causing insulin resistance and T2D. The factors such as adipokines and various transcription factors help to maintain a proper metabolic state in the body. Deregulation in any of these signalling balances due to obesity may trigger an inflammatory cascade which could lead to the aforesaid problems of insulin resistance and T2D. In this review, we have discussed the factors that probably link inflammation to obesity-induced insulin resistance and subsequently T2D and the possible therapeutic opportunities to decrease health risk of T2D in future. PMID:21348821

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly institutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cano Megias, M; Guisado Vasco, P

    2014-12-01

    A 93-year-old woman is admitted to a conventional hospital ward for an acute respiratory infection. The patient has type 2 diabetes mellitus of approximately 15 years evolution and has no other associated comorbidities, except for progressive dependence due to senescence and a previous hospitalization for pneumonia 6 months ago. She is currently in an assisted-living residence. A recent laboratory test revealed an HbA1c level of 7.8%, with a serum creatinine level of 1.3mg/dl (MDRD, 45ml/min). Her standard treatment consists of 5mg of glibenclamide a day and 850mg of metformin every 12hours. What regimen should we follow once she is hospitalized? Does she require any change in her treatment at discharge? PMID:24703988

  14. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22654403

  15. Vascular repair strategies in type 2 diabetes: novel insights

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnerus, Kira; Landmesser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Impaired functions of vascular cells are responsible for the majority of complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently a better understanding of mechanisms contributing to development of vascular dysfunction and the role of systemic inflammatory activation and functional alterations of several secretory organs, of which adipose tissue has more recently been investigated, has been achieved. Notably, the progression of vascular disease within the context of T2D appears to be driven by a multitude of incremental signaling shifts. Hence, successful therapies need to target several mechanisms in parallel, and over a long time period. This review will summarize the latest molecular strategies and translational developments of cardiovascular therapy in patients with T2D. PMID:26543824

  16. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: contributions from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John P; Fine, David F; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are major public health burdens associated with aging. As the age of the population rapidly increases, a sheer increase in the incidence of these diseases is expected. Research has identified T2D as a risk factor for cognitive impairment and potentially AD, but the neurobiological pathways that are affected are only beginning to be understood. The rapid advances in neuroimaging in the past decade have added significant understanding to how T2D affects brain structure and function and possibly lead to AD. This article provides a review of studies that have utilized structural and functional neuroimaging to identify neural pathways that link T2D to impaired cognitive performance and potentially AD. A primary focus of this article is the potential for neuroimaging to assist in understanding the mechanistic pathways that may provide translational opportunities for clinical intervention.

  17. Type 2 Diabetes as a Protein Misfolding Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abhisek; Morales-Scheihing, Diego; Butler, Peter C.; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a highly prevalent and chronic metabolic disorder. Recent evidence suggests that formation of toxic aggregates of the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) might contribute to β-cell dysfunction and disease. However, the mechanism of protein aggregation and associated toxicity is still unclear. Misfolding, aggregation and accumulation of diverse proteins in different organs is the hallmark in the group of protein misfolding disorders (PMDs), including highly prevalent illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in the formation of protein aggregates in pancreas and associated toxicity in the light of the longstanding knowledge from neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. PMID:25998900

  18. Continuous insulin infusion systems in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2011-04-01

    There are various delivery devices available for insulin like syringes, pens, and insulin pumps. Syringes have drawbacks like dosage errors and pain. Insulin pumps can be useful to mimic the physiological insulin secretion. Though the insulin pumps are launched in India a decade ago, they are not popular due to high price and thus there is limited experience and queries with its use. Use of insulin pumps can improve the quality of life for diabetic patients. Available evidence from recent studies is a compelling indication and not to deny the never before discovered benefits of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in selective patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pumps with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system helps as a therapeutic option enabling diabetic patients to restructure lifestyles based on glycemic patterns. PMID:21818997

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and youth.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, S; Tandon, Nikhil

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) which used to be a disease of adults is now seen commonly at an early age in children and adolescents. T2DM is now an important diagnostic consideration in children who present with signs and symptoms of diabetes. The emerging epidemic of obesity in children throughout the world and the resultant insulin resistance contributes to the increasing prevalence of T2DM in this population. The recommended treatment options include metformin and insulin. Optimal glycemic control is essential considering the lifelong nature of the disease and therefore, the increased risk of long term complications - both microvascular and macrovascular. This review article summarizes the classification, diagnosis, pathogenesis, management, complications and screening of T2DM in children, incorporating and contextualizing guidelines from various professional associations.

  20. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents on atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Khaodhiar, Lalita

    2015-08-01

    Youth receiving treatment with antipsychotics are particularly susceptible to weight gain, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and associated metabolic disorders, which is directly associated with excess morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population. The risk of T2D is 2- to 3-fold that of the general population, starts early in the course of treatment, and reflects the effects of weight gain in conjunction with direct effects of antipsychotics on the hypothalamus, pancreatic beta cells, and insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues. Close monitoring with early intervention through lifestyle intervention, switching away from antipsychotics with deleterious metabolic effects, and adjunctive treatment with metformin are modalities available to mitigate weight gain and improve cardiometabolic health in these patients. Despite rapidly advancing knowledge in the field, patient's access to metabolic screening and quality care remains limited. Efforts must be made to broaden reach of early cardiometabolic intervention among these patients in order to avert serious cardiovascular disease burden in the future.

  1. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly institutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Cano Megias, M; Guisado Vasco, P

    2014-12-01

    A 93-year-old woman is admitted to a conventional hospital ward for an acute respiratory infection. The patient has type 2 diabetes mellitus of approximately 15 years evolution and has no other associated comorbidities, except for progressive dependence due to senescence and a previous hospitalization for pneumonia 6 months ago. She is currently in an assisted-living residence. A recent laboratory test revealed an HbA1c level of 7.8%, with a serum creatinine level of 1.3mg/dl (MDRD, 45ml/min). Her standard treatment consists of 5mg of glibenclamide a day and 850mg of metformin every 12hours. What regimen should we follow once she is hospitalized? Does she require any change in her treatment at discharge?

  3. Lessons learned from urban Latinas with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Carmen Rivera

    2003-07-01

    This study focused on Latinas (female Hispanics) with Type 2 diabetes because this disease has a high prevalence and incidence among this population and cultural norms may affect women's experiences with diabetes. The study used a descriptive phenomenology design with a purposive sample of 13 Latina volunteers recruited from a local community health center in southern New England. Data were collected via interviews in English or Spanish. Six themes emerged from the analysis: stress as a cause and effect; too little, too late; profound sadness, diabetic anger, and loss of control; obsession with diet; life under a magnifying glass; and religion as a lifeline. Further research should pursue development of a culturally relevant approach to the health care management of Latinos.

  4. Mechanisms of Islet Amyloidosis Toxicity in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Andisheh; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid formation by the neuropancreatic hormone, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin), one of the most amyloidogenic sequences known, leads to islet amyloidosis in type 2 diabetes and to islet transplant failure. Under normal conditions, IAPP plays a role in the maintenance of energy homeostasis by regulating several metabolic parameters, such as satiety, blood glucose levels, adiposity and body weight. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation, the nature of IAPP toxic species and the cellular pathways that lead to pancreatic β-cell toxicity are not well characterized. Several mechanisms of toxicity, including receptor and non-receptor-mediated events, have been proposed. Analogs of IAPP have been approved for the treatment of diabetes and are under investigation for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23337872

  5. New insights from monogenic diabetes for "common" type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tallapragada, Divya Sri Priyanka; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between monogenic and complex genetic diseases are becoming increasingly blurred, as a result of better understanding of phenotypes and their genetic determinants. This had a large impact on the way complex disease genetics is now being investigated. Starting with conventional approaches like familial linkage, positional cloning and candidate genes strategies, the scope of complex disease genetics has grown exponentially with scientific and technological advances in recent times. Despite identification of multiple loci harboring common and rare variants associated with complex diseases, interpreting and evaluating their functional role has proven to be difficult. Information from monogenic diseases, especially related to the intermediate traits associated with complex diseases comes handy. The significant overlap between traits and phenotypes of monogenic diseases with related complex diseases provides a platform to understand the disease biology better. In this review, we would discuss about one such complex disease, type 2 diabetes, which shares marked similarity of intermediate traits with different forms of monogenic diabetes. PMID:26300908

  6. Type 2 diabetes in indigenous Australian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Maple-Brown, Louise J; Sinha, Ashim K; Davis, Elizabeth A

    2010-09-01

    Rates of type 2 diabetes are higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australian children and adolescents. Presentation may be incidental, part of obesity investigation, symptomatic (polyuria and polydipsia) or in ketoacidosis. Investigation should include assessment of fasting insulin, c-peptide and autoantibodies, as well as assessment of diabetes complications and co-morbidities. Management is a challenge, particularly in a resource-limited setting. Management should involve the whole family and, in some cases, extended family, and community, local health-care providers are key, and a multidisciplinary team approach is essential. The primary initial intervention involves life-style change, but medications (oral and insulin) are frequently necessary. Screening of high-risk individuals is recommended. Waist circumference is a key component of risk assessment. Prevention strategies targeting children and adolescents from this high-risk population are urgently required.

  7. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Dias, Monike Lourenço; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Franco, Denise Reis; Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. PMID:25609989

  8. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Banerjee, Swati; Kelly, Daniel F; Lee, Phillip D K

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism, a condition of endogenous growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion prior to epiphyseal closure, is a rare condition. In the adult condition of GH excess, acromegaly, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported, with resolution following normalization of GH levels. We report the case of a 16-year-old male with pituitary gigantism due to a large invasive suprasellar adenoma who presented with T2DM and DKA. Despite surgical de-bulking, radiotherapy and medical treatment with cabergoline and pegvisomant, GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels remained elevated. However, the T2DM and recurrent DKA were successfully managed with metformin and low-dose glargine insulin, respectively. We review the pathophysiology of T2DM and DKA in growth hormone excess and available treatment options. PMID:17629784

  9. Functional herbal food ingredients used in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yunman

    2012-01-01

    From many reports it is clear that diabetes will be one of the major diseases in the coming years. As a result there is a rapidly increasing interest in searching new medicines, or even better searching prophylactic methods. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in functional herbal food ingredients for diabetes. The present paper reviews functional herbal food ingredients with regards to their anti-diabetic active principles and pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in Asian culinary system and medical system and have demonstrated clinical or/and experimental anti-diabetic effectiveness. Our idea of reviewing this article is to give more attention to these functional food ingredients as targets medicinal foods in order to prevent or slow down the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes among Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Hu, Jie; Chiu, Norman H L

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we explore the genetic variation that may relate to type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Hispanic adults. The genotypes of 36 Hispanic adults were analyzed by using the Cardio-Metabochip. The goal is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated to T2D among Hispanic adults. A total of 26 SNPs were identified to be associated with T2D among Hispanic adults. None of these SNPs have been reported for T2D. By using the principle components analysis to analyze the genotype of 26 SNPs in 36 samples, the samples obtained from diabetic patients could be distinguished from the control samples. The findings support genetic involvement in T2D among Hispanic adults.

  11. [Copy number variation: markers and predictors for type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valverde, Alan Gilberto; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Méndez-Beleche, Alberto; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Cruz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease characterized by a deficiency in production or action of insulin. It is the result mainly of the interaction of the environment, lifestyle, as well as genetic factors. It is considered as one of the major health issues in the world because it affects severely the psychological well-being and overall life quality. Recently it has been shown that DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are associated with several diseases, including obesity and T2D. The CNVs are present from 9 to 18 % of the genome and can modify the expression levels of mRNA and proteins encoded by genes located near their localization. Less is known about their contribution to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, which is necessary to characterize so that these variations can be potentially used as biomarkers of genetic risk CNVs of T2D.

  12. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  13. Type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome in Japanese Americans.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, W Y; Bergstrom, R W; Boyko, E J; Chen, K; Kahn, S E; Leonetti, D L; McNeely, M J; Newell, L L; Shofer, J B; Wahl, P W

    2000-10-01

    Japanese Americans have experienced a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes than in Japan. Research conducted in Seattle suggests that lifestyle factors associated with 'westernization' play a role in bringing out this susceptibility to diabetes. These lifestyle factors include consumption of a diet higher in saturated fat and reduced physical activity. A consequence of this is the development of central (visceral) adiposity, insulin resistance, and other features associated with this insulin resistance metabolic syndrome, such as dyslipidemia (high triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and small and dense LDL particles), hypertension, and coronary heart disease. We have postulated that the superimposition of insulin resistance upon a genetic background of reduced beta-cell reserve results in hyperglycemia and diabetes among Japanese Americans. This article reviews evidence that support this view.

  14. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  15. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes and Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Jianjun; Boehm, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of heritability of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been attributed to inherent genetics. Recent genetic studies, especially genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified a multitude of variants associated with T2D. It is thus reasonable to question if these findings may be utilized in a clinical setting. Here we briefly review the identification of risk loci for T2D and discuss recent efforts and propose future work to utilize these loci in clinical setting—for the identification of individuals who are at particularly high risks of developing T2D and for the stratification of specific health-care approaches for those who would benefit most from such interventions. PMID:26110315

  16. What Have Metabolomics Approaches Taught Us About Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Burkart, Alison M; Isganaitis, Elvira; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, making identification of biomarkers for detection, staging, and effective prevention strategies an especially critical scientific and medical goal. Fortunately, advances in metabolomics techniques, together with improvements in bioinformatics and mathematical modeling approaches, have provided the scientific community with new tools to describe the T2D metabolome. The metabolomics signatures associated with T2D and obesity include increased levels of lactate, glycolytic intermediates, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and long-chain fatty acids. Conversely, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, betaine, and other metabolites decrease. Future studies will be required to fully integrate these and other findings into our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to identify biomarkers of disease risk, stage, and responsiveness to specific treatments. PMID:27319324

  17. Uncovering physiological mechanisms for health disparities in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Staiano, Amanda E; Harrington, Deirdre M; Johannsen, Neil M; Newton, Robert L; Sarzynski, Mark A; Swift, Damon L; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence in the United States is significantly higher in African Americans vs Whites. Yet, the physiological mechanisms contributing to this health disparity have been poorly described. To design effective strategies to reduce this disparity, there is a need to determine whether racial differences in diabetes prevalence are attributable to modifiable or non-modifiable factors. This review synthesizes and critically evaluates the potential physiological and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the higher susceptibility of African Americans to T2D. These mechanisms include: 1) obesity and fat distribution; 2) metabolic flexibility; 3) muscle physiology; 4) energy expenditure and fitness; and 5) genetics. We focus on the clinical significance of findings and limitations of the recent literature.

  18. Postmenopausal hormone therapy, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and brain volumes

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Manson, JoAnn E.; Yaffe, Kristine; Hugenschmidt, Christina; Vaughan, Leslie; Craft, Suzanne; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Casanova, Ramon; Masaki, Kamal; Resnick, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the effect of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on brain volumes in women aged 65–79 years differs depending on type 2 diabetes status during postintervention follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trials assigned women to HT (0.625 mg/day conjugated equine estrogens with or without 2.5 mg/day medroxyprogesterone acetate) or placebo for an average of 5.6 years. A total of 1,402 trial participants underwent brain MRI 2.4 years after the trials; these were repeated in 699 women 4.7 years later. General linear models were used to assess the interaction between diabetes status and HT assignment on brain volumes. Results: Women with diabetes at baseline or during follow-up who had been assigned to HT compared to placebo had mean decrement in total brain volume of −18.6 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] −29.6, −7.6). For women without diabetes, this mean decrement was −0.4 (95% CI −3.8, 3.0) (interaction p = 0.002). This interaction was evident for total gray matter (p < 0.001) and hippocampal (p = 0.006) volumes. It was not evident for changes in brain volumes over follow-up or for ischemic lesion volumes and was not influenced by diabetes duration or oral medications. Conclusions: For women aged 65 years or older who are at increased risk for brain atrophy due to type 2 diabetes, prescription of postmenopausal HT is associated with lower gray matter (total and hippocampal) volumes. Interactions with diabetes and insulin resistance may explain divergent findings on how estrogen influences brain volume among older women. PMID:26163429

  19. Total Antioxidant Status in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Kharroubi, Akram T.; Darwish, Hisham M.; Akkawi, Mutaz A.; Ashareef, Abdelkareem A.; Almasri, Zaher A.; Bader, Khaldoun A.; Khammash, Umaiyeh M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in type 2 diabetic and normal Palestinian subjects as well as the major factors influencing TAS levels. A sample of convenience composed of 212 type 2 diabetic and 208 normal subjects above the age of 40 were recruited. Only 9.8% of the subjects had normal body mass index (BMI) levels (<25), 29% were overweight (≥25 to <30), and 61.2% were obese (≥30). The mean levels of TAS were significantly higher in diabetic compared to control subjects (2.18 versus 1.84 mM Trolox, P = 0.001) and in hypertensive subjects compared to subjects with normal blood pressure (BP). Mean TAS levels were higher in obese compared to nonobese subjects (2.12 versus 1.85 mM Trolox, P = 0.001). Mean TAS levels were similarly higher in subjects with high fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to normal FPG (2.19 versus 1.90 mM Trolox) and high HbA1c (≥6.5%) compared to HbA1c < 6.5% (2.14 versus 1.91 mM Trolox). Multivariate analysis revealed that only diabetic status (P = 0.032) and the level of education (P = 0.036) were significantly associated with TAS. In conclusion diabetic patients had 18.5% increase in TAS levels compared to control subjects. PMID:26090472

  20. Attenuated Purinergic Receptor Function in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Rosenmeier, Jaya B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Diabetes induces cardiovascular dysregulation, but the extent to which the vasodilatatory capacity of nucleotides and nucleosides is affected in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The present study investigated 1) the vasodilatatory effect of ATP, uridine-triphosphate (UTP), and adenosine (ADO) and 2) the expression and distribution of P2Y2 and P2X1 receptors in skeletal muscles of diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 10 diabetic patients and 10 age-matched control subjects, leg blood flow (LBF) was measured during intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP, UTP, and ADO, eliciting a blood flow equal to knee-extensor exercise at 12 W (∼2.6 l/min). RESULTS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system was 50% lower in the diabetic group as exemplified by an LBF increase of 274 ± 37 vs. 143 ± 26 ml/μmol ATP × kg, 494 ± 80 vs. 234 ± 39 ml/μmol UTP × kg, and 14.9 ± 2.7 vs. 7.5 ± 0.6 ml/μmol ADO × kg in control and diabetic subjects, respectively, thus making the vasodilator potency as follows: UTP control subjects (100) > ATP control subjects (55) > UTP diabetic subjects (47) > ATP diabetic subjects (29) > ADO control subjects (3) > ADO diabetic subjects (1.5). The distribution and mRNA expression of receptors were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system is severely reduced in type 2 diabetic patients. The potency of nucleotides varies with the following rank order: UTP > ATP > ADO. This is not due to alterations in receptor distribution and mRNA expression, but may be due to differences in receptor sensitivity. PMID:19808895

  1. New treatments for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wolffenbuttel, B H; Graal, M B

    1996-11-01

    In subjects with type 2 diabetes, both defects of insulin secretion and insulin resistance contribute to the development of hyperglycaemia. The major goals of treatment are to optimise blood glucose control, and normalise the associated lipid disturbances and elevated blood pressure. Pharmacologic treatment is often necessary. This paper discusses new forms of oral treatment for subjects with type 2 diabetes. These include a new sulphonylurea compound glimepiride (Amaryl), which binds to a different protein of the putative sulphonylurea receptor than glibenclamide, and seems to have a lower risk of hypoglycaemia. A new class of drugs with insulin secretory capacity, of which repaglinide (NovoNorm) is the leading compound, is now in phase III clinical trials. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors reversibly inhibit alpha-glucosidase enzymes in the small intestine, which delays cleavage of oligo- and disaccharides to monosaccharides. This leads to a delayed and reduced blood glucose rise after a meal. Two compounds are in development or have been marketed, ie, miglitol and acarbose (Glucobay). Another new class of drugs is the thiazolidine-diones, which seem to work by enhancing insulin action. The 'insulin sensitising' effects of the leading compounds, troglitazone and BRL 49653C, do not involve any effect on insulin secretion. These drugs also seem to beneficially influence serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Oral antihyperglycaemic agents can be used only during a limited period of time in most patients, after which the diabetic state 'worsens' and insulin therapy has to be started. In this light, two new forms of treatment which require subcutaneous injections are also discussed: the synthetic human amylin analogue AC137 (pramlintide) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide, a strong glucose-dependent stimulator of insulin secretion. It remains to be seen whether these compounds can be developed further for clinical use in patients with diabetes.

  2. New treatments for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Wolffenbuttel, B. H.; Graal, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    In subjects with type 2 diabetes, both defects of insulin secretion and insulin resistance contribute to the development of hyperglycaemia. The major goals of treatment are to optimise blood glucose control, and normalise the associated lipid disturbances and elevated blood pressure. Pharmacologic treatment is often necessary. This paper discusses new forms of oral treatment for subjects with type 2 diabetes. These include a new sulphonylurea compound glimepiride (Amaryl), which binds to a different protein of the putative sulphonylurea receptor than glibenclamide, and seems to have a lower risk of hypoglycaemia. A new class of drugs with insulin secretory capacity, of which repaglinide (NovoNorm) is the leading compound, is now in phase III clinical trials. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors reversibly inhibit alpha-glucosidase enzymes in the small intestine, which delays cleavage of oligo- and disaccharides to monosaccharides. This leads to a delayed and reduced blood glucose rise after a meal. Two compounds are in development or have been marketed, ie, miglitol and acarbose (Glucobay). Another new class of drugs is the thiazolidine-diones, which seem to work by enhancing insulin action. The 'insulin sensitising' effects of the leading compounds, troglitazone and BRL 49653C, do not involve any effect on insulin secretion. These drugs also seem to beneficially influence serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Oral antihyperglycaemic agents can be used only during a limited period of time in most patients, after which the diabetic state 'worsens' and insulin therapy has to be started. In this light, two new forms of treatment which require subcutaneous injections are also discussed: the synthetic human amylin analogue AC137 (pramlintide) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide, a strong glucose-dependent stimulator of insulin secretion. It remains to be seen whether these compounds can be developed further for clinical use in patients with diabetes. PMID:8944206

  3. Thyroid dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Demitrost, Laloo; Ranabir, Salam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a growing problem in our country and we have observed that many patients are associated with thyroid dysfunction later in their life. However, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in these patients has not been investigated. Aims and Objectives: To find the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in type 2 DM in Manipur, India. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, data of 202 Type 2 DM patients who attended the diabetic clinic of the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal from January 2011 to July 2012, and whose thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was investigated were included. The inclusion criteria are known cases of type 2 DM. Exclusion criteria are patients with previous history of hypothyroidism and those on drugs affecting the thyroid profile. Results: Out the 202 type 2 DM patients for the study of which 61 are males and 141 are females, 139 (68.8%) are euthyroid, 33 (16.3%) have subclinical hypothyroidism (10 males and 23 females), 23 (11.4%) have hypothyroidism (6 males and 17 females), 4 (2%) have subclinical hyperthyroidism and 3 (1.5%) are hyperthyroidism cases. Maximum cases were of hypothyroidism (subclinical and clinical) seen in the age group of 45-64 years. Patients with BMI > 25 were at increased risk of having hypothyroidism (P < 0.016). Conclusion: Prevalence of hypothyroidism is quite high in type 2 DM patients above 45 years and more so if their BMI is over 25. PMID:23565418

  4. Intergenerational transmission of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Poston, Lucilla

    2011-07-01

    Studies in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and their children suggest that the in utero 'diabetic' environment in which the fetus develops can increase the risk of diabetes in the child, in a non-genetic but heritable fashion. Studies in rodents provide strong evidence for maternal transmission of diabetes, but are based primarily on a model type 1 DM and there is no standard animal model of type 2 DM in pregnancy or of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), although those reported uniformly show glucose intolerance in the offspring. Rodent models of diet-induced obesity have relevance to current upward trends in maternal obesity and GDM, although maternal glucose homeostasis is not always assessed and elements of the diet may have an independent influence. The mechanisms by which maternal type 2DM evokes a higher risk of the disorder in the offspring are likely to result from epigenetic modification in early life of pathways of pancreatic β cells and of liver and muscle insulin signalling pathways. Also, epigenetic processes associated with hormonal imbalance may lead to irreversible 'reordering' of hypothalamic neural networks in fetal/neonatal life, permanently alter energy balance and lead to obesity with associated insulin resistance.

  5. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  6. A review of the treatment of type 2 diabetes in children.

    PubMed

    Onge, Erin St; Miller, Shannon A; Motycka, Carol; DeBerry, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in children and adolescents has risen at staggering rates. Studies have shown that treating type 2 diabetes with oral medications in children may be more difficult than treating in adults. Compounding this problem is the fact that most of the medications available for treating type 2 diabetes have not been studied in children. Recently, the American Diabetes Association and the Pediatric Endocrine Society have collaborated to create a guideline for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in children. Similar to the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes, metformin remains the mainstay of therapy along with diet and exercise. Adjunctive therapy should be based on the limited clinical evidence available as well as on patient preference. In order to avoid detrimental microvascular and macrovascular complications, patients, clinicians, and family members should work together to ensure adequate treatment of type 2 diabetes in children.

  7. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM.

  8. Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among Nigerian type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, C. O.; Osinupebi, O. A.; Olajubu, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria is a risk factor for symptomatic urinary infection and septicemia among predisposed individuals such as diabetics. We investigated the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among our type 2 diabetics with a view to documenting the prevalence, type of organisms responsible and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. One hundred and twenty-four type 2 Nigerian diabetics (55 males and 69 females) submitted midstream urine specimens for culture. Thirty-three patients had significant bacteriuria (9 males and 24 females), showing the frequency of occurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to be 26.6%. The most common organism isolated was Klebsiella pneumonia at 42.4%. Gram-negative bacilli made up about 23 (69.7%) of the isolates. Isolates were poorly sensitive to the readily available antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole), but a large number of the organisms isolated were sensitive to nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Sensitivity to erythromycin, nalidixic acid and cefuroxime was moderate. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is, thus, more prevalent among the Nigerian diabetic population than in the non-diabetics. A changing pattern of disease is observed with Klebsiella sp. now accounting for the majority of asymptomatic bacteriuria among diabetics. The organisms are not sensitive to the commonly available antibacterial agents. PMID:12793791

  9. Genetic analysis of HLA, NA and HPA typing in type 2 diabetes and ASO

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, S; Shouzu, A; Omoto, S; Matsuzaki, T; Yamaoka, M; Abe, M; Hosokawa, M; Nishikawa, M; Iwasaka, T; Fukuhara, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary We examined the genetic status of human leucocyte antigens (HLA), human platelet alloantigens (HPA) and neutrophil-specific antigens (NA) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). To our knowledge, the present study is the first report showing the relationship among three genetic factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus and ASO patients. HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–restriction fragment length polymorphism method. HPA-typing and NA-typing were by a PCR-sequence-specific primer method. The incidence of HLA-DRB1* 1501 was found to be significant in type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic, particularly ASO-positive patients, compared to control subjects. There were no differences in NA1/NA2 between the control and diabetic or non-diabetic ASO groups. However, the frequency of NA2/NA2 in ASO-positive diabetes and non-diabetic ASO patients was significantly higher than controls. The a/b genotype of HPA-5a/5b was significantly lower in type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic ASO-positive patients than in controls. These findings suggest that genetic studies of HLA, NA and HPA could be useful to understand the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and ASO. PMID:16611256

  10. Risk Factors for and Barriers to Control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi Population

    PubMed Central

    Alneami, Yahya Mari; Coleman, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is dramatically increasing in urban areas within Saudi Arabia. Hence, Type-2 Diabetes has now become the most common public health problem. Understanding the major risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes may lead to strategies to prevent, control, and reduce in the burden of disease cases. Objective: To describe risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Methods: The literature search was conducted on risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia using the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar (2007-2015). The literature search yielded 80 articles, of which 70 articles were included in this review after excluding non-relevant articles. Results: The literature review revealed that obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, and aging are the major risk factors for Type-2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Further, the review allocated a complex set of barriers including, lack of education, social support, and healthy environment. These barriers may hinder Saudis with Type-2 Diabetes from controlling their disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is high among the Saudi population and represents a major public health problem. Effective research programs are needed to address the modifiable risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi population. PMID:27157156

  11. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  12. Aggressively managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Craig W

    2008-05-01

    Physicians have many options available for treating patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Making decisions on types of pharmaceuticals to use and when to introduce them into the treatment regimen can be a complex process. In addition, nutrition and exercise must be considered in any comprehensive treatment plan. The author describes the case of an African American woman with uncontrolled T2DM, obesity, hyperlipidemia, low bone mass, menopausal symptoms, stage 3 chronic kidney disease, distal sensory neuropathy, and background retinopathy. An aggressive, comprehensive treatment plan developed for this patient included pharmaceuticals (triple oral therapy: metformin, pioglitazone hydrochloride, and sitagliptin phosphate), nutrition counseling (with a registered, licensed dietician), and exercise. Treatment led to substantial improvements in the patient's daytime glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin level, and body weight at 3-month follow-up. Further interventions were needed to address the patient's hyperlipidemia and low bone mass. The author offers physician guidelines for making decisions on glycemic control for patients with T2DM and for managing hyperlipidemia. He also strongly recommends incorporating nutrition counseling by registered, licensed dietitians and exercise (preferably of a weight-bearing nature) into treatment plans for patients with T2DM, hyperlipidemia, and low bone mass.

  13. Update on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    To achieve good metabolic control in diabetes and keep long term, a combination of changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment is necessary. Achieving near-normal glycated hemoglobin significantly, decreases risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. At present there are different treatments, both oral and injectable, available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment algorithms designed to reduce the development or progression of the complications of diabetes emphasizes the need for good glycaemic control. The aim of this review is to perform an update on the benefits and limitations of different drugs, both current and future, for the treatment of T2DM. Initial intervention should focus on lifestyle changes. Moreover, changes in lifestyle have proven to be beneficial, but for many patients is a complication keep long term. Physicians should be familiar with the different types of existing drugs for the treatment of diabetes and select the most effective, safe and better tolerated by patients. Metformin remains the first choice of treatment for most patients. Other alternative or second-line treatment options should be individualized depending on the characteristics of each patient. This article reviews the treatments available for patients with T2DM, with an emphasis on agents introduced within the last decade. PMID:27660695

  14. Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Immunological data show that type 2 diabetes (T2D) manifests autoimmune features. We wanted to test the association epidemiologically by assessing subsequent diagnosis of T2D following diagnosis of autoimmune disease (AId) and subsequent AId after T2D in the same individuals. Patients were identified from three Swedish health databases. A total of 32 different AId were included. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for T2D diagnosis in patients with previously diagnosed AId and compared to those without a previous AId. Among a total of 757,368 AId patients, 15,103 were diagnosed with T2D, giving an overall SIR for T2D of 1.66. T2D risks were increased after 27 AIds; the highest SIRs were noted for chorea minor (8.00), lupoid hepatitis (5.75), and Addison disease (2.63). T2D was increased after 27 of 32 AIds but we were unable to control for factors such as obesity and smoking. However, the clearly increased risks for T2D in most types of AId patients, and in reverse order increased risks for AId after T2D, do not support an overall confounding by life-style factors. Mechanistic links shared by T2D, AId and life-style factors such as obesity, perhaps through chronic inflammation, may drive autoimmune activation of T2D and many AIds. PMID:26350756

  15. Update on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-09-15

    To achieve good metabolic control in diabetes and keep long term, a combination of changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment is necessary. Achieving near-normal glycated hemoglobin significantly, decreases risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. At present there are different treatments, both oral and injectable, available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment algorithms designed to reduce the development or progression of the complications of diabetes emphasizes the need for good glycaemic control. The aim of this review is to perform an update on the benefits and limitations of different drugs, both current and future, for the treatment of T2DM. Initial intervention should focus on lifestyle changes. Moreover, changes in lifestyle have proven to be beneficial, but for many patients is a complication keep long term. Physicians should be familiar with the different types of existing drugs for the treatment of diabetes and select the most effective, safe and better tolerated by patients. Metformin remains the first choice of treatment for most patients. Other alternative or second-line treatment options should be individualized depending on the characteristics of each patient. This article reviews the treatments available for patients with T2DM, with an emphasis on agents introduced within the last decade. PMID:27660695

  16. Update on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    To achieve good metabolic control in diabetes and keep long term, a combination of changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment is necessary. Achieving near-normal glycated hemoglobin significantly, decreases risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. At present there are different treatments, both oral and injectable, available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment algorithms designed to reduce the development or progression of the complications of diabetes emphasizes the need for good glycaemic control. The aim of this review is to perform an update on the benefits and limitations of different drugs, both current and future, for the treatment of T2DM. Initial intervention should focus on lifestyle changes. Moreover, changes in lifestyle have proven to be beneficial, but for many patients is a complication keep long term. Physicians should be familiar with the different types of existing drugs for the treatment of diabetes and select the most effective, safe and better tolerated by patients. Metformin remains the first choice of treatment for most patients. Other alternative or second-line treatment options should be individualized depending on the characteristics of each patient. This article reviews the treatments available for patients with T2DM, with an emphasis on agents introduced within the last decade.

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tieh, Peter; Dreimane, Daina

    2014-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. Previously an adult onset disease, it is now being diagnosed more and more in childhood and adolescence. Lately, Asia has become the epicenter of this epidemic. Childhood T2DM is a new challenge for the pediatrician. Due to similarities in presentation, children may initially be misdiagnosed with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Most oral anti-diabetic agents have not been approved for use in adolescents, and there is a concern for safety of their use. Lifestyle intervention is difficult to conduct, and adherence to recommendations is lower in adolescents than in adults with T2DM. Higher incidence and early onset of co-morbidities, with lack of long term outcomes data make the management problematic. In many communities, due to a shortage of specialists, general practitioners will treat children with T2DM. Guidelines cited in this review are designed to help with the diagnostic process and management.

  18. Update on the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-09-15

    To achieve good metabolic control in diabetes and keep long term, a combination of changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment is necessary. Achieving near-normal glycated hemoglobin significantly, decreases risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. At present there are different treatments, both oral and injectable, available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment algorithms designed to reduce the development or progression of the complications of diabetes emphasizes the need for good glycaemic control. The aim of this review is to perform an update on the benefits and limitations of different drugs, both current and future, for the treatment of T2DM. Initial intervention should focus on lifestyle changes. Moreover, changes in lifestyle have proven to be beneficial, but for many patients is a complication keep long term. Physicians should be familiar with the different types of existing drugs for the treatment of diabetes and select the most effective, safe and better tolerated by patients. Metformin remains the first choice of treatment for most patients. Other alternative or second-line treatment options should be individualized depending on the characteristics of each patient. This article reviews the treatments available for patients with T2DM, with an emphasis on agents introduced within the last decade.

  19. Macrovascular complication phenotypes in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrovascular diseases (MVD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are often considered all together, without discriminating the areas involved. The aim of our study was to analyse MVD prevalence in a large population of T2DM patients by dividing the cases into subgroups according to MVD sites (NMVD, no MVD; NSCS, non-significant carotid stenosis; CBVD, cerebrovascular disease; CAD, coronary artery disease; PAD, peripheral artery disease; PVD, polyvascular disease) and studying the anthropometric, clinical and laboratory parameters in each group. Methods A diabetic outpatient cohort (n = 1199) was retrospectively studied. Demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters were included in analyses. A thorough cardiovascular history as documented by previous medical records (including medical and hospital records) and vascular laboratory studies (including standardised electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, provocative tests for cardiac ischaemia, ankle/brachial index, duplex ultrasonography of the carotid and lower limbs and, in selected cases, computed tomography angiography, carotid and peripheral arteriography and evaluation of transcutaneous oxygen pressure), was collected for all of the patients. Standardised procedures were used to assess microvascular complications as well as metabolic syndrome (Mets). Results The unadjusted MVD prevalence was 46.4% among the participants. The majority of patients with MVD were in the PVD group. In the multivariate analysis, age, male sex and diabetes duration were independent risk factors for PAD and PVD (P < 0.01). A low HDL-C value was an independent risk factor in the CAD and PVD groups (P = 0.03). Very high frequencies of MetS were observed in the PAD and PVD groups (94.9 and 95.7% respectively). The most MetS diagnostic criteria were recorded among members of the CAD group (all or all-1 criteria were present in 73% of patients). The average age in the CAD group (64.5 y) was comparable to that of the NMVD group

  20. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  1. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-08-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  2. Pharmacogenetics and personalized treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Semiz, Sabina; Dujic, Tanja; Causevic, Adlija

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide epidemic with considerable health and economic consequences. T2DM patients are often treated with more than one drug, including oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) and drugs used to treat diabetic complications, such as dyslipidemia and hypertension. If genetic testing could be employed to predict treatment outcome, appropriate measures could be taken to treat T2DM more efficiently. Here we provide a review of pharmacogenetic studies focused on OAD and a role of common drug-metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug-transporters (DT) variants in therapy outcomes. For example, genetic variations of several membrane transporters, including SLC22A1/2 and SLC47A1/2 genes, are implicated in the highly variable glycemic response to metformin, a first-line drug used to treat newly diagnosed T2DM. Furthermore, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are implicated in variation of sulphonylurea and meglitinide metabolism. Additional variants related to drug target and diabetes risk genes have been also linked to interindividual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of OAD. Thus, in addition to promoting safe and cost-effective individualized diabetes treatment, pharmacogenomics has a great potential to complement current efforts to optimize treatment of diabetes and lead towards its effective and personalized care. PMID:23894862

  3. Clinical translation of genetic predictors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Majithia, Amit R.; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated genetic discoveries and their potential for clinical application Recent findings The advent of genome-wide association screening has uncovered many loci newly associated with T2D. This review describes the techniques applied to discover novel T2D genes and compares their relative strengths, biases, and findings to date. The results of large-scale genome-wide association studies carried out since 2007 are summarized, and limitations of interpreting this preliminary data are offered. Recent studies exploring the clinical potential of these discoveries are reviewed, focusing on insights into T2D pathogenesis, risk prediction of future diabetes, and utility in guiding pharmacotherapy. The new T2D-associated loci have been implicated in β-cell development and function, highlighting insulin secretion in the disease process. Preliminary risk prediction studies show that more loci are needed to improve T2D risk indices. Studies have also revealed that genes may play a role in the pharmacologic response to anti-diabetic medications. Summary Since 2007 genome-wide association studies have rapidly increased the number of T2D-associated loci. This review summarizes the history of genetic association studies, the results from the new genome-wide association studies and the clinical application of these findings. PMID:19306524

  4. Renal AA Amyloidosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Ramón; Madero, Magdalena; Gamba, Gerardo; Soriano, Juan; Soto, Virgilia

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and a major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Inflammation is closely involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM, and reactive amyloidosis occurs in the presence of chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that patients with T2DM may have a higher prevalence of renal AA amyloidosis (RAAA) and that this could contribute to worse atherosclerosis and CVD. Materials and Methods We analyzed 330 autopsy kidneys from patients with a previous T2DM diagnosis. The kidney tissue was evaluated in order to determine the presence of diabetic nephropathy and RAAA, and systemic vessels were evaluated for the presence of atherosclerosis. Results RAAA was detected in 9% of our study population and was associated with an increased risk for nodular sclerosis [OR (95% CI)] [11 (2.04-59.16)], for chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy [4.59 (2.02-10.42)], for myocardial infarction [3.41 (1.52-7.64)] as well as for aortic [4.75 (1.09-20.69)], coronary [3.22 (1.47-7.04)], and intrarenal atherosclerosis [3.84 (1.46-10.09)]. Conclusions RAAA is prevalent in T2DM and is associated with worse CVD and renal disease, likely because RAAA is a marker of severe chronic inflammation. PMID:25337080

  5. Vitamin D replacement and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Issa, Claire M; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the evidence testing the possible benefit of vitamin D replacement on diabetes control and complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) has become a significant global health care problem and its reported incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite the improvement in therapy and development of new drugs, treatment is still not optimal especially with the associated adverse effects of most of the available drugs. New efforts are shifted toward disease prevention and a search for safer drugs. New mounting evidence is associating low vitamin D to diabetes mellitus and as such many studies were conducted to test the effect of vitamin D replacement on incidence of diabetes, diabetes control as well as diabetes complications. Although these studies present several limitations, vitamin D replacement seems to have beneficial effect on all aspects of diabetes: incidence, control and complications. Further longer term and more powered controlled trials are necessary to draw firmer conclusions on this beneficial role of vitamin D treatment on DM.

  6. Pharmacogenetic studies update in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Usman, Kauser; Banerjee, Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent progressive polygenic metabolic disorder resulting from ineffective insulin cascading in the body. World-wide, about 415 million people are suffering from T2DM with a projected rise to 642 million in 2040. T2DM is treated with several classes of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) viz. biguanides, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, etc. Treatment strategies for T2DM are to minimize long-term micro and macro vascular complications by achieving an optimized glycemic control. Genetic variations in the human genome not only disclose the risk of T2DM development but also predict the personalized response to drug therapy. Inter-individual variability in response to OADs is due to polymorphisms in genes encoding drug receptors, transporters, and metabolizing enzymes for example, genetic variants in solute carrier transporters (SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A3, SLC47A1 and SLC47A2) are actively involved in glycemic/HbA1c management of metformin. In addition, CYP gene encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes also play a crucial role with respect to metabolism of drugs. Pharmacogenetic studies provide insights on the relationship between individual genetic variants and variable therapeutic outcomes of various OADs. Clinical utility of pharmacogenetic study is to predict the therapeutic dose of various OADs on individual basis. Pharmacogenetics therefore, is a step towards personalized medicine which will greatly improve the efficacy of diabetes treatment. PMID:27555891

  7. Serum metabolite signatures of type 2 diabetes mellitus complications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Xie, Guoxiang; Ni, Yan; Liu, Tao; Yang, Ming; Wei, Huafeng; Jia, Wei; Ji, Guang

    2015-01-01

    A number of metabolic conditions, including hypoglycemia, high blood pressure (HBP), dyslipidemia, nerve damage and amputation, and vision problems, occur as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels over a prolonged period of time. The different components of diabetic complications are not independent but rather interdependent of each other, rendering the disease difficult to diagnose and control. The underlying pathogenesis of those components cannot be easily elucidated because of the heterogeneous, polygenic, and multifactorial nature of the disease. Metabonomics offers a snapshot of distinct biochemical variations that may reflect the unique metabolic phenotype under pathophysiological conditions. Here we report a mass-spectrometry-based metabonomic study designed to identify the distinct metabolic changes associated with several complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The 292 patients recruited in the study were divided into five groups, including T2DM with HBP, T2DM with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), T2DM with HBP and NAFLD, T2DM with HBP and coronary heart disease (CHD), and T2DM with HBP, NAFLD, and CHD. Serum differential metabolites were identified in each group of T2DM complication, mainly involving bile acid, fatty acid, amino acid, lipid, carbohydrate, steroids metabolism, and tricarboxylic acids cycle. These broad-spectrum metabolic changes emphasize the complex abnormalities present among these complications with elevated blood glucose levels, providing a novel strategy for stratifying patients with T2DM complications using blood-based metabolite markers.

  8. Pharmacogenetics in type 2 diabetes: potential implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunmei; Florez, Jose C

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic research aims to study how genetic variation may influence drug efficacy and/or toxicity; pharmacogenomics expands this quest to the entire genome. Pharmacogenetic findings may help to uncover new drug targets, illuminate pathophysiology, clarify disease heterogeneity, aid in the fine-mapping of genetic associations, and contribute to personalized treatment. In diabetes, there is precedent for the successful application of pharmacogenetic concepts to monogenic forms of the disease, such as maturity onset diabetes of the young or neonatal diabetes. Whether similar insights will be produced for the common form of type 2 diabetes remains to be seen. With recent advances in genetic approaches, the successive application of candidate gene studies, large-scale genotyping studies and genome-wide association studies has begun to generate suggestive results that may lead to changes in clinical practice. However, many potential barriers to the translation of pharmacogenetic discoveries to the clinical management of diabetes still remain. Here, we offer a contemporary overview of the field in its current state, identify potential obstacles, and highlight future directions. PMID:22126607

  9. Intensifying Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Choices & Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Sethi, Bipin; Jain, Sunil M; Guruprasad, C S; Shah, Siddharth N

    2015-05-01

    Insulin therapy remains the cornerstone of effective diabetes management. Timely intensification of insulin therapy reduces the progression of diabetes and the development of diabetes-related complications. Given that overall hyperglycaemia is a relative contribution of both fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia, use of basal insulin alone may not achieve optimal glucose control due to its inability to cover postprandial glucose excursions. Intensifying therapy with addition of bolus insulin or switching to premixed insulin is a viable option in patients failing on basal alone therapy. Although the benefits of early insulin treatment are well established, a considerable delay in intensifying insulin therapy in patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control is still observed. Most of the patients and physicians are reluctant to intensify therapy due to the fear of hypoglycaemia, regimen complexity, and increased burden of multiple daily injections. In this context, there is a need for a flexible, alternative intensification option taking into account individual patient considerations to achieve or maintain individual glycaemic targets. An ideal insulin regimen should mimic physiological insulin release while providing optimal glycaemic control with low risk of hypoglycaemia, weight gain and fewer daily injections. The current paper reviews the challenges of insulin intensification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus poorly controlled on current treatment regimens. PMID:26548029

  10. Genetics of type 2 diabetes in European populations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Hu, Frank B

    2012-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a leading health problem throughout the world. It is caused by environmental and genetic factors, as well as interactions between the two. However, until very recently, the T2D susceptibility genes have been poorly understood. During the past 5 years, with the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a total of 58 T2D susceptibility loci have been associated with T2D risk at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10(-8) ), with evidence showing that most of these genetic variants influence pancreatic β-cell function. Most novel T2D susceptibility loci were identified through GWAS in European populations and later confirmed in other ethnic groups. Although the recent discovery of novel T2D susceptibility loci has contributed substantially to our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, the clinical utility of these loci in disease prediction and prognosis is limited. More studies using multi-ethnic meta-analysis, gene-environment interaction analysis, sequencing analysis, epigenetic analysis, and functional experiments are needed to identify new susceptibility T2D loci and causal variants, and to establish biological mechanisms.

  11. Pathophysiological insights of methylglyoxal induced type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dornadula, Sireesh; Elango, Bhakkiyalakshmi; Balashanmugam, Ponjayanthi; Palanisamy, Rajaguru; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2015-09-21

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder constituting a major health problem whose prevalence has gradually increased worldwide over the past few decades. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains more complex and heterogeneous and arises as a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate functional β-cell mass and comprises about 90% of all diabetic cases. Appropriate experimental animal models are essential for understanding the molecular basis, pathogenesis of complications, and the utility of therapeutic agents to abrogate this multifaceted disorder. Currently, animal models for T2DM are obtained as spontaneously developed diabetes or diabetes induced by chemicals or dietary manipulations or through surgical or genetic methods. The currently used diabetogenic agents have certain limitations. Recently, methylglyoxal (MG), a highly reactive compound derived mainly from glucose and fructose metabolism has been implicated in diabetic complications. MG is a major precursor of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) and promotes impaired functions of insulin signaling, GLUT transporters, anion channels, kinases, and endothelial cells and is finally involved in apoptosis. Recent array of literature also cited that higher concentrations of MG causes rapid depolarization, elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and acidification in pancreatic β-cells. This review henceforth highlights the mechanism of action of MG and its implications in the pathophysiology of experimental diabetes.

  12. Physical exercise as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Stefano; Sacchetti, Massimo; Haxhi, Jonida; Orlando, Giorgio; D'Errico, Valeria; Fallucca, Sara; Menini, Stefano; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have highlighted the importance of physical activity (PA) for health, and recent evidence now points to the positive improvements associated with exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few physicians are willing to prescribe exercise as a therapy for diabetic patients. In addition, there is a lack of information on how to implement exercise therapy especially in long-term exercise regimens. The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize standards of exercise therapy for patients with T2DM, both in terms of prescribing and monitoring, according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We present details of the exercise therapies used in long-term studies, describing how the parameters for exercise prescription were applied in clinical practice. These parameters are described in terms of frequency, intensity, duration, mode and rate of progression in long-term therapeutic prescriptions. Individual responses to exercise dose are discussed, and critical issues to be considered in patients with underlying disease and in T2DM patients are highlighted.

  13. Pharmacogenetics and personalized treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Sabina; Dujic, Tanja; Causevic, Adlija

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide epidemic with considerable health and economic consequences. T2DM patients are often treated with more than one drug, including oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) and drugs used to treat diabetic complications, such as dyslipidemia and hypertension. If genetic testing could be employed to predict treatment outcome, appropriate measures could be taken to treat T2DM more efficiently. Here we provide a review of pharmacogenetic studies focused on OAD and a role of common drug-metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug-transporters (DT) variants in therapy outcomes. For example, genetic variations of several membrane transporters, including SLC2A1/2 and SLC47A1/2 genes, are implicated in the highly variable glycemic response to metformin, a first-line drug used to treat newly diagnosed T2DM. Furthermore, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are implicated in variation of sulphonylurea and meglitinide metabolism. Additional variants related to drug target and diabetes risk genes have been also linked to interindividual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of OAD. Thus, in addition to promoting safe and cost-effective individualized diabetes treatment, pharmacogenomics has a great potential to complement current efforts to optimize treatment of diabetes and lead towards its effective and personalized care. PMID:23894862

  14. Type 2 diabetes among Asian Americans: Prevalence and prevention.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam H; Nguyen, Thuc-Nhi; Fischer, Taylor; Ha, Won; Tran, Thanh V

    2015-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing problem among Asian Americans. Based on the Centers for Disease Control, the age-adjusted prevalence of T2DM for Asian Americans is 9%, placing them at "moderate risk". However differential patterns of disease burden emerge when examining disaggregated data across Asian American ethnic groups; with Filipino, Pacific Islander, Japanese, and South Asian groups consistently described as having the highest prevalence of T2DM. Disentangling and strengthening prevalence data is vital for on-going prevention efforts. The strongest evidence currently available to guide the prevention of T2DM in the United States comes from a large multicenter randomized clinical control trial called the Diabetes Prevention Program, which targets individual lifestyle behavior changes. It has been translated and adopted for some Asian American groups, and shows promise. However stronger study designs and attention to several key methodological considerations will improve the science. Increased attention has also been directed toward population level downstream prevention efforts. Building an infrastructure that includes both individual and population approaches is needed to prevent T2DM among Asian American populations, and is essential for reducing health disparities.

  15. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what are the mechanisms. PMID:22433668

  16. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, José A

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies, and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what the mechanisms are.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes via chronic inflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Khan, Jalaluddin A; Kumosani, Taha A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, it is crucial to investigate the potential common processes that could explain this relation between AD and T2DM. In the recent decades, an abundance of evidence has emerged demonstrating that chronic inflammatory processes may be the major factors contributing to the development and progression of T2DM and AD. In this article, we have discussed the molecular underpinnings of inflammatory process that contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM and AD and how they are linked to these two diseases. In depth understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms through which AD and T2DM are associated to each other may help the researchers to develop novel and more effective strategies to treat together AD and T2DM. Several treatment options have been identified which spurn the inflammatory processes and discourage the production of inflammatory mediators, thereby preventing or slowing down the onset of T2DM and AD.

  18. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  19. Depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus: prevalence, impact, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Katherine; Brown, Miriam E; Svrakic, Dragan M; Lustman, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    Clinically significant depression is present in one of every four people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Depression increases the risk of the development of T2DM and the subsequent risks of hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and micro- and macrovascular complications. Conversely, a diagnosis of T2DM increases the risk of incident depression and can contribute to a more severe course of depression. This linkage reflects a shared etiology consisting of complex bidirectional interactions among multiple variables, a process that may include autonomic and neurohormonal dysregulation, weight gain, inflammation, and hippocampal structural alterations. Two recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled depression treatment trials in patients with T2DM concluded that psychotherapy and antidepressant medication (ADM) were each moderately effective for depression and that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) had beneficial effects on glycemic control. However, the number of studies (and patients exposed to randomized treatment) included in these analyses is extremely small and limits the certainty of conclusions that can be drawn from the data. Ultimately, there is no escaping the paucity of the evidence base and the need for additional controlled trials that specifically address depression management in T2DM. Future trials should determine both the effects of treatment and the change in depression during treatment on measures of mood, glycemic control, and medical outcome.

  20. Vitamin D replacement and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Issa, Claire M; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the evidence testing the possible benefit of vitamin D replacement on diabetes control and complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) has become a significant global health care problem and its reported incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite the improvement in therapy and development of new drugs, treatment is still not optimal especially with the associated adverse effects of most of the available drugs. New efforts are shifted toward disease prevention and a search for safer drugs. New mounting evidence is associating low vitamin D to diabetes mellitus and as such many studies were conducted to test the effect of vitamin D replacement on incidence of diabetes, diabetes control as well as diabetes complications. Although these studies present several limitations, vitamin D replacement seems to have beneficial effect on all aspects of diabetes: incidence, control and complications. Further longer term and more powered controlled trials are necessary to draw firmer conclusions on this beneficial role of vitamin D treatment on DM. PMID:25495839

  1. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  2. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Argentina 1979-2012.

    PubMed

    Barengo, Noël C; Trejo, Ruby; Sposetti, Georgina

    2013-07-16

    The objective of this review was to revise the existing information regarding type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence in the Argentine population during the past 30 years and to see whether the available data and methodology of the studies conducted allow analysis of time trends. The PubMED and LILACS databases were searched using the search terms "diabetes prevalence" and "Argentina". A total of 301 studies were identified and 19 of them remained in the review after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The studies reviewed covered a time period of 30 years (1979-2012). The studies conducted in Argentina during the last 30 years assessing the prevalence of T2D are very heterogeneous. The majority of the studies were conducted in the province of Buenos Aires. As the assessment of T2D varied between the studies in respect of diagnostic criteria and diagnostic tests for T2D, meaningful comparisons are difficult to make, not to mention an analysis of time trends. All in all, the T2D prevalence seems to be at least 10% in the Argentina population. However, the latest large population surveys conducted in Argentina is promising and may offer the most reliable estimates of the T2D prevalence even though the diagnosis of T2D was based on participant self-report. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  4. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  5. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in children: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Delamater, Alan M

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed.

  6. Genetic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; Wang, X; Strizich, G; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem throughout the world and the epidemic is particularly severe in Asian countries. Compared with European populations, Asians tend to develop diabetes at a younger age and at much higher incidence rates given the same amount of weight gain. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with T2D. Although the majority of GWAS results were conducted in populations of European ancestry, recent GWAS in Asians have made important contributions to the identification of T2D susceptibility loci. These studies not only confirmed T2D susceptibility loci initially identified in European populations, but also identified novel susceptibility loci that provide new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases. In this article, we review GWAS results of T2D conducted in East and South Asians and compare them to those of European populations. Currently identified T2D genetic variants do not appear to explain the phenomenon that Asians are more susceptible to T2D than European populations, suggesting further studies in Asian populations are needed. PMID:27583258

  7. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  8. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin. PMID:26132858

  9. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. Methods: We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond’s checklist for appraising the quality of studies. Results: The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. Conclusion: A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening. PMID:27390696

  10. Pharmacogenomics in type 2 diabetes: oral antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Daniels, M A; Kan, C; Willmes, D M; Ismail, K; Pistrosch, F; Hopkins, D; Mingrone, G; Bornstein, S R; Birkenfeld, A L

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a fast progressing disease reaching pandemic proportions. T2DM is specifically harmful because of its severe secondary complications. In the course of the disease, most patients require treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), for which a relatively large number of different options are available. The growing number of individuals affected by T2DM as well as marked interindividual differences in the response to treatment call for individualized therapeutic regimens that can maximize treatment efficacy and thus reduce side effects and costs. A large number of genetic polymorphisms have been described affecting the response to treatment with OADs; in this review, we summarize the most recent advances in this area of research. Extensive evidence exists for polymorphisms affecting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biguanides and sulfonylureas. Data on incretin-based medications as well as the new class of sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are just starting to emerge. With diabetes being a known comorbidity of several psychiatric disorders, we also review genetic polymorphisms possibly responsible for a common treatment response in both conditions. For all drug classes reviewed here, large prospective trials are necessary in order to consolidate the existing evidence and derive treatment schemes based on individual genetic traits.

  11. DNA Methylation: An Epigenetic Insight into Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alam, Fahmida; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Mohamed, Mafauzy; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major regulator of epigenetic modifications has been shown to alter the expression of genes that are involved in aspects of glucose metabolism such as glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction and other conditions, and it ultimately leads to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Current evidences indicate an association of DNA methylation with T2DM. This review provides an overview of how various factors play crucial roles in T2DM pathogenesis and how DNA methylation interacts with these factors. Additionally, an update on current techniques of DNA methylation analysis with their pros and cons is provided as a basis for the adoption of suitable techniques in future DNA methylation research towards better management of T2DM. To elucidate the mechanistic relationship between vital environmental factors and the development of T2DM, a better understanding of the changes in gene expression associated with DNA methylation at the molecular level is still needed. PMID:27229720

  12. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: focus on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and regular exercise may provide a strong stimulus for improving both. In this review, we first discuss the link between inflammation and metabolism. Next, we give an update on the clinical metabolic effects of exercise in T2DM patients with special focus on which parameters to consider for optimizing metabolic improvements. We then discuss the mechanisms whereby exercise exerts its anti-inflammatory and related metabolic effects. Evidence exists that interleukin (IL)-1β is involved in pancreatic β-cell damage, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α appears to be a key molecule in peripheral insulin resistance. Mechanistic studies in humans suggest that moderate acute elevations in IL-6, as provoked by exercise, exert direct anti-inflammatory effects by an inhibition of TNF-α and by stimulating IL-1ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), thereby limiting IL-1β signaling. In addition, IL-6 has direct impact on glucose and lipid metabolism. Moreover, indirect anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via improvements in, for example, body composition. While waiting for the outcome of long-term randomized clinical training studies with hard end points, it should be emphasized that physical activity represents a natural strong anti-inflammatory and metabolism-improving strategy with minor side effects.

  13. Bariatric surgery and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sabrina; le Roux, Carel W; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic dysregulation is the defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and can give rise to microvascular complications, specifically retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Pharmacological targeting of risk factors for microvascular complications can yield therapeutic gains, particularly in relation to retinopathy and nephropathy. Bariatric surgery is superior to intensified pharmacotherapy in relation to glycaemic control and can remediate dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Consequently, evidence of the effect of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications is now emerging in the literature. Examination of the recent published evidence base (covering the period 2011-2014) on the effects of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications reveals further evidence supportive of the efficacy of bariatric surgery in preventing the incidence and progression of albuminuria and arresting renal functional decline. Data on retinopathy are more ambivalent potentially representing the potential in some cases for a degree of surgery associated reactive hypoglycaemia to detract from the benefits of amelioration of hyperglycaemia. A significant gap in the literature remains in relation to the effects of surgery on diabetic neuropathy. Overall, there is a pressing need for prospective randomised controlled trials examining long-term microvascular outcomes following bariatric surgery in patients with T2DM.

  14. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  15. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus: is it feasible?

    PubMed

    Palermo, Andrea; Maggi, Daria; Maurizi, Anna Rita; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2014-03-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires the implementation of preventive strategies to halt this trend, tailored to the specific needs of individual regions. Risk factors for T2DM are among the main targets for improving health outcomes and curbing the development of diabetes; excessive weight and obesity are two of the most important risk factors that need to be addressed. A growing body of evidence suggests that subjects with pre-diabetes who lose body weight and increase physical activity can delay or prevent the onset of T2DM, and in some cases, blood glucose levels may return to normal. Several studies have shown that moderate to intensive levels of exercise are effective in reducing both intra-abdominal and total adiposity among obese subjects, both improving cardiovascular risk profile and reducing the risk of T2DM development. These consistent observations have given rise to large-scale randomized controlled trials that use lifestyle intervention (including behavioural strategies for the reinforcement of prescribed changes in nutritional intake, physical activity or both), with or without pharmacological treatment, in populations at high risk of developing T2DM. In this review, large-scale national trials that have focused on the prevention of T2DM are critically evaluated.

  16. Nonpharmacological interventions for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter E; Greaves, Colin J; Lindström, Jaana; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie J

    2012-01-17

    During the past decade, improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetes development has resulted in advances in therapeutic concepts, but has also supported the potential for diabetes prevention through nonpharmacological means. At the beginning of the century, we experienced a shift in paradigm, as landmark studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is preventable with lifestyle intervention; moderate changes in diet and physical activity produce a substantial and sustained reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) for individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. This evidence must now be translated into clinical and public-health practice, but translational studies have varied in their ability to replicate the results of clinical trials. This variation reflects a number of challenging barriers for diabetes prevention in real-world clinical practice, which makes it necessary to focus on identifying efficient intervention methods and delivery mechanisms. Research is now focusing on these mechanisms, as well as on developing efficient screening and risk-identification strategies and realistic scenarios for public-health policy to implement diabetes prevention programs. In this Review, we will discuss these mechanisms and will consider the implications of diabetes prevention for public-health strategy and policy.

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and Invokana: an FDA approved drug.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nida

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease affecting wide range of people across the globe. In India the rate of subjects being suffered from diabetes is continuously increasing. So, the development of drugs for its effective treatment is essential. Thereby, various attempts have been made to discover newer drugs, to reduce the rate of anti diabetic occurrence. Anti-diabetic drugs were found to treat diabetes mellitus by lowering glucose levels in the blood. Both the use antidiabetic drugs as well as the changes in lifestyle and proper diet can significantly affect the severity of diabetes mellitus and also reduces the symptoms and occurrence of the disease. Researches in the past few years on diabetes mellitus showed that this disease is spreading at a very faster rate, thereby; various attempts have been made to treat it efficaciously. Development and approval of antidiabetic drugs is quite necessary. There are different classes of anti-diabetic drugs reported to treat diabetes. The objective of the present review is to explore Invokana as a newly approved antidiabetic drug for the effective treatment of type 2 diabetes. This review focuses mainly on the various aspects of diabetes mellitus and its treatment perspectives. From the various clinical studies done on Invokana, it was concluded that and Invokana was found to be very effective for the efficacious therapy of diabetes mellitus.

  18. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-07-25

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  19. Epigenetic alterations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karachanak-Yankova, S; Dimova, R; Nikolova, D; Nesheva, D; Koprinarova, M; Maslyankov, S; Tafradjiska, R; Gateva, P; Velizarova, M; Hammoudeh, Z; Stoynev, N; Toncheva, D; Tankova, T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetic changes, in particular DNA methylation processes, play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) linking genetic and environmental factors. To clarify this role, we have analyzed in patients with different duration of T2DM: (i) expression levels of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as marker of DNA methylation, and ii) methylation changes in 22 genes connected to cellular stress and toxicity. We have analyzed MBD2 mRNA expression levels in16 patients and 12 controls and the methylation status of stress and toxicity genes in four DNA pools: (i) controls; (ii) newly-diagnosed T2DM patients; (iii) patients with T2DM duration of <5 years and (iv) of >5 years. The MBD2 expression levels were 10.4-times increased on average in T2DM patients compared to controls. Consistent increase in DNA methylation fraction with the increase in T2DM duration was observed in Prdx2 and SCARA3 genes, connected to oxidative stress protection and in BRCA1 and Tp53 tumor-suppressor genes. In conclusion, increased MBD2 expression in patients indicated general dysregulation of DNA methylation in T2DM. The elevated methylation of Prdx2 and SCARA3 genes suggests disturbance in oxidative stress protection in T2DM. The increased methylation of BRCA1 and Tp53 genes unraveled an epigenetic cause for T2DM related increase in cancer risk. PMID:27785392

  20. Metals in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Minerals are one of the components of food, though they are not synthesized in the body but they are essential for optimal health. Several essential metals are required for the proper functioning of many enzymes, transcriptional factors and proteins important in various biochemical pathways. For example Zn, Mg and Mn are cofactors of hundreds of enzymes, and Zn is involved in the synthesis and secretion of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Similarly, Cr enhances the insulin receptor activity on target tissues, especially in muscle cells. Insulin is the key hormone required to maintain the blood glucose level in normal range. In case of insulin deficiency or resistance, blood glucose concentration exceeds the upper limit of the normal range of 126 mg/dl. Persistent increase of blood serum glucose level leads to overt chronic hyperglycemia, which is a major clinical symptom of diabetes mellitus. Poor glycemic control and diabetes alters the levels of essential trace elements such as Zn, Mg, Mn, Cr, Fe etc. by increasing urinary excretion and their concomitant decrease in the blood. Hence, the main purpose of this review is to discuss the important roles of essential trace elements in normal homeostasis and physiological functioning. Moreover, perturbation of essential trace elements is also discussed in perspective of type 2 diabetes pathobiology. PMID:24401367

  1. Metabolic surgery: A paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Viswanath, Ananth K

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major public health issues globally over the past few decades. Despite dietary interventions, lifestyle modifications and the availability of several pharmaceutical agents, management of T2DM with obesity is a major challenge to clinicians. Metabolic surgery is emerging as a promising treatment option for the management of T2DM in the obese population in recent years. Several observational studies and a few randomised controlled trials have shown clear benefits of various bariatric procedures in obese individuals in terms of improvement or remission of T2DM and multiple other health benefits such as improvement of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoarthritis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Uncertainties about the long-term implications of metabolic surgery such as relapse of T2DM after initial remission, nutritional and psychosocial complications and the optimal body mass index for different ethnic groups exist. The article discusses the major paradigm shift in recent years in the management of T2DM after the introduction of metabolic surgery. PMID:26240695

  2. [Anthropometric parameters and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    de Castro, Simone Henriques; de Mato, Haroldo José; Gomes, Marilia de Brito

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate the value of body mass index (BMI) as predictor of waist circumference of cardiovascular risk (CRWC) and diagnostic of metabolic syndrome (MSWC) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2), we assessed BMI and WC in 753 patients with DM 2 (472 women) with 23 +/- 8 years. The participants had been divided in groups in accordance with the presence or absence of ACCR or ACMS. The best BMI cut-off to predict such disturbances was evaluated in women and men. In females, BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m(2) was the best predictor of CRWC. Area under ROC curve and IC 95% were 0.7202 (0.6753 - 0.7652) for CRWC and of [0.8318 (0.7928 - 0.8708)] for MSWC. In males, IMC > or = 25.0 kg/m(2) was better predictor for CRWC presence [0.8527 (0.8098 - 0.8955)], while BMI > or = 30.0 kg/m(2) for MSWC [0.9071 (0.8708 - 0.9433)]. We conclude that BMI can be a simple way to evaluate metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk where there were not material and prepared professionals for the WC evaluation. We need prospective studies to evaluate if it is necessary to change the BMI cut-off adopted as indicative of these disturbances in the diabetic population. PMID:16936985

  3. Glucagon and heart in type 2 diabetes: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Mannucci, Edoardo; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of glucagon in type 2 diabetes are well known and, until now, have been considered deleterious. However, glucagon has an important role in the maintenance of both heart and kidney function. Moreover, in the past, glucagon has been therapeutically used for heart failure treatment. The new antidiabetic drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, are able to decrease and to increase glucagon levels, respectively, while contrasting data have been reported regarding the glucagon like peptide 1 receptors agonists. The cardiovascular outcome trials, requested by the FDA, raised some concerns about the possibility that the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors can precipitate the heart failure, while, at least for empagliflozin, a positive effect has been shown in decreasing both cardiovascular death and heart failure. The recent LEADER Trial, showed a significant reduction of cardiovascular death with liraglutide, but a neutral effect on heart failure. A possible explanation of the results with the DPPIV inhibitors and empagliflozin might be related to their divergent effect on glucagon levels. Due to unclear effects of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists on glucagon, the possible role of this hormone in the Leader trial remains unclear. PMID:27568179

  4. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  5. Genetic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; Wang, X; Strizich, G; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem throughout the world and the epidemic is particularly severe in Asian countries. Compared with European populations, Asians tend to develop diabetes at a younger age and at much higher incidence rates given the same amount of weight gain. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 70 loci associated with T2D. Although the majority of GWAS results were conducted in populations of European ancestry, recent GWAS in Asians have made important contributions to the identification of T2D susceptibility loci. These studies not only confirmed T2D susceptibility loci initially identified in European populations, but also identified novel susceptibility loci that provide new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases. In this article, we review GWAS results of T2D conducted in East and South Asians and compare them to those of European populations. Currently identified T2D genetic variants do not appear to explain the phenomenon that Asians are more susceptible to T2D than European populations, suggesting further studies in Asian populations are needed.

  6. Type 2 Diabetes Dysregulates Glucose Metabolism in Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K; Mehra, Parul; Gibb, Andrew A; Haberzettl, Petra; Hong, Kyung U; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Qianhong; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Bolli, Roberto; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G

    2016-06-24

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased mortality and progression to heart failure. Recent studies suggest that diabetes also impairs reparative responses after cell therapy. In this study, we examined potential mechanisms by which diabetes affects cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). CPCs isolated from the diabetic heart showed diminished proliferation, a propensity for cell death, and a pro-adipogenic phenotype. The diabetic CPCs were insulin-resistant, and they showed higher energetic reliance on glycolysis, which was associated with up-regulation of the pro-glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3). In WT CPCs, expression of a mutant form of PFKFB, which mimics PFKFB3 activity and increases glycolytic rate, was sufficient to phenocopy the mitochondrial and proliferative deficiencies found in diabetic cells. Consistent with activation of phosphofructokinase in diabetic cells, stable isotope carbon tracing in diabetic CPCs showed dysregulation of the pentose phosphate and glycero(phospho)lipid synthesis pathways. We describe diabetes-induced dysregulation of carbon partitioning using stable isotope metabolomics-based coupling quotients, which relate relative flux values between metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that diabetes causes an imbalance in glucose carbon allocation by uncoupling biosynthetic pathway activity, which could diminish the efficacy of CPCs for myocardial repair. PMID:27151219

  7. Skeletal muscle capillary density and microvascular function are compromised with aging and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Groen, Bart B L; Hamer, Henrike M; Snijders, Tim; van Kranenburg, Janneau; Frijns, Dionne; Vink, Hans; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-04-15

    Adequate muscle perfusion is required for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. Impairments in microvascular structure and/or function with aging and type 2 diabetes have been associated with the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. Our objective was to compare muscle fiber type specific capillary density and endothelial function between healthy young men, healthy older men, and age-matched type 2 diabetes patients. Fifteen healthy young men (24 ± 1 yr), 15 healthy older men (70 ± 2 yr), and 15 age-matched type 2 diabetes patients (70 ± 1 yr) were selected to participate in the present study. Whole body insulin sensitivity, muscle fiber type specific capillary density, sublingual microvascular density, and dimension of the erythrocyte-perfused boundary region were assessed to evaluate the impact of aging and/or type 2 diabetes on microvascular structure and function. Whole body insulin sensitivity was significantly lower at a more advanced age, with lowest values reported in the type 2 diabetic patients. In line, skeletal muscle capillary contacts were much lower in the older and older type 2 diabetic patients when compared with the young. Sidestream darkfield imaging showed a significantly greater thickness of the erythrocyte perfused boundary region in the type 2 diabetic patients compared with the young. Skeletal muscle capillary density is reduced with aging and type 2 diabetes and accompanied by impairments in endothelial glycocalyx function, which is indicative of compromised vascular function. PMID:24577061

  8. Association of the calpain-10 gene with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    del Bosque-Plata, Laura; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Aurón-Gómez, Moisés; Ramírez, Erika; Velasco-Pérez, María Luisa; Ramírez-Silva, Alfredo; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco; Hanis, Craig L; Tsuchiya, Takafumi; Yoshiuchi, Issei; Cox, Nancy J; Bell, Graeme I

    2004-02-01

    Variation in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN10) has been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in the Mexican American population of Starr County, Texas. We typed five polymorphisms in the calpain-10 gene (SNP-43, -43, -63, and -110 and Indel-19) to test for association with type 2 diabetes in 248 individuals representative of the mestizo population of Mexico City and Orizaba, Mexico including 134 patients with type 2 diabetes and 114 subjects with normal fasting blood glucose levels. We found a significant difference in SNP-44 allele and genotype frequencies between type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The rare allele at SNP-44 was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio (OR)=2.72, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.16-6.35, P=0.017). SNP-110, which is in perfect linkage disequilibrium with SNP-44, was also associated with type 2 diabetes. The SNP-43, Indel-19, and SNP-63 haplogenotype 112/121 associated with significantly increased risk (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.31-3.57) of type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans was not associated with significantly increased in risk in Mexicans (OR=1.15, 95% CI=0.57-2.34). The results suggest that variation in CAPN10 affects risk of type 2 diabetes in the mestizo population of central Mexico (Mexico City and Orizaba) and in Mexican Americans (Starr County, Texas). PMID:14741193

  9. Nepalese patients’ perceptions of treatment modalities for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Perceptions and beliefs about treatment can influence patients’ adherence to treatment regimens. Perceptions, in turn, are often shaped by patients’ sociocultural context. Nepal and the Nepalese have unique sociocultural traditions and beliefs, and their perceptions of diabetes treatment remain largely unexplored. This study explored Nepalese participants’ perceptions of diabetes treatment, and whether perceptions differed between the Nepalese living in Australia and Nepal. Methods Face-to-face qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with Nepalese participants with type 2 diabetes in Sydney and Kathmandu. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Perceptions of diabetes treatment were similar among Nepalese participants in Australia and Nepal. There was a general reluctance to start oral antidiabetic medications and an even greater reluctance to commence parenteral (insulin) therapy. Participants preferred to try lifestyle modifications and alternative treatments such as herbs and “traditional” medicines, particularly as a first step. Unwillingness to take medications was primarily associated with the belief that, once started, these medications needed to be taken for life, and perceptions of long-term harms caused by such medications. Even when commenced on medication, participants were averse to any type of therapy escalation, for example, moving to insulin therapy. Insulin was perceived as the “last option” available for diabetes treatment. Most participants, however, did not find medication taking challenging once they had commenced treatment. Conclusion Antidiabetic medications were perceived to be harmful and unstoppable once initiated. These perceptions significantly impacted participants’ willingness to commence antidiabetic medications and therefore have the potential to adversely affect their medication-taking behavior. This study therefore highlights the need to explore

  10. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  11. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis. PMID:25941651

  12. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  13. Nepalese patients’ perceptions of treatment modalities for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Perceptions and beliefs about treatment can influence patients’ adherence to treatment regimens. Perceptions, in turn, are often shaped by patients’ sociocultural context. Nepal and the Nepalese have unique sociocultural traditions and beliefs, and their perceptions of diabetes treatment remain largely unexplored. This study explored Nepalese participants’ perceptions of diabetes treatment, and whether perceptions differed between the Nepalese living in Australia and Nepal. Methods Face-to-face qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with Nepalese participants with type 2 diabetes in Sydney and Kathmandu. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Perceptions of diabetes treatment were similar among Nepalese participants in Australia and Nepal. There was a general reluctance to start oral antidiabetic medications and an even greater reluctance to commence parenteral (insulin) therapy. Participants preferred to try lifestyle modifications and alternative treatments such as herbs and “traditional” medicines, particularly as a first step. Unwillingness to take medications was primarily associated with the belief that, once started, these medications needed to be taken for life, and perceptions of long-term harms caused by such medications. Even when commenced on medication, participants were averse to any type of therapy escalation, for example, moving to insulin therapy. Insulin was perceived as the “last option” available for diabetes treatment. Most participants, however, did not find medication taking challenging once they had commenced treatment. Conclusion Antidiabetic medications were perceived to be harmful and unstoppable once initiated. These perceptions significantly impacted participants’ willingness to commence antidiabetic medications and therefore have the potential to adversely affect their medication-taking behavior. This study therefore highlights the need to explore

  14. Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Consensus Report: Current Status, Challenges, and Priorities.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Kristen J; Anderson, Barbara J; Berg, Erika G; Chiang, Jane L; Chou, Hubert; Copeland, Kenneth C; Hannon, Tamara S; Huang, Terry T-K; Lynch, Jane L; Powell, Jeff; Sellers, Elizabeth; Tamborlane, William V; Zeitler, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant and increasing burden in adolescents and young adults. Clear strategies for research, prevention, and treatment of the disease in these vulnerable patients are needed. Evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes in children is different not only from type 1 but also from type 2 diabetes in adults. Understanding the unique pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in youth, as well as the risk of complications and the psychosocial impact, will enable industry, academia, funding agencies, advocacy groups, and regulators to collectively evaluate both current and future research, treatment, and prevention approaches. This Consensus Report characterizes type 2 diabetes in children, evaluates the fundamental differences between childhood and adult disease, describes the current therapeutic options, and discusses challenges to and approaches for developing new treatments. PMID:27486237

  15. Low-frequency variants in HMGA1 are not associated with type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Marcel; Huyvaert, Marlène; Perry, John R B; Pearson, Richard D; Falchi, Mario; Morris, Andrew P; Vivequin, Sidonie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Yengo, Loïc; Gaget, Stefan; Pattou, Francois; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Charpentier, Guillaume; Carlsson, Lena M S; Jacobson, Peter; Sjöström, Lars; Lantieri, Olivier; Heude, Barbara; Walley, Andrew; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Froguel, Philippe; Cauchi, Stéphane

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been suggested that the low-frequency c.136-14_136-13insC variant in high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) may strongly contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk. In our study, we attempted to confirm that HMGA1 is a novel type 2 diabetes locus in French Caucasians. The gene was sequenced in 368 type 2 diabetic case subjects with a family history of type 2 diabetes and 372 normoglycemic control subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes. None of the 41 genetic variations identified were associated with type 2 diabetes. The lack of association between the c.136-14_136-13insC variant and type 2 diabetes was confirmed in an independent French group of 4,538 case subjects and 4,015 control subjects and in a large meta-analysis of 16,605 case subjects and 46,179 control subjects. Finally, this variant had no effects on metabolic traits and was not involved in variations of HMGA1 and insulin receptor (INSR) expressions. The c.136-14_136-13insC variant was not associated with type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent. Our study emphasizes the need to analyze a large number of subjects to reliably assess the association of low-frequency variants with the disease. PMID:22210315

  16. Evidence-based dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Neff, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    We review the scientific evidence behind current dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes and examine the effects of various dietary interventions on glycemic control, serum lipids, and inflammation in individuals with diabetes. Attention is focused on dietary fiber, glycemic index, dietary protein, omega-3 fatty acids, chromium, magnesium, and vitamin E. Practical dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes are highlighted.

  17. Physical activity in youth with well-controlled versus poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes increases risk of chronic disease. The existing guidelines are for American youth to attain at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity (PA). Fewer than 20% achieve this goal. This study examines differences between blood glucose control and PA in youth with type 2 diabetes durin...

  18. Dietary polyphenols and type 2 diabetes: current insights and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J B; Högger, P

    2015-01-01

    Significant evidence suggests that polyphenol-rich diets have the ability to protect against diabetes. Since several previous reviews focused on the nutrition and health effects including type 2 diabetes of polyphenols in 2007-2008, a number of related original publications have been pulished in this field. This review summarizes important advances related to influence of dietary polyphenols and polyphenol-rich diets on preventing and managing type 2 diabetes, as well as diabetes-mediated changes in bioactivities of dietary polyphenols. It appears that anthocyanins or anthocyanin-rich food intake is related to the risk of type 2 diabetes, but there is no association for other polyphenol subclasses. It is discussed that procyanidins are more active when administered individually than when mixed with food. The benefits of dietary polyphenols for type 2 diabetes can be summarized as: protection of pancreatic β-cells against glucose toxicity, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, inhibition of α-amylases or α- glucosidases and thus decrease of starch digestion, and inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation. Moreover, type 2 diabetes also significantly influences the benefits of dietary polyphenols, although there are very limited studies have been conducted so far. How type 2 diabetes impacts the pharmacology of dietary polyphenols is not well understood. Comprehension of type 2 diabetes-mediated changes in pharmacokinetics and bioactivity of dietary polyphenols might lead to improve the benefits of these phytochemicals and subsequent clinical outcomes for type 2 diabetics.

  19. Pregnancy outcomes in youth with type 2 diabetes: The TODAY Study experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes, maternal and fetal/neonatal, during the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. The TODAY study was a randomized controlled trial comparing three treatment options for youth with type 2 diabetes. Informed consent included the req...

  20. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  1. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  2. Insulin-degrading enzyme inhibition, a novel therapy for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Costes, Safia; Butler, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been identified as a type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene, though its physiological function remains unclear. Maianti et al. (2014) now propose that an IDE inhibitor may be a promising therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes.

  3. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  4. Applying the Transtheoretical Model to Investigate Behavioural Change in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Wang, Ming-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Background: Long-term behaviour change in type 2 diabetic patients may provide effective glycemic control. Purpose: To investigate the key factors that promote behaviour change in diabetic subjects using the transtheoretical model. Methods: Subjects were selected by purposive sampling from type 2 diabetes outpatients. Self-administered…

  5. Issues of Cause and Control in Patient Accounts of Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, O.; Peel, E.; Douglas, M.; Lawton, J.

    2006-01-01

    Patients experience considerable difficulties in making and sustaining health-related lifestyle changes. Many Type 2 diabetes patients struggle to follow disease risk-management advice even when they receive extensive information and support. Drawing on a qualitative study of patients with Type 2 diabetes, the paper uses discourse analysis to…

  6. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease—by losing weight through eating fewer calories and less fat and being more active. Astudy of people at ... can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by • losing weight • cutting back on calories and saturated fat • increasing your daily physical activity Losing 7% of ...

  7. Stress and type 2 diabetes: a review of how stress contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shona J; Ismail, Mubarak

    2015-03-18

    Current policy and research around type 2 diabetes (T2D) interventions largely invoke a behavioral model. We suggest that activation of the physiologic stress response (PSR) from chronic exposure to stressors, low socioeconomic status (SES), severe mental health problems, or aggressive behavior increases the risk of T2D. This article is a comprehensive review of the literature on the link between T2D and psychosocial factors focusing on prospective studies of the risk for developing diabetes. The review found an increased risk for T2D in people: exposed to stressful working conditions or traumatic events; with depression; with personality traits or mental health problems that put them in conflict with others; of low SES, either currently or in childhood; and in racial/ethnic minority populations, independent of current SES. This review suggests that T2D prevention research would be more effective if (a) the PSR to psychosocial factors (especially social disparities) was recognized and (b) intervention programs evaluated reduction in social disparities as part of a comprehensive approach.

  8. Outcomes of Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation in Type 2 Diabetic Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Marcelo Santos; Kuo, Hung-Tien

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease may receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant. However, outcomes are not well described. Risks for death and graft failure were examined in SPK type 2 diabetic recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using the United Network for Organ Sharing database, outcomes of SPK transplants were compared between type 2 and type 1 diabetic recipients. All primary SPK adult recipients transplanted between 2000 and 2007 (n = 6756) were stratified according to end-stage pancreas disease diagnosis (type 1: n=6141, type 2: n=582). Posttransplant complications and risks for death and kidney/pancreas graft failure were compared. Results Of the 6756 SPK transplants, 8.6% were performed in recipients with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Rates of delayed kidney graft function and primary kidney nonfunction were higher in the type 2 diabetics. Five-year overall and death-censored kidney graft survival were inferior in type 2 diabetics. After adjustment for other risk factors, including recipient (age, race, body weight, dialysis time, and cardiovascular comorbidities), donor, and transplant immune characteristics, type 2 diabetes was not associated with increased risk for death or kidney or pancreas failure when compared with type 1 diabetic recipients. Conclusions After adjustment for other risk factors, SPK recipients with type 2 diabetes diagnosis were not at increased risk for death, kidney failure, or pancreas failure when compared with recipients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21441123

  9. The genetics of type 2 diabetes: what have we learned from GWAS?

    PubMed

    Billings, Liana K; Florez, Jose C

    2010-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been at the forefront of human diseases and phenotypes studied by new genetic analyses. Thanks to genome-wide association studies, we have made substantial progress in elucidating the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the concept, history, and recent discoveries produced by genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes and glycemic traits, with a focus on the key notions we have gleaned from these efforts. Genome-wide association findings have illustrated novel pathways, pointed toward fundamental biology, confirmed prior epidemiological observations, drawn attention to the role of β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes, explained ~10% of disease heritability, tempered our expectations with regard to their use in clinical prediction, and provided possible targets for pharmacotherapy and pharmacogenetic clinical trials. We can apply these lessons to future investigation so as to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Mood and metabolism: Anhedonia as a clinical target in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jasmine; Swardfager, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a bidirectional relationship between depression and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In Type 2 diabetes, depression affects behavioural factors such as diet and physical activity that promote positive energy balance and influence diabetes outcomes. Examinations of depressive symptoms by dimension have suggested that anhedonia, the inability to anticipate, seek, choose and enjoy reward, may be of particular clinical importance. Structural and functional brain changes in Type 2 diabetes distributed throughout the principally dopaminergic reward circuitry suggest a neurobiological basis for motivational and decisional aspects of anhedonia. Interrelated neuroendocrine, bio-energetic, oxidative and inflammatory changes suggest mechanisms underlying neuronal damage and dopaminergic deficits. A consequential shift in effort-related reward choices and their effects on energy expenditure, self-care and eating behaviours is suggested to affect Type 2 diabetes outcomes. The clinical implications for screening and psychopharmacology of depressive symptoms in people with Type 2 diabetes are discussed.

  11. Teriparatide in patients with osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Pavo, Imre; Alam, Jahangir; Disch, Damon P; Schuster, Dara; Harris, Jennifer M; Krege, John H

    2016-10-01

    Despite evidence for higher fracture risk, clinical effects of osteoporosis treatments in type 2 diabetes (T2D) are largely unknown. Post hoc analyses of the DANCE observational study compared T2D patients and patients without diabetes to assess the effect of teriparatide, an osteoanabolic therapy on skeletal outcomes and safety. Patients included ambulatory men and women with osteoporosis receiving teriparatide 20μg/day SQ up to 24months followed by observation up to 24months. Main outcome measures included nonvertebral fracture incidence comparing 0-6months with 6+ months of teriparatide, change from baseline in BMD and back pain severity, and serious adverse events. Analyses included 4042 patients; 291 with T2D, 3751 without diabetes. Treatment exposure did not differ by group. For T2D patients, fracture incidence was 3.5 per 100 patient-years during 0-6months treatment, and 1.6 during 6months to treatment end (47% of baseline, 95% CI 12-187%); during similar periods, for patients without diabetes, fracture incidence was 3.2 and 1.8 (57% of baseline, 95% CI 39-83%). As determinants of fracture outcome during teriparatide treatment, diabetes was not a significant factor (P=0.858), treatment duration was significant (P=0.003), and the effect of duration was not significantly different between the groups (interaction P=0.792). Increases in spine and total hip BMD did not differ between groups; increase in femoral neck BMD was greater in T2D patients than in patients without diabetes (+0.34 and +0.004g/cm(2), respectively; P=0.014). Back pain severity decreased in both groups. Teriparatide was well tolerated without new safety findings. In conclusion, during teriparatide treatment, reduction in nonvertebral fracture incidence, increase in BMD, and decrease in back pain were similar in T2D and non-diabetic patients. PMID:27374026

  12. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, KP; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria®), Argentina (Teneglucon®), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%–0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  13. Strategies for preventing type 2 diabetes: an update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Khavandi, Kaivan; Amer, Halima; Ibrahim, Bashar; Brownrigg, Jack

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes is a major and growing public health challenge which threatens to overwhelm medical services in the future. Type 2 diabetes confers significant morbidity and mortality, most notably with target organ damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The magnitude of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes is best illustrated by its position as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent. Complications related to neuropathy are also vast, often working in concert with vascular abnormalities and resulting in serious clinical consequences such as foot ulceration. Increased understanding of the natural history of this disorder has generated the potential to intervene and halt pathological progression before overt disease ensues, after which point management becomes increasingly challenging. The concept of prediabetes as a formal diagnosis has begun to be translated from the research setting to clinical practice, but with continually updated guidelines, varied nomenclature, emerging pharmacotherapies and an ever-changing evidence base, clinicians may be left uncertain of best practice in identifying and managing patients at the prediabetic stage. This review aims to summarize the epidemiological data, new concepts in disease pathogenesis and guideline recommendations in addition to lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical therapies targeted at stopping progression of prediabetes to diabetes. While antidiabetic medications, with newer anti-obesity medications and interventional bariatric procedures have shown some promising benefits, diet and therapeutic lifestyle change remains the mainstay of management to improve the metabolic profile of individuals with glucose dysregulation. New risk stratification tools to identify at-risk individuals, coupled with unselected population level intervention hold promise in future practice. PMID:23997928

  14. Myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ofstad, Anne Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), two separate conditions which often co-exist and influence each other's course. The prevalence of myocardial dysfunction may be as high as 75% in T2DM populations but is often overlooked due to the initial asymptomatic nature of the disease, complicating co-morbidities such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and obesity, and the lack of consensus on diagnostic criteria. More sensitive echocardiographic applications are furthermore needed to improve detection of early subclinical changes in myocardial function which do not affect conventional echocardiographic parameters. The pathophysiology of the diabetic myocardial dysfunction is not fully elucidated, but involves hyperglycemia and high levels of free fatty acids. It evolves over several years and increases the risk of developing overt HF, and is suggested to at least in part account for the worse outcome seen in T2DM individuals after cardiac events. CAD and stroke are the most frequent CV manifestations among T2DM patients and relate to a large degree to the accelerated atherosclerosis driven by inflammation. Diagnosing CAD is challenging due to the lower sensitivity inherent in the diagnostic tests and there is thus a need for new biomarkers to improve prediction and detection of CAD. It seems that a multi-factorial approach (i.e. targeting several CV risk factors simultaneously) is superior to a strict glucose lowering strategy in reducing risk for macrovascular events, and recent research may even support an effect also on HF outcomes. PMID:27071642

  15. Endocrine stress responses and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azaz; Madhu, S V; Sharma, S B; Desai, N G

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried to ascertain whether stress responses are associated with abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and pancreatic beta cell function and risk of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Salivary cortisol, a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and salivary α-amylase, a marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) were compared in 125 subjects of newly detected diabetes mellitus (NDDM) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects who were diagnosed on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Assessment of stress in them was done through stress scales - presumptive stressful life events scale (PSLES), perceived stress scale (PSS) and sense of coherence (SOC) and correlated with these and other stress response markers. Significantly higher 10 pm salivary cortisol and post dexamethasone salivary cortisol were found in NDDM subjects as compared to NGT. 10 pm salivary cortisol correlated significantly with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h plasma glucose (2h PG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) while post dex salivary cortisol correlated with 2h PG, HbA1c and salivary α-amylase with 2h PG. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (OR: 1.840), SOC (OR: 0.688) and 10 pm salivary cortisol (OR: 1.427) were the strongest predictors of NDDM. The results of the present study indicate that NDDM subjects display significantly higher chronic stress and stress responses when compared to subjects with NGT. Chronic stress and endocrine stress responses are significantly associated with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26303379

  16. Type 2 diabetes is associated with postprandial amino acid measures.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; de Mutsert, Renée; Rensen, Patrick C N; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; den Heijer, Martin; le Cessie, Saskia; Suhre, Karsten; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2016-01-01

    Most studies examining the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and amino acids have focused on fasting concentrations. We hypothesized that, besides fasting concentrations, amino acid responses to a standardized meal challenge are also associated with T2D. In a cross-sectional study of 525 participants (165 newly-diagnosed T2D, 186 newly-diagnosed impaired fasting glycaemia, and 174 normal fasting glucose), we examined postprandial amino acid concentrations and the responses (defined as the concentrations and responses 150 min after a standardized meal) of fourteen amino acids in relation to T2D. T2D was associated with lower postprandial concentration of seven amino acids compared to the normal fasting glucose group (lowest effect estimate for serine: -0.54 standard deviations (SD) (95% CI: -0.77, -0.32)), and higher concentrations of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and (iso-)leucine (highest effect estimate for (iso-)leucine: 0.44 SD (95% CI: 0.20, 0.67)). Regarding the meal responses, T2D was associated with lower responses of seven amino acids (ranging from -0.55 SD ((95% CI): -0.78, -0.33) for serine to -0.25 SD ((95% CI: -0.45, -0.02) for ornithine). We conclude that T2D is associated with postprandial concentrations of amino acids and a reduced amino acid meal response, indicating that these measures may also be potential markers of T2D.

  17. Teneligliptin in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Panneerselvam, A; Singh, K P; Parmar, Girish; Gadge, Pradeep; Swami, Onkar C

    2016-01-01

    Teneligliptin is a recently developed oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor indicated for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults along with diet and exercise. Teneligliptin has been recently available in Japan (Teneria(®)), Argentina (Teneglucon(®)), and India (Tenepure; Teneza) at relatively affordable price. This is a positive step toward the management of T2DM in developing countries, where the cost of medicine is out-of-pocket expenditure and is a limiting factor for health care. This review evaluates the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in the management of T2DM. Teneligliptin has been systematically evaluated in T2DM as monotherapy with diet and exercise and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin in short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) studies. These studies have reported a reduction in HbA1c of 0.8%-0.9% within 12 weeks of therapy. Two 52-week studies reported sustained improvement in glycemic control with teneligliptin. Teneligliptin has been found to be well tolerated, and the safety profile is similar to other dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and constipation are the main adverse events. Teneligliptin can be administered safely to patients with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease without dose adjustment. Similarly, it can be used in patients with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Teneligliptin is effective and well tolerated and may have an important role in the management of T2DM. PMID:27574456

  18. Cardiovascular disease in Navajo Indians with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoy, W; Light, A; Megill, D

    1995-01-01

    Rates of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have risen sharply in recent years among Navajo Indians, the largest reservation-based American Indian tribe, but the association between the two conditions is not entirely clear. Rates of cardiovascular disease and some possible associations in several hundred diabetic and non-diabetic Navajos were estimated. Nearly one-third (30.9 percent) of those with diabetes had formal diagnoses of cardiovascular disease--25.3 percent had heart disease, 4.4 percent had cerebrovascular disease, and 4.1 percent had peripheral vascular disease. (The percentages exceed the total because some people had more than one diagnosis. Age-adjusted rates were 5.2 times those of nondiabetics for heart disease, 10.2 times for cerebrovascular disease, and 6.8 times for peripheral vascular disease. Accentuation of risk was most marked in young diabetics and in female diabetics. Hypertensive diabetics had a twofold increase in heart disease and more than a fivefold increase in cerebral and peripheral vascular disease over nonhypertensive diabetics. Age, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and albumenuria were independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride levels or body weight were not. Male sex and diabetes duration were independent risk factors for cerebral and peripheral vascular disease but not for heart disease. In view of the impressive segregation of cardiovascular disease in the diabetic Navajo population, the prevention of diabetes through population-based health promotion seems basic to its containment. Over the short term, vigorous treatment of hypertension in subjects who are already diabetic is mandatory. PMID:7838949

  19. Direct Medical Cost of Type 2 Diabetes in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Shuyu Ng, Charmaine; Toh, Matthias Paul Han Sim; Ko, Yu; Yu-Chia Lee, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chronic nature of diabetes along with their complications, they have been recognised as a major health issue, which results in significant economic burden. This study aims to estimate the direct medical cost associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Singapore in 2010 and to examine both the relationship between demographic and clinical state variables with the total estimated expenditure. The National Healthcare Group (NHG) Chronic Disease Management System (CDMS) database was used to identify patients with T2DM in the year 2010. DM-attributable costs estimated included hospitalisations, accident and emergency (A&E) room visits, outpatient physician visits, medications, laboratory tests and allied health services. All charges and unit costs were provided by the NHG. A total of 500 patients with DM were identified for the analyses. The mean annual direct medical cost was found to be $2,034, of which 61% was accounted for by inpatient services, 35% by outpatient services, and 4% by A&E services. Independent determinants of total costs were DM treatments such as the use of insulin only (p<0.001) and the combination of both oral medications and insulin (p=0.047) as well as having complications such as cerebrovascular disease (p<0.001), cardiovascular disease (p=0.002), peripheral vascular disease (p=0.001), and nephropathy (p=0.041). In this study, the cost of DM treatments and DM-related complications were found to be strong determinants of costs. This finding suggests an imperative need to address the economic burden associated with diabetes with urgency and to reorganise resources required to improve healthcare costs. PMID:25816299

  20. Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Maurizio; Merante, Valentina; Medaglia, Valeria; Irace, Concetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM has a huge and growing burden on public health, whereas new care models are not implemented into clinical practice; in fact the purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a program of integrated care for T2DM, compared with ordinary diligence. Methods "Progetto Diabete Calabria" is a new organizational model for the management of patients with diabetes mellitus, based on General Practitioners (GPs) empowerment and the use of a web-based electronic health record, shared in remote consultations among GPs and Hospital Consultants. One-year change in glucose and main cardiovascular risk factors control in 104 patients (Cases) following this integrated care program has been evaluated and compared with that of 208 control patients (Controls) matched for age, gender, and cardiometabolic profile, and followed in an ordinary outpatient medical management by the Consultants only. Both patient groups had Day Hospitals before and after the study period. Results The mean number of accesses to the Consultants during the study was 0.6±0.9 for Cases, and 1.3±1.5 for Controls (p<0.0001). At follow-up, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) significantly decreased from 58±6 to 54±8 mmol/mol in Cases only (p=0.01); LDL cholesterol decreased in both groups; body mass index decreased in Cases only, from 31.0±4.8 to 30.5±4.6 kg/m2 (p=0.03). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a health care program based on GPs empowerment and taking care plus remote consultation with Consultants is at least as effective as standard outpatient management, in order to improve the control of T2DM. PMID:25974092

  1. Milk signalling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2011-04-01

    The presented hypothesis identifies milk consumption as an environmental risk factor of Western diet promoting type 2 diabetes (T2D). Milk, commonly regarded as a valuable nutrient, exerts important endocrine functions as an insulinotropic, anabolic and mitogenic signalling system supporting neonatal growth and development. The presented hypothesis substantiates milk's physiological role as a signalling system for pancreatic β-cell proliferation by milk's ability to increase prolactin-, growth hormone and incretin-signalling. The proposed mechanism of milk-induced postnatal β-cell mass expansion mimics the adaptive prolactin-dependent proliferative changes observed in pregnancy. Milk signalling down-regulates the key transcription factor FoxO1 leading to up-regulation of insulin promoter factor-1 which stimulates β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion as well as coexpression of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). The recent finding that adult rodent β-cells only proliferate by self-duplication is of crucial importance, because permanent milk consumption beyond the weaning period may continuously over-stimulate β-cell replication thereby accelerating the onset of replicative β-cell senescence. The long-term use of milk may thus increase endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and toxic IAPP oligomer formation by overloading the ER with cytotoxic IAPPs thereby promoting β-cell apoptosis. Both increased β-cell proliferation and β-cell apoptosis are hallmarks of T2D. This hypothesis gets support from clinical states of hyperprolactinaemia and progeria syndromes with early onset of cell senescence which are both associated with an increased incidence of T2D and share common features of milk signalling. Furthermore, the presented milk hypothesis of T2D is compatible with the concept of high ER stress in T2D and the toxic oligomer hypothesis of T2D and may explain the high association of T2D and Alzheimer disease.

  2. Waist circumference threshold values for type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2009-07-01

    Adult gains in body weight, excess adiposity, and intra-abdominal fat have each been associated with risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), forming the basis for preventive medicine guidelines and actuarial predictions using practical indices of weight (e.g., body mass index [BMI]) and waist circumference (WC). As obesity-related disease spreads beyond affluent western countries, application of WC thresholds to other populations has highlighted issues of their generalizability. For example, U.S. national health goals based on BMI < 25 kg/m(2) and WC < 89 cm (women) and <102 cm (men) differ considerably with a recent law in Japan mandating intervention for older adults with WC exceeding 90 cm (women) and 85 cm (men). The U.S. military has also faced issues of generalizability of WC-based adiposity standards that are fair and achievable. Data from many studies indicate that WC is a reliable biomarker for T2DM risk, suggesting that, for adult men and women, action thresholds should be more stringent than current U.S. guidelines, and it would not be harmful to set worldwide targets somewhere below 90 cm for men and women, regardless of weight status. Medical technology has provided many great insights into disease, including modern imaging technologies that have differentiated fat depots that have the greatest influence on T2DM, but ultimately, an inexpensive measuring tape provides the most useful and cost-effective preventive measure for T2DM today. At some point in the future, a Star Trek-like abdominal body fat "tricorder" noninvasive assessment of tissue composition may provide an advantage over abdominal girth.

  3. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  4. Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Daniel A.; Gyan, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increased arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes patients and general population. However, the contribution of diabetes to arterial stiffness is often masked by coexistent obesity and hypertension. In this study, we assessed arterial stiffness in nonhypertensive, nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in Ghana. Methods. In case-control design, 166 nonhypertensive, nonobese participants, comprising 96 T2DM patients and 70 nondiabetes controls, were recruited. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) indices were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), augmentation index (AIx), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Results. With similar peripheral and central BP indices, T2DM patients had higher PWVao (8.3 ± 1 versus 7.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.044) and CAVI (7.9 ± 1.2 versus 6.9 ± 0.7, p = 0.021) than nondiabetic control. AIx and haPWV were similar between T2DM and nondiabetic controls. Multiple regression models showed that, in the entire study participants, the major determinants of PWVao were diabetes status, age, gender, systolic BP, and previous smoking status (β = 0.22, 0.36, 0.48, 0.21, and 0.25, resp.; all p < 0.05); the determinants of CAVI were diabetes status, age, BMI, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and previous smoking status (β = 0.21, 0.38, 0.2, 0.18, 0.24. 0.2, −0.19, and 0.2, resp.; all p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that nonhypertensive, nonobese T2DM patients have increased arterial stiffness without appreciable increase in peripheral and central pressure indices. PMID:27774104

  5. Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Porta, Miquel; Jacobs, David R; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-08-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are lipophilic compounds that travel with lipids and accumulate mainly in adipose tissue. Recent human evidence links low-dose POPs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Because humans are contaminated by POP mixtures and POPs possibly have nonmonotonic dose-response relations with T2D, critical methodological issues arise in evaluating human findings. This review summarizes epidemiological results on chlorinated POPs and T2D, and relevant experimental evidence. It also discusses how features of POPs can affect inferences in humans. The evidence as a whole suggests that, rather than a few individual POPs, background exposure to POP mixtures-including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls-can increase T2D risk in humans. Inconsistent statistical significance for individual POPs may arise due to distributional differences in POP mixtures among populations. Differences in the observed shape of the dose-response curves among human studies may reflect an inverted U-shaped association secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction or endocrine disruption. Finally, we examine the relationship between POPs and obesity. There is evidence in animal studies that low-dose POP mixtures are obesogenic. However, relationships between POPs and obesity in humans have been inconsistent. Adipose tissue plays a dual role of promoting T2D and providing a relatively safe place to store POPs. Large prospective studies with serial measurements of a broad range of POPs, adiposity, and clinically relevant biomarkers are needed to disentangle the interrelationships among POPs, obesity, and the development of T2D. Also needed are laboratory experiments that more closely mimic real-world POP doses, mixtures, and exposure duration in humans. PMID:24483949

  6. Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes - More Common Than You Think

    PubMed Central

    Gehlaut, Richa Redhu; Dogbey, Godwin Y.; Schwartz, Frank L.; Marling, Cynthia R.; Shubrook, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia is often the limiting factor for intensive glucose control in diabetes management, however its actual prevalence in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is not well documented. Methodology: A total of 108 patients with T2DM wore a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) for 5 days. Rates and patterns of hypoglycemia and glycemic variability (GV) were calculated. Patient and medication factors were correlated with rates, timing, and severity of hypoglycemia. Results: Of the patients, 49.1% had at least 1 hypoglycemic episode (mean 1.74 episodes/patient/ 5 days of CGMS) and 75% of those patients experienced at least 1 asymptomatic hypoglycemic episode. There was no significant difference in the frequency of daytime versus nocturnal hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was more frequent in individuals on insulin (alone or in combination) (P = .02) and those on oral hypoglycemic agents (P < .001) compared to noninsulin secretagogues. CGMS analysis resulted in treatment modifications in 64% of the patients. T2DM patients on insulin exhibited higher glycemic variability (GV) scores (2.3 ± 0.6) as compared to those on oral medications (1.8 ± 0.7, P = .017). Conclusions: CGMS can provide rich data that show glucose excursions in diabetes patients throughout the day. Consequently, unwarranted onset of hypo- and hyperglycemic events can be detected, intervened, and prevented by using CGMS. Hypoglycemia was frequently unrecognized by the patients in this study (75%), which increases their potential risk of significant adverse events. Incorporation of CGMS into the routine management of T2DM would increase the detection and self-awareness of hypoglycemia resulting in safer and potentially better overall control. PMID:25917335

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José Mª; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001–2012). We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods. The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07–1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–0.99). The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments. PMID:27149499

  8. Endocrine stress responses and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azaz; Madhu, S V; Sharma, S B; Desai, N G

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried to ascertain whether stress responses are associated with abnormalities in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and pancreatic beta cell function and risk of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Salivary cortisol, a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and salivary α-amylase, a marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) were compared in 125 subjects of newly detected diabetes mellitus (NDDM) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects who were diagnosed on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Assessment of stress in them was done through stress scales - presumptive stressful life events scale (PSLES), perceived stress scale (PSS) and sense of coherence (SOC) and correlated with these and other stress response markers. Significantly higher 10 pm salivary cortisol and post dexamethasone salivary cortisol were found in NDDM subjects as compared to NGT. 10 pm salivary cortisol correlated significantly with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h plasma glucose (2h PG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) while post dex salivary cortisol correlated with 2h PG, HbA1c and salivary α-amylase with 2h PG. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that body mass index (OR: 1.840), SOC (OR: 0.688) and 10 pm salivary cortisol (OR: 1.427) were the strongest predictors of NDDM. The results of the present study indicate that NDDM subjects display significantly higher chronic stress and stress responses when compared to subjects with NGT. Chronic stress and endocrine stress responses are significantly associated with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus.

  9. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Arruda, L C M; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Malmegrim, K C R; Leal, A M O

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  10. Biochemical and Clinical Profile in Type 2 Diabetics with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bodi, Akhil Venkata; Sudagani, Jaidev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There were 72 million adults with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in 2013 in the South East Asian region of which India is a part. This figure is expected to rise to more than 123 million by 2035. Some studies have also shown that there is an increased risk of depression in subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). The present study is an attempt to decipher whether there is any difference in the metabolic and clinical profile between patients having T2DM with depression and without depression. Aim To study the clinical and biochemical profile of subjects with T2DM and depression and compare a non-depressed diabetic cohort on the same parameters. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital in rural Andhra Pradesh. Patients with T2DM who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria and attending the outpatient clinic of the General Medicine department were the subjects of this study. The subjects with T2DM were categorized as depressed or non-depressed after administering the Patient Health Questionnare-9. Out of them 30 subjects with depression and 30 without depression were selected. Samples for blood were collected and analysed for glucose, urea, creatinine, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin. Urine micro protein was estimated. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and chronic complications were recorded. Results The two groups were similar on most of the socio-demographic parameters, biochemical and many of the clinical parameters like age, waist circumference, glycated haemoglobin, lipid profile and insulin use. The Chi-square test for association between the categorical variables like use of insulin, gender predilection, exercise and complications with depression were not significant. Conclusion The study did not show any significant difference between the two groups in terms of the biochemical and clinical profile. PMID:27656433

  11. Flu Shot Tied to Fewer Hospitalizations, Deaths in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160085.html Flu Shot Tied to Fewer Hospitalizations, Deaths in Type ... TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The seasonal flu vaccine may offer people with type 2 diabetes ...

  12. Fried, Grilled or Baked Foods? They May Affect Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fried, Grilled or Baked Foods? They May Affect Type 2 Diabetes Risk Researchers suggest steaming, poaching and stewing for ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Diets Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population

    PubMed Central

    Abi Khalil, Charbel; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Robay, Amal; Ramstetter, Monica D.; Al-Azwani, Iman K.; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Gharbiah, Maey; Bener, Abdulbari; Stadler, Dora; Hackett, Neil R.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians. Methods All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124) and controls (n = 590) were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1), Persian/South Asian (Q2) and African (Q3)]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%), the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR) for T2D SNPs in Qatari’s is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations. Results Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565), both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565) was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations. Conclusions With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting

  14. Cardiac Dysfunction during Exercise in Uncomplicated Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    REGENSTEINER, JUDITH G.; BAUER, TIMOTHY A.; REUSCH, JANE E. B.; QUAIFE, ROBERT A.; CHEN, MARCUS Y.; SMITH, SUSAN C.; MILLER, TYLER M.; GROVES, BERTRON M.; WOLFEL, EUGENE E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been associated with reduced peak exercise capacity (V̇O2peak). The causes of this impairment are not clearly established, but evidence suggests that abnormalities in cardiac function play a significant role. We hypothesized that exercise would be associated with impaired cardiac function and hemodynamics in recently diagnosed T2DM, even in the absence of clinically evident cardiovascular complications. Methods After baseline normal echocardiography screening, 10 premenopausal women with uncomplicated T2DM (average duration of diagnosed T2DM, 3.6 yr) and 10 healthy nondiabetic women of similar age, weight, and activity levels performed a peak cardiopulmonary exercise test while instrumented with an indwelling pulmonary artery catheter for assessing cardiac function. On separate days, technetium-99m sestamibi (cardolite) imaging was performed to assess myocardial perfusion at rest and peak exercise in seven T2DM and seven control patients. Results Resting measures of cardiac hemodynamics were similar in T2DM and control subjects. Absolute V̇O2peak (mL·min−1) and peak cardiac output (L·min−1) tended to be lower in T2DM than in control subjects but did not reach statistical significance. However, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) rose significantly more during exercise in T2DM than in controls (148% vs 109% increase at peak exercise, P < 0.01). Normalized myocardial perfusion index was lower in persons with diabetes than in controls (11.0 ± 3.5 × e−9 vs 17.5 ± 8.1 × e−9, respectively, P < 0.05) and inversely related to peak exercise PCWP (R = −0.56, P < 0.05). Conclusions Cardiac hemodynamics during graded exercise are altered in women with recently diagnosed T2DM as demonstrated by the disproportionate increase in PCWP at peak exercise compared with controls subjects. Cardiac abnormalities observed are potentially early signs of subclinical cardiac dysfunction associated with T2DM, which may

  15. Benefits of modest weight loss on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lau, David C W; Teoh, Hwee

    2013-04-01

    The epidemic of overweight and obesity is a major driver of the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus globally. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases exponentially as body mass index rises above 25 kg/m(2). Obesity currently costs the Canadian economy approximately $7.1 billion annually whereas per capita health care cost for individuals with diabetes are 3 to 4 times that for persons without the disease. Each kilogram of weight lost through health behaviour changes in people with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a relative diabetes risk reduction of 16%. As 80% to 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and adiposity worsens the metabolic and physiologic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes, weight loss is recommended as the cornerstone management measure. A modest weight loss of 5% to 10% is an achievable and realistic goal for preventing type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals and improving glycemic and metabolic control in people with type 2 diabetes. When health behaviour modification fails to achieve glycemic and metabolic goal targets, priority should be given to antihyperglycemic agents that are associated with weight loss or weight neutrality. Every pound of body fat loss matters and every kilogram counts in the management of type 2 diabetes.

  16. Relationship between blood pressure reverse dipping and type 2 diabetes in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lu; Yan, Bin; Gao, Ya; Su, Dan; Peng, Liyuan; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Yuhuan; Han, Donggang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that nocturnal variations of blood pressure (BP) were closely related to type 2 diabetes. However, little information has been revealed about the relationship between reverse-dipper pattern of BP and type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, BP variations of 531 hypertensive patients were evaluated with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnosis of diabetes in Chinese adults was made according to diabetes diagnostic criteria of 2015. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between type 2 diabetes and ABPM results. In the study, patients with reverse-dipper pattern (32.3%) had the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared with dippers (21.4%) and nondippers (23.3%). After multivariate logistic regression, reverse-dipper BP pattern (OR 2.067, P = 0.024) and nondipper BP pattern (OR 1.637, P = 0.039) were found to be correlated with type 2 diabetes compared with dipper pattern. The results of our study also suggested that type 2 diabetes might contribute to the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (OR 1.691, P = 0.023). In addition, fasting glucose was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal SBP (r = -0.095, P = 0.029). Reverse-dipper pattern of BP in ABPM may be independently associated with type 2 diabetes in patients with hypertension. PMID:27109832

  17. Behavioral economics survey of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Naoya; Okajima, Fumitaka; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Goto, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to treatment and the metabolic control of diabetes are challenging in many patients with diabetes. The theory of neuroeconomics can provide important clues for understanding unreasonable human behavior concerning decisions between outcomes occurring at different time points. Objective We investigated patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine whether patients who are at a risk of developing complications are less risk averse. We also examined whether patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different behavioral traits in decision making under risk. Methods We conducted a behavioral economics survey of 219 outpatients, 66 with type 1 diabetes and 153 with type 2 diabetes. All patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital. At the time of the survey, levels of hemoglobin A1c were not significantly different between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Results Patients with type 2 diabetes showed a lower response rate to the survey compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (71.9% vs 87.9%, P<0.01). Logistic regression analysis indicated that diabetic retinopathy was negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries, myopic time preference, willingness to pay for preventive medicine, and levels of satisfaction with life. Diabetic nephropathy was also negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries. Detailed analysis revealed that a lower proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes (22.7%) were categorized as risk averse compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (43.1%, P<0.05) in hypothetical lottery risk estimation. Conclusion This is the first report that investigated patients with diabetes in a clinical setting using a method based on behavioral economics. The results suggest that the attitude of patients toward risk plays an important role in the progress of the complications of diabetes. Different educational and

  18. Differential control of muscle mass in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sala, David; Zorzano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus--whether driven by insulin deficiency or insulin resistance--causes major alterations in muscle metabolism. These alterations have an impact on nutrient handling, including the metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, and also on muscle mass and strength. However, the ways in which the distinct forms of diabetes affect muscle mass differ greatly. The most common forms of diabetes mellitus are type 1 and type 2. Thus, whereas type 1 diabetic subjects without insulin treatment display a dramatic loss of muscle, most type 2 diabetic subjects show no changes or even an increase in muscle mass. However, the most commonly used rodent models of type 2 diabetes are characterized by muscle atrophy and do not mimic the features of the disease in humans in terms of muscle mass. In this review, we analyze the processes that are differentially regulated under these forms of diabetes and propose regulatory mechanisms to explain them.

  19. Novel peptides under development for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alain D; Kim, Dennis; Weyer, Christian

    2002-04-01

    Recent availability of expanded treatment options for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not translated into easier and significantly better glycemic and metabolic management. Patients with type 1 diabetes continue to experience increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes and progressive weight gain resulting from intensive insulin treatment, despite the recent availability of a variety of insulin analog. Given the progressive nature of the disease, most patients with type 2 diabetes inevitably proceed from oral agent monotherapy to combination therapy and, ultimately, require exogenous insulin replacement. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes is also accompanied by untoward weight gain. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes continue to be characterized by marked postprandial hyperglycemia. Two hormones still in development are candidates for pharmacologic intervention, have novel modes of action (some centrally mediated), and show great promise in addressing some of the unmet needs of current diabetes management. Pramlintide acetate, an analog of the beta cell hormone amylin and the first non-insulin related therapeutic modality for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients with severe beta cell failure, may be useful as adjunctive therapy to insulin. The principal anti-diabetic effects of pramlintide arise from interactions via its cognate receptors located in the central nervous system resulting in postprandial glucagon suppression, modulation of nutrient absorption rate, and reduction of food intake. Another polypeptide hormone, exendin-4, exerts at least some of its pharmacologic actions as an agonist at the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor. GLP-1 and related compounds exhibit multiple modes of action, the most notable being a glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects and the potential to preserve or improve the beta-cell function. The latter effect could potentially halt or delay the progressive deterioration of the diabetic state associated with type 2 diabetes

  20. Effect of an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Atrial Fibrillation Risk in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: the Look AHEAD Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Alvaro; Bahnson, Judy L.; Gaussoin, Sarah A.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Johnson, Karen C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Vetter, Marion; Mantzoros, Christos S.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the impact of behavioral weight loss interventions on atrial fibrillation (AF) risk in persons with diabetes is unknown. We addressed this question in the Look AHEAD randomized trial. Methods and Results 5067 overweight or obese individuals 45-76 years old with type 2 diabetes without prevalent AF were randomized to either an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) designed to achieve and maintain weight loss through caloric reduction and increased physical activity or to a diabetes support and education (DSE) usual care group. AF was ascertained from electrocardiograms at study exams and hospitalization discharge summaries. Multivariable Cox models were used to estimate the intention to treat effect of the intervention adjusting for baseline covariates. During a mean follow-up of 9.0 years, 294 incident AF cases were identified. Rates of AF were comparable in the ILI and DSE groups (6.1 and 6.7 cases per 1,000 person-years, respectively, p=0.42). The intervention did not affect AF incidence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77, 1.28). Similarly, neither weight loss nor improvement in physical fitness during the first year of the intervention were significantly associated with AF incidence: multivariable HR (95%CI) comparing top versus bottom quartile were 0.70 (0.41, 1.18) for weight loss and 0.88 (0.55, 1.43) for physical fitness improvement. Conclusion In a large randomized trial of overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, an ILI that induced modest weight loss did not reduce the risk of developing AF. PMID:26386801

  1. Genome-wide association scans for Type 2 diabetes: new insights into biology and therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mark I; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2007-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex, multifactorial disease, for which genetic and environmental factors jointly determine susceptibility. Disentangling the genetic aetiology of Type 2 diabetes has proven a challenging task, rewarded, until recently, with only limited success. However, the field of Type 2 diabetes genetics has been transformed over the past few months, with the publication of six genome-wide association scans, leading to the establishment of novel genomic regions that harbour disease susceptibility loci. Here, we provide an overview of the main recent findings and discuss their significance in providing biological insights and their translational implications.

  2. Unrealistic Optimism, Sex, and Risk Perception of Type 2 Diabetes Onset: Implications for Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sealey-Potts, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This study examined links among unrealistic optimism, sex, and risk perception of type 2 diabetes onset in college students. Participants included 660 college students who consented to complete a questionnaire. The results showed significant differences between students who perceived that they were at risk for type 2 diabetes onset and those who thought their peers were the ones at risk. A higher prevalence of participants thought their peers were the ones at risk for type 2 diabetes. Women were more likely than men to report a higher risk perception, indicating that their peers were at lower risk for diabetes onset. PMID:25717271

  3. Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Nonaffective Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian; Bernardo, Miguel; Donner, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We attempted to replicate two previous studies which found an increased risk of diabetes in the relatives of schizophrenia probands. Methods N=34 patients with newly-diagnosed nonaffective psychosis and N=52 non-psychiatric controls were interviewed for parental history of Type 2 diabetes. Results In a logistic regression model that included multiple potential confounders, psychosis was a significant predictor of Type 2 diabetes in either parent (p<0.04). Discussion We found an increased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the parents of nonaffective psychosis subjects. This association may be due to shared environmental or genetic risk factors, or both. PMID:18031995

  4. Physical activity in prevention and management of obesity and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hill, James O; Stuht, Jennifer; Wyatt, Holly R; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and type-2 diabetes can be considered diseases of physical inactivity. Physically activity protects against type-2 diabetes through its positive effects on weight management and on the metabolic pathways involved in glycemic control that are not weight-dependent. Increasing physical activity is one of the most effective strategies both for preventing type-2 diabetes and for managing it once it is present. However, we still face an enormous challenge in getting people to achieve sustainable increases in physical activity. A promising strategy is to get people walking more, starting small and increasing gradually over time.

  5. Muraglitazar: beneficial or detrimental in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2006-06-01

    Hyperglycaemia in Type 2 diabetes has a major role in the development of microvascular complications, whereas the dyslipidaemia is the major cause of macrovascular complications. In patients with Type 2 diabetes, activation of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma with the fibrates and glitazones improves dyslipidaemia and increases insulin sensitivity, respectively. Muraglitazar is an agonist at both of these receptors and has been shown to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, decrease triglycerides and improve insulin sensitivity. However, there is also some evidence that muraglitazar has detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. Before muraglitazar is widely used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, more safety testing needs to be undertaken.

  6. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction. PMID:26823010

  7. Prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Among Children and Adolescents From 2001 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Dabelea, Dana; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Saydah, Sharon; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Linder, Barbara; Divers, Jasmin; Bell, Ronny; Badaru, Angela; Talton, Jennifer W.; Crume, Tessa; Liese, Angela D.; Merchant, Anwar T.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Reynolds, Kristi; Dolan, Lawrence; Liu, Lenna L.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Despite concern about an “epidemic,” there are limited data on trends in prevalence of either type 1 or type 2 diabetes across US race and ethnic groups. OBJECTIVE To estimate changes in the prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in US youth, by sex, age, and race/ethnicity between 2001 and 2009. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Case patients were ascertained in 4 geographic areas and 1 managed health care plan. The study population was determined by the 2001 and 2009 bridged-race intercensal population estimates for geographic sites and membership counts for the health plan. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence (per 1000) of physician-diagnosed type 1 diabetes in youth aged 0 through 19 years and type 2 diabetes in youth aged 10 through 19 years. RESULTS In 2001, 4958 of 3.3 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.48 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.44–1.52). In 2009, 6666 of 3.4 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.93 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.88–1.97). In 2009, the highest prevalence of type 1 diabetes was 2.55 per 1000 among white youth (95% CI, 2.48–2.62) and the lowest was 0.35 per 1000 in American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.26–0.47) and type 1 diabetes increased between 2001 and 2009 in all sex, age, and race/ethnic subgroups except for those with the lowest prevalence (age 0–4 years and American Indians). Adjusted for completeness of ascertainment, there was a 21.1% (95% CI, 15.6%–27.0%) increase in type 1 diabetes over 8 years. In 2001, 588 of 1.7 million youth were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.34 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.31–0.37). In 2009, 819 of 1.8 million were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.46 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.43–0.49). In 2009, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 1.20 per 1000 among American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.96–1.51); 1.06 per 1000 among black youth (95% CI, 0.93–1.22); 0.79 per 1000 among Hispanic youth (95% CI, 0

  8. Differences in emotional distress among inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Okauchi, Yukiyoshi; Sudo, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Omote, Yayoko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in emotional distress among three groups of inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization. Methods The 42 participating inpatients were divided into three groups: type 1 diabetes (n=11), obese type 2 diabetes [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2); n=24], and non-obese type 2 diabetes (BMI <25 kg/m(2); n=7). The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, which is a self-administered questionnaire to assess emotional distress in the patients with diabetes, was performed at admission and discharge. Results The total PAID score was similar and tended to improve during hospitalization in all three groups, although there were differences among the groups in the scores of particular questions. At admission, the score of the question "worrying about low blood sugar reactions?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with type 1 diabetes. At discharge, the score of "not accepting diabetes?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes, while that of "feeling unsatisfied with your diabetes physician?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes. The score of "feelings of deprivation regarding food and meals?" significantly worsened in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization compared with the patients in with non-obese type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The characteristics of emotional distress during hospitalization varied among the patients with the three types of diabetes, thus emphasizing the importance of tailoring support according to the type of diabetes.

  9. Differences in emotional distress among inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Okauchi, Yukiyoshi; Sudo, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Omote, Yayoko; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in emotional distress among three groups of inpatients with type 1, obese type 2, and non-obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization. Methods The 42 participating inpatients were divided into three groups: type 1 diabetes (n=11), obese type 2 diabetes [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2); n=24], and non-obese type 2 diabetes (BMI <25 kg/m(2); n=7). The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale, which is a self-administered questionnaire to assess emotional distress in the patients with diabetes, was performed at admission and discharge. Results The total PAID score was similar and tended to improve during hospitalization in all three groups, although there were differences among the groups in the scores of particular questions. At admission, the score of the question "worrying about low blood sugar reactions?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with type 1 diabetes. At discharge, the score of "not accepting diabetes?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes, while that of "feeling unsatisfied with your diabetes physician?" was significantly different among the three groups and highest in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes. The score of "feelings of deprivation regarding food and meals?" significantly worsened in the patients with obese type 2 diabetes during hospitalization compared with the patients in with non-obese type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The characteristics of emotional distress during hospitalization varied among the patients with the three types of diabetes, thus emphasizing the importance of tailoring support according to the type of diabetes. PMID:26466689

  10. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes in Communities Across the U.S

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Ann L.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    There are as many as 79 million people in the U.S. with prediabetes, and their risk of developing type 2 diabetes is four to 12 times higher than it is for people with normal glucose tolerance. Although advances in diabetes treatment are still needed, there is a critical need to implement effective strategies to stem the current and projected growth in new cases of type 2 diabetes. RCTs and translation studies have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed in those at high risk, through a structured lifestyle intervention that can be delivered cost effectively. In order to bring this compelling lifestyle intervention to communities across America, Congress authorized the CDC to establish and lead the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Several aspects of the etiology of type 2 diabetes suggest that strategies addressing both those at high risk and the general population are necessary to make a major impact on the diabetes epidemic. PMID:23498297

  11. Aqueous Extract of Garcinia Indica Choisy Restores Glutathione in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kirana, H; Srinivasan, BP

    2010-01-01

    Significant depletion of glutathione (GSH-reduced form) was observed in type 2 diabetes due to oxidative stress. Hence the present study was aimed to investigate a drug which restores GSH along with its anti-diabetic activity. Aqueous extract of Garcinia indica at a dose of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg was given orally to streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats for a period of 4 weeks. At the end, parameters such as fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and GSH in blood were analyzed. Aqueous extract of G. indica significantly decreased both the fasting and postprandial blood glucose in type 2 diabetic rats. The extract also restored the erythrocyte GSH in type 2 diabetic rats. Drug at higher dose, i.e. 200 mg/kg, had a more pronounced effect. Restoring the erythrocyte GSH, an intracellular anti-oxidant in diabetes, will be beneficial specially by preventing the risk of developing complications. PMID:21042483

  12. Vascular effects of ultrafine particles in persons with type 2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes confers an increased risk for cardiovascular effects of airborne particles. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles (UFP) would activate blood platelets and vascular endothelium in people with type 2 diabetes. ...

  13. Pancreatic islet enhancer clusters enriched in type 2 diabetes risk-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Gaulton, Kyle J; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Mularoni, Loris; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Akerman, Ildem; Tena, Juan J; Morán, Ignasi; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; van de Bunt, Martijn; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Castro, Natalia; Nammo, Takao; Cebola, Inês; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Pattou, François; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Gloyn, Anna L; Ravassard, Philippe; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Müller, Ferenc; McCarthy, Mark I; Ferrer, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people, causing severe complications and premature death, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Pancreatic islet dysfunction is central in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and understanding islet genome regulation could therefore provide valuable mechanistic insights. We have now mapped and examined the function of human islet cis-regulatory networks. We identify genomic sequences that are targeted by islet transcription factors to drive islet-specific gene activity and show that most such sequences reside in clusters of enhancers that form physical three-dimensional chromatin domains. We find that sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glycemia are enriched in these clustered islet enhancers and identify trait-associated variants that disrupt DNA binding and islet enhancer activity. Our studies illustrate how islet transcription factors interact functionally with the epigenome and provide systematic evidence that the dysregulation of islet enhancers is relevant to the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes. PMID:24413736

  14. Pancreatic islet enhancer clusters enriched in type 2 diabetes risk–associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Akerman, İldem; Tena, Juan J.; Morán, Ignasi; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; van de Bunt, Martijn; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Castro, Natalia; Nammo, Takao; Cebola, Inês; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Pattou, François; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ravassard, Philippe; Skarmeta, José Luis Gómez; Müller, Ferenc; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ferrer, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects over 300 million people, causing severe complications and premature death, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Pancreatic islet dysfunction is central for type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and therefore understanding islet genome regulation could provide valuable mechanistic insights. We have now mapped and examined the function of human islet cis-regulatory networks. We identify genomic sequences that are targeted by islet transcription factors to drive islet-specific gene activity, and show that most such sequences reside in clusters of enhancers that form physical 3D chromatin domains. We find that sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glycemia are enriched in these clustered islet enhancers, and identify trait-associated variants that disrupt DNA-binding and islet enhancer activity. Our studies illustrate how islet transcription factors interact functionally with the epigenome, and provide systematic evidence that dysregulation of islet enhancers is relevant to the mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes. PMID:24413736

  15. Type 2 diabetes in youth: epidemiology and current research toward prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2008-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has emerged as a diagnosis among adolescents in the United States, particularly among minority groups and concurrent with the well-documented epidemic of overweight and obesity. Opportunities for prevention of type 2 diabetes and approaches to optimized treatment regimens for adolescents with the disease have drawn largely from studies conducted in adult populations. Recognizing that much work remains to be done, this review summarizes key findings from recent research and highlights recent findings from large, ongoing studies of youth that address the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young people, the prevalence of complications among this group, and the current knowledge base that informs opportunities for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes in adolescents.

  16. Variation in macro and trace elements in progression of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khalid; Bawazeer, Nahla; Joy, Salini Scaria

    2014-01-01

    Macro elements are the minerals of which the body needs more amounts and are more important than any other elements. Trace elements constitute a minute part of the living tissues and have various metabolic characteristics and functions. Trace elements participate in tissue and cellular and subcellular functions; these include immune regulation by humoral and cellular mechanisms, nerve conduction, muscle contractions, membrane potential regulations, and mitochondrial activity and enzyme reactions. The status of micronutrients such as iron and vanadium is higher in type 2 diabetes. The calcium, magnesium, sodium, chromium, cobalt, iodine, iron, selenium, manganese, and zinc seem to be low in type 2 diabetes while elements such as potassium and copper have no effect. In this review, we emphasized the status of macro and trace elements in type 2 diabetes and its advantages or disadvantages; this helps to understand the mechanism, progression, and prevention of type 2 diabetes due to the lack and deficiency of different macro and trace elements.

  17. Variation in Macro and Trace Elements in Progression of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Macro elements are the minerals of which the body needs more amounts and are more important than any other elements. Trace elements constitute a minute part of the living tissues and have various metabolic characteristics and functions. Trace elements participate in tissue and cellular and subcellular functions; these include immune regulation by humoral and cellular mechanisms, nerve conduction, muscle contractions, membrane potential regulations, and mitochondrial activity and enzyme reactions. The status of micronutrients such as iron and vanadium is higher in type 2 diabetes. The calcium, magnesium, sodium, chromium, cobalt, iodine, iron, selenium, manganese, and zinc seem to be low in type 2 diabetes while elements such as potassium and copper have no effect. In this review, we emphasized the status of macro and trace elements in type 2 diabetes and its advantages or disadvantages; this helps to understand the mechanism, progression, and prevention of type 2 diabetes due to the lack and deficiency of different macro and trace elements. PMID:25162051

  18. Aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa linn. reduces oxidative stress in experimentally induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kirana, H; Agrawal, S S; Srinivasan, B P

    2009-10-01

    One of the major etiologies in pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes especially complications is oxidative stress. Aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg orally decreased the fasting blood glucose in streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats. The drug had enzyme induction effect with respect to catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, however decreased the exaggerated activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in type 2 diabetic rats. F. religiosa modulated the enzymes of antioxidant defence system to combat oxidative stress. As a result, glutathione (GSH-reduced form) was restored and inhibited the formation of malondialdehyde. Drug at higher dose (200 mg/kg) had more pronounced effect. F. religiosa, a rasayana group of plant drug having anti-diabetic activity along with antioxidant potential was beneficial in treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20112810

  19. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  20. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: What Can Be Unified and What Needs to Be Individualized?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Goldfine, Allison B.; Nathan, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Smith, Robert J.; Smith, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This report examines what is known about the relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes and how future research in these areas might be directed to benefit prevention, interventions, and overall patient care. Research Design and Methods: An international working group of 32 experts in the pathophysiology, genetics, clinical trials, and clinical care of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes participated in a conference held on 6–7 January 2011 and cosponsored by The Endocrine Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. A writing group comprising eight participants subsequently prepared this summary and recommendations. Participants reviewed and discussed published literature and their own unpublished data. Results: The writing group unanimously supported the summary and recommendations as representing the working group's majority or unanimous opinions. Conclusions: The major questions linking obesity to type 2 diabetes that need to be addressed by combined basic, clinical, and population-based scientific approaches include the following: 1) Why do not all patients with obesity develop type 2 diabetes? 2) Through what mechanisms do obesity and insulin resistance contribute to β-cell decompensation, and if/when obesity prevention ensues, how much reduction in type 2 diabetes incidence will follow? 3) How does the duration of type 2 diabetes relate to the benefits of weight reduction by lifestyle, weight-loss drugs, and/or bariatric surgery on β-cell function and glycemia? 4) What is necessary for regulatory approval of medications and possibly surgical approaches for preventing type 2 diabetes in patients with obesity? Improved understanding of how obesity relates to type 2 diabetes may help advance effective and cost-effective interventions for both conditions, including more tailored therapy. To expedite this process, we recommend further investigation into the pathogenesis of these coexistent

  1. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: What Can Be Unified and What Needs to Be Individualized?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Goldfine, Allison B.; Nathan, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Smith, Robert J.; Smith, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This report examines what is known about the relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes and how future research in these areas might be directed to benefit prevention, interventions, and overall patient care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An international working group of 32 experts in the pathophysiology, genetics, clinical trials, and clinical care of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes participated in a conference held on 6–7 January 2011 and cosponsored by The Endocrine Society, the American Diabetes Association, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. A writing group comprising eight participants subsequently prepared this summary and recommendations. Participants reviewed and discussed published literature and their own unpublished data. RESULTS The writing group unanimously supported the summary and recommendations as representing the working group's majority or unanimous opinions. CONCLUSIONS The major questions linking obesity to type 2 diabetes that need to be addressed by combined basic, clinical, and population-based scientific approaches include the following: 1) Why do not all patients with obesity develop type 2 diabetes? 2) Through what mechanisms do obesity and insulin resistance contribute to β-cell decompensation, and if/when obesity prevention ensues, how much reduction in type 2 diabetes incidence will follow? 3) How does the duration of type 2 diabetes relate to the benefits of weight reduction by lifestyle, weight-loss drugs, and/or bariatric surgery on β-cell function and glycemia? 4) What is necessary for regulatory approval of medications and possibly surgical approaches for preventing type 2 diabetes in patients with obesity? Improved understanding of how obesity relates to type 2 diabetes may help advance effective and cost-effective interventions for both conditions, including more tailored therapy. To expedite this process, we recommend further investigation into the pathogenesis of these coexistent

  2. Pathogenesis and prevention of type 2 diabetes: parental determinants, breastfeeding, and early childhood nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Sarah; Freemark, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Among the factors predisposing to type 2 diabetes in children, adolescents, and young adults, the health and behavior of both the mother and father are critical. Prevention and treatment of parental nutritional disorders (including obesity and malnutrition), promotion of breastfeeding, and avoidance of overfeeding of young children are essential for childhood health and metabolic function. Focusing research and policy on parental influences on childhood health should reduce the risks of obesity and type 2 diabetes in future generations.

  3. Prevalence and determinants of osteoporosis in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased risk of osteoporosis and its clinical significance in patients with diabetes is controversial. We analyze osteoporosis prevalence and determinants of bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Methods Three hundred and ninety-eight consecutive diabetic patients from a single outpatient clinic received a standardized questionnaire on osteoporosis risk factors, and were evaluated for diabetes-related complications, HbA1c levels, and lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) BMD. Of these, 139 (71 men, 68 women) type 1 and 243 (115 men, 128 women) type 2 diabetes patients were included in the study. BMD (T-scores and values adjusted for age, BMI and duration of disease) was compared between patient groups and between patients with type 2 diabetes and population-based controls (255 men, 249 women). Results For both genders, adjusted BMD was not different between the type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups but was higher in the type 2 group compared with controls (p < 0.0001). Osteoporosis prevalence (BMD T-score < −2.5 SD) at FN and LS was equivalent in the type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups, but lower in type 2 patients compared with controls (FN: 13.0% vs 21.2%, LS: 6.1% vs 14.9% men; FN: 21.9% vs 32.1%, LS: 9.4% vs 26.9% women). Osteoporosis prevalence was higher at FN-BMD than at LS-BMD. BMD was positively correlated with BMI and negatively correlated with age, but not correlated with diabetes-specific parameters (therapy, HbBA1c, micro- and macrovascular complications) in all subgroups. Fragility fracture prevalence was low (5.2%) and not different between diabetes groups. Fracture patients had lower BMDs compared with those without fractures; however, BMD T-score was above −2.5 SD in most patients. Conclusions Diabetes-specific parameters did not predict BMD. Fracture occurrence was similar in both diabetes groups and related to lower BMD, but seems unrelated to the threshold T-score, <−2.5 SD. These results

  4. Comparative analysis of lipid profiles among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and concurrent type 2 diabetes, and hypertension: a view of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Isezuo, S. A.; Badung, S. L. H.; Omotoso, A. B. O.

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension are independent risk factors for atherosclerotic lesions that are partly linked with dyslipidaemia. This risk is additive when diabetes and hypertension occur concurrently. In order to determine if concurrent type 2 diabetes and hypertension results in putative increases in dyslipidaemia in a Nigerian population, we compared the plasma lipid levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia among age and sex-matched indigenous Nigerians with type 2 diabetes, hypertension and concurrent diabetes and hypertension. Age and sex-matched healthy Nigerians that are free of diabetes and hypertension served as controls. The patients as a whole were more likely to have dyslipidaemia than controls (p < 0.05). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was similar among patients and controls. Mean total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels, atherogenic index and prevalence of dyslipidaemia did not differ significantly among patients with hypertension, diabetes, and concurrent hypertension and diabetes (p = 0.99 for each parameter). It is concluded that concurrent hypertension and type 2 diabetes does not result in a more severe dyslipidaemia than when either of the two conditions occurs in isolation. We attribute this to the common pathogenic link between hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia in metabolic syndrome. Evidence, albeit indirect, of this syndrome among native Africans is, therefore, provided. PMID:12793789

  5. Vascular dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease: a potential etiological linkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuzhou; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Kream, Richard M; Mantione, Kirk J; Stefano, George B

    2014-08-01

    The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity leading to whole organ metabolic homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key etiological factor leading to moderate to severe vasculopathies observed in both Type 2 diabetic and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Accordingly, evidence-based epidemiological factors support a compelling hypothesis stating that metabolic rundown encountered in Type 2 diabetes engenders severe cerebral vascular insufficiencies that are causally linked to long term neural degenerative processes in AD. Of mechanistic importance, Type 2 diabetes engenders an immunologically mediated chronic pro-inflammatory state involving interactive deleterious effects of leukocyte-derived cytokines and endothelial-derived chemotactic agents leading to vascular and whole organ dysfunction. The long term negative consequences of vascular pro-inflammatory processes on the integrity of CNS basal forebrain neuronal populations mediating complex cognitive functions establish a striking temporal comorbidity of AD with Type 2 diabetes. Extensive biomedical evidence supports the pivotal multi-functional role of constitutive nitric oxide (NO) production and release as a critical vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant, mechanism within the vascular endothelium. Within this context, we currently review the functional contributions of dysregulated endothelial NO expression to the etiology and persistence of Type 2 diabetes-related and co morbid AD-related vasculopathies. Additionally, we provide up-to-date perspectives on critical areas of AD research with special reference to common NO-related etiological factors linking Type 2 diabetes to the pathogenesis of AD.

  6. Cognitive function, dementia and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Mark W J; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Marioni, Riccardo E; Price, Jacqueline F

    2011-02-01

    Increasing numbers of people are developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, but interventions to prevent and treat the classic microvascular and macrovascular complications have improved, so that people are living longer with the condition. This trend means that novel complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which are not targeted by current management strategies, could start to emerge. Cognitive impairment and dementia could come into this category. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5-2.5-fold increased risk of dementia. The etiology of dementia and cognitive impairment in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus is probably multifactorial. Chronic hyperglycemia is implicated, perhaps by promoting the development of cerebral microvascular disease. Data suggest that the brains of older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus might be vulnerable to the effects of recurrent, severe hypoglycemia. Other possible moderators of cognitive function include inflammatory mediators, rheological factors and dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cognitive function should now be included as a standard end point in randomized trials of therapeutic interventions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Amanda G; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  8. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  9. Increased GABA concentrations in type 2 diabetes mellitus are related to lower cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; Backes, Walter H; Hofman, Paul A M; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Edden, Richard A E; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Schram, Miranda T; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Wildberger, Joachim E; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with accelerated cognitive decline. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated although it is known that insulin signaling modulates neurotransmitter activity, including inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and excitatory glutamate (Glu) receptors. Therefore, we examined whether levels of GABA and Glu are related to diabetes status and cognitive performance.Forty-one participants with type 2 diabetes and 39 participants without type 2 diabetes underwent detailed cognitive assessments and 3-Tesla proton MR spectroscopy. The associations of neurotransmitters with type 2 diabetes and cognitive performance were examined using multivariate regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, BMI, and percentage gray/white matter ratio in spectroscopic voxel.Analysis revealed higher GABA+ levels in participants with type 2 diabetes, in participants with higher fasting blood glucose levels and in participants with higher HbA1c levels, and higher GABA+ levels in participants with both high HbA1c levels and less cognitive performance.To conclude, participants with type 2 diabetes have alterations in the GABAergic neurotransmitter system, which are related to lower cognitive functioning, and hint at the involvement of an underlying metabolic mechanism. PMID:27603392

  10. Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, prevalence is positively associated with ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; Heidari-Bakavoli, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure stimulates energy expenditure and glucose disposal. If these factors play a significant role in whole body energy balance, and glucose homeostasis, it is predicted that both obesity and type 2 diabetes prevalence would be lower where it is colder. Previous studies have noted connections between ambient temperature and obesity, but the direction of the effect is confused. No previous studies have explored the link of type 2 diabetes to ambient temperature. We used county level data for obesity and diabetes prevalence across the mainland USA and matched this to county level ambient temperature data. Average ambient temperature explained 5.7% of the spatial variation in obesity and 29.6% of the spatial variation in type 2 diabetes prevalence. Correcting the type 2 diabetes data for the effect of obesity reduced the explained variation to 26.8%. Even when correcting for obesity, poverty and race, ambient temperature explained 12.4% of the variation in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this significant effect remained when latitude was entered into the model as a predictor. When obesity prevalence was corrected for poverty and race the significant effect of temperature disappeared. Enhancing energy expenditure by cold exposure will likely not impact obesity significantly, but may be useful to combat type 2 diabetes. PMID:27477955

  11. Inflammation as a link between obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Esser, Nathalie; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie; Piette, Jacques; Scheen, André J; Paquot, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    It is recognized that a chronic low-grade inflammation and an activation of the immune system are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Systemic inflammatory markers are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and its macrovascular complications. Adipose tissue, liver, muscle and pancreas are themselves sites of inflammation in presence of obesity. An infiltration of macrophages and other immune cells is observed in these tissues associated with a cell population shift from an anti-inflammatory to a pro-inflammatory profile. These cells are crucial for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which act in an autocrine and paracrine manner to interfere with insulin signaling in peripheral tissues or induce β-cell dysfunction and subsequent insulin deficiency. Particularly, the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β is implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes through the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The objectives of this review are to expose recent data supporting the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and to examine various mechanisms underlying this relationship. If type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory disease, anti-inflammatory therapies could have a place in prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Standardization of Type 2 Diabetes Outpatient Expenditure with Bundled Payment Method in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Luo, Yun; Li, Qian; Wu, Meng-Fan; Zhou, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Chinese population has been increasing by years, directly leading to an average annual growth rate of 19.90% of medical expenditure. Therefore, it is urgent to work on strategies to control the growth of medical expenditure on type 2 diabetes on the basis of the reality of China. Therefore, in this study, we explored the feasibility of implementing bundled payment in China through analyzing bundled payment standards of type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Methods: This study analyzed the outpatient expenditure on type 2 diabetes with Beijing Urban Employee's Basic Medical Insurance from 2010 to 2012. Based on the analysis of outpatient expenditure and its influential factors, we adopted decision tree approach to conduct a case-mix analysis. In the end, we built a case-mix model to calculate the standard expenditure and the upper limit of each combination. Results: We found that age, job status, and whether with complication were significant factors that influence outpatient expenditure for type 2 diabetes. Through the analysis of the decision tree, we used six variables (complication, age, diabetic foot, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac-cerebrovascular disease, and neuropathy) to group the cases, and obtained 11 case-mix groups. Conclusions: We argued that it is feasible to implement bundled payment on type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Bundled payment is effective to control the increase of outpatient expenditure. Further improvements are needed for the implementation of bundled payment reimbursement standards, together with relevant policies and measures. PMID:27064041

  13. Increased GABA concentrations in type 2 diabetes mellitus are related to lower cognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    van Bussel, Frank C.G.; Backes, Walter H.; Hofman, Paul A.M.; Puts, Nicolaas A.J.; Edden, Richard A.E.; van Boxtel, Martin P.J.; Schram, Miranda T.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Jansen, Jacobus F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with accelerated cognitive decline. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated although it is known that insulin signaling modulates neurotransmitter activity, including inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and excitatory glutamate (Glu) receptors. Therefore, we examined whether levels of GABA and Glu are related to diabetes status and cognitive performance. Forty-one participants with type 2 diabetes and 39 participants without type 2 diabetes underwent detailed cognitive assessments and 3-Tesla proton MR spectroscopy. The associations of neurotransmitters with type 2 diabetes and cognitive performance were examined using multivariate regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, BMI, and percentage gray/white matter ratio in spectroscopic voxel. Analysis revealed higher GABA+ levels in participants with type 2 diabetes, in participants with higher fasting blood glucose levels and in participants with higher HbA1c levels, and higher GABA+ levels in participants with both high HbA1c levels and less cognitive performance. To conclude, participants with type 2 diabetes have alterations in the GABAergic neurotransmitter system, which are related to lower cognitive functioning, and hint at the involvement of an underlying metabolic mechanism. PMID:27603392

  14. Inverse association of plasma vanadium levels with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Sun, Taoping; Liu, Jun; Shan, Zhilei; Jin, Yilin; Chen, Sijing; Bao, Wei; Hu, Frank B; Liu, Liegang

    2014-08-15

    Vanadium compounds have been proposed to have beneficial effects on the pathogenesis and complications of type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between plasma vanadium levels and type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-control study involving 1,598 Chinese subjects with or without newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (December 2004-December 2007). Cases and controls were frequency-matched by age and sex. Plasma vanadium concentrations were measured and compared between groups. Analyses showed that plasma vanadium concentrations were significantly lower in cases with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes than in controls (P = 0.001). Mean plasma vanadium levels in participants with and without diabetes were 1.0 μg/L and 1.2 μg/L, respectively. Participants in the highest quartile of plasma vanadium concentration had a notably lower risk of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (odds ratio = 0.26, 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 0.35; P < 0.001), compared with persons in the lowest quartile. The trend remained significant after adjustment for known risk factors and in further stratification analyses. Our results suggested that plasma vanadium concentrations were inversely associated with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in this Chinese population.

  15. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Amanda G.; Chen, Jian; Moran, Christopher; Phan, Thanh; Beare, Richard; Cooper, Kimberley; Litras, Stacey; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years) without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ) pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline. PMID:27314047

  16. Disruption of multisystem responses to stress in type 2 diabetes: Investigating the dynamics of allostatic load

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Hackett, Ruth A.; Lazzarino, Antonio I.; Bostock, Sophie; La Marca, Roberto; Carvalho, Livia A.; Hamer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Psychological stress-related processes are thought to contribute to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes, but the biological mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we tested the notion that people with type 2 diabetes experience chronic allostatic load, manifest as dynamic disturbances in reactivity to and recovery from stress across multiple (cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic) biological systems, coupled with heightened experience of chronic life stress. We carried out an experimental comparison of 140 men and women aged 50–75 y with type 2 diabetes and 280 nondiabetic individuals matched on age, sex, and income. We monitored blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, salivary cortisol, plasma interleukin (IL)-6, and total cholesterol in response to standardized mental stress, and assessed salivary cortisol over the day. People with type 2 diabetes showed impaired poststress recovery in systolic and diastolic BP, heart rate and cholesterol, and blunted stress reactivity in systolic BP, cortisol, cholesterol, and IL-6. Cortisol and IL-6 concentrations were elevated, and cortisol measured over the day was higher in the type 2 diabetes group. Diabetic persons reported greater depressive and hostile symptoms and greater stress experience than did healthy controls. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by disruption of stress-related processes across multiple biological systems and increased exposure to life stress. Chronic allostatic load provides a unifying perspective with implications for etiology and patient management. PMID:25331894

  17. Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Potential Etiological Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuzhou; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Xiaofeng; Kream, Richard M.; Mantione, Kirk J.; Stefano, George B.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity leading to whole organ metabolic homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key etiological factor leading to moderate to severe vasculopathies observed in both Type 2 diabetic and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients. Accordingly, evidence-based epidemiological factors support a compelling hypothesis stating that metabolic rundown encountered in Type 2 diabetes engenders severe cerebral vascular insufficiencies that are causally linked to long term neural degenerative processes in AD. Of mechanistic importance, Type 2 diabetes engenders an immunologically mediated chronic pro-inflammatory state involving interactive deleterious effects of leukocyte-derived cytokines and endothelial-derived chemotactic agents leading to vascular and whole organ dysfunction. The long term negative consequences of vascular pro-inflammatory processes on the integrity of CNS basal forebrain neuronal populations mediating complex cognitive functions establish a striking temporal comorbidity of AD with Type 2 diabetes. Extensive biomedical evidence supports the pivotal multi-functional role of constitutive nitric oxide (NO) production and release as a critical vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant, mechanism within the vascular endothelium. Within this context, we currently review the functional contributions of dysregulated endothelial NO expression to the etiology and persistence of Type 2 diabetes-related and co morbid AD-related vasculopathies. Additionally, we provide up-to-date perspectives on critical areas of AD research with special reference to common NO-related etiological factors linking Type 2 diabetes to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25082505

  18. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset. Results Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658847

  19. Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus by viral eradication in chronic hepatitis C: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Vanni, Ester; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Saracco, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a systemic disease inducing metabolic alterations leading to extrahepatic consequences. In particular, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection seems to increase the risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in predisposed individuals, independently of liver disease stage. The mechanisms through which hepatitis C induces T2DM involve direct viral effects, insulin resistance, pro-inflammatory cytokines and other immune-mediated processes. Many studies have reported the clinical consequences of type 2 diabetes mellitus on hepatitis C outcome, but very few studies have addressed the issue of microangiopathic complications among patients with hepatitis C only, who develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, clinical trials in HCV-positive patients have reported improvement in glucose metabolism after antiviral treatment; recent studies have suggested that this metabolic amelioration might have a clinical impact on type 2 diabetes mellitus-related complications. These observations raise the question as to whether the HCV eradication may also have an impact on the future morbidity and mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus. The scope of this review is to summarise the current evidence linking successful antiviral treatment and the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications in hepatitis C-infected patients.

  20. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: where do we stand with drug treatment and behavioral management?

    PubMed

    Nader, Nicole S; Kumar, Seema

    2008-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, once considered a disease of adults, is a growing problem in the pediatric population. The emergence of type 2 diabetes in this age group has paralleled the epidemic of childhood obesity. Lifestyle modifications represent first-line therapy for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes. However, many children and adolescents go on to require treatment with oral medications or insulin for optimal control. A paucity of data exist regarding the optimal treatment regimen for children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Further research regarding the treatment of type 2 diabetes in youth is required.

  2. Beta-cell function and mass in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne O

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the work described here was to improve our understanding of beta-cell function (BCF) and beta-cell mass (BCM) and their relationship in vivo using the minipig as a model for some of the aspects of human type 2 diabetes (T2DM). More specifically, the aim was to evaluate the following questions: How is BCF, especially high frequency pulsatile insulin secretion, affected by a primary reduction in BCM or by primary obesity or a combination of the two in the minipig? Can evaluation of BCF in vivo be used as a surrogate measure to predict BCM in minipigs over a range of BCM and body weight? We first developed a minipig model of reduced BCM and mild diabetes using administration of a combination of streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide (NIA) as a tool to study effects of a primary reduction of BCM on BCF. The model was characterized using a mixed-meal oral glucose tolerance test and intravenous stimulation with glucose and arginine as well as by histology of the pancreas after euthanasia. It was shown that stable, moderate diabetes can be induced and that the model is characterized by fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, reduced insulin secretion and reduced BCM. Several defects in insulin secretion are well documented in human T2DM; however, the role in the pathogenesis and the possible clinical relevance of high frequency (rapid) pulsatile insulin secretion is still debated. We therefore investigated this phenomenon in normal minipigs and found easily detectable pulses in peripheral vein plasma samples that were shown to be correlated with pulses found in portal vein plasma. Furthermore, the rapid kinetics of insulin in the minipig strongly facilitates pulse detection. These characteristics make the minipig particularly suitable for studying the occurrence of disturbed pulsatility in relation to T2DM. Disturbances of rapid pulsatile insulin secretion have been reported to be a very early event in the development of T2DM and include disorderliness of pulses

  3. Beta-cell function and mass in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne O

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the work described here was to improve our understanding of beta-cell function (BCF) and beta-cell mass (BCM) and their relationship in vivo using the minipig as a model for some of the aspects of human type 2 diabetes (T2DM). More specifically, the aim was to evaluate the following questions: How is BCF, especially high frequency pulsatile insulin secretion, affected by a primary reduction in BCM or by primary obesity or a combination of the two in the minipig? Can evaluation of BCF in vivo be used as a surrogate measure to predict BCM in minipigs over a range of BCM and body weight? We first developed a minipig model of reduced BCM and mild diabetes using administration of a combination of streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide (NIA) as a tool to study effects of a primary reduction of BCM on BCF. The model was characterized using a mixed-meal oral glucose tolerance test and intravenous stimulation with glucose and arginine as well as by histology of the pancreas after euthanasia. It was shown that stable, moderate diabetes can be induced and that the model is characterized by fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, reduced insulin secretion and reduced BCM. Several defects in insulin secretion are well documented in human T2DM; however, the role in the pathogenesis and the possible clinical relevance of high frequency (rapid) pulsatile insulin secretion is still debated. We therefore investigated this phenomenon in normal minipigs and found easily detectable pulses in peripheral vein plasma samples that were shown to be correlated with pulses found in portal vein plasma. Furthermore, the rapid kinetics of insulin in the minipig strongly facilitates pulse detection. These characteristics make the minipig particularly suitable for studying the occurrence of disturbed pulsatility in relation to T2DM. Disturbances of rapid pulsatile insulin secretion have been reported to be a very early event in the development of T2DM and include disorderliness of pulses

  4. A case-control study of osteopathic palpatory findings in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Licciardone, John C; Fulda, Kimberly G; Stoll, Scott T; Gamber, Russell G; Cage, A Clifton

    2007-01-01

    Background Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is often managed by osteopathic physicians, osteopathic palpatory findings in this disease have not been adequately studied. Methods A case-control study was used to measure the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and a series of 30 osteopathic palpatory findings. The latter included skin changes, trophic changes, tissue changes, tenderness, and immobility at spinal segmental levels T5–T7, T8–T10, and T11-L2 bilaterally. Logistic regression models that adjusted for age, sex, and comorbid conditions were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between type 2 diabetes mellitus and each of these findings. Results and discussion A total of 92 subjects were included in the study. After controlling for age, sex, hypertension, and clinical depression, the only significant finding was an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and tissue changes at T11-L2 on the right side (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.76–17.47; P = .003). Subgroup analyses of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension demonstrated significant associations with tissue changes at T11-L2 bilaterally (OR, 27.38; 95% CI, 1.75–428; P = .02 for the left side and OR, 24.00; 95% CI, 1.51–382; P = .02 for the right side). Among subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, there was also a strong diabetes mellitus duration effect for tissue changes at T11-L2 bilaterally (OR, 12.00; 95% CI, 1.02–141; P = .05 for short duration vs. OR, 32.00; 95% CI, 2.29–448; P = .01 for long duration on the left side; and OR, 17.33; 95% CI, 1.39–217; P = .03 for short duration vs. OR, 32.00; 95% CI, 2.29–448; P = .01 for long duration on the right side). Conclusion The only consistent finding in this study was an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and tissue changes at T11-L2 on the right side. Potential explanations for this finding include reflex viscerosomatic changes directly

  5. Accelerated complications in Type 2 diabetes mellitus: the need for greater awareness and earlier detection.

    PubMed

    Muggeo, M

    1998-01-01

    Persistent hyperglycaemia is the underlying pathogenic factor responsible for chronic diabetic complications in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In Type 1 diabetes, diagnosis is made soon after the onset of hyperglycaemia and several years are required for the resultant complications to appear clinically. The onset of Type 2 diabetes is insidious and is usually recognized only 5-12 years after hyperglycaemia develops. During this period of undiagnosed diabetes, hyperglycaemia, in combination with lifestyle factors (physical inactivity, alcohol use, smoking), and other metabolic (dyslipidaemia, obesity, insulin resistance) and haemodynamic (hypertension) abnormalities frequently associated with Type 2 diabetes, promote the initiation and progression of micro- and macrovascular complications. Furthermore, when blood glucose levels are increased only slightly and no symptoms are apparent, the physician may be reluctant to diagnose Type 2 diabetes or start treatment. This delay in diagnosing the disease results in a high prevalence of chronic complications at the time of actual diagnosis. Indeed, when Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, cardiovascular disease and neuropathy are found in approximately 10% of cases, and retinopathy and nephropathy in 15-20%. All healthcare providers should be aware of this phenomenon, which may be termed 'accelerated complications', and should plan thorough screening programmes for these conditions at diagnosis. All reversible risk factors associated with diabetes should be identified and treated. When acute metabolic derangements and infections are not the main causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes, the costs of diabetes care are related mainly to chronic complications of the disease. Therefore, because of the high frequency of Type 2 diabetes, the most efficient method of reducing costs is to increase awareness and secure earlier detection that leads to fast and aggressive treatment of the accelerated chronic complications often

  6. Modelling the economics of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention: a literature review of methods.

    PubMed

    Watson, P; Preston, L; Squires, H; Chilcott, J; Brennan, A

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to review modelling methods for type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention cost-effectiveness studies. The review was conducted to inform the design of a policy analysis model capable of assisting resource allocation decisions across a spectrum of prevention strategies. We identified recent systematic reviews of economic evaluations in diabetes prevention and management of obesity. We extracted studies from two existing systematic reviews of economic evaluations for the prevention of diabetes. We extracted studies evaluating interventions in a non-diabetic population with type 2 diabetes as a modelled outcome, from two systematic reviews of obesity intervention economic evaluations. Databases were searched for studies published between 2008 and 2013. For each study, we reviewed details of the model type, structure, and methods for predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our review identified 46 articles and found variation in modelling approaches for cost-effectiveness evaluations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Investigation of the variables used to estimate the risk of type 2 diabetes suggested that impaired glucose regulation, and body mass index were used as the primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes. A minority of cost-effectiveness models for diabetes prevention accounted for the multivariate impacts of interventions on risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Twenty-eight cost-effectiveness models included cardiovascular events in addition to type 2 diabetes. Few cost-effectiveness models have flexibility to evaluate different intervention types. We conclude that to compare a range of prevention interventions it is necessary to incorporate multiple risk factors for diabetes, diabetes-related complications and obesity-related co-morbidity outcomes.

  7. Digital games for type 1 and type 2 diabetes: underpinning theory with three illustrative examples.

    PubMed

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Gammon, Shauna; Dixon, Mavis C; MacRury, Sandra M; Fergusson, Michael J; Miranda Rodrigues, Francisco; Mourinho Baptista, Telmo; Yang, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria. PMID:25791276

  8. Digital games for type 1 and type 2 diabetes: underpinning theory with three illustrative examples.

    PubMed

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Gammon, Shauna; Dixon, Mavis C; MacRury, Sandra M; Fergusson, Michael J; Miranda Rodrigues, Francisco; Mourinho Baptista, Telmo; Yang, Stephen P

    2015-03-18

    Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria.

  9. Digital Games for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Shauna; Dixon, Mavis C; MacRury, Sandra M; Fergusson, Michael J; Miranda Rodrigues, Francisco; Mourinho Baptista, Telmo; Yang, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes—children/adolescents and adults—from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs—children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria. PMID:25791276

  10. Psychiatric co-morbidity with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Coclami, T; Cross, M

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of diabetes comorbidity in Greek psychiatric patients, differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetics and the outcome of psychiatric disorder. Of 800 psychiatric patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 82 (10.2%) had diabetes mellitus; 28% type 1 and 72% type 2. The mean age at onset of mental illness was earlierfortype 1 diabetics (mean 26.95, SD 9.09 years) than type 2 (mean 33.22, SD 10.71 years) (P < 0.015) and the duration of untreated mental illness was shorter (mean 2.86, SD 3.06 years compared with mean 4.13, SD 6.24 years for type 2 diabetics). Schizophrenia was the commonest psychiatric diagnosis in both types of diabetes. There was no significant difference in outcome of psychiatric disorder between the 2 types of diabetics. Existence of diabetes mellitus (regardless of type), duration of untreated mental illness and lack of patient therapeutic education were negative predictors of (unfavourable) outcome. These findings provide evidence of a high prevalence of diabetes in psychiatric patients and that having diabetes has an adverse effect on outcome of psychiatric illness. PMID:22256413

  11. Adiponectin as a Protective Factor Against the Progression Toward Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Hossein; Raeisi, Alireza; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammad Reza; Ostovar, Afshin; Assadi, Majid; Asadipooya, Kamyar; Vahdat, Katayoun; Dobaradaran, Sina; Nabipour, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Serum adiponectin levels have been suggested to be predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in diverse populations. However, the relationship between circulating adiponectin levels and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women has not been investigated. A total of 382 healthy postmenopausal women who participated in a prospective cohort study were followed for 5.8 years. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was defined according to the criteria set out by the American Diabetes Association. Adiponectin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured using ELISA. Of 195 women who did not have diabetes at baseline and who were reexamined in the second phase of the study for diabetic status, 35 subjects (17.9%) developed type 2 diabetes mellitus during the 5.8 years follow-up period. The women with type 2 diabetes had lower adiponectin levels than the healthy postmenopausal women. Multiple regression analysis showed that, after adjustments were made for age, cardiovascular risk factors, OPG, and hs-CRP levels, higher baseline adiponectin levels were associated with a lower relative risk (RR) of having type 2 (RR = 0.07, confidence interval [CI]: 0.01–0.66, P = 0.021). Higher baseline adiponectin levels functioned as a predictor of a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus among postmenopausal women during a 5.8 years follow-up study. Therefore, it is suggested that elevated adiponectin levels may offer protection against the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus after the menopause. PMID:26287420

  12. Adiponectin as a Protective Factor Against the Progression Toward Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Hossein; Raeisi, Alireza; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammad Reza; Ostovar, Afshin; Assadi, Majid; Asadipooya, Kamyar; Vahdat, Katayoun; Dobaradaran, Sina; Nabipour, Iraj

    2015-08-01

    Serum adiponectin levels have been suggested to be predictors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in diverse populations. However, the relationship between circulating adiponectin levels and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women has not been investigated.A total of 382 healthy postmenopausal women who participated in a prospective cohort study were followed for 5.8 years. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was defined according to the criteria set out by the American Diabetes Association. Adiponectin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured using ELISA.Of 195 women who did not have diabetes at baseline and who were reexamined in the second phase of the study for diabetic status, 35 subjects (17.9%) developed type 2 diabetes mellitus during the 5.8 years follow-up period. The women with type 2 diabetes had lower adiponectin levels than the healthy postmenopausal women. Multiple regression analysis showed that, after adjustments were made for age, cardiovascular risk factors, OPG, and hs-CRP levels, higher baseline adiponectin levels were associated with a lower relative risk (RR) of having type 2 (RR = 0.07, confidence interval [CI]: 0.01-0.66, P = 0.021).Higher baseline adiponectin levels functioned as a predictor of a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus among postmenopausal women during a 5.8 years follow-up study. Therefore, it is suggested that elevated adiponectin levels may offer protection against the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus after the menopause.

  13. Association Between Type 2 Diabetes and Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Eriksson, Johan G.; Blomstedt, Paul; Kajantie, Eero; Kiviranta, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Recently, exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to examine the association between type 2 diabetes and POP exposure in the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The cohort consists of 8,760 people born in Helsinki during 1934–1944, before the global POP emission peak. In 2003, a clinical examination was performed, including blood sampling for laboratory analyses of serum lipids and POPs. Complete data from the examination were available for 1,988 participants. The concentrations of each POP were categorized into four groups on the basis of percentile intervals, and logistic regression was performed to examine diabetes prevalence across the POP categories, adjusting for sex, age, waist circumference, and mean arterial pressure and using the lowest category as the reference group. RESULTS Among the participants with the highest exposure to oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p’-DDE, and polychlorinated biphenyl 153, the risk of type 2 diabetes was 1.64–2.24 times higher than that among individuals with the lowest exposure (Plin = 0.003–0.050, where Plin is the P value for linear trend across POP categories). In the stratified analysis, the associations between type 2 diabetes and oxychlordane and trans-nonachlor remained significant and were strongest among the overweight participants. Exposure to 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) and 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 153) was not associated with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms the association between type 2 diabetes and adult-only exposure to organochlorine pesticides in a general urban population. PMID:21816981

  14. Sarcopenia: a potential cause and consequence of type 2 diabetes in Australia's ageing population?

    PubMed

    Scott, David; de Courten, Barbora; Ebeling, Peter R

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Australia's older adult population. Sarcopenia, the age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass, quality and function, may make a significant but under-appreciated contribution to increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. As skeletal muscle is the largest insulin-sensitive tissue in the body, low muscle mass in sarcopenia likely results in reduced capacity for glucose disposal. Age-related declines in muscle quality, including increased mitochondrial dysfunction and fat infiltration, are also implicated in skeletal muscle inflammation and subsequent insulin resistance. Prospective studies have shown that low muscle mass and strength are associated with increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes. Prevalent type 2 diabetes also appears to exacerbate progression of sarcopenia in older adults. Recently developed operational definitions and the inclusion of sarcopenia in the International classification of diseases, 10th revision, clinical modification, provide impetus for clinicians to diagnose and treat sarcopenia in older patients. Simple assessments to diagnose sarcopenia can potentially play a role in primary and secondary prevention of type 2 diabetes in older patients. Lifestyle modification programs for older adults with type 2 diabetes, particularly for those with sarcopenia, should incorporate progressive resistance training, along with adequate intakes of protein and vitamin D, which may improve both functional and metabolic health and prevent undesirable decreases in muscle mass associated with weight loss interventions. As some older adults with type 2 diabetes have a poor response to exercise, clinicians must ensure that lifestyle modification programs are appropriately prescribed, regularly monitored and modified if necessary. PMID:27681976

  15. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels <1.8 μg/dL after overnight 1 mg DST (p = 0.041). Statistically significant correlation was determined between cortisol levels after 1 mg DST and age, daily insulin dose (r = 0.266 and p < 0.001, r = 0.163 and p = 0.008, respectively). According to our findings, the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  16. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  17. Pleiotropy and pathway analyses of genetic variants associated with both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, LA; Pankow, James S; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Tang, Weihong; Prizment, Anna; Couper, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Epidemiological evidence shows that diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to identify genes that may contribute to both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer outcomes and the biological pathways these diseases may share. Methods: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is a population-based prospective cohort study in four U.S. communities that included a baseline examination in 1987-89 and three follow-up exams at three year intervals. Participants were 45-64 years old at baseline. We conducted a genomewide association (GWA) study of incident type 2 diabetes in males, summarized variation across genetic loci into a polygenic risk score, and determined if that diabetes risk score was also associated with incident prostate cancer in the same study population. Secondarily we conducted a separate GWA study of prostate cancer, performed a pathway analysis of both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer, and qualitatively determined if any of the biochemical pathways identified were shared between the two outcomes. Results: We found that the polygenic risk score for type 2 diabetes was not statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer. The pathway analysis also found no overlap between pathways associated with type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer. However, it did find that the growth hormone signaling pathway was statistically significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The inability of this study to find an association between type 2 diabetes polygenic risk scores with prostate cancer or biological pathways in common suggests that shared genetic variants may not contribute significantly to explaining shared etiology. PMID:23565322

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: a review from a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Kiess, W; Böttner, A; Raile, K; Kapellen, T; Müller, G; Galler, A; Paschke, R; Wabitsch, M

    2003-01-01

    Changes in food consumption and exercise are fueling a worldwide increase in obesity in children and adolescents. As a consequence of this dramatic development, an increasing rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been recorded in children and adolescents in the USA and, more recently, in many countries around the world. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Lower susceptibility in white Caucasians and higher susceptibility in Asians, Hispanics and blacks have been noted. There is a high hidden prevalence and a lack of exact data on the epidemiology of the disease in Europe: in Germany only 70 patients below the age of 15 years were identified in the systematic, nationwide DPV (Diabetessoftware für prospektive Verlaufsdokumentation) diabetes survey, but our calculations suggest that more than 5000 young people in Germany at present would meet the diagnostic criteria of type 2 diabetes. In Australasia, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is reportedly high in some ethnic groups and again is linked very closely to the obesity epidemic. No uniform and evidence-based treatment strategy is available: many groups use metformin, exercise programmes and nutritional education as a comprehensive approach to treat type 2 diabetes in childhood and adolescence. The lack of clear epidemiological data and a strong need for accepted treatment strategies point to the key role of preventive programmes. Prevention of obesity will help to counteract the emerging worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes in youth. Preventive programmes should focus on exercise training and reducing sedentary behaviour such as television viewing, encouraging healthy nutrition and supporting general education programmes since shorter school education is clearly associated with higher rates of obesity and hence the susceptibility of an individual to acquire type 2 diabetes.

  19. Effectiveness of a Regional Prepregnancy Care Program in Women With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Helen R.; Roland, Jonathan M; Skinner, Timothy C.; Simmons, David; Gurnell, Eleanor; Morrish, Nicholas J.; Soo, Shiu-Ching; Kelly, Suzannah; Lim, Boon; Randall, Joanne; Thompsett, Sarah; Temple, Rosemary C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To implement and evaluate a regional prepregnancy care program in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prepregnancy care was promoted among patients and health professionals and delivered across 10 regional maternity units. A prospective cohort study of 680 pregnancies in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes was performed. Primary outcomes were adverse pregnancy outcome (congenital malformation, stillbirth, or neonatal death), congenital malformation, and indicators of pregnancy preparation (5 mg folic acid, gestational age, and A1C). Comparisons were made with a historical cohort (n = 613 pregnancies) from the same units during 1999–2004. RESULTS A total of 181 (27%) women attended, and 499 women (73%) did not attend prepregnancy care. Women with prepregnancy care presented earlier (6.7 vs. 7.7 weeks; P < 0.001), were more likely to take 5 mg preconception folic acid (88.2 vs. 26.7%; P < 0.0001) and had lower A1C levels (A1C 6.9 vs. 7.6%; P < 0.0001). They had fewer adverse pregnancy outcomes (1.3 vs. 7.8%; P = 0.009). Multivariate logistic regression confirmed that in addition to glycemic control, lack of prepregnancy care was independently associated with adverse outcome (odds ratio 0.2 [95% CI 0.05–0.89]; P = 0.03). Compared with 1999–2004, folic acid supplementation increased (40.7 vs. 32.5%; P = 0.006) and congenital malformations decreased (4.3 vs. 7.3%; P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Regional prepregnancy care was associated with improved pregnancy preparation and reduced risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prepregnancy care had benefits beyond improved glycemic control and was a stronger predictor of pregnancy outcome than maternal obesity, ethnicity, or social disadvantage. PMID:21115765

  20. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. PMID:27598916

  1. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24633252

  2. Hepcidin and iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yin, Hui-qing; Liu, Hao-ling; Xiu, Lei; Peng, Xiao-yu

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of iron levels and hepatic regulatory molecules expression involved in iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese/type 2 diabetic rat models. Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group (n=20 each). The rats were evaluated physiologically and biochemically. The hepatic histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The mRNA expression patterns of hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ferroportin (Fpn) in the rat liver in control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression patterns of hepcidin in liver of each group were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. As compared with control group, the ferritin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group was increased significantly (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in soluble transferring receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio among the three groups (P>0.05). The real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting results all revealed that the expression levels of hepcidin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were elevated significantly as compared with those in control group (P<0.001). The expression levels of hepcidin mRNA between non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group showed no significant difference (P>0.05). However, the protein expression levels of hepcidin in type 2 diabetic group were significantly higher than those in non-diabetic obese group (P<0.05). Compared to control group, the expression levels of IL-6 mRNA in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were increased significantly and the expression levels of Fpn mRNA decreased (P<0.05). However, the expression levels of HIF mRNA had no significant difference among three groups. It is suggested that iron metabolism is

  3. Obesity-Related Genomic Loci Are Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; He, Jiang; Chen, Li; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Qiang; Ge, Jiapu; Chen, Gang; Guo, Xiaohui; Lu, Juming; Weng, Jianping; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Xiao, Jianzhong; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Jie; Tian, Haoming; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhu, Dalong; Zhou, Zhiguang; Shan, Guangliang; Yang, Wenying

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Obesity is a well-known risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic loci associated with obesity. The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of obesity-related genomic loci to type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population. Methods We successfully genotyped 18 obesity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms among 5338 type 2 diabetic patients and 4663 controls. Both individual and joint effects of these single nucleotide polymorphisms on type 2 diabetes and quantitative glycemic traits (assessing β-cell function and insulin resistance) were analyzed using logistic and linear regression models, respectively. Results Two single nucleotide polymorphisms near MC4R and GNPDA2 genes were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes before adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (OR (95% CI) = 1.14 (1.06, 1.22) for the A allele of rs12970134, P = 4.75×10−4; OR (95% CI) = 1.10 (1.03, 1.17) for the G allele of rs10938397, P = 4.54×10−3). When body mass index and waist circumference were further adjusted, the association of MC4R with type 2 diabetes remained significant (P = 1.81×10−2) and that of GNPDA2 was attenuated (P = 1.26×10−1), suggesting the effect of the locus including GNPDA2 on type 2 diabetes may be mediated through obesity. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs2260000 within BAT2 was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes after adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (P = 1.04×10−2). In addition, four single nucleotide polymorphisms (near or within SEC16B, BDNF, MAF and PRL genes) showed significant associations with quantitative glycemic traits in controls even after adjusting for body mass index and waist circumference (all P values<0.05). Conclusions This study indicates that obesity-related genomic loci were associated with type 2 diabetes and glycemic traits in the Han Chinese population. PMID:25093408

  4. Practical Application of Antidiabetic Efficacy of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huizhen; Liu, Fukang; Zuo, Pingguo; Huang, Guiling; Song, Zhixiu; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Huixia; Guo, Fei; Han, Chao; Sun, Guiju

    2015-01-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine as a chief ingredient of L. barbarum (wolf berry/goji berry) for the treatment of various diseases with the symptoms of frequent drinking and urination. This study was conducted as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. A total of 67 patients with type 2 diabetes (30 in control group and 37 in LBP group) were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind study (administration at 300mg/day body weight). In order to observe the hypoglycemic and lipid-lowering activity of LBP in patients with type 2 diabetes after dinner, various tests were conducted between control and LBP intervention groups in 3 months. Although, the study had small sample size and short follow-up, significant findings were observed. The results of our study indicated a remarkable protective effect of LBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum glucose was found to be significantly decreased and insulinogenic index increased during OMTT after 3 months administration of LBP. LBP also increased HDL levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. It showed more obvious hypoglycemic efficacy for those people who did not take any hypoglycemic medicine compared to patients taking hypoglycemic medicines. This study showed LBP to be a good potential treatment aided-agent for type 2 diabetes. PMID:25381995

  5. Pharmacogenetics and individual responses to treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Andersson, Ehm; Roepstorff, Soeren; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize current knowledge and provide perspectives on the relationships between human genetic variants, type 2 diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and disease progression. Type 2 diabetes is a complex disease with clear-cut diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines. Yet, the interindividual response to therapy and slope of disease progression varies markedly among patients with type 2 diabetes. Gene-gene, gene-environment, and gene-treatment interactions may explain some of the variation in disease progression. Several genetic variants have been suggested to be associated with response to antidiabetic drugs. Some are present in drug receptors or drug metabolizers (OCT genes, KCNJ11, ABCC8, and CYP2C9). Numerous type 2 diabetes risk variants have been identified, but genetic risk score models applying these variants have failed to identify 'disease progressors' among patients with diabetes. Although genetic risk scores are based on a few known loci and only explain a fraction of the heritability of type 2 diabetes, it seems that the genes responsible for the development of diabetes may not be the same driving disease progression after the diagnosis has been made. Pharmacogenetic interactions explain some of the interindividual variation in responses to antidiabetic treatment and may provide the foundation for future genotype-based treatment standards. PMID:26181639

  6. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Risk among Asian Indians in the US: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Annie; Ashcraft, Alyce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate type 2 diabetes risk among Asian Indians of Kerala ethnicity living in a West Texas County of the USA. The study used a descriptive correlational design with thirty-seven adult nondiabetic Asian Indian subjects between 20 and 70 years of age. The measurement included nonbiochemical indices of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes, length of immigration in the US, history of hypertension, physical activity pattern, and fruit and vegetable intake. The majority of the subjects showed an increased nonbiochemical indices corresponding with overweight and obesity, placing them at risk for type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications. The physical activity pattern indicated a sedentary lifestyle. The decreased physical activity was associated with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat percentage; length of residence in the US greater than 10 years was associated with increased body fat percentage and BMI; family history of type 2 diabetes was associated with an increase in body fat percentage. Fruit and vegetable intake pattern was not associated with a risk for type 2 diabetes. Further studies are recommended for risk surveillance among Asian Indian population living in the US. PMID:23970965

  8. Circadian rhythm of autonomic activity in non diabetic offsprings of type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, A; Perciaccante, A; Paris, A; Serra, P; Tubani, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by heart rate variability (HRV) with 24-hours ECG Holter (HRV), the circadian autonomic activity in offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects and the relation with insulin-resistance. METHODS: 50 Caucasian offsprings of type 2 diabetic subjects were divided in two groups: insulin-resistant offsprings (IR) and non insulin-resistant offsprings (NIR). Autonomic nervous activity was studied by HRV. Time domain and spectral analysis (low frequency, LF, and high frequency, HF, provide markers of sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation when assessed in normalized units) were evaluated. RESULTS. Time domain showed a reduction of total SDNN in IR (p < 0.001) and NIR (p 0.047) versus controls. Spectral analysis showed a total and night LF higher in IR and NIR than in control group (all p < 0.001). CONCLUSION. In frequency domain, the analysis of sympathetic (LF) and parasympathetic (HF) component evidenced an association between the offspring of type 2 diabetic subjects and a sympathetic overactivity. A global reduction and alteration of circadian rhythm of autonomic activity are present in offspring of type 2 diabetic patients with and without insulin resistance. The data of our study suggested that an autonomic impairment is associated with the familiarity for type 2 diabetes independently to insulin resistance and that an impairment of autonomic system activity could precede the insulin resistance. PMID:16197556

  9. Pleiotropic effects of type 2 diabetes management strategies on renal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Smits, Mark M; Kramer, Mark H H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with the type 2 diabetes pandemic, diabetic kidney disease has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As established in landmark randomised trials and recommended in clinical guidelines, prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease focuses on control of the two main renal risk factors, hyperglycaemia and systemic hypertension. Treatment of systemic hypertension with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers is advocated because these drugs seem to exert specific renoprotective effects beyond blood pressure lowering. Emerging evidence shows that obesity, glomerular hyperfiltration, albuminuria, and dyslipidaemia might also adversely affect the kidney in diabetes. Control of these risk factors could have additional benefits on renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, despite multifactorial treatment approaches, residual risk for the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes remains, and novel strategies or therapies to treat the disease are urgently needed. Several drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with pleiotropic effects that could favourably or unfavourably change patients' renal risk profile. We review the risk factors and treatment of diabetic kidney disease, and describe the pleiotropic effects of widely used drugs in type 2 diabetes management on renal outcomes, with special emphasis on antihyperglycaemic drugs.

  10. Pathophysiology of prediabetes and treatment implications for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing public health challenge globally. An estimated 285 million people, corresponding to 6.4 % of the world's adult population has diabetes. This is expected to reach 552 million by 2030, 7.8 % of the adult population, with the African region expected to experience the greatest increase. A much larger segment of the world's population, approximating 79 million individuals in the US alone, has prediabetes. Multiple factors including genetic predisposition, insulin resistance, increased insulin secretory demand, glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, impaired incretin release/action, amylin accumulation, and decreased β-cell mass play a causative role in the progressive β-cell dysfunction characteristic of prediabetes. Interventions preventing progression to type 2 diabetes should therefore delay or prevent β-cell failure. This article will first review the principal pathophysiological mechanisms underlying prediabetes and subsequently address treatment considerations based on these in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. In view of long-standing safety data with demonstrated efficacy and cost-effectiveness in the prevention of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals, metformin should be considered as initial therapy for those unable to comply with or lifestyle modification or where the latter has been ineffective in decreasing progression to type 2 diabetes.

  11. Elevated galanin may predict the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus for development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrated that type 2 diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, i.e., the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are frequently companied with Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Despite many studies recently probed into the comorbid state of both diseases, so far the precise mechanism for this association is poorly understood. Emerging evidences suggest that defects in galanin play a central role on type 2 diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. This review provides a new insight into the multivariate relationship among galanin, type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the effect of galanin system on the cross-talk between both diseases in human and rodent models. The current data support that activating central GalR2 attenuates insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease feature in animal models. These may help us better understanding the pathogenesis of both diseases and provide useful hints for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Proteasome inhibition in skeletal muscle cells unmasks metabolic derangements in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalili, Lubna; de Castro Barbosa, Thais; Ostling, Jörgen; Massart, Julie; Cuesta, Pablo Garrido; Osler, Megan E; Katayama, Mutsumi; Nyström, Ann-Christin; Oscarsson, Jan; Zierath, Juleen R

    2014-11-01

    Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE)-based proteome analysis has revealed intrinsic insulin resistance in myotubes derived from type 2 diabetic patients. Using 2-D DIGE-based proteome analysis, we identified a subset of insulin-resistant proteins involved in protein turnover in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting aberrant regulation of the protein homeostasis maintenance system underlying metabolic disease. We then validated the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in myotubes to investigate whether impaired proteasome function may lead to metabolic arrest or insulin resistance. Myotubes derived from muscle biopsies obtained from people with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or type 2 diabetes were exposed to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ; Velcade) without or with insulin. BZ exposure increased protein carbonylation and lactate production yet impaired protein synthesis and UPS function in myotubes from type 2 diabetic patients, marking the existence of an insulin-resistant signature that was retained in cultured myotubes. In conclusion, BZ treatment further exacerbates insulin resistance and unmasks intrinsic features of metabolic disease in myotubes derived from type 2 diabetic patients. Our results highlight the existence of a confounding inherent abnormality in cellular protein dynamics in metabolic disease, which is uncovered through concurrent inhibition of the proteasome system.

  13. Influence of type 2 diabetes on symbolic analysis and complexity of heart rate variability in men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with diabetes may develop cardiac autonomic dysfunction that may be evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV). The aim was evaluated heart rate variability (HRV) of individuals with type 2 diabetes, without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), in response to active postural maneuver by means of nonlinear analysis (symbolic analysis, Shannon and conditional entropy) and correlate HRV parameters between them, glycated hemoglobin and diabetes duration. Methods Nineteen men with type 2 diabetes without CAN (T2D) and nineteen healthy men (CG), age-range from 40 to 60 years were studied. We assessed HRV in supine and orthostatic position using symbolic analysis (0V%, 1V%, 2LV% and 2UV%), Shannon and conditional entropy (SE and NCI). Results In supine position T2D presented higher sympathetic modulation (0V%) than CG. However, there was not any difference between groups for indexes of complexity (SE and NCI). Furthermore, T2D presented a preserved response of cardiac autonomic modulation after active postural maneuver. Conclusions The present study showed that individuals with type 2 diabetes without CAN presented higher cardiac sympathetic modulation. However, the complexity of HRV was not influenced by imbalance of the autonomic modulation in individuals with type 2 diabetes. In addition, the response of autonomic nervous system in the heart remains preserved after active postural maneuver in individuals with type 2 diabetes, possibly due to the lack of CAN in this group. PMID:24485048

  14. Recommendations for health-enhancing physical activities in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Mynarski, Władysław; Cholewa, Jarosław; Rozpara, Michał; Borek, Zbigniew; Strojek, Krzysztof; Nawrocka, Agnieszka

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease of civilization with epidemiological coverage. An integral component of a comprehensive process of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention and treatment is reasonably proportioned exercise. The aim of the study was to evaluate the weekly physical activity of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects with respect to recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine and American Diabetes Association. [Subjects] The study involved 31 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (treatment duration 9 ± 0.8) and 31 healthy people. [Methods] Physical activity levels were determined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A χ(2) test was applied to determine the percentage of people who met recommendations. [Results] Analysis of the obtained results demonstrated that the intensity of physical activity in patients with diabetes was moderate or low. The men in the control group met the recommendations for standard health-related activities significantly more often than the patients with diabetes. In women, there was no such relationship, since most of the women were insufficiently physically active. [Conclusion] The conclusion to be drawn is that there is an urgent need to develop and implement effective programs to enhance physical activity among people at risk of diseases of civilization, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:26356173

  15. Burden of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Japan, 2010-2030.

    PubMed

    Saito, Eiko; Charvat, Hadrien; Goto, Atsushi; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus constitutes a major disease burden globally, and the prevalence of diabetes continues to increase worldwide. We aimed to estimate the burden of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Japan between 2010 and 2030. In this study, we estimated the population attributable fraction of cancer risk associated with type 2 diabetes in 2010 and 2030 using the prevalence estimates of type 2 diabetes in Japan from 1990 to 2030, summary hazard ratios of diabetes and cancer risk from a pooled analysis of eight large-scale Japanese cohort studies, observed incidence/mortality of cancer in 2010 and predicted incidence/mortality for 2030 derived from the age-period-cohort model. Our results showed that between 2010 and 2030, the total numbers of cancer incidence and mortality were predicted to increase by 38.9% and 10.5% in adults aged above 20 years, respectively. In the number of excess incident cancer cases associated with type 2 diabetes, an increase of 26.5% in men and 53.2% in women is expected between 2010 and 2030. The age-specific analysis showed that the population attributable fraction of cancer will increase in adults aged >60 years over time, but will not change in adults aged 20-59 years. In conclusion, this study suggests a modest but steady increase in cancers associated with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Impact of Intensive Glycemic Control on the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation and Associated Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (from the ACCORD Study)

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Omid; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Tsioufis, Costas; Tsachris, Demetrios; Morgan, Timothy; Basile, Jan; Bigger, Thomas; Cushman, William; Goff, David; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Thomas, Abraham; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and is associated with markers of poor glycemic control; however the impact of glycemic control on incident AF and outcomes is unknown. We sought to prospectively evaluate if intensive glycemic control in individuals with DM impacts incident AF, and to evaluate morbidity and mortality among individuals with DM and incident AF. We studied 10,082 individuals with DM from the ACCORD cohort in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Participants were randomized to an intensive therapeutic strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of <6.0%, or a standard strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin of 7.0-7.9%. Incident AF occurred in 159 patients (1.58%) over the follow-up period at a rate of 5.9/1,000 person-years in the intensive-therapy group, and a rate of 6.37/1,000 person-years in the standard-therapy group (p=0.52). In a multivariate model, predictors of incident AF were age, weight, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart failure history. Patients with DM and new-onset AF had a HR of 2.65 for all-cause mortality (95% CI 1.8-3.86, p<0.0001), HR of 2.1 for myocardial infarction (95% CI 1.33-3.31, p=0.0015), and HR of 3.80 for development of heart failure (95% CI 2.48-5.84, p<0.0001). In conclusion, intensive glycemic control did not impact rate of new-onset AF. Patients with DM and incident AF had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality as compared to those without AF. PMID:25159234

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroparesis-related symptoms among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Rakan A; Alhussan, Fulwa A; Alnasser, Sulaiman A; Algeffari, Metab A

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroparesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) vary widely. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and explore the relationship between gastroparesis and other risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluating 147 type 2 diabetics using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI). A GCSI Total Score ≥ 1.90 were chosen as having definite symptoms of gastroparesis. All patients completed a demographic questionnaire and interviewed to complete the. Demographic Data, disease duration, Medication, comorbidities, recent blood glucose and HbA1C were collected and investigated. Results The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among type 2 diabetics was 10.8%. Clinical symptoms of gastroparesis were significantly correlated to HbA1c (p=0.001), blood glucose (p= 0.003), duration of diabetes (p= 0.02) and comorbidities (p=0.009). The most common symptoms were bloating, stomach fullness and early satiety (63.94%, 55.1% and 48.3% respectively). In logistic regression analysis, female gender emerged as significant independent predictors of the presence of at least one symptom. Conclusions The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis observed in the Saudi patientsdiagnosedwithtype2 diabetes was 10.8% and is independently associated with poor controlled diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long duration of diabetes and history of Co-morbid conditions. PMID:27610063

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroparesis-related symptoms among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Rakan A; Alhussan, Fulwa A; Alnasser, Sulaiman A; Algeffari, Metab A

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroparesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) vary widely. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and explore the relationship between gastroparesis and other risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluating 147 type 2 diabetics using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI). A GCSI Total Score ≥ 1.90 were chosen as having definite symptoms of gastroparesis. All patients completed a demographic questionnaire and interviewed to complete the. Demographic Data, disease duration, Medication, comorbidities, recent blood glucose and HbA1C were collected and investigated. Results The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among type 2 diabetics was 10.8%. Clinical symptoms of gastroparesis were significantly correlated to HbA1c (p=0.001), blood glucose (p= 0.003), duration of diabetes (p= 0.02) and comorbidities (p=0.009). The most common symptoms were bloating, stomach fullness and early satiety (63.94%, 55.1% and 48.3% respectively). In logistic regression analysis, female gender emerged as significant independent predictors of the presence of at least one symptom. Conclusions The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis observed in the Saudi patientsdiagnosedwithtype2 diabetes was 10.8% and is independently associated with poor controlled diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long duration of diabetes and history of Co-morbid conditions.

  19. FDA OKs New Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Type 2 About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  20. Sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in Type 2 diabetes: the influence of drug target and diabetes risk polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Aquilante, Christina L

    2010-01-01

    The sulfonylureas stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β cells, and have been a cornerstone of Type 2 diabetes pharmacotherapy for over 50 years. Although sulfonylureas are effective antihyperglycemic agents, interindividual variability exists in drug response (i.e., pharmacodynamics), disposition (i.e., pharmacokinetics) and adverse effects. The field of pharmacogenomics has been applied to sulfonylurea clinical studies in order to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of this response variability. Historically, most studies have sought to determine the influence of polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzyme genes on sulfonylurea pharmacokinetics in humans. More recently, polymorphisms in sulfonylurea drug target genes and diabetes risk genes have been implicated as important determinants of sulfonylurea pharmacodynamics in patients with Type 2 diabetes. As such, the purpose of this review is to discuss sulfonylurea pharmacogenomics in the setting of Type 2 diabetes, specifically focusing on polymorphisms in drug target and diabetes risk genes, and their relationship with interindividual variability in sulfonylurea response and adverse effects. PMID:20222815

  1. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Weedon, Michael N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Perry, John R.B.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Morris, Andrew P.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Harries, Lorna W.; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Knight, Beatrice; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Doney, Alex S.F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:17463249

  2. [Coffee drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Optimistic scientific data].

    PubMed

    Wierzejska, Regina; Jarosz, Mirosław

    2012-01-01

    An alarming increase the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is forcing to constant analysis the lifestyle factors which can affect the risk of this illness. The research in the last ten years revealed new knowledge concerning the inverse association between habitual coffee drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes. The study indicate that people who drink at least 3 cups of coffee per day more seldom have diabetes and positive effect of coffee is rising along with the amount of the coffee in the diet. It is not clear what mechanism may be responsible for such association but the attention is focus mainly on caffeine, polyphenols, magnesium. Because of the fact that high coffee consumption can cause other adverse health effects coffee should not be treat as a public health strategy to prevent type 2 diabetes, but collected data have scientific character at the moment.

  3. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24532291

  4. Exercise as Medicine: Key Concepts in Discussing Physical Activity with Patients who have Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Marni J; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-12-01

    People with type 2 diabetes stand to benefit substantially from being physically active. Practice guidelines consistently recommend that people with diabetes obtain at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise per week. Although the message of 150 minutes per week is important, there are several other key messages regarding physical activity that may not be communicated as often or as clearly. This article gives an overview of the importance of resistance training, the dose-response relationship between physical activity and health outcomes, and the emerging evidence concerning the role of sedentary behavior in people with type 2 diabetes. This article provides valuable content for healthcare providers that will help to inform their discussions about physical activity with patients who have type 2 diabetes.

  5. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rachel J.; Samuel, Varman T.; Petersen, Kitt F.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its downstream sequelae, hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are rapidly growing epidemics, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates, and soaring health-care costs. Developing interventions requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol activation of protein kinase Cε in triggering hepatic insulin resistance. Therapeutic approaches based on this mechanism could alleviate the related epidemics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24899308

  6. The evolving world of GLP-1 agonist therapies for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Kevin C R

    2010-04-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist drugs have attractions as a treatment for type 2 diabetes since they positively alter a number of key pathophysiological defects. These include increasing insulin release, reducing glucagon release, slowing gastric emptying and reducing food intake. In numerous clinical trials these agents have been shown to reduce DCCT-aligned HbA(1c) between 0.8% and 1.1% in patients with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes, whilst also being associated with some weight loss. Whilst medium-term safety and side-effect profiles are now well established, there are as yet no long-term studies on the safety of this group of drugs. The place of the GLP-1 agonists in the treatment paradigm for type 2 diabetes will evolve over the next decade.

  7. Systems analysis and the prediction and prevention of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Richard N; Stefanovski, Darko; Kim, Stella P

    2014-08-01

    Prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has increased at an alarming rate, highlighting the need to correctly predict the development of this disease in order to allow intervention and thus, slow progression of the disease and resulting metabolic derangement. There have been many recent 'advances' geared toward the detection of pre-diabetes, including genome wide association studies and metabolomics. Although these approaches generate a large amount of data with a single blood sample, studies have indicated limited success using genetic and metabolomics information alone for identification of disease risk. Clinical assessment of the disposition index (DI), based on the hyperbolic law of glucose tolerance, is a powerful predictor of Type 2 diabetes, but is not easily assessed in the clinical setting. Thus, it is evident that combining genetic or metabolomic approaches for a more simple assessment of DI may provide a useful tool to identify those at highest risk for Type 2 diabetes, allowing for intervention and prevention.

  8. Treatment of type 2 diabetes, lifestyle, GLP1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2014-10-15

    In recent years the treatment focus for type 2 diabetes has shifted to prevention by lifestyle change and to more aggressive reduction of blood sugars during the early stage of treatment. Weight reduction is an important goal for many people with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery is no longer considered a last resort treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists given by injection are emerging as a useful treatment since they not only lower blood sugar but are associated with a modest weight reduction. The role of the oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors is emerging as second line treatment ahead of sulphonylureas due to a possible beneficial effect on the beta cell and weight neutrality. Drugs which inhibit glucose re-absorption in the kidney, sodium/glucose co-transport 2 inhibitors, may have a role in the treatment of diabetes. Insulin treatment still remains the cornerstone of treatment in many patients with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Linkage of calpain 10 to type 2 diabetes: the biological rationale.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nancy J; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Roe, Cheryl A; Tsuchiya, Takafumi; Bell, Graeme I

    2004-02-01

    The follow-up studies to the original report of association of variation at calpain 10 (CAPN10) with type 2 diabetes in the Mexican-American population of Starr County, Texas, encompass a broad range of science. There are association studies on genetic variation at CAPN10 in different human populations over a range of phenotypes related to type 2 diabetes, physiological studies on the biological functions of calpain proteases, and evolutionary studies on CAPN10 and the NIDDM1 region. We review here the studies published to date on CAPN10, as well as the latest findings from positional cloning studies on a number of other complex disorders. Collectively, these studies provide perspective on the challenges of moving from the linkage mapping and positional cloning studies on which we have been focused to an understanding of the biology shaping the relationship of genotype to phenotype at loci influencing susceptibility to complex disorders like type 2 diabetes. PMID:14749261

  10. Treatment of type 2 diabetes, lifestyle, GLP1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the treatment focus for type 2 diabetes has shifted to prevention by lifestyle change and to more aggressive reduction of blood sugars during the early stage of treatment. Weight reduction is an important goal for many people with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery is no longer considered a last resort treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists given by injection are emerging as a useful treatment since they not only lower blood sugar but are associated with a modest weight reduction. The role of the oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors is emerging as second line treatment ahead of sulphonylureas due to a possible beneficial effect on the beta cell and weight neutrality. Drugs which inhibit glucose re-absorption in the kidney, sodium/glucose co-transport 2 inhibitors, may have a role in the treatment of diabetes. Insulin treatment still remains the cornerstone of treatment in many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25317241

  11. Patient considerations in the management of type 2 diabetes – critical appraisal of dapagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, Marissa C; Brooks, Amie D; Thacker, Stacey M

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects more than 350 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing. Many patients with diabetes do not achieve and/or maintain glycemic targets, despite therapy implementation and escalation. Multiple therapeutic classes of agents are available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and the armamentarium has expanded significantly in the past decade. Selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, including dapagliflozin, represent the latest development in pharmacologic treatment options for type 2 diabetes. This class has a unique mechanism of action, working by increasing glucose excretion in the urine. The insulin-independent mechanism results in decreased serum glucose, without hypoglycemia or weight gain. Dapagliflozin is a once-daily oral therapy. Expanding therapy options for a complex patient population is critical, and dapagliflozin has a distinct niche that can be a viable option for select patients with diabetes. PMID:24790417

  12. Assessment of trace elements levels in patients with Type 2 diabetes using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Badran, M; Morsy, R; Soliman, H; Elnimr, T

    2016-01-01

    The trace elements metabolism has been reported to possess specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of diabetes mellitus. Due to the continuous increase in the population of patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study aims to assess the levels and inter-relationships of fast blood glucose (FBG) and serum trace elements in Type 2 diabetic patients. This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian Type 2 diabetic patients and 36 healthy volunteers (Hospital of Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt). The blood serum was digested and then used to determine the levels of 24 trace elements using an inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Multivariate statistical analysis depended on correlation coefficient, cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to analysis the data. The results exhibited significant changes in FBG and eight of trace elements, Zn, Cu, Se, Fe, Mn, Cr, Mg, and As, levels in the blood serum of Type 2 diabetic patients relative to those of healthy controls. The statistical analyses using multivariate statistical techniques were obvious in the reduction of the experimental variables, and grouping the trace elements in patients into three clusters. The application of PCA revealed a distinct difference in associations of trace elements and their clustering patterns in control and patients group in particular for Mg, Fe, Cu, and Zn that appeared to be the most crucial factors which related with Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, on the basis of this study, the contributors of trace elements content in Type 2 diabetic patients can be determine and specify with correlation relationship and multivariate statistical analysis, which confirm that the alteration of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  13. Assessment of trace elements levels in patients with Type 2 diabetes using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Badran, M; Morsy, R; Soliman, H; Elnimr, T

    2016-01-01

    The trace elements metabolism has been reported to possess specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of diabetes mellitus. Due to the continuous increase in the population of patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study aims to assess the levels and inter-relationships of fast blood glucose (FBG) and serum trace elements in Type 2 diabetic patients. This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian Type 2 diabetic patients and 36 healthy volunteers (Hospital of Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt). The blood serum was digested and then used to determine the levels of 24 trace elements using an inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Multivariate statistical analysis depended on correlation coefficient, cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to analysis the data. The results exhibited significant changes in FBG and eight of trace elements, Zn, Cu, Se, Fe, Mn, Cr, Mg, and As, levels in the blood serum of Type 2 diabetic patients relative to those of healthy controls. The statistical analyses using multivariate statistical techniques were obvious in the reduction of the experimental variables, and grouping the trace elements in patients into three clusters. The application of PCA revealed a distinct difference in associations of trace elements and their clustering patterns in control and patients group in particular for Mg, Fe, Cu, and Zn that appeared to be the most crucial factors which related with Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, on the basis of this study, the contributors of trace elements content in Type 2 diabetic patients can be determine and specify with correlation relationship and multivariate statistical analysis, which confirm that the alteration of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26653752

  14. Dietary patterns in urban Ghana and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Laura K; Kröger, Janine; Schulze, Matthias B; Bedu-Addo, George; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Danquah, Ina

    2014-07-14

    There is epidemiological evidence for associations between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes. However, for sub-Saharan Africa, information on dietary patterns and their contribution to diabetes is lacking. The aim of the present study was to identify dietary patterns and their associations with type 2 diabetes in an urban Ghanaian population. In a hospital-based case-control study on risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Kumasi, a FFQ was administered to 675 controls and 542 cases. Dietary patterns were identified by using factor analysis including thirty-three food items. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations of dietary patterns with type 2 diabetes. Overall, two dietary patterns were identified: (1) a 'purchase' dietary pattern which positively correlated with the consumption of sweets, rice, meat, fruits and vegetables and (2) a 'traditional' dietary pattern that correlated with the intake of fruits, plantain, green leafy vegetables, fish, fermented maize products and palm oil. In the highest quintile of the 'purchase' dietary pattern, participants were younger, leaner and of higher socio-economic status than those in the lower quintiles. In contrast, participants in the highest quintile of the 'traditional' dietary pattern were older, heavier and more deprived compared with those in the lower quintiles. In the multivariate model, the 'purchase' dietary pattern was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes (OR per 1 sd 0·41, 95% CI 0·33, 0·50); the 'traditional' dietary pattern increased the odds of diabetes per 1 sd by 54% (95% CI 1·35, 1·81). In conclusion, two diverse dietary patterns were identified and associated with type 2 diabetes in urban Ghana. The determinants of pattern adherence require further investigation. PMID:24708913

  15. Therapeutic potential of N-acetylcysteine as an antiplatelet agent in patients with type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelet hyperaggregability is a pro-thrombotic feature of type-2 diabetes, associated with low levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Clinical delivery of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a biosynthetic precursor of GSH, may help redress a GSH shortfall in platelets, thereby reducing thrombotic risk in type-2 diabetes patients. We investigated the effect of NAC in vitro, at concentrations attainable with tolerable oral dosing, on platelet GSH concentrations and aggregation propensity in blood from patients with type-2 diabetes. Methods Blood samples (n = 13) were incubated (2 h, 37°C) with NAC (10-100 micromolar) in vitro. Platelet aggregation in response to thrombin and ADP (whole blood aggregometry) was assessed, together with platelet GSH concentration (reduced and oxidized), antioxidant status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and plasma NOx (a surrogate measure of platelet-derived nitric oxide; NO). Results At therapeutically relevant concentrations (10-100 micromolar), NAC increased intraplatelet GSH levels, enhanced the antioxidant effects of platelets, and reduced ROS generation in blood from type-2 diabetes patients. Critically, NAC inhibited thrombin- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro. Plasma NOx was enhanced by 30 micromolar NAC. Conclusions Our results suggest that NAC reduces thrombotic propensity in type-2 diabetes patients by increasing platelet antioxidant status as a result of elevated GSH synthesis, thereby lowering platelet-derived ROS. This may increase bioavailability of protective NO in a narrow therapeutic range. Therefore, NAC might represent an alternative or additional therapy to aspirin that could reduce thrombotic risk in type-2 diabetes. PMID:21600014

  16. DNA polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Mexican ethnic group.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martínez, S E; Islas-Andrade, S; Machorro-Lazo, M V; Revilla, M C; Juárez, R E; Mújica-López, K I; Morán-Moguel, M C; López-Cardona, M G; Sánchez-Corona, J

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder resulting from the action and interaction of many genetic and environmental factors. It has been reported that polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of glucose are associated with the susceptibility to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus increases with age, as well as with obesity and hypertension, its prevalence and incidence are different among geographical regions and ethnic groups. In Mexico, a higher prevalence and incidence has been described in the south of the country, and differences between urban and rural communities have been observed. We studied 73 individuals from Santiago Jamiltepec, a small indigenous community from Oaxaca State, Mexico. This population has shown a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between the Pst I (insulin gene), Nsi I (insulin receptor gene) and Gly972Arg (insulin receptor substrate 1 gene) polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and hypertension in this population. Clinical evaluation consisted of BMI and blood pressure measurements, and biochemical assays consisted of determination of fasting plasma insulin and glucose levels. PCR and restriction enzyme digestion analysis were applied to genomic DNA to identify the three polymorphisms. From statistical analysis carried out here, individually, the Pst I, Nsi I and Gly972Arg polymorphisms were not associated with the type 2 diabetes, obese or hypertensive phenotypes in this population. Nevertheless, there was an association between the Nsi I and Pst I polymorphisms and increased serum insulin levels.

  17. Serum Chromium Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and Its Association with Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Senthil; Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Karuthodiyil, Rajendran; Vijayarajan, Nikhilan; Gnanasekar, Rajiv; Kapil, Vivian V.; Mohamed, Azeem S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chromium is an essential micronutrient which is required for the normal functioning of insulin and regulation of blood sugar levels. It acts as a vital antioxidant for maintaining insulin homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the free radical production is increased and levels of antioxidants like chromium, vanadium, selenium and manganese are reduced. There have been previous studies to suggest that low serum levels of chromium are associated with poorer glycaemic control. Aim To study the level of serum chromium in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with glycaemic control. Materials and Methods Serum chromium concentration was determined by using inductively coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectophotometry in 42 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without any pre-existing complications. They were divided into 2 groups – well controlled (HbA1c ≤7.0%) and uncontrolled groups (HbA1c >7.0%). Results Mean serum chromium concentration measured in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients was significantly lower (0.065 ± 0.03 mcg/L vs 0.103 ± 0.04 mcg/L, p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant inverse linear correlation of the HbA1c values and the serum chromium concentration (r= -0.6514, p < 0.0001). There was also a decrease in chromium levels across both the groups with advancing age and the decrease being significant beyond 40 years of age (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study describes the relationship between serum chromium levels and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Significant reduction in chromium levels are probable indicators of metabolic response to oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further large scale studies relating serum chromium and type 2 diabetes mellitus may help to understand more about the exact relationship. PMID:26676175

  18. Mortality reduction among persons with type 2 diabetes: (-)-Epicatechin as add-on therapy to metformin?

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Moreno-Ulloa, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, and is growing at a rapid rate with drastic projections for developing countries. Mexico occupies the ninth place worldwide for type 2 diabetes prevalence, and in the foreseeable future, it is expected rise to the seventh place. Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in these patients. Although several drugs are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that reduce factors associated with myocardial infarction, an excess risk of death is still present. In this regard, the American Diabetes Association recommends metformin (oral glucose lowering drug) as the first-line therapy in type 2 diabetic subjects, based on its amply confirmed positive metabolic effects; however, its capacity to reduce cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic subjects is inconclusive. Thus, mortality reduction in these patients has been an elusive goal, and is therefore, imperative to evaluate new pharmacological interventions that may favorably impact mortality in these individuals. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate consumption of cacao-derived products (i.e., chocolate and cocoa) may reduce the risk of diabetes, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. Moreover, interventional studies have also suggested that dark chocolate and cocoa consumption is vasculoprotective in normal and type 2 diabetic individuals. (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI) is the main flavanol present in cacao, and suggested to be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after dark chocolate/cocoa consumption. Interestingly, in vivo studies have evidenced the capacity of (-)-EPI to reduce infarct size, and preserve cardiac mechanics in rodent models of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, long-term studies using (-)-EPI and evaluating its effects on mortality are lacking. Thus, based on their particular properties, it is valid to speculate that (-)-EPI and metformin in conjunction may

  19. Microbiota and epigenetic regulation of inflammatory mediators in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Jahn, D; Hippe, B; Brath, H; Haslberger, A G

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in the structure of the gut microbiota leading to low-grade inflammatory responses. An increased penetration of the impaired gut membrane by bacterial components is believed to induce this inflammation, possibly involving epigenetic alteration of inflammatory molecules such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated changes of the gut microbiota and epigenetic DNA methylation of TLR2 and TLR4 in three groups of subjects: type 2 diabetics under glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, obese individuals without established insulin resistance, and a lean control group. Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, lactic acid bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroidetes abundances were analysed by PCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing. The epigenetic methylation in the regulatory region of TLR4 and TLR2 was analysed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. We observed a significantly higher ratio of Firmicutes/ Bacteroidetes in type 2 diabetics compared to lean controls and obese. Major differences were shown in lactic acid bacteria, with the highest abundance in type 2 diabetics, followed by obese and lean participants. In comparison, F. prausnitzii was least abundant in type 2 diabetics, and most abundant in lean controls. Methylation analysis of four CpGs in the first exon of TLR4 showed significantly lower methylation in obese individuals, but no significant difference between type 2 diabetics and lean controls. Methylation of seven CpGs in the promoter region of TLR2 was significantly lower in type 2 diabetics compared to obese subjects and lean controls. The methylation levels of both TLRs were significantly correlated with body mass index. Our data suggest that changes in gut microbiota and thus cell wall components are involved in the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions. An improved diet targeted to induce gut microbial balance and in the following even epigenetic changes of

  20. A priori-defined Diet Quality Indexes and Risk of Type 2 diabetes: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Simone; Harmon, Brook E.; Boushey, Carol J.; Morimoto, Yukiko; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kröger, Janine; Schulze, Matthias B.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Aim Dietary patterns have been associated with type 2 diabetes incidence, but little is known about the impact of ethnicity on this relation. This study evaluated the association of four a priori dietary quality indexes and type 2 diabetes risk among whites, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians in the Hawaii component of the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Methods After excluding participants with prevalent diabetes and missing values, the analysis included 89,185 participants (11,217 cases). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline with a quantitative food frequency questionnaire designed for use in the relevant ethnic populations. Sex- and ethnicity-specific hazard ratios were calculated for the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010), the alternative HEI-2010 (AHEI-2010), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). Results We observed significant inverse associations between higher scores of the DASH index and type 2 diabetes risk in white men and women, as well as in Japanese American women and Native Hawaiian men with respective risk reductions of 37, 31, 19 and 21% (highest compared to lowest index category). A higher adherence to the AHEI-2010 and aMED diet was related to a 13–28% lower type 2 diabetes risk in white participants but not in other ethnic groups. No significant associations with type 2 diabetes risk were observed for the HEI-2010 index. Conclusions The small ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes risk associated with scores of a priori-defined dietary patterns may be due to different consumption patterns of food components and the fact that the original indexes were not based on Asians and Pacific Islanders. PMID:25319012

  1. Mortality reduction among persons with type 2 diabetes: (-)-Epicatechin as add-on therapy to metformin?

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Moreno-Ulloa, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, and is growing at a rapid rate with drastic projections for developing countries. Mexico occupies the ninth place worldwide for type 2 diabetes prevalence, and in the foreseeable future, it is expected rise to the seventh place. Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in these patients. Although several drugs are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that reduce factors associated with myocardial infarction, an excess risk of death is still present. In this regard, the American Diabetes Association recommends metformin (oral glucose lowering drug) as the first-line therapy in type 2 diabetic subjects, based on its amply confirmed positive metabolic effects; however, its capacity to reduce cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic subjects is inconclusive. Thus, mortality reduction in these patients has been an elusive goal, and is therefore, imperative to evaluate new pharmacological interventions that may favorably impact mortality in these individuals. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate consumption of cacao-derived products (i.e., chocolate and cocoa) may reduce the risk of diabetes, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. Moreover, interventional studies have also suggested that dark chocolate and cocoa consumption is vasculoprotective in normal and type 2 diabetic individuals. (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI) is the main flavanol present in cacao, and suggested to be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after dark chocolate/cocoa consumption. Interestingly, in vivo studies have evidenced the capacity of (-)-EPI to reduce infarct size, and preserve cardiac mechanics in rodent models of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, long-term studies using (-)-EPI and evaluating its effects on mortality are lacking. Thus, based on their particular properties, it is valid to speculate that (-)-EPI and metformin in conjunction may

  2. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Health: NLM update Transcript Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients : 09/26/2016 To use the sharing ... within the 'start here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page . The National Center for Farmworker ...

  3. Transferability and fine mapping of type 2 diabetes loci in African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Saxena, Richa; Li, Jiang; Palmer, Nicholette D; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Xu, Jianzhao; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Zmuda, Joseph M; Siscovick, David S; Patel, Sanjay R; Crook, Errol D; Sims, Mario; Chen, Yii-Der I; Bertoni, Alain G; Li, Mingyao; Grant, Struan F A; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Psaty, Bruce M; Pankow, James S; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) disproportionally affects African Americans (AfA) but, to date, genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are primarily from European and Asian populations. We examined the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and locus transferability of 40 reported T2D loci in six AfA GWAS consisting of 2,806 T2D case subjects with or without end-stage renal disease and 4,265 control subjects from the Candidate Gene Association Resource Plus Study. Our results revealed that seven index SNPs at the TCF7L2, KLF14, KCNQ1, ADCY5, CDKAL1, JAZF1, and GCKR loci were significantly associated with T2D (P < 0.05). The strongest association was observed at TCF7L2 rs7903146 (odds ratio [OR] 1.30; P = 6.86 × 10⁻⁸). Locus-wide analysis demonstrated significant associations (P(emp) < 0.05) at regional best SNPs in the TCF7L2, KLF14, and HMGA2 loci as well as suggestive signals in KCNQ1 after correction for the effective number of SNPs at each locus. Of these loci, the regional best SNPs were in differential linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the index and adjacent SNPs. Our findings suggest that some loci discovered in prior reports affect T2D susceptibility in AfA with similar effect sizes. The reduced and differential LD pattern in AfA compared with European and Asian populations may facilitate fine mapping of causal variants at loci shared across populations. PMID:23193183

  4. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic β‐cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population‐matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder. PMID:17551080

  5. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls.

    PubMed

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta-cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population-matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder.

  6. Effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects] Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned to the control group or passive static stretching group. [Methods] Glycated hemoglobin was measured before and after the 8-week training period. [Results] Glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly in the passive static stretching group, and there were significant differences in blood glucose levels between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Passive static stretching of the skeletal muscles may be an alternative to exercise to help regulate blood glucose levels in diabetes patients. PMID:26157241

  7. Insulin-degrading enzyme: a link between Alzheimer's and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rizwanul; Nazir, Aamir

    2014-03-01

    Enzymes play a very vital role in maintaining the homeostasis inside the body. Improper functioning of enzymes is associated with many diseases. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, is believed to act as a junction point of Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies provide inkling for the use of IDE as a potential target hence the design of its regulators would be a viable approach towards treatment of these diseases. This review provides an overview of the IDE structure and function; a relationship is drawn between IDE, Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease and the approaches that make IDE a potential target, are discussed.

  8. Islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes: from metabolic stress to therapy.

    PubMed

    Donath, Marc Y; Schumann, Desiree M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Perren, Aurel; Ehses, Jan A

    2008-02-01

    Decreases in both mass and secretory function of insulin-producing beta-cells contribute to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The histology of islets from patients with type 2 diabetes displays an inflammatory process characterized by the presence of cytokines, apoptotic cells, immune cell infiltration, amyloid deposits, and eventually fibrosis. This inflammatory process is probably the combined consequence of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and increased circulating adipokines. Therefore, modulation of intra-islet inflammatory mediators, in particular interleukin-1 beta, appears as a promising therapeutic approach.

  9. [Type 2 diabetes--hereditary destiny or punishment of the affluent society?].

    PubMed

    Groop, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The pandemic of type 2 diabetes is threatening the entire world population. The number of obese people in the world has quadrupled over the last 30 years. It is clear that the human genome has not undergone such a rapid change, and thus alone does not explain the increased obesity. In fact, the rapidly changing society seems to be on a collision course with the genome. Through gene research we may hopefully learn the mechanisms by which the genome of some people makes them susceptible to type 2 diabetes while simultaneously protecting against the effects of unfavorable environmental factors and diabetes.

  10. Fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan K

    2009-01-01

    JanumetTM, a fixed dose combination of sitagliptin/metformin HCL manufactured by Merck Pharmaceuticals, has received US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes, that are inadequately controlled, either by sitagliptin or metformin alone or together in free-dose combination form. Sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme DDP-4, assists patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to achieve glycemic control. It has been shown to be safe and effective at 100 mg daily doses. The effect of giving sitagliptin in combination with metformin is thought to have a complimentary and possibly additive effect on glycemic control. PMID:21437126

  11. Management of Pregnant Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Consequences of Fetal Programming in Their Offspring.

    PubMed

    Berry, Diane C; Boggess, Kim; Johnson, Quinetta B

    2016-05-01

    The obesity epidemic has fueled an epidemic of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women of childbearing age. This paper examines the state of the science on preconception and pregnancy management of women with type 2 diabetes to optimize outcomes for the women and their infants. In addition, the consequence of fetal programming as a result of suboptimal maternal glycemic control is discussed. The paper focuses on type 2 diabetes, not type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes. Management of women with type 2 diabetes includes preconception counseling, preconception weight management and weight loss, proper weight gain during pregnancy, self-monitoring of blood glucose levels, medication, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise.

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dileepan, Kavitha; Feldt, M Max

    2013-12-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence and consensus, type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) remains the most common form of DM in children and adolescents. The incidence of type 2 DM in the pediatric population is rapidly increasing because of the obesity epidemic, and minority groups are disproportionately affected. (2) (10) (19) On the basis of some research evidence and consensus, it can be challenging to initially differentiate between type 2 DM and type 1 DM clinically because of the increased prevalence of obesity, the complex interplay of autoimmunity and obesity, and common symptoms at presentation. (1) (10) (19) Significant evidence and consensus support a genetic basis for the development of type 2 DM in children. Physicians should routinely screen at risk children older than age 10 years for DM. Screening criteria include obesity, a family history of type 2 DM, a minority racial or ethnic background, acanthosis nigricans, or other diseases associated with insulin resistance, including polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, or dyslipidemia. (1) (10) (18) (19) On the basis of consensus, diagnosis of type 2 DM can be confirmed by an elevated fasting blood glucose level greater than 126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/L), an elevated 2-hour plasma glucose greater than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) on an oral glucose tolerance test, an elevated random blood glucose greater than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L), or a hemoglobin A1c level greater than 6.5% with suggestive symptoms. (10) According to strong research evidence and consensus, once the diagnosis has been made, treatment should be based on the acuity of presentation and should focus on lifestyle modification and on normalizing hyperglycemia to minimize complications. Metformin is currently first-line treatment for type 2 DM in children and adolescents older than age 10 years who present nonacutely. (18) (19) Strong research evidence and consensus demonstrate that because type 2 DM has an insidious onset, microvascular and

  13. Long-term insulin glargine therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a focus on cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Joshua J; Donner, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperinsulinemia is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but the effects of exogenous insulin on cardiovascular disease progression have been less well studied. Insulin has been shown to have both cardioprotective and atherosclerosis-promoting effects in laboratory animal studies. Long-term clinical trials using insulin to attain improved diabetes control in younger type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients have shown improved cardiovascular outcomes. Shorter trials of intensive diabetes control with high insulin use in higher risk patients with type 2 diabetes have shown either no cardiovascular benefit or increased all cause and cardiovascular mortality. Glargine insulin is a basal insulin analog widely used to treat patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This review focuses on the effects of glargine on cardiovascular outcomes. Glargine lowers triglycerides, leads to a modest weight gain, causes less hypoglycemia when compared with intermediate-acting insulin, and has a neutral effect on blood pressure. The Outcome Reduction With Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN trial), a 6.2 year dedicated cardiovascular outcomes trial of glargine demonstrated no increased cardiovascular risk.

  14. Protective effect of DRB1 locus against type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    Perez-Luque, Elva; Alaez, Carmen; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Garay, M Eugenia; Fajardo, Martha E; Nava, Laura E; Gorodezky, Clara

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the participation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles in the expression of type 2 diabetic and in nondiabetic subjects with and without family history of diabetes. The purpose was to evaluate any HLA association and to look for different patterns of insulin resistance and insulin secretion, comparing subjects with a low probability of developing diabetes, as a result of their family history. We recruited 87 healthy subjects without family history of diabetes, 48 healthy subjects with family history, and 47 type 2 diabetic patients. All of them were Mexican Mestizos of central Mexico. Using a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, insulin resistance was determined and insulin secretion was assessed with the HOMA model. DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were typed using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) and sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). Nondiabetic subjects had similar HOMA-IR and DeltaI 30/DeltaG 30 index (HOMA). A significant decreased frequency of DRB1*0403 (p = 0.01; odds ratio [OR] = 0.20) was demonstrated in type 2 diabetic patients, and DRB1*0701 (p = 0.02; OR = 0.17) in nondiabetics with family history of diabetes. These alleles associated with protection against type 2 diabetes, share glutamic acid at position-74 and were previously demonstrated to contribute to protection against type I diabetes.

  15. Enhanced ROS production and oxidative damage in subcutaneous white adipose tissue mitochondria in obese and type 2 diabetes subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the insulin target tissues has been implicated in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The study has examined the oxidative stress parameters in the mitochondria of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from obese and non-obese subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. An accumulation of protein carbonyls, fluorescent lipid peroxidation products, and malondialdehyde occurs in the adipose tissue mitochondria of obese type 2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese diabetic subjects with the maximum increase noticed in the obese type 2 diabetes patients and the minimum in non-obese type 2 diabetics. The mitochondria from obese type 2 diabetics, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese type 2 diabetics also produce significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro compared to those of controls, and apparently the mitochondrial ROS production rate in each group is proportional to the respective load of oxidative damage markers. Likewise, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase show decreased activities most markedly in obese type 2 diabetes subjects and to a lesser degree in non-obese type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic obese subjects in comparison to control. The results imply that mitochondrial dysfunction with enhanced ROS production may contribute to the metabolic abnormality of adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes.

  16. The prevention and control the type-2 diabetes by changing lifestyle and dietary pattern

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is a major, non-communicable disease with increasing prevalence at a global level. Type-2 diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. Type-2 diabetes is the leading cause of premature deaths. Improperly managed, it can lead to a number of health issues, including heart diseases, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, leg and foot amputations, and death. Type-2 diabetes or adult-onset diabetes is most common type of diabetes, usually begins when a person is in his or her mid-50s, but diabetes is not inevitable. Minor changes in your lifestyle can greatly reduce your chances of getting this disease. Therefore, in order to prevent this condition, action should be taken regarding the modifiable factors that influence its development-lifestyle and dietary habits. However, with proper testing, treatment and lifestyle changes, healthy eating as a strategy, promote walking, exercise, and other physical activities have beneficial effects on human health and prevention or treatment of diabetes, promoting adherence to this pattern is of considerable public health importance. PMID:24741641

  17. The prevention and control the type-2 diabetes by changing lifestyle and dietary pattern.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is a major, non-communicable disease with increasing prevalence at a global level. Type-2 diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. Type-2 diabetes is the leading cause of premature deaths. Improperly managed, it can lead to a number of health issues, including heart diseases, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, leg and foot amputations, and death. Type-2 diabetes or adult-onset diabetes is most common type of diabetes, usually begins when a person is in his or her mid-50s, but diabetes is not inevitable. Minor changes in your lifestyle can greatly reduce your chances of getting this disease. Therefore, in order to prevent this condition, action should be taken regarding the modifiable factors that influence its development-lifestyle and dietary habits. However, with proper testing, treatment and lifestyle changes, healthy eating as a strategy, promote walking, exercise, and other physical activities have beneficial effects on human health and prevention or treatment of diabetes, promoting adherence to this pattern is of considerable public health importance.

  18. [THE ROLE OF OSTEOCALCIN IN COURSE OF OSTEOARTHRITIS AND TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlyova, L V; Oliinyk, M O

    2015-01-01

    We studied the level of osteocalcin and its relationships with carbohydrate metabolism and clinical and radiographic changes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2) and their combination. Significant negative correlation between the level of osteocalcin and carbohydrate metabolism, and clinical and radiographic changes in patients with OA and DM 2 was found. We determined, that negative correlation of osteocalcin with carbohydrate metabolism and radiographic changes, and more pronounced pain in OA maybe an indication that the lack of production of osteocalcin leads to more severe changes during the OA on the background of DM 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27491153

  19. Articular and abarticular manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abourazzak, Fatima Ezzahra; Akasbi, Nessrine; Houssaini, Ghita Sqalli; Bazouti, Sabah; Bensbaa, Salma; Hachimi, Hicham; Ajdi, Farida; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high-prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. It affects the connective tissues in many ways and causes alterations in the periarticular and the musculoskeletal systems. In most cases, these manifestations are associated with functional disability and pain, affecting the quality of life of the diabetic patient. The aim of our study is to review the different articular and abarticular manifestations in diabetic patients and the associated factors of these rheumatic manifestations. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study that includes all patients suffering from type 2 DM who present with articular or abarticular manifestations. Results We included 116 diabetic patients presenting with articular or abarticular manifestations. Our study showed four important findings. First, a large variety of articular and abarticular manifestations were present in patients with type 2 DM. Second, osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was the most frequent articular manifestations. It was seen in 49% of our patients. Third, the most common manifestations in diabetic Moroccan patients were carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, and diabetic cheiroarthropathy (29%, 23%, and 16%, respectively). Fourth, there was a significant association between vascular complications and the development of articular and abarticular manifestations. Conclusion This study shows that the articular and abarticular manifestations in diabetic Moroccan patients are dominated by CTS, adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, and diabetic cheiroarthropathy, with a significant association between vascular complications and the development of some of these manifestations. PMID:27708897

  20. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Epidemiology: work-related stress and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Kivimäki, Mika

    2013-08-01

    A new cohort study links work-related stress to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in women, but the findings are less clear in men. Randomized controlled studies are now needed to determine whether management of stress could be used to reduce the risk of developing T2DM.

  2. Physical activity related information sources predict physical activity behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini; Boule, Normand G

    2010-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a key management strategy for type 2 diabetes. Despite the known benefits, PA levels are low. Whether the low level of PA is related to lack of knowledge or support is not fully understood. This study was conducted to describe where and how often adults with type 2 diabetes receive and seek information related to PA and examine the relationships between the source and quality of PA information with PA behaviors. A series of questions related to the source and quality of PA information were added to a baseline survey distributed to the participants (N = 244) of the Canadian Aerobic and Resistance Training in Diabetes (CARED) study. Physicians and television were found to be the main sources of PA-related information. In our cross-sectional model, sources of PA-related information other than that from health care professionals explained 14% (p = .05) and 16% (p < .05) of the variance for aerobic-based and resistance training behaviors and 22% (p < .01) and 15% (p < .05) for these behaviors in our longitudinal model. Physical activity (PA)-related information is widely available to adults with type 2 diabetes. Neither the quantity nor the quality of the PA information provided by health care professionals predicted PA behavior. These data provide further insight into the modes with which PA can be promoted to adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21170787

  3. Spouse Control and Type 2 Diabetes Management: Moderating Effects of Dyadic Expectations for Spouse Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Amber J.; Franks, Melissa M.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    For married patients, chronic illness management often includes involvement of their spouses. We examined expectations regarding spouse involvement in the health of a partner with type 2 diabetes (N = 139 couples) from the perspectives of the patient and spouse. Partners' dyadic expectations and spouses' gender were posited to moderate spouses'…

  4. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  5. Modeling Type 2 Diabetes GWAS Candidate Gene Function in hESCs.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Guy A

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a complex polygenic disorder that affects about 1 in 12 adults. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Zeng et al. (2016) elegantly combine CRISPR-based gene editing in hESCs with directed β cell differentiation to investigate the functions of genes highlighted by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for this disease. PMID:27588741

  6. Investigating Factors Associated with Depression of Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Duo; Dong, Qing; Gu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To assess the depression status of type 2 diabetic retinopathy patients in Nantong China and to identify factors associated with depression. Methods Two hundred and ninety-four patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University. The severity of DR was measured in the worse eye. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); the quality of life was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). The logistic regression analyses were used to identify the independent factors of depression. Results The mean age of the study subjects was 57.77 years (SD: 9.64). Approximately 35.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms (n = 105).Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.014), low monthly income (p = 0.01), poor vision in the better eye (P = 0.002), laser treatment history (p = 0.01) were significant risk factors for depression. The quality of life of individuals with CES-D score<16 was significantly better compared with individuals with CES-D score≥16. Conclusion The reported depressive symptoms among type 2 diabetic retinopathy population is higher in Nantong China. Gender, salary, vision acuity and treatment history were important risk factors linked to this disorder in the Chinese type 2 diabetic retinopathy population from Nantong. More attention by medical care personnel needs to be paid to the psychological health of this population. PMID:26151365

  7. Elevated Basal Insulin Secretion in Type 2 Diabetes Caused by Reduced Plasma Membrane Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Vini; Kazim, Abdulla S.; Helgeson, Johan; Lewold, Clemens; Barik, Satadal; Buda, Pawel; Reinbothe, Thomas M.; Wennmalm, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated basal insulin secretion under fasting conditions together with insufficient stimulated insulin release is an important hallmark of type 2 diabetes, but the mechanisms controlling basal insulin secretion remain unclear. Membrane rafts exist in pancreatic islet cells and spatially organize membrane ion channels and proteins controlling exocytosis, which may contribute to the regulation of insulin secretion. Membrane rafts (cholesterol and sphingolipid containing microdomains) were dramatically reduced in human type 2 diabetic and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat islets when compared with healthy islets. Oxidation of membrane cholesterol markedly reduced microdomain staining intensity in healthy human islets, but was without effect in type 2 diabetic islets. Intriguingly, oxidation of cholesterol affected glucose-stimulated insulin secretion only modestly, whereas basal insulin release was elevated. This was accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ spike frequency and Ca2+ influx and explained by enhanced single Ca2+ channel activity. These results suggest that the reduced presence of membrane rafts could contribute to the elevated basal insulin secretion seen in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27533789

  8. Confounding Effects of Metformin on the Human Gut Microbiome in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Boren, Jan; Smith, Ulf

    2016-01-12

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, though diabetes treatment regimens, including metformin, may confound the results. Forslund et al. (2015) identify distinct disease and drug signatures and highlight the importance of adjusting for treatment when investigating how T2D influences the human gut microbiome. PMID:26771114

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group for Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Vivian W. Q.; Zhang, Yiqi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a Participatory Empowerment Group (PEG) for Chinese type 2 diabetes patients in Shanghai. Method: A randomized waiting list control and pretest and posttest comparisons were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention by comparing blood sugar level and health-related quality of life.…

  10. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  11. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  12. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D Score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  13. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  14. Contributors to Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants with Type 2 Diabete

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sarah E.; Reed, Preston L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes have a higher prevalence of depression than the general population. Korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes are understudied. Objectives To identify the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms in Korean immigrants. Method In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a community sample of 164 Korean immigrant adults with type 2 diabetes were assessed for depressive symptoms using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. Predictors of depression were grouped into three categories: demographic (age, gender, education, English proficiency); clinical (duration of diabetes, comorbidities, insulin use); and psychosocial (general health, diabetes-related quality-of-life, family support). Results Approximately 56% of participants had CES-D scores ≥ 16. Higher levels of depression were associated with greater impact of diabetes on QOL (b = 5.68, p = .001), worse overall health (b = -0.09, p = .012), and less family support (b = -4.02, p = .042). The relationship between depression and diabetes impact on quality-of-life was stronger for men than women (b = 6.67, p = .020). Discussion Depressive symptoms are common among Korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes. Assessing diabetes-related quality-of-life, general health, and family support may be of value in better understanding depressive symptoms among this population. Among Korean immigrant men with type 2 diabetes, specific attention should be paid to diabetes-related quality-of-life. PMID:23190692

  15. Triglyceride-increasing alleles associated with protection against type-2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are an established risk factor for type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, recent studies have hinted at the possibility that genetic risk for TG may paradoxically protect against T2D. In this study, we examined the association of genetic risk for TG with incident T2...

  16. Ending SNAP subsidies for sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Seligman, Hilary Kessler; Gardner, Christopher; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-06-01

    To reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes rates, lawmakers have proposed modifying Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to encourage healthier food choices. We examined the impact of two proposed policies: a ban on using SNAP dollars to buy sugar-sweetened beverages; and a subsidy in which for every SNAP dollar spent on fruit and vegetables, thirty cents is credited back to participants' SNAP benefit cards. We used nationally representative data and models describing obesity, type 2 diabetes, and determinants of food consumption among a sample of over 19,000 SNAP participants. We found that a ban on SNAP purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages would be expected to significantly reduce obesity prevalence and type 2 diabetes incidence, particularly among adults ages 18-65 and some racial and ethnic minorities. The subsidy policy would not be expected to have a significant effect on obesity and type 2 diabetes, given available data. Such a subsidy could, however, more than double the proportion of SNAP participants who meet federal vegetable and fruit consumption guidelines.

  17. LEADER 3—Lipase and Amylase Activity in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, William M.; Nauck, Michael A.; Zinman, Bernard; Daniels, Gilbert H.; Bergenstal, Richard M.; Mann, Johannes F.E.; Steen Ravn, Lasse; Moses, Alan C.; Stockner, Mette; Baeres, Florian M.M.; Marso, Steven P.; Buse, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This report from the LEADER (Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results) trial describes baseline lipase and amylase activity in type 2 diabetic subjects without acute pancreatitis symptoms before randomization to the glucagonlike peptide analog liraglutide or placebo. Methods The LEADER is an international randomized placebo-controlled trial evaluating the cardiovascular safety of liraglutide in 9340 type 2 diabetic patients at high cardiovascular risk. Fasting lipase and amylase activity was assessed at baseline, before receiving liraglutide or placebo, using a commercial assay (Roche) with upper limit of normal values of 63 U/L for lipase and 100 U/L for amylase. Results Either or both enzymes were above the upper limit of normal in 22.7% of subjects; 16.6% (n = 1540) had an elevated lipase level (including 1.2% >3-fold elevated), and 11.8% (n = 1094) had an elevated amylase level (including 0.2% >3-fold elevated). In multivariable regression models, severely reduced kidney function was associated with the largest effect on increasing activity of both. However, even among subjects with normal kidney function, 12.2% and 7.7% had elevated lipase and amylase levels. Conclusions In this large study of type 2 diabetic patients, nearly 25%