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Sample records for af2 clonal complex

  1. African 2, a Clonal Complex of Mycobacterium bovis Epidemiologically Important in East Africa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M. Carmen; Müller, Borna; Hailu, Elena; Asiimwe, Benon; Kremer, Kristin; Dale, James; Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Hilty, Markus; Rigouts, Leen; Firdessa, Rebuma; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Ngandolo, Bongo Nare Richard; Bruchfeld, Judith; Boschiroli, Laura; Müller, Annélle; Sahraoui, Naima; Pacciarini, Maria; Cadmus, Simeon; Joloba, Moses; van Soolingen, Dick; Michel, Anita L.; Djønne, Berit; Aranaz, Alicia; Zinsstag, Jakob; van Helden, Paul; Portaels, Françoise; Kazwala, Rudovick; Källenius, Gunilla; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Aseffa, Abraham; Gordon, Stephen V.; Smith, Noel H.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies. PMID:21097608

  2. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  3. The Complex, Clonal, and Controversial Nature of Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Evans, James A; McDonald, Stuart A C

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BO) is a preneoplastic condition described as the replacement of the stratified squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus with one that histologically presents as a diverse mixture of metaplastic glands resembling gastric or intestinal-type columnar epithelium. The clonal origins of BO are still unclear. More recently, we have begun to investigate the relationship between the various metaplastic gland phenotypes observed in BO, how they evolve, and the cancer risk they bestow. Studies have revealed that glands along the BO segment are clonal units containing a single stem cell clone that can give rise to all the differentiated epithelial cell types in glands. Clonal lineage tracing analysis has revealed that Barrett's glands are capable of bifurcation and this facilitates clonal expansion and competition. In fact, BO in some patients appears to consist of multiple, independently initiated clones that compete with each other for space and possibly resources. This chapter discusses the concepts of clonal competition and expansion in BO and sets out to query what we know about the role of gland diversity and phenotypic evolution within this complex columnar metaplasia. PMID:27573766

  4. Intrafamilial cluster of pulmonary tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis of the African 1 clonal complex.

    PubMed

    Godreuil, S; Jeziorski, E; Bañuls, A L; Fraisse, T; Van de Perre, P; Boschiroli, M L

    2010-12-01

    A new clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle from west central African countries has been described as the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex. Here, the first intrafamilial cluster of human tuberculosis cases due to M. bovis Af1 clonal complex strains is reported. We discuss hypotheses regarding modes of transmission. PMID:20980573

  5. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection. PMID:26948373

  6. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  7. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains.

    PubMed

    Neemuchwala, Alefiya; Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  8. Emergence of Clonal Complex 17 Enterococcus faecium in The Netherlands▿

    PubMed Central

    Top, Janetta; Willems, Rob; van der Velden, Saskia; Asbroek, Miranda; Bonten, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The global emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium has been characterized as the clonal spread of clonal complex 17 (CC17) E. faecium. CC17 was defined upon multilocus sequence typing and is characterized by resistance to quinolones and ampicillin and the presence of the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) in the majority of isolates. The recently noticed increased incidence of vancomycin-susceptible CC17 E. faecium infections in our hospital initiated a nationwide study to determine ecological changes among enterococcal infections. The data and strain collections were obtained from 26 (38%) and 9 (14%) of 66 microbiology laboratories in The Netherlands. E. faecium and E. faecalis were distinguished by multiplex PCR; all E. faecium isolates were genotyped by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and the presence of esp was identified by PCR. Average numbers of ampicillin-resistant enterococcal isolates from normally sterile body sites per hospital increased from 5 ± 1 in 1994 to 25 ± 21 in 2005. Among all enterococcal bloodstream infections, the proportions of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium (AREF) increased from 4% in 1994 to 20% in 2005 (P < 0.001). All E. faecalis isolates were susceptible to ampicillin, whereas 78% of the E. faecium isolates were resistant (49% of these contained esp). Genotyping revealed that 86% of AREF isolates belonged to CC17, including four dominant MLVA types found in ≥3 hospitals, accounting for 64% of the AREF isolates. Infections caused by CC17 E. faecium has increased nationwide, especially in university hospitals due to the clonal spread of four MLVA types, and seems associated with acquisition of the esp gene. PMID:17977983

  9. Revealing hidden clonal complexity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by qualitative and quantitative improvement of sampling.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, L; Palacios, J J; Herranz, M; Ruiz Serrano, M J; Bouza, E; García-de-Viedma, D

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of microevolution events, its functional relevance and impact on molecular epidemiology strategies, constitutes one of the most challenging aspects of the study of clonal complexity in infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated whether two improved sampling schemes could provide access to the clonal complexity that is undetected by the current standards (analysis of one isolate from one sputum). We evaluated in 48 patients the analysis by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat of M. tuberculosis isolates cultured from bronchial aspirate (BAS) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and, in another 16 cases, the analysis of a higher number of isolates from independent sputum samples. Analysis of the isolates from BAS/BAL specimens revealed clonal complexity in a very high proportion of cases (5/48); in most of these cases, complexity was not detected when the isolates from sputum samples were analysed. Systematic analysis of isolates from multiple sputum samples also improved the detection of clonal complexity. We found coexisting clonal variants in two of 16 cases that would have gone undetected in the analysis of the isolate from a single sputum specimen. Our results suggest that analysis of isolates from BAS/BAL specimens is highly efficient for recording the true clonal composition of M. tuberculosis in the lungs. When these samples are not available, we recommend increasing the number of isolates from independent sputum specimens, because they might not harbour the same pool of bacteria. Our data suggest that the degree of clonal complexity in tuberculosis has been underestimated because of the deficiencies inherent in a simplified procedure. PMID:25658553

  10. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Kemp, Michael; Holm, Anette; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Detlefsen, Mette; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-05-01

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected through 2 independent person-to-person transmission chains. PMID:27089007

  11. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Michael; Holm, Anette; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Detlefsen, Mette; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected through 2 independent person-to-person transmission chains. PMID:27089007

  12. Multiple sampling and discriminatory fingerprinting reveals clonally complex and compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Yurena; Romero, Beatriz; Copano, María Francisca; Bouza, Emilio; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2015-01-30

    The combination of new genotyping tools and a more exhaustive sampling policy in the analysis of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has shown that infection by this pathogen is more complex than initially expected. Mixed infections, coexistence of clonal variants from a parental strain, and compartmentalized infections are all different modalities of this clonal complexity. Until recently, genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis in animal populations was based on spoligotyping and analysis of a single isolate per infection; therefore, clonal complexity is probably underdetected. We used multiple sampling combined with highly discriminatory MIRU-VNTR to study compartmentalized infections by M. bovis in a low-tuberculosis prevalence setting. We spoligotyped the M. bovis isolates from two or more anatomic locations sampled from 55 animals on 39 independent farms. Compartmentalized infections, with two different strains infecting independent lymph nodes in the same animal, were found in six cases (10.9%). MIRU-VNTR analysis confirmed that the compartmentalization was strict and that only one strain was present in each infected node. MIRU-VNTR analysis of additional infected animals on one of the farms confirmed that the compartmentalized infection was a consequence of superinfection, since the two strains were independently infecting other animals. This same analysis revealed the emergence of a microevolved clonal variant in one of the lymph nodes of the compartmentalized animal. Clonal complexity must also be taken into consideration in M. bovis infection, even in low-prevalence settings, and analyses must be adapted to detect it and increase the accuracy of molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:25439651

  13. Subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 121 are associated with distinct clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Kevin; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frederic; Goering, Richard V; Žemličková, Helena; Machova, Ivana; Struelens, Marc J; Zautner, Andreas E; Holtfreter, Silva; Bröker, Barbara; Ritchie, Stephen; Reaksmey, Sin; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J; Cuny, Christiane; Layer, Franziska; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 by mutation discovery at 115 genetic housekeeping loci from each of 154 isolates, sampled on five continents between 1953 and 2009. In addition, we pyro-sequenced the genomes from ten representative isolates. The genome-wide SNPs that were ascertained revealed the evolutionary history of CC121, indicating at least six major clades (A to F) within the clonal complex and dating its most recent common ancestor to the pre-antibiotic era. The toxin gene complement of CC121 isolates was correlated with their SNP-based phylogeny. Moreover, we found a highly significant association of clinical phenotypes with phylogenetic affiliations, which is unusual for S. aureus. All isolates evidently sampled from superficial infections (including staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, bullous impetigo, exfoliative dermatitis, conjunctivitis) clustered in clade F, which included the European epidemic fusidic-acid resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). In comparison, isolates from deep-seated infections (abscess, furuncle, pyomyositis, necrotizing pneumonia) were disseminated in several clades, but not in clade F. Our results demonstrate that phylogenetic lineages with distinct clinical properties exist within an S. aureus clonal complex, and that SNPs serve as powerful discriminatory markers, able to identify these lineages. All CC121 genomes harboured a 41-kilobase prophage that was dissimilar to S. aureus phages sequenced previously. Community-associated MRSA and MSSA from Cambodia were extremely closely related, suggesting this MRSA arose in the region. PMID:23505464

  14. Subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 121 Are Associated with Distinct Clinical Entities

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Kevin; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frederic; Goering, Richard V.; Žemličková, Helena; Machova, Ivana; Struelens, Marc J.; Zautner, Andreas E.; Holtfreter, Silva; Bröker, Barbara; Ritchie, Stephen; Reaksmey, Sin; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.; Cuny, Christiane; Layer, Franziska; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 by mutation discovery at 115 genetic housekeeping loci from each of 154 isolates, sampled on five continents between 1953 and 2009. In addition, we pyro-sequenced the genomes from ten representative isolates. The genome-wide SNPs that were ascertained revealed the evolutionary history of CC121, indicating at least six major clades (A to F) within the clonal complex and dating its most recent common ancestor to the pre-antibiotic era. The toxin gene complement of CC121 isolates was correlated with their SNP-based phylogeny. Moreover, we found a highly significant association of clinical phenotypes with phylogenetic affiliations, which is unusual for S. aureus. All isolates evidently sampled from superficial infections (including staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, bullous impetigo, exfoliative dermatitis, conjunctivitis) clustered in clade F, which included the European epidemic fusidic-acid resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). In comparison, isolates from deep-seated infections (abscess, furuncle, pyomyositis, necrotizing pneumonia) were disseminated in several clades, but not in clade F. Our results demonstrate that phylogenetic lineages with distinct clinical properties exist within an S. aureus clonal complex, and that SNPs serve as powerful discriminatory markers, able to identify these lineages. All CC121 genomes harboured a 41-kilobase prophage that was dissimilar to S. aureus phages sequenced previously. Community-associated MRSA and MSSA from Cambodia were extremely closely related, suggesting this MRSA arose in the region. PMID:23505464

  15. Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro Secretion of Alpha Toxin (hla) Correlates with the Affiliation to Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Stieber, Bettina; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The alpha toxin of Staphylococcus aureus is a pore forming toxin that penetrates host cell membranes causing osmotic swelling, rupture, lysis and subsequently cell death. Haemolysin alpha is toxic to a wide range of different mammalian cells; i.e., neurotoxic, dermonecrotic, haemolytic, and it can cause lethality in a wide variety of animals. In this study, the in vitro alpha toxin production of 648 previously genotyped isolates of S. aureus was measured quantitatively using antibody microarrays. Isolates originated from medical and veterinary settings and were selected in order to represent diverse clonal complexes and defined clinical conditions. Generally, the production of alpha toxin in vitro is related to the clonal complex affiliation. For clonal complexes CC22, CC30, CC45, CC479, CC705 and others, invariably no alpha toxin production was noted under the given in vitro conditions, while others, such as CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15 or CC96 secreted variable or high levels of alpha toxin. There was no correlation between alpha toxin yield and clinical course of the disease, or between alpha toxin yield and host species. PMID:24940872

  16. The Staphylococcus aureus lineage-specific markers collagen adhesin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 distinguish multilocus sequence typing clonal complexes within spa clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Sebastian, Silvie; Welling, Maaike A; Beisser, Patrick S; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2009-10-01

    Spa typing/based upon repeat pattern (BURP) sometimes cannot differentiate multilocus sequence typing (MLST) clonal complexes (CCs) within spa-CCs. It has been observed previously that virulence factors, such as collagen adhesin (CNA) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), are associated with certain Staphylococcus aureus lineages. Analysis of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus by spa typing/BURP and detection of CNA and TSST-1 observed an association between CNA and MLST CC1, 12, 22, 30, 45, 51, and 239 and between TSST-1 and MLST CC30. In spa-CC 012, associated with MLST CC7, CC15, and CC30, MLST CC30 could be distinguished from MLST CC7 and CC15 with CNA and TSST-1 as lineage-specific markers. Lineage-specific markers can overcome clustering of nonrelated MLST CCs into 1 spa-CC. PMID:19748421

  17. Locally Confined Clonal Complexes of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Two Buruli Ulcer Endemic Regions of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Sarah; Minyem, Jacques C.; Um Boock, Alphonse; Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre Franklin; Junghanss, Thomas; Brites, Daniela; Harris, Simon R.; Parkhill, Julian; Pluschke, Gerd; Lamelas Cabello, Araceli

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of the necrotizing skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU), which has been reported from over 30 countries worldwide. The majority of notified patients come from West African countries, such as Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Benin and Cameroon. All clinical isolates of M. ulcerans from these countries are closely related and their genomes differ only in a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a molecular epidemiological study with clinical isolates from patients from two distinct BU endemic regions of Cameroon, the Nyong and the Mapé river basins. Whole genome sequencing of the M. ulcerans strains from these two BU endemic areas revealed the presence of two phylogenetically distinct clonal complexes. The strains from the Nyong river basin were genetically more diverse and less closely related to the M. ulcerans strain circulating in Ghana and Benin than the strains causing BU in the Mapé river basin. Conclusions Our comparative genomic analysis revealed that M. ulcerans clones diversify locally by the accumulation of SNPs. Case isolates coming from more recently emerging BU endemic areas, such as the Mapé river basin, may be less diverse than populations from longer standing disease foci, such as the Nyong river basin. Exchange of strains between distinct endemic areas seems to be rare and local clonal complexes can be easily distinguished by whole genome sequencing. PMID:26046531

  18. Clonal Structure and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Invasive Infections in Paediatric Patients from South Poland: Association between Age, spa Types, Clonal Complexes, and Genetic Markers.

    PubMed

    Ilczyszyn, Weronika M; Sabat, Artur J; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Szkarlat, Anna; Klepacka, Joanna; Sowa-Sierant, Iwona; Wasik, Barbara; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Buda, Aneta; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study was to examine clonal structure and genetic profile of invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from infants and children treated at the Jagiellonian University Children's Hospital of Krakow, Poland. The 107 invasive S. aureus isolates, collected between February 2012 and August 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis were performed to determine clonal distribution, diversity and gene content in regard to patients characteristics. In total, 107 isolates were recovered from 88 patients with clinical symptoms of invasive bacterial infection. The final set of 92 non-duplicate samples included 38 MRSA isolates. Additionally, a set of 54 S. aureus isolates collected during epidemiological screening was genotyped and analysed. There were 72 healthcare-associated (HCA) and 20 community-onset (CO) infection events caused by 33 and 5 MRSA isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates were affiliated with the major European clonal complexes CC5 (t003, spa-CC 002), CC45 (spa-CC 015), CC7 or CC15 (t084, t091, spa-CC 084). Two epidemic clones (CC5-MRSA-II or CC45-MRSA-IV) dominated among MRSA isolates, while MSSA population contained 15 different CCs. The epidemiological screening isolates belonged to similar genetic lineages as those collected from invasive infection cases. The HCA infection events, spa types t003, t2642 or CC5 were significantly associated with infections occurring in neonates and children under 5 years of age. Moreover, carriage of several genetic markers, including erm(A), sea (N315), egc-cluster, chp was significantly higher in isolates obtained from children in this age group. The spa types t091 and t008 were underrepresented among patients aged 5 years or younger, whereas spa type t008, CC8 and presence of splE was associated with infection in children aged 10 years or older. The HCA-MRSA strains were most frequently found in children under 5

  19. Clonal Structure and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Invasive Infections in Paediatric Patients from South Poland: Association between Age, spa Types, Clonal Complexes, and Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ilczyszyn, Weronika M.; Sabat, Artur J.; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Szkarlat, Anna; Klepacka, Joanna; Sowa-Sierant, Iwona; Wasik, Barbara; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Buda, Aneta; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study was to examine clonal structure and genetic profile of invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from infants and children treated at the Jagiellonian University Children’s Hospital of Krakow, Poland. The 107 invasive S. aureus isolates, collected between February 2012 and August 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis were performed to determine clonal distribution, diversity and gene content in regard to patients characteristics. In total, 107 isolates were recovered from 88 patients with clinical symptoms of invasive bacterial infection. The final set of 92 non-duplicate samples included 38 MRSA isolates. Additionally, a set of 54 S. aureus isolates collected during epidemiological screening was genotyped and analysed. There were 72 healthcare-associated (HCA) and 20 community-onset (CO) infection events caused by 33 and 5 MRSA isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates were affiliated with the major European clonal complexes CC5 (t003, spa-CC 002), CC45 (spa-CC 015), CC7 or CC15 (t084, t091, spa-CC 084). Two epidemic clones (CC5-MRSA-II or CC45-MRSA-IV) dominated among MRSA isolates, while MSSA population contained 15 different CCs. The epidemiological screening isolates belonged to similar genetic lineages as those collected from invasive infection cases. The HCA infection events, spa types t003, t2642 or CC5 were significantly associated with infections occurring in neonates and children under 5 years of age. Moreover, carriage of several genetic markers, including erm(A), sea (N315), egc-cluster, chp was significantly higher in isolates obtained from children in this age group. The spa types t091 and t008 were underrepresented among patients aged 5 years or younger, whereas spa type t008, CC8 and presence of splE was associated with infection in children aged 10 years or older. The HCA-MRSA strains were most frequently found in children under 5

  20. Sequence Type 4821 Clonal Complex Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis in China, 1978–2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bingqing; Xu, Zheng; Du, Pengcheng; Xu, Li; Sun, Xiaofang; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains belonging to sequence type 4821 clonal complex (CC4821), a hyperinvasive lineage first identified for serogroup C in 2003, have been increasingly isolated in China. We characterized the outer membrane protein genes of 48 serogroup B and 214 serogroup C strains belonging to CC4821 and analyzed the genomic sequences of 22 strains. Four serogroup B strains had porin A (i.e., PorA), PorB, and ferric enterobactin transport (i.e., FetA) genotypes identical to those for serogroup C. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomic sequences showed that the 22 CC4821 strains from patients and healthy carriers were unevenly clustered into 2 closely related groups; each group contained serogroup B and C strains. Serogroup B strains appeared variable at the capsule locus, and several recombination events had occurred at uncertain breakpoints. These findings suggest that CC4821 serogroup C N. meningitidis is the probable origin of highly pathogenic CC4821 serogroup B strains. PMID:25989189

  1. Differentiation of clonal complex 59 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Pearson, Julie C; Tan, Hui-Leen; Christiansen, Keryn J; O'Brien, Frances G

    2010-05-01

    Clonal complex 59 (CC59) community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains were characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, diagnostic DNA microarrays, and PCRs targeting staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Six distinct groups within CC59 were characterized. At least seven different variants of SCCmec elements were identified (IVa [2B], IVb [2B], IVd [2B], IV variant [2B], IVa [2B&5], V variant [5C2], and V [5C2&5]). (The structural type is indicated by a Roman numeral, with a lowercase letter indicating the subtype, and the ccr complex and the mec complex are indicated by an Arabic numeral and an uppercase letter, respectively. Where there is an extra ccr element, this is indicated by "&" and an Arabic numeral designating the ccr type.) The first group is similar to the American sequence type 59 (ST59) MRSA-IV CA-MRSA strain USA1000. The second group includes a PVL-negative ST87 strain with an SCCmec element of subtype IVb (2B). The third group comprises PVL-variable ST59 MRSA-IV strains harboring multiple SCCmec IV subtypes. PVL-negative ST59 MRSA strains with multiple or composite SCCmec elements (IVa [2B&5]) form the fourth group. Group 5 corresponds to the internationally known "Taiwan clone," a PVL-positive strain with a variant SCCmec element (V [5C2&5]). This strain proved to be the most common CC59 MRSA strain isolated in Western Australia. Finally, group 6 encompasses the ST59 MRSA-V variant (5C2). The differentiation of CC59 into groups and strains indicates a rapid evolution and spread of SCCmec elements. Observed differences between groups of strains as well as intrastrain variability within a group facilitate the tracing of their spread. PMID:20211891

  2. Population structure of hyperinvasive serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by multilocus boxB sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    Rakov, Alexey V.; Ubukata, Kimiko; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2011-01-01

    At least four outbreaks of invasive disease caused by serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae have occurred in the United States over the past two decades. We studied the population structure of this clonal complex using a sample of 203 outbreak and surveillance isolates that were collected over 22 years from 34 US states and eight other countries. Conventional multilocus sequence typing identified five types and distinguished a single outbreak from the others. To improve typing resolution, multilocus boxB sequence typing (MLBT) was developed from 10 variable boxB minisatellite loci. MLBT identified 86 types and distinguished between each of the four outbreaks. Diversity across boxB loci tended to be positively correlated with repeat array size and, overall, best fit the infinite alleles mutation model. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium was strong, but pairwise disequilibrium decreased with the physical distance between loci and was strongest in one large region of the chromosome, indicating recent recombinations. Two major clusters were identified in the sample, and they were differentiated geographically, as western and more easterly US clusters, and temporally, as clusters that predominated before and after the licensure of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The diversity and linkage disequilibrium within these two clusters also differed, suggesting different population dynamics. MLBT revealed hidden aspects of the population structure of these hyperinvasive pneumococci, and it may provide a useful adjunct tool for outbreak investigations, surveillance, and population genetics studies of other pneumococcal clonal complexes. PMID:21888992

  3. Spreading of AbaR-type genomic islands in multidrug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii strains belonging to different clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Stietz, María Silvina; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Jeric, Paola; Limansky, Adriana S; Márquez, Carolina; Bello, Helia; Catalano, Mariana; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of AbaR-type genomic island in multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) strains circulating in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile, we studied 51 MDRAb isolates recovered from several hospitals over 30 years. AbaR-type genomic resistance islands were found in 36 MDRAb isolates since 1986 till now. MLST technique allowed us to identify the presence of four different Clonal Complexes (109, 104, 119, 113) among the positive AbaR-type island positive strains. This is the first description of AbaR-type islands in the CC104 and CC113 that are the most widespread Clonal Complexes in Argentina. In addition, PCR mapping exposed different arrays to those previously described, evidencing the plasticity of this island. Our results evidence a widespread distribution of the AbaR-type genomic islands along the time in the MDRAb population, including the epidemic global clone 1 (GC1) as well as different clonal complexes to those already described in the literature. PMID:23397241

  4. Multi-object spectroscopy data reduction: the AF2+WYFFOS pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínquez Palmero, Lilian; Jackson, Richard; Molaeinezhad, Alireza; Fariña, Cecilia; Balcells, Marc; Benn, Chris R.

    2014-08-01

    The scientific productivity of complex instrumentation strongly depends on the availability of data-reduction pipelines. In the case of AF2+WYFFOS, the multi-object one-degree field-of-view fibre-fed spectrograph at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT), the full scientific exploitation of the data has often been slowed down because of the non-availability of a pipeline. A dedicated pipeline has been developed to overcome this. Running in IDL, it performs full reduction of AF2+WYFFOS data: fibre-to-fibre sensitivity corrections, fibre tracing, wavelength calibration, optimal extraction, sky subtraction.

  5. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect the major clonal complexes of Streptococcus suis relevant to human infection.

    PubMed

    Hatrongjit, Rujirat; Kerdsin, Anusak; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Oishi, Kazunori; Akeda, Yukihiro

    2016-05-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered a reliable method for providing insight into the Streptococcus suis population structure, clonal relationships and the potential of particular clones to cause disease. Indeed, MLST has revealed the presence of several clonal complexes (CCs) within the Streptococcus suis population. However, the method is costly, time-consuming and difficult to use for screening large numbers of isolates. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify Streptococcus suis CCs that are relevant to human infections. The multiplex PCR assay was capable of simultaneously distinguishing CC1, CC25, CC28, CC104, CC221/234 and CC233/379, which are related to human infections in Thailand, in a single reaction. The multiplex PCR assay is useful for low-cost screening of large numbers of isolates with rapid analytical capacity and could be utilized in most laboratories. PMID:26932590

  6. Oropharyngeal Carriage of Meningococcus in Portugal by Group and Clonal Complex 6 Years After Adolescent Vaccine Campaign.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Christensen, Hannah; Giles, Jessica; Ferreira, Muriel; Sikora, Paulina; Madanelo, Ines; Lucidarme, Jay; Januário, Luis; Finn, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Portugal introduced (2+1) conjugate Meningococcal group C vaccine in 2006 with high coverage catch up to 18 years and has given only 1 dose at 1 year since 2012. Among 601 student oropharyngeal swabs, meningococcal carriage rate was 13.3% (A-0%, B-5.3%, C-0.3%, W-0.2%, X-0.2% and Y-1.7%). C and W strains were of potentially disease-causing clonal complexes (cc) but not the hyperinvasive cc11. PMID:26222062

  7. Population-based epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: clonal complex 30 genotype is associated with mortality.

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Eskesen, A N; Aamot, H V; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) are associated with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. The impact of specific S. aureus genotypes on outcome is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of SABSI, with a special emphasis on the impact of bacterial clonal lineage on mortality. We conducted a 3-year population-based prospective study between 2011 and 2014, including 303 consecutive adult patients. Clinical data were obtained from interviews and medical records. S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarrays. The incidence rate of SABSI was 27.6 per 100,000 inhabitants [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.6-31.0]. The median age of the patients was 71 years (interquartile range 56-81 years) and 61.4 % were male. Most SABSI (70.6 %) occurred in hospitals or associated to healthcare, and 34.1 % of these were associated with intravascular catheters. Only five (1.6 %) SABSI were caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The 30-day case fatality rate was 20.8 % (95 % CI 16.6-25.7). S. aureus clonal complex 30 [hazard ratio (HR) 3.9; 95 % CI 1.8-8.5, p = 0.001], unknown focus of infection (HR 4.5; 95 % CI 1.9-10.8, p = 0.001) and respiratory tract infection (HR 12.7; 95 % CI 4.6-34.6, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality in a Cox regression analysis after adjusting for age, sex and underlying conditions. A high proportion of potential preventable SABSI calls for effective infection control measures. S. aureus clonal complex 30 genotype was associated with mortality in patients with bloodstream infections. The genetic basis underlying this association remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26873380

  8. Spatiotemporal Co-existence of Two Mycobacterium ulcerans Clonal Complexes in the Offin River Valley of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Araceli; Ampah, Kobina Assan; Aboagye, Samuel; Kerber, Sarah; Danso, Emelia; Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Asare, Prince; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Röltgen, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, comparative genome sequence analysis of African Mycobacterium ulcerans strains isolated from Buruli ulcer (BU) lesion specimen has revealed a very limited genetic diversity of closely related isolates and a striking association between genotype and geographical origin of the patients. Here, we compared whole genome sequences of five M. ulcerans strains isolated in 2004 or 2013 from BU lesions of four residents of the Offin river valley with 48 strains isolated between 2002 and 2005 from BU lesions of individuals residing in the Densu river valley of Ghana. While all M. ulcerans isolates from the Densu river valley belonged to the same clonal complex, members of two distinct clonal complexes were found in the Offin river valley over space and time. The Offin strains were closely related to genotypes from either the Densu region or from the Asante Akim North district of Ghana. These results point towards an occasional involvement of a mobile reservoir in the transmission of M. ulcerans, enabling the spread of bacteria across different regions. PMID:27434064

  9. Spatiotemporal Co-existence of Two Mycobacterium ulcerans Clonal Complexes in the Offin River Valley of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Aboagye, Samuel; Kerber, Sarah; Danso, Emelia; Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Asare, Prince; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R.; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Röltgen, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, comparative genome sequence analysis of African Mycobacterium ulcerans strains isolated from Buruli ulcer (BU) lesion specimen has revealed a very limited genetic diversity of closely related isolates and a striking association between genotype and geographical origin of the patients. Here, we compared whole genome sequences of five M. ulcerans strains isolated in 2004 or 2013 from BU lesions of four residents of the Offin river valley with 48 strains isolated between 2002 and 2005 from BU lesions of individuals residing in the Densu river valley of Ghana. While all M. ulcerans isolates from the Densu river valley belonged to the same clonal complex, members of two distinct clonal complexes were found in the Offin river valley over space and time. The Offin strains were closely related to genotypes from either the Densu region or from the Asante Akim North district of Ghana. These results point towards an occasional involvement of a mobile reservoir in the transmission of M. ulcerans, enabling the spread of bacteria across different regions. PMID:27434064

  10. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  11. Complex spatial clonal structure in the macroalgae Fucus radicans with both sexual and asexual recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ardehed, Angelica; Johansson, Daniel; Schagerström, Ellen; Kautsky, Lena; Johannesson, Kerstin; Pereyra, Ricardo T

    2015-10-01

    In dioecious species with both sexual and asexual reproduction, the spatial distribution of individual clones affects the potential for sexual reproduction and local adaptation. The seaweed Fucus radicans, endemic to the Baltic Sea, has separate sexes, but new attached thalli may also form asexually. We mapped the spatial distribution of clones (multilocus genotypes, MLGs) over macrogeographic (>500 km) and microgeographic (<100 m) scales in the Baltic Sea to assess the relationship between clonal spatial structure, sexual recruitment, and the potential for natural selection. Sexual recruitment was predominant in some areas, while in others asexual recruitment dominated. Where clones of both sexes were locally intermingled, sexual recruitment was nevertheless low. In some highly clonal populations, the sex ratio was strongly skewed due to dominance of one or a few clones of the same sex. The two largest clones (one female and one male) were distributed over 100-550 km of coast and accompanied by small and local MLGs formed by somatic mutations and differing by 1-2 mutations from the large clones. Rare sexual events, occasional long-distance migration, and somatic mutations contribute new genotypic variation potentially available to natural selection. However, dominance of a few very large (and presumably old) clones over extensive spatial and temporal scales suggested that either these have superior traits or natural selection has only been marginally involved in the structuring of genotypes. PMID:26664675

  12. Clonal Complex 17 Group B Streptococcus strains causing invasive disease in neonates and adults originate from the same genetic pool

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ramoutar, Erin; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Melano, Roberto G.; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of group B Streptococcus (GBS) neonatal disease, particularly late-onset disease, is associated with strains of serotype III, clonal complex (CC) 17. CC17 strains also cause invasive infections in adults. Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships of isolates recovered from neonatal and adult CC17 invasive infections. We performed whole-genome-based phylogenetic analysis of 93 temporally and geographically matched CC17 strains isolated from both neonatal and adult invasive infections in the metropolitan region of Toronto/Peel, Canada. We also mined the whole-genome data to reveal mobile genetic elements carrying antimicrobial resistance genes. We discovered that CC17 GBS strains causing neonatal and adult invasive disease are interspersed and cluster tightly in a phylogenetic tree, signifying that they are derived from the same genetic pool. We identified limited variation due to recombination in the core CC17 genome. We describe that loss of Pilus Island 1 and acquisition of different mobile genetic elements carrying determinants of antimicrobial resistance contribute to CC17 genetic diversity. Acquisition of some of these mobile genetic elements appears to correlate with clonal expansion of the strains that possess them. Our results provide a genome-wide portrait of the population structure and evolution of a major disease-causing clone of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:26843175

  13. Teleost fish mount complex clonal IgM and IgT responses in spleen upon systemic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Jouneau, Luc; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Bouchez, Olivier; Giudicelli, Véronique; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Quillet, Edwige; Benmansour, Abdenour; Cazals, Frédéric; Six, Adrien; Fillatreau, Simon; Sunyer, Oriol; Boudinot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Upon infection, B-lymphocytes expressing antibodies specific for the intruding pathogen develop clonal responses triggered by pathogen recognition via the B-cell receptor. The constant region of antibodies produced by such responding clones dictates their functional properties. In teleost fish, the clonal structure of B-cell responses and the respective contribution of the three isotypes IgM, IgD and IgT remain unknown. The expression of IgM and IgT are mutually exclusive, leading to the existence of two B-cell subsets expressing either both IgM and IgD or only IgT. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the variable heavy chain (VH) domain repertoires of the IgM, IgD and IgT in spleen of homozygous isogenic rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) before, and after challenge with a rhabdovirus, the Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV), using CDR3-length spectratyping and pyrosequencing of immunoglobulin (Ig) transcripts. In healthy fish, we observed distinct repertoires for IgM, IgD and IgT, respectively, with a few amplified μ and τ junctions, suggesting the presence of IgM- and IgT-secreting cells in the spleen. In infected animals, we detected complex and highly diverse IgM responses involving all VH subgroups, and dominated by a few large public and private clones. A lower number of robust clonal responses involving only a few VH were detected for the mucosal IgT, indicating that both IgM(+) and IgT(+) spleen B cells responded to systemic infection but at different degrees. In contrast, the IgD response to the infection was faint. Although fish IgD and IgT present different structural features and evolutionary origin compared to mammalian IgD and IgA, respectively, their implication in the B-cell response evokes these mouse and human counterparts. Thus, it appears that the general properties of antibody responses were already in place in common ancestors of fish and mammals, and were globally conserved during evolution with possible functional

  14. Teleost Fish Mount Complex Clonal IgM and IgT Responses in Spleen upon Systemic Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rosario; Jouneau, Luc; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Bouchez, Olivier; Giudicelli, Véronique; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Quillet, Edwige; Benmansour, Abdenour; Cazals, Frédéric; Six, Adrien; Fillatreau, Simon; Sunyer, Oriol; Boudinot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Upon infection, B-lymphocytes expressing antibodies specific for the intruding pathogen develop clonal responses triggered by pathogen recognition via the B-cell receptor. The constant region of antibodies produced by such responding clones dictates their functional properties. In teleost fish, the clonal structure of B-cell responses and the respective contribution of the three isotypes IgM, IgD and IgT remain unknown. The expression of IgM and IgT are mutually exclusive, leading to the existence of two B-cell subsets expressing either both IgM and IgD or only IgT. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the variable heavy chain (VH) domain repertoires of the IgM, IgD and IgT in spleen of homozygous isogenic rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) before, and after challenge with a rhabdovirus, the Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV), using CDR3-length spectratyping and pyrosequencing of immunoglobulin (Ig) transcripts. In healthy fish, we observed distinct repertoires for IgM, IgD and IgT, respectively, with a few amplified μ and τ junctions, suggesting the presence of IgM- and IgT-secreting cells in the spleen. In infected animals, we detected complex and highly diverse IgM responses involving all VH subgroups, and dominated by a few large public and private clones. A lower number of robust clonal responses involving only a few VH were detected for the mucosal IgT, indicating that both IgM+ and IgT+ spleen B cells responded to systemic infection but at different degrees. In contrast, the IgD response to the infection was faint. Although fish IgD and IgT present different structural features and evolutionary origin compared to mammalian IgD and IgA, respectively, their implication in the B-cell response evokes these mouse and human counterparts. Thus, it appears that the general properties of antibody responses were already in place in common ancestors of fish and mammals, and were globally conserved during evolution with possible functional

  15. Fine-scale temporal and spatial variation of taxon and clonal structure in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex in heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyclical parthenogenetic water fleas of the genus Daphnia have become a prominent model organism in ecology and evolution. In the past, analyses of their population structure have been limited by the prevailing use of allozyme markers, which in general do not allow for the distinction of individual clones. In this study, we used 10 microsatellite markers to track changes in the taxonomic and clonal composition of Daphnia populations, and traced the abundance of the most common clones in two European reservoirs. One of the localities was inhabited by a single species of the Daphnia longispina complex (D. galeata), the other by two parental species (D. galeata and D. longispina) and their interspecific hybrids. The study took place during the transition from summer stratification to autumn mixing, representing a period of major environmental change within lake habitats. Results In both reservoirs, we observed temporal (generation-to-generation) and spatial (along the heterogeneous reservoir environment) changes in Daphnia community structure. In the single-species reservoir, the clonal diversity of D. galeata increased with time, as a few dominant clones were replaced by a higher number of less common clones. A loss in selective advantage for the dominant clones may have been due to gradual changes in the environment, or due to selection acting in a negative frequency-dependent manner. In the multispecies reservoir, there were no apparent temporal trends in clonal diversity but we observed significantly lower clonal diversity in the interspecific hybrids than in the coexisting parental species, supporting the existence of reproductive barriers between the parental genomes. Conclusions Our study, tracing clonal lineages of Daphnia in time and space by the fine-resolution markers, contributes to the understanding of how clonal reproduction impacts community structure in cyclically parthenogenetic organisms. PMID:22280487

  16. Infection of Melissococcus plutonius clonal complex 12 strain in European honeybee larvae is essentially confined to the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    TAKAMATSU, Daisuke; SATO, Masumi; YOSHIYAMA, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Melissococcus plutonius is an important pathogen that causes European foulbrood (EFB) in honeybee larvae. Recently, we discovered a group of M. plutonius strains that are phenotypically and genetically distinct from other strains. These strains belong to clonal complex (CC) 12, as determined by multilocus sequence typing analysis, and show atypical cultural and biochemical characteristics in vitro compared with strains of other CCs tested. Although EFB is considered to be a purely intestinal infection according to early studies, it is unknown whether the recently found CC12 strains cause EFB by the same pathomechanism. In this study, to obtain a better understanding of EFB, we infected European honeybee (Apis mellifera) larvae per os with a well-characterized CC12 strain, DAT561, and analyzed the larvae histopathologically. Ingested DAT561 was mainly localized in the midgut lumen surrounded by the peritrophic matrix (PM) in the larvae. In badly affected larvae, the PM and midgut epithelial cells degenerated, and some bacterial cells were detected outside of the midgut. However, they did not proliferate in the deep tissues actively. By immunohistochemical analysis, the PM was stained with anti-M. plutonius serum in most of the DAT561-infected larvae. In some larvae, luminal surfaces of the PM were more strongly stained than the inside. These results suggest that infection of CC12 strain in honeybee larvae is essentially confined to the intestine. Moreover, our results imply the presence of M. plutonius-derived substances diffusing into the larval tissues in the course of infection. PMID:26256232

  17. Time-Scaled Evolutionary Analysis of the Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, C. L.; McAdam, P. R.; van Bunnik, B. A. D.; Girvan, E. K.; Edwards, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. R.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) is associated with disease in humans and livestock, and its origins and transmission have generated considerable interest. We performed a time-scaled phylogenetic analysis of CC398, including sequenced isolates from the United Kingdom (Scotland), along with publicly available genomes. Using state-of-the-art methods for mapping traits onto phylogenies, we quantified transitions between host species to identify sink and source populations for CC398 and employed a novel approach to investigate the gain and loss of antibiotic resistance in CC398 over time. We identified distinct human- and livestock-associated CC398 clades and observed multiple transmissions of CC398 from livestock to humans and between countries, lending quantitative support to previous reports. Of note, we identified a subclade within the livestock-associated clade comprised of isolates from hospital environments and newborn babies, suggesting that livestock-associated CC398 is capable of onward transmission in hospitals. In addition, our analysis revealed significant differences in the dynamics of resistance to methicillin and tetracycline related to contrasting historical patterns of antibiotic usage between the livestock industry and human medicine. We also identified significant differences in patterns of gain and loss of different tetracycline resistance determinants, which we ascribe to epistatic interactions between the resistance genes and/or differences in the modes of inheritance of the resistance determinants. PMID:25239891

  18. Time-Scaled Evolutionary Analysis of the Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398.

    PubMed

    Ward, M J; Gibbons, C L; McAdam, P R; van Bunnik, B A D; Girvan, E K; Edwards, G F; Fitzgerald, J R; Woolhouse, M E J

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) is associated with disease in humans and livestock, and its origins and transmission have generated considerable interest. We performed a time-scaled phylogenetic analysis of CC398, including sequenced isolates from the United Kingdom (Scotland), along with publicly available genomes. Using state-of-the-art methods for mapping traits onto phylogenies, we quantified transitions between host species to identify sink and source populations for CC398 and employed a novel approach to investigate the gain and loss of antibiotic resistance in CC398 over time. We identified distinct human- and livestock-associated CC398 clades and observed multiple transmissions of CC398 from livestock to humans and between countries, lending quantitative support to previous reports. Of note, we identified a subclade within the livestock-associated clade comprised of isolates from hospital environments and newborn babies, suggesting that livestock-associated CC398 is capable of onward transmission in hospitals. In addition, our analysis revealed significant differences in the dynamics of resistance to methicillin and tetracycline related to contrasting historical patterns of antibiotic usage between the livestock industry and human medicine. We also identified significant differences in patterns of gain and loss of different tetracycline resistance determinants, which we ascribe to epistatic interactions between the resistance genes and/or differences in the modes of inheritance of the resistance determinants. PMID:25239891

  19. Particular Distribution of Enterobacter cloacae Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection within Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on biochemical properties, Enterobacter cloacae represents a large complex of at least 13 variant species, subspecies, and genotypes that progressively identified as the most species causing hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance between phylogenetically related strains within the E. cloacae complex and the frequency of urinary tract infection caused by them. Methods: A 268-bp fragment was obtained from hsp60 gene for 50 clinical E. cloacae isolates from urine cultures of inpatients that admitted to six hospitals in Tehran, Iran during December 2012 to November 2013. The 107 nucleotide sequences were analyzed and the evolutionary distances of sequences were computed and neighbor-joining tree was calculated. Results: It showed that all of the genetic clusters have not an equal involvement in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. Three superior clusters were found, together representing more than two third (80%) of the isolates (cluster VI with 25 members; clusters III and VIII with 9 and 6 members, respectively) and some genetic clusters were absent (IV, X, XII, and xiii), some of which are supposed to be associated with plants and no human infection has been reported. Conclusions: This study, for the first time, reports the unequal contribution of E. cloacae complex subspecies and clusters in urinary tract infections in Iran and together with studies from other countries suggest that the subspecies of E.hormaechei subsp. Oharae is the most prevalent E. cloacae complex subspecies regardless of country under study. PMID:26498349

  20. Studying clonal dynamics in response to cancer therapy using high-complexity barcoding.

    PubMed

    Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Ruddy, David A; Krishnamurthy Radhakrishna, Viveksagar; Caushi, Justina X; Zhao, Rui; Hims, Matthew M; Singh, Angad P; Kao, Iris; Rakiec, Daniel; Shaw, Pamela; Balak, Marissa; Raza, Alina; Ackley, Elizabeth; Keen, Nicholas; Schlabach, Michael R; Palmer, Michael; Leary, Rebecca J; Chiang, Derek Y; Sellers, William R; Michor, Franziska; Cooke, Vesselina G; Korn, Joshua M; Stegmeier, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Resistance to cancer therapies presents a significant clinical challenge. Recent studies have revealed intratumoral heterogeneity as a source of therapeutic resistance. However, it is unclear whether resistance is driven predominantly by pre-existing or de novo alterations, in part because of the resolution limits of next-generation sequencing. To address this, we developed a high-complexity barcode library, ClonTracer, which enables the high-resolution tracking of more than 1 million cancer cells under drug treatment. In two clinically relevant models, ClonTracer studies showed that the majority of resistant clones were part of small, pre-existing subpopulations that selectively escaped under therapeutic challenge. Moreover, the ClonTracer approach enabled quantitative assessment of the ability of combination treatments to suppress resistant clones. These findings suggest that resistant clones are present before treatment, which would make up-front therapeutic combinations that target non-overlapping resistance a preferred approach. Thus, ClonTracer barcoding may be a valuable tool for optimizing therapeutic regimens with the goal of curative combination therapies for cancer. PMID:25849130

  1. Sequence Analysis of 96 Genomic Regions Identifies Distinct Evolutionary Lineages within CC156, the Largest Streptococcus pneumoniae Clonal Complex in the MLST Database

    PubMed Central

    Moschioni, Monica; Lo Sapio, Morena; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Torricelli, Giulia; Guidotti, Silvia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Donati, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is based on the sequence of seven housekeeping gene fragments. The analysis of MLST allelic profiles by eBURST allows the grouping of genetically related strains into Clonal Complexes (CCs) including those genotypes with a common descent from a predicted ancestor. However, the increasing use of MLST to characterize S. pneumoniae strains has led to the identification of a large number of new Sequence Types (STs) causing the merger of formerly distinct lineages into larger CCs. An example of this is the CC156, displaying a high level of complexity and including strains with allelic profiles differing in all seven of the MLST loci, capsular type and the presence of the Pilus Islet-1 (PI-1). Detailed analysis of the CC156 indicates that the identification of new STs, such as ST4945, induced the merging of formerly distinct clonal complexes. In order to discriminate the strain diversity within CC156, a recently developed typing schema, 96-MLST, was used to analyse 66 strains representative of 41 different STs. Analysis of allelic profiles by hierarchical clustering and a minimum spanning tree identified ten genetically distinct evolutionary lineages. Similar results were obtained by phylogenetic analysis on the concatenated sequences with different methods. The identified lineages are homogenous in capsular type and PI-1 presence. ST4945 strains were unequivocally assigned to one of the lineages. In conclusion, the identification of new STs through an exhaustive analysis of pneumococcal strains from various laboratories has highlighted that potentially unrelated subgroups can be grouped into a single CC by eBURST. The analysis of additional loci, such as those included in the 96-MLST schema, will be necessary to accurately discriminate the clonal evolution of the pneumococcal population. PMID:23593373

  2. Reduced In Vitro Activity of Ceftaroline by Etest among Clonal Complex 239 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Strains from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Jenney, A. W. J.; Jeremiah, C. J.; Mirčeta, M.; Kandiah, J. P.; Holt, D. C.; Tong, S. Y. C.; Spelman, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 421 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were tested for ceftaroline susceptibility by Etest (bioMérieux). A multidrug resistant phenotype was found in 40.9%, and clonal complex 239 (CC239) was found in 33.5%. Ceftaroline nonsusceptibility (MIC, >1.0 μg/ml) was 16.9% overall. Nonsusceptibility was significantly higher in CC239 (41.1%, 58/141) and in isolates with a multidrug resistant phenotype (35.5%, 61/172) compared with comparators (P < 0.0001). Nonsusceptibility of common multidrug resistant MRSA clones limits the empirical use of ceftaroline for these infections. PMID:26392488

  3. Reduced In Vitro Activity of Ceftaroline by Etest among Clonal Complex 239 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Strains from Australia.

    PubMed

    Abbott, I J; Jenney, A W J; Jeremiah, C J; Mirčeta, M; Kandiah, J P; Holt, D C; Tong, S Y C; Spelman, D W

    2015-12-01

    A total of 421 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were tested for ceftaroline susceptibility by Etest (bioMérieux). A multidrug resistant phenotype was found in 40.9%, and clonal complex 239 (CC239) was found in 33.5%. Ceftaroline nonsusceptibility (MIC, >1.0 μg/ml) was 16.9% overall. Nonsusceptibility was significantly higher in CC239 (41.1%, 58/141) and in isolates with a multidrug resistant phenotype (35.5%, 61/172) compared with comparators (P < 0.0001). Nonsusceptibility of common multidrug resistant MRSA clones limits the empirical use of ceftaroline for these infections. PMID:26392488

  4. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Blom, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation. PMID:25795671

  5. [Factor AF2--the 4th column in tumor therapy. Documentation No.22].

    PubMed

    Kast, A; Hauser, S P

    1990-04-17

    Factor AF2 is an extract from the spleen and liver of sheep embryos and lambs. The product contains biotechnologically produced, chromatographically uniform, molecularly standardized polypeptides, glycopeptides, glycolipids and nucleotides, deproteinized and free of pyrogens'. Factor AF2 is intended mainly for use in 'supportive antitumour therapy', as a 'biological antiemetic and analgesic'. The proposed duration of treatment is usually more than six months. The dosage varies considerably according to the indication. The average daily costs are, therefore, between DM 4.- (prevention of recurrence) and DM 107.- (adjuvant to chemotherapy). Allergic reactions have been reported in 'rare cases'. Factor AF2 was developed in the forties by Guarnieri in Rome. Since 1984, Factor AF2 is 'biotechnologically' produced and as a 'biological response modifier' (BRM) in the oncotherapy distributed by Biosyn Arzneimittel GmbH, Stuttgart. Dr. rer. nat. T. Stiefel and Dr. rer. nat. H. Porcher are the representatives of Biosyn Arzneimittel GmbH. In the past, both worked with Vitorgan Arzneimittel GmbH (cytoplasmatic therapy according to Theurer). It is claimed that Factor AF2 contains 'immunomodulating and immunorestorative biomolecules' assignable to the BRM group. Terms and investigations from current immunological research are applied to Factor AF2. No preclinical investigations are available which demonstrate any cytostatic effect of Factor AF2. In vivo, no effects were observed on the transplanted meth-A-sarcoma in mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2349412

  6. Distinct binding determinants for 9-cis retinoic acid are located within AF-2 of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, B F; Allenby, G; Janocha, R; Kazmer, S; Speck, J; Sturzenbecker, L J; Abarzúa, P; Levin, A A; Grippo, J F

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids exert their physiological action by interacting with two families of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which regulate gene expression by forming transcriptionally active heterodimeric RAR/RXR or homodimeric RXR/RXR complexes on DNA. Retinoid receptor activity resides in several regions, including the DNA and ligand binding domains, a dimerization interface, and both a ligand-independent (AF-1) and a ligand-dependent (AF-2) transactivation function. While 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) alone is the cognate ligand for the RXRs, both 9-cis RA and all-trans RA (t-RA) compete for binding with high affinity to the RARs. This latter observation suggested to us that the two isomers may interact with a common binding site. Here we report that RAR alpha has two distinct but overlapping binding sites for 9-cis RA and t-RA. Truncation of a human RAR alpha to 419 amino acids yields a receptor that binds both t-RA and 9-cis RA with high affinity, but truncation to amino acid 404 yields a mutant receptor that binds only t-RA with high affinity. Remarkably, this region also defines a C-terminal boundary for AF-2, as addition of amino acids 405 to 419 restores receptor-mediated gene activity to a truncated human RAR alpha lacking this region. It is interesting to speculate that binding of retinoid stereoisomers to unique sites within an RAR may function with AF-2 to cause differential activation of retinoid-responsive gene pathways. Images PMID:8139538

  7. INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

    2013-12-10

    Spectra from the “at-line” spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the “odd” shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it “odd” shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

  8. Low strain, long life creep fatigue of AF2-1DA and INCO 718

    SciTech Connect

    Thakker, A.B.; Cowles, B.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two aircraft turbine disk alloys, GATORIZED AF2-DA and INCO 718 were evaluated for their low strain long life creep-fatigue behavior. Static (tensile and creep rupture) and cyclic properties of both alloys were characterized. The cntrolled strain LCF tests were conducted at 760 C (1400 F) and 649 C (1200 F) for AF2-1DA and INCO 718, respectively. Hold times were varied for tensile, compressive and tensile/compressive strain dwell (relaxation) tests. Stress (creep) hold behavior of AF2-1DA was also evaluated. Generally, INCO 718 exhibited more pronounced reduction in cyclic life due to hold than AF2-1DA. The percent reduction in life for both alloys for strain dwell tests was greater at low strain ranges (longer life regime). Changing hold time from 0 to 0.5, 2.0 and 15.0 min. resulted in corresponding reductions in life. The continuous cycle and cyclic/dwell initiation failure mechanism was predominantly transgranular for AF2-1DA and intergranular for INCO 718.

  9. Low strain, long life creep fatigue of AF2-1DA and INCO 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakker, A. B.; Cowles, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two aircraft turbine disk alloys, GATORIZED AF2-DA and INCO 718 were evaluated for their low strain long life creep-fatigue behavior. Static (tensile and creep rupture) and cyclic properties of both alloys were characterized. The cntrolled strain LCF tests were conducted at 760 C (1400 F) and 649 C (1200 F) for AF2-1DA and INCO 718, respectively. Hold times were varied for tensile, compressive and tensile/compressive strain dwell (relaxation) tests. Stress (creep) hold behavior of AF2-1DA was also evaluated. Generally, INCO 718 exhibited more pronounced reduction in cyclic life due to hold than AF2-1DA. The percent reduction in life for both alloys for strain dwell tests was greater at low strain ranges (longer life regime). Changing hold time from 0 to 0.5, 2.0 and 15.0 min. resulted in corresponding reductions in life. The continuous cycle and cyclic/dwell initiation failure mechanism was predominantly transgranular for AF2-1DA and intergranular for INCO 718.

  10. Cloning and characterization of two duplicated interleukin-17A/F2 genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): Transcripts expression and bioactivity of recombinant IL-17A/F2.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Yu, Juhua; Li, Jianlin; Tang, Yongkai; Yu, Fan; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) plays an important role in inflammation and host defense in mammals. In this study, we identified two duplicated IL-17A/F2 genes in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) (ccIL-17A/F2a and ccIL-17A/F2b), putative encoded proteins contain 140 amino acids (aa) with conserved IL-17 family motifs. Expression analysis revealed high constitutive expression of ccIL-17A/F2s in mucosal tissues, including gill, skin and intestine, their expression could be induced by Aeromonas hydrophila, suggesting a potential role in mucosal immunity. Recombinant ccIL-17A/F2a protein (rccIL-17A/F2a) produced in Escherichia coli could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β) and the antimicrobial peptides S100A1, S100A10a and S100A10b in the primary kidney in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Above findings suggest that ccIL-17A/F2 plays an important role in both proinflammatory and innate immunity. Two duplicated ccIL-17A/F2s showed different expression level with ccIL-17A/F2a higher than b, comparison of two 5' regulatory regions indicated the length from anticipated promoter to transcriptional start site (TSS) and putative transcription factor binding site (TFBS) were different. Promoter activity of ccIL-17A/F2a was 2.5 times of ccIL-17A/F2b which consistent with expression results of two genes. These suggest mutations in 5'regulatory region contributed to the differentiation of duplicated genes. To our knowledge, this is the first report to analyze 5'regulatory region of piscine IL-17 family genes. PMID:26921542

  11. What Is the Origin of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398 Isolates from Humans without Livestock Contact? An Epidemiological and Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lekkerkerk, W S N; van Wamel, W J B; Snijders, S V; Willems, R J; van Duijkeren, E; Broens, E M; Wagenaar, J A; Lindsay, J A; Vos, M C

    2015-06-01

    Fifteen percent of all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) human carriers detected in The Netherlands had not been in direct contact with pigs or veal calves. To ensure low MRSA prevalence, it is important to investigate the likely origin of this MRSA of unknown origin (MUO). Recently, it was shown that CC398 strains originating from humans and animals differ in the presence of specific mobile genetic elements (MGEs). We hypothesized that determining these specific MGEs in MUO isolates and comparing them with a set of CC398 isolates of various known origin might provide clues to their origin. MUO CC398 isolates were compared to MRSA CC398 isolates obtained from humans with known risk factors, a MRSA CC398 outbreak isolate, livestock associated (LA) MRSA CC398 isolates from pigs, horses, chickens, and veal calves, and five methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) CC398 isolates of known human origin. All strains were spa typed, and the presence or absence of, scn, chp, φ3 int, φ6 int, φ7 int, rep7, rep27, and cadDX was determined by PCRs. The MRSA CC398 in humans, MUO, or MRSA of known origin (MKO) resembled MRSA CC398 as found in pigs and not MSSA CC398 as found in humans. The distinct human MSSA CC398 spa type, t571, was not present among our MRSA CC398 strains; MRSA CC398 was tetracycline resistant and carried no φ3 bacteriophage with scn and chp. We showed by simple PCR means that human MUO CC398 carriers carried MRSA from livestock origin, suggestive of indirect transmission. Although the exact transmission route remains unknown, direct human-to-human transmission remains a possibility as well. PMID:25809975

  12. Defining Clonal Color in Fluorescent Multi-Clonal Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juwell W.; Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Runnels, Judith M.; Tsao, Hensin; Lin, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal heterogeneity and selection underpin many biological processes including development and tumor progression. Combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in germline cells has proven its utility for tracking the formation and regeneration of different organ systems. Such cell populations encoded by combinatorial fluorescent proteins are also attractive tools for understanding clonal expansion and clonal competition in cancer. However, the assignment of clonal identity requires an analytical framework in which clonal markings can be parameterized and validated. Here we present a systematic and quantitative method for RGB analysis of fluorescent melanoma cancer clones. We then demonstrate refined clonal trackability of melanoma cells using this scheme. PMID:27073117

  13. Clonal reproduction in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305–E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest. PMID:26195774

  14. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nosocomial infections in a tertiary-care facility: emergence of new clonal complexes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Senok, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Al-Saedan, R; Somily, A

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continue to be reported. This study was carried out to characterize MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. MRSA isolates causing nosocomial infections (n = 117) obtained from 2009-2015 at a tertiary-care facility in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray (Alere Technologies, Jena, Germany). Fourteen clonal complexes (CC) were identified, with the most common being CC80 (n = 35), CC6 (n = 15), CC5 (n = 13) and CC22 (n = 12). With the exception of nine ST239 MRSA-III isolates, all others were of community-associated MRSA lineages. The following strains are identified for the first time in Saudi Arabia: ST8-MRSA-IV [PVL(+)/ACME(+)], USA300 (n = 1); ST72-MRSA-IV USA700 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-IV, [PVL(+)/edinA(+)], WA MRSA-121 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-V+SCCfus, WA MRSA-14/109 (n = 2), CC97-MRSA-IV, WA MRSA-54/63; CC2250/2277-MRSA-IV and WA MRSA-114. CC15-MRSA (n = 3) was identified for the first time in clinical infection in Saudi Arabia. None of the isolates harboured vancomycin resistance genes, while genes for resistance to mupirocin and quaternary ammonium compounds were found in one and nine isolates respectively. Fifty-seven isolates (48.7%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. While the staphylokinase (sak) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn) genes were present in over 95% of the isolates, only 37.6% had the chemotaxis-inhibiting protein (chp) gene. Increasing occurrence of community-acquired MRSA lineages plus emergence of pandemic and rare MRSA strains is occurring in our setting. Strict infection control practices are important to limit the dissemination of these MRSA strains. PMID:27621823

  15. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  16. MRSA Clonal Complex 22 Strains Harboring Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin (TSST-1) Are Endemic in the Primary Hospital in Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Abdelateef, Nahed; Elamreen, Farid Abu; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Pierard, Denis; Becker, Karsten; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in both community and healthcare-related settings worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the epidemiology of S. aureus and MRSA in Gaza is based on a single community-based carriage study. Here we describe a cross-sectional analysis of 215 clinical isolates collected from Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza during 2008 and 2012. Methods All isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing, and detection of genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1). Representative genotypes were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using VITEK2 and MicroScan. Results MRSA represented 56.3% of all S. aureus strains, and increased in frequency from 2008 (54.8%) to 2012 (58.4%). Aside from beta-lactams, resistance was observed to tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and fluoroquinolones. Molecular typing identified 35 spa types representing 17 MLST clonal complexes (CC), with spa 998 (Ridom t223, CC22) and spa 70 (Ridom t044, CC80) being the most prevalent. SCCmec types I, III, IV, V and VI were identified among MRSA isolates, while type II was not detected. PVL genes (lukF/S-PV) were detected in 40.0% of all isolates, while the TSST-1 gene (tst) was detected in 27.4% of all isolates, with surprisingly high frequency within CC22 (70.4%). Both PVL and TSST-1 genes were found in several isolates from 2012. Conclusions Molecular typing of clinical isolates from Gaza hospitals revealed unusually high prevalence of TSST-1 genes among CC22 MRSA, which is noteworthy given a recent community study describing widespread carriage of a CC22 MRSA clone known as the ‘Gaza strain’. While the latter did not address TSST-1, tst-positive spa 998 (Ridom t223) has been detected in several neighboring countries, and described as endemic in an Italian NICU, suggesting international spread of a

  17. Shifts in the Antibiotic Susceptibility, Serogroups, and Clonal Complexes of Neisseria meningitidis in Shanghai, China: A Time Trend Analysis of the Pre-Quinolone and Quinolone Eras

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zou, Ying; Wang, Gangyi; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Miao; Hu, Fupin; Qu, Di; Chen, Min; Wang, Minggui

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones have been used broadly since the end of the 1980s and have been recommended for Neisseria meningitidis prophylaxis since 2005 in China. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how N. meningitidis antimicrobial susceptibility, serogroup prevalence, and clonal complex (CC) prevalence shifted in association with the introduction and expanding use of quinolones in Shanghai, a region with a traditionally high incidence of invasive disease due to N. meningitidis. Methods and Findings A total of 374 N. meningitidis isolates collected by the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 1965 and 2013 were studied. Shifts in the serogroups and CCs were observed, from predominantly serogroup A CC5 (84%) in 1965–1973 to serogroup A CC1 (58%) in 1974–1985, then to serogroup C or B CC4821 (62%) in 2005–2013. The rates of ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility in N. meningitidis disease isolates increased from 0% in 1965–1985 to 84% (31/37) in 2005–2013 (p < 0.001). Among the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates, 87% (27/31) were assigned to either CC4821 (n = 20) or CC5 (n = 7). The two predominant ciprofloxacin-resistant clones were designated ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B and ChinaCC5-R14-A. The ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by a point mutation, and was present in 52% (16/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ChinaCC5-R14-A clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by horizontal gene transfer, and was found in 23% (7/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility rate was 47% (7/15) among isolates from asymptomatic carriers, and nonsusceptibility was associated with diverse multi-locus sequence typing profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. As detected after 2005, ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible strains were shared between some of the patients and their close contacts. A limitation of this study is that isolates

  18. Enhancing cancer clonality analysis with integrative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is understood that cancer is a clonal disease initiated by a single cell, and that metastasis, which is the spread of cancer from the primary site, is also initiated by a single cell. The seemingly natural capability of cancer to adapt dynamically in a Darwinian manner is a primary reason for therapeutic failures. Survival advantages may be induced by cancer therapies and also occur as a result of inherent cell and microenvironmental factors. The selected "more fit" clones outmatch their competition and then become dominant in the tumor via propagation of progeny. This clonal expansion leads to relapse, therapeutic resistance and eventually death. The goal of this study is to develop and demonstrate a more detailed clonality approach by utilizing integrative genomics. Methods Patient tumor samples were profiled by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and RNA-seq on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 and methylation profiling was performed on the Illumina Infinium 450K array. STAR and the Haplotype Caller were used for RNA-seq processing. Custom approaches were used for the integration of the multi-omic datasets. Results Reported are major enhancements to CloneViz, which now provides capabilities enabling a formal tumor multi-dimensional clonality analysis by integrating: i) DNA mutations, ii) RNA expressed mutations, and iii) DNA methylation data. RNA and DNA methylation integration were not previously possible, by CloneViz (previous version) or any other clonality method to date. This new approach, named iCloneViz (integrated CloneViz) employs visualization and quantitative methods, revealing an integrative genomic mutational dissection and traceability (DNA, RNA, epigenetics) thru the different layers of molecular structures. Conclusion The iCloneViz approach can be used for analysis of clonal evolution and mutational dynamics of multi-omic data sets. Revealing tumor clonal complexity in an integrative and quantitative manner facilitates improved mutational

  19. Genetic Diversity of Human Pathogenic Members of the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Inferred from Multilocus DNA Sequence Data and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses: Evidence for the Recent Dispersion of a Geographically Widespread Clonal Lineage and Nosocomial Origin

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Magnon, Karen C.; Cox, Patricia A.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sanche, Stephen; Geiser, David M.; Juba, Jean H.; van Burik, Jo-Anne H.; Padhye, Arvind; Anaissie, Elias J.; Francesconi, Andrea; Walsh, Thomas J.; Robinson, Jody S.

    2004-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a phylogenetically diverse monophyletic complex of filamentous ascomycetous fungi that are responsible for localized and disseminated life-threatening opportunistic infections in immunocompetent and severely neutropenic patients, respectively. Although members of this complex were isolated from patients during a pseudoepidemic in San Antonio, Tex., and from patients and the water system in a Houston, Tex., hospital during the 1990s, little is known about their genetic relatedness and population structure. This study was conducted to investigate the global genetic diversity and population biology of a comprehensive set of clinically important members of the F. oxysporum complex, focusing on the 33 isolates from patients at the San Antonio hospital and on strains isolated in the United States from the water systems of geographically distant hospitals in Texas, Maryland, and Washington, which were suspected as reservoirs of nosocomial fusariosis. In all, 18 environmental isolates and 88 isolates from patients spanning four continents were genotyped. The major finding of this study, based on concordant results from phylogenetic analyses of multilocus DNA sequence data and amplified fragment length polymorphisms, is that a recently dispersed, geographically widespread clonal lineage is responsible for over 70% of all clinical isolates investigated, including all of those associated with the pseudoepidemic in San Antonio. Moreover, strains of the clonal lineage recovered from patients were conclusively shown to genetically match those isolated from the hospital water systems of three U.S. hospitals, providing support for the hypothesis that hospitals may serve as a reservoir for nosocomial fusarial infections. PMID:15528703

  20. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling

  1. Clonality Testing in Veterinary Medicine: A Review With Diagnostic Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Keller, S M; Vernau, W; Moore, P F

    2016-07-01

    The accurate distinction of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations can present challenges. Given the different prognoses and treatment strategies, a correct diagnosis is crucial. Molecular clonality assays assess rearranged lymphocyte antigen receptor gene diversity and can help differentiate reactive from neoplastic lymphoid proliferations. Molecular clonality assays are commonly used to assess atypical, mixed, or mature lymphoid proliferations; small tissue fragments that lack architecture; and fluid samples. In addition, clonality testing can be utilized to track neoplastic clones over time or across anatomic sites. Molecular clonality assays are not stand-alone tests but useful adjuncts that follow clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic assessment. Even though clonality testing provides valuable information in a variety of situations, the complexities and pitfalls of this method, as well as its dependency on the experience of the interpreter, are often understated. In addition, a lack of standardized terminology, laboratory practices, and interpretational guidelines hinders the reproducibility of clonality testing across laboratories in veterinary medicine. The objectives of this review are twofold. First, the review is intended to familiarize the diagnostic pathologist or interested clinician with the concepts, potential pitfalls, and limitations of clonality testing. Second, the review strives to provide a basis for future harmonization of clonality testing in veterinary medicine by providing diagnostic guidelines. PMID:26933096

  2. The strainrange partitioning behavior of an advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The low-cycle, creep-fatigue characteristics of the advanced gas turbine disk alloy, AF2-1DA have been determined at 1400 F and are presented in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning (SRP). The mean stresses which develop in the PC and CP type SRP cycles at the lowest inelastic strainrange were observed to influence the cyclic lives to a greater extent than the creep effects and hence interfered with a conventional interpretation of the results by SRP. A procedure is proposed for dealing with the mean stress effects on life which is compatible with SRP.

  3. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  4. The population genetics of clonal and partially clonal diploids.

    PubMed Central

    Balloux, François; Lehmann, Laurent; de Meeûs, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The consequences of variable rates of clonal reproduction on the population genetics of neutral markers are explored in diploid organisms within a subdivided population (island model). We use both analytical and stochastic simulation approaches. High rates of clonal reproduction will positively affect heterozygosity. As a consequence, nearly twice as many alleles per locus can be maintained and population differentiation estimated as F(ST) value is strongly decreased in purely clonal populations as compared to purely sexual ones. With increasing clonal reproduction, effective population size first slowly increases and then points toward extreme values when the reproductive system tends toward strict clonality. This reflects the fact that polymorphism is protected within individuals due to fixed heterozygosity. Contrarily, genotypic diversity smoothly decreases with increasing rates of clonal reproduction. Asexual populations thus maintain higher genetic diversity at each single locus but a lower number of different genotypes. Mixed clonal/sexual reproduction is nearly indistinguishable from strict sexual reproduction as long as the proportion of clonal reproduction is not strongly predominant for all quantities investigated, except for genotypic diversities (both at individual loci and over multiple loci). PMID:12930767

  5. RNA structure replaces the need for U2AF2 in splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Ling; Taggart, Allison J.; Lim, Kian Huat; Cygan, Kamil J.; Ferraris, Luciana; Creton, Robbert; Huang, Yen-Tsung; Fairbrother, William G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure plays an integral role in catalytic, ribosomal, small nuclear, micro, and transfer RNAs. Discovering a prevalent role for secondary structure in pre-mRNAs has proven more elusive. By utilizing a variety of computational and biochemical approaches, we present evidence for a class of nuclear introns that relies upon secondary structure for correct splicing. These introns are defined by simple repeat expansions of complementary AC and GT dimers that co-occur at opposite boundaries of an intron to form a bridging structure that enforces correct splice site pairing. Remarkably, this class of introns does not require U2AF2, a core component of the spliceosome, for its processing. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this mechanism was present in the ancestral vertebrate lineage prior to the divergence of tetrapods from teleosts. While largely lost from land dwelling vertebrates, this class of introns is found in 10% of all zebrafish genes. PMID:26566657

  6. Is Bordetella pertussis clonal?

    PubMed Central

    Khattak, M. N.; Matthews, R. C.; Burnie, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether Bordetella pertussis is essentially clonal. DESIGN--Analysis of restriction fragments of XbaI digests of DNA from clinical and control isolates of B pertussis by pulse field gel electrophoresis. MATERIALS--105 isolates of B pertussis: 67 clinical isolates from throughout the United Kingdom and 23 from Germany (collected during the previous 18 months); vaccine strains 2991 and 3700; and 13 control isolates from Manchester University's culture collection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Frequency of DNA types according to country of origin and classical serotyping. RESULTS--17 DNA types were identified on the basis of the variation in 11 fragments, banding at 200-412 kilobases; 15 types were found in the clinical and control isolates from the United Kingdom and seven in those from Germany. There was no correlation with serotype. DNA type 1 was the commonest overall (22/105 strains, 22%), predominating in serotypes 1,2 and 1,2,3 and including the vaccine strains but not the isolates from Germany. CONCLUSIONS--Current infections due to B pertussis are not caused by a clonal pathogen as multiple strains are circulating in a given population at one time. There is also considerable epidemiological variation in the pathogen population between countries. These findings may have implications for the design of acellular vaccines. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 PMID:1392709

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius Strain AF2, a Producer of Cellulose, Isolated from Kombucha Tea.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; González-García, Laura Natalia; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Goldman, Gustavo H; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius strain AF2, which was isolated from Kombucha tea and is capable of producing cellulose, although at lower levels compared to another bacterium from the same environment, K. rhaeticus strain AF1. PMID:26634755

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius Strain AF2, a Producer of Cellulose, Isolated from Kombucha Tea

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; González-García, Laura Natalia; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius strain AF2, which was isolated from Kombucha tea and is capable of producing cellulose, although at lower levels compared to another bacterium from the same environment, K. rhaeticus strain AF1. PMID:26634755

  9. The clonal origin and clonal evolution of epithelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sergio Britto; Novelli, Marco; Wright, Nicholas A

    2000-01-01

    While the origin of tumours, whether from one cell or many, has been a source of fascination for experimental oncologists for some time, in recent years there has been a veritable explosion of information about the clonal architecture of tumours and their antecedents, stimulated, in the main, by the ready accessibility of new molecular techniques. While most of these new results have apparently confirmed the monoclonal origin of human epithelial (and other) tumours, there are a significant number of studies in which this conclusion just cannot be made. Moreover, analysis of many articles show that the potential impact of such considerations as patch size and clonal evolution on determinations of clonality have largely been ignored, with the result that a number of these studies are confounded. However, the clonal architecture of preneoplastic lesions provide some interesting insights — many lesions which might have been hitherto regarded as hyperplasias are apparently clonal in derivation. If this is indeed true, it calls into some question our hopeful corollary that a monoclonal origin presages a neoplastic habitus. Finally, it is clear, for many reasons, that methods of analysis which involve the disaggregation of tissues, albeit microdissected, are far from ideal and we should be putting more effort into techniques where the clonal architecture of normal tissues, preneoplastic and preinvasive lesions and their derivative tumours can be directly visualized in situ. PMID:10762440

  10. PCR techniques for clonality assays.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Cano, S J; Blanes, A; Wolfe, H J

    2001-03-01

    Clonal overgrowths represent the hallmark of neoplastic proliferations, and their demonstration has been proved useful clinically for the diagnosis of malignant lymphomas based on the detection of specific and dominant immunoglobulin and/or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. Nonrandom genetic alterations can also be used to test clonal expansions and the clonal evolution of neoplasms, especially analyzing hypervariable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) regions from patients heterozygous for a given marker. These tests rely basically on the demonstration of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from either hemizygosity (nonrandom interstitial DNA deletions) or homozygosity of mutant alleles observed in neoplasms. LOH analyses identify clonal expansions of a tumor cell population, and point to monoclonal proliferation when multiple and consistent LOH are demonstrated. Based on the methylation-related inactivation of one X chromosome in female subjects, X-linked markers (e.g., androgen receptor gene) will provide clonality information using LOH analyses after DNA digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases. Therefore, both non-X-linked and X-linked analyses give complementary information, related and not related to the malignant transformation pathway respectively. Applied appropriately, these tools can establish the clonal evolution of tumor cell populations (tumor heterogeneity), identify early relapses, distinguish recurrent tumors from other metachronic neoplasms, and differentiate field transformation from metastatic tumor growths in synchronic and histologically identical neoplasms. PMID:11277392

  11. [Evaluation of the complementary drug Factor AF2 as a supportive agent in management of advanced urothelial carcinoma. Prospective randomized multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Krege, S; Hinke, A; Otto, T; Rübben, H

    2002-03-01

    This is a prospective randomized multicenter trial for evaluation of the biological response modifier Factor AF2 in advanced urothelial cancer treated with chemotherapy. Main aim of the study was the analysis of supportive effects. Additionally patients were examined with regard to tumor response, time to progression and survival. 106 patients with advanced urothelial cancer received chemotherapy with cisplatin and methotrexate. They were randomized for additional Factor AF2 (500 mg i.v., given at days 0-3, 7-10 and 11-14). Myelotoxicity was more common and severe in the group without Factor AF2 reaching statistical significance. Gastrointestinal side effects occurred in both groups, though grade III to IV toxicity was more common without Factor AF2. Overall remission rate was 38%, median survival 33 weeks, mean time to progression 20 weeks. There was no significant difference between the two groups with or without Factor AF2. PMID:11993095

  12. Synthetic clonal reproduction through seeds.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Mohan P A; Jolivet, Sylvie; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Pereira, Lucie; Davda, Jayeshkumar N; Cromer, Laurence; Wang, Lili; Nogué, Fabien; Chan, Simon W L; Siddiqi, Imran; Mercier, Raphaël

    2011-02-18

    Cloning through seeds has potential revolutionary applications in agriculture, because it would allow vigorous hybrids to be propagated indefinitely. However, asexual seed formation or apomixis, avoiding meiosis and fertilization, is not found in the major food crops. To develop de novo synthesis of apomixis, we crossed Arabidopsis MiMe and dyad mutants that produce diploid clonal gametes to a strain whose chromosomes are engineered to be eliminated after fertilization. Up to 34% of the progeny were clones of their parent, demonstrating the conversion of clonal female or male gametes into seeds. We also show that first-generation cloned plants can be cloned again. Clonal reproduction through seeds can therefore be achieved in a sexual plant by manipulating two to four conserved genes. PMID:21330535

  13. A clonal complex 12 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, West Australian MRSA-59, harbors a novel pseudo-SCCmec element.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    A West Australian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain (WA MRSA-59) was characterized by microarray and sequencing. Its pseudo-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element comprised dcs, Q9XB68-dcs, mvaS-SCC, Q5HJW6, dru, ugpQ, ydeM, mecA-mecR-mecI, txbi mecI, tnp IS431, copA2-mco (copper resistance), ydhK, arsC-arsB-arsR (arsenic resistance), open reading frame PT43, and per-2. Recombinase genes, xylR (mecR2), and PSM-mec (phenol-soluble modulin) were absent. We suggest that mec complex A should be split into two subtypes. One harbors PSM-mec and xylR (mecR2). It is found in SCCmec types II, III, and VIII. The second subtype, described herein, is present in WA MRSA-59 and some coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:26349822

  14. A Clonal Complex 12 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain, West Australian MRSA-59, Harbors a Novel Pseudo-SCCmec Element

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Pearson, Julie; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A West Australian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain (WA MRSA-59) was characterized by microarray and sequencing. Its pseudo-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element comprised dcs, Q9XB68-dcs, mvaS-SCC, Q5HJW6, dru, ugpQ, ydeM, mecA-mecR-mecI, txbi mecI, tnp IS431, copA2-mco (copper resistance), ydhK, arsC-arsB-arsR (arsenic resistance), open reading frame PT43, and per-2. Recombinase genes, xylR (mecR2), and PSM-mec (phenol-soluble modulin) were absent. We suggest that mec complex A should be split into two subtypes. One harbors PSM-mec and xylR (mecR2). It is found in SCCmec types II, III, and VIII. The second subtype, described herein, is present in WA MRSA-59 and some coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:26349822

  15. Impact of clonal competition for peptide-MHC complexes on the CD8[superscript +] T-cell repertoire selection in a persistent viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, Katherine K.; Fulton, Zara; Cooper, Leanne; Silins, Sharon L.; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Miles, John J.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-04-29

    CD8{sup +} T-cell responses to persistent viral infections are characterized by the accumulation of an oligoclonal T-cell repertoire and a reduction in the naive T-cell pool. However, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains elusive. Here we show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8{sup +} T cells recognizing distinct epitopes from the pp65 protein and restricted through an identical HLA class I allele (HLA B*3508) exhibited either a highly conserved public T-cell repertoire or a private, diverse T-cell response, which was uniquely altered in each donor following in vitro antigen exposure. Selection of a public T-cell receptor (TCR) was coincident with an atypical major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide structure, in that the epitope adopted a helical conformation that bulged from the peptide-binding groove, while a diverse TCR profile was observed in response to the epitope that formed a flatter, more 'featureless' landscape. Clonotypes with biased TCR usage demonstrated more efficient recognition of virus-infected cells, a greater CD8 dependency, and were more terminally differentiated in their phenotype when compared with the T cells expressing diverse TCR. These findings provide new insights into our understanding on how the biology of antigen presentation in addition to the structural features of the pMHC-I might shape the T-cell repertoire and its phenotype.

  16. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, Sequence Type (ST), and Genomic Presence of IS1301 in Group B Meningococcal ST269 Clonal Complex Isolates from England and Wales▿

    PubMed Central

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J.; Kaczmarski, Edward B.; Guiver, Malcolm; Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Vallely, Pamela J.; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Tang, Christoph M.; Borrow, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Highly effective glycoconjugate vaccines exist against four of the five major pathogenic groups of meningococci: A, C, W-135, and Y. An equivalent vaccine against group B meningococci (menB) has remained elusive due to the poorly immunogenic capsular polysaccharide. A promising alternative, the investigational recombinant menB (rMenB)- outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine, contains fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), NadA, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for 90% of meningococcal disease in England and Wales, where the multilocus sequence type (ST) 269 (ST269) clonal complex (cc269) has recently expanded to account for a third of menB cases. To assess the potential cc269 coverage of the rMenB-OMV vaccine, English and Welsh cc269 isolates from the past decade were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, and NadA. All of the isolates harbored fHbp and nhba alleles, while 98% of the cc269 isolates were devoid of nadA. Subvariant profiling of fHbp, nhba, and porA against STs revealed the presence of two broadly distinct and well-defined clusters of isolates, centered around ST269 and ST275, respectively. An additional molecular marker, insertion sequence IS1301, was found to be present in 100% and <2% of isolates of the respective clusters. On the basis of the genetic data, the potential rMenB-OMV coverage of cc269 in England and Wales is high (up to 100%) within both clusters. Expression studies and serum bactericidal antibody assays will serve to enhance predictions of coverage and will augment ongoing studies regarding the significance of IS1301 within the ST269 cluster. PMID:19759227

  17. Clonal Characteristics of Circulating B Lymphocyte Repertoire in Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan-Guo; Wang, Yu-Qi; Zhang, Ming; Han, Ying-Xin; Huang, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Li, Zhuo-Min; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Yan; Zhu, Hong-Mei; Zhu, Shi-da; Li, Hong-Mei; Li, Ning; Yan, Hui-Ping; Gao, Zu-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is an autoimmune liver disease characterized by elevated serum anti-mitochondrial Ab and lymphocyte-mediated bile duct damage. This study was designed to reveal the clonal characteristics of B lymphocyte repertoire in patients with PBC to facilitate better understanding of its pathogenesis and better management of these patients. Using high-throughput sequencing of Ig genes, we analyzed the repertoire of circulating B lymphocytes in 43 patients with PBC, and 34 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, PBC patients showed 1) a gain of 14 new clones and a loss of 8 clones; 2) a significant clonal expansion and increased relative IgM abundance, which corresponded with the elevated serum IgM level; 3) a significant reduction of clonal diversity and somatic hypermutations in class-switched sequences, which suggested a general immunocompromised status; 4) the reduction of clonal diversity and enhancement of clonal expansion were more obvious at the cirrhotic stage; and 5) treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid could increase the clonal diversity and reduce clonal expansion of the IgM repertoire, with no obvious effect on the somatic hypermutation level. Our data suggest that PBC is a complex autoimmune disease process with evidence of B lymphocyte clonal gains and losses, Ag-dependent ogligoclonal expansion, and a generally compromised immune reserve. This new insight into the pathogenesis of PBC opens up the prospect of studying disease-relevant B cells to better diagnose and treat this devastating disease. PMID:27430717

  18. Prevention of Obesity and Insulin Resistance by Estrogens Requires ERα Activation Function-2 (ERαAF-2), Whereas ERαAF-1 Is Dispensable

    PubMed Central

    Handgraaf, Sandra; Riant, Elodie; Fabre, Aurélie; Waget, Aurélie; Burcelin, Rémy; Lière, Philippe; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-François; Gourdy, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial metabolic actions of estrogen-based therapies are mainly mediated by estrogen receptor α (ERα), a nuclear receptor that regulates gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs): AF-1 and AF-2. Using mouse models deleted electively for ERαAF-1 (ERαAF-1°) or ERαAF-2 (ERαAF-2°), we determined their respective roles in the actions of estrogens on body composition and glucose homeostasis in response to either a normal diet or a high-fat diet (HFD). ERαAF-2° males and females developed accelerated weight gain, massive adiposity, severe insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance—quite reminiscent of the phenotype observed in mice deleted for the entire ERα protein (ERα−/−). In striking contrast, ERαAF-1° and wild-type (wt) mice shared a similar metabolic phenotype. Accordingly, 17β-estradiol administration regulated key metabolic genes in insulin-sensitive tissues and conferred a strong protection against HFD-induced metabolic disturbances in wt and ERαAF-1° ovariectomized mice, whereas these actions were totally abrogated in ERαAF-2° and ERα−/− mice. Thus, whereas both AFs have been previously shown to contribute to endometrial and breast cancer cell proliferation, the protective effect of estrogens against obesity and insulin resistance depends on ERαAF-2 but not ERαAF-1, thereby delineating new options for selective modulation of ERα. PMID:23903353

  19. The Emergence and Spread of Multiple Livestock-Associated Clonal Complex 398 Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains among Animals and Humans in the Republic of Ireland, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gráinne I.; Abbott, Yvonne; Burns, Aisling; Leonard, Finola; McManus, Brenda A.; O’Connell, Brian; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex (CC) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are associated with carriage and infection among animals and humans but only a single case of CC398 MRSA has been reported in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). The present study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CC398 MRSA (n = 22) and MSSA (n = 10) from animals and humans in the ROI from 2010–2014. Isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarray profiling and PCR for CC398-associated resistance genes. All MRSA underwent SCCmec IV or V subtyping. Four distinct CC398-MRSA incidents were identified from (i) a man in a nursing home (spa type t011-SCCmec IVa, immune evasion complex (IEC) negative), (ii) a horse and veterinarian who had recently travelled to Belgium (t011-IVa, IEC positive), (iii) pigs (n = 9) and farm workers (n = 9) on two farms, one which had been restocked with German gilts and the other which was a finisher farm (t034-VT, IEC negative, 3/9 pigs; t011- VT, IEC negative, 6/9 pigs & 9/9 farm workers), and (iv) a child who had worked on a pig farm in the UK (t034-VT, IEC negative). Isolates also carried different combinations of multiple resistance genes including erm(A), erm(B), tet(K), tet(M) & tet(L), fexA, spc, dfrG, dfrK aacA-aphD and aadD further highlighting the presence of multiple CC398-MRSA strains. CC398 MSSA were recovered from pigs (n = 8) and humans (n = 2). CC398 MSSA transmission was identified among pigs but zoonotic transmission was not detected with animal and human isolates exhibiting clade-specific traits. This study highlights the importation and zoonotic spread of CC398 MRSA in the ROI and the spread of CC398 MSSA among pigs. Increased surveillance is warranted to prevent further CC398 MRSA importation and spread in a country that was considered CC398 MRSA free. PMID:26886749

  20. Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Awasaki, Takeshi; Schroeder, Mark David; Long, Fuhui; Yang, Jacob S.; He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Wu, Gloria Yueh-Yi; Peng, Hanchuan; Myers, Gene; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. Results By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often co-innervate the same local neuropil(s) and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. Conclusions These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain. PMID:23541733

  1. How clonal are bacteria over time?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria and archaea reproduce clonally (vertical descent), but exchange genes by recombination (horizontal transfer). Recombination allows adaptive mutations or genes to spread rapidly within (or even between) species, and reduces the burden of deleterious mutations. Clonality-defined here as the balance between vertical and horizontal inheritance-is therefore a key microbial trait, determining how quickly a population can adapt and the size of its gene pool. Here, I discuss whether clonality varies over time and if it can be considered a stable trait of a given population. I show that, in some cases, clonality is clearly not static. For example, non-clonal (highly recombining) populations can give rise to clonal expansions, often of pathogens. However, an analysis of time-course metagenomic data from a lake suggests that a bacterial population's past clonality (as measured by its genetic diversity) is a good predictor of its future clonality. Clonality therefore appears to be relatively-but not completely-stable over evolutionary time. PMID:27057964

  2. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist “mate finding,” particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants. PMID:26195747

  3. Ecological Consequences of Clonal Integration in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenghong; Liu, Jian; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Clonal plants are widespread throughout the plant kingdom and dominate in diverse habitats. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environment is pervasive at multiple scales, even at scales relevant to individual plants. Clonal integration refers to resource translocation and information communication among the ramets of clonal plants. Due to clonal integration, clonal plant species possess a series of peculiar attributes: plasticity in response to local and non-local conditions, labor division with organ specialization for acquiring locally abundant resources, foraging behavior by selective placement of ramets in resource-rich microhabitats, and avoidance of intraclonal competition. Clonal integration has very profound ecological consequences for clonal plants. It allows them to efficiently cope with environmental heterogeneity, by alleviating local resource shortages, buffering environmental stresses and disturbances, influencing competitive ability, increasing invasiveness, and altering species composition and invasibility at the community level. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of research on the ecological consequences of plant clonal integration based on a large body of literature. We also attempt to propose perspectives for future research. PMID:27446093

  4. Differential ligand-dependent interactions between the AF-2 activating domain of nuclear receptors and the putative transcriptional intermediary factors mSUG1 and TIF1.

    PubMed Central

    vom Baur, E; Zechel, C; Heery, D; Heine, M J; Garnier, J M; Vivat, V; Le Douarin, B; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1996-01-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system we report the isolation of a novel mouse protein, mSUG1, that interacts with retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) both in yeast cells and in vitro in a ligand- and AF-2 activating domain (AF-2 AD)-dependent manner and show that it is a structural and functional homologue of the essential yeast protein SUG1. mSUG1 also efficiently interacts with other nuclear receptors, including oestrogen (ER), thyroid hormone (TR), Vitamin D3 (VDR) and retinoid X (RXR) receptors. By comparing the interaction properties of these receptors with mSUG1 and TIF1, we demonstrate that: (i) RXR alpha efficiently interacts with TIF1, but not with mSUG1, whereas TR alpha interacts much more efficiently with mSUG1 than with TIF1, and RAR alpha, VDR and ER efficiently interact with mSUG1 and TIF1; (ii) the amphipathic alpha-helix core of the AF-2 AD is differentially involved in interactions of RAR alpha with mSUG1 and TIF1; (iii) the AF-2 AD cores of RAR alpha and ER are similarly involved in their interaction with TIF1, but not with mSUG1. Thus, the interaction interfaces between the different receptors and either mSUG1 or TIF1 may vary depending on the nature of the receptor and the putative mediator of its AF-2 function. We discuss the possibility that mSUG1 and TIF1 may mediate the transcriptional activity of the AF-2 of nuclear receptors through different mechanisms. Images PMID:8598193

  5. Clonal Integration Enhances the Performance of a Clonal Plant Species under Soil Alkalinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil. PMID:25790352

  6. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  7. PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

    2012-07-26

    Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

  8. Epigenetic Memory as a Basis for Intelligent Behavior in Clonal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Latzel, Vít; Rendina González, Alejandra P.; Rosenthal, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally induced epigenetic change enables plants to remember past environmental interactions. If this memory capability is exploited to prepare plants for future challenges, it can provide a basis for highly sophisticated behavior, considered intelligent by some. Against the backdrop of an overview of plant intelligence, we hypothesize: (1) that the capability of plants to engage in such intelligent behavior increases with the additional level of complexity afforded by clonality, and; (2) that more faithful inheritance of epigenetic information in clonal plants, in conjunction with information exchange and coordination between connected ramets, is likely to enable especially advanced intelligent behavior in this group. We therefore further hypothesize that this behavior provides ecological and evolutionary advantages to clonal plants, possibly explaining, at least in part, their widespread success. Finally, we suggest avenues of inquiry to enable assessing intelligent behavior and the role of epigenetic memory in clonal species.

  9. Multiplexing clonality: combining RGB marking and genetic barcoding.

    PubMed

    Cornils, Kerstin; Thielecke, Lars; Hüser, Svenja; Forgber, Michael; Thomaschewski, Michael; Kleist, Nadja; Hussein, Kais; Riecken, Kristoffer; Volz, Tassilo; Gerdes, Sebastian; Glauche, Ingmar; Dahl, Andreas; Dandri, Maura; Roeder, Ingo; Fehse, Boris

    2014-04-01

    RGB marking and DNA barcoding are two cutting-edge technologies in the field of clonal cell marking. To combine the virtues of both approaches, we equipped LeGO vectors encoding red, green or blue fluorescent proteins with complex DNA barcodes carrying color-specific signatures. For these vectors, we generated highly complex plasmid libraries that were used for the production of barcoded lentiviral vector particles. In proof-of-principle experiments, we used barcoded vectors for RGB marking of cell lines and primary murine hepatocytes. We applied single-cell polymerase chain reaction to decipher barcode signatures of individual RGB-marked cells expressing defined color hues. This enabled us to prove clonal identity of cells with one and the same RGB color. Also, we made use of barcoded vectors to investigate clonal development of leukemia induced by ectopic oncogene expression in murine hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, by combining RGB marking and DNA barcoding, we have established a novel technique for the unambiguous genetic marking of individual cells in the context of normal regeneration as well as malignant outgrowth. Moreover, the introduction of color-specific signatures in barcodes will facilitate studies on the impact of different variables (e.g. vector type, transgenes, culture conditions) in the context of competitive repopulation studies. PMID:24476916

  10. Multiplexing clonality: combining RGB marking and genetic barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Cornils, Kerstin; Thielecke, Lars; Hüser, Svenja; Forgber, Michael; Thomaschewski, Michael; Kleist, Nadja; Hussein, Kais; Riecken, Kristoffer; Volz, Tassilo; Gerdes, Sebastian; Glauche, Ingmar; Dahl, Andreas; Dandri, Maura; Roeder, Ingo; Fehse, Boris

    2014-01-01

    RGB marking and DNA barcoding are two cutting-edge technologies in the field of clonal cell marking. To combine the virtues of both approaches, we equipped LeGO vectors encoding red, green or blue fluorescent proteins with complex DNA barcodes carrying color-specific signatures. For these vectors, we generated highly complex plasmid libraries that were used for the production of barcoded lentiviral vector particles. In proof-of-principle experiments, we used barcoded vectors for RGB marking of cell lines and primary murine hepatocytes. We applied single-cell polymerase chain reaction to decipher barcode signatures of individual RGB-marked cells expressing defined color hues. This enabled us to prove clonal identity of cells with one and the same RGB color. Also, we made use of barcoded vectors to investigate clonal development of leukemia induced by ectopic oncogene expression in murine hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, by combining RGB marking and DNA barcoding, we have established a novel technique for the unambiguous genetic marking of individual cells in the context of normal regeneration as well as malignant outgrowth. Moreover, the introduction of color-specific signatures in barcodes will facilitate studies on the impact of different variables (e.g. vector type, transgenes, culture conditions) in the context of competitive repopulation studies. PMID:24476916

  11. Clonal Evolution in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Bita; Vij, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy encountered among patients in the United States. The last decade has seen incremental improvements in the survival of patients with MM. These advances are, to a large extent, attributable to the addition of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs to the armamentarium of treatment options. The adoption of these drug classes was the result of an empiric research paradigm. However, with the application of next generation sequencing technologies, we are now starting to unravel the genomic landscape of MM. It is hoped that this will allow us to better disentangle the biology of the disease and allow for identification of new therapeutic targets. In this article, we review what we have learned to date about the mutational profile, clonal architecture, and evolution of the disease, and discuss the potential clinical implications of these findings. PMID:27521309

  12. Improved Clonal Selection Algorithm Combined with Ant Colony Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shangce; Wang, Wei; Dai, Hongwei; Li, Fangjia; Tang, Zheng

    Both the clonal selection algorithm (CSA) and the ant colony optimization (ACO) are inspired by natural phenomena and are effective tools for solving complex problems. CSA can exploit and explore the solution space parallely and effectively. However, it can not use enough environment feedback information and thus has to do a large redundancy repeat during search. On the other hand, ACO is based on the concept of indirect cooperative foraging process via secreting pheromones. Its positive feedback ability is nice but its convergence speed is slow because of the little initial pheromones. In this paper, we propose a pheromone-linker to combine these two algorithms. The proposed hybrid clonal selection and ant colony optimization (CSA-ACO) reasonably utilizes the superiorities of both algorithms and also overcomes their inherent disadvantages. Simulation results based on the traveling salesman problems have demonstrated the merit of the proposed algorithm over some traditional techniques.

  13. The transactivation domain AF-2 but not the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor is required to inhibit differentiation of avian erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, M; Boer, L; Wessely, O; Parker, M; Beug, H

    1998-02-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that an activated estrogen receptor (ER) is required for long-term self-renewal of c-ErbB-expressing avian erythroid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that activation of the ER does not only arrest or retard differentiation of early progenitors but that it affects erythroid differentiation at all stages of erythroid maturation. A search for genes whose expression is affected by the ER showed that the 17beta-estradiol-activated receptor suppressed the differentiation-associated up-regulation of Gata-1, SCL-1, and globin genes in partially mature cells. In the same cells, the expression of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and histone H5 was enhanced. This led to premature expression of CAII, a possible explanation for the toxic effects of overexpressed ER. Repression specifically required the transactivation domain AF-2, but neither an intact DNA-binding domain (DBD) nor the AF-1 domain. The transcriptional activation of CAII, however, required both an intact AF-2 and a functional DBD. The requirement for the AF-2, but not the DBD, suggested that the ER may compete with other nuclear hormone receptors for transcriptional coactivators that bind AF-2, a domain well conserved within this family of transcription factors. We show, however, that this model does not apply for the most likely candidate, the avian thyroid hormone receptor. PMID:9482667

  14. Clonal analysis and virulent traits of pathogenic extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolates from swine in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) can cause a variety of infections outside the gastrointestinal tract in humans and animals. Infections due to swine ExPECs have been occurring with increasing frequency in China. These ExPECs may now be considered a new food-borne pathogen that causes cross-infections between humans and pigs. Knowledge of the clonal structure and virulence genes is needed as a framework to improve the understanding of phylogenetic traits of porcine ExPECs. Results Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data showed that the isolates investigated in this study could be placed into four main clonal complexes, designated as CC10, CC1687, CC88 and CC58. Strains within CC10 were classified as phylogroup A, and these accounted for most of our porcine ExPEC isolates. Isolates in the CC1687 clonal complex, formed by new sequence types (STs), was classified as phylogroup D, with CC88 isolates considered as B2 and CC58 isolates as B1. Porcine ExPECs in these four clonal complexes demonstrated significantly different virulence gene patterns. A few porcine ExPECs were indentified in phylogroup B2, the phylogroup in which human ExPECs mainly exist. However some STs in the four clonal groups of porcine ExPECs were reported to cause extraintestinal infections in human, based on data in the MLST database. Conclusion Porcine ExPECs have different virulence gene patterns for different clonal complexes. However, these strains are mostly fell in phylogenentic phylogroup A, B1 and D, which is different from human ExPECs that concentrate in phylogroup B2. Our findings provide a better understanding relating to the clonal structure of ExPECs in diseased pigs and indicate a need to re-evaluate their contribution to human ExPEC diseases. PMID:22909380

  15. Evidence for impaired retinoic acid receptor-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2 cofactor activity in human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moghal, N; Neel, B G

    1995-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is required for normal airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. One of the earliest events following the exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to RA is the strong induction of RA receptor beta (RAR beta) mRNA. Previous work established that many lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors display abnormal RAR beta mRNA expression, most often absence or weak expression of the RAR beta 2 isoform, even after RA treatment. Restoration of RAR beta 2 into RAR beta-negative lung cancer cell lines has been reported to inhibit tumorigenicity. Since RAR beta 2 inactivation may contribute to lung cancer, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of defective RAR beta 2 expression. Nuclear run-on assays and transient transfections with RAR beta 2 promoter constructs indicate the presence of trans-acting transcriptional defects in most lung cancer cell lines, which map to the RA response element (RARE). These defects cannot be complemented by RAR-retinoid X receptor cotransfection and can be separated into two types: (i) one affecting transcription from direct repeat RAREs, but not palindromic RAREs, and (ii) another affecting transcription from both types of RARE. Studies using chimeras between RAR alpha, TR alpha, and other transcription factors suggest the existence of novel RAR-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2-specific cofactors, which are necessary for high levels of transcription. Furthermore, these factors may be frequently inactivated in human lung cancer. PMID:7791800

  16. Enforced Clonality Confers a Fitness Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Jana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    In largely clonal plants, splitting of a maternal plant into potentially independent plants (ramets) is usually spontaneous; however, such fragmentation also occurs in otherwise non-clonal species due to application of external force. This process might play an important yet largely overlooked role for otherwise non-clonal plants by providing a mechanism to regenerate after disturbance. Here, in a 5-year garden experiment on two short-lived, otherwise non-clonal species, Barbarea vulgaris and Barbarea stricta, we compared the fitness of plants fragmented by simulated disturbance (“enforced ramets”) both with plants that contemporaneously originate in seed and with individuals unscathed by the disturbance event. Because the ability to regrow from fragments is related to plant age and stored reserves, we compared the effects of disturbance applied during three different ontogenetic stages of the plants. In B. vulgaris, enforced ramet fitness was higher than the measured fitness values of both uninjured plants and plants established from seed after the disturbance. This advantage decreased with increasing plant age at the time of fragmentation. In B. stricta, enforced ramet fitness was lower than or similar to fitness of uninjured plants and plants grown from seed. Our results likely reflect the habitat preferences of the study species, as B. vulgaris occurs in anthropogenic, disturbed habitats where body fragmentation is more probable and enforced clonality thus more advantageous than in the more natural habitats preferred by B. stricta. Generalizing from our results, we see that increased fitness yielded by enforced clonality would confer an evolutionary advantage in the face of disturbance, especially in habitats where a seed bank has not been formed, e.g., during invasion or colonization. Our results thus imply that enforced clonality should be taken into account when studying population dynamics and life strategies of otherwise non-clonal species in disturbed

  17. Clinical impact of clonal and subclonal TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nadeu, Ferran; Delgado, Julio; Royo, Cristina; Baumann, Tycho; Stankovic, Tatjana; Pinyol, Magda; Jares, Pedro; Navarro, Alba; Martín-García, David; Beà, Sílvia; Salaverria, Itziar; Oldreive, Ceri; Aymerich, Marta; Suárez-Cisneros, Helena; Rozman, Maria; Villamor, Neus; Colomer, Dolors; López-Guillermo, Armando; González, Marcos; Alcoceba, Miguel; Terol, Maria José; Colado, Enrique; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Enjuanes, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have revealed the complex clonal heterogeneity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The acquisition and selection of genomic aberrations may be critical to understanding the progression of this disease. In this study, we have extensively characterized the mutational status of TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM in 406 untreated CLL cases by ultra-deep next-generation sequencing, which detected subclonal mutations down to 0.3% allele frequency. Clonal dynamics were examined in longitudinal samples of 48 CLL patients. We identified a high proportion of subclonal mutations, isolated or associated with clonal aberrations. TP53 mutations were present in 10.6% of patients (6.4% clonal, 4.2% subclonal), ATM mutations in 11.1% (7.8% clonal, 1.3% subclonal, 2% germ line mutations considered pathogenic), SF3B1 mutations in 12.6% (7.4% clonal, 5.2% subclonal), NOTCH1 mutations in 21.8% (14.2% clonal, 7.6% subclonal), and BIRC3 mutations in 4.2% (2% clonal, 2.2% subclonal). ATM mutations, clonal SF3B1, and both clonal and subclonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter time to first treatment irrespective of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region gene (IGHV) mutational status. Clonal and subclonal TP53 and clonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter overall survival together with the IGHV mutational status. Clonal evolution in longitudinal samples mainly occurred in cases with mutations in the initial samples and was observed not only after chemotherapy but also in untreated patients. These findings suggest that the characterization of the subclonal architecture and its dynamics in the evolution of the disease may be relevant for the management of CLL patients. PMID:26837699

  18. Clinical impact of clonal and subclonal TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nadeu, Ferran; Delgado, Julio; Royo, Cristina; Baumann, Tycho; Stankovic, Tatjana; Pinyol, Magda; Jares, Pedro; Navarro, Alba; Martín-García, David; Beà, Sílvia; Salaverria, Itziar; Oldreive, Ceri; Aymerich, Marta; Suárez-Cisneros, Helena; Rozman, Maria; Villamor, Neus; Colomer, Dolors; López-Guillermo, Armando; González, Marcos; Alcoceba, Miguel; Terol, Maria José; Colado, Enrique; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Enjuanes, Anna; Campo, Elías

    2016-04-28

    Genomic studies have revealed the complex clonal heterogeneity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The acquisition and selection of genomic aberrations may be critical to understanding the progression of this disease. In this study, we have extensively characterized the mutational status of TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM in 406 untreated CLL cases by ultra-deep next-generation sequencing, which detected subclonal mutations down to 0.3% allele frequency. Clonal dynamics were examined in longitudinal samples of 48 CLL patients. We identified a high proportion of subclonal mutations, isolated or associated with clonal aberrations. TP53 mutations were present in 10.6% of patients (6.4% clonal, 4.2% subclonal), ATM mutations in 11.1% (7.8% clonal, 1.3% subclonal, 2% germ line mutations considered pathogenic), SF3B1 mutations in 12.6% (7.4% clonal, 5.2% subclonal), NOTCH1 mutations in 21.8% (14.2% clonal, 7.6% subclonal), and BIRC3 mutations in 4.2% (2% clonal, 2.2% subclonal). ATM mutations, clonal SF3B1, and both clonal and subclonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter time to first treatment irrespective of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region gene (IGHV) mutational status. Clonal and subclonal TP53 and clonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter overall survival together with the IGHV mutational status. Clonal evolution in longitudinal samples mainly occurred in cases with mutations in the initial samples and was observed not only after chemotherapy but also in untreated patients. These findings suggest that the characterization of the subclonal architecture and its dynamics in the evolution of the disease may be relevant for the management of CLL patients. PMID:26837699

  19. Lessons from the dissection of the activation functions (AF-1 and AF-2) of the estrogen receptor alpha in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Abot, Anne; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Laurell, Henrik; Gourdy, Pierre; Lenfant, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    Estrogens influence most of the physiological processes in mammals, including but not limited to reproduction, cognition, behavior, vascular system, metabolism and bone integrity. Given this widespread role for estrogen in human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen influence the pathophysiology of numerous diseases, including cancer (of the reproductive tract as breast, endometrial but also colorectal, prostate,…), as well as neurodegenerative, inflammatory-immune, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and osteoporosis. These actions are mediated by the activation of estrogen receptors (ER) alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), which regulate target gene transcription (genomic action) through two independent activation functions (AF)-1 and AF-2, but can also elicit rapid membrane initiated steroid signals (MISS). Targeted ER gene inactivation has shown that although ERβ plays an important role in the central nervous system and in the heart, ERα appears to play a prominent role in most of the other tissues. Pharmacological activation or inhibition of ERα and/or ERβ provides already the basis for many therapeutic interventions, from hormone replacement at menopause to prevention of the recurrence of breast cancer. However, the use of these estrogens or selective estrogen receptors modulators (SERMs) have also induced undesired effects. Thus, an important challenge consists now to uncouple the beneficial actions from other deleterious ones. The in vivo molecular "dissection" of ERα represents both a molecular and integrated approach that already allowed to delineate in mouse the role of the main "subfunctions" of the receptor and that could pave the way to an optimization of the ER modulation. PMID:23200732

  20. The N-terminal part of TIF1, a putative mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function (AF-2) of nuclear receptors, is fused to B-raf in the oncogenic protein T18.

    PubMed Central

    Le Douarin, B; Zechel, C; Garnier, J M; Lutz, Y; Tora, L; Pierrat, P; Heery, D; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) bound to response elements mediate the effects of cognate ligands on gene expression. Their ligand-dependent activation function, AF-2, presumably acts on the basal transcription machinery through intermediary proteins/mediators. We have isolated a mouse nuclear protein, TIF1, which enhances RXR and RAR AF-2 in yeast and interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with several NRs in yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in vitro. Remarkably, these interactions require the amino acids constituting the AF-2 activating domain conserved in all active NRs. Moreover, the oestrogen receptor (ER) AF-2 antagonist hydroxytamoxifen cannot promote ER-TIF1 interaction. We propose that TIF1, which contains several conserved domains found in transcriptional regulatory proteins, is a mediator of ligand-dependent AF-2. Interestingly, the TIF1 N-terminal moiety is fused to B-raf in the mouse oncoprotein T18. Images PMID:7744009

  1. Clonal diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates revealed by a snapshot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is a notorious opportunistic pathogen mainly associated with hospital-acquired infections. Studies on the clonal relatedness of isolates could lay the foundation for effective infection control. A snapshot study was performed to investigate the clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings. Results Among 82 non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates that were recovered during a period of four days in 13 hospitals in Sichuan, Southwest China, 67 isolates were identified as A. baumannii. Half of the 67 A. baumannii isolates were non-susceptible to carbapenems. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene detected, present in 40 isolates including five carbapenem-susceptible ones. The isolates belonged to 62 pulsotypes determined by PFGE and 31 sequence types (ST) by multi-locus sequence typing. Forty-three isolates belonged to the globally-disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common sequence types. Conclusions Clinical isolates of A. baumannii were diverse in clonality in this snapshot study. However, most of the isolates belonged to the globally-distributed clonal complex CC92. ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common types in our region. In particular, ST208 might be an emerging lineage carrying blaOXA-23. PMID:24144168

  2. [Reducing the side effects of aggressive chemotherapy (cisplatin and epirubicin) with xenogenic peptides (factor AF2) in patients with hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer. A prospective, randomized study].

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, I; Wand, H

    1989-06-01

    The indication of a chemotherapy is advisable with patients who are suffering from a progressively metastasised, secondarily hormone refractory carcinoma of the prostate. In search of efficient chemotherapy protocols we combined cisplatin with epirubicin (PE scheme) in our clinic. Massive side effects of that aggressive chemotherapy scheme like gastro-intestinal trouble and myelotoxicity are the limiting factors of the scheme. With measures like reducing the dosage, delaying the next cycle, or breaking off the therapy the effective dosage can often not be achieved. The anti-emetics which are usually used today exclusively give anti-emetic protection. The additional administration of xenogenic peptides (Factor AF2) had additionally myeloprotective effect in former studies. In this study we examined whether, by additionally giving Factor AF2, the patients' subjective condition, and above all their hemogram, could be stabilised in order to achieve the effective dosage or dosage intensity. For that, the patients were prospectively randomised in two groups by means of a random selection board. The analysis of the data gained in the protocol showed that the additional administration of Factor AF2 improves the patients' subjective conditions significantly. Apart from that, we noticed a considerable reduction of the vomiting frequency. Concerning the objective measured parameters of the leukocytes, thrombocytes, erythrocytes, and the hemoglobin level, the significantly myeloprotective effect of Factor AF2 could be proved. Due to the fact that in the verum group there were considerably fewer cases of breaking off or delays of the treatment than in the control group, the effective dosage intensity could be achieved with a higher number of patients in that group. PMID:2691943

  3. Improvement of impaired mitogen-induced interferon-gamma release of peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from tumor patients by Factor AF2.

    PubMed

    Baier, J E; Neumann, H A; Gallati, H; Ricken, D

    1991-01-01

    Factor AF2, a now standardized extract from liver and spleen of newborn lambs, showed myeloprotective capacity on platelet- and erythrocyte-count as well as on hemoglobinconcentration in patients undergoing aggressive chemotherapy. In addition, a possible influence on prolonged remission duration in patients with mammary carcinoma had been claimed. In this study, the effect of Factor AF2 on mitogen-induced interferon-gamma release by PBMC was tested in 23 healthy humans and in 23 tumor patients. All patients were prior to surgery and had not yet received radio- or chemotherapy at the time of examination. The interferon-gamma concentration of the supernatants was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cells were stimulated with PHA at 7.5 micrograms/ml. In the reference group, interferon-gamma concentration rose to 26 units/ml and to 15.5 units/ml in the tumor patients. In the reference persons, an addition of Factor AF2 at concentrations from 10(1) micrograms/ml to 10(3) micrograms/ml resulted in a small non-significant decrease of interferon-gamma release. At 10(4) micrograms/ml, neither test group showed measurable interferon-gamma concentration. In the tumor patients, cocultivation with Factor AF2 until concentration of 10(2) micrograms/ml resulted in a dose-dependent increase of interferon-gamma release, where 20.5 units/ml interferon-gamma were reached. At 10(3) micrograms/ml, Factor AF2 showed no effect on interferon-gamma release compared with the stimulation with mitogen alone. Flow-cytometry analysis of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, CD56, and HLA-DR expression of the PBMC deriving either from reference persons or from patients revealed an almost identical distribution. A slight difference in CD16-positive and HLA-DR positive cells, respectively, was not significant. PMID:1788474

  4. Evolutionary perspectives on clonal reproduction in vertebrate animals

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.

    2015-01-01

    A synopsis is provided of different expressions of whole-animal vertebrate clonality (asexual organismal-level reproduction), both in the laboratory and in nature. For vertebrate taxa, such clonal phenomena include the following: human-mediated cloning via artificial nuclear transfer; intergenerational clonality in nature via parthenogenesis and gynogenesis; intergenerational hemiclonality via hybridogenesis and kleptogenesis; intragenerational clonality via polyembryony; and what in effect qualifies as clonal replication via self-fertilization and intense inbreeding by simultaneous hermaphrodites. Each of these clonal or quasi-clonal mechanisms is described, and its evolutionary genetic ramifications are addressed. By affording an atypical vantage on standard vertebrate reproduction, clonality offers fresh perspectives on the evolutionary and ecological significance of recombination-derived genetic variety. PMID:26195735

  5. Clonal Architecture of Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Defined by Single-Cell Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Andrew E. O.; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Miller, Christopher A.; Fulton, Robert; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Eades, William C.; Elliott, Kevin; Heath, Sharon; Westervelt, Peter; Ding, Li; Conrad, Donald F.; White, Brian S.; Shao, Jin; Link, Daniel C.; DiPersio, John F.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been used to infer the clonality of heterogeneous tumor samples. These analyses yield specific predictions—the population frequency of individual clones, their genetic composition, and their evolutionary relationships—which we set out to test by sequencing individual cells from three subjects diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia, each of whom had been previously characterized by whole genome sequencing of unfractionated tumor samples. Single-cell mutation profiling strongly supported the clonal architecture implied by the analysis of bulk material. In addition, it resolved the clonal assignment of single nucleotide variants that had been initially ambiguous and identified areas of previously unappreciated complexity. Accordingly, we find that many of the key assumptions underlying the analysis of tumor clonality by deep sequencing of unfractionated material are valid. Furthermore, we illustrate a single-cell sequencing strategy for interrogating the clonal relationships among known variants that is cost-effective, scalable, and adaptable to the analysis of both hematopoietic and solid tumors, or any heterogeneous population of cells. PMID:25010716

  6. Clonal deletion and clonal anergy in the thymus induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.L.; Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The present study demonstrates that immune tolerance can be achieved in the thymus both by clonal deletion and by clonal inactivation, but that the two tolerant states are induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities. TCR engagement of self antigens on bone marrow-derived, radiation-sensitive (presumably dendritic) cells induces clonal deletion of developing thymocytes, whereas TCR engagement of self antigens on radiation-resistant cellular elements, such as thymic epithelium, induces clonal anergy. The nondeleted, anergic thymocytes can express IL-2-Rs but are unable to proliferate in response to either specific antigen or anti-TCR antibodies, and do develop into phenotypically mature cells that emigrate out of the thymus and into the periphery.

  7. Quality improvement in Vignoles through clonal selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is to select an improved, loose-clustered clone of Vignoles that will contribute to an integrated approach to disease control. Clonal selection has historically proven useful in reducing cluster compactness through a variety of mechanisms, including decreased berry size, lengthening of the ...

  8. Plant Diseases Impact USDA Clonal Vaccinium Genebank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Agricultural Research Service maintains a diverse collection of Vaccinium genotypes at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository, a temperate fruit and nut genebank in Corvallis, Oregon. Vaccinium species are hosts for two emerging diseases in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that impact the colle...

  9. 'Sharpe', a clonal plum rootstock for peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sharpe clonal rootstock for peach is jointly released for grower trial by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA), and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Sharpe, previously tested as FLA1-1, was discovered in the wild and appears to be a hybrid of Chickas...

  10. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Cancer.gov

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  11. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  12. Consequences of clonality for sexual fitness: Clonal expansion enhances fitness under spatially restricted dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Van Drunen, Wendy E.; van Kleunen, Mark; Dorken, Marcel E.

    2015-01-01

    Clonality is a pervasive feature of sessile organisms, but this form of asexual reproduction is thought to interfere with sexual fitness via the movement of gametes among the modules that comprise the clone. This within-clone movement of gametes is expected to reduce sexual fitness via mate limitation of male reproductive success and, in some cases, via the production of highly inbred (i.e., self-fertilized) offspring. However, clonality also results in the spatial expansion of the genetic individual (i.e., genet), and this should decrease distances gametes and sexually produced offspring must travel to avoid competing with other gametes and offspring from the same clone. The extent to which any negative effects of clonality on mating success might be offset by the positive effects of spatial expansion is poorly understood. Here, we develop spatially explicit models in which fitness was determined by the success of genets through their male and female sex functions. Our results indicate that clonality serves to increase sexual fitness when it is associated with the outward expansion of the genet. Our models further reveal that the main fitness benefit of clonal expansion might occur through the dispersal of offspring over a wider area compared with nonclonal phenotypes. We conclude that, instead of interfering with sexual reproduction, clonal expansion should often serve to enhance sexual fitness. PMID:26195748

  13. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  14. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality.

    PubMed

    Laskey, Sarah B; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Bruner, Katherine M; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  15. Detectable Clonal Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic mosaicism is the presence of two or more cellular populations with distinct genotypes in an individual who developed from a single fertilized ovum. While initially observed across a spectrum of rare genetic disorders, detailed assessment of data from genome-wide association studies now reveal that detectable clonal mosaicism involving large structural alterations (> 2 Mb) can also be seen in populations of apparently healthy individuals. The first generation of descriptive studies have generated new interest in understanding the molecular basis of the affected genomic regions, percent of the cellular subpopulation involved, and developmental timing of the underlying mutational event, which could reveal new insights into the initiation, clonal expansion and phenotypic manifestations of mosaic events. Early evidence indicates detectable clonal mosaicism increases in frequency with age and could preferentially occur in males. The observed pattern of recurrent events affecting specific chromosomal regions indicates some regions are more susceptible to these events, which could reflect inter-individual differences in genomic stability. Moreover, it is also plausible that the presence of large structural events could be associated with cancer risk. The characterization of detectable genetic mosaicism reveals that there could be important dynamic changes in the human genome associated with the aging process, which could be associated with risk for common disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurological disorders. PMID:24246702

  16. Detection of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type XI Carrying Highly Divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr Genes in Human Clinical Isolates of Clonal Complex 130 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Anna C.; Deasy, Emily C.; Slickers, Peter; Brennan, Grainne; O'Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Coleman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon. PMID:21636525

  17. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Wilson, Jack H.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W airplane was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of controls on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics for a range of possible loadings of the.airplane were determined. The effect of a revised-tail installation (small dual fins added to the stabilizer of the original tail and the vertical-tail height of the original tail increased) and the effect of various ventral-fin and antispin-fillet installations were determined. The investigation also included spin-recovery parachute tests.

  18. Inferring Clonal Composition from Multiple Sections of a Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Alex; Weber, Kris; Smith, Josh; Nickerson, Debbie; Song, ChaoZhong; Witten, Daniela; Blau, C. Anthony; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-01-01

    Cancers arise from successive rounds of mutation and selection, generating clonal populations that vary in size, mutational content and drug responsiveness. Ascertaining the clonal composition of a tumor is therefore important both for prognosis and therapy. Mutation counts and frequencies resulting from next-generation sequencing (NGS) potentially reflect a tumor's clonal composition; however, deconvolving NGS data to infer a tumor's clonal structure presents a major challenge. We propose a generative model for NGS data derived from multiple subsections of a single tumor, and we describe an expectation-maximization procedure for estimating the clonal genotypes and relative frequencies using this model. We demonstrate, via simulation, the validity of the approach, and then use our algorithm to assess the clonal composition of a primary breast cancer and associated metastatic lymph node. After dividing the tumor into subsections, we perform exome sequencing for each subsection to assess mutational content, followed by deep sequencing to precisely count normal and variant alleles within each subsection. By quantifying the frequencies of 17 somatic variants, we demonstrate that our algorithm predicts clonal relationships that are both phylogenetically and spatially plausible. Applying this method to larger numbers of tumors should cast light on the clonal evolution of cancers in space and time. PMID:25010360

  19. Kin Recognition in a Clonal Fish, Poecilia formosa.

    PubMed

    Makowicz, Amber M; Tiedemann, Ralph; Steele, Rachel N; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can distinguish between different clonal lineages, associating with genetically identical, sister clones, and use multiple sensory modalities. Also, they scale their aggressive behaviors according to the relatedness to other females: they are more aggressive to non-related clones. Our results demonstrate that even in species with very small genetic differences between individuals, kin recognition can be adaptive. Their discriminatory abilities and regulation of costly behaviors provides a powerful example of natural selection in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:27483372

  20. Kin Recognition in a Clonal Fish, Poecilia formosa

    PubMed Central

    Makowicz, Amber M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can distinguish between different clonal lineages, associating with genetically identical, sister clones, and use multiple sensory modalities. Also, they scale their aggressive behaviors according to the relatedness to other females: they are more aggressive to non-related clones. Our results demonstrate that even in species with very small genetic differences between individuals, kin recognition can be adaptive. Their discriminatory abilities and regulation of costly behaviors provides a powerful example of natural selection in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:27483372

  1. Clonal Evolution Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis Transformed to Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Daniel A.C.; Miller, Christopher A.; McLellan, Michael D.; Fulton, Robert S.; Moore, Deborah M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Oh, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal architecture in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is poorly understood. Here we report genomic analyses of a patient with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) transformed to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on PMF and sAML diagnosis samples, with skin included as a germline surrogate. Deep sequencing validation was performed on the WGS samples and an additional sample obtained during sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Clustering analysis of 649 validated somatic single nucleotide variants revealed four distinct clonal groups, each including putative driver mutations. The first group (including JAK2 and U2AF1), representing the founding clone, included mutations with high frequency at all three disease stages. The second clonal group (including MYB) was present only in PMF, suggesting the presence of a clone that was dispensable for transformation. The third group (including ASXL1) contained mutations with low frequency in PMF and high frequency in subsequent samples, indicating evolution of the dominant clone with disease progression. The fourth clonal group (including IDH1 and RUNX1) was acquired at sAML transformation and was predominantly absent at sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Taken together, these findings illustrate the complex clonal dynamics associated with disease evolution in MPNs and sAML. PMID:25252869

  2. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis implies a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Chassain, Benoît; Lemée, Ludovic; Didi, Jennifer; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Brisse, Sylvain; Pons, Jean-Louis; Pestel-Caron, Martine

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is recognized as one of the major pathogenic species within the genus Staphylococcus, even though it belongs to the coagulase-negative group. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 87 S. lugdunensis isolates from various clinical and geographic sources by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, dat, ddl, gmk, ldh, recA, and yqiL). The number of alleles ranged from four (gmk and ldh) to nine (yqiL). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 20 different sequence types (STs) and five clonal complexes. The 20 STs lacked correlation with geographic source. Isolates recovered from hematogenic infections (blood or osteoarticular isolates) or from skin and soft tissue infections did not cluster in separate lineages. Penicillin-resistant isolates clustered mainly in one clonal complex, unlike glycopeptide-tolerant isolates, which did not constitute a distinct subpopulation within S. lugdunensis. Phylogenies from the sequences of the seven individual housekeeping genes were congruent, indicating a predominantly mutational evolution of these genes. Quantitative analysis of the linkages between alleles from the seven loci revealed a significant linkage disequilibrium, thus confirming a clonal population structure for S. lugdunensis. This first MLST scheme for S. lugdunensis provides a new tool for investigating the macroepidemiology and phylogeny of this unusually virulent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. PMID:22785196

  3. Multilocus Sequence Typing Analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Implies a Clonal Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chassain, Benoît; Lemée, Ludovic; Didi, Jennifer; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Brisse, Sylvain; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is recognized as one of the major pathogenic species within the genus Staphylococcus, even though it belongs to the coagulase-negative group. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 87 S. lugdunensis isolates from various clinical and geographic sources by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, dat, ddl, gmk, ldh, recA, and yqiL). The number of alleles ranged from four (gmk and ldh) to nine (yqiL). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 20 different sequence types (STs) and five clonal complexes. The 20 STs lacked correlation with geographic source. Isolates recovered from hematogenic infections (blood or osteoarticular isolates) or from skin and soft tissue infections did not cluster in separate lineages. Penicillin-resistant isolates clustered mainly in one clonal complex, unlike glycopeptide-tolerant isolates, which did not constitute a distinct subpopulation within S. lugdunensis. Phylogenies from the sequences of the seven individual housekeeping genes were congruent, indicating a predominantly mutational evolution of these genes. Quantitative analysis of the linkages between alleles from the seven loci revealed a significant linkage disequilibrium, thus confirming a clonal population structure for S. lugdunensis. This first MLST scheme for S. lugdunensis provides a new tool for investigating the macroepidemiology and phylogeny of this unusually virulent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. PMID:22785196

  4. Antioxidant activities from different rosemary clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lan; Narasimhamoorthy, Brindha; Zhao, Liuqing; Greaves, John A; Schroeder, William D

    2016-06-15

    Rosemary extract is widely used in food industry and carnosic acid is reported to be the major component that is responsible for its antioxidant activities. However, it is unclear how the numerous plant metabolites interact and contribute to the overall antioxidant activity. In this study, with poultry fat as the model food system, rosemary extract from six clonal lines were evaluated that each represented a different genetic variant. As expected, rosemary extract with higher carnosic acid content had higher antioxidant activity. However, rosemary extract which had carnosic acid removed retained a significant amount of activity. Furthermore, when the individual contributions of carnosic acid and the portion without carnosic acid were evaluated separately, neither was shown to be responsible for the overall level of its stabilization effect from rosemary extract as a whole entity. The interactions among different plant metabolites have a major impact on the overall antioxidant capabilities of rosemary extract. PMID:26868574

  5. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool. PMID:27198673

  6. Neisseria meningitidis ST-11 clonal complex, Chile 2012.

    PubMed

    Araya, Pamela; Fernández, Jorge; Del Canto, Felipe; Seoane, Mabel; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana B; Barra, Gisselle; Pidal, Paola; Díaz, Janepsy; Hormazábal, Juan C; Valenzuela, María T

    2015-02-01

    Serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis was the main cause of invasive meningococcal disease in Chile during 2012. The case-fatality rate for this disease was higher than in previous years. Genotyping of meningococci isolated from case-patients identified the hypervirulent lineage W:P1.5,2:ST-11, which contained allele 22 of the fHbp gene. PMID:25625322

  7. Neisseria meningitidis ST-11 Clonal Complex, Chile 2012

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Pamela; Del Canto, Felipe; Seoane, Mabel; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana B.; Barra, Gisselle; Pidal, Paola; Díaz, Janepsy; Hormazábal, Juan C.; Valenzuela, María T.

    2015-01-01

    Serogroup W Neisseria meningitidis was the main cause of invasive meningococcal disease in Chile during 2012. The case-fatality rate for this disease was higher than in previous years. Genotyping of meningococci isolated from case-patients identified the hypervirulent lineage W:P1.5,2:ST-11, which contained allele 22 of the fHbp gene. PMID:25625322

  8. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. III. Clonal Frames

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Bridges, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    PCR fragments, 1500-bp, from 15 previously sequenced regions in the Escherichia coli chromosome have been compared by restriction analysis in a large set of wild (ECOR) strains. Prior published observations of segmental clonality are confirmed: each of several sequence types is shared by a number of strains. The rate of recombinational replacement and the average size of the replacements are estimated in a set of closely related strains in which a clonal frame is dotted with occasional stretches of DNA belonging to other clones. A clonal hierarchy is described. Some new comparative sequencing data are presented. PMID:1979037

  9. Effects of clonal integration on the invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides under heterogeneous and homogeneous water availability

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Liu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, living in heterogeneous or homogeneous habitats. To understand how clonal integration affects the performance of these plants in different habitat conditions, an 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted: ramet pairs of A. philoxeroides were grown in two habitats, either heterogeneous or homogeneous in water availability, with the stolon connections either severed or kept intact. Under heterogeneous water availability, compared with ramets in homogeneous habitats, clonal integration significantly promoted the growth and photosynthetic performance of water-stressed apical ramets, whereas it only increased the photosynthetic performance but did not affect the growth of water-stressed basal ramets. Moreover, clonal integration markedly increased the root/shoot ratios of ramets grown in habitats with high water supply but decreased it under low water availability. Under homogeneous water availability, stolon connection (clonal integration) did not influence the growth, photosynthetic performance and biomass allocation of water-stressed ramets, but it significantly promoted the growth of well-watered ramets in both apical and basal sections. These findings deepen our understanding of the bidirectional and differentiated (mainly acropetal) clonal integration of A. philoxeroides, suggesting that the invasive plant A. philoxeroides can benefit from clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats. PMID:27416868

  10. Effects of clonal integration on the invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides under heterogeneous and homogeneous water availability.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Liu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, living in heterogeneous or homogeneous habitats. To understand how clonal integration affects the performance of these plants in different habitat conditions, an 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted: ramet pairs of A. philoxeroides were grown in two habitats, either heterogeneous or homogeneous in water availability, with the stolon connections either severed or kept intact. Under heterogeneous water availability, compared with ramets in homogeneous habitats, clonal integration significantly promoted the growth and photosynthetic performance of water-stressed apical ramets, whereas it only increased the photosynthetic performance but did not affect the growth of water-stressed basal ramets. Moreover, clonal integration markedly increased the root/shoot ratios of ramets grown in habitats with high water supply but decreased it under low water availability. Under homogeneous water availability, stolon connection (clonal integration) did not influence the growth, photosynthetic performance and biomass allocation of water-stressed ramets, but it significantly promoted the growth of well-watered ramets in both apical and basal sections. These findings deepen our understanding of the bidirectional and differentiated (mainly acropetal) clonal integration of A. philoxeroides, suggesting that the invasive plant A. philoxeroides can benefit from clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats. PMID:27416868

  11. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Rumen L; Kuhner, Mary K; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A; Galipeau, Patricia C; Paulson, Thomas G; Sather, Cassandra L; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D; Blount, Patricia L; Vaughan, Thomas L; Reid, Brian J; Maley, Carlo C

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  12. NSAIDs Modulate Clonal Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Rumen L.; Kuhner, Mary K.; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Sather, Cassandra L.; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D.; Blount, Patricia L.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Reid, Brian J.; Maley, Carlo C.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5–8 time points over 6.4–19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1–8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3–1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  13. Molecular Mimicry and Clonal Deletion: A Fresh Look

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Noel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous “black holes”, in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  14. GENETIC VARIATION IN CLONAL VERTEBRATES DETECTED BY SIMPLE SEQUENCE FINGERPRINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of clonal heterogeneity is central to understanding evolutionary and population genetics of roughly 50 species of vertebrates lack effective genetic recombination. imple-sequence DNA fingerprinting with oligonucleotide probes (CAG)5 and (GACA)4 was used to detect hete...

  15. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    PubMed

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  16. Clonal Expansion (CE) Models in Cancer Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer arises when cells accumulate sufficient critical mutations. Carcinogens increase the probability of mutation during cell division or promote clonal expansion within stages. Multistage CE models recapitulate this process and provide a framework for incorporating relevant da...

  17. Clonal integration in Ludwigia hexapetala under different light regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological integration among ramets of invasive plant species may support their colonization and spread in novel aquatic environments where growth-limiting resources are spatially heterogeneous. Under contrasting light conditions, we investigated how clonal integration influences growth, biomass...

  18. Clonality and anatomic distribution on the skin of antibiotic resistant and sensitive Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, Hans B; Kilian, Mogens

    2014-09-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance in the population of Propionibacterium acnes is a major concern. Our aims were to examine the clonal relationships and anatomical distribution of resistant and sensitive P. acnes. A collection of 350 P. acnes isolates was therefore used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of tetracycline, erythro-mycin and clindamycin, multilocus sequence type, and the identity of genetic resistance markers. Two hitherto unknown resistance mutations were detected. Resistant P. acnes mainly belonged to clonal clusters in division I-1a frequently isolated from skin and associated with moderate to severe acne. All high-level tetracycline resistant strains were members of a single clone. Multiple isolates from distinct anatomic areas of surface skin and follicles of 2 acne patients revealed substantial clonal diversity between areas and co-existence of resistant and sensitive clones. Fifty-two percent of Danish acne patients and 43% of controls carried at least one resistant P. acnes strain, resistance to clindamycin being most frequent followed by tetracycline and erythromycin. Resistance to tetracycline was detected exclusively among isolates from acne patients. In conclusion, antibiotic resistance is associated with particular evolutionary clades of P. acnes and a substantial part is due to a single geographically widespread clone (ST3). Individuals carry a strikingly complex population of P. acnes with distinct virulence potential and antibiotic resistance. PMID:24577497

  19. High-Resolution Two-Locus Clonal Typing of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Billig, Mariya; Dykhuizen, Daniel; Riddell, Kim; Rogers, Peggy; Qin, Xuan; Butler-Wu, Susan; Cookson, Brad T.; Fang, Ferric C.; Scholes, Delia; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2012-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is usually based on the sequencing of 5 to 8 housekeeping loci in the bacterial chromosome and has provided detailed descriptions of the population structure of bacterial species important to human health. However, even strains with identical MLST profiles (known as sequence types or STs) may possess distinct genotypes, which enable different eco- or pathotypic lifestyles. Here we describe a two-locus, sequence-based typing scheme for Escherichia coli that utilizes a 489-nucleotide (nt) internal fragment of fimH (encoding the type 1 fimbrial adhesin) and the 469-nt internal fumC fragment used in standard MLST. Based on sequence typing of 191 model commensal and pathogenic isolates plus 853 freshly isolated clinical E. coli strains, this 2-locus approach—which we call CH (fumC/fimH) typing—consistently yielded more haplotypes than standard 7-locus MLST, splitting large STs into multiple clonal subgroups and often distinguishing different within-ST eco- and pathotypes. Furthermore, specific CH profiles corresponded to specific STs, or ST complexes, with 95% accuracy, allowing excellent prediction of MLST-based profiles. Thus, 2-locus CH typing provides a genotyping tool for molecular epidemiology analysis that is more economical than standard 7-locus MLST but has superior clonal discrimination power and, at the same time, corresponds closely to MLST-based clonal groupings. PMID:22226951

  20. Genetic variegation of clonal architecture and propagating cells in leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristina; Lutz, Christoph; van Delft, Frederik W; Bateman, Caroline M; Guo, Yanping; Colman, Susan M; Kempski, Helena; Moorman, Anthony V; Titley, Ian; Swansbury, John; Kearney, Lyndal; Enver, Tariq; Greaves, Mel

    2011-01-20

    Little is known of the genetic architecture of cancer at the subclonal and single-cell level or in the cells responsible for cancer clone maintenance and propagation. Here we have examined this issue in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in which the ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is an early or initiating genetic lesion followed by a modest number of recurrent or 'driver' copy number alterations. By multiplexing fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for these mutations, up to eight genetic abnormalities can be detected in single cells, a genetic signature of subclones identified and a composite picture of subclonal architecture and putative ancestral trees assembled. Subclones in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have variegated genetics and complex, nonlinear or branching evolutionary histories. Copy number alterations are independently and reiteratively acquired in subclones of individual patients, and in no preferential order. Clonal architecture is dynamic and is subject to change in the lead-up to a diagnosis and in relapse. Leukaemia propagating cells, assayed by serial transplantation in NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice, are also genetically variegated, mirroring subclonal patterns, and vary in competitive regenerative capacity in vivo. These data have implications for cancer genomics and for the targeted therapy of cancer. PMID:21160474

  1. Is cancer really a 'local' cellular clonal disease?

    PubMed

    Bronchud, M H

    2002-11-01

    Cancer is not simply the result of specific genetic alterations in key regulatory genes, but rather a complex multistep process involving selection of a clonal population of cells. To accumulate three, or often as many as seven, specific mutations in a single cell without incurring a significant number of additional mutations that might lead to cell lethality requires a large number of target cells, some mutagenic activity acting on those target cells for a variable period of time, and efficient selection strategies, which may be to some extent tissue-specific. A number of 'protective' intracellular regulatory circuits might be present in proliferating cells deliberately to protect against carcinogenesis. If it does require some seven sequential carcinogenic 'genetic hits' in a single cellular clone for a malignant tumor to develop, it is mathematically more likely to occur in a tissue with a high background of genetic alterations in neighboring cellular clones, than in a tissue with a low background of such alterations, or with no detectable carcinogenic mutations at all. In this context, the old 'field cancerization' theory by Slaughter and the more recent 'multistep carcinogenesis' model by Fearon and Vogelstein can come together in a single model: 'multistep field cancerization'. This simple conclusion, and our ability to measure 'background carcinogenesis' in different parts of the body, might allow early detection of cancer risk, and eventually help us to develop suitable therapeutic strategies to delay or suppress the carcinogenic process. Molecular technologies are just beginning to be sufficiently sensitive to start testing the hypothesis. PMID:12376079

  2. A novel artificial immune clonal selection classification and rule mining with swarm learning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sheshtawi, Khaled A.; Abdul-Kader, Hatem M.; Elsisi, Ashraf B.

    2013-06-01

    Metaheuristic optimisation algorithms have become popular choice for solving complex problems. By integrating Artificial Immune clonal selection algorithm (CSA) and particle swarm optimisation (PSO) algorithm, a novel hybrid Clonal Selection Classification and Rule Mining with Swarm Learning Algorithm (CS2) is proposed. The main goal of the approach is to exploit and explore the parallel computation merit of Clonal Selection and the speed and self-organisation merits of Particle Swarm by sharing information between clonal selection population and particle swarm. Hence, we employed the advantages of PSO to improve the mutation mechanism of the artificial immune CSA and to mine classification rules within datasets. Consequently, our proposed algorithm required less training time and memory cells in comparison to other AIS algorithms. In this paper, classification rule mining has been modelled as a miltiobjective optimisation problem with predictive accuracy. The multiobjective approach is intended to allow the PSO algorithm to return an approximation to the accuracy and comprehensibility border, containing solutions that are spread across the border. We compared our proposed algorithm classification accuracy CS2 with five commonly used CSAs, namely: AIRS1, AIRS2, AIRS-Parallel, CLONALG, and CSCA using eight benchmark datasets. We also compared our proposed algorithm classification accuracy CS2 with other five methods, namely: Naïve Bayes, SVM, MLP, CART, and RFB. The results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable to the 10 studied algorithms. As a result, the hybridisation, built of CSA and PSO, can develop respective merit, compensate opponent defect, and make search-optimal effect and speed better.

  3. Roles of Clonal Integration in both Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijie; Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that clonal integration can promote the performance of clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats, but the roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats were rarely studied simultaneously. Ramet pairs of Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb were placed in two habitats either heterogeneous or homogeneous in soil nutrient availability, with stolon connections left intact or severed. Total biomass, total length of stolons, and number of new ramets of distal (relatively young) ramets located in low-nutrient environments were significantly greater when the distal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from proximal (relatively old) ramets located in high-nutrient environments. Total length of stolons of proximal ramets growing in low-nutrient environments was significantly higher when the proximal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from the distal ramets growing in high-nutrient environments, but stolon connection did not affect total biomass or number of new ramets of the proximal ramets. Stolon severing also did not affect the growth of the whole ramet pairs in heterogeneous environments. In homogeneous high-nutrient environments stolon severing promoted the growth of the proximal ramets and the ramet pairs, but in homogeneous low-nutrient environments it did not affect the growth of the proximal or distal ramets. Hence, for A. philoxeroides, clonal fragmentation appears to be more advantageous than clonal integration in resource-rich homogeneous habitats, and clonal integration becomes beneficial in heterogeneous habitats. Our study contributes to revealing roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats and expansion patterns of invasive clonal plants such as A. philoxeroides in multifarious habitats. PMID:27200026

  4. Roles of Clonal Integration in both Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Habitats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijie; Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that clonal integration can promote the performance of clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats, but the roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats were rarely studied simultaneously. Ramet pairs of Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb were placed in two habitats either heterogeneous or homogeneous in soil nutrient availability, with stolon connections left intact or severed. Total biomass, total length of stolons, and number of new ramets of distal (relatively young) ramets located in low-nutrient environments were significantly greater when the distal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from proximal (relatively old) ramets located in high-nutrient environments. Total length of stolons of proximal ramets growing in low-nutrient environments was significantly higher when the proximal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from the distal ramets growing in high-nutrient environments, but stolon connection did not affect total biomass or number of new ramets of the proximal ramets. Stolon severing also did not affect the growth of the whole ramet pairs in heterogeneous environments. In homogeneous high-nutrient environments stolon severing promoted the growth of the proximal ramets and the ramet pairs, but in homogeneous low-nutrient environments it did not affect the growth of the proximal or distal ramets. Hence, for A. philoxeroides, clonal fragmentation appears to be more advantageous than clonal integration in resource-rich homogeneous habitats, and clonal integration becomes beneficial in heterogeneous habitats. Our study contributes to revealing roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats and expansion patterns of invasive clonal plants such as A. philoxeroides in multifarious habitats. PMID:27200026

  5. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (<5%). Whole-genome sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (<12% diagnostic events were retained at recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  6. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J H; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J L; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L; Lee, John J Y; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K A; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q; Schein, Jacqueline E; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E; Fults, Daniel W; Walter, Andrew W; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Garvin, James H; Stearns, Duncan S; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J; Olson, Jeffrey J; Van Meir, Erwin G; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles G; Cooper, Michael K; Packer, Roger J; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Weiss, William A; Collier, Lara S; Dupuy, Adam J; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Largaespada, David A; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard A; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D; Jones, Steven J M; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-01-21

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon-driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with 'humanized' in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (<5%). Whole-genome sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (<12% diagnostic events were retained at recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  7. Lineage and clonal development of gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Nomura, S; Esumi, H; Job, C; Tan, S S

    1998-12-01

    Individual gastric glands of the stomach are composed of cells of different phenotypes. These are derived from multipotent progenitor stem cells located at the isthmus region of the gland. Previous cell lineage analyses suggest that gastric glands, as in the colon and small intestine, are invariably monoclonal by adult stages. However, little is known about the ontogenetic progression of glandular clonality in the stomach. To examine this issue, we employed an in situ cell lineage marker in female mice heterozygous for an X-linked transgene. We found that stomach glands commence development as polyclonal units, but by adulthood (6 weeks), the majority progressed to monoclonal units. Our analysis suggests that at least three progenitor cells are required to initiate the development of individual gastric glands if they are analyzed just after birth. Hence, unlike the colon and small intestine, stomachs showed a significant fraction (10-25%) of polyclonal glands at adult stages. We suggest that these glands persist from polyclonal glands present in the embryonic stomach and hypothesize that they represent a subpopulation of glands with larger numbers of self-renewing stem cells. PMID:9851847

  8. Genetic diversity and clonal characteristics of ciprofloxacin-resistant meningococcal strains in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqing; Fan, Yaochun; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Li; Du, Pengcheng; Gao, Yuan; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the clonal characteristics and gyrA gene diversity of ciprofloxacin-resistant meningococcal strains in China. One hundred and forty-one ciprofloxacin-resistant and 103 ciprofloxacin-susceptible meningococcal strains were selected for multilocus sequence typing. Of these, 54 ciprofloxacin-resistant and 42 ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains were selected for gyrA gene sequencing. Of the three clonal complexes prevalent in China, serogroup A of ST-5 complex (CC5) and serogroup C/B strains of CC4821 had a high proportion of ciprofloxacin resistance, whereas CC11 serogroup W strains were all susceptible. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the gyrA gene among ciprofloxacin-resistant strains showed more diversity than those among ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains. All ciprofloxacin-resistant strains had a T91I mutation and the ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains had no T91I mutation. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the gyrA gene sequences of CC4821 serogroup B/C strains, CC11 serogroup W, CC1 serogroup A, ciprofloxacin-susceptible CC5 serogroup A and reference strains had high similarity. By contrast, the ciprofloxacin-resistant CC5 serogroup A strains had a highly conserved gyrA gene sequence which was different (94.8% similarity) from that in the above strains. The results of our investigation showed that the high proportion of ciprofloxacin resistance in Neisseria meningitidis is associated with certain sequence types (STs) or clonal complexes (CCs). The prevalence of certain CCs with a high proportion of ciprofloxacin resistance can facilitate the spread of ciprofloxacin resistance. PMID:25082942

  9. BubbleTree: an intuitive visualization to elucidate tumoral aneuploidy and clonality using next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Kuziora, Michael; Creasy, Todd; Lai, Zhongwu; Morehouse, Christopher; Guo, Xiang; Sebastian, Yinong; Shen, Dong; Huang, Jiaqi; Dry, Jonathan R; Xue, Feng; Jiang, Liyan; Yao, Yihong; Higgs, Brandon W

    2016-02-29

    Tumors are characterized by properties of genetic instability, heterogeneity, and significant oligoclonality. Elucidating this intratumoral heterogeneity is challenging but important. In this study, we propose a framework, BubbleTree, to characterize the tumor clonality using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. BubbleTree simultaneously elucidates the complexity of a tumor biopsy, estimating cancerous cell purity, tumor ploidy, allele-specific copy number, and clonality and represents this in an intuitive graph. We further developed a three-step heuristic method to automate the interpretation of the BubbleTree graph, using a divide-and-conquer strategy. In this study, we demonstrated the performance of BubbleTree with comparisons to similar commonly used tools such as THetA2, ABSOLUTE, AbsCN-seq and ASCAT, using both simulated and patient-derived data. BubbleTree outperformed these tools, particularly in identifying tumor subclonal populations and polyploidy. We further demonstrated BubbleTree's utility in tracking clonality changes from patients' primary to metastatic tumor and dating somatic single nucleotide and copy number variants along the tumor clonal evolution. Overall, the BubbleTree graph and corresponding model is a powerful approach to provide a comprehensive spectrum of the heterogeneous tumor karyotype in human tumors. BubbleTree is R-based and freely available to the research community (https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/BubbleTree.html). PMID:26578606

  10. An invasive clonal plant benefits from clonal integration more than a co-occurring native plant in nutrient-patchy and competitive environments.

    PubMed

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  11. An Invasive Clonal Plant Benefits from Clonal Integration More than a Co-Occurring Native Plant in Nutrient-Patchy and Competitive Environments

    PubMed Central

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  12. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  13. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  14. Clonal integration in homogeneous environments increases performance of Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Physiological integration between connected ramets can increase the performance of clonal plants when ramets experience contrasting levels of resource availabilities in heterogeneous environments. It has generally been shown or assumed that clonal integration has little effect on clonal performance in homogeneous environments. However, a conceptual model suggests that integration could increase performance in a homogeneous environment when connected ramets differ in uptake ability and external resource supply is high. We tested this hypothesis in a greenhouse experiment with the amphibious plant Alternanthera philoxeroides. Ramets in clonal fragments containing three rooted and two unrooted ramets were either left connected or divided into a basal part with two rooted ramets and an apical part with the other ramets. To simulate realistic, homogeneous environments of the species with different levels of resource supply, plants were grown at 0, 20, or 40 cm of water depth. Water depth had a positive effect on most measures of growth, indicating that resource supply increased with depth. Connection had negative to neutral effects on total growth of fragments at a water depth of 0 cm, and neutral to positive effects at 20- and 40-cm depths; effects on the apical part were generally positive and larger at greater depth; effects on the basal part were generally negative and smaller at greater depth. Results largely supported the hypothesis and further suggest that clonal integration of allocation and reproduction may modify benefits of resource sharing in homogeneous environments. PMID:26009243

  15. Multiple disturbances accelerate clonal growth in a potentially monodominant bamboo.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Paul R; Platt, William J

    2008-03-01

    Organisms capable of rapid clonal growth sometimes monopolize newly freed space and resources. We hypothesize that sequential disturbances might change short-term clonal demography of these organisms in ways that promote formation of monotypic stands. We examined this hypothesis by studying the clonal response of Arundinaria gigantea (giant cane, a bamboo) to windstorm and fire. We studied giant cane growing in both a large tornado-blowdown gap and under forest canopy, in burned and unburned plots, using a split-block design. We measured density of giant cane ramets (culms) and calculated finite rates of increase (lamda) for populations of ramets over three years. Ramet density nearly doubled in stands subjected to both windstorm and fire; the high ramet densities that resulted could inhibit growth in other plants. In comparison, ramet density increased more slowly after windstorm alone, decreased after fire alone, and remained in stasis in controls. We predict that small, sparse stands of giant cane could spread and amalgamate to form dense, monotypic stands (called "canebrakes") that might influence fire return intervals and act as an alternative state to bottomland forest. Other clonal species may similarly form monotypic stands following successive disturbances via rapid clonal growth. PMID:18459325

  16. Molecular epidemiology of clonal diploids: a quick overview and a short DIY (do it yourself) notice.

    PubMed

    De Meeûs, Thierry; Lehmann, Laurent; Balloux, François

    2006-03-01

    In this short review we report the basic notions needed for understanding the population genetics of clonal diploids. We focus on the consequences of clonality on the distribution of genetic diversity within individuals, between individuals and between populations. We then summarise how to detect clonality in mainly sexual populations, conversely, how to detect sexuality in mainly clonal populations and also how genetic differentiation between populations is affected by clonality in diploids. This information is then used for building recipes on how to analyse and interpret genetic polymorphism data in molecular epidemiology studies of clonal diploids. PMID:16290062

  17. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R; Lau, Chiu T; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria Del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L; Kate, Fiebo J W Ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C; Naber, Anton H J; van Oijen, Arnoud H A M; Baak, Lubbertus C; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J M; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Maley, Carlo C; Graham, Trevor A; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm(2) (95% CI: 0.09-4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of 'benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  18. Pretransplant cytotoxic conditioning produces effects consistent with clonal deletion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, T L; Johnson, C P; Sutherland, D E

    1987-05-01

    A rat cardiac allograft model (ACl to Lewis) was used to investigate the clonal deletion theory. Twelve groups of Lewis recipients received various combinations of donor-specific blood transfusions (DSTs), immediate post-DST immunosuppression with azathioprine/prednisone, and low-dose cyclosporine (1 mg/kg/day) posttransplant. DSTs and cyclosporine together gave modest prolongation of graft survival (from 6.0 to 17 days). DSTs plus immediate post-DST immunosuppression followed by low-dose cyclosporine prolonged graft survival to an average of 45 days. Third-party transfusions alone and in combination with immunosuppression did not significantly prolong allograft survival. Postoperative cyclosporine was required for the expression of this effect suggesting that clonal depression rather than clonal deletion had occurred. Combining DSTs with brief but intense preoperative immunosuppression may be a more effective method of pretransplant conditioning than DSTs alone. PMID:3295388

  19. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R.; Lau, Chiu T.; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L.; Kate, Fiebo J. W. ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C.; Naber, Anton H. J.; van Oijen, Arnoud H. A. M.; Baak, Lubbertus C.; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J. M.; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Graham, Trevor A.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm2 (95% CI: 0.09–4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of ‘benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  20. [Clonal eosinophilia revealed by recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infection].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Figueredo, M; Dumon-Gubeno, M-C; Nicolle, I; Tarhini, A; Medioni, L-D; Naman, H; Mouroux, J

    2011-06-01

    Acquired eosinophilia is currently classified into secondary (reactional to underlying diseases), clonal (presence of a bone marrow histological, cytogenetic or molecular marker of a myeloid malignancy) and idiopathic (neither secondary nor clonal) categories. We report the case of a 47-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital for Staphylococcus aureus recurring infections. An hypereosinophilia was discovered and led to molecular analysis. The identification of FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene permitted the diagnostic of clonal eosinophilia. Treatment by imatinib mesylate induced an haematological remission, the control of the infection and thoracotomy cicatrization. This case is original because of its infectious presentation and the efficacy of imatinib mesylate to control the infectious process. PMID:21665081

  1. Female and male fitness consequences of clonal growth in a dwarf bamboo population with a high degree of clonal intermingling

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ayumi; Tomimatsu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou; Saitoh, Tomoyuki; Shibata, Shozo; Makita, Akifumi; Suyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Although many studies have reported that clonal growth interferes with sexual reproduction as a result of geitonogamous self-pollination and inbreeding depression, the mating costs of clonal growth are expected to be reduced when genets are spatially intermingled with others. This study examined how clonal growth affects both female and male reproductive success by studying a population of a mass-flowering plant, Sasa veitchii var. hirsuta, with a high degree of clonal intermingling. Methods In a 10 × 10 m plot, genets were discriminated based on the multilocus genotypes of 11 nuclear microsatellite loci. The relationships between genet size and the components of reproductive success were then investigated. Male siring success and female and male selfing rates were assessed using paternity analysis. Key Results A total of 111 genets were spatially well intermingled with others. In contrast to previous studies with species forming distinct monoclonal patches, seed production linearly increased with genet size. While male siring success was a decelerating function of genet size, selfing rates were relatively low and not related to genet size. Conclusions The results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize the role of the spatial arrangement of genets on both the quantity and quality of offpsring, and suggest that an intermingled distribution of genets can reduce the mating costs of clonal growth and enhance overall fitness, particularly female fitness. PMID:25228034

  2. Clonal Diversification and Changes in Lipid Traits and Colony Morphology in Mycobacterium abscessus Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Hsu, Amy P; Tettelin, Hervé; Shallom, Shamira J; Drake, Steven K; Ding, Li; Wu, Un-In; Adamo, Nick; Prevots, D Rebecca; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2015-11-01

    The smooth-to-rough colony morphology shift in Mycobacterium abscessus has been implicated in loss of glycopeptidolipid (GPL), increased pathogenicity, and clinical decline in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the evolutionary phenotypic and genetic changes remain obscure. Serial isolates from nine non-CF patients with persistent M. abscessus infection were characterized by colony morphology, lipid profile via thin-layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), sequencing of eight genes in the GPL locus, and expression level of fadD23, a key gene involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids. All 50 isolates were typed as M. abscessus subspecies abscessus and were clonally related within each patient. Rough isolates, all lacking GPL, predominated at later disease stages, some showing variation within rough morphology. While most (77%) rough isolates harbored detrimental mutations in mps1 and mps2, 13% displayed previously unreported mutations in mmpL4a and mmpS4, the latter yielding a putative GPL precursor. Two isolates showed no deleterious mutations in any of the eight genes sequenced. Mixed populations harboring different GPL locus mutations were detected in 5 patients, demonstrating clonal diversification, which was likely overlooked by conventional acid-fast bacillus (AFB) culture methods. Our work highlights applications of MALDI-TOF MS beyond identification, focusing on mycobacterial lipids relevant in virulence and adaptation. Later isolates displayed accumulation of triacylglycerol and reduced expression of fadD23, sometimes preceding rough colony onset. Our results indicate that clonal diversification and a shift in lipid metabolism, including the loss of GPL, occur during chronic lung infection with M. abscessus. GPL loss alone may not account for all traits associated with rough morphology. PMID:26292297

  3. Clonal Outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Eastern Panama

    PubMed Central

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Baro, Nicholas K.; Calzada, Jose E.; Santamaria, Ana M.; Daniels, Rachel; Wong, Wesley; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Socrates; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Marti, Matthias; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the source of resurgent parasites is paramount to a strategic, successful intervention for malaria elimination. Although the malaria incidence in Panama is low, a recent outbreak resulted in a 6-fold increase in reported cases. We hypothesized that parasites sampled from this epidemic might be related and exhibit a clonal population structure. We tested the genetic relatedness of parasites, using informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms and drug resistance loci. We found that parasites were clustered into 3 clonal subpopulations and were related to parasites from Colombia. Two clusters of Panamanian parasites shared identical drug resistance haplotypes, and all clusters shared a chloroquine-resistance genotype matching the pfcrt haplotype of Colombian origin. Our findings suggest these resurgent parasite populations are highly clonal and that the high clonality likely resulted from epidemic expansion of imported or vestigial cases. Malaria outbreak investigations that use genetic tools can illuminate potential sources of epidemic malaria and guide strategies to prevent further resurgence in areas where malaria has been eliminated. PMID:25336725

  4. The role of plant propagation at clonal genebanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clonal genebanks utilize both seed and vegetative propagation techniques. Seed propagation is important for the introduction of new genotypes (accessions), especially crop wild relatives. Additionally, seed may be produced by breeding or to otherwise support research. Temperate tree fruit and nut c...

  5. Generation of clonal zebrafish line by androgenesis without egg irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jilun; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of clonal zebrafish will facilitate large-scale genetic screening and help us to overcome other biological and biotechnological challenges due to their isogenecity. However, protocols for the development of clonal lines have not been optimized. Here, we sought to develop a novel method for generation of clonal zebrafish by androgenesis induced by cold shock. Androgenetic zebrafish doubled haploids (DHs) were induced by cold shock of just-fertilized eggs, and the eggs were then heat shocked to double the chromosome set. The yield rate of putative DHs relative to the total number of eggs used was 1.10% ± 0.19%. Microsatellite genotyping of the putative DHs using 30 loci that covered all 25 linkage groups detected no heterozygous loci, confirming the homozygosity of the DHs. Thus, a clonal line was established from sperm of a DH through a second cycle of cold-shock androgenesis and heat-shock chromosome doubling, followed by genetic verification of the isogenic rate confirming the presence of identical DNA fingerprints by using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. In addition, our data provided important insights into the cytological mechanisms of cold-shock-induced androgenesis. PMID:26289165

  6. Clonal diversity of recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, MJ; Shen, D; Shao, J; Ding, L; White, BS; Kandoth, C; Miller, CA; Niu, B; McLellan, MD; Dees, ND; Fulton, R; Elliot, K; Heath, S; Grillot, M; Westervelt, P; Link, DC; DiPersio, JF; Mardis, E; Ley, TJ; Wilson, RK; Graubert, TA

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that most cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are clonally heterogeneous, with a founding clone and multiple subclones. It is not known whether specific gene mutations typically occur in founding clones or subclones. We screened a panel of 94 candidate genes in a cohort of 157 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). This included 150 cases with samples obtained at MDS diagnosis and 15 cases with samples obtained at sAML transformation (8 were also analyzed at the MDS stage). We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to define the clonal architecture in eight sAML genomes and identified the range of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) for founding clone mutations. At least one mutation or cytogenetic abnormality was detected in 83% of the 150 MDS patients and 17 genes were significantly mutated (false discovery rate ≤0.05). Individual genes and patient samples displayed a wide range of VAFs for recurrently mutated genes, indicating that no single gene is exclusively mutated in the founding clone. The VAFs of recurrently mutated genes did not fully recapitulate the clonal architecture defined by WGS, suggesting that comprehensive sequencing may be required to accurately assess the clonal status of recurrently mutated genes in MDS. PMID:23443460

  7. Quantification of Clonal Circulating Plasma cells in Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Wilson I; Morice, William G; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gupta, Vinay; Timm, Michael M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Buadi, Francis K; Lacy, Martha Q; Singh, Preet P; Kapoor, Prashant; Gertz, Morie A; Kumar, Shaji K

    2014-01-01

    The presence of clonal circulating plasma cells (cPCs) remains a marker of high-risk disease in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, its prognostic utility in MM patients with previously treated disease is unknown. We studied 647 consecutive patients with previously treated MM seen at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester who had their peripheral blood evaluated for cPCs by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Of these patients, 145 had actively relapsing disease while the remaining 502 had disease that was in a plateau and included 68 patients in complete remission (CR) and 434 patients with stable disease. Patients with actively relapsing disease were more likely to have clonal cPCs than those in a plateau (P < 0.001). None of the patients in CR had any clonal cPCs detected. Among patients whose disease was in a plateau, the presence of clonal cPCs predicted for a worse median survival (22 months vs. not reached; P=0.004). Among actively relapsing patients, the presence of ≥100 cPCs predicted for a worse survival after flow cytometry analysis (12 months vs. 33 months; P<0.001). Future studies are needed to determine the role of these findings in developing a risk-adapted treatment approach in MM patients with actively relapsing disease. PMID:25113422

  8. Genomic Aberrations Drive Clonal Evolution of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Akash Kumar; Sreekumar, Arun

    2016-05-01

    Molecular features of castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer (CRPC-NE) are not well characterized. A recent study that investigated genomic aberrations of CRPC-NE tumors suggests their clonal evolution from CRPC adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, the existence of a distinct DNA methylation profile in CRPC-NE implicates a critical role for epigenetic modification in the development of CRPC-NE. PMID:27037211

  9. Phenotypic differences among three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three major clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum present in North America and Europe named NA1, NA2, and EU1. Twenty-three isolates representing all three lineages were evaluated for phenotype including (i) aggressiveness on detached Rhododendron leaves and (ii) growth rate at minimum, ...

  10. Comparative organogenic responses of six clonal apple rootstock cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The organogenesis potential is different among cultivars and must be optimized for individual genotypes. Shoot organogenesis capacity from leaf explants and root organogenesis capacity of in vitro shoots in six clonal apple rootstock cultivars were compared. The shoot organogenesis capacity was hi...

  11. Generation of clonal zebrafish line by androgenesis without egg irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jilun; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of clonal zebrafish will facilitate large-scale genetic screening and help us to overcome other biological and biotechnological challenges due to their isogenecity. However, protocols for the development of clonal lines have not been optimized. Here, we sought to develop a novel method for generation of clonal zebrafish by androgenesis induced by cold shock. Androgenetic zebrafish doubled haploids (DHs) were induced by cold shock of just-fertilized eggs, and the eggs were then heat shocked to double the chromosome set. The yield rate of putative DHs relative to the total number of eggs used was 1.10% ± 0.19%. Microsatellite genotyping of the putative DHs using 30 loci that covered all 25 linkage groups detected no heterozygous loci, confirming the homozygosity of the DHs. Thus, a clonal line was established from sperm of a DH through a second cycle of cold-shock androgenesis and heat-shock chromosome doubling, followed by genetic verification of the isogenic rate confirming the presence of identical DNA fingerprints by using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. In addition, our data provided important insights into the cytological mechanisms of cold-shock–induced androgenesis. PMID:26289165

  12. Increase of genetic diversity and clonal replacement of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in South-East Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Folli, Bettina; Leitner, Eva; Feierl, Gebhard; Kittinger, Clemens; Grisold, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Spa-typing and microarray techniques were used to study epidemiological changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in South-East Austria. The population structure of 327 MRSA isolated between 2002 and 2012 was investigated. MRSA was assigned to 58 different spa types and 14 different MLST CC (multilocus sequence type clonal complexes); in particular, between 2007 and 2012, an increasing diversity in MRSA clones could be observed. The most abundant clonal complex was CC5. On the respective SCCmec cassettes, the CC5 isolates differed clearly within this decade and CC5/SCCmecI, the South German MRSA, predominant in 2002, was replaced by CC5/SCCmecII, the Rhine-Hesse MRSA in 2012. Whereas in many European countries MLST CC22-MRSA (EMRSA 15, the Barnim epidemic MRSA) is predominant, this clone occurred in Austria nearly 10 years later than in neighbouring countries. CC45, the Berlin EMRSA, epidemic in Germany, was only sporadically found in South-East Austria. The Irish ST8-MRSA-II represented by spa-type t190 was frequently found in 2002 and 2007, but disappeared in 2012. Our results demonstrate clonal replacement of MRSA clones within the last years in Austria. Ongoing surveillance is warranted for detection of changes within the MRSA population. PMID:27231237

  13. Increase of genetic diversity and clonal replacement of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in South-East Austria.

    PubMed

    Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Folli, Bettina; Leitner, Eva; Feierl, Gebhard; Kittinger, Clemens; Grisold, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Spa-typing and microarray techniques were used to study epidemiological changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in South-East Austria. The population structure of 327 MRSA isolated between 2002 and 2012 was investigated. MRSA was assigned to 58 different spa types and 14 different MLST CC (multilocus sequence type clonal complexes); in particular, between 2007 and 2012, an increasing diversity in MRSA clones could be observed. The most abundant clonal complex was CC5. On the respective SCCmec cassettes, the CC5 isolates differed clearly within this decade and CC5/SCCmecI, the South German MRSA, predominant in 2002, was replaced by CC5/SCCmecII, the Rhine-Hesse MRSA in 2012. Whereas in many European countries MLST CC22-MRSA (EMRSA 15, the Barnim epidemic MRSA) is predominant, this clone occurred in Austria nearly 10 years later than in neighbouring countries. CC45, the Berlin EMRSA, epidemic in Germany, was only sporadically found in South-East Austria. The Irish ST8-MRSA-II represented by spa-type t190 was frequently found in 2002 and 2007, but disappeared in 2012. Our results demonstrate clonal replacement of MRSA clones within the last years in Austria. Ongoing surveillance is warranted for detection of changes within the MRSA population. PMID:27231237

  14. Clonal Origin of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Recurrence After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenglu; Gong, Weihua; Shou, Dawei; Zhang, Luzhou; Gu, Xiangqian; Wang, Yuliang; Teng, Dahong; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to determine whether patterns of tumor clonal origin in pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (PNHC) could serve as an indicator of tumor recurrence following liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor tissue samples from 60 PNHC patients who underwent liver transplantation were examined. The diagnosis of patients conformed to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) standards for pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma. We performed loss of heterozygosity tests at multiple microsatellite sites to determine the clonal origins of the tumors. Clinical information, pathological data, preoperative serum alpha-feto protein (AFP) and postoperative follow-ups were obtained and correlations between the clonal origin of the tumor, tumor-free survival, pathological characteristics, and AFP levels in serum were studied. RESULTS A total of 165 tumor nodules were collected. Tumor clonal origins were identified as intrahepatic metastasis (IM; 41.67%), multicentric occurrence (MO; 55%) or unidentified (3.33%). Three-year tumor-free survival for the IM group was 48% compared to 75.76% in the MO group (p<0.05), while the occurrence of microscopic tumor thrombus was 100% and 3.03% (p<0.05) for these groups, respectively. The degree of tumor differentiation was 80% for the IM group and 18.18% for the MO group (p<0.05), while the mean AFP concentration for these groups was 226.80 μg/L (2.78-3000 μg/L) and 24.59 μg/L (1.16-531. 30 μg/L; p<0.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Clonal origin patterns can serve as important indicators to predict the recurrence of PNHC following liver transplantation. Taken together with pathological characteristics and preoperative serum AFP levels, the risk of recurrence can be established in advance. PMID:27487734

  15. Colonization history and clonal richness of asexual Daphnia in periglacial habitats of contrasting age in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Haileselasie, Tsegazeabe H; Mergeay, Joachim; Weider, Lawrence J; Jeppesen, Erik; De Meester, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Due to climate change, Arctic ice sheets are retreating. This leads to the formation of numerous new periglacial ponds and lakes, which are being colonized by planktonic organisms such as the water flea Daphnia. This system provides unique opportunities to test genotype colonization dynamics and the genetic assemblage of populations. Here, we studied clonal richness of the Daphnia pulex species complex in novel periglacial habitats created by glacial retreat in the Jakobshavn Isbrae area of western Greenland. Along a 10 km transect, we surveyed 73 periglacial habitats out of which 61 were colonized by Daphnia pulex. Hence, for our analysis, we used 21 ponds and 40 lakes in two clusters of habitats differing in age (estimated <50 years vs. >150 years). We tested the expectation that genetic diversity would be low in recently formed (i.e. young), small habitats, but would increase with increasing age and size. We identified a total of 42 genetically distinct clones belonging to two obligately asexual species of the D. pulex species complex: D. middendorffiana and the much more abundant D. pulicaria. While regional clonal richness was high, most clones were rare: 16 clones were restricted to a single habitat and the five most widespread clones accounted for 68% of all individuals sampled. On average, 3·2 clones (range: 1-12) coexisted in a given pond or lake. There was no relationship between clonal richness and habitat size when we controlled for habitat age. Whereas clonal richness was statistically higher in the cluster of older habitats when compared with the cluster of younger ponds and lakes, most young habitats were colonized by multiple genotypes. Our data suggest that newly formed (periglacial) ponds and lakes are colonized within decades by multiple genotypes via multiple colonization events, even in the smallest of our study systems (4 m(2) ). PMID:27279332

  16. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo. PMID:26952167

  17. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER- 'collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  18. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher A.; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E.; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J.; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A.; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER− ‘collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  19. Rapamycin inhibits clonal expansion and adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, W C; Bierer, B E; McKnight, S L

    1995-01-01

    Differentiating 3T3-L1 cells express an immunophilin early during the adipocyte conversion program as described in this issue [Yeh, W.-C., Li, T.-K., Bierer, B. E. & McKnight, S. L. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 11081-11085]. The temporal expression profile of this protein, designated FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51, is concordant with the clonal-expansion period undertaken by 3T3-L1 cells after exposure to adipogenic hormones. Having observed FKBP51 synthesis early during adipogenesis, we tested the effects of three immunosuppressive drugs--cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin--on the terminal-differentiation process. Adipocyte conversion was not affected by either cyclosporin A or FK506 and yet was significantly reduced by rapamycin at drug concentrations as low as 10 nM. Clonal expansion was impeded in drug-treated cultures, as was the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets normally seen late during differentiation. Rapamycin treatment likewise inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha, a transcription factor required for 3T3-L1 cell differentiation. All three of these effects were reversed by high FK506 concentrations, indicating that the operative inhibitory event was mediated by an immunophilin-rapamycin complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479942

  20. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C.; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S.; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A.; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human–mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1+ vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo. PMID:26952167

  1. Serum SmD autoantibody proteomes are clonally restricted and share variable-region peptides.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Mahmood A; Chataway, Tim K; Gilada, George A; Jackson, Michael W; Goldblatt, Fiona M; Walker, Jenny G; Colella, Alex D; Gordon, Tom P

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods have allowed variable (V)-region peptide signatures to be derived from human autoantibodies present in complex serum mixtures. Here, we analysed the clonality and V-region composition of immunoglobulin (Ig) proteomes specific for the immunodominant SmD protein subunit of the lupus-specific Sm autoantigen. Precipitating SmD-specific IgGs were eluted from native SmD-coated ELISA plates preincubated with sera from six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) positive for anti-Sm/RNP. Heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain clonality and V-region sequences were analysed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and combined de novo database mass spectrometric sequencing. SmD autoantibody proteomes from all six patients with SLE expressed IgG1 kappa restricted clonotypes specified by IGHV3-7 and IGHV1-69 H-chains and IGKV3-20 and IGKV2-28 L-chains, with shared and individual V-region amino acid replacement mutations. Clonotypic sharing and restricted V-region diversity of systemic autoimmunity can now be extended from the Ro/La cluster to Sm autoantigen and implies a common pathway of anti-Sm autoantibody production in unrelated patients with SLE. PMID:25577500

  2. Estrogen receptor activation function 2 (AF-2) is essential for hormone-dependent transactivation and cell transformation induced by a v-Jun DNA binding domain-estrogen receptor chimera.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Catherine A; Clark, William; Black, Elizabeth J; Gillespie, David A F

    2003-08-25

    A chimeric protein consisting of the estrogen receptor alpha ligand binding domain (ER-alpha LBD) fused to the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the v-Jun oncoprotein, deltavJ-hER, was previously shown to elicit estradiol-dependent transcriptional activation and cell transformation. Remarkably, in the unliganded state deltavJ-hER is not inert, but rather inhibits cell proliferation. To understand the molecular basis for these opposite effects on cell growth, we investigated the effect of estradiol on deltavJ-hER function. We find that deltavJ-hER is localised to the cell nucleus and capable of binding TPA-response element (TRE) DNA recognition sites in the presence and absence of estradiol, indicating that these properties are unlikely to be the targets of hormonal regulation. In contrast, a mutant derivative of deltavJ-hER in which amino acid substitutions selectively disrupt activation function 2 (AF-2) function is unable to elicit estradiol-dependent transcription or cell transformation, even though DNA binding is not impaired. Taken together, these observations establish that estrogen receptor AF-2 activity is essential for cell transformation by deltavJ-hER. PMID:12932827

  3. Distinguishing between Incomplete Lineage Sorting and Genomic Introgressions: Complete Fixation of Allospecific Mitochondrial DNA in a Sexually Reproducing Fish (Cobitis; Teleostei), despite Clonal Reproduction of Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Choleva, Lukas; Musilova, Zuzana; Kohoutova-Sediva, Alena; Paces, Jan; Rab, Petr; Janko, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing between hybrid introgression and incomplete lineage sorting causing incongruence among gene trees in that they exhibit topological differences requires application of statistical approaches that are based on biologically relevant models. Such study is especially challenging in hybrid systems, where usual vectors mediating interspecific gene transfers - hybrids with Mendelian heredity - are absent or unknown. Here we study a complex of hybridizing species, which are known to produce clonal hybrids, to discover how one of the species, Cobitis tanaitica, has achieved a pattern of mito-nuclear mosaic genome over the whole geographic range. We appplied three distinct methods, including the method using solely the information on gene tree topologies, and found that the contrasting mito-nuclear signal might not have resulted from the retention of ancestral polymorphism. Instead, we found two signs of hybridization events related to C. tanaitica; one concerning nuclear gene flow and the other suggested mitochondrial capture. Interestingly, clonal inheritance (gynogenesis) of contemporary hybrids prevents genomic introgressions and non-clonal hybrids are either absent or too rare to be detected among European Cobitis. Our analyses therefore suggest that introgressive hybridizations are rather old episodes, mediated by previously existing hybrids whose inheritance was not entirely clonal. Cobitis complex thus supports the view that the type of resulting hybrids depends on a level of genomic divergence between sexual species. PMID:24971792

  4. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Corey C.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R.L.; Gertz, Caitlyn C.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Turrero Garcia, Miguel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L.; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  5. Clonal forestry, heterosis and advanced-generation breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report discusses the clonal planting stock offers many advantages to the forest products industry. Advanced-generation breeding strategies should be designed to maximize within-family variance and at the same time allow the capture of heterosis. Certainly there may be a conflict in the choice of breeding strategy based on the trait of interest. It may be that the majority of the traits express heterosis due to overdominance. Alternatively, disease resistance is expressed as the lack of a specific metabolite or infection court then the homozygous recessive genotype may be the most desirable. Nonetheless, as the forest products industry begins to utilize the economic advantages of clonal forestry, breeding strategies will have to be optimized for these commercial plant materials. Here, molecular markers can be used to characterize the nature of heterosis and therefore define the appropriate breeding strategy.

  6. Mechanisms of clonal evolution in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ford, Anthony; Kweon, Soo-Mi; Trageser, Daniel; Hasselfeld, Brian; Henke, Nadine; Mooster, Jana; Geng, Huimin; Schwarz, Klaus; Kogan, Scott C.; Casellas, Rafael; Schatz, David G.; Lieber, Michael R; Greaves, Mel F.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia can often be retraced to a pre-leukemic clone carrying a prenatal genetic lesion. Postnatally acquired mutations then drive clonal evolution towards overt leukemia. RAG1-RAG2 and AID enzymes, the diversifiers of immunoglobulin genes, are strictly segregated to early and late stages of B-lymphopoiesis, respectively. Here, we identified small pre-BII cells as a natural subset of increased genetic vulnerability owing to concurrent activation of these enzymes. Consistent with epidemiological findings on childhood ALL etiology, susceptibility to genetic lesions during B-lymphopoiesis at the large to small pre-BII transition is exacerbated by abnormal cytokine signaling and repetitive inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that AID and RAG1-RAG2 drive leukemic clonal evolution with repeated exposure to inflammatory stimuli, paralleling chronic infections in childhood. PMID:25985233

  7. Distinguishing clonal apple rootstocks by isozymes banding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, K; Modgil, M; Sharma, D R

    2001-11-01

    Molecular characterisation of clonal apple rootstocks using isozymes was carried out to identify isozyme polymorphism in seven clonal apple rootstocks and to identify the most characteristic and stable enzyme markers for each individual rootstock. Five enzyme systems were studied out of which polyphenol oxidase, malate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase and peroxidase were useful in discriminating among the rootstocks. The peroxidase enzyme system showed maximum variation and esterase showed the least variation among the rootstocks. Out of seven rootstocks, three were distinguished on the basis of one enzyme system only (M.3 with MDH or PER, M.7 with PPO or PER and MM. 111 with MDH). Out of the sixteen loci studied seven were found to be polymorphic. Genetic variation among the rootstocks was explained on the basis of various parameters. The percentage of polymorphic loci varied from 13.33 to 35.71 per cent. PMID:11906109

  8. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  9. Clonal analysis of limbal epithelial stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    While convincing data clearly suggest the presence of stem cells in the basal limbal epithelium in vivo, testing the proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation capacity of stem cells relies on the development of methodologies that allow for their isolation and extensive propagation in vitro. Clonal analysis involving differentiation between short-lived transient cell clones and long-lived stem cell clones is an invaluable technique to identify stem cells in vitro, and allows cells to be expanded over multiple passages. This chapter describes a protocol for the isolation, expansion, and clonal analysis of limbal epithelial stem cells. The cultivation method described may be essential for long-term restoration of the damaged ocular surface in patients with limbal stem cell deficiency. PMID:23690004

  10. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  11. Local genetic structure in a clonal dioecious angiosperm.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, M V; Reusch, T B H; Procaccini, G

    2005-04-01

    We used seven microsatellite loci to characterize genetic structure and clonal architecture at three different spatial scales (from meters to centimetres) of a Cymodocea nodosa population. C. nodosa exhibits both sexual reproduction and vegetative propagation by rhizome elongation. Seeds remain buried in the sediment nearby the mother plant in a dormant stage until germination. Seed dispersal potential is therefore expected to be extremely restricted. High clonal diversity (up to 67% of distinct genotypes) and a highly intermingled configuration of genets at different spatial scales were found. No significant differences in genetic structure were found among the three spatial scales, indicating that genetic diversity is evenly distributed along the meadow. Autocorrelation analyses of kinship estimates confirmed the absence of spatial clumping of genets at small spatial scale and the expectations of a very restricted seed dispersal (observed dispersal range 1-21 m) in this species. PMID:15773928

  12. Molecular Markers Reveal Exclusively Clonal Reproduction in Trichophyton rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Gräser, Y.; Kühnisch, J.; Presber, W.

    1999-01-01

    Genotypic variability among 96 Trichophyton rubrum strains which displayed different colony morphologies and were collected from four continents was investigated. Twelve markers representing 57 loci were analyzed by PCR fingerprinting, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and random amplified monomorphic DNA markers. Interestingly, none of the methods used revealed any DNA polymorphism, indicating a strictly clonal mode of reproduction and a strong adaptation to human skin. PMID:10523582

  13. Ubiquitylation of CD98 limits cell proliferation and clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Ablack, Jailal N G; Metz, Patrick J; Chang, John T; Cantor, Joseph M; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2015-12-01

    CD98 heavy chain (SLC3A2) facilitates lymphocyte clonal expansion that enables adaptive immunity; however, increased expression of CD98 is also a feature of both lymphomas and leukemias and represents a potential therapeutic target in these diseases. CD98 is transcriptionally regulated and ectopic expression of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ubiquitin ligases MARCH1 or MARCH8 leads to ubiquitylation and lysosomal degradation of CD98. Here, we examined the potential role of ubiquitylation in regulating CD98 expression and cell proliferation. We report that blocking ubiquitylation by use of a catalytically inactive MARCH or by creating a ubiquitylation-resistant CD98 mutant, prevents MARCH-induced CD98 downregulation in HeLa cells. March1-null T cells display increased CD98 expression. Similarly, T cells expressing ubiquitylation-resistant CD98 manifest increased proliferation in vitro and clonal expansion in vivo. Thus, ubiquitylation and the resulting downregulation of CD98 can limit cell proliferation and clonal expansion. PMID:26493331

  14. Gene expression variability in clonal populations: Causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Roberfroid, Stefanie; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade it has been shown that among cell variation in gene expression plays an important role within clonal populations. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanisms contributing to gene expression variability in clonal populations. These are ranging from inherent variations in the biochemical process of gene expression itself, such as intrinsic noise, extrinsic noise and bistability to individual responses to variations in the local micro-environment, a phenomenon called phenotypic plasticity. Also genotypic variations caused by clonal evolution and phase variation can contribute to gene expression variability. Consequently, gene expression studies need to take these fluctuations in expression into account. However, frequently used techniques for expression quantification, such as microarrays, RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR and gene reporter fusions classically determine the population average of gene expression. Here, we discuss how these techniques can be adapted towards single cell analysis by integration with single cell isolation, RNA amplification and microscopy. Alternatively more qualitative selection-based techniques, such as mutant screenings, in vivo expression technology (IVET) and recombination-based IVET (RIVET) can be applied for detection of genes expressed only within a subpopulation. Finally, differential fluorescence induction (DFI), a protocol specially designed for single cell expression is discussed. PMID:26731119

  15. A Computational Clonal Analysis of the Developing Mouse Limb Bud

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Luciano; Arqués, Carlos G.; Torres, Miguel S.; Sharpe, James

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis. PMID:21347315

  16. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  17. Clonal Integration of Fragaria orientalis in Reciprocal and Coincident Patchiness Resources: Cost-Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying

    2013-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to experience different levels of resources. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clonal plants can reciprocally translocate resources between ramets in heterogeneous environments. But little is known about the interaction between benefits of clonal integration and patterns of resource heterogeneity in different patches, i.e., coincident patchiness or reciprocal patchiness. We hypothesized that clonal integration will show different effects on ramets in different patches and more benefit to ramets under reciprocal patchiness than to those under coincident patchiness, as well as that the benefit from clonal integration is affected by the position of proximal and distal ramets under reciprocal or coincident patchiness. A pot experiment was conducted with clonal fragments consisting of two interconnected ramets (proximal and distal ramet) of Fragaria orientalis. In the experiment, proximal and distal ramets were grown in high or low availability of resources, i.e., light and water. Resource limitation was applied either simultaneously to both ramets of a clonal fragment (coincident resource limitation) or separately to different ramets of the same clonal fragment (reciprocal resource limitation). Half of the clonal fragments were connected while the other half were severed. From the experiment, clonal fragments growing under coincident resource limitation accumulated more biomass than those under reciprocal resource limitation. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, the support from proximal ramets to distal ramets was stronger than that from distal ramets to proximal ramets. Through division of labour, clonal fragments of F. orientalis benefited more in reciprocal patchiness than in coincident patchiness. While considering biomass accumulation and ramets production, coincident patchiness were more favourable to clonal plant F. orientalis. PMID:24265832

  18. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    PubMed

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants. PMID:24352844

  19. Clonality, recombination, and hybridization in the plumbing-inhabiting human pathogen Fusarium keratoplasticum inferred from multilocus sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent work has shown that Fusarium species and genotypes most commonly associated with human infections, particularly of the cornea (mycotic keratitis), are the same as those most commonly isolated from plumbing systems. The species most dominant in plumbing biofilms is Fusarium keratoplasticum, a cosmopolitan fungus known almost exclusively from animal infections and biofilms. To better understand its diversity and population dynamics, we developed and utilized a nine-locus sequence-based typing system to make inferences about clonality, recombination, population structure, species boundaries and hybridization. Results High levels of genetic diversity and evidence for recombination and clonality were detected among 75 clinical and 156 environmental isolates of Fusarium keratoplasticum. The multilocus sequence typing system (MLST) resolved 111 unique nine-locus sequence types (STs). The single locus bifactorial determinants of mating compatibility (mating types MAT1-1 and MAT1-2), were found in a ratio of 70:30. All but one of the 49 isolates of the most common ST (FSSC 2d-2) came from human infections, mostly of the cornea, and from biofilms associated with contact lenses and plumbing surfaces. Significant levels of phylogenetic incongruence were found among loci. Putative clonal relationships among genotypes were estimated, showing a mixture of large clonal complexes and unrelated singletons. Discordance between the nuclear ribosomal rRNA and other gene genealogies is consistent with introgression of ribosomal RNA alleles of phylogenetic species FSSC 9 into F. keratoplasticum. No significant population subdivision based on clinical versus non-clinical sources was found. Conclusions Incongruent phylogenetic trees and the presence of both mating types within otherwise identical STs were observed, providing evidence for sexuality in F. keratoplasticum. Cryptic speciation suggested in a published three-locus MLST system was not supported with the addition

  20. Clonal architectures and driver mutations in metastatic melanomas.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Kim, Minjung; Kanchi, Krishna L; Dees, Nathan D; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Malachi; Fenstermacher, David; Sung, Hyeran; Miller, Christopher A; Goetz, Brian; Wendl, Michael C; Griffith, Obi; Cornelius, Lynn A; Linette, Gerald P; McMichael, Joshua F; Sondak, Vernon K; Fields, Ryan C; Ley, Timothy J; Mulé, James J; Wilson, Richard K; Weber, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS) and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1), protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT), as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2). Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9) with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma. PMID:25393105

  1. Clonal Architectures and Driver Mutations in Metastatic Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Dees, Nathan D.; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Malachi; Fenstermacher, David; Sung, Hyeran; Miller, Christopher A.; Goetz, Brian; Wendl, Michael C.; Griffith, Obi; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Linette, Gerald P.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Fields, Ryan C.; Ley, Timothy J.; Mulé, James J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weber, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS) and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1), protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT), as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2). Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3′ base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9) with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma. PMID:25393105

  2. Clonal relationships in recurrent B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, So Young; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2016-03-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements remain largely unmodified during the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. We investigated the clonal relationships between lymphoma components at diagnosis and at relapse by analyzing Ig gene rearrangements. A BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed in 27 patients using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues, with subsequent cloning and sequencing of the amplified Ig genes in 17 patients. All 27 cases of primary and corresponding relapsed tumors showed monoclonal rearrangements of the Ig genes by BIOMED-2 PCR. Whereas IgVH or IgVK fragment lengths were identical in 8/27 pairs (30%), fragment lengths differed in 19/27 pairs (70%). In 17 cases analyzed by sequencing, an identical VDJ gene rearrangement was confirmed in 4/4 pairs (100%) with the same fragment lengths and in 10/13 pairs (77%) with different fragment lengths. Four of 17 primary lymphomas had multiple VDJ rearrangements, and three of them showed an unrelated relapse. Unrelated relapse was observed in 1/8 mantle cell lymphomas, 1/5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and a large B cell lymphoma developed in a patient with a small lymphocytic lymphoma. Unrelated relapses developed after a longer disease-free interval and tended to show poorer outcome compared with related relapse. In summary, relapse of a lymphoma from an unrelated clone is uncommon, but can occur in B-cell lymphomas. Clonal relationships should be determined by sequencing of the Ig genes, and not just by comparing the PCR product size. PMID:26848863

  3. Clonal relationships in recurrent B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, So Young; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements remain largely unmodified during the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. We investigated the clonal relationships between lymphoma components at diagnosis and at relapse by analyzing Ig gene rearrangements. A BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed in 27 patients using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues, with subsequent cloning and sequencing of the amplified Ig genes in 17 patients. All 27 cases of primary and corresponding relapsed tumors showed monoclonal rearrangements of the Ig genes by BIOMED-2 PCR. Whereas IgVH or IgVK fragment lengths were identical in 8/27 pairs (30%), fragment lengths differed in 19/27 pairs (70%). In 17 cases analyzed by sequencing, an identical VDJ gene rearrangement was confirmed in 4/4 pairs (100%) with the same fragment lengths and in 10/13 pairs (77%) with different fragment lengths. Four of 17 primary lymphomas had multiple VDJ rearrangements, and three of them showed an unrelated relapse. Unrelated relapse was observed in 1/8 mantle cell lymphomas, 1/5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and a large B cell lymphoma developed in a patient with a small lymphocytic lymphoma. Unrelated relapses developed after a longer disease-free interval and tended to show poorer outcome compared with related relapse. In summary, relapse of a lymphoma from an unrelated clone is uncommon, but can occur in B-cell lymphomas. Clonal relationships should be determined by sequencing of the Ig genes, and not just by comparing the PCR product size. PMID:26848863

  4. Inflammation as a Driver of Clonal Evolution in Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Angela G.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of inflammation's role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) is evolving. The impact of chronic inflammation, a characteristic feature of MPN, likely goes far beyond its role as a driver of constitutional symptoms. An inflammatory response to the neoplastic clone may be responsible for some pathologic aspects of MPN. Moreover, JAK2V617F mutated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are resistant to inflammation, and this gives the neoplastic clone a selective advantage allowing for its clonal expansion. Because inflammation plays a central role in MPN inflammation is a logical therapeutic target in MPN. PMID:26538830

  5. Plant traits and ecosystem effects of clonality: a new research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonal plants spread laterally by spacers between their ramets (shoot–root units); these spacers can transport and store resources. While much is known about how clonality promotes plant fitness, we know little about how different clonal plants influence ecosystem functions related to carbon, nutrient and water cycling. Approach The response–effect trait framework is used to formulate hypotheses about the impact of clonality on ecosystems. Central to this framework is the degree of correspondence between interspecific variation in clonal ‘response traits’ that promote plant fitness and interspecific variation in ‘effect traits’, which define a plant's potential effect on ecosystem functions. The main example presented to illustrate this concept concerns clonal traits of vascular plant species that determine their lateral extension patterns. In combination with the different degrees of decomposability of litter derived from their spacers, leaves, roots and stems, these clonal traits should determine associated spatial and temporal patterns in soil organic matter accumulation, nutrient availability and water retention. Conclusions This review gives some concrete pointers as to how to implement this new research agenda through a combination of (1) standardized screening of predominant species in ecosystems for clonal response traits and for effect traits related to carbon, nutrient and water cycling; (2) analysing the overlap between variation in these response traits and effect traits across species; (3) linking spatial and temporal patterns of clonal species in the field to those for soil properties related to carbon, nutrient and water stocks and dynamics; and (4) studying the effects of biotic interactions and feedbacks between resource heterogeneity and clonality. Linking these to environmental changes may help us to better understand and predict the role of clonal plants in modulating impacts of climate change and human activities on

  6. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  7. Why it is crucial to analyze non clonal chromosome aberrations or NCCAs?

    PubMed

    Heng, Henry H Q; Regan, Sarah M; Liu, Guo; Ye, Christine J

    2016-01-01

    Current cytogenetics has largely focused its efforts on the identification of recurrent karyotypic alterations, also known as clonal chromosomal aberrations (CCAs). The rationale of doing so seems simple: recurrent genetic changes are relevant for diseases or specific physiological conditions, while non clonal chromosome aberrations (NCCAs) are insignificant genetic background or noise. However, in reality, the vast majority of chromosomal alterations are NCCAs, and it is challenging to identify commonly shared CCAs in most solid tumors. Furthermore, the karyotype, rather than genes, represents the system inheritance, or blueprint, and each NCCA represents an altered genome system. These realizations underscore the importance of the re-evaluation of NCCAs in cytogenetic analyses. In this concept article, we briefly review the definition of NCCAs, some historical misconceptions about them, and why NCCAs are not insignificant "noise," but rather a highly significant feature of the cellular population for providing genome heterogeneity and complexity, representing one important form of fuzzy inheritance. The frequencies of NCCAs also represent an index to measure both internally- and environmentally-induced genome instability. Additionally, the NCCA/CCA cycle is associated with macro- and micro-cellular evolution. Lastly, elevated NCCAs are observed in many disease/illness conditions. Considering all of these factors, we call for the immediate action of studying and reporting NCCAs. Specifically, effort is needed to characterize and compare different types of NCCAs, to define their baseline in various tissues, to develop methods to access mitotic cells, to re-examine/interpret the NCCAs data, and to develop an NCCA database. PMID:26877768

  8. Clonal Dissemination of Enterobacter cloacae Harboring blaKPC-3 in the Upper Midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Melissa L.; Shaw, Kristin M.; Dobbins, Ginette; Snippes Vagnone, Paula M.; Harper, Jane E.; Boxrud, Dave; Lynfield, Ruth; Aziz, Maliha; Price, Lance B.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CP-CRE, are an emerging threat to human and animal health, because they are resistant to many of the last-line antimicrobials available for disease treatment. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter cloacae harboring blaKPC-3 recently was reported in the upper midwestern United States and implicated in a hospital outbreak in Fargo, North Dakota (L. M. Kiedrowski, D. M. Guerrero, F. Perez, R. A. Viau, L. J. Rojas, M. F. Mojica, S. D. Rudin, A. M. Hujer, S. H. Marshall, and R. A. Bonomo, Emerg Infect Dis 20:1583–1585, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2009.140344). In early 2009, the Minnesota Department of Health began collecting and screening CP-CRE from patients throughout Minnesota. Here, we analyzed a retrospective group of CP-E. cloacae isolates (n = 34) collected between 2009 and 2013. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis revealed that 32 of the strains were clonal, belonging to the ST171 clonal complex and differing collectively by 211 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and it revealed a dynamic clone under positive selection. The phylogeography of these strains suggests that this clone existed in eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota prior to 2009 and subsequently was identified in the Minneapolis and St. Paul metropolitan area. All strains harbored identical IncFIA-like plasmids conferring a CP-CRE phenotype and an additional IncX3 plasmid. In a single patient with multiple isolates submitted over several months, we found evidence that these plasmids had transferred from the E. cloacae clone to an Escherichia coli ST131 bacterium, rendering it as a CP-CRE. The spread of this clone throughout the upper midwestern United States is unprecedented for E. cloacae and highlights the importance of continued surveillance to identify such threats to human health. PMID:26438492

  9. Clonal expansion of antitumor T cells in breast cancer correlates with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Miran; Tarhan, Yunus Emre; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Sasa, Mitsunori; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Kalari, Krishna R.; Suman, Vera J.; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei; Boughey, Judy C.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of tumor plays a critical role in therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. Cancer tissues are composed of a complex network between anti-tumor and pro-tumor immune cells and molecules; therefore a comprehensive analysis of the tumor immune condition is imperative for better understanding of the roles of the immune microenvironment in anticancer treatment response. In this study, we performed T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis of tumor infiltrating T cells (TILs) in cancer tissues of pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) from 19 breast cancer patients; five cases showed CR (complete response), ten showed PR (partial response), and four showed SD/PD (stable disease/progressive disease) to the treatment. From the TCR sequencing results, we calculated the diversity index of the TCRβ chain and found that clonal expansion of TILs could be detected in patients who showed CR or PR to NAC. Noteworthy, the diversity of TCR was further reduced in the post-NAC tumors of CR patients. Our quantitative RT-PCR also showed that expression ratio of CD8/Foxp3 was significantly elevated in the post-NAC tumors of CR cases (p=0.0032), indicating that antitumor T cells were activated and enriched in these tumors. Collectively, our findings suggest that the clonal expansion of antitumor T cells may be a critical factor associated with response to chemotherapy and that their TCR sequences might be applicable for the development of TCR-engineered T cells treatment for individual breast cancer patients when their tumors relapse. PMID:27278091

  10. Clonal expansion of antitumor T cells in breast cancer correlates with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Miran; Tarhan, Yunus Emre; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Sasa, Mitsunori; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Kalari, Krishna R; Suman, Vera J; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei; Boughey, Judy C; Goetz, Matthew P; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2016-08-01

    The immune microenvironment of tumor plays a critical role in therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. Cancer tissues are composed of a complex network between antitumor and pro-tumor immune cells and molecules; therefore a comprehensive analysis of the tumor immune condition is imperative for better understanding of the roles of the immune microenvironment in anticancer treatment response. In this study, we performed T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis of tumor infiltrating T cells (TILs) in cancer tissues of pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) from 19 breast cancer patients; five cases showed CR (complete response), ten showed PR (partial response), and four showed SD/PD (stable disease/progressive disease) to the treatment. From the TCR sequencing results, we calculated the diversity index of the TCRβ chain and found that clonal expansion of TILs could be detected in patients who showed CR or PR to NAC. Noteworthy, the diversity of TCR was further reduced in the post-NAC tumors of CR patients. Our quantitative RT-PCR also showed that expression ratio of CD8/Foxp3 was significantly elevated in the post-NAC tumors of CR cases (p=0.0032), indicating that antitumor T cells were activated and enriched in these tumors. Collectively, our findings suggest that the clonal expansion of antitumor T cells may be a critical factor associated with response to chemotherapy and that their TCR sequences might be applicable for the development of TCR-engineered T cells treatment for individual breast cancer patients when their tumors relapse. PMID:27278091

  11. Clonal expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection dynamics reveals the effect of antibiotic intervention.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Gareth; Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Williams, Alexander; Wagner, Nelly L; Boots, Michael; Renshaw, Stephen A; Foster, Simon J

    2014-02-01

    To slow the inexorable rise of antibiotic resistance we must understand how drugs impact on pathogenesis and influence the selection of resistant clones. Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen with populations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals and the community. Host phagocytes play a crucial role in controlling S. aureus infection, which can lead to a population "bottleneck" whereby clonal expansion of a small fraction of the initial inoculum founds a systemic infection. Such population dynamics may have important consequences on the effect of antibiotic intervention. Low doses of antibiotics have been shown to affect in vitro growth and the generation of resistant mutants over the long term, however whether this has any in vivo relevance is unknown. In this work, the population dynamics of S. aureus pathogenesis were studied in vivo using antibiotic-resistant strains constructed in an isogenic background, coupled with systemic models of infection in both the mouse and zebrafish embryo. Murine experiments revealed unexpected and complex bacterial population kinetics arising from clonal expansion during infection in particular organs. We subsequently elucidated the effect of antibiotic intervention within the host using mixed inocula of resistant and sensitive bacteria. Sub-curative tetracycline doses support the preferential expansion of resistant microorganisms, importantly unrelated to effects on growth rate or de novo resistance acquisition. This novel phenomenon is generic, occurring with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the presence of β-lactams and with the unrelated human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The selection of resistant clones at low antibiotic levels can result in a rapid increase in their prevalence under conditions that would previously not be thought to favor them. Our results have key implications for the design of effective treatment regimes to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance, where

  12. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  13. Divergent clonal evolution of castration resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Himisha; Prandi, Davide; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Benelli, Matteo; Puca, Loredana; Cyrta, Joanna; Marotz, Clarisse; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V.S.K.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Tomlins, Scott A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Garraway, Levi A.; Rubin, Mark A.; Demichelis, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    An increasingly recognized resistance mechanism to androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapy in prostate cancer involves epithelial plasticity, wherein tumor cells demonstrate low to absent AR expression and often neuroendocrine features. The etiology and molecular basis for these “alternative” treatment-resistant cell states remain incompletely understood. Here, by analyzing whole exome sequencing data of metastatic biopsies from patients, we observed significant genomic overlap between castration resistant adenocarcinoma (CRPC-Adeno) and neuroendocrine histologies (CRPC-NE); analysis of serial progression samples points to a model most consistent with divergent clonal evolution. Genome-wide DNA methylation revealed marked epigenetic differences between CRPC-NE and CRPC-Adeno that also designated cases of CRPC-Adeno with clinical features of AR-independence as CRPC-NE, suggesting that epigenetic modifiers may play a role in the induction and/or maintenance of this treatment-resistant state. This study supports the emergence of an alternative, “AR-indifferent” cell state through divergent clonal evolution as a mechanism of treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26855148

  14. Preventing clonal evolutionary processes in cancer: Insights from mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Clonal evolutionary processes can drive pathogenesis in human diseases, with cancer being a prominent example. To prevent or treat cancer, mechanisms that can potentially interfere with clonal evolutionary processes need to be understood better. Mathematical modeling is an important research tool that plays an ever-increasing role in cancer research. This paper discusses how mathematical models can be useful to gain insights into mechanisms that can prevent disease initiation, help analyze treatment responses, and aid in the design of treatment strategies to combat the emergence of drug-resistant cells. The discussion will be done in the context of specific examples. Among defense mechanisms, we explore how replicative limits and cellular senescence induced by telomere shortening can influence the emergence and evolution of tumors. Among treatment approaches, we consider the targeted treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We illustrate how basic evolutionary mathematical models have the potential to make patient-specific predictions about disease and treatment outcome, and argue that evolutionary models could become important clinical tools in the field of personalized medicine. PMID:26195751

  15. Divergent clonal evolution of castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Himisha; Prandi, Davide; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Benelli, Matteo; Puca, Loredana; Cyrta, Joanna; Marotz, Clarisse; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Tomlins, Scott A; Nanus, David M; Tagawa, Scott T; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Garraway, Levi A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2016-03-01

    An increasingly recognized resistance mechanism to androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapy in prostate cancer involves epithelial plasticity, in which tumor cells demonstrate low to absent AR expression and often have neuroendocrine features. The etiology and molecular basis for this 'alternative' treatment-resistant cell state remain incompletely understood. Here, by analyzing whole-exome sequencing data of metastatic biopsies from patients, we observed substantial genomic overlap between castration-resistant tumors that were histologically characterized as prostate adenocarcinomas (CRPC-Adeno) and neuroendocrine prostate cancer (CRPC-NE); analysis of biopsy samples from the same individuals over time points to a model most consistent with divergent clonal evolution. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed marked epigenetic differences between CRPC-NE tumors and CRPC-Adeno, and also designated samples of CRPC-Adeno with clinical features of AR independence as CRPC-NE, suggesting that epigenetic modifiers may play a role in the induction and/or maintenance of this treatment-resistant state. This study supports the emergence of an alternative, 'AR-indifferent' cell state through divergent clonal evolution as a mechanism of treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26855148

  16. Clonality of Bacterial Pathogens Causing Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pudová, V; Htoutou Sedláková, M; Kolář, M

    2016-09-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most serious complications in patients staying in intensive care units. This multicenter study of Czech patients with HAP aimed at assessing the clonality of bacterial pathogens causing the condition. Bacterial isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Included in this study were 330 patients hospitalized between May 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014 at departments of anesthesiology and intensive care medicine of four big hospitals in the Czech Republic. A total of 531 bacterial isolates were obtained, of which 267 were classified as etiological agents causing HAP. Similarity or identity was assessed in 231 bacterial isolates most frequently obtained from HAP patients. Over the study period, no significant clonal spread was noted. Most isolates were unique strains, and the included HAP cases may therefore be characterized as mostly endogenous. Yet there were differences in species and potential identical isolates between the participating centers. In three hospitals, Gram-negative bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) prevailed as etiological agents, and Staphylococcus aureus was most prevalent in the fourth center. PMID:27170306

  17. Clonality and intracellular polyploidy in virus evolution and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Moreno, Elena; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-07-21

    In the present article we examine clonality in virus evolution. Most viruses retain an active recombination machinery as a potential means to initiate new levels of genetic exploration that go beyond those attainable solely by point mutations. However, despite abundant recombination that may be linked to molecular events essential for genome replication, herein we provide evidence that generation of recombinants with altered biological properties is not essential for the completion of the replication cycles of viruses, and that viral lineages (near-clades) can be defined. We distinguish mechanistically active but inconsequential recombination from evolutionarily relevant recombination, illustrated by episodes in the field and during experimental evolution. In the field, recombination has been at the origin of new viral pathogens, and has conferred fitness advantages to some viruses once the parental viruses have attained a sufficient degree of diversification by point mutations. In the laboratory, recombination mediated a salient genome segmentation of foot-and-mouth disease virus, an important animal pathogen whose genome in nature has always been characterized as unsegmented. We propose a model of continuous mutation and recombination, with punctuated, biologically relevant recombination events for the survival of viruses, both as disease agents and as promoters of cellular evolution. Thus, clonality is the standard evolutionary mode for viruses because recombination is largely inconsequential, since the decisive events for virus replication and survival are not dependent on the exchange of genetic material and formation of recombinant (mosaic) genomes. PMID:26195777

  18. Synchronous Endometrial and Ovarian Carcinomas: Evidence of Clonality.

    PubMed

    Anglesio, Michael S; Wang, Yi Kan; Maassen, Madlen; Horlings, Hugo M; Bashashati, Ali; Senz, Janine; Mackenzie, Robertson; Grewal, Diljot S; Li-Chang, Hector; Karnezis, Anthony N; Sheffield, Brandon S; McConechy, Melissa K; Kommoss, Friedrich; Taran, Florin A; Staebler, Annette; Shah, Sohrab P; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Gilks, C Blake; Kommoss, Stefan; Huntsman, David G

    2016-06-01

    Many women with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma present with concurrent endometrial carcinoma. Organ-confined and low-grade synchronous endometrial and ovarian tumors (SEOs) clinically behave as independent primary tumors rather than a single advanced-stage carcinoma. We used 18 SEOs to investigate the ancestral relationship between the endometrial and ovarian components. Based on both targeted and exome sequencing, 17 of 18 patient cases of simultaneous cancer of the endometrium and ovary from our series showed evidence of a clonal relationship, ie, primary tumor and metastasis. Eleven patient cases fulfilled clinicopathological criteria that would lead to classification as independent endometrial and ovarian primary carcinomas, including being of FIGO stage T1a/1A, with organ-restricted growth and without surface involvement; 10 of 11 of these cases showed evidence of clonality. Our observations suggest that the disseminating cells amongst SEOs are restricted to physically accessible and microenvironment-compatible sites yet remain indolent, without the capacity for further dissemination. PMID:26832771

  19. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  20. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytica...

  1. Standardizing the Nomenclature for Clonal Lineages of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages based on a range of molecular marker systems. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of lineages. Here we name clonal lineages of P. ramor...

  2. Alternative end joining, clonal evolution, and escape from a telomere-driven crisis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Eric A; Baird, Duncan M

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction and fusion play key roles in driving genomic instability and clonal evolution in many tumor types. We have recently described a role for DNA ligase III (LIG3) in facilitating the escape of cells from crisis induced by telomere dysfunction. Our data indicate that LIG3-mediated telomere fusion is important in facilitating clonal evolution. PMID:27308409

  3. CYTOTOXICITY OF CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS TOWARDS HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EVALUATED IN A CLONAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of human bronchial epithelial cells after administration of four chemical carcinogens was measured in a clonal assay. Human bronchial epithelial cells were obtained from outgrowths of explanted tissue pieces. Serum-free medium was used for both explant culture and clonal...

  4. SNP-based differentiation of Phytophthora infestans clonal lineages using locked nucleic acid probes and high resolution melt analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of the devastating late blight disease of potato and tomato, exhibits a clonal reproductive lifestyle in North America. Phenotypes such as fungicide sensitivity and host preference are conserved among individuals within clonal lineages, while substantial phenotypic ...

  5. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  6. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Hiley, Crispin T; Watkins, Thomas B K; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Shukla, Sachet A; Wu, Catherine J; Peggs, Karl S; Chan, Timothy A; Hadrup, Sine R; Quezada, Sergio A; Swanton, Charles

    2016-03-25

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8(+)tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  7. Uncovering the Number and Clonal Dynamics of Mesp1 Progenitors during Heart Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chabab, Samira; Lescroart, Fabienne; Rulands, Steffen; Mathiah, Navrita; Simons, Benjamin D.; Blanpain, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The heart arises from distinct sources of cardiac progenitors that independently express Mesp1 during gastrulation. The precise number of Mesp1 progenitors that are specified during the early stage of gastrulation, and their clonal behavior during heart morphogenesis, is currently unknown. Here, we used clonal and mosaic tracing of Mesp1-expressing cells combined with quantitative biophysical analysis of the clonal data to define the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth during heart development. Our data indicate that the myocardial layer of the heart derive from ∼250 Mesp1-expressing cardiac progenitors born during gastrulation. Despite arising at different time points and contributing to different heart regions, the temporally distinct cardiac progenitors present very similar clonal dynamics. These results provide insights into the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth and open up avenues to decipher the clonal dynamics of progenitors in other organs and tissues. PMID:26725109

  8. Divergent modes of clonal spread and intraperitoneal mixing in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Andrew; Roth, Andrew; Laks, Emma; Masud, Tehmina; Bashashati, Ali; Zhang, Allen W; Ha, Gavin; Biele, Justina; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Prentice, Leah M; Khattra, Jaswinder; Smith, Maia A; Nielsen, Cydney B; Mullaly, Sarah C; Kalloger, Steve; Karnezis, Anthony; Shumansky, Karey; Siu, Celia; Rosner, Jamie; Chan, Hector Li; Ho, Julie; Melnyk, Nataliya; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Moore, Richard; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Gilks, C Blake; Huntsman, David G; McAlpine, Jessica N; Aparicio, Samuel; Shah, Sohrab P

    2016-07-01

    We performed phylogenetic analysis of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (68 samples from seven patients), identifying constituent clones and quantifying their relative abundances at multiple intraperitoneal sites. Through whole-genome and single-nucleus sequencing, we identified evolutionary features including mutation loss, convergence of the structural genome and temporal activation of mutational processes that patterned clonal progression. We then determined the precise clonal mixtures comprising each tumor sample. The majority of sites were clonally pure or composed of clones from a single phylogenetic clade. However, each patient contained at least one site composed of polyphyletic clones. Five patients exhibited monoclonal and unidirectional seeding from the ovary to intraperitoneal sites, and two patients demonstrated polyclonal spread and reseeding. Our findings indicate that at least two distinct modes of intraperitoneal spread operate in clonal dissemination and highlight the distribution of migratory potential over clonal populations comprising high-grade serous ovarian cancers. PMID:27182968

  9. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  10. Demographic consequences of greater clonal than sexual reproduction in Dicentra canadensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hua; Miriti, Maria N; Goodell, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Clonality is a widespread life history trait in flowering plants that may be essential for population persistence, especially in environments where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. Frequent clonal reproduction, however, could hinder sexual reproduction by spatially aggregating ramets that compete with seedlings and reduce inter-genet pollination. Nevertheless, the role of clonality in relation to variable sexual reproduction in population dynamics is often overlooked. We combined population matrix models and pollination experiments to compare the demographic contributions of clonal and sexual reproduction in three Dicentra canadensis populations, one in a well-forested landscape and two in isolated forest remnants. We constructed stage-based transition matrices from 3 years of census data to evaluate annual population growth rates, λ. We used loop analysis to evaluate the relative contribution of different reproductive pathways to λ. Despite strong temporal and spatial variation in seed set, populations generally showed stable growth rates. Although we detected some pollen limitation of seed set, manipulative pollination treatments did not affect population growth rates. Clonal reproduction contributed significantly more than sexual reproduction to population growth in the forest remnants. Only at the well-forested site did sexual reproduction contribute as much as clonal reproduction to population growth. Flowering plants were more likely to transition to a smaller size class with reduced reproductive potential in the following year than similarly sized nonflowering plants, suggesting energy trade-offs between sexual and clonal reproduction at the individual level. Seed production had negligible effects on growth and tuber production of individual plants. Our results demonstrate that clonal reproduction is vital for population persistence in a system where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. The bias toward clonality may be driven by low fitness returns

  11. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-01-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  12. Effects of clonality on the genetic variability of rare, insular species: the case of Ruta microcarpa from the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, M; Reid, A; Caujapé-Castells, J; Marrero, Á; Fernández-Palacios, J M; Mesa-Coelo, R A; Conti, E

    2013-01-01

    Many plant species combine sexual and clonal reproduction. Clonal propagation has ecological costs mainly related to inbreeding depression and pollen discounting; at the same time, species able to reproduce clonally have ecological and evolutionary advantages being able to persist when conditions are not favorable for sexual reproduction. The presence of clonality has profound consequences on the genetic structure of populations, especially when it represents the predominant reproductive strategy in a population. Theoretical studies suggest that high rate of clonal propagation should increase the effective number of alleles and heterozygosity in a population, while an opposite effect is expected on genetic differentiation among populations and on genotypic diversity. In this study, we ask how clonal propagation affects the genetic diversity of rare insular species, which are often characterized by low levels of genetic diversity, hence at risk of extinction. We used eight polymorphic microsatellite markers to study the genetic structure of the critically endangered insular endemic Ruta microcarpa. We found that clonality appears to positively affect the genetic diversity of R. microcarpa by increasing allelic diversity, polymorphism, and heterozygosity. Moreover, clonal propagation seems to be a more successful reproductive strategy in small, isolated population subjected to environmental stress. Our results suggest that clonal propagation may benefit rare species. However, the advantage of clonal growth may be only short-lived for prolonged clonal growth could ultimately lead to monoclonal populations. Some degree of sexual reproduction may be needed in a predominantly clonal species to ensure long-term viability. PMID:23789068

  13. Ice age cloning--comparison of the Quaternary evolutionary histories of sexual and clonal forms of spiny loaches (Cobitis; Teleostei) using the analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Janko, K; Culling, M A; Ráb, P; Kotlík, P

    2005-09-01

    Recent advances in population history reconstruction offered a powerful tool for comparisons of the abilities of sexual and clonal forms to respond to Quaternary climatic oscillations, ultimately leading to inferences about the advantages and disadvantages of a given mode of reproduction. We reconstructed the Quaternary historical biogeography of the sexual parental species and clonal hybrid lineages within the Europe-wide hybrid complex of Cobitis spiny loaches. Cobitis elongatoides and Cobitis taenia recolonizing Europe from separated refuges met in central Europe and the Pontic region giving rise to hybrid lineages during the Holocene. Cobitis elongatoides due to its long-term reproductive contact with the remaining parental species of the complex--C. tanaitica and C. spec.--gave rise to two clonal hybrid lineages probably during the last interglacial or even earlier, which survived the Würmian glaciation with C. elongatoides. These lineages followed C. elongatoides postglacial expansion and probably decreased its dispersal rate. Our data indicate the frequent origins of asexuality irrespective of the parental populations involved and the comparable dispersal potential of diploid and triploid lineages. PMID:16101769

  14. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands. PMID:27573765

  15. A clonal selection algorithm model for daily rainfall data prediction.

    PubMed

    Noor Rodi, N S; Malek, M A; Ismail, Amelia Ritahani; Ting, Sie Chun; Tang, Chao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study applies the clonal selection algorithm (CSA) in an artificial immune system (AIS) as an alternative method to predicting future rainfall data. The stochastic and the artificial neural network techniques are commonly used in hydrology. However, in this study a novel technique for forecasting rainfall was established. Results from this study have proven that the theory of biological immune systems could be technically applied to time series data. Biological immune systems are nonlinear and chaotic in nature similar to the daily rainfall data. This study discovered that the proposed CSA was able to predict the daily rainfall data with an accuracy of 90% during the model training stage. In the testing stage, the results showed that an accuracy between the actual and the generated data was within the range of 75 to 92%. Thus, the CSA approach shows a new method in rainfall data prediction. PMID:25429452

  16. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity. PMID:25881961

  17. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  18. Clonal mixtures of Salix - a control measure for rust

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, A.R.; Dawson, W.M.; Allen C.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Willow grown in short rotation coppice can be used as a renewable energy source. However, disease caused by Melampsora epitea var. epitea can be a severely limiting factor on its productivity. Populations of this pathogen in N. Ireland have been shown to be composed of at least fourteen pathotypes. Pathotype composition was influenced by time, age and clone. Fungicides were unacceptable to control disease, therefore the use of clonal mixtures was employed as an alternative strategy. When grown in mixtures the onset of disease was delayed, its build up slowed and final levels reduced. This was reflected in increased yield. Current work investigating the effect of planting density and increasing mixture diversity indicates that neither have a major impact on disease.

  19. [Molecular Mechanism and Malignant Clonal Evolution of Multiple Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Zhu, Ping; Wu, Xue-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Almost all patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have chromosomal translocation which can result in genetic variation. There are mainly five types of chromosomal translocations, involving the IGH gene translocation to 11q13 (CCND1), 4p16 (FGFR/MMSET), 16q23 (MAF), 6p21 (CCND3) and 20q11 (MAFB). It is possible that all IGH translocations converge on a common cell cycle signal pathway. Some MM develops through a multistep transformation from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to smoldering MM (SMM) and eventually to MM and plasma cell leukemia (PCL). Similarly to what Darwin proposed in the mid-19th century-random genetic variation and natural selection in the context of limited resources, MM clonal evolution follow branching and nonlinear mode. The failure of MM treatment is usually related with the minimal subclone which is hardly found at newlydiagnosed. PMID:26524068

  20. Comparing nonparametric Bayesian tree priors for clonal reconstruction of tumors.

    PubMed

    Deshwar, Amit G; Vembu, Shankar; Morris, Quaid

    2015-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods, especially nonparametric Bayesian methods, have become increasingly popular to infer clonal population structure of tumors. Here we describe the treeCRP, an extension of the Chinese restaurant process (CRP), a popular construction used in nonparametric mixture models, to infer the phylogeny and genotype of major subclonal lineages represented in the population of cancer cells. We also propose new split-merge updates tailored to the subclonal reconstruction problem that improve the mixing time of Markov chains. In comparisons with the tree-structured stick breaking prior used in PhyloSub, we demonstrate superior mixing and running time using the treeCRP with our new split-merge procedures. We also show that given the same number of samples, TSSB and treeCRP have similar ability to recover the subclonal structure of a tumor… PMID:25592565

  1. Environmental gradients structure Daphnia pulex × pulicaria clonal distribution.

    PubMed

    Pantel, J H; Juenger, T E; Leibold, M A

    2011-04-01

    The rarity of eukaryotic asexual reproduction is frequently attributed to the disadvantage of reduced genetic variation relative to sexual reproduction. However, parthenogenetic lineages that evolved repeatedly from sexual ancestors can generate regional pools of phenotypically diverse clones. Various theories to explain the maintenance of this genetic diversity as a result of environmental and spatial heterogeneity [frozen niche variation (FNV), general-purpose genotype] are conceptually similar to community ecological explanations for the maintenance of regional species diversity. We employed multivariate statistics common in community ecological research to study population genetic structure in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia pulex × pulicaria. This parthenogenetic hybrid arose repeatedly from sexual ancestors. Daphnia pulex × pulicaria populations harboured substantial genetic variation among populations and the clonal composition at each pond corresponded to nutrient levels and invertebrate predator densities. The interclonal selection process described by the FNV hypothesis likely structured our D. pulex × pulicaria populations. PMID:21288271

  2. Genetic Structure in Aquatic Bladderworts: Clonal Propagation and Hybrid Perpetuation

    PubMed Central

    KAMEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; OHARA, MASASHI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The free-floating aquatic bladderwort Utricularia australis f. australis is a sterile F1 hybrid of U. australis f. tenuicaulis and U. macrorhiza. However, co-existence of the hybrids and parental species has not been observed. In the present study, the following questions are addressed. (a) Does the capacity of the two parental species to reproduce sexually contribute to higher genotypic diversity than that of sterile F1 hybrid? (b) Are there any populations where two parental species and their hybrid co-exist? (c) If not, where and how do hybrids originate? • Methods The presence and absence of Utricularia was thoroughly investigated in two regions in Japan. An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was conducted for 397 individuals collected from all populations (33 in total) where Utricularia was observed. • Key Results The mean number of genotypes per population (G) and genotypic diversity (D) were extremely low irrespective of the capacity to reproduce sexually: G was 1·1–1·2 and D was 0·02–0·04. The hybrid rarely co-existed with either parental species, and the co-existence of two parental species was not observed. Several AFLP bands observed in the hybrid are absent in both parental genotypes, and parent and hybrid genotypes in the same region do not show greater genetic similarity than those in distant regions. • Conclusions The capacity to reproduce sexually in parental species plays no role in increasing genotypic diversity within populations. The observed genotypes of the hybrid could not have originated from hybridization between the extant parental genotypes within the study regions. Considering the distribution ranges of three investigated taxa, it is clear that the hybrid originated in the past, and hybrid populations have been maintained exclusively by clonal propagation, which may be ensured by both hybrid vigor and long-distance dispersal of clonal offspring. PMID:16926229

  3. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  4. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  5. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients. PMID:27246203

  6. Clonal reproduction shapes evolution in the lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense.

    PubMed

    Falk, Bryan G; Glor, Richard E; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-06-01

    The preponderant clonal evolution hypothesis (PCE) predicts that frequent clonal reproduction (sex between two clones) in many pathogens capable of sexual recombination results in strong linkage disequilibrium and the presence of discrete genetic subdivisions characterized by occasional gene flow. We expand on the PCE and predict that higher rates of clonal reproduction will result in: (1) morphologically cryptic species that exhibit (2) low within-species variation and (3) recent between-species divergence. We tested these predictions in the Caribbean lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense using 63 single-infection samples in lizards collected from across the parasite's range, and sequenced them at two mitochondrial, one apicoplast, and five nuclear genes. We identified 11 provisionally cryptic species within P. floridense, each of which exhibits low intraspecific variation and recent divergence times between species (some diverged approximately 110,000 years ago). Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that clonal reproduction can profoundly affect diversification of species capable of sexual recombination, and suggest that clonal reproduction may have led to a large number of unrecognized pathogen species. The factors that may influence the rates of clonal reproduction among pathogens are unclear, and we discuss how prevalence and virulence may relate to clonal reproduction. PMID:25959003

  7. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-01-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients. PMID:27246203

  8. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-06-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients.

  9. Clonally related uterine leiomyomas are common and display branched tumor evolution.

    PubMed

    Mehine, Miika; Heinonen, Hanna-Riikka; Sarvilinna, Nanna; Pitkänen, Esa; Mäkinen, Netta; Katainen, Riku; Tuupanen, Sari; Bützow, Ralf; Sjöberg, Jari; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2015-08-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are extremely frequent benign smooth muscle tumors often presenting as multiple concurrent lesions and causing symptoms such as abnormal menstrual bleeding, abdominal pain and infertility. While most leiomyomas are believed to arise independently, a few studies have encountered separate lesions harboring identical genetic changes, suggesting a common clonal origin. To investigate the frequency of clonally related leiomyomas, genome-wide tools need to be utilized, and thus little is known about this phenomenon. Using MED12 sequencing and SNP arrays, we searched for clonally related uterine leiomyomas in a set of 103 tumors from 14 consecutive patients who entered hysterectomy owing to symptomatic lesions. Whole-genome sequencing was also utilized to study the genomic architecture of clonally related tumors. This revealed four patients to have two or more tumors that were clonally related, all of which lacked MED12 mutations. Furthermore, some tumors were composed of genetically distinct subclones, indicating a nonlinear, branched model of tumor evolution. DEPDC5 was discovered as a novel tumor suppressor gene playing a role in the progression of uterine leiomyomas. Perhaps counterintuitively—considering Knudson's two-hit hypothesis—a large shared deletion was followed by different truncating DEPDC5 mutations in four clonally related leiomyomas. This study provides insight into the intratumor heterogeneity of these tumors and suggests that a shared clonal origin is a common feature of leiomyomas that do not carry an MED12 mutation. These observations also offer one explanation to the common occurrence of multiple concurrent lesions. PMID:25964426

  10. Clonal diversity and estimation of relative clone age: application to agrobiodiversity of yam (Dioscorea rotundata)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonal propagation is a particular reproductive system found in both the plant and animal kingdoms, from human parasites to clonally propagated crops. Clonal diversity provides information about plant and animal evolutionary history, i.e. how clones spread, or the age of a particular clone. In plants, this could provide valuable information about agrobiodiversity dynamics and more broadly about the evolutionary history of a particular crop. We studied the evolutionary history of yam, Dioscorea rotundata. In Africa, Yam is cultivated by tuber clonal propagation. Results We used 12 microsatellite markers to identify intra-clonal diversity in yam varieties. We then used this diversity to assess the relative ages of clones. Using simulations, we assessed how Approximate Bayesian Computation could use clonal diversity to estimate the age of a clone depending on the size of the sample, the number of independent samples and the number of markers. We then applied this approach to our particular dataset and showed that the relative ages of varieties could be estimated, and that each variety could be ranked by age. Conclusions We give a first estimation of clone age in an approximate Bayesian framework. However the precise estimation of clone age depends on the precision of the mutation rate. We provide useful information on agrobiodiversity dynamics and suggest recurrent creation of varietal diversity in a clonally propagated crop. PMID:24219837

  11. Evidence for clonal origin of neoplastic neuronal and glial cells in gangliogliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. J.; Leon, S. P.; Folkerth, R. D.; Guo, S. Z.; Wu, J. K.; Black, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    Gangliogliomas are rare tumors of the central nervous system that account for approximately 1% of all brain tumors. Histologically, gangliogliomas are composed of intimately admixed glial and neuronal components, the pathological origins of which remain to be characterized. Clonal analysis through examination of the pattern of the X chromosome inactivation allows one to distinguish monoclonal differentiation of a genetically abnormal progenitor cell from parallel, but independent, clonal expansion of two different cell types during tumorigenesis in biphasic neoplasms, such as gangliogliomas. In the present study, we investigated the clonality of eight gangliogliomas from female patients using both methylation- and transcription-based clonality assays at the androgen receptor locus (HUMARA) on the X chromosome. Among tumors from seven patients who were heterozygous at the HUMARA locus, five were identified as monoclonal with the methylation-based clonality assay, and the results were confirmed by the transcription-based method, whereas two were shown to be polyclonal by the methylation-based clonality assay but monoclonal by transcription-based clonality analysis. We conclude that the predominant cell types in most gangliogliomas are monoclonal in origin and derive from a common precursor cell that subsequently differentiates to form neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250169

  12. Clonal Plasticity of Aquatic Plant Species Submitted to Mechanical Stress: Escape versus Resistance Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Puijalon, Sara; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Van Groenendael, Jan; Bornette, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The plastic alterations of clonal architecture are likely to have functional consequences, as they affect the spatial distribution of ramets over patchy environments. However, little is known about the effect of mechanical stresses on the clonal growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clonal plasticity induced by mechanical stress consisting of continuous water current encountered by aquatic plants. More particularly, the aim was to test the capacity of the plants to escape this stress through clonal plastic responses. Methods The transplantation of ramets of the same clone in two contrasting flow velocity conditions was carried out for two species (Potamogeton coloratus and Mentha aquatica) which have contrasting clonal growth forms. Relative allocation to clonal growth, to creeping stems in the clonal biomass, number and total length of creeping stems, spacer length and main creeping stem direction were measured. Key Results For P. coloratus, plants exposed to water current displayed increased total length of creeping stems, increased relative allocation to creeping stems within the clonal dry mass and increased spacer length. For M. aquatica, plants exposed to current displayed increased number and total length of creeping stems. Exposure to current induced for both species a significant increase of the proportion of creeping stems in the downstream direction to the detriment of creeping stems perpendicular to flow. Conclusions This study demonstrates that mechanical stress from current flow induced plastic variation in clonal traits for both species. The responses of P. coloratus could lead to an escape strategy, with low benefits with respect to sheltering and anchorage. The responses of M. aquatica that may result in a denser canopy and enhancement of anchorage efficiency could lead to a resistance strategy. PMID:18854376

  13. Cytomegalovirus infection associated with clonal proliferation of T-cell large granular lymphocytes: causal or casual?

    PubMed

    Wong, K F; Yip, S F; So, C C; Lau, G T C; Yeung, Y M

    2003-04-01

    Clonal proliferation of T-cell large granular lymphocytes (LGL) is an indolent disorder characterized by splenomegaly, lymphocytosis and frequent manifestations of immune disturbances. The LGL are CD3(+) CD4(-) CD8(+) CD56(-). The clonality of the tumor cell population is often only demonstrable by T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement study because chromosomal abnormality is distinctly rare. We describe a case of T-cell LGL leukemia that presented initially as cytomegalovirus infection. The leukemic LGL are shown to be clonal by both TCR gene rearrangement and chromosomal studies. They persist after subsidence of the cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:12660039

  14. Massive Idiosyncratic Exon Skipping Corrects the Nonsense Mutation in Dystrophic Mouse Muscle and Produces Functional Revertant Fibers by Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q.L.; Morris, G.E.; Wilton, S.D.; Ly, T.; Artem'yeva, O.V.; Strong, P.; Partridge, T.A.

    2000-01-01

    Conventionally, nonsense mutations within a gene preclude synthesis of a full-length functional protein. Obviation of such a blockage is seen in the mdx mouse, where despite a nonsense mutation in exon 23 of the dystrophin gene, occasional so-called revertant muscle fibers are seen to contain near-normal levels of its protein product. Here, we show that reversion of dystrophin expression in mdx mice muscle involves unprecedented massive loss of up to 30 exons. We detected several alternatively processed transcripts that could account for some of the revertant dystrophins and could not detect genomic deletion from the region commonly skipped in revertant dystrophin. This, together with exon skipping in two noncontiguous regions, favors aberrant splicing as the mechanism for the restoration of dystrophin, but is hard to reconcile with the clonal idiosyncrasy of revertant dystrophins. Revertant dystrophins retain functional domains and mediate plasmalemmal assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex. Physiological function of revertant fibers is demonstrated by the clonal growth of revertant clusters with age, suggesting that revertant dystrophin could be used as a guide to the construction of dystrophin expression vectors for individual gene therapy. The dystrophin gene in the mdx mouse provides a favored system for study of exon skipping associated with nonsense mutations. PMID:10704448

  15. Heterogeneity of Clonal Expansion and Maturation-Linked Mutation Acquisition in Hematopoietic Progenitors in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Laszlo, George S.; Lionberger, Jack M.; Pollard, Jessica A.; Harrington, Kimberly H.; Gudgeon, Chelsea J.; Othus, Megan; Rafii, Shahin; Meshinchi, Soheil; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Bernstein, Irwin D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances led to an appreciation of the genetic complexity of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but underlying progenitor cells remain poorly understood because their rarity precludes direct study. We developed a co-culture method integrating hypoxia, aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibition, and micro-environmental support via human endothelial cells to isolate these cells. X-chromosome inactivation studies of the least mature precursors derived following prolonged culture of CD34+/CD33− cells revealed polyclonal growth in highly curable AMLs, suggesting mutations necessary for clonal expansion were acquired in more mature progenitors. Consistently, in core-binding factor (CBF) leukemias with known complementing mutations, immature precursors derived following prolonged culture of CD34+/CD33− cells harbored neither mutation or the CBF mutation alone, whereas more mature precursors often carried both mutations. These results were in contrast to those with leukemias with poor prognosis that showed clonal dominance in the least mature precursors. These data indicate heterogeneity among progenitors in human AML that may have prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24721792

  16. Clonal Analysis of Meningococci during a 26 Year Period Prior to the Introduction of Meningococcal Serogroup C Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Christopher B.; Diggle, Mathew A.; Davies, Robert L.; Clarke, Stuart C.

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a public health burden in the UK and elsewhere. Invasive Neisseria meningitidis, isolated in Scotland between 1972 and 1998, were characterised retrospectively to examine the serogroup and clonal structure of the circulating population. 2607 isolates causing invasive disease were available for serogroup and MLST analysis whilst 2517 were available for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis only. Serogroup distribution changed from year to year but serogroups B and C were dominant throughout. Serogroup B was dominant throughout the 1970s and early 1980s until serogroup C became dominant during the mid-1980s. The increase in serogroup C was not associated with one particular sequence type (ST) but was associated with a number of STs, including ST-8, ST-11, ST-206 and ST-334. This is in contrast to the increase in serogroup C disease seen in the 1990s that was due to expansion of the ST-11 clonal complex. While there was considerable diversity among the isolates (309 different STs among the 2607 isolates), a large proportion of isolates (59.9%) were associated with only 10 STs. These data highlight meningococcal diversity over time and the need for ongoing surveillance during the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. PMID:25615448

  17. Clonal relationships among bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Whittam, T S; Gilks, C F; Wilson, R A; Mulligan, M E; Adams, K S; Arbeit, R D

    1995-01-01

    The clonal relationships among 187 bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli from 179 patients at Boston, Mass., Long Beach, Calif., and Nairobi, Kenya, were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), analysis of polymorphisms associated with the ribosomal operon (ribotyping), and serotyping. MLEE based on 20 enzymes resolved 101 electrophoretic types (ETs), forming five clusters; ribotyping resolved 56 distinct patterns concordant with the analysis by MLEE. The isolates at each study site formed a genetically diverse group and demonstrated similar clonal structures, with the same small subset of lineages accounting for the majority of isolates at each site. Moreover, two ribotypes accounted for approximately 30% of the isolates at each study site. One cluster contained the majority (65%) of isolates and, by direct comparison of the ETs and ribotypes of individual isolates, was genetically indistinguishable from the largest cluster for each of two other collections of E. coli causing pyelonephritis and neonatal meningitis (R. K. Selander, T. K. Korhonen, V. Väisänen-Rhen, P. H. Williams, P. E. Pattison, and D. A. Caugent, Infect. Immun. 52:213-222, 1986; M. Arthur, C. E. Johnson, R. H. Rubin, R. D. Arbeit, C. Campanelli, C. Kim, S. Steinbach, M. Agarwal, R. Wilkinson, and R. Goldstein, Infect. Immun. 57:303-313, 1989), thus defining a virulent set of lineages. The isolates within these virulent lineages typically carried DNA homologous to the adhesin operon pap or sfa and the hemolysin operon hly and expressed O1, O2, O4, O6, O18, O25, or O75 antigens. DNA homologous to pap was distributed among isolates of each major cluster, whereas hly was restricted to isolates of two clusters, typically detected in pap-positive strains, and sfa was restricted to isolates of one cluster, typically detected in pap- and hly-positive strains. The occurrence of pap-positive isolates in the same geographically and genetically divergent lineages suggests that this

  18. Multifocal clonal evolution characterized using circulating tumour DNA in a case of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Rueda, Oscar M.; Provenzano, Elena; Grant, John; Chin, Suet-Feung; Tsui, Dana W. Y.; Marass, Francesco; Gale, Davina; Ali, H. Raza; Shah, Pankti; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Farahani, Hossein; Shumansky, Karey; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Shah, Sohrab P.; Wallis, Matthew; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA analysis can be used to track tumour burden and analyse cancer genomes non-invasively but the extent to which it represents metastatic heterogeneity is unknown. Here we follow a patient with metastatic ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer receiving two lines of targeted therapy over 3 years. We characterize genomic architecture and infer clonal evolution in eight tumour biopsies and nine plasma samples collected over 1,193 days of clinical follow-up using exome and targeted amplicon sequencing. Mutation levels in the plasma samples reflect the clonal hierarchy inferred from sequencing of tumour biopsies. Serial changes in circulating levels of sub-clonal private mutations correlate with different treatment responses between metastatic sites. This comparison of biopsy and plasma samples in a single patient with metastatic breast cancer shows that circulating tumour DNA can allow real-time sampling of multifocal clonal evolution. PMID:26530965

  19. Clonality in myeloproliferative disorders: Analysis by means of polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, D.G.; Blanchard, K.L.; Levy, J.; Perrin, S.; Bunn, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The myeloproliferative syndromes are acquired disorders of hematopoiesis that provide insights into the transition from somatic cell mutation to neoplasia. The clonal origin of specific blood cells can be assessed in patients with X chromosome-linked polymorphisms, taking advantage of random inactivation of the X chromosome. The authors have adapted the PCR for determination of clonality on as few as 100 cells, including individual colonies grown in culture. Amplifying a polymorphic portion of the X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene after selective digestion of the active X chromosome with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme gave results fully concordant with standard Southern blotting of DNA samples form normal (polyclonal) polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) as well as clonal PMN from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and polycythemia vera (PCV). They have used this technique to demonstrate heterogeneity of lineage involvement in patients with PCV. The same clinical phenotype may arise from clonal proliferation of different hematopoietic progenitors.

  20. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  1. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality.

    PubMed

    Kamvar, Zhian N; Brooks, Jonah C; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  2. Multifocal clonal evolution characterized using circulating tumour DNA in a case of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Rueda, Oscar M; Provenzano, Elena; Grant, John; Chin, Suet-Feung; Tsui, Dana W Y; Marass, Francesco; Gale, Davina; Ali, H Raza; Shah, Pankti; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Farahani, Hossein; Shumansky, Karey; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Shah, Sohrab P; Wallis, Matthew; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA analysis can be used to track tumour burden and analyse cancer genomes non-invasively but the extent to which it represents metastatic heterogeneity is unknown. Here we follow a patient with metastatic ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer receiving two lines of targeted therapy over 3 years. We characterize genomic architecture and infer clonal evolution in eight tumour biopsies and nine plasma samples collected over 1,193 days of clinical follow-up using exome and targeted amplicon sequencing. Mutation levels in the plasma samples reflect the clonal hierarchy inferred from sequencing of tumour biopsies. Serial changes in circulating levels of sub-clonal private mutations correlate with different treatment responses between metastatic sites. This comparison of biopsy and plasma samples in a single patient with metastatic breast cancer shows that circulating tumour DNA can allow real-time sampling of multifocal clonal evolution. PMID:26530965

  3. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and pyrosequencing for the characterization of the dentine caries-associated microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Schweifing, Kathrin; Banerjee, Avijit; Wade, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas, and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture. PMID:25429361

  4. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and pyrosequencing for the characterization of the dentine caries-associated microbiome.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Schweifing, Kathrin; Banerjee, Avijit; Wade, William G

    2014-01-01

    Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas, and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture. PMID:25429361

  5. Metalaxyl Resistance in Phytophthora infestans: Assessing Role of RPA190 Gene and Diversity Within Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Matson, Michael E H; Small, Ian M; Fry, William E; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-12-01

    Prior work has shown that the inheritance of resistance to metalaxyl, an oomycete-specific fungicide, is complex and may involve multiple genes. Recent research indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene encoding RPA190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, confers resistance to metalaxyl (or mefenoxam) in some isolates of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Using both DNA sequencing and high resolution melt assays for distinguishing RPA190 alleles, we show here that the SNP is absent from certain resistant isolates of P. infestans from North America, Europe, and Mexico. The SNP is present in some members of the US-23 and US-24 clonal lineages, but these tend to be fairly sensitive to the fungicide based on artificial media and field test data. Diversity in the level of sensitivity, RPA190 genotype, and RPA190 copy number was observed in these lineages but were uncorrelated. Controlled laboratory crosses demonstrated that RPA190 did not cosegregate with metalaxyl resistance from a Mexican and British isolate. We conclude that while metalaxyl may be used to control many contemporary strains of P. infestans, an assay based on RPA190 will not be sufficient to diagnose the sensitivity levels of isolates. PMID:26551315

  6. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections. PMID:22664376

  7. Clonal evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: impact of subclonality on disease progression.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Rosenquist, Richard

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, next-generation sequencing has unraveled the molecular landscape in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with the discovery of a number of recurrently mutated genes. Mutations in several of these genes, such as NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3, are linked to a more aggressive disease with early disease progression, short time-to-first-treatment and even chemorefractoriness. Although in its infancy, we have also begun to understand the complex dynamics of subclonal diversity and its impact on disease outcome. From pioneering studies, we know that certain genetic events are found in the majority of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and are considered as 'clonal driver mutations' (e.g., +12, 13q-), whereas others, present only in a fraction of the tumor, are deemed to be 'subclonal driver mutations' for example, TP53 and SF3B1. Over the coming years, we need to gain a deeper insight into the dynamics of this subclonal architecture to understand how, at an individual level, chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients should be followed, which will be particularly relevant as novel targeted therapies begin to emerge. PMID:25345442

  8. 'Clonal pluralization of the self': a new form of delusional misidentification syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Viktor; Tényi, Tamás; Simon, Mária; Trixler, Mátyás

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a patient with paranoid schizophrenia, who has the delusion that he exists in plural numbers. The patient declares these doubles to be both psychologically and physically completely identical to him, and he believes 'them' to be in fact women. In connection with the case, the authors discuss the phenomena of reduplicative paramnesia and clonal pluralization, and they suggest introducing the psychopathological term 'clonal pluralization of the self' for the reported phenomenon. PMID:12679592

  9. Differential Influence of Clonal Integration on Morphological and Growth Responses to Light in Two Invasive Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Schooler, Shon S.; Van Klinken, Rieks D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims In contrast to seeds, high sensitivity of vegetative fragments to unfavourable environments may limit the expansion of clonal invasive plants. However, clonal integration promotes the establishment of propagules in less suitable habitats and may facilitate the expansion of clonal invaders into intact native communities. Here, we examine the influence of clonal integration on the morphology and growth of ramets in two invasive plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides and Phyla canescens, under varying light conditions. Methods In a greenhouse experiment, branches, connected ramets and severed ramets of the same mother plant were exposed under full sun and 85% shade and their morphological and growth responses were assessed. Key results The influence of clonal integration on the light reaction norm (connection×light interaction) of daughter ramets was species-specific. For A. philoxeroides, clonal integration evened out the light response (total biomass, leaf mass per area, and stem number, diameter and length) displayed in severed ramets, but these connection×light interactions were largely absent for P. canescens. Nevertheless, for both species, clonal integration overwhelmed light effect in promoting the growth of juvenile ramets during early development. Also, vertical growth, as an apparent shade acclimation response, was more prevalent in severed ramets than in connected ramets. Finally, unrooted branches displayed smaller organ size and slower growth than connected ramets, but the pattern of light reaction was similar, suggesting mother plants invest in daughter ramets prior to their own branches. Conclusions Clonal integration modifies light reaction norms of morphological and growth traits in a species-specific manner for A. philoxeroides and P. canescens, but it improves the establishment of juvenile ramets of both species in light-limiting environments by promoting their growth during early development. This factor may be partially

  10. Longevity of clonal plants: why it matters and how to measure it

    PubMed Central

    de Witte, Lucienne C.; Stöcklin, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Background Species' life-history and population dynamics are strongly shaped by the longevity of individuals, but life span is one of the least accessible demographic traits, particularly in clonal plants. Continuous vegetative reproduction of genets enables persistence despite low or no sexual reproduction, affecting genet turnover rates and population stability. Therefore, the longevity of clonal plants is of considerable biological interest, but remains relatively poorly known. Scope Here, we critically review the present knowledge on the longevity of clonal plants and discuss its importance for population persistence. Direct life-span measurements such as growth-ring analysis in woody plants are relatively easy to take, although, for many clonal plants, these methods are not adequate due to the variable growth pattern of ramets and difficult genet identification. Recently, indirect methods have been introduced in which genet size and annual shoot increments are used to estimate genet age. These methods, often based on molecular techniques, allow the investigation of genet size and age structure of whole populations, a crucial issue for understanding their viability and persistence. However, indirect estimates of clonal longevity are impeded because the process of ageing in clonal plants is still poorly understood and because their size and age are not always well correlated. Alternative estimators for genet life span such as somatic mutations have recently been suggested. Conclusions Empirical knowledge on the longevity of clonal species has increased considerably in the last few years. Maximum age estimates are an indicator of population persistence, but are not sufficient to evaluate turnover rates and the ability of long-lived clonal plants to enhance community stability and ecosystem resilience. In order to understand the dynamics of populations it will be necessary to measure genet size and age structure, not only life spans of single individuals, and to

  11. PyClone: Statistical inference of clonal population structure in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andrew; Khattra, Jaswinder; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Ha, Gavin; Aparicio, Samuel; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel statistical method, PyClone, for inference of clonal population structures in cancers. PyClone is a Bayesian clustering method for grouping sets of deeply sequenced somatic mutations into putative clonal clusters while estimating their cellular prevalences and accounting for allelic imbalances introduced by segmental copy number changes and normal cell contamination. Single cell sequencing validation demonstrates that PyClone infers accurate clustering of mutations that co-occur in individual cells. PMID:24633410

  12. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [15N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes. PMID:26904051

  13. Chromosome aberrations of clonal origin are present in astronauts' blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Durante, M.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome translocations remain in peripheral blood cells over many years, and can potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low-dose rate exposures. However, several recent studies have indicated that some individuals possess clones of cells with balanced chromosome abnormalities, which can result in an overestimation of damage and, therefore, influence the accuracy of dose calculations. We carefully examined the patterns of chromosome damage found in the blood lymphocytes of twelve astronauts, and also applied statistical methods to screen for the presence of potential clones. Cells with clonal aberrations were identified in three of the twelve individuals. These clonal cells were present in samples collected both before and after space flight, and yields are higher than previously reported for healthy individuals in this age range (40-52 years of age). The frequency of clonal damage appears to be even greater in chromosomes prematurely condensed in interphase, when compared with equivalent analysis in metaphase cells. The individuals with clonal aberrations were followed-up over several months and the yields of all clones decreased during this period. Since clonal aberrations may be associated with increased risk of tumorigenesis, it is important to accurately identify cells containing clonal rearrangements for risk assessment as well as biodosimetry. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential and its distinction from myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, Rafael; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Hasserjian, Robert P.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genetic analyses of large populations have revealed that somatic mutations in hematopoietic cells leading to clonal expansion are commonly acquired during human aging. Clonally restricted hematopoiesis is associated with an increased risk of subsequent diagnosis of myeloid or lymphoid neoplasia and increased all-cause mortality. Although myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are defined by cytopenias, dysplastic morphology of blood and marrow cells, and clonal hematopoiesis, most individuals who acquire clonal hematopoiesis during aging will never develop MDS. Therefore, acquisition of somatic mutations that drive clonal expansion in the absence of cytopenias and dysplastic hematopoiesis can be considered clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP), analogous to monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, which are precursor states for hematologic neoplasms but are usually benign and do not progress. Because mutations are frequently observed in healthy older persons, detection of an MDS-associated somatic mutation in a cytopenic patient without other evidence of MDS may cause diagnostic uncertainty. Here we discuss the nature and prevalence of CHIP, distinction of this state from MDS, and current areas of uncertainty regarding diagnostic criteria for myeloid malignancies. PMID:25931582

  15. B-cell clonality and infection with Helicobacter pylori: implications for development of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, D; Ferraccioli, G F; DeVita, S; Avellini, C; Beltrami, C A; Labombarda, A; Bernardis, V; De Biase, F; Trevisi, A; Pivetta, B; Boiocchi, M; Bartoli, E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and MALT lymphoma, it is not known how it may trigger these lesions and whether there is an identifiable pre-neoplastic stage. AIMS: To investigate the relation between MALT, H pylori infection, and B-cell clonality (a potential marker of pre-neoplastic lesions). PATIENTS: 141 subjects with simple dyspepsia. METHODS: Gastric biopsy specimens from all patients were examined for MALT and H pylori. Of these, 25 consecutive MALT positive specimens were scored for features of MALT lymphoma and VDJ clonality studied by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Overall, prevalence was 62% for H pylori and 46% for MALT. VDJ clonality was frequent in the sub-group studied (nine of 25), mostly associated with lymphoid follicles (eight of nine or 89%), and with a high scoring for MALT lymphoma. VDJ clonality was equally frequent in patients with and without H pylori (seven of 20 and two of five or 35% and 40% respectively). CONCLUSIONS: B-cell clonality is unexpectedly common in subjects with simple dyspepsia and MALT raising clinical management questions. These findings also suggest that the cascade MALT formation--B-cell clonality--MALT lymphoma may not be uniquely associated with H pylori infection. PMID:8984020

  16. [Fitness analysis of seed- and vegetative reproduction of clonal tree Symplocos laurina].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchun; Du, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Gao, Xianming; Su, Zhixian

    2005-09-01

    There are two ways in Symplocos laurina propagation, clonal and sexual reproduction. The study showed that under different habitat conditions, Symplocos laurina could adopt different ways to propagate and occupy space. In conditions with abundant water and nutrient resources, such as in evergreen broad-leaved forests or bamboo forests, the survival rate and space-occupying ability of both ramets and sexual seedlings were relatively high, with clonal ramets took advantage in terms of number and space, suggesting that clonal propagation was the dominant way in such environments. Oppositely, in habitats lack of sufficient nutrition, the survival rate and space-occupying ability of seedlings were low, and grown-up plantlets would preempt in number and space occupation. Bottleneck in sexual propagation appeared in the stage from seed to seedling, while clonal propagation appeared during the period from seedling to ramet. The way of Symplocos laurina invasion was to settle a plantlet, and then occupied the space rapidly by clonal growth, with clonal seedlings dominated in initial stage and lost the advantage after 15 ages. PMID:16355784

  17. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  18. Clonal selection drives genetic divergence of metastatic medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaochong; Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian; Dupuy, Adam J; Shih, David J H; Witt, Hendrik; Croul, Sidney; Bouffet, Eric; Fults, Daniel W; Eberhart, Charles G; Garzia, Livia; Van Meter, Timothy; Zagzag, David; Jabado, Nada; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Scheetz, Todd E; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Li, Xiao-Nan; Scherer, Stephen W; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Akagi, Keiko; MacDonald, Tobey J; Koster, Jan; McCabe, Martin G; Sarver, Aaron L; Collins, V Peter; Weiss, William A; Largaespada, David A; Collier, Lara S; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-02-23

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, arises in the cerebellum and disseminates through the cerebrospinal fluid in the leptomeningeal space to coat the brain and spinal cord. Dissemination, a marker of poor prognosis, is found in up to 40% of children at diagnosis and in most children at the time of recurrence. Affected children therefore are treated with radiation to the entire developing brain and spinal cord, followed by high-dose chemotherapy, with the ensuing deleterious effects on the developing nervous system. The mechanisms of dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid are poorly studied, and medulloblastoma metastases have been assumed to be biologically similar to the primary tumour. Here we show that in both mouse and human medulloblastoma, the metastases from an individual are extremely similar to each other but are divergent from the matched primary tumour. Clonal genetic events in the metastases can be demonstrated in a restricted subclone of the primary tumour, suggesting that only rare cells within the primary tumour have the ability to metastasize. Failure to account for the bicompartmental nature of metastatic medulloblastoma could be a major barrier to the development of effective targeted therapies. PMID:22343890

  19. Global evolution of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Zarrilli, Raffaele; Pournaras, Spyros; Giannouli, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to carbapenems and most or all available antibiotics during the last decade is a worrying evolution. The apparent predominance of a few successful multidrug-resistant lineages worldwide underlines the importance of elucidating the mode of spread and the epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in single hospitals, at a country-wide level and on a global scale. The evolutionary advantage of the dominant clonal lineages relies on the capability of the A. baumannii pangenome to incorporate resistance determinants. In particular, the simultaneous presence of divergent strains of the international clone II and their increasing prevalence in international hospitals further support the ongoing adaptation of this lineage to the hospital environment. Indeed, genomic and genetic studies have elucidated the role of mobile genetic elements in the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and substantiate the rate of genetic alterations associated with acquisition in A. baumannii of various resistance genes, including OXA- and metallo-β-lactamase-type carbapenemase genes. The significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms and transposon mutagenesis in the evolution of A. baumannii has been also documented. Establishment of a network of reference laboratories in different countries would generate a more complete picture and a fuller understanding of the importance of high-risk A. baumannii clones in the international dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23127486

  20. Emerging sporotrichosis is driven by clonal and recombinant Sporothrix species.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, GSybren; Zhang, Yu; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-05-01

    Sporotrichosis, caused by agents of the fungal genus Sporothrix, occurs worldwide, but the infectious species are not evenly distributed. Sporothrix propagules usually gain entry into the warm-blooded host through minor trauma to the skin from contaminated plant debris or through scratches or bites from felines carrying the disease, generally in the form of outbreaks. Over the last decade, sporotrichosis has changed from a relatively obscure endemic infection to an epidemic zoonotic health problem. We evaluated the impact of the feline host on the epidemiology, spatial distribution, prevalence and genetic diversity of human sporotrichosis. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers revealed large structural genetic differences between S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii populations, suggesting that the interplay of host, pathogen and environment has a structuring effect on the diversity, frequency and distribution of Sporothrix species. Phylogenetic data support a recent habitat shift within S. brasiliensis from plant to cat that seems to have occurred in southeastern Brazil and is responsible for its emergence. A clonal structure was found in the early expansionary phase of the cat-human epidemic. However, the prevalent recombination structure in the plant-associated pathogen S. schenckii generates a diversity of genotypes that did not show any significant increase in frequency as etiological agents of human infection over time. These results suggest that closely related pathogens can follow different strategies in epidemics. Thus, species-specific types of transmission may require distinct public health strategies for disease control. PMID:26038739

  1. Clonal dominance among T-lymphocyte infiltrates in arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, I.; Stegagno, M.; Wright, K.A.; Krane, S.M.; Amento, E.P.; Colvin, R.B.; Duquesnoy, R.J.; Kurnick, J.T.

    1988-02-01

    Synovial membranes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as other types of chronic destructive inflammatory arthritis contain infiltrates of activated T lymphocytes that probably contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. In an effort to elucidate the nature of these infiltrates, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-responsive T lymphocytes were grown out of synovial fragments from 14 patients undergoing surgery for advanced destructive inflammatory joint disease. Eleven of the samples examined were from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis, while three others were obtained from individuals with clinical osteoarthritis. Southern blot analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) ..beta..-chain genes in 13 of 14 cultures showed distinct rearrangements, indicating that each culture was characterized by the predominance of a limited number of clones. T-cell populations from peripheral blood stimulated with a variety of activators and expanded with IL-2 did not demonstrate evidence of similar clonality in long-term culture. These results suggest that a limited number of activated T-cell clones predominate at the site of tissue injury in rheumatoid synovial membranes as well as in other types of destructive inflammatory joint disease. Further characterization of these T-cell clones may aid our understanding of the pathogenesis of these rheumatic disorders.

  2. Quantifying Clonal and Subclonal Passenger Mutations in Cancer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Ivana; Gerold, Jeffrey M.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of mutations in the exome of cancer cells are passengers, which do not affect the reproductive rate of the cell. Passengers can provide important information about the evolutionary history of an individual cancer, and serve as a molecular clock. Passengers can also become targets for immunotherapy or confer resistance to treatment. We study the stochastic expansion of a population of cancer cells describing the growth of primary tumors or metastatic lesions. We first analyze the process by looking forward in time and calculate the fixation probabilities and frequencies of successive passenger mutations ordered by their time of appearance. We compute the likelihood of specific evolutionary trees, thereby informing the phylogenetic reconstruction of cancer evolution in individual patients. Next, we derive results looking backward in time: for a given subclonal mutation we estimate the number of cancer cells that were present at the time when that mutation arose. We derive exact formulas for the expected numbers of subclonal mutations of any frequency. Fitting this formula to cancer sequencing data leads to an estimate for the ratio of birth and death rates of cancer cells during the early stages of clonal expansion. PMID:26828429

  3. Clonal propagation of Cyclamen persicum via somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Traud

    2010-01-01

    Cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum) is an economically important ornamental pot plant with local use as cut flower as well. Traditionally, it is propagated via seeds, but interest is given in vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as superior single plants. Somatic embryogenesis is an efficient in vitro propagation method for many cyclamen cultivars. Starting from ovules of unpollinated flowers, callus is induced and propagated in a medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-(gamma,gamma-dimethylallylamino)purine (2iP). Transfer to hormone-free medium results in the differentiation of somatic embryos, which afterwards germinate on the same medium. These first culture stages take about 6-7 months and are carried out in complete darkness. Two to four months after the transfer to light, plantlets develop which can be acclimatized in the greenhouse. The regenerated plants are characterized by low percentages of somaclonal variation. This protocol has proven useful not only for clonal propagation, but also for artificial seed preparation, cryopreservation, genetic transformation and protoplast regeneration. PMID:20099110

  4. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  5. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  6. Timing of induced resistance in a clonal plant network.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; van Dijk, William; Stuefer, Josef F

    2010-05-01

    After local herbivory, plants can activate defense traits both at the damaged site and in undamaged plant parts such as in connected ramets of clonal plants. Since defense induction has costs, a mismatch in time and space between defense activation and herbivore feeding might result in negative consequences for plant fitness. A short time lag between attack and defense activation is important to ensure efficient protection of the plant. Additionally, the duration of induced defense production once the attack has stopped is also relevant in assessing the cost-benefit balance of inducible defenses, which will depend on the absence or presence of subsequent attacks. In this study we quantified the timing of induced responses in ramet networks of the stoloniferous herb Trifolium repens after local damage by Mamestra brassicae larvae. We studied the activation time of systemic defense induction in undamaged ramets and the decay time of the response after local attack. Undamaged ramets became defense-induced 38-51 h after the initial attack. Defense induction was measured as a reduction in leaf palatability. Defense induction lasted at least 28 days, and there was strong genotypic variation in the duration of this response. Ramets formed after the initial attack were also defense-induced, implying that induced defense can extend to new ramet generations, thereby contributing to protection of plant tissue that is both very vulnerable to herbivores and most valuable in terms of future plant growth and fitness. PMID:20522188

  7. Emerging sporotrichosis is driven by clonal and recombinant Sporothrix species

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, GSybren; Zhang, Yu; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis, caused by agents of the fungal genus Sporothrix, occurs worldwide, but the infectious species are not evenly distributed. Sporothrix propagules usually gain entry into the warm-blooded host through minor trauma to the skin from contaminated plant debris or through scratches or bites from felines carrying the disease, generally in the form of outbreaks. Over the last decade, sporotrichosis has changed from a relatively obscure endemic infection to an epidemic zoonotic health problem. We evaluated the impact of the feline host on the epidemiology, spatial distribution, prevalence and genetic diversity of human sporotrichosis. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers revealed large structural genetic differences between S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii populations, suggesting that the interplay of host, pathogen and environment has a structuring effect on the diversity, frequency and distribution of Sporothrix species. Phylogenetic data support a recent habitat shift within S. brasiliensis from plant to cat that seems to have occurred in southeastern Brazil and is responsible for its emergence. A clonal structure was found in the early expansionary phase of the cat–human epidemic. However, the prevalent recombination structure in the plant-associated pathogen S. schenckii generates a diversity of genotypes that did not show any significant increase in frequency as etiological agents of human infection over time. These results suggest that closely related pathogens can follow different strategies in epidemics. Thus, species-specific types of transmission may require distinct public health strategies for disease control. PMID:26038739

  8. Clonal competition with alternating dominance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Keats, Jonathan J.; Chesi, Marta; Egan, Jan B.; Garbitt, Victoria M.; Palmer, Stephen E.; Braggio, Esteban; Van Wier, Scott; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Baker, Angela S.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Carpten, John D.; Barrett, Michael; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that tumors can follow several evolutionary paths over a patient's disease course. With the use of serial genomic analysis of samples collected at different points during the disease course of 28 patients with multiple myeloma, we found that the genomes of standard-risk patients show few changes over time, whereas those of cytogenetically high-risk patients show significantly more changes over time. The results indicate the existence of 3 temporal tumor types, which can either be genetically stable, linearly evolving, or heterogeneous clonal mixtures with shifting predominant clones. A detailed analysis of one high-risk patient sampled at 7 time points over the entire disease course identified 2 competing subclones that alternate in a back and forth manner for dominance with therapy until one clone underwent a dramatic linear evolution. With the use of the Vk*MYC genetically engineered mouse model of myeloma we modeled this competition between subclones for predominance occurring spontaneously and with therapeutic selection. PMID:22498740

  9. Exploiting Temporal Collateral Sensitivity in Tumor Clonal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; Sedlak, Joseph C; Srinivas, Raja; Creixell, Pau; Pritchard, Justin R; Tidor, Bruce; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Hemann, Michael T

    2016-03-24

    The prevailing approach to addressing secondary drug resistance in cancer focuses on treating the resistance mechanisms at relapse. However, the dynamic nature of clonal evolution, along with potential fitness costs and cost compensations, may present exploitable vulnerabilities-a notion that we term "temporal collateral sensitivity." Using a combined pharmacological screen and drug resistance selection approach in a murine model of Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we indeed find that temporal and/or persistent collateral sensitivity to non-classical BCR-ABL1 drugs arises in emergent tumor subpopulations during the evolution of resistance toward initial treatment with BCR-ABL1-targeted inhibitors. We determined the sensitization mechanism via genotypic, phenotypic, signaling, and binding measurements in combination with computational models and demonstrated significant overall survival extension in mice. Additional stochastic mathematical models and small-molecule screens extended our insights, indicating the value of focusing on evolutionary trajectories and pharmacological profiles to identify new strategies to treat dynamic tumor vulnerabilities. PMID:26924578

  10. Decoding astrocyte heterogeneity: New tools for clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Bribián, A; Figueres-Oñate, M; Martín-López, E; López-Mascaraque, L

    2016-05-26

    The importance of astrocyte heterogeneity came out as a hot topic in neurosciences especially over the last decades, when the development of new methodologies allowed demonstrating the existence of big differences in morphological, neurochemical and physiological features between astrocytes. However, although the knowledge about the biology of astrocytes is increasing rapidly, an important characteristic that remained unexplored, until the last years, has been the relationship between astrocyte lineages and cell heterogeneity. To fill this gap, a new method called StarTrack was recently developed, a powerful genetic tool that allows tracking astrocyte lineages forming cell clones. Using StarTrack, a single astrocyte progenitor and its progeny can be specifically labeled from its generation, during embryonic development, to its final fate in the adult brain. Because of this specific labeling, astrocyte clones, exhibiting heterogeneous morphologies and features, can be easily analyzed in relation to their ontogenetic origin. This review summarizes how astrocyte heterogeneity can be decoded studying the embryonic development of astrocyte lineages and their clonal relationship. Finally, we discuss about some of the challenges and opportunities emerging in this exciting area of investigation. PMID:25917835

  11. Clonal groups of Salmonella typhimurium in New York State.

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, P L; Timoney, J F; Jacobson, R H; Khakhria, R

    1989-01-01

    The epidemiology of 278 strains of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from 1973 to 1981 from animals in New York State was studied by using four "fingerprinting" techniques, bacteriophage type (B.R. Callow, J. Hyg. 57:346-359, 1959), biotype (J. P. Duguid, E. S. Anderson, G. A. Alfredsson, R. Barker, and D. C. Old, J. Med. Microbiol. 8:149-166, 1975), plasmid profile, and antibiogram. Phage type with biotype was the most useful marker for distinguishing clonal groups of S. typhimurium. Four clones of S. typhimurium predominated, i.e., phage type/biotypes U275/26, 49/26, 10/3, and 2/3. U275/26 and 49/26 were commonly found until 1976, but clones 10/3 and 2/3 were predominant after 1976. Comparison of results with data from Canada suggested a dissemination of strains of S. typhimurium between Canada and New York. Cattle were a common source of phage type 49, as has been observed in other countries. PMID:2656740

  12. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. PMID:26581629

  13. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    King, Jessica M.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.

    2016-01-01

    . R. Murdoch et al., Arch Intern Med 169:463–473, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2008.603, and H. Wisplinghoff et al., Clin Infect Dis 39:309–317, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/421946). Even with current medical advances, S. aureus bloodstream infections and infective endocarditis carry mortality rates of 20 to 66% (S. Y. Tong et al., Clin Microbiol Rev 28:603–661, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00134-14). S. aureus lineages associated with human disease worldwide include clonal complex 5 (CC5)/USA100, CC30/USA200, CC8/USA300, CC1/USA400, and CC45/USA600. The CC5/USA100, CC30/USA200, and CC45/USA600 lineages cause invasive disease yet remain poorly characterized. USA300 and cytotoxins are central to most S. aureus virulence studies, and yet, we find evidence that clonal groups are quite heterogeneous in parameters canonically used to measure virulence, including cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, and blood survival, and that the superantigen profile is an important parameter to consider when defining the virulence of S. aureus strains. PMID:27303750

  14. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica M; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S; Vu, Bao G; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    . Murdoch et al., Arch Intern Med 169:463-473, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2008.603, and H. Wisplinghoff et al., Clin Infect Dis 39:309-317, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/421946). Even with current medical advances, S. aureus bloodstream infections and infective endocarditis carry mortality rates of 20 to 66% (S. Y. Tong et al., Clin Microbiol Rev 28:603-661, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CMR.00134-14). S. aureus lineages associated with human disease worldwide include clonal complex 5 (CC5)/USA100, CC30/USA200, CC8/USA300, CC1/USA400, and CC45/USA600. The CC5/USA100, CC30/USA200, and CC45/USA600 lineages cause invasive disease yet remain poorly characterized. USA300 and cytotoxins are central to most S. aureus virulence studies, and yet, we find evidence that clonal groups are quite heterogeneous in parameters canonically used to measure virulence, including cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, and blood survival, and that the superantigen profile is an important parameter to consider when defining the virulence of S. aureus strains. PMID:27303750

  15. Single cell genotyping of exome sequencing-identified mutations to characterize the clonal composition and evolution of inv(16) AML in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Niemöller, Christoph; Renz, Nathalie; Bleul, Sabine; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Greil, Christine; Yoshida, Kenichi; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Follo, Marie; Duyster, Justus; Claus, Rainer; Ogawa, Seishi; Lübbert, Michael; Becker, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    We recently described the development of an inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis. Here, we further characterized the clonal composition and evolution of the AML based on the genetic information from the bulk specimen and analyses of individual bone marrow cells for mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. To control for allele dropout, heterozygous polymorphisms located close to the respective mutation loci were assessed in parallel. The clonal composition concluded from exome sequencing suggested a proliferation advantage associated with the acquisition of mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. Out of 102 single cell sequencing reactions on these mutations and the respective polymorphisms, analyses yielded conclusive results for at least 2 mutation sites in 12 cells. The single cell genotyping not only confirmed the co-occurrence of the PTPRT, CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations in the same AML clone but also revealed a clonal hierarchy, as the PTPRT mutation was likely acquired after the CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations. This insight had not been possible based solely on the exome sequencing data and suggests that the mutation in PTPRT, which encodes a STAT3-inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase, contributed to the AML development at a later stage by enhancing proliferation. PMID:27244256

  16. Clinical Clostridium difficile: clonality and pathogenicity locus diversity.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Kate E; Griffiths, David; Didelot, Xavier; Evans, Jessica; Vaughan, Alison; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Stoesser, Nicole; Jolley, Keith A; Golubchik, Tanya; Harding, Rosalind M; Peto, Tim E; Fawley, Warren; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark; Crook, Derrick W

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in healthcare settings. The major virulence determinants are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (tcdA) and toxin B (tcdB), encoded within the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc). Isolates vary in pathogenicity from hypervirulent PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 with high mortality, to benign non-toxigenic strains carried asymptomatically. The relative pathogenicity of most toxigenic genotypes is still unclear, but may be influenced by PaLoc genetic variant. This is the largest study of C. difficile molecular epidemiology performed to date, in which a representative collection of recent isolates (n = 1290) from patients with CDI in Oxfordshire, UK, was genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. The population structure was described using NeighborNet and ClonalFrame. Sequence variation within toxin B (tcdB) and its negative regulator (tcdC), was mapped onto the population structure. The 69 Sequence Types (ST) showed evidence for homologous recombination with an effect on genetic diversification four times lower than mutation. Five previously recognised genetic groups or clades persisted, designated 1 to 5, each having a strikingly congruent association with tcdB and tcdC variants. Hypervirulent ST-11 (078) was the only member of clade 5, which was divergent from the other four clades within the MLST loci. However, it was closely related to the other clades within the tcdB and tcdC loci. ST-11 (078) may represent a divergent formerly non-toxigenic strain that acquired the PaLoc (at least) by genetic recombination. This study focused on human clinical isolates collected from a single geographic location, to achieve a uniquely high density of sampling. It sets a baseline of MLST data for future comparative studies investigating genotype virulence potential (using clinical severity data for these isolates), possible reservoirs of human CDI, and the evolutionary origins of hypervirulent strains

  17. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  18. Phylogenetic Meta-Analysis of the Functional Traits of Clonal Plants Foraging in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiu-Fang; Song, Yao-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Pan, Xu; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Foraging behavior, one of the adaptive strategies of clonal plants, has stimulated a tremendous amount of research. However, it is a matter of debate whether there is any general pattern in the foraging traits (functional traits related to foraging behavior) of clonal plants in response to diverse environments. We collected data from 97 published papers concerning the relationships between foraging traits (e.g., spacer length, specific spacer length, branch intensity and branch angle) of clonal plants and essential resources (e.g., light, nutrients and water) for plant growth and reproduction. We incorporated the phylogenetic information of 85 plant species to examine the universality of foraging hypotheses using phylogenetic meta-analysis. The trends toward forming longer spacers and fewer branches in shaded environments were detected in clonal plants, but no evidence for a relation between foraging traits and nutrient availability was detected, except that there was a positive correlation between branch intensity and nutrient availability in stoloniferous plants. The response of the foraging traits of clonal plants to water availability was also not obvious. Additionally, our results indicated that the foraging traits of stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to resource availability than those of rhizomatous plants. In consideration of plant phylogeny, these results implied that the foraging traits of clonal plants (notably stoloniferous plants) only responded to light intensity in a general pattern but did not respond to nutrient or water availability. In conclusion, our findings on the effects of the environment on the foraging traits of clonal plants avoided the confounding effects of phylogeny because we incorporated phylogeny into the meta-analysis. PMID:25216101

  19. Clonal Patch Size and Ramet Position of Leymus chinensis Affected Reproductive Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive allocation is critically important for population maintenance and usually varies with not only environmental factors but also biotic ones. As a typical rhizome clonal plant in China's northern grasslands, Leymus chinensis usually dominates the steppe communities and grows in clonal patches. In order to clarify the sexual reproductive allocation of L. chinensis in the process of the growth and expansion, we selected L. chinensis clonal patches of a range of sizes to examine the reproductive allocation and allometric growth of the plants. Moreover, the effects of position of L. chinensis ramets within the patch on their reproductive allocation were also examined. Clonal patch size and position both significantly affected spike biomass, reproductive tiller biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio. From the central to the marginal zone, both the spike biomass and reproductive tiller biomass displayed an increasing trend in all the five patch size categories except for reproductive tiller biomass in 15–40m2 category. L. chinensis had significantly larger SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio in marginal zone than in central zone of clonal patches that are larger than 15 m2 in area. Regression analysis showed that the spike biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio were negatively correlated with clonal patch size while patch size showed significantly positive effect on SEED/SPIKE biomass ratio, but the reproductive tiller biomass and SEED/TILLER biomass ratio were not dependent on clonal patch size. The relationships between biomass of spike and reproductive tiller, between mature seed biomass and spike biomass and between mature seed biomass and reproductive tiller biomass were significant allometric for all or some of patch size categories, respectively. The slopes of all these allometric relationships were significantly different from 1. The allometric growth of L. chinensis is patch size-dependent. This finding will be helpful for developing appropriate practices for

  20. Diagnostic Utility of a Clonality Test for Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Koreans Using the BIOMED-2 PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young; Choi, Yoo Duk; Choi, Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background A clonality test for immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TCR) is a useful adjunctive method for the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs). Recently, the BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has been established as a standard method for assessing the clonality of LPDs. We tested clonality in LPDs in Koreans using the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR and compared the results with those obtained in European, Taiwanese, and Thai participants. We also evaluated the usefulness of the test as an ancillary method for diagnosing LPDs. Methods Two hundred and nineteen specimens embedded in paraffin, including 78 B cell lymphomas, 80 T cell lymphomas and 61 cases of reactive lymphadenitis, were used for the clonality test. Results Mature B cell malignancies showed 95.7% clonality for IG, 2.9% co-existing clonality, and 4.3% polyclonality. Mature T cell malignancies exhibited 83.8% clonality for TCR, 8.1% co-existing clonality, and 16.2% polyclonality. Reactive lymphadenitis showed 93.4% polyclonality for IG and TCR. The majority of our results were similar to those obtained in Europeans. However, the clonality for IGK of B cell malignancies and TCRG of T cell malignancies was lower in Koreans than Europeans. Conclusions The BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR assay was a useful adjunctive method for diagnosing LPDs. PMID:24255634

  1. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  2. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  3. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Richard; Harismendy, Olivier; Pu, Minya; Crain, Brian; Yost, Shawn; Frazer, Kelly A.; Rana, Brinda; Hasteh, Farnaz; Wallace, Anne; Parker, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal) pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC) mutations/ # total HC mutations). Methods Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48) and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value <0.01), across renal cell, testicular, and colorectal cancer. The CLS test correctly classified all validation samples but one, which it appears may have been incorrectly classified in the published data. As proof-of-concept we then applied the CLS test to two new cases of invasive synchronous bilateral breast cancer at our institution, each with one hormone receptor positive (ER+/PR+/HER2-) lobular and one triple negative ductal carcinoma. High confidence mutations were identified by exome sequencing and results were validated using deep targeted sequencing. The first tumor pair had CLS of 81% (p-value < 10–15), supporting clonality. In the second pair, no common mutations of 184 variants were validated (p-value >0.99), supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the

  4. Clonal haematopoiesis harbouring AML-associated mutations is ubiquitous in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew L; Challen, Grant A; Birmann, Brenda M; Druley, Todd E

    2016-01-01

    Clonal haematopoiesis is thought to be a rare condition that increases in frequency with age and predisposes individuals to haematological malignancy. Recent studies, utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), observed haematopoietic clones in 10% of 70-year olds and rarely in younger individuals. However, these studies could only detect common haematopoietic clones->0.02 variant allele fraction (VAF)-due to the error rate of NGS. To identify and characterize clonal mutations below this threshold, here we develop methods for targeted error-corrected sequencing, which enable the accurate detection of clonal mutations as rare as 0.0003 VAF. We apply these methods to study serially banked peripheral blood samples from healthy 50-60-year-old participants in the Nurses' Health Study. We observe clonal haematopoiesis, frequently harbouring mutations in DNMT3A and TET2, in 95% of individuals studied. These clonal mutations are often stable longitudinally and present in multiple haematopoietic compartments, suggesting a long-lived haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell of origin. PMID:27546487

  5. Clonal haematopoiesis harbouring AML-associated mutations is ubiquitous in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew L.; Challen, Grant A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Druley, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal haematopoiesis is thought to be a rare condition that increases in frequency with age and predisposes individuals to haematological malignancy. Recent studies, utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), observed haematopoietic clones in 10% of 70-year olds and rarely in younger individuals. However, these studies could only detect common haematopoietic clones—>0.02 variant allele fraction (VAF)—due to the error rate of NGS. To identify and characterize clonal mutations below this threshold, here we develop methods for targeted error-corrected sequencing, which enable the accurate detection of clonal mutations as rare as 0.0003 VAF. We apply these methods to study serially banked peripheral blood samples from healthy 50–60-year-old participants in the Nurses' Health Study. We observe clonal haematopoiesis, frequently harbouring mutations in DNMT3A and TET2, in 95% of individuals studied. These clonal mutations are often stable longitudinally and present in multiple haematopoietic compartments, suggesting a long-lived haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell of origin. PMID:27546487

  6. TNFα facilitates clonal expansion of JAK2V617F positive cells in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Aichberger, Karl J.; Luty, Samuel B.; Bumm, Thomas G.; Petersen, Curtis L.; Doratotaj, Shirin; Vasudevan, Kavin B.; LaTocha, Dorian H.; Yang, Fei; Press, Richard D.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Pahl, Heike L.; Silver, Richard T.; Agarwal, Anupriya; O'Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.; Bagby, Grover C.

    2011-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα are elevated in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Here we reveal a central role for TNFα in promoting clonal dominance of JAK2V617F expressing cells in MPN. We show that JAK2V617F kinase regulates TNFα expression in cell lines and primary MPN cells and TNFα expression is correlated with JAK2V617F allele burden. In clonogenic assays, normal controls show reduced colony formation in the presence of TNFα while colony formation by JAK2V617F-positive progenitor cells is resistant or stimulated by exposure to TNFα. Ectopic JAK2V617F expression confers TNFα resistance to normal murine progenitor cells and overcomes inherent TNFα hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia complementation group C deficient progenitors. Lastly, absence of TNFα limits clonal expansion and attenuates disease in a murine model of JAK2V617F-positive MPN. Altogether our data are consistent with a model where JAK2V617F promotes clonal selection by conferring TNFα resistance to a preneoplastic TNFα sensitive cell, while simultaneously generating a TNFα-rich environment. Mutations that confer resistance to environmental stem cell stressors are a recognized mechanism of clonal selection and leukemogenesis in bone marrow failure syndromes and our data suggest that this mechanism is also critical to clonal selection in MPN. PMID:21860020

  7. Phenotypic, transcriptomic, and genomic features of clonal plasma cells in light-chain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Corchete, Luis A; Sanchez-Vega, Beatriz; Rapado, Inmaculada; Puig, Noemi; Barrio, Santiago; Sanchez, Maria-Luz; Alignani, Diego; Lasa, Marta; García de Coca, Alfonso; Pardal, Emilia; Oriol, Alberto; Garcia, Maria-Esther Gonzalez; Escalante, Fernando; González-López, Tomás J; Palomera, Luis; Alonso, José; Prosper, Felipe; Orfao, Alberto; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Mateos, María-Victoria; Lahuerta, Juan-Jose; Gutierrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-06-16

    Immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis (AL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are 2 distinct monoclonal gammopathies that involve the same cellular compartment: clonal plasma cells (PCs). Despite the fact that knowledge about MM PC biology has significantly increased in the last decade, the same does not apply for AL. Here, we used an integrative phenotypic, molecular, and genomic approach to study clonal PCs from 24 newly diagnosed patients with AL. Through principal-component-analysis, we demonstrated highly overlapping phenotypic profiles between AL and both monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and MM PCs. However, in contrast to MM, highly purified fluorescence-activated cell-sorted clonal PCs from AL (n = 9) showed almost normal transcriptome, with only 38 deregulated genes vs normal PCs; these included a few tumor-suppressor (CDH1, RCAN) and proapoptotic (GLIPR1, FAS) genes. Notwithstanding, clonal PCs in AL (n = 11) were genomically unstable, with a median of 9 copy number alterations (CNAs) per case, many of such CNAs being similar to those found in MM. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) performed in 5 AL patients revealed a median of 15 nonrecurrent mutations per case. Altogether, our results show that in the absence of a unifying mutation by WES, clonal PCs in AL display phenotypic and CNA profiles similar to MM, but their transcriptome is remarkably similar to that of normal PCs. PMID:27069257

  8. Clonal evolution in relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Ley, Timothy J; Larson, David E; Miller, Christopher A; Koboldt, Daniel C; Welch, John S; Ritchey, Julie K; Young, Margaret A; Lamprecht, Tamara; McLellan, Michael D; McMichael, Joshua F; Wallis, John W; Lu, Charles; Shen, Dong; Harris, Christopher C; Dooling, David J; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Chen, Ken; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; Magrini, Vincent J; Cook, Lisa; McGrath, Sean D; Vickery, Tammi L; Wendl, Michael C; Heath, Sharon; Watson, Mark A; Link, Daniel C; Tomasson, Michael H; Shannon, William D; Payton, Jacqueline E; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J; Graubert, Timothy A; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; DiPersio, John F

    2012-01-26

    Most patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) die from progressive disease after relapse, which is associated with clonal evolution at the cytogenetic level. To determine the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, we sequenced the primary tumour and relapse genomes from eight AML patients, and validated hundreds of somatic mutations using deep sequencing; this allowed us to define clonality and clonal evolution patterns precisely at relapse. In addition to discovering novel, recurrently mutated genes (for example, WAC, SMC3, DIS3, DDX41 and DAXX) in AML, we also found two major clonal evolution patterns during AML relapse: (1) the founding clone in the primary tumour gained mutations and evolved into the relapse clone, or (2) a subclone of the founding clone survived initial therapy, gained additional mutations and expanded at relapse. In all cases, chemotherapy failed to eradicate the founding clone. The comparison of relapse-specific versus primary tumour mutations in all eight cases revealed an increase in transversions, probably due to DNA damage caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy. These data demonstrate that AML relapse is associated with the addition of new mutations and clonal evolution, which is shaped, in part, by the chemotherapy that the patients receive to establish and maintain remissions. PMID:22237025

  9. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four -stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a ‘parallel’ evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a ‘stepwise’ evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  10. Spatial Genetic Structure and Clonal Diversity in an Alpine Population of Salix herbacea (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Christoph; Schurm, Sophia; Poschlod, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Many alpine plant species combine clonal and sexual reproduction to minimize the risks of flowering and seed production in high mountain regions. The spatial genetic structure and diversity of these alpine species is strongly affected by different clonal strategies (phalanx or guerrilla) and the proportion of generative and vegetative reproduction. Methods The clonal structure of the alpine plant species Salix herbacea was investigated in a 3 × 3 m plot of an alpine meadow using microsatellite (simple sequence repeat; SSR) analysis. The data obtained were compared with the results of a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Key Results SSR analysis, based on three loci and 16 alleles, revealed 24 different genotypes and a proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0·18. Six SSR clones were found consisting of at least five samples, 17 clones consisting of more than two samples and seven single genotypes. Mean clone size comprising at least five samples was 0·96 m2, and spatial autocorrelation analysis showed strong similarity of samples up to 130 cm. RAPD analysis revealed a higher level of clonal diversity but a comparable number of larger clones and a similar spatial structure. Conclusions The spatial genetic structure as well as the occurrence of single genotypes revealed in this study suggests both clonal and sexual propagation and repeated seedling recruitment in established populations of S. herbacea and is thus suggestive of a relaxed phalanx strategy. PMID:17242040

  11. GACD: Integrated Software for Genetic Analysis in Clonal F1 and Double Cross Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Meng, Lei; Wu, Wencheng; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-01

    Clonal species are common among plants. Clonal F1 progenies are derived from the hybridization between 2 heterozygous clones. In self- and cross-pollinated species, double crosses can be made from 4 inbred lines. A clonal F1 population can be viewed as a double cross population when the linkage phase is determined. The software package GACD (Genetic Analysis of Clonal F1 and Double cross) is freely available public software, capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in clonal F1 and double cross populations. Three functionalities are integrated in GACD version 1.0: binning of redundant markers (BIN); linkage map construction (CDM); and QTL mapping (CDQ). Output of BIN can be directly used as input of CDM. After adding the phenotypic data, the output of CDM can be used as input of CDQ. Thus, GACD acts as a pipeline for genetic analysis. GACD and example datasets are freely available from www.isbreeding.net. PMID:26503825

  12. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Min; An, Chang Hyeok; Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-09-29

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four-stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a 'parallel' evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a 'stepwise' evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  13. Emergence of Clonal Hematopoiesis in the Majority of Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Perdigones, Nieves; Perin, Juan C.; Olson, Timothy S.; Ye, Wenda; Roth, Jacquelyn J.; Lind, Curt; Cattier, Carine; Li, Yimei; Hartung, Helge; Paessler, Michele E.; Frank, Dale M.; Xie, Hongbo M.; Cross, Shanna; Cockroft, Joshua D.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Monos, Dimitrios; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a non-malignant disease caused by autoimmune destruction of early hematopoietic cells. Clonal hematopoiesis is a late complication, seen in 20–25% of older patients. We hypothesized that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is a more general phenomenon, which can arise early in disease even in younger patients. To evaluate clonal hematopoiesis in aAA, we used comparative whole exome sequencing of paired bone marrow and skin in 22 patients. We found somatic mutations in sixteen patients (72.7%) with a median disease duration of 1 year; twelve (66.7%) were patients with pediatriconset aAA. Fifty-eight mutations in 51 unique genes were primarily in pathways of immunity and transcriptional regulation. Most frequently mutated was PIGA, with 7 mutations. Only two mutations were in genes recurrently-mutated in MDS. Two patients had oligoclonal loss of HLA alleles, linking immune escape to clone emergence. Two patients had activating mutations in key signaling pathways (STAT5B(p.N642H), CAMK2G(p.T306M)). Our results suggest that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is common, with two mechanisms emerging― immune escape and increased proliferation. Our findings expand conceptual understanding of this non-neoplastic blood disorder. Future prospective studies of clonal hematopoiesis in aAA will be critical for understanding outcomes, and for designing personalized treatment strategies. PMID:25800665

  14. Distinct fates of self-specific T cells developing in irradiation bone marrow chimeras: Clonal deletion, clonal anergy, or in vitro responsiveness to self-Mls-1a controlled by hemopoietic cells in the thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Speiser, D.E.; Chvatchko, Y.; Zinkernagel, R.M.; MacDonald, H.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Elimination of potentially self-reactive T lymphocytes during their maturation in the thymus has been shown to be a major mechanism in accomplishing self-tolerance. Previous reports demonstrated that clonal deletion of self-Mls-1a-specific V beta 6+ T lymphocyte is controlled by a radiosensitive I-E+ thymic component. Irradiation chimeras reconstituted with I-E- bone marrow showed substantial numbers of mature V beta 6+ T cells despite host Mls-1a expression. Analysis of the functional properties of such chimeric T cells revealed a surprising variability in their in vitro reactivity to host Mls-1a, depending on the H-2 haplotype of stem cells used for reconstitution. In chimeras reconstituted with B10.S (H-2s) stem cells, mature V beta 6+ lymphocytes were present but functionally anergic to host-type Mls-1a in vitro. In contrast, in chimeras reconstituted with B10.G (H-2q) bone marrow, nondeleted V beta 6+ cells were highly responsive to Mls-1a in vitro. These findings suggest that clonal anergy of V beta 6+ cells to self-Mls-1a may be controlled by the affinity/avidity of T cell receptor interactions with bone marrow-derived cells in the thymus depending on the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules involved. Furthermore, chimeras bearing host (Mls-1a)-reactive V beta 6+ cells did not differ clinically from those with anergic or deleted V beta 6+ cells and survived more than one year without signs of autoimmune disease. Interestingly, their spleen cells had no Mls-1a stimulatory capacity in vitro. Therefore, regulation at the level of antigen presentation may be an alternative mechanism for maintenance of tolerance to certain self-antigens such as Mls-1a.

  15. In vitro clonal analysis of mouse neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Morita, T; Sieber-Blum, M

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of lineage segregation during mammalian neural crest development has not been sufficiently performed due to technical difficulties. In the present study, therefore, we established a clonal culture system of mouse neural crest cells in order to analyze developmental potentials of individual neural crest cells and their patterns of lineage segregation. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and cholera toxin (CT) were applied to culture medium to trigger melanogenic differentiation of mouse neural crest cells. Three morphologically distinct types of clones were observed. (1) "Pigmented clones" consisted of melanocytes only, suggesting that the clone-forming cells were committed to the melanogenic lineage. These clones were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The proportion of this type of clone (8%) was much lower than that of the equivalent type of clone in quail trunk neural crest (40-60%; Sieber-Blum and Cohen, 1980, Dev. Biol. 80, 96-106). It therefore appears that the segregation pattern to the melanogenic lineage during mouse neural crest development in vitro differs quantitatively from that in the quail. (2) "Mixed clones" consisted of pigmented and unpigmented cells. Like pigmented clones, they were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The clones contained up to four types of cells: melanocytes, S100-positive cells (Schwann cells or melanogenic precursor cells), serotonin (5-HT)-positive autonomic neuron-like cells, and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive sensory neuron-like cells. Thus, at least some mixed clone-forming cells are pluripotent. (3) Two classes of "unpigmented clones" were observed that consisted of unpigmented cells only. These clones developed in the presence and absence of TPA and CT. Unpigmented clones in one class contained up to three types of cells as well as other, as yet unidentified cells: S100-, 5-HT-, and SP-positive cells. This observation suggests that at least some of these clones originate from cells

  16. Intraspecific competition and light effect on reproduction of Ligularia virgaurea, an invasive native alpine grassland clonal herb.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Ge-Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Du, Guo-Zhen; He, Gui-Yong

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between sexual reproduction and clonal growth in clonal plants often shows up at the ramet level. However, only a few studies focus on the relationship at the genet level, which could finally account for evolution. The sexual reproduction and clonal growth of Ligularia virgaurea, a perennial herb widely distributed in the alpine grasslands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, were studied under different competition intensities and light conditions at the genet level through a potted experiment. The results showed that: (1) sexual reproduction did not depend on density or light, and increasing clonal growth with decreasing density and increasing light intensity indicated that intraspecific competition and light intensity may affect the clonal life history of L. virgaurea; (2) both sexual reproduction and clonal growth show a positive linear relationship with genet size under different densities and light conditions; (3) a threshold size is required for sexual reproduction and no evidence of a threshold size for clonal growth under different densities and light conditions; (4) light level affected the allocation of total biomass to clonal and sexual structures, with less allocation to clonal structures and more allocation to sexual structures in full sunlight than in shade; (5) light determined the onset of sexual reproduction, and the genets in the shade required a smaller threshold size for sexual reproduction to occur than the plants in full sunlight; and (6) no evidence was found of trade-offs between clonal growth and sexual reproduction under different densities and light conditions at the genet level, and the positive correlation between two reproductive modes indicated that these are two integrated processes. Clonal growth in this species may be viewed as a growth strategy that tends to maximize genet fitness. PMID:24683463

  17. Genome-scale investigation of phenotypically distinct but nearly clonal Trichoderma strains

    PubMed Central

    Weld, Richard J.; Cox, Murray P.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; McLean, Kirstin L.; Stewart, Alison; Steyaert, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological control agents (BCA) are beneficial organisms that are applied to protect plants from pests. Many fungi of the genus Trichoderma are successful BCAs but the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Trichoderma cf. atroviride strain LU132 is a remarkably effective BCA compared to T. cf. atroviride strain LU140 but these strains were found to be highly similar at the DNA sequence level. This unusual combination of phenotypic variability and high DNA sequence similarity between separately isolated strains prompted us to undertake a genome comparison study in order to identify DNA polymorphisms. We further investigated if the polymorphisms had functional effects on the phenotypes. The two strains were clearly identified as individuals, exhibiting different growth rates, conidiation and metabolism. Superior pathogen control demonstrated by LU132 depended on its faster growth, which is a prerequisite for successful distribution and competition. Genome sequencing identified only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) between the strains. Based on this SNP, we successfully designed and validated an RFLP protocol that can be used to differentiate LU132 from LU140 and other Trichoderma strains. This SNP changed the amino acid sequence of SERF, encoded by the previously undescribed single copy gene “small EDRK-rich factor” (serf). A deletion of serf in the two strains did not lead to identical phenotypes, suggesting that, in addition to the single functional SNP between the nearly clonal Trichoderma cf. atroviride strains, other non-genomic factors contribute to their phenotypic variation. This finding is significant as it shows that genomics is an extremely useful but not exhaustive tool for the study of biocontrol complexity and for strain typing. PMID:27190719

  18. Streptococcus suis in invasive human infections in Poland: clonality and determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, A; Molska, E; Janas, K; Skoczyńska, A; Stefaniuk, E; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of Streptococcus suis human invasive isolates, collected in Poland by the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. Isolates obtained from 21 patients during 2000-2013 were investigated by phenotypic tests, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), analysis of the TR9 locus from the multilocus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SmaI-digested DNA. Determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analysed by sequencing. All isolates represented sequence type 1 (ST1) and were suggested to be serotype 2. PFGE and analysis of the TR9 locus allowed the discrimination of four and 17 types, respectively. Most of the isolates were haemolysis- and DNase-positive, and around half of them formed biofilm. Genes encoding suilysin, extracellular protein factor, fibronectin-binding protein, muramidase-released protein, surface antigen one, enolase, serum opacity factor and pili were ubiquitous in the studied group, while none of the isolates carried sequences characteristic for the 89K pathogenicity island. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, gentamicin, linezolid, vancomycin and daptomycin. Five isolates (24 %) were concomitantly non-susceptible to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and harboured the tet(O) and erm(B) genes; for one isolate, lsa(E) and lnu(B) were additionally detected. Streptococcus suis isolated in Poland from human invasive infections belongs to a globally distributed clonal complex of this pathogen, enriched in virulence markers. This is the first report of the lsa(E) and lnu(B) resistance genes in S. suis. PMID:26980093

  19. Genome-scale investigation of phenotypically distinct but nearly clonal Trichoderma strains.

    PubMed

    Lange, Claudia; Weld, Richard J; Cox, Murray P; Bradshaw, Rosie E; McLean, Kirstin L; Stewart, Alison; Steyaert, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Biological control agents (BCA) are beneficial organisms that are applied to protect plants from pests. Many fungi of the genus Trichoderma are successful BCAs but the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Trichoderma cf. atroviride strain LU132 is a remarkably effective BCA compared to T. cf. atroviride strain LU140 but these strains were found to be highly similar at the DNA sequence level. This unusual combination of phenotypic variability and high DNA sequence similarity between separately isolated strains prompted us to undertake a genome comparison study in order to identify DNA polymorphisms. We further investigated if the polymorphisms had functional effects on the phenotypes. The two strains were clearly identified as individuals, exhibiting different growth rates, conidiation and metabolism. Superior pathogen control demonstrated by LU132 depended on its faster growth, which is a prerequisite for successful distribution and competition. Genome sequencing identified only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) between the strains. Based on this SNP, we successfully designed and validated an RFLP protocol that can be used to differentiate LU132 from LU140 and other Trichoderma strains. This SNP changed the amino acid sequence of SERF, encoded by the previously undescribed single copy gene "small EDRK-rich factor" (serf). A deletion of serf in the two strains did not lead to identical phenotypes, suggesting that, in addition to the single functional SNP between the nearly clonal Trichoderma cf. atroviride strains, other non-genomic factors contribute to their phenotypic variation. This finding is significant as it shows that genomics is an extremely useful but not exhaustive tool for the study of biocontrol complexity and for strain typing. PMID:27190719

  20. Different Growth Promoting Effects of Endophytic Bacteria on Invasive and Native Clonal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhi-Cong; Fu, Wei; Wan, Ling-Yun; Cai, Hong-Hong; Wang, Ning; Qi, Shan-Shan; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP) effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of Wedelia trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets’ growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion. PMID:27252722

  1. Sexual recombination punctuated by outbreaks and clonal expansions predicts Toxoplasma gondii population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Michael E.; Sundar, Natarajan

    2009-01-01

    The cosmopolitan parasitic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is capable of infecting essentially any warm-blooded vertebrate worldwide, including most birds and mammals, and establishes chronic infections in one-third of the globe’s human population. The success of this highly prevalent zoonosis is largely the result of its ability to propagate both sexually and clonally. Frequent genetic exchanges via sexual recombination among extant parasite lineages that mix in the definitive felid host produces new lines that emerge to expand the parasite’s host range and cause outbreaks. Highly successful lines spread clonally via carnivorism and in some cases sweep to pandemic levels. The extent to which sexual reproduction versus clonal expansion shapes Toxoplasma’s current, global population genetic structure is the central question this review will attempt to answer. PMID:19217909

  2. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi.

    PubMed

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers. PMID:26922778

  3. Clonal structure affects the assembling behavior in the Japanese queenless ant Pristomyrmex punctatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Yudai; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Hiraoka, Tuyosi; Obara, Yoshiaki; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2007-10-01

    The queenless ant Pristomyrmex punctatus (Hymenoptera: Myrmicinae) has a unique society that differs from those of other typical ants. This species does not have a queen, and the workers lay eggs and produce their clones parthenogenetically. However, a colony of these ants does not always comprise members derived from a single clonal line. In this study, we examined whether P. punctatus changes its “assembling behavior” based on colony genetic structure. We prepared two subcolonies—a larger one comprising 200 individuals and a smaller one comprising 100 individuals; these subcolonies were established from a single stock colony. We investigated whether these subcolonies assemble into a single nest. The genetically monomorphic subcolonies (single clonal line) always fused into a single nest; however, the genetically polymorphic subcolonies (multiple clonal lines) did not tend to form a single colony. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the colony genetic structure significantly affects social viscosity in social insects.

  4. ClonalFrameML: Efficient Inference of Recombination in Whole Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is an important evolutionary force in bacteria, but it remains challenging to reconstruct the imports that occurred in the ancestry of a genomic sample. Here we present ClonalFrameML, which uses maximum likelihood inference to simultaneously detect recombination in bacterial genomes and account for it in phylogenetic reconstruction. ClonalFrameML can analyse hundreds of genomes in a matter of hours, and we demonstrate its usefulness on simulated and real datasets. We find evidence for recombination hotspots associated with mobile elements in Clostridium difficile ST6 and a previously undescribed 310kb chromosomal replacement in Staphylococcus aureus ST582. ClonalFrameML is freely available at http://clonalframeml.googlecode.com/. PMID:25675341

  5. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  6. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1. PMID:26858442

  7. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Francesco R.; Sobolewski, Michele D.; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M.; Watters, Sarah A.; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T.; Halvas, Elias K.; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J.; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W.; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E.; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A.; Rehm, Catherine A.; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F.; Kearney, Mary F.; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Mellors, John W.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4+T cells. Some of these CD4+T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4+ T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1–infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4+T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1. PMID:26858442

  8. Different Growth Promoting Effects of Endophytic Bacteria on Invasive and Native Clonal Plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhi-Cong; Fu, Wei; Wan, Ling-Yun; Cai, Hong-Hong; Wang, Ning; Qi, Shan-Shan; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP) effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of Wedelia trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets' growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion. PMID:27252722

  9. Improved clonal and nonclonal growth of human, rat and bovine adrenocortical cells in culture.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J M; Hornsby, P J

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the development of a culture system for long-term growth and cloning of human fetal adrenocortical cells. Optimal conditions for stimulating clonal growth were determined by testing the efficacy of horse serum (HS), fetal bovine serum (FBS), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibronectin, and a combination of growth factors, UltroSer G, in stimulating growth from low density. Optimal conditions for clonal growth were achieved using fibronectin-coated dishes and DME/F12 medium with 10% FBS, 10% HS, 2% UltroSer G, and 100 ng/ml FGF or 100 pM EGF. Conditions for growth at clonal density were found to be optimal for growth of early passage, nonclonal cultures at higher densities. The improved growth conditions used for cloning were shown to allow continued long-term growth of nonclonal human adrenocortical cells without fibroblast overgrowth. All cells in cultures grown in HS, FBS, and UltroSer G had morphologic characteristics of adrenocortical cells, whereas cells grown in FBS only rapidly became overgrown with fibroblasts. Clonal and nonclonal early passage human adrenocortical cells had similar mitogenic responses to FGF and EGF. Whereas FGF, EGF, and UltroSer G showed similar stimulation of DNA synthesis and clonal growth in human adrenocortical cells and human adrenal gland fibroblasts, the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate stimulated growth only in adrenocortical cells and was strongly inhibitory to growth in fibroblasts. In both cell types, forskolin inhibited DNA synthesis. Human adrenocortical cell cultures were functional and synthesized cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. The improved growth conditions for clonal growth of human adrenocortical cells also provided optimal conditions for long-term growth of cultured rat adrenocortical cells and increased the cloning efficiency of cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. PMID:3667487

  10. Clonal genotype and population structure inference from single-cell tumor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; McPherson, Andrew; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Smith, Maia A; Nielsen, Cydney B; McAlpine, Jessica N; Aparicio, Samuel; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Shah, Sohrab P

    2016-07-01

    Single-cell DNA sequencing has great potential to reveal the clonal genotypes and population structure of human cancers. However, single-cell data suffer from missing values and biased allelic counts as well as false genotype measurements owing to the sequencing of multiple cells. We describe the Single Cell Genotyper (https://bitbucket.org/aroth85/scg), an open-source software based on a statistical model coupled with a mean-field variational inference method, which can be used to address these problems and robustly infer clonal genotypes. PMID:27183439

  11. Synchrony of clonal cell proliferation and contiguity of clonally related cells: production of mosaicism in the ventricular zone of developing mouse neocortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed clonal cell proliferation in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the early developing mouse neocortex with a replication-incompetent retrovirus encoding human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP). The retrovirus was injected into the lateral ventricles on embryonic day 11 (E11), i.e., at the onset of neuronogenesis. Three days postinjection, on E14, a total of 259 AP-labeled clones of various sizes were found in 7 fetal brains. There are approximately 7 cell cycles between E11 and E14 (), and there is a 1-2 cell cycle delay between retroviral injection and the production of a retrovirally labeled "founder" cell; thus, we estimate that the "age" of the clones was about 5-6 cell cycles. Almost one-half of the clones (48.3%) identified were pure proliferating clones containing cells only in the VZ. Another 18.5% contained both proliferating and postproliferative cells, and 33.2% contained only postproliferative cells. It was striking that over 90% of the clonally related proliferating cells occurred in clusters of two or more apparently contiguous cells, and about 73% of the proliferating cells occurred in clusters of three or more cells. Regardless of the number of cells in the clone, these clusters were tightly packed and confined to a single level of the VZ. This clustering of proliferating cells indicates that clonally related cells maintain neighbor-neighbor relationships as they undergo interkinetic nuclear migration and progress through several cell cycles, and, as a result, the ventricular zone is a mosaic of small clusters of clonally related and synchronously cycling cells. In addition, cells in the intermediate zone and the cortical plate were also frequently clustered, indicating that they became postproliferative at a similar time and that the output of the VZ is influenced by its mosaic structure.

  12. Phenotypic plasticity or speciation? A case from a clonal marine organism

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Clonal marine organisms exhibit high levels of morphological variation. Morphological differences may be a response to environmental factors but also they can be attributed to accumulated genetic differences due to disruption of gene flow among populations. In this study, we examined the extensive morphological variation (of 14 characters) in natural populations observed in the gorgonian Eunicea flexuosa, a widely distributed Caribbean octocoral. Eco-phenotypic and genetic effects were evaluated by reciprocal transplants of colonies inhabiting opposite ends of the depth gradient and analysis of population genetics of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, respectively. Results Significant differences (P < 0.001) in 14 morphological traits were found among colonies inhabiting 12 locations distributed in seven reefs in southwest Puerto Rico. Results from principal component analysis indicated the presence of two groups based on depth distribution, suggesting the presence of two discrete morphotypes (i.e. shallow type < 5 m and deep type > 17 m). A discriminant function analysis based on a priori univariate and multivariate analyses (which separated the colonies in morphotypes) correctly classified 93% of the colonies for each environment. Light, water motion and sediment transport might influence the distribution of the two morphotypes. Reaction norms of morphological characters of colonies reciprocally transplanted showed gradual significant changes through the 15 months of transplantation. Sclerites of shallow water colonies became larger when transplanted to deeper environments and vice versa, but neither of the two transplanted groups overlapped with the residents' morphology. Genetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggested that such discrete morphology and non-overlapping phenotypic plasticity is correlated with the presence of two independent evolutionary lineages. The distribution of the lineages is non-random and may be related to

  13. Determination of serotyping antigens, clonal analysis and genetic characterization of the 4CMenB vaccine antigen genes in invasive Neisseria meningitidis from Western Canada, 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Law, Dennis K S; Zhou, Jianwei; Deng, Saul; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory; Horsman, Greg; Wylie, John; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2014-11-01

    This study examined invasive Neisseria meningitidis recovered from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) cases in Western Canada between 2009 and 2013. A total of 161 isolates from individual IMD cases were analysed for serogroup, serotype, serosubtype, PorA genotype, multi-locus sequence type and nucleotide sequence of their 4CMenB vaccine antigen genes. Sixty-nine isolates were serogroup B (MenB), 47 were serogroup Y (MenY), 22 were serogroup C (MenC), 19 were serogroup W (MenW), three were serogroup E and one was non-encapsulated. MenC, MenY and MenW were mainly clonal, represented primarily by clonal complex (cc) 11, cc23 or cc167, and cc22, respectively. In contrast, MenB were composed of eight different ccs together with 11 isolates not assigned to any known cc. Antigenic analysis and PorA genotyping confirmed the heterogeneity of MenB isolates, while such results supported the clonal nature of most MenC, MenY and MenW isolates. Thirty-four (21.1%) isolates had at least one gene that encoded one matching vaccine protein component of the 4CMenB vaccine (i.e. PorA P1.4; fHbp variant 1.1; NHBA peptide 2; and NadA-1, -2, or -3). An additional 18 isolates had genes that encoded variant 1 or subfamily B factor H binding proteins of this same vaccine. PMID:25165123

  14. Survival of Sporangia of New Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans in Soil under Semiarid Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there is no information on the viability of sporangia in soil of the new metalaxyl-resistant genotypes of P. infestans in the semiarid Columbia Basin of WA, and in potato growing regions throughout the world. Sporangia of metalaxyl-resistant US-8 and US-11 clonal lineages of P. infestans ...

  15. 30 years of preserving clonal genetic resources in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) has preserved clonal plant genetic resources of horticultural crops in field gene banks. Facilities in Hilo, Hawaii; Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Miami, Florida; and...

  16. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  17. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  18. The Hayflick Limit May Determine the Effective Clonal Diversity of Naive T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ndifon, Wilfred; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2016-06-15

    Having a large number of sufficiently abundant T cell clones is important for adequate protection against diseases. However, as shown in this paper and elsewhere, between young adulthood and >70 y of age the effective clonal diversity of naive CD4/CD8 T cells found in human blood declines by a factor of >10. (Effective clonal diversity accounts for both the number and the abundance of T cell clones.) The causes of this observation are incompletely understood. A previous study proposed that it might result from the emergence of certain rare, replication-enhancing mutations in T cells. In this paper, we propose an even simpler explanation: that it results from the loss of T cells that have attained replicative senescence (i.e., the Hayflick limit). Stochastic numerical simulations of naive T cell population dynamics, based on experimental parameters, show that the rate of homeostatic T cell proliferation increases after the age of ∼60 y because naive T cells collectively approach replicative senescence. This leads to a sharp decline of effective clonal diversity after ∼70 y, in agreement with empirical data. A mathematical analysis predicts that, without an increase in the naive T cell proliferation rate, this decline will occur >50 yr later than empirically observed. These results are consistent with a model in which exhaustion of the proliferative capacity of naive T cells causes a sharp decline of their effective clonal diversity and imply that therapeutic potentiation of thymopoiesis might either prevent or reverse this outcome. PMID:27183600

  19. Poppr: an R package for genetic analysis of populations with mixed (clonal/sexual) reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poppr is an R package for analysis of population genetic data. It extends the adegenet package and provides several novel tools, particularly with regard to analysis of data from admixed, clonal, and/or sexual populations. Currently, poppr can be used for dominant/codominant and haploid/diploid gene...

  20. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  1. The Prunus collection at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Davis, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Davis, CA is a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS) genebank that houses national collections of various Mediterranean fruit and nut crops. The Prunus collection is the second largest in this genebank and is e...

  2. Enrichment of Oligodendrocyte Progenitors from Differentiated Neural Precursors by Clonal Sphere Preparations.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Coles, Brenda; van der Kooy, Derek

    2016-05-01

    Remyelination is the goal of potential cell transplantation therapies for demyelinating diseases and other central nervous system injuries. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can result in remyelination in the central nervous system, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are envisioned to be an autograft cell source of transplantation therapy for many cell types. However, it remains time-consuming and difficult to generate OPCs from iPSCs. Clonal sphere preparations are reliable cell culture methods for purifying select populations of proliferating cells. To make clonal neurospheres from human embryonic stem cell (ESC)/iPSC colonies, we have found that a monolayer differentiation phase helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have compared a direct isolation of neural stem cells from human ESC/iPSC colonies (protocol 1) with monolayer neural differentiation, followed by clonal neural stem cell sphere preparations (protocol 2). The two-step method combining monolayer neuralization, followed by clonal sphere preparations, is more useful than direct sphere preparations in generating mature human oligodendrocytes. The initial monolayer culture stage appears to bias cells toward the oligodendrocyte lineage. This method of deriving oligodendrocyte lineage spheres from iPSCs represents a novel strategy for generating OPCs. PMID:26972950

  3. GRAPE GENETIC RESOURCES AND RESEARCH AT THE DAVIS CALIFORNIA NATIONAL CLONAL GERMPLASM REPOSITORY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Davis, California National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) houses most Mediterranean-adapted fruit and nut crop collections in the U.S., including grapes (Vitis). The NCGR is part of the USDA National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS). Our missions are to acquire, preserve, characterize and dis...

  4. A simple model for the influence of habitat resource availability on lateral clonal spread

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Martin; Smyčka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Plant clonal spread is ubiquitous and of great interest, owing both to its key role in plant community assembly and its suitability for plant behaviour research. However, mechanisms that govern spreading distance are not well known. Here we link spacer costs and below-ground competition in a simple model of growth in a homogeneous below-ground environment, in which optimal distance between ramets is based on minimizing the sum of these costs. Using this model, we predict a high prevalence of clonal growth that does not employ spacers in resource-poor environments and a nonlinear increase in spreading distance in response to increasing below-ground resource availability. Analysis of database data on clonal growth in relationship to below-ground resource availability revealed that patterns of the spread based on stolons is compatible with the model's predictions. As expected, model prediction failed for rhizomatous species, where spacer sizes are likely to be selected mainly to play roles other than spread. The model's simplicity makes it useful as a null model in testing hypotheses about the effects of environmental heterogeneity on clonal spread. PMID:25833862

  5. OCCURRENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI CLONAL GROUP A IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolates of Escherichia coli belonging to clonal group A (CGA), a recently described disseminated cause of drug-resistant urinary tract infections in humans, were present in four of seven sewage effluents collected from geographically dispersed areas of the United States. ...

  6. Genetic distance and age affect the cuticular chemical profiles of the clonal ant Cerapachys biroi.

    PubMed

    Teseo, Serafino; Lecoutey, Emmanuel; Kronauer, Daniel J C; Hefetz, Abraham; Lenoir, Alain; Jaisson, Pierre; Châline, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Although cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have received much attention from biologists because of their important role in insect communication, few studies have addressed the chemical ecology of clonal species of eusocial insects. In this study we investigated whether and how differences in CHCs relate to the genetics and reproductive dynamics of the parthenogenetic ant Cerapachys biroi. We collected individuals of different ages and subcastes from several colonies belonging to four clonal lineages, and analyzed their cuticular chemical signature. CHCs varied according to colonies and clonal lineages in two independent data sets, and correlations were found between genetic and chemical distances between colonies. This supports the results of previous research showing that C. biroi workers discriminate between nestmates and non-nestmates, especially when they belong to different clonal lineages. In C. biroi, the production of individuals of a morphological subcaste specialized in reproduction is inversely proportional to colony-level fertility. As chemical signatures usually correlate with fertility and reproductive activity in social Hymenoptera, we asked whether CHCs could function as fertility-signaling primer pheromones determining larval subcaste fate in C. biroi. Interestingly, and contrary to findings for several other ant species, fertility and reproductive activity showed no correlation with chemical signatures, suggesting the absence of fertility related CHCs. This implies that other cues are responsible for subcaste differentiation in this species. PMID:24756691

  7. Incorporating clonal growth form clarifies the role of plant height in response to nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Gough, Laura; Gross, Katherine L; Cleland, Elsa E; Clark, Christopher M; Collins, Scott L; Fargione, Joseph E; Pennings, Steven C; Suding, Katharine N

    2012-08-01

    Nutrient addition to grasslands consistently causes species richness declines and productivity increases. Competition, particularly for light, is often assumed to produce this result. Using a long-term dataset from North American herbaceous plant communities, we tested whether height and clonal growth form together predict responses to fertilization because neither trait alone predicted species loss in a previous analysis. Species with a tall-runner growth form commonly increased in relative abundance in response to added nitrogen, while short species and those with a tall-clumped clonal growth form often decreased. The ability to increase in size via vegetative spread across space, while simultaneously occupying the canopy, conferred competitive advantage, although typically only the abundance of a single species within each height-clonal growth form significantly responded to fertilization in each experiment. Classifying species on the basis of two traits (height and clonal growth form) increases our ability to predict species responses to fertilization compared to either trait alone in predominantly herbaceous plant communities. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-012-2264-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:22302512

  8. Evaluation of the USDA National Clonal Pyrus Germplasm Collection for Resistance to Podosphaera leucotricha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew (PM) occurs worldwide and is prevalent on susceptible cultivars wherever pears are grown. It causes economic losses due to russeted fruit and increases the need for fungicides. A core subset of the Pyrus germplasm collection at the USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvalli...

  9. Sambucus genetic resources at the U.S.D.A. National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Corvallis, Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR-Corvallis) preserves the genetic diversity of elderberry (Sambucus L.). This genebank preserves representatives of seven of the nine major world Sambucus species and 50 cultivar...

  10. Vigor rating and brix for first clonal selection stage of the Canal Point Cultivar Development Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genetic variability in agronomic performance will help optimize breeding and selection strategies. Vigor ratings and Brix data were collected from the 2009 and 2010 clones in the first clonal selection stage (Stage I) of the Canal Point (CP) sugar...

  11. Rhodamine-123 Selectively Reduces Clonal Growth of Carcinoma Cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-12-01

    Rhodamine-123, a cationic laser dye, markedly reduced the clonal growth of carcinoma cells but had little effect on nontumorigenic epithelial cells in vitro. This selective inhibitory effect of Rhodamine-123 on some carcinomas is unusual since known anticancer drugs, such as arabinosyl cytosine and methotrexate, have not been shown to exhibit such selectivity in vitro.

  12. Analyzing clonal fidelity of micropropagated Psidium guajava L. plants using simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micropropagation of Psidium guajava L. (guava) is a viable alternative to currently adopted techniques for large-scale plant propagation of commercial cultivars. Assessment of clonal fidelity in micropropagated plants is the first step towards ensuring genetic uniformity in mass production of planti...

  13. Clonal identification of multipotent precursors from adult mouse pancreas that generate neural and pancreatic lineages.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; Smukler, Simon R; Kieffer, Timothy J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Asghar, Zeenat; Wheeler, Michael B; Korbutt, Gregory; van der Kooy, Derek

    2004-09-01

    The clonal isolation of putative adult pancreatic precursors has been an elusive goal of researchers seeking to develop cell replacement strategies for diabetes. We report the clonal identification of multipotent precursor cells from the adult mouse pancreas. The application of a serum-free, colony-forming assay to pancreatic cells enabled the identification of precursors from pancreatic islet and ductal populations. These cells proliferate in vitro to form clonal colonies that coexpress neural and pancreatic precursor markers. Upon differentiation, individual clonal colonies produce distinct populations of neurons and glial cells, pancreatic endocrine beta-, alpha- and delta-cells, and pancreatic exocrine and stellate cells. Moreover, the newly generated beta-like cells demonstrate glucose-dependent Ca(2+) responsiveness and insulin release. Pancreas colonies do not express markers of embryonic stem cells, nor genes suggestive of mesodermal or neural crest origins. These cells represent a previously unidentified adult intrinsic pancreatic precursor population and are a promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:15322557

  14. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shou-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai; Werger, Marinus J A; Dong, Ming; During, Heinjo J; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. To evaluate the success of planted species and provide guidance for selecting proper species to stabilize active dunes, demographic studies in natural habitats are essential. We studied the life history traits and population dynamics of a dominant clonal shrub Hedysarum laeve in Inner-Mongolia, northern China. Vital rates of 19057 ramets were recorded during three annual censuses (2007-2009) and used to parameterize Integral Projection Models to analyse population dynamics. The life history of H. laeve was characterized by high ramet turnover and population recruitment entirely depended on clonal propagation. Stochastic population growth rate was 1.32, suggesting that the populations were experiencing rapid expansion. Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth. The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification. Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems. PMID:25757743

  15. Measuring genetic diversity and purity of cranberry clonal cultivars using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) are an economically important fruit crop in North America, which are grown from clonally preserved and propagated cultivars. Growers usually select cultivars for their operation based on the know attributes of each cultivar in order to best fit their particul...

  16. High variation in clonal vs. sexual reproduction in populations of the wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana (Rosaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, John A.; Kramer, Andrea T.; Ashley, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants reproduce both clonally and sexually, and the balance between the two modes of reproduction will vary among populations. Clonal reproduction was characterized in three populations of the wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana, to determine the extent that reproductive mode varied locally between sites. The study sites were fragmented woodlands in Cook County, Illinois, USA. Methods A total of 95 strawberry ramets were sampled from the three sites via transects. Ramets were mapped and genotyped at five variable microsatellite loci. The variability at these five loci was sufficient to assign plants to clones with high confidence, and the spatial pattern of genets was mapped at each site. Key Results A total of 27 distinct multilocus genotypes were identified. Of these, 18 genotypes were detected only once, with the remaining nine detected in multiple ramets. The largest clone was identified in 16 ramets. No genets were shared between sites, and each site exhibited markedly different clonal and sexual recruitment patterns, ranging from two non-overlapping and widespread genets to 19 distinct genets. Only one flowering genet was female; the remainder were hermaphrodites. Conclusions Local population history or fine-scale ecological differences can result in dramatically different reproductive patterns at small spatial scales. This finding may be fairly widespread among clonal plant species, and studies that aim to characterize reproductive modes in species capable of asexual reproduction need to evaluate reproductive modes in multiple populations and sites. PMID:19797422

  17. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shou-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai; Werger, Marinus J. A.; Dong, Ming; During, Heinjo J.; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. To evaluate the success of planted species and provide guidance for selecting proper species to stabilize active dunes, demographic studies in natural habitats are essential. We studied the life history traits and population dynamics of a dominant clonal shrub Hedysarum laeve in Inner-Mongolia, northern China. Vital rates of 19057 ramets were recorded during three annual censuses (2007–2009) and used to parameterize Integral Projection Models to analyse population dynamics. The life history of H. laeve was characterized by high ramet turnover and population recruitment entirely depended on clonal propagation. Stochastic population growth rate was 1.32, suggesting that the populations were experiencing rapid expansion. Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth. The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification. Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems. PMID:25757743

  18. Background and initial evaluations of recently introduced cultivars distributed by the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) distributes budwood of new, potentially important commercial citrus cultivars as they are re- leased from quarantine after completing a thorough “Variety Introduction (VI)” disease testing and therapy program. This article is the second in a seri...

  19. Comparison of stem morphology and anatomy of two alfalfa clonal lines exhibiting divergent cell wall composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous research, two alfalfa clonal lines (252, 1283) were identified that exhibited environmentally stable differences in stem cell walls. Compared to stems of 1283, stems of 252 have a higher cell wall concentration and greater amounts of lignin and cellulose but reduced levels of pectic suga...

  20. Assessment of clonality and serotypes of Streptococcus mutans among children by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Stephanie S; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Childers, Noel K

    2015-12-01

    Studies using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) have demonstrated that Streptococcus mutans isolates are genetically diverse. Our laboratory previously demonstrated clonality of S. mutans using MLST but could not discount the possibility of sampling bias. In this study, the clonality of randomly selected S. mutans plaque isolates from African-American children was examined using MLST. Serotype and the presence of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) encoded by cnm/cbm were also assessed. One-hundred S. mutans isolates were randomly selected for MLST analysis. Sequence analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were generated using start2 and mega. Thirty-four sequence types were identified, of which 27 were unique to this population. Seventy-five per cent of the isolates clustered into 16 clonal groups. The serotypes observed were c (n = 84), e (n = 3), and k (n = 11). The prevalence of S. mutans isolates of serotype k was notably high, at 17.5%. All isolates were cnm/cbm negative. The clonality of S. mutans demonstrated in this study illustrates the importance of localized population studies and are consistent with transmission. The prevalence of serotype k, a recently proposed systemic pathogen, observed in this study, is higher than reported in most populations and is the first report of S. mutans serotype k in a United States population. PMID:26443288

  1. Industry view on the relative importance of "clonality" of biopharmaceutical-producing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Frye, Christopher; Deshpande, Rohini; Estes, Scott; Francissen, Kathy; Joly, John; Lubiniecki, Anthony; Munro, Trent; Russell, Reb; Wang, Tongtong; Anderson, Karin

    2016-03-01

    Recently, several health authorities have requested substantial detail from sponsor firms regarding the practices employed to generate the production cell line for recombinant DNA-(rDNA) derived biopharmaceuticals. Two possible inferences from these regulatory agency questions are that (1) assurance of "clonality" of the production cell line is of major importance to assessing the safety and efficacy of the product and (2), without adequate proof of "clonality", additional studies of the cell line and product are often required to further ensure the product's purity and homogeneity. Here we address the topic of "clonality" in the broader context of product quality assurance by current technologies and practices, as well as discuss some of the relevant science and historical perspective. We agree that the clonal derivation of a production cell line is one factor with potential impact, but it is only one of many factors. Further, we believe that regulatory emphasis should be primarily placed on ensuring product quality of the material actually administered to patients, and on ensuring process consistency and implementing appropriate control strategies through the life cycle of the products. PMID:26852257

  2. Ephemeral clonal integration in Calathea marantifolia (Marantaceae): Evidence of diminished integration over time.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, David P; da S L Sternberg, Leonel

    2009-02-01

    A major advantage of clonal growth forms is the intergenerational transfer of resources through vascular connections (clonal integration). Connections linking ramets can be persistent or ephemeral. For species with ephemeral connections, whether the extent of clonal integration changes over time is unclear. To address this issue, we tracked water movement using an isotopic label and assessed the demographic performance of parent and offspring ramets over time in a severing experiment. Our study system was the understory herb Calathea marantifolia, which has parent ramets that produce vegetative bulbils (clonal offspring) that pass through distinct pre- and post-rooting stages. Little water was transported between parents and offspring, and the direction of movement was primarily from parent to pre-rooting offspring. Anatomical observations of inter-ramet connections showed that vascular bundles were twice as abundant in parent stems compared to inter-ramet connections. Severing inter-ramet connections reduced the growth of offspring ramets but not parents. Survival of pre-rooting offspring was reduced by 10% due to severing, but post-rooting offspring were not affected. Our results suggest that offspring ramets of C. marantifolia are weaned from their parent as they progress from pre- to post-rooting stages. PMID:21628198

  3. Clonal population structures are derived from various population processes in the protistan oyster parasite Perkinsus marinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population genetic analysis of genotypes comprised of seven microsatellite loci revealed clonal genetic patterns in each of four populations of the protistan estuarine parasite Perkinsus marinus. Each locus was amplified directly from DNA extracted from infected oysters collected from four geographi...

  4. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  5. Floral variation and environmental heterogeneity in a tristylous clonal aquatic of the Pantanal wetlands of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leme da Cunha, Nicolay; Fischer, Erich; Lorenz-Lemke, Aline P.; Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The balance between stochastic forces and frequency-dependent mating largely governs style morph frequencies in heterostylous populations. In clonal species, deviations from equal morph ratios often result from founder events and unfavourable conditions for sexual reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether different flooding regimes, because of their influence on sexual vs. clonal reproduction, are associated with regional variation in morph frequencies and floral trait differentiation in populations of the clonal, tristylous, aquatic Eichhornia azurea (Pontederiaceae) in the Pantanal wetlands of Brazil. Methods Style morph frequencies were sampled from 73 populations distributed across four flooding regimes differing in depth and duration. Measurements of flower size, sex-organ dimension, pollen size and pollen production were made in selected populations, and pollinator assemblages and their functional traits were recorded. Key Results Most populations of E. azurea were tristylous (78 %), but the majority exhibited uneven morph ratios. The frequency of the mid-styled morph was significantly lower than that of the long- and short-styled morphs. Morph evenness was positively associated with population size but not with flooding regime. There were significant phenotypic differences among flooding regimes for all floral traits, including populations with reduced flower size, sex-organ length and smaller pollen. Pollinator assemblages varied with flood duration. Conclusions The similar morph structure and evenness of populations, regardless of flooding regime, suggest that sexual reproduction and clonal dispersal are sufficiently common to prevent the signature of founder events from dominating in a region. However, the pervasive occurrence of biased morph ratios in most populations suggests that many are in a non-equilibrium state. The reduced frequency of the mid-styled morph in trimorphic and dimorphic populations may be

  6. Perception of neighboring plants by rhizomes and roots: morphological manifestations of a clonal plant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Pyke, David A.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    A previous study showed that clonal morphology of the rhizomatous grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus (Scibner & J.G. Smith Gould) was influenced more by neighbouring root systems than by the local distribution of nutrients. In this study we determine whether individual rhizomes or roots of E. lanceolatus perceive neighbouring root systems and how this is manifested in morphological responses of E. lanceolatus clones. Elymus lanceolatus was grown in the same bin with Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) A. Love or Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) Schult. plants. Elymus lanceolatus was separated from its neighbours by different barriers. The barriers allowed either only E. lanceolatus roots; only a single E. lanceolatus primary rhizome; or both roots and rhizomes to contact the neighbour root system. When only a single E. lanceolatus primary rhizome with potentially developing branching rhizomes made contact with the neighbour, the clonal structure of E. lanceolatus was modified more with P. spicata as the neighbour than with A. desertorum. With root contact of E. lanceolatus alone there was a similar effect with the neighbouring plants, but there was a more marked inhibitory effect on E. lanceolatus clonal growth with P. spicata than with A. desertorum, compared with the treatment with only a single rhizome in contact with the neighbour. Root resource competition in the unconstrained treatment (roots and rhizomes) between neighbouring plant and E. lanceolatus was more apparent with A. desertorum than with P. spicata. This study is one of the first to document that rhizome and root contact of a clonal plant with its neighbours may induce different clonal responses depending on the species of neighbour.

  7. Clonal Non-Malignant Hematological Disorders: Unraveling Molecular Pathogenic Mechanisms to Develop Novel Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M.; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Clonal non-malignant hematological disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases that are particularly challenging for hematologists. Indeed, most obvious and frequent hematological diseases include a broad spectrum of malignancies, such as leukemias, lymphomas, myeloma, and other myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders. In recent years, all these diseases have been categorized by the WHO according to a novel classification of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, which takes in account the outstanding progress in our understanding of molecular defects underlying hematological malignancies. Regardless of a number of novel technologies, hematologists continue to deal daily with conditions where a clear diagnosis of a malignancy is missing: this is the case of several clonal hematological disorders, which are considered bona fide non-malignant. Some myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic T and NK disorders of granular lymphocytes, myelofibrosis, monoclonal gammopathies, monoclonal B-cel lymphocytosis, mastocytosis and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria are paradigmatic examples of how clonal disorders are clearly different from cancers, even if they may share with hematological malignancies similar molecular, genetic, epigenetic and immunological processes. Indeed, it is not entirely clear whether in individual conditions such pathogenic mechanisms may represent initial step(s) of malignant transformation, making a bridge between these clonal non-malignant disorders and typical hematological cancers. Some of these non-malignant disorders imply specific pathogenic mechanisms and/or clinical course, and so they have been definitely established with their own biological and clinical identity. However, the obvious question whether some of these clonal non-malignant hematological diseases form some a kind of disease-continuum with their corresponding malignant counterpart is still to be answered. PMID:24778992

  8. Effects of nutrient patches and root systems on the clonal plasticity of a rhizomatous grass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Pyke, David A.; Caldwell, M.M.; Durham, S.

    1998-01-01

    Clonal plant foraging has been examined primarily on individual clones exposed to resource-poor and resource-rich environments. We designed an experiment to examine the clonal foraging behavior of the rhizomatous grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus under the influence of neighboring plant root systems in a heterogeneous nutrient environment. Individual Elymus clones were planted in large bins together with one of three neighboring grass species, Agropyron desertorum, Pseudoroegneria spicata, or Bromus tectorum, which differ in rooting density and growth activity. The position of Elymus clones was manipulated so rhizomes encountered a short-duration nutrient patch and subsequently root systems of the neighboring plants. Unexpectedly, the morphological plasticity of the perennial grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus was influenced by the presence of the neighboring species much more than by the local nutrient enrichments, although nutrient patches did amplify some of the foraging responses. Elymus rhizomes branched readily and initiated large daughter plants as they encountered the low-density root systems of Pseudoroegneria. When Elymus encountered the fine, dense root systems of the annual Bromus, clonal expansion was initially reduced. Yet, after the short growing season of Bromus, Elymus resumed clonal expansion and produced several daughter plants. Elymus clones were most constrained by the fine, dense root systems of Agropyron desertorum. In this case, a few, long rhizomes avoided the densely rooted soil environment by growing aboveground as stolons crossing over the Agropyron tussocks. Elymus clonal biomass was largest in neighborhoods of Pseudoroegneria, intermediate in neighborhoods with Bromus, and smallest in neighborhoods with Agropyron. The latter were approximately half the size of those in the Pseudoroegneria environments. Elymus growth could not be explained by simple resource competition alone; other mechanisms must have been involved in

  9. A comparison of 454 sequencing and clonal sequencing for the characterization of hepatitis C virus NS3 variants.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cynthia K Y; Welkers, Matthijs R A; Thomas, Xiomara V; Sullivan, James C; Kieffer, Tara L; Reesink, Henk W; Rebers, Sjoerd P H; de Jong, Menno D; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard

    2015-07-01

    We compared 454 amplicon sequencing with clonal sequencing for the characterization of intra-host hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 variants. Clonal and 454 sequences were obtained from 12 patients enrolled in a clinical phase I study for telaprevir, an NS3-4a protease inhibitor. Thirty-nine datasets were used to compare the consensus sequence, average pairwise distance, normalized Shannon entropy, phylogenetic tree topology and the number and frequency of variants derived from both sequencing techniques. In general, a good concordance was observed between both techniques for the majority of datasets. Discordant results were observed for 5 out of 39 clonal and 454 datasets, which could be attributed to primer-related selective amplification used for clonal sequencing. Both 454 and clonal datasets consisted of a few major variants and a large number of low-frequency variants. Telaprevir resistance-associated variants were observed in low frequencies and were detected more often by 454. We conclude that performance of 454 and clonal sequencing is comparable for the characterization of intra-host virus populations. Not surprisingly, 454 is superior for the detection of low frequency resistance-associated variants. However, despite the greater coverage, 454 failed to detect some low frequency variants detected by clonal sequencing. PMID:25818622

  10. Heterogeneous water supply affects growth and benefits of clonal integration between co-existing invasive and native Hydrocotyle species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Bai, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Shi-Qi; Yao, Bin; Wang, Wen; Luo, Fang-Li

    2016-01-01

    Spatial patchiness and temporal variability in water availability are common in nature under global climate change, which can remarkably influence adaptive responses of clonal plants, i.e. clonal integration (translocating resources between connected ramets). However, little is known about the effects of spatial patchiness and temporal heterogeneity in water on growth and clonal integration between congeneric invasive and native Hydrocotyle species. In a greenhouse experiment, we subjected severed or no severed (intact) fragments of Hydrocotyle vulgaris, a highly invasive species in China, and its co-existing, native congener H. sibthorpioides to different spatial patchiness (homogeneous and patchy) and temporal interval (low and high interval) in water supply. Clonal integration had significant positive effects on growth of both species. In the homogeneous water conditions, clonal integration greatly improved the growth in fragments of both species under low interval in water. However, in the patchy water conditions, clonal integration significantly increased growth in both ramets and fragments of H. vulgaris under high interval in water. Therefore, spatial patchiness and temporal interval in water altered the effects of clonal integration of both species, especially for H. vulgaris. The adaptation of H. vulgaris might lead to invasive growth and potential spread under the global water variability. PMID:27439691

  11. Heterogeneous water supply affects growth and benefits of clonal integration between co-existing invasive and native Hydrocotyle species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Bai, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Shi-Qi; Yao, Bin; Wang, Wen; Luo, Fang-Li

    2016-01-01

    Spatial patchiness and temporal variability in water availability are common in nature under global climate change, which can remarkably influence adaptive responses of clonal plants, i.e. clonal integration (translocating resources between connected ramets). However, little is known about the effects of spatial patchiness and temporal heterogeneity in water on growth and clonal integration between congeneric invasive and native Hydrocotyle species. In a greenhouse experiment, we subjected severed or no severed (intact) fragments of Hydrocotyle vulgaris, a highly invasive species in China, and its co-existing, native congener H. sibthorpioides to different spatial patchiness (homogeneous and patchy) and temporal interval (low and high interval) in water supply. Clonal integration had significant positive effects on growth of both species. In the homogeneous water conditions, clonal integration greatly improved the growth in fragments of both species under low interval in water. However, in the patchy water conditions, clonal integration significantly increased growth in both ramets and fragments of H. vulgaris under high interval in water. Therefore, spatial patchiness and temporal interval in water altered the effects of clonal integration of both species, especially for H. vulgaris. The adaptation of H. vulgaris might lead to invasive growth and potential spread under the global water variability. PMID:27439691

  12. How Clonal Is Clonal? Genome Plasticity across Multicellular Segments of a "Candidatus Marithrix sp." Filament from Sulfidic, Briny Seafloor Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Fadeev, Eduard; Joye, Samantha B; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Marithrix" is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria). This genus of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 μm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, "Candidatus Marithrix" was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the "Candidatus Marithrix" genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98 and 100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes-the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or "intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity" (ISH) events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament. PMID:27536274

  13. Clonal relatedness and conserved integron structures in epidemiologically unrelated Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the VIM-1 metallo-{beta}-lactamase from different Italian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Cresti, Stefania; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Pagani, Laura; Lagatolla, Cristina; Cornaglia, Giuseppe; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2005-01-01

    Three epidemiologically independent Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, representative of the first VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase producers detected at three different hospitals in northern Italy, were investigated to determine their genomic relatedness and to compare the structures of the genetic supports for the VIM-1 determinants. The three isolates, all of serotype O11, appeared to be clonally related according to the results of genotyping by macrorestriction analysis of genomic DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA. Investigation of the genetic support for the bla(VIM-1) determinant revealed that it was carried on identical or almost identical integrons (named In70.2 and In70.3) located within a conserved genomic context. The integrons were structurally related to In70 and In110, two plasmid-borne bla(VIM-1)-containing integrons from Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Pseudomonas putida isolates, respectively, from the same geographic area (northern Italy) and were found to be inserted close to the res site of a Tn5051-like transposon, different from any of those described previously, that was apparently carried on the bacterial chromosome. The present findings suggest that the three VIM-1-producing isolates are members of the same clonal complex which have been spreading in hospitals in northern Italy since the late 1990s and point to a common ancestry of their bla(VIM-1)-containing integrons. PMID:15616282

  14. The analysis of clonal diversity and therapy responses using STAT3 mutations as a molecular marker in large granular lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Hanna L. M.; Olson, Thomas; Clemente, Michael J.; Lagström, Sonja; Ellonen, Pekka; Lundan, Tuija; Hamm, David E.; Zaman, Syed Arshi Uz; Lopez Marti, Jesus M.; Andersson, Emma I.; Jerez, Andres; Porkka, Kimmo; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Mustjoki, Satu

    2015-01-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of natural killer cells are intriguing entities between benign and malignant lymphoproliferation. The molecular pathogenesis has partly been uncovered by the recent discovery of somatic activating STAT3 and STAT5b mutations. Here we show that 43% (75/174) of patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia and 18% (7/39) with chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of natural killer cells harbor STAT3 mutations when analyzed by quantitative deep amplicon sequencing. Surprisingly, 17% of the STAT3-mutated patients carried multiple STAT3 mutations, which were located in different lymphocyte clones. The size of the mutated clone correlated well with the degree of clonal expansion of the T-cell repertoire analyzed by T-cell receptor beta chain deep sequencing. The analysis of sequential samples suggested that current immunosuppressive therapy is not able to reduce the level of the mutated clone in most cases, thus warranting the search for novel targeted therapies. Our findings imply that the clonal landscape of large granular lymphocytic leukemia is more complex than considered before, and a substantial number of patients have multiple lymphocyte subclones harboring different STAT3 mutations, thus mimicking the situation in acute leukemia. PMID:25281507

  15. Characterization of Clonality of Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Human B Lymphoproliferative Disease in Mice with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakamine, Hirokazu; Masih, Aneal S.; Okano, Motohiko; Taguchi, Yuichi; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Davis, Jack R.; Mahloch, Mark L.; Beisel, Kirk W.; Kleveland, Kimberly; Sanger, Warren G.; Purtilo, David T.

    1993-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy and understanding of the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) occurring in immunosuppressed transplant recipients (post-transplantation LPD), clonality of Epstein-Barr virus-induced human LPDs in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency was examined by analyzing: 1) human immunoglobulin genes and their products, 2) the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus DNA, and 3) genetic alteration of c-myc or bcl-2 genes. A spectrum of clonality was found in the LPDs comparable with that reported for post-transplantation LPDs, although rearrangements of c-myc or bcl-2 genes were not detected. It is confirmed that this system is useful in terms of clonality for understanding the early phases in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation LPD or LPD in immune deficient patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:8380952

  16. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, John; Colin, Sean; Gemmell, Brad; Dabiri, John; Sutherland, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labor in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater distributed propulsion vehicle design.

  17. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  18. Clonal selection in the germinal center by regulated proliferation and hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Alexander D.; Shulman, Ziv; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During immune responses, B lymphocytes clonally expand and undergo secondary diversification of their immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in germinal centers (GCs)1–4. High affinity B cells are expanded through iterative interzonal cycles of division and hypermutation in the GC dark zone (DZ) followed by migration to the GC light zone (LZ) where they are selected based on affinity to return to the DZ5–10. Here we combine a transgenic strategy to measure cell division and a photoactivatable fluorescent reporter to examine whether the extent of clonal expansion and hypermutation are regulated during interzonal GC cycles. We find that both cell division and hypermutation are directly proportional to the amount of antigen captured and presented by GC B cells to T follicular helper (TFH) cells in the LZ. Our data explain how GC B cells with the highest affinity for antigen are selectively expanded and diversified. PMID:24805232

  19. The Independent Probabilistic Firing of Transcription Factors: A Paradigm for Clonal Variability in the Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Boije, Henrik; Rulands, Steffen; Dudczig, Stefanie; Simons, Benjamin D.; Harris, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Early retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vertebrates produce lineages that vary greatly both in terms of cell number and fate composition, yet how this variability is achieved remains unknown. One possibility is that these RPCs are individually distinct and that each gives rise to a unique lineage. Another is that stochastic mechanisms play upon the determinative machinery of equipotent early RPCs to drive clonal variability. Here we show that a simple model, based on the independent firing of key fate-influencing transcription factors, can quantitatively account for the intrinsic clonal variance in the zebrafish retina and predict the distributions of neuronal cell types in clones where one or more of these fates are made unavailable. PMID:26343455

  20. Single cell-derived clonal analysis of human glioblastoma links functional and genomic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Mona; Reimand, Jüri; Lan, Xiaoyang; Head, Renee; Zhu, Xueming; Kushida, Michelle; Bayani, Jane; Pressey, Jessica C.; Lionel, Anath C.; Clarke, Ian D.; Cusimano, Michael; Squire, Jeremy A.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bernstein, Mark; Woodin, Melanie A.; Bader, Gary D.; Dirks, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a cancer comprised of morphologically, genetically, and phenotypically diverse cells. However, an understanding of the functional significance of intratumoral heterogeneity is lacking. We devised a method to isolate and functionally profile tumorigenic clones from patient glioblastoma samples. Individual clones demonstrated unique proliferation and differentiation abilities. Importantly, naïve patient tumors included clones that were temozolomide resistant, indicating that resistance to conventional GBM therapy can preexist in untreated tumors at a clonal level. Further, candidate therapies for resistant clones were detected with clone-specific drug screening. Genomic analyses revealed genes and pathways that associate with specific functional behavior of single clones. Our results suggest that functional clonal profiling used to identify tumorigenic and drug-resistant tumor clones will lead to the discovery of new GBM clone-specific treatment strategies. PMID:25561528

  1. Characterization of 19 microsatellite loci in the clonal monkshood Aconitum kusnezoffii (Ranunculaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xing-Yue; Tian, Hao; Liao, Wan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from Aconitum kusnezoffii (Ranunculaceae) to estimate male and female reproductive success and evaluate the effects of clonal growth on sexual reproduction. Methods and Results: A genomic enrichment approach was used to develop microsatellite markers. In three investigated A. kusnezoffii populations, a total of 19 microsatellite loci were successfully amplified, and 13 of these loci were polymorphic. Most of the primer pairs designed for the identified loci also amplified corresponding microsatellite loci in A. barbatum var. puberulum and A. alboviolaceum. Conclusions: The identified microsatellite loci will be useful for quantifying male and female fitness in A. kusnezoffii and evaluating the effects of clonal growth on sexual reproduction. PMID:27347450

  2. The coelomic epithelium transcriptome from a clonal sea star, Coscinasterias muricata.

    PubMed

    Gabre, Jonatan L; Martinez, Pedro; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Abril, Josep F

    2015-12-01

    Coscinasterias is a cosmopolitan genus of large asteroid sea stars with the ability of somatic fission as a clonal reproductive strategy. During fission, the animals tear themselves apart across their central disc, where the lost body parts are regenerated afterwards. Here, we have sequenced and subsequently analysed the transcriptome of the coelomic epithelium of a clonal Coscinasterias muricata specimen from New Zealand. Out of the total 389,768 raw reads, 11,344 contigs were assembled and grouped into functions. Raw read and assembled contig sequences are available at NCBI (BioSample: SAMN03371637), while the annotated assembly can be accessed through the project transcriptome browser (compgen.bio.ub.edu/gbrowse/starfish_transcriptome/). Our data is valuable for future detailed exploration of the coelomic epithelium functions as well as for a better understanding of sea star physiology. PMID:26321383

  3. Clonal Analysis Provides Evidence for Transient Initial Cells in Shoot Apical Meristems of Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Zagórska-Marek; Turzańska

    2000-03-01

    Drift of mutated sectors in sectorial or mericlinal plant chimeras has been interpreted as indirect evidence of initial impermanence at the apex. However, the same effect may result from mutation in noninitial cells positioned close to the vertex of the apical dome. Clonal analysis of the cell packets present in the superficial layer of spruce and magnolia apices provided the library of patterns suggesting that the position and the number of initial cells, and in some cases also the meristem axis inclination, may change over time. Multicellular clones originating from a single cell have been found in the geometric center of some apices, whereas in other apices the cellular center (where three or four clonal borders meet) did not correspond to the geome PMID:11010992

  4. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore.

    PubMed

    Costello, John H; Colin, Sean P; Gemmell, Brad J; Dabiri, John O; Sutherland, Kelly R

    2015-01-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labour in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole-colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning, whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but, more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater-distributed propulsion vehicle design. PMID:26327286

  5. The fate of cells in skin: from clonal analysis to cell kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Allon M.; Doupe, David P.; Winton, Douglas J.; Jones, Phil H.; Simons, Benjamin D.

    2007-03-01

    Biologists are keen to understand the mechanisms of development and maintenance of tissues in mammals. As well as its intrinsic scientific interest, an understanding of the kinetics of cell division has important implications for mechanisms of aging and cancer development. Analysis of cell populations (clones) resulting from progenitor cells provides indirect access to the laws governing cell division and fate. Yet, until recently, the quality of clonal fate data acquired in vivo has inhibited reliable quantitative analysis. By addressing a recent, detailed, and extensive experimental study of mammalian skin, we develop a general theoretical framework which shows that the wide range of clonal fate data are consistent with a remarkably simple cell kinetic model. As well as overturning the accepted paradigm for skin maintenance, the analysis introduces a general framework for analysing clone fate data in future experiments. We now have a robust platform to study the effect of drug treatments and the influence of cell mutations on the epidermis.

  6. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity. PMID:25275470

  7. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore

    PubMed Central

    Costello, John H.; Colin, Sean P.; Gemmell, Brad J.; Dabiri, John O.; Sutherland, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labour in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole-colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning, whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but, more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater-distributed propulsion vehicle design. PMID:26327286

  8. Spliceosomal gene mutations in myelodysplasia: molecular links to clonal abnormalities of hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daichi; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of the myeloid malignancies and clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that may give rise to these disorders have identified that mutations in genes encoding core spliceosomal proteins and accessory regulatory splicing factors are among the most common targets of somatic mutations. These spliceosomal mutations often occur in a mutually exclusive manner with one another and, in aggregate, account for the most frequent class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in particular. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the effects of several of these mutations on splicing and splice site recognition, functional connections linking the mechanistic changes in splicing induced by these mutations to the phenotypic consequences of clonal and aberrant hematopoiesis are not yet well defined. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanistic and biological effects of spliceosomal gene mutations in MDSs as well as the regulation of splicing throughout normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27151974

  9. Analysis of the Clonality of Candida tropicalis Strains from a General Hospital in Beijing Using Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Jing; Li, Lianqing; Li, Wenge; Cui, Zhigang; Chen, Xia; Cen, Ruiqi; Lu, Jinxing; Cheng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based on six loci was used to analyze the relationship of 58 Candida tropicalis isolates from individual patients in a general hospital in Beijing, China. A total of 52 diploid sequence types (DSTs) were generated by the MLST, all of which were new to the central database. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) dendrograms were constructed, which showed that the 58 isolates were distributed robustly and 6 main groups were clustered regardless of the specimen source and medical department. The minimum spanning tree (MST) of the 58 isolates (52 DSTs) and all 401 isolates (268 DSTs) in the C. tropicalis central database (http://pubmlst.org/ctropicalis/) indicated that the isolates in this study clustered in three relative pure clonal complexes, and 2 clustered with isolates from Taiwan, Belgium, Brazil, and the US. This study presents the first MLST analysis of C. tropicalis isolates from Mainland China, which may be useful for further studies on the similarity, genetic relationship, and molecular epidemiology of C. tropicalis strains worldwide. PMID:23152759

  10. Clonal expansion accounts for an excess of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus colonising HIV-positive individuals in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olalekan, Adesola O; Schaumburg, Frieder; Nurjadi, Dennis; Dike, Adobi E; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kolawole, Deboye O; Kun, Jürgen F; Zanger, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Nasal colonisation with Staphylococcus aureus is a risk factor for invasive infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. This study aimed to characterise colonising S. aureus from regions with a high HIV prevalence. Single nasal swabs were taken from a total of 374 HIV-positive and 370 healthy individuals. Overall, 202 S. aureus carriers were detected. Compared with healthy individuals, HIV-positive subjects were more likely to be S. aureus nasal carriers (33% vs. 21%; P=0.0001). Isolates from HIV-positive individuals were more often resistant to meticillin (16% vs. 8%; P=0.13), chloramphenicol (47% vs. 16%; P<0.0001), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT) (90% vs. 55%; P<0.0001) and ciprofloxacin (18% vs. 0%; P<0.0001). Strains belonging to the spa clonal complexes 3772/ST25 and 064/ST8 were significantly more often isolated from HIV-positive individuals and exhibited greater resistance to ciprofloxacin, SXT and chloramphenicol (spa-CC 3772) or to meticillin (spa-CC 064), respectively. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene content was high overall and was equally distributed between isolates from HIV-positive and healthy individuals (33% vs. 30%). Genotypic characteristics of colonising isolates were similar to those reported to cause invasive infection in Nigeria. The HIV pandemic contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus. Measures to contain antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in Nigeria must target risk groups such as HIV-positive individuals. PMID:22831840

  11. Clonal spread and interspecies transmission of clinically relevant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli of ST410--another successful pandemic clone?

    PubMed

    Schaufler, Katharina; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Wöhrmann, Michael; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz; Müller, Kerstin; Kola, Axel; Fruth, Angelika; Ewers, Christa; Guenther, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing multi-resistant Escherichia coli have been on the rise for years. Initially restricted to mostly a clinical context, recent findings prove their prevalence in extraclinical settings independent of the original occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. To get further insights into the complex ecology of potentially clinically relevant ESBL-producing E. coli, 24 isolates from wild birds in Berlin, Germany, and 40 ESBL-producing human clinical E. coli isolates were comparatively analyzed. Isolates of ST410 occurred in both sample groups (six). In addition, three ESBL-producing E. coli isolates of ST410 from environmental dog feces and one clinical dog isolate were included. All 10 isolates were clonally analyzed showing almost identical macrorestriction patterns. They were chosen for whole-genome sequencing revealing that the whole-genome content of these 10 E. coli isolates showed a very high genetic similarity, differing by low numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms only. This study gives initial evidence for a recent interspecies transmission of a new successful clone of ST410 E. coli between wildlife, humans, companion animals and the environment. The results underline the zoonotic potential of clinically relevant multi-resistant bacteria found in the environment as well as the mandatory nature of the 'One Health' approach. PMID:26656065

  12. Human fetal and adult chondrocytes. Effect of insulinlike growth factors I and II, insulin, and growth hormone on clonal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, U; Zapf, J; Heit, W; Helbing, G; Heinze, E; Froesch, E R; Teller, W M

    1986-01-01

    Clonal proliferation of freshly isolated human fetal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes in response to human insulinlike growth factors I and II (IGF I, IGF II), human biosynthetic insulin, and human growth hormone (GH) was assessed. IGF I (25 ng/ml) stimulated clonal growth of fetal chondrocytes (54 +/- 12 colonies/1,000 inserted cells, mean +/- 1 SD), but IGF II (25 ng/ml) was significantly more effective (106 +/- 12 colonies/1,000 inserted cells, P less than 0.05, unstimulated control: 14 +/- 4 colonies/1,000 inserted cells). In contrast, IGF I (25 ng/ml) was more effective in adult chondrocytes (42 +/- 6 colonies/1,000 inserted cells) than IGF II (25 ng/ml) (21 +/- 6 colonies/1,000 inserted cells; P less than 0.05, unstimulated control: 6 +/- 3 colonies/1,000 inserted cells). GH and human biosynthetic insulin did not affect clonal growth of fetal or adult chondrocytes. The clonal growth pattern of IGF-stimulated fetal and adult chondrocytes was not significantly changed when chondrocytes were first grown in monolayer culture, harvested, and then inserted in the clonal culture system. However, the adult chondrocytes showed a time-dependent decrease of stimulation of clonal growth by IGF I and II. This was not true for fetal chondrocytes. The results are compatible with the concept that IGF II is a more potent stimulant of clonal growth of chondrocytes during fetal life, whereas IGF I is more effective in stimulating clonal growth of chondrocytes during postnatal life. Images PMID:3519682

  13. Simulation of the clonal growth of Bostrychia radicans (Ceramiales-Rhodophyta) using Lindenmayer systems.

    PubMed

    Collado-Vides, L; Gómez-Alcaraz, G; Rivas-Lechuga, G; Gómez-Gutierrez, V

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model for the clonal growth of the alga Bostrychia radicans was constructed based on architectural growth rules and Lindenmayer systems. The sequence of theoretical growth and invasive strategy of space is shown in several graphical schemes which represent different steps of the model. We postulate that Bostrychia radicans has a 'phalanx' strategy of colonization (Lovett Doust, L. 1981. J. Ecol. 69, 743-755.) based on the biological interpretation of the model and field observations. PMID:9146832

  14. Against the odds: complete outcrossing in a monoecious clonal seagrass Posidonia australis (Posidoniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Gecan, Ilena; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Kendrick, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Seagrasses are marine, flowering plants with a hydrophilous pollination strategy. In these plants, successful mating requires dispersal of filamentous pollen grains through the water column to receptive stigmas. Approximately 40 % of seagrass species are monoecious, and therefore little pollen movement is required if inbreeding is tolerated. Outcrossing in these species is further impacted by clonality, which is variable, but can be extensive in large, dense meadows. Despite this, little is known about the interaction between clonal structure, genetic diversity and mating systems in hydrophilous taxa. Methods Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were used to characterize genetic diversity, clonal structure, mating system and realized pollen dispersal in two meadows of the temperate, monoecious seagrass, Posidonia australis, in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. Key Results Within the two sampled meadows, genetic diversity was moderate among the maternal shoots (R = 0·45 and 0·64) and extremely high in the embryos (R = 0·93–0·97). Both meadows exhibited a highly clumping (or phalanx) structure among clones, with spatial autocorrelation analysis showing significant genetic structure among shoots and embryos up to 10–15 m. Outcrossing rates were not significantly different from one. Pollen dispersal distances inferred from paternity assignment averaged 30·8 and 26·8 m, which was larger than the mean clone size (12·8 and 13·8 m). Conclusions These results suggest highly effective movement of pollen in the water column. Despite strong clonal structure and moderate genetic diversity within meadows, hydrophilous pollination is an effective vector for completely outcrossed offspring. The different localized water conditions at each site (highly exposed conditions vs. weak directional flow) appear to have little influence on the success and pattern of successful pollination in the two meadows. PMID:24812250

  15. Clonal mixing in the soldier-producing aphid Pemphigus spyrothecae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul C D; Whitfield, John A; Foster, William A; Amos, William

    2002-08-01

    Illuminating the genetic relationships within soldier-producing aphid colonies is an essential element of any attempt to explain the evolution of the altruistic soldier caste. Pemphigus spyrothecae is a soldier-producing aphid that induces galls on the leaf petioles of its host (trees of the genus Populus). At least a quarter of the aphids within the clonally produced gall population are morphologically and behaviourally distinct first-instar soldiers that defend the gall population from predation. Using field trapping and microsatellites, we investigated the degree of clonal mixing within natural gall populations. Field trapping in the UK showed that all the migrants of P. spyrothecae and of two other Pemphigus species were wingless first-instar soldiers. The average degree of mixing estimated from trapping P. spyrothecae migrants was 0.68% (range = 0-15%). Microsatellite genotyping of 277 aphids from 13 galls collected in Italy revealed an average mixing level of 10.4% (range = 0-59%). Six galls contained more than one clone (range = 2-5 clones). Non-kin aphids were not restricted to the soldier caste but were evenly distributed across instars. An additional gall, from which 527 occupants were genotyped, contained 12 non-kin aphids distributed among nine clones, showing that clonal diversity can be high even when mixing is very low. These observations suggest that although soldiers migrate regularly and can moult and reproduce within foreign galls, clonal mixing in this species is generally low and is unlikely to provide a barrier to the evolution of investment by the aphid clones in an altruistic soldier caste. PMID:12144671

  16. An efficient identification strategy of clonal tea cultivars using long-core motif SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rang Jian; Gao, Xiang Feng; Kong, Xiang Rui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), especially those with long-core motifs (tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide) represent an excellent tool for DNA fingerprinting. SSRs with long-core motifs are preferred since neighbor alleles are more easily separated and identified from each other, which render the interpretation of electropherograms and the true alleles more reliable. In the present work, with the purpose of characterizing a set of core SSR markers with long-core motifs for well fingerprinting clonal cultivars of tea (Camellia sinensis), we analyzed 66 elite clonal tea cultivars in China with 33 initially-chosen long-core motif SSR markers covering all the 15 linkage groups of tea plant genome. A set of 6 SSR markers were conclusively selected as core SSR markers after further selection. The polymorphic information content (PIC) of the core SSR markers was >0.5, with ≤5 alleles in each marker containing 10 or fewer genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the core SSR markers were not strongly correlated with the trait 'cultivar processing-property'. The combined probability of identity (PID) between two random cultivars for the whole set of 6 SSR markers was estimated to be 2.22 × 10(-5), which was quite low, confirmed the usefulness of the proposed SSR markers for fingerprinting analyses in Camellia sinensis. Moreover, for the sake of quickly discriminating the clonal tea cultivars, a cultivar identification diagram (CID) was subsequently established using these core markers, which fully reflected the identification process and provided the immediate information about which SSR markers were needed to identify a cultivar chosen among the tested ones. The results suggested that long-core motif SSR markers used in the investigation contributed to the accurate and efficient identification of the clonal tea cultivars and enabled the protection of intellectual property. PMID:27504250

  17. T cell fate and clonality inference from single-cell transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Stubbington, Michael J T; Lönnberg, Tapio; Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2016-04-01

    We developed TraCeR, a computational method to reconstruct full-length, paired T cell receptor (TCR) sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA sequence data. TraCeR links T cell specificity with functional response by revealing clonal relationships between cells alongside their transcriptional profiles. We found that T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model span early activated CD4(+) T cells as well as mature effector and memory cells. PMID:26950746

  18. B cell clonality in gastric lymphoid tissues of patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, G F; Sorrentino, D; De Vita, S; Casatta, L; Labombarda, A; Avellini, C; Dolcetti, R; Di Luca, D; Beltrami, C A; Boiocchi, M; Bartoli, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in the stomach and of a possible antigen driven proliferation, in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). METHODS: Twenty one patients with primary SS and 80 dyspeptic controls underwent upper endoscopy. Lymphoid tissue and Helicobacter pylori were assessed by histopathological analysis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) genome were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA amplification. Two PCR VDJ procedures were used to detect immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangement. RESULTS: Organised MALT was found in 33.3% of the patients, compared with 21.5% of the controls (NS). H pylori infection was seen in 71% of patients and 63% of controls. Genomic EBV or HHV-6 was found in a minor portion of SS gastric tissues. B cell expansion was detected in nine of the 21 patients. Infectious agents in the stomach might have contributed to B cell clonality only in 55.5% of the cases. No strict relationship was found between lymphoid follicles and clonality. CONCLUSION: Lymphoid accumulation in the gastric mucosa is common in Sjögren's syndrome, but full evidence for an antigen driven B cell expansion could not be demonstrated. Only a portion of those with clonal B cell expansion had evidence of an infectious agent. Other unknown infectious agents or factors related to the underlying disease (autoantigen) and its tissue environment may have a further role as possible causes of B clonal expansion in the gastric mucosa. Images PMID:8660105

  19. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m−3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m−3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network. PMID:26301826

  20. Geographic and Habitat Origin Influence Biomass Production and Storage Translocation in the Clonal Plant Aegopodium podagraria

    PubMed Central

    D′Hertefeldt, Tina; Eneström, Johanna M.; Pettersson, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    Through physiological integration, clonal plants can support ramets in unfavourable patches, exploit heterogeneously distributed resources and distribute resources that are taken up over large areas. Physiological integration generally increases in adverse conditions, but it is not well known which factors determine the evolution of physiological integration. The aim of this study was to investigate if clonal plants from Southern and Northern populations of the clonal herb Aegopodium podagraria differed in physiological integration in terms of translocation of carbon to the rhizomes, and in biomass production using a reciprocal transplant experiment. Aegopodium podagraria from shaded conditions have been suggested to share more resources than clones from open conditions and therefore, plants from forest and open populations within the Southern and Northern regions were included. The regional growing conditions greatly affected biomass production. Plants grown in North Sweden produced more biomass and allocated more biomass to shoots, while plants grown in South Sweden allocated more biomass to rhizomes. There was a regional origin effect as plants originating from North Sweden produced more biomass in both regions. Within the Northern region, plants from shaded habitats translocated more 14C to the rhizomes, suggesting more storage there than in plants from open habitats. In addition to genetic differentiation in biomass production between Northern and Southern populations, probably as a response to a shorter growing season in the North, there appeared to be genetic differentiation in physiological integration within the Northern region. This shows that both regional and local conditions need to be taken into account in future studies of genetic differentiation of physiological integration in clonal plants. PMID:24427305

  1. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  2. Light limitation and litter of an invasive clonal plant, Wedelia trilobata, inhibit its seedling recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shan-Shan; Dai, Zhi-Cong; Miao, Shi-Li; Zhai, De-Li; Si, Chun-Can; Huang, Ping; Wang, Rui-Ping; Du, Dao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Invasive clonal plants have two reproduction patterns, namely sexual and vegetative propagation. However, seedling recruitment of invasive clonal plants can decline as the invasion process proceeds. For example, although the invasive clonal Wedelia trilobata (Asteraceae) produces numerous seeds, few seedlings emerge under its dense population canopy in the field. In this study it is hypothesized that light limitation and the presence of a thick layer of its own litter may be the primary factors causing the failure of seedling recruitment for this invasive weed in the field. Methods A field survey was conducted to determine the allocation of resources to sexual reproduction and seedling recruitment in W. trilobata. Seed germination was also determined in the field. Effects of light and W. trilobata leaf extracts on seed germination and seedling growth were tested in the laboratory. Key Results Wedelia trilobata blooms profusely and produces copious viable seeds in the field. However, seedlings of W. trilobata were not detected under mother ramets and few emerged seedlings were found in the bare ground near to populations. In laboratory experiments, low light significantly inhibited seed germination. Leaf extracts also decreased seed germination and inhibited seedling growth, and significant interactions were found between low light and leaf extracts on seed germination. However, seeds were found to germinate in an invaded field after removal of the W. trilobata plant canopy. Conclusions The results indicate that lack of light and the presence of its own litter might be two major factors responsible for the low numbers of W. trilobata seedlings found in the field. New populations will establish from seeds once the limiting factors are eliminated, and seeds can be the agents of long-distance dispersal; therefore, prevention of seed production remains an important component in controlling the spread of this invasive clonal plant. PMID:24825293

  3. Evidence for viable, non-clonal but fatherless Boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Johnson, Daniel H; Moore, Sharon; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2011-04-23

    Parthenogenesis in vertebrates is considered an evolutionary novelty. In snakes, all of which exhibit genetic sex determination with ZZ : ZW sex chromosomes, this rare form of asexual reproduction has failed to yield viable female WW offspring. Only through complex experimental manipulations have WW females been produced, and only in fish and amphibians. Through microsatellite DNA fingerprinting, we provide the first evidence of facultative parthenogenesis in a Boa constrictor, identifying multiple, viable, non-experimentally induced females for the first time in any vertebrate lineage. Although the elevated homozygosity of the offspring in relation to the mother suggests that the mechanism responsible may be terminal fusion automixis, no males were produced, potentially indicating maternal sex chromosome hemizygosity (WO). These findings provide the first evidence of parthenogenesis in the family Boidae (Boas), and suggest that WW females may be more common within basal reptilian lineages than previously assumed. PMID:21047849

  4. Automated analysis of clonal cancer cells by intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Sarah Earley; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-07-01

    Longitudinal analyses of single cell lineages over prolonged periods have been challenging particularly in processes characterized by high cell turn-over such as inflammation, proliferation, or cancer. RGB marking has emerged as an elegant approach for enabling such investigations. However, methods for automated image analysis continue to be lacking. Here, to address this, we created a number of different multicolored poly- and monoclonal cancer cell lines for in vitro and in vivo use. To classify these cells in large scale data sets, we subsequently developed and tested an automated algorithm based on hue selection. Our results showed that this method allows accurate analyses at a fraction of the computational time required by more complex color classification methods. Moreover, the methodology should be broadly applicable to both in vitro and in vivo analyses. PMID:24349895

  5. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants. PMID:22720041

  6. Effects of vegetative propagule pressure on the establishment of an introduced clonal plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruihua; Chen, Qiuwen; Dong, Bicheng; Yu, Feihai

    2014-01-01

    Some introduced clonal plants spread mainly by vegetative (clonal) propagules due to the absence of sexual reproduction in the introduced range. Propagule pressure (i.e. total number of propagules) may affect the establishment and thus invasion success of introduced clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. A greenhouse experiment with an introduced plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris was conducted to investigate the role of propagule pressure on its invasion process. High (five ramets) or low (one ramet) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil or in an experimental plant community consisting of four grassland species. H. vulgaris produced more total biomass under high than under low propagule pressure in both habitat conditions. Interestingly, the size of the H. vulgaris individuals was smaller under high than under low propagule pressure in bare soil, whereas it did not differ between the two propagule pressure treatments in the grassland community. The results indicated that high propagule pressure can ensure the successful invasion in either the grass community or bare soil, and the shift in the intraspecific interaction of H. vulgaris from competition in the bare soil to facilitation in the grassland community may be a potential mechanism. PMID:24981102

  7. Loss of heterozygosity drives clonal diversity of Phytophthora capsici in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Diao, Yongzhao; Zhou, Yuxin; Lin, Dong; Bi, Yang; Pang, Zhili; Trout Fryxell, Rebecca; Liu, Xili; Lamour, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes significant loss to pepper (Capsicum annum) in China and our goal was to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for P. capsici and characterize genetic diversity nationwide. Eighteen isolates of P. capsici from locations worldwide were re-sequenced and candidate nuclear and mitochondrial SNPs identified. From 2006 to 2012, 276 isolates of P. capsici were recovered from 136 locations in 27 provinces and genotyped using 45 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial SNPs. There were two main mitochondrial haplotypes and 95 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) identified. Genetic diversity was geographically structured with a high level of genotypic diversity in the north and on Hainan Island in the south, suggesting outcrossing contributes to diversity in these areas. The remaining areas of China are dominated by four clonal lineages that share mitochondrial haplotypes, are almost exclusively the A1 or A2 mating type and appear to exhibit extensive diversity based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Analysis of SNPs directly from infected peppers confirmed LOH in field populations. One clonal lineage is dominant throughout much of the country. The overall implications for long-lived genetically diverse clonal lineages amidst a widely dispersed sexual population are discussed. PMID:24349339

  8. Consequences of multiple inflorescences and clonality for pollinator behavior and plant mating.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wan-Jin; Harder, Lawrence D

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperms engage in distributed reproduction, producing sex organs in multiple flowers on one or more inflorescences, including on different physical individuals of clonal plants. We investigated the effects of alternative deployments of artificial flowers for pollinator behavior and simulated pollen dispersal. Plants presented 18 flowers on either one inflorescence (1-I plants) or three inflorescences (3-I plants) spaced either closely or widely. Bees often skipped inflorescences on 3-I plants, visiting an average of 1.5 fewer flowers overall than on 1-I plants. In simulations with all flowers receiving and donating pollen, this behavior caused 7% less geitonogamy for 3-I plants, contradicting a common supposition that clonality increases geitonogamy. Bees generally moved upward within inflorescences and downward between inflorescences. Consequently, in simulations, segregation of pollen receipt to lower flowers and pollen donation to upper flowers reduced self-pollination and enhanced pollen export much more for 1-I plants. Nectar volume per flower had little relevant influence on bee behavior. The observed bee responses and simulated mating results suggest that production of multiple inflorescences and clonality promote pollination quality when flowers simultaneously receive and donate pollen, whereas a single large inflorescence is advantageous when segregation of sex roles among flowers reduces geitonogamy effectively. PMID:25325743

  9. Disturbance and clonal reproduction determine liana distribution and maintain liana diversity in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Ledo, Alicia; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2014-08-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) and habitat specialization have received strong empirical support as mechanisms that explain tree species diversity maintenance and distribution in tropical forests. In contrast, disturbance appears to play only a minor role. Previous studies have rarely examined the relative strengths of these diversity maintenance mechanisms concurrently, and few studies have included plant groups other than trees. Here we used a large, spatially explicit data set from Barro Colorado Island, Panama (BCI) to test whether liana and tree species distribution patterns are most consistent with NDD, habitat specialization, or disturbance. We found compelling evidence that trees responded to habitat specialization and NDD; however, only disturbance explained the distribution of the majority of liana species and maintained liana diversity. Lianas appear to respond to disturbance with high vegetative (clonal) reproduction, and liana species' ability to produce clonal stems following disturbance results in a clumped spatial distribution. Thus, clonal reproduction following disturbance explains local liana spatial distribution and diversity maintenance on BCI, whereas negative density dependence and habitat specialization, two prominent mechanisms contributing to tree species diversity and distribution, do not. PMID:25230468

  10. Liver cell adenoma: A case report with clonal analysis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Su, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ai-Ning; Zhu, Shao-Jun; Feng, Ying-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of liver cell adenoma (LCA) in a 33-year-old female patient with special respect to its clonality status, pathogenic factors and differential diagnosis. The case was examined by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and a clonality assay based on X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism in female somatic tissues and polymorphism at androgen receptor focus. The clinicopathological features of the reported cases from China and other countries were compared. The lesion was spherical, sizing 2 cm in its maximal dimension. Histologically, it was composed of cells arranged in cords, most of which were two-cell-thick and separated by sinusoids. Focal fatty change and excessive glycogen storage were observed. The tumor cells were round or polygonal in shape, resembling the surrounding parenchymal cells. Mitosis was not found. No portal tract, central vein or ductule was found within the lesion. The tumor tissue showed a positive reaction for cytokeratin (CK) 18, but not for CK19, vimentin, estrogen and progesterone receptors. Monoclonality was demonstrated for the lesion, confirming the diagnosis of an LCA. Clonality analysis is helpful for its distinction from focal nodular hyperplasia. PMID:16610069

  11. Noise-Driven Phenotypic Heterogeneity with Finite Correlation Time in Clonal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, UnJin; Skinner, John J.; Reinitz, John; Rosner, Marsha Rich; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing awareness in the wider biological community of the role of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity in playing key roles in phenomena such as cellular bet-hedging and decision making, as in the case of the phage-λ lysis/lysogeny and B. Subtilis competence/vegetative pathways. Here, we report on the effect of stochasticity in growth rate, cellular memory/intermittency, and its relation to phenotypic heterogeneity. We first present a linear stochastic differential model with finite auto-correlation time, where a randomly fluctuating growth rate with a negative average is shown to result in exponential growth for sufficiently large fluctuations in growth rate. We then present a non-linear stochastic self-regulation model where the loss of coherent self-regulation and an increase in noise can induce a shift from bounded to unbounded growth. An important consequence of these models is that while the average change in phenotype may not differ for various parameter sets, the variance of the resulting distributions may considerably change. This demonstrates the necessity of understanding the influence of variance and heterogeneity within seemingly identical clonal populations, while providing a mechanism for varying functional consequences of such heterogeneity. Our results highlight the importance of a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic view of clonality in understanding selection as an optimization problem on noise-driven processes, resulting in a wide range of biological implications, from robustness to environmental stress to the development of drug resistance. PMID:26203903

  12. Clonality analysis of combined Brenner and mucinous tumours of the ovary reveals their monoclonal origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihong; Wu, Ren-chin; Shwartz, Lauren Ende; Haley, Lisa; Lin, Ming-tse; Shih, Ie-ming; Kurman, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    The derivation of ovarian intestinal-type mucinous tumours is not well established. Some are derived from teratomas but the origin of the majority is not clear. It has been recently proposed that the non-germ cell group may be derived from Brenner tumours, as the association of a mucinous tumour with a Brenner tumour is frequently observed. In order to explore the histogenesis of these neoplasms, we undertook a clonality analysis of the two components of ten combined Brenner and mucinous tumours using a human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) assay. All eight informative cases of ten showed a concordant X-chromosome inactivation pattern between the two tumour components, indicative of a shared clonal origin (p = 0.0039). Microsatellite genotyping in five of the combined tumours displayed an identical heterozygous pattern with paired Fallopian tube tissue, indicative of a somatic cell origin. In addition, paired box protein 8, a highly sensitive Müllerian epithelial marker, was not detected by immunohistochemistry in either tumour component in any of the ten tumours, suggesting that this subset of mucinous tumours does not originate from Müllerian-derived epithelium. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in combined mucinous and Brenner tumours, there is a shared clonal relationship between the two different tumour components and suggests that some pure mucinous tumours may develop from a Brenner tumour in which the Brenner tumour component becomes compressed and obliterated by an expanding mucinous neoplasm. PMID:26095692

  13. Genotyping the clonal structure of a gorgonian coral, Junceella juncea (Anthozoa: Octocorallia), using microsatellite loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Fan, Tung-Yung; Dai, Chang-Feng

    2005-11-01

    The identification of different clones is fundamental to the study of population structure among organisms with mixed reproductive modes such as cnidarians. However, due to the low genetic variation of coral mtDNA and contamination by zooxanthellate DNA, very few molecular markers are available for studying the clonal structure of cnidarians. Herein we used four polymorphic loci of microsatellite DNA isolated from a zooxanthellae-free octocoral, Junceella juncea, to study its clonal structure in seven populations collected from three localities in Taiwan. In total, 40 multilocus genotypes were found among 152 colonies, and the number of genotypes (clones) identified in the seven populations ranged from 2 to 16. Each of the 40 multilocus genotypes was restricted to a single population, even where adjacent populations were only 100 m distant. The ratio of observed to expected genotypic diversity (Go:Ge) ranged from 0.217 to 0.650, and Go showed a significant departure from Ge ( p<0.05) at each site indicating that asexual fragmentation may play a major role in the maintenance of established populations. Mean relatedness ( R) values showed that genotypes within reefs were more closely related than those between regions. The results indicate that microsatellites are useful for discerning the clonal structures among and within populations at different spatial scales.

  14. Clonal tracking of rhesus macaque hematopoiesis highlights a distinct lineage origin for natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfeng; Li, Brian; Lu, Rong; Koelle, Samson J; Yang, Yanqin; Jares, Alexander; Krouse, Alan E; Metzger, Mark; Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin; Wu, Colin O; Donahue, Robert E; Chen, Irvin S Y; Weissman, Irving; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of hematopoietic stem cell function in nonhuman primates provides insights that are relevant for human biology and therapeutic strategies. In this study, we applied quantitative genetic barcoding to track the clonal output of transplanted autologous rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells over a time period of up to 9.5 months. We found that unilineage short-term progenitors reconstituted myeloid and lymphoid lineages at 1 month but were supplanted over time by multilineage clones, initially myeloid restricted, then myeloid-B clones, and then stable myeloid-B-T multilineage, long-term repopulating clones. Surprisingly, reconstitution of the natural killer (NK) cell lineage, and particularly the major CD16(+)/CD56(-) peripheral blood NK compartment, showed limited clonal overlap with T, B, or myeloid lineages, and therefore appears to be ontologically distinct. Thus, in addition to providing insights into clonal behavior over time, our analysis suggests an unexpected paradigm for the relationship between NK cells and other hematopoietic lineages in primates. PMID:24702997

  15. Noise-Driven Phenotypic Heterogeneity with Finite Correlation Time in Clonal Populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, UnJin; Skinner, John J; Reinitz, John; Rosner, Marsha Rich; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing awareness in the wider biological community of the role of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity in playing key roles in phenomena such as cellular bet-hedging and decision making, as in the case of the phage-λ lysis/lysogeny and B. Subtilis competence/vegetative pathways. Here, we report on the effect of stochasticity in growth rate, cellular memory/intermittency, and its relation to phenotypic heterogeneity. We first present a linear stochastic differential model with finite auto-correlation time, where a randomly fluctuating growth rate with a negative average is shown to result in exponential growth for sufficiently large fluctuations in growth rate. We then present a non-linear stochastic self-regulation model where the loss of coherent self-regulation and an increase in noise can induce a shift from bounded to unbounded growth. An important consequence of these models is that while the average change in phenotype may not differ for various parameter sets, the variance of the resulting distributions may considerably change. This demonstrates the necessity of understanding the influence of variance and heterogeneity within seemingly identical clonal populations, while providing a mechanism for varying functional consequences of such heterogeneity. Our results highlight the importance of a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic view of clonality in understanding selection as an optimization problem on noise-driven processes, resulting in a wide range of biological implications, from robustness to environmental stress to the development of drug resistance. PMID:26203903

  16. Clonal CD8+ T Cell Persistence and Variable Gene Usage Bias in a Human Transplanted Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Azari, Kodi; Hofmann, Christian; Ng, Hwee L.; Reed, Elaine F.; McDiarmid, Suzanne; Yang, Otto O.

    2015-01-01

    Immune prophylaxis and treatment of transplanted tissue rejection act indiscriminately, risking serious infections and malignancies. Although animal data suggest that cellular immune responses causing rejection may be rather narrow and predictable based on genetic background, there are only limited data regarding the clonal breadth of anti-donor responses in humans after allogeneic organ transplantation. We evaluated the graft-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes in skin punch biopsies of a transplanted hand over 178 days. Profiling of T cell receptor (TCR) variable gene usage and size distribution of the infiltrating cells revealed marked skewing of the TCR repertoire indicating oligoclonality, but relatively normal distributions in the blood. Although sampling limitation prevented complete assessment of the TCR repertoire, sequencing further identified 11 TCR clonal expansions that persisted through varying degrees of clinical rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. These 11 clones were limited to three TCR beta chain variable (BV) gene families. Overall, these data indicate significant oligoclonality and likely restricted BV gene usage of alloreactive CD8+ T lymphocytes, and suggest that changes in rejection status are more due to varying regulation of their activity or number rather than shifts in the clonal populations in the transplanted organ. Given that controlled animal models produce predictable BV usage in T lymphocytes mediating rejection, understanding the determinants of TCR gene usage associated with rejection in humans may have application in specifically targeted immunotherapy. PMID:26287728

  17. Clonal diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii from diabetic patients in Saudi Arabian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman A; Aboulmagd, Elsayed; Evans, Benjamin A; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2014-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CR-AB) represents a major health-care problem, causing high rates of morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the clonality of CR-AB isolated from diabetic patients from different regions in Saudi Arabia, as well as the relatedness of the β-lactamase genes. A total of 64 non-repetitive CR-AB clinical isolates were collected from 16 different regions in Saudi Arabia from intensive care patients. Isolates were identified phenotypically by the Vitek 2 compact system and genotypically by amplification of the blaOXA-51-like gene. The target sequences were amplified by PCR and the clonal diversity of the isolates was explored by PFGE. Resistance studies revealed that the prevalence of imipenem and meropenem resistance was 92% and 96%, respectively, while the vast majority of the isolates were susceptible to tigecycline and colistin. In addition, blaVIM and blaOXA-23 were the most prevalent genes in the isolates under investigation, while ISAba1 was the most dominant insertion sequence. PFGE results showed 13 clusters; clone H was dominant, comprising 20 isolates from four hospitals, followed by clones C and F, comprising 11 isolates each from three and six hospitals, respectively. Moreover, the current study signified the clonal diversity of CR-AB in Saudi Arabia and showed the ability of some clones to infect patients in many different cities. PMID:25106863

  18. A timeline demarcating two waves of clonal deletion and Foxp3 upregulation during thymocyte development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daniel Y; Yap, Jin Y; Wirasinha, Rushika C; Howard, Debbie R; Goodnow, Christopher C; Daley, Stephen R

    2016-04-01

    Thymocytes that bind strongly to self-antigens are prevented from becoming naive T cells by several mechanisms. They undergo clonal deletion at two stages of development; wave 1 in immature thymocytes lacking the medulla-homing chemokine receptor, CCR7, or wave 2 in more mature CCR7(+) thymocytes. Alternatively, self-reactive thymocytes upregulate Foxp3 to become T-regulatory cells. Here, we describe the differential timing of the two waves of deletion and Foxp3 upregulation relative to the immature proliferating stage. Proliferating thymocytes were pulse-labeled in normal C57BL/6 mice with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Thymocytes progressed into wave 1 (CCR7(-)) and wave 2 (CCR7(+)) of clonal deletion ~2 and 5 days after proliferation, respectively. Foxp3 upregulation occurred between 4 and 8 days after proliferation, predominantly in thymocytes with a Helios(+) CCR7(+) phenotype. These findings establish a timeline that suggests that wave 1 of clonal deletion occurs in the thymic cortex, whereas wave 2 and Foxp3 upregulation both occur in the thymic medulla. PMID:26510893

  19. Somatically Acquired LINE-1 Insertions in Normal Esophagus Undergo Clonal Expansion in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCC) is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the world and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage when successful treatment is challenging. Understanding the mutational profile of this cancer may identify new treatment strategies. Because somatic retrotransposition has been shown in tumors of the gastrointestinal system, we focused on LINE-1 (L1) mobilization as a source of genetic instability in this cancer. We hypothesized that retrotransposition is ongoing in SCC patients. The expression of L1 encoded proteins is necessary for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of L1 open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p). Using immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p expression in all four SCC cases evaluated. Using L1-seq, we identified and validated 74 somatic insertions in eight tumors of the nine evaluated. Of these, 12 insertions appeared to be somatic, not genetically inherited, and sub-clonal (i.e., present in less than one copy per genome equivalent) in the adjacent normal esophagus (NE), while clonal in the tumor. Our results indicate that L1 retrotransposition is active in SCC of the esophagus and that insertion events are present in histologically NE that expands clonally in the subsequent tumor. PMID:27319353

  20. Genetic diversity in three invasive clonal aquatic species in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elodea canadensis, Egeria densa and Lagarosiphon major are dioecious clonal species which are invasive in New Zealand and other regions. Unlike many other invasive species, the genetic variation in New Zealand is very limited. Clonal reproduction is often considered an evolutionary dead end, even though a certain amount of genetic divergence may arise due to somatic mutations. The successful growth and establishment of invasive clonal species may be explained not by adaptability but by pre-existing ecological traits that prove advantageous in the new environment. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure in the North Island of New Zealand using AFLPs and related the findings to the number of introductions and the evolution that has occurred in the introduced area. Results Low levels of genetic diversity were found in all three species and appeared to be due to highly homogeneous founding gene pools. Elodea canadensis was introduced in 1868, and its populations showed more genetic structure than those of the more recently introduced of E. densa (1946) and L. major (1950). Elodea canadensis and L. major, however, had similar phylogeographic patterns, in spite of the difference in time since introduction. Conclusions The presence of a certain level of geographically correlated genetic structure in the absence of sexual reproduction, and in spite of random human dispersal of vegetative propagules, can be reasonably attributed to post-dispersal somatic mutations. Direct evidence of such evolutionary events is, however, still insufficient. PMID:20565861

  1. Spatial Heterogeneity in Light Supply Affects Intraspecific Competition of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants. PMID:22720041

  2. Clonal tracing of Sox9+ liver progenitors in oval cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, Branden D.; Finegold, Milton J.; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating ducts, termed “oval cells”, have long thought to be bipotential, i.e. produce both biliary ducts and hepatocytes during chronic liver injury. The precursor to oval cells is considered to be a facultative liver stem cell (LSC). Recent lineage tracing experiments indicated that the LSC is Sox9+ and can replace the bulk of hepatocyte mass in several settings. However, no clonal relationship between Sox9+ cells and the two epithelial liver lineages was established. We labeled Sox9+ mouse liver cells at low density with a multicolor fluorescent confetti reporter. Organoid formation validated the progenitor activity of the labeled population. Sox9+ cells were traced in multiple oval cell injury models using both histology and FACS. Surprisingly, only rare clones containing both hepatocytes and oval cells were found in any experiment. Quantitative analysis showed that Sox9+ cells contributed only minimally (<1%) to the hepatocyte pool, even in classic oval cell injury models. In contrast, clonally marked mature hepatocytes demonstrated the ability to self-renew in all classic mouse oval cell activation injuries. A hepatocyte chimera model to trace hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells also demonstrated the prevalence of hepatocyte-driven regeneration in mouse oval cell injury models. Conclusion Sox9+ ductal progenitor cells give rise to clonal oval cell proliferation and bipotential organoids but rarely produce hepatocytes in vivo. Hepatocytes themselves are the predominant source of new parenchyma cells in prototypical mouse models of oval cell activation. PMID:24700457

  3. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Vasistha, Navneet A; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F P; Arnold, Sebastian J; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2(Cre) mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  4. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vasistha, Navneet A.; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F.P.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2Cre mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  5. Clonal integration facilitates the colonization of drought environments by plant invaders

    PubMed Central

    Lechuga-Lago, Yaiza; Sixto-Ruiz, Marta; Roiloa, Sergio R.; González, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasion represents one of the main threats for biodiversity conservation at the global scale. Identifying the mechanisms underlying the process of biological invasions is a crucial objective in the prediction of scenarios of future invasions and the mitigation of their impacts. In this sense, some plant attributes might better explain the success of invasive plant species than others. Recently, clonal growth has been identified as an attribute that could contribute to the invasiveness of plants. In this experiment, we aim to determine the effect of physiological integration (one of the most striking attributes associated with clonal growth) in the performance (at morphological and physiological levels) of the aggressive invader Carpobrotus edulis, when occupying stressful environments. To achieve this objective we performed a greenhouse experiment in which apical ramets of C. edulis were water-stressed and the connection with the basal ramets was either left intact (physiological integration is allowed) or severed (physiological integration is impeded). Our results show that clonal integration allowed apical ramets to buffer drought stress in terms of photochemical activity, and as a consequence, to increase their growth in comparison with severed apical ramets. Interestingly, this increase in biomass was mainly due to the production of aboveground structures, increasing the spread along the soil surface, and consequently having important implications for the colonization success of new environments by this aggressive invader. PMID:27154623

  6. Coexistence of normal and clonal haemopoiesis in aplastic anaemia patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, G; Podestà, M; Pitto, A; Sessarego, M; Figari, O; Fugazza, G; Benvenuto, F; Bruno, B; Van Lint, M T; Truini, M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A

    1999-12-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities and paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) phenotype are frequent findings in aplastic anaemia patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy (IST). In this study we investigated whether the appearance of clonal haemopoiesis influences patient outcome and survival. 97 patients entered this study and were followed from the onset of the disease for a median follow-up (FU) of 53 months. 93% are alive, 56% achieved complete remission, 30% partial remission, both transfusion independent, and 14% did not respond. Three groups were identified: (A) patients without evidence of emerging clones (71/97); (B) patients who acquired chromosomal abnormalities (13/97); (C) patients who showed low expression of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GPI-AP) (PNH phenotype) at presentation or later (16/97). Three patients showed both PIG-AP deficiency and chromosomal abnormalities. The actuarial survival of patients without clonal haemopoiesis (n = 71) at 6 years was 95%, for patients with chromosomal abnormalities (n = 13), 88%, and for patients with PIG-AP deficiency (n = 16), 89%. There was no difference in the probability of becoming transfusion independent in the three groups (93%, 92% and 88% respectively). This study confirmed that a proportion of severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) patients exhibit clonal markers during the time after IST, often coexisting with cytogenetically or phenotypically normal haemopoiesis. There was no significant clinical impact of these abnormalities on transfusion independence and survival at the median follow-up of 4 years. PMID:10583249

  7. Genetic uniformity characterizes the invasive spread of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), a clonal aquatic plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Ye; Zhang, Da-Yong; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2010-05-01

    Aquatic plant invasions are often associated with long-distance dispersal of vegetative propagules and prolific clonal reproduction. These reproductive features combined with genetic bottlenecks have the potential to severely limit genetic diversity in invasive populations. To investigate this question we conducted a global scale population genetic survey using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers of the world's most successful aquatic plant invader -Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth). We sampled 1140 ramets from 54 populations from the native (South America) and introduced range (Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, Central America and the Caribbean). Although we detected 49 clones, introduced populations exhibited very low genetic diversity and little differentiation compared with those from the native range, and approximately 80% of introduced populations were composed of a single clone. A widespread clone ('W') detected in two Peruvian populations accounted for 70.9% of the individuals sampled and dominated in 74.5% of the introduced populations. However, samples from Bangladesh and Indonesia were composed of different genotypes, implicating multiple introductions to the introduced range. Nine of 47 introduced populations contained clonal diversity suggesting that sexual recruitment occurs in some invasive sites where environmental conditions favour seedling establishment. The global patterns of genetic diversity in E. crassipes likely result from severe genetic bottlenecks during colonization and prolific clonal propagation. The prevalence of the 'W' genotype throughout the invasive range may be explained by stochastic sampling, or possibly because of pre-adaptation of the 'W' genotype to tolerate low temperatures. PMID:20529068

  8. Clonal integration facilitates the colonization of drought environments by plant invaders.

    PubMed

    Lechuga-Lago, Yaiza; Sixto-Ruiz, Marta; Roiloa, Sergio R; González, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasion represents one of the main threats for biodiversity conservation at the global scale. Identifying the mechanisms underlying the process of biological invasions is a crucial objective in the prediction of scenarios of future invasions and the mitigation of their impacts. In this sense, some plant attributes might better explain the success of invasive plant species than others. Recently, clonal growth has been identified as an attribute that could contribute to the invasiveness of plants. In this experiment, we aim to determine the effect of physiological integration (one of the most striking attributes associated with clonal growth) in the performance (at morphological and physiological levels) of the aggressive invader Carpobrotus edulis, when occupying stressful environments. To achieve this objective we performed a greenhouse experiment in which apical ramets of C. edulis were water-stressed and the connection with the basal ramets was either left intact (physiological integration is allowed) or severed (physiological integration is impeded). Our results show that clonal integration allowed apical ramets to buffer drought stress in terms of photochemical activity, and as a consequence, to increase their growth in comparison with severed apical ramets. Interestingly, this increase in biomass was mainly due to the production of aboveground structures, increasing the spread along the soil surface, and consequently having important implications for the colonization success of new environments by this aggressive invader. PMID:27154623

  9. Clonal response to cold tolerance in creeping bentgrass and role of proline-associated pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Dipayan; Bhowmik, Prasanta C; Kwon, Young-In; Shetty, Kalidas

    2009-11-01

    Single seed origin creeping bentgrass ('Penncross') clonal lines were screened to find genetic heterogeneity, which reflected diversity of phenolic production linked to cold stress within a cross-pollinated cultivar. In this study, total soluble phenolic and antioxidant activity varied among 20 creeping bentgrass clonal lines, confirming wide heterogeneity in this cross-pollinated species. Correlations between phenolic content and proline-associated pentose phosphate pathway were also found among the clonal lines. The active metabolic role of proline in cellular metabolic adjustment to cold stress and its support for likely energy synthesis via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was inferred in creeping bentgrass clonal lines based on the activity of proline dehydrogenase. Results of photochemical efficiency of these clonal lines after cold temperature treatment (4 degrees C) also indicated a close association between stress tolerance and proline-associated pentose phosphate pathway regulation for phenolic biosynthesis and antioxidant response. This study provides a sound metabolic based rationale to screen bentgrass clonal lines for enhanced cold stress tolerance. PMID:19576763

  10. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  11. Intracavernous delivery of clonal mesenchymal stem cells rescues erectile function in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J-K; Kim, D-H; Song, K-M; Ryu, D-S; Kim, S-N; Shin, D-H; Yi, T; Suh, J-K; Song, S U

    2016-01-01

    The major hurdle for the clinical application of stem cell therapy is the heterogeneous nature of the isolated cells, which may cause different treatment outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of mouse clonal bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) obtained from a single colony by using subfractionation culturing method for erectile function in diabetic animals. Twelve-week-old C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: controls, diabetic mice, and diabetic mice treated with a single intracavernous injection of PBS (20 μL) or clonal BMSCs (3 × 10(5) cells/20 μL). Clonal BMSCs were isolated from 5-week-old C3H mice. Two weeks after treatment, erectile function was measured by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. The penis was stained with antibodies to PECAM-1, smooth muscle α-actin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), neurofilament, and phosphorylated endothelial NOS (phospho-eNOS). We also performed Western blot for phospho-eNOS, and eNOS in the corpus cavernosum tissue. Local delivery of clonal BMSCs significantly restored cavernous endothelial and smooth muscle cell contents, and penile nNOS and neurofilament contents, and induced eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177) in diabetic mice. Intracavernous injection of clonal BMSCs induced significant recovery of erectile function, which reached 80-90% of the control values. Clonal BMSCs successfully restored erectile function through dual angiogenic and neurotrophic effects in diabetic mice. The homogenous nature of clonal mesenchymal stem cells may allow their clinical applications and open a new avenue through which to treat diabetic erectile dysfunction. PMID:26711324

  12. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier; Fontenay, Michaela

    2016-02-11

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug's effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34(+)CD38(-) cell-derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  13. Physiological Integration Ameliorates Negative Effects of Drought Stress in the Clonal Herb Fragaria orientalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Sammul, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to establish ramets in sites of contrasting resource status. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clones in heterogeneous environments can act as cooperative systems – effects of stress on one ramet can be ameliorated by another connected ramet inhabiting benign conditions. But little is known about the effects of patch contrast on physiological integration of clonal plants and no study has addressed its effects on physiological traits like osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates and antioxidant enzymes. We examined the effect of physiological integration on survival, growth and stress indicators such as osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and antioxidant enzymes in a clonal plant, Fragaria orientalis, growing in homogenous and heterogeneous environments differing in patch contrast of water availability (1 homogeneous (no contrast) group; 2 low contrast group; 3 high contrast group). Drought stress markedly reduced the survival and growth of the severed ramets of F. orientalis, especially in high contrast treatments. Support from a ramet growing in benign patch considerably reduced drought stress and enhanced growth of ramets in dry patches. The larger the contrast between water availability, the larger the amount of support the depending ramet received from the supporting one. This support strongly affected the growth of the supporting ramet, but not to an extent to cause increase in stress indicators. We also found indication of costs related to maintenance of physiological connection between ramets. Thus, the net benefit of physiological integration depends on the environment and integration between ramets of F. orientalis could be advantageous only in heterogeneous conditions with a high contrast. PMID:22957054

  14. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug’s effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34+CD38− cell–derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  15. Defense signaling among interconnected ramets of a rhizomatous clonal plant, induced by jasmonic-acid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Song; Lei, Ning-Fei; Liu, Qing

    2011-07-01

    Resource sharing between ramets of clonal plants is a well-known phenomenon that allows stoloniferous and rhizomatous species to internally transport water, mineral nutrients and carbohydrates from sites of high supply to sites of high demand. Moreover, vascular ramet connections are likely to provide an excellent means to share substances other than resources, such as defense signals. In a greenhouse experiment, the rhizomatous sedge Carex alrofusca, consisting of integrated ramets of different ages, was used to study the transmission of defense signals through belowground rhizome connections in response to local spray with jasmonic-acid. A feeding preference test with the caterpillar Gynaephora rnenyuanensis was employed to assess benefits of rhizome connections on defense signaling. Young ramets were more responsive to jasmonic-acid treatment than middle-aged or old ramets. Condensed tannin content in the foliage of young ramets showed a significant increase and soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen content showed marginally significant decreases in the 1 mM jasmonic-acid treatment but not in control and/or 0.0001 mM jasmonic-acid treatments. The caterpillar G. rnenyuanensis preferentially grazed young ramets. After a localized spray of 1 mM jasmonic-acid, the leaf area of young ramets consumed by herbivores was greatly reduced. We propose that defense signals may be transmitted through physical connections (stolon or rhizome) among interconnected ramets of clonal plants. Induced resistance to herbivory may selectively enhance the protection of more vulnerable and valuable plant tissues and confer a significant benefit to clonal plants by a modular risk-spreading strategy, equalizing ontogenetic differences of unevenly-aged ramets in chemical defense compounds and nutritional properties of tissue.

  16. Extensive Clonality and Strong Differentiation in the Insular Pacific Tree Santalum insulare: Implications for its Conservation

    PubMed Central

    LHUILLIER, EMELINE; BUTAUD, JEAN-FRANÇOIS; BOUVET, JEAN-MARC

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The impact of evolutionary forces on insular systems is particularly exacerbated by the remoteness of islands, strong founder effects, small population size and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors. Patterns of molecular diversity were analysed in an island system with Santalum insulare, a sandalwood species endemic to eastern Polynesia. The aims were to evaluate clonality and to study the genetic diversity and structure of this species, in order to understand the evolutionary process and to define a conservation strategy. • Methods Eight nuclear microsatellites were used to investigate clonality, genetic variation and structure of the French Polynesian sandalwood populations found on ten islands distributed over three archipelagos. • Key Results It was found that 58 % of the 384 trees analysed were clones. The real size of the populations is thus dramatically reduced, with sometimes only one genet producing ramets by root suckering. The diversity parameters were low for islands (nA = 1·5–5·0; HE = 0·28–0·49). No departure from Hardy–Weinberg proportion was observed except within Tahiti island, where a significant excess of homozygotes was noted in the highland population. Genetic structure was characterized by high levels of differentiation between archipelagos (27 % of the total variation) and islands (FST = 0·50). The neighbour-joining tree did not discriminate the three archipelagos but separated the Society archipelago from the other two. • Conclusions This study shows that clonality is a frequent phenomenon in S. insulare. The genetic diversity within populations is lower than the values assessed in species distributed on the mainland, as a consequence of insularity. But this can also be explained by the overexploitation of sandalwood. The differentiation between archipelagos and islands within archipelagos is very high because of the limited gene flow due to oceanic barriers. Delineation of evolutionary

  17. cloncase: Estimation of sex frequency and effective population size by clonemate resampling in partially clonal organisms.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sajid; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Gladieux, Pierre; Giraud, Tatiana; Leconte, Marc; Gautier, Angélique; Mboup, Mamadou; Chen, Wanquan; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; Enjalbert, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    Inferring reproductive and demographic parameters of populations is crucial to our understanding of species ecology and evolutionary potential but can be challenging, especially in partially clonal organisms. Here, we describe a new and accurate method, cloncase, for estimating both the rate of sexual vs. asexual reproduction and the effective population size, based on the frequency of clonemate resampling across generations. Simulations showed that our method provides reliable estimates of sex frequency and effective population size for a wide range of parameters. The cloncase method was applied to Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici, a fungal pathogen causing stripe/yellow rust, an important wheat disease. This fungus is highly clonal in Europe but has been suggested to recombine in Asia. Using two temporally spaced samples of P. striiformis f.sp. tritici in China, the estimated sex frequency was 75% (i.e. three-quarter of individuals being sexually derived during the yearly sexual cycle), indicating strong contribution of sexual reproduction to the life cycle of the pathogen in this area. The inferred effective population size of this partially clonal organism (Nc  = 998) was in good agreement with estimates obtained using methods based on temporal variations in allelic frequencies. The cloncase estimator presented herein is the first method allowing accurate inference of both sex frequency and effective population size from population data without knowledge of recombination or mutation rates. cloncase can be applied to population genetic data from any organism with cyclical parthenogenesis and should in particular be very useful for improving our understanding of pest and microbial population biology. PMID:26858112

  18. Clonal relatedness is a predictor of spontaneous multidrug efflux pump gene overexpression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Jacinto, Pauline L; Buensalido, Joseph Adrian L; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2015-05-01

    Increased expression of genes encoding multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MDR-EPs) contributes to antimicrobial agent and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Previously identified associations between norA overexpression and spa type t002 meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and a similar yet weaker association between mepA overexpression and type t008 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), in clinical isolates are suggestive of clonal dissemination. It is also possible that related strains are prone to mutations resulting in overexpression of specific MDR-EP genes. Exposure of non-MDR-EP-overexpressing clinical isolates to biocides and dyes can select for MDR-EP-overexpressing mutants. spa types t002 and t008 isolates are predominated by multilocus sequencing typing sequence types (STs) 5 and 8, respectively. In this study, non-MDR-EP gene-overexpressing clinical isolates (MRSA and MSSA) representing ST5 and ST8 were subjected to single exposures of ethidium bromide (EtBr) to select for EtBr-resistant mutants. Measurements of active EtBr transport among mutants were used to demonstrate an efflux-proficient phenotype. Using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, it was found that EtBr-resistant mutants of ST5 and ST8 parental strains predominantly overexpressed mepA (100%) and mdeA (83%), respectively, regardless of meticillin sensitivity. Associations between clonal lineage and MDR-EP gene overexpression differed from those previously observed and suggest the latter is due to clonal spread of efflux-proficient strains. The predilection of in vitro-selected mutants of related strains to overexpress the same MDR-EP gene indicates the presence of a consistent mutational process. PMID:25548027

  19. Clonal types of Toxoplasma gondii among immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Irene; Kwofie, Kofi Dadzie; Blay, Emmanuel Awusah; Osei, Joseph Harold Nyarko; Frempong, Kwadwo Kyeremeh; Koku, Roberta; Ghansah, Anita; Lartey, Margaret; Suzuki, Takashi; Boakye, Daniel Adjei; Koram, Kwadwo Ansah; Ohta, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    There are three major clonal lineages, types I, II, and III, of Toxoplasma gondii known to cause human toxoplasmosis worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii infections have, however, not been genotyped in Ghana. This study detected the clonal types infecting immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana. Blood samples were obtained from 148 HIV seropositive pre-antiretroviral therapy individuals (0≤CD4(+) T-cell count/μl blood ≤200) at the Fevers Unit and 149 HIV seronegative apparently healthy blood donors at the blood bank, all of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Genomic DNA was extracted and multilocus genotyping conducted by nested PCR-RFLP analysis using GRA6, SAG3, and BTUB gene markers. Among the HIV seropositive participants, 54.7% (81/148) were T. gondii DNA positive for any of the markers. Out of the 81, 42.0% (34) were positive for SAG3 only, 30.9% (25) for GRA6 only, 24.7% (20) for both SAG3 and GRA6, and 2.5% (2) for SAG3, GRA6, and BTUB. Overall, 93.8% of the positives were of clonal type II, 1.2% type I, while 4.9% (4) were atypical or mixed types (I and II). In the healthy blood donors, prevalence of T. gondii DNA positivity was 3.4% (5/149) by SAG3 and/or GRA6; among them, 60.0% (3/5) were type I, and the remaining 40.0%, type II. This study showed a relatively high prevalence of active T. gondii infections in immune compromised patients and low prevalence in immune competent individuals in Accra. Type II was highly prevalent. Detection of T. gondii in blood donors raises public health concerns and screening for T. gondii should be considered. PMID:26775819

  20. Clonal Diversity of Nosocomial Epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Pilar; Valdezate, Sylvia; Medina-Pascual, Maria J.; Rubio, Virginia; Vindel, Ana; Saez-Nieto, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major pathogens involved in nosocomial outbreaks. The clonal diversity of 729 epidemic strains isolated from 19 Spanish hospitals (mainly from intensive care units) was analyzed over an 11-year period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identified 58 PFGE types that were subjected to susceptibility testing, rpoB gene sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). All PFGE types were multidrug resistant; colistin was the only agent to which all pathogens were susceptible. The 58 PFGE types were grouped into 16 clones based on their genetic similarity (cutoff of 80%). These clones were distributed into one major cluster (cluster D), three medium clusters (clusters A, B, and C), and three minor clusters (clusters E, F, and G). The rpoB gene sequencing and MLST results reflected a clonal distribution, in agreement with the PFGE results. The MLST sequence types (STs) (and their percent distributions) were as follows: ST-2 (47.5%), ST-3 (5.1%), ST-15 (1.7%), ST-32 (1.7%), ST-79 (13.6%), ST-80 (20.3%), and ST-81 (10.2%). ST-79, ST-80, and ST-81 and the alleles cpn60-26 and recA29 are described for the first time. International clones I, II, and III were represented by ST-81, ST-2, and ST-3, respectively. ST-79 and ST-80 could be novel emerging clones. This work confirms PFGE and MLST to be complementary tools in clonality studies. Here PFGE was able to demonstrate the monoclonal pattern of most outbreaks, the inter- and intrahospital transmission of bacteria, and their endemic persistence in some wards. MLST allowed the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of Spanish clones to be monitored and permitted international comparisons to be made. PMID:21177889

  1. Photoablative dilution with pre-enrichment for the clonal isolation of rare cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Leary, James F.

    2009-02-01

    The clonal isolation of rare cells, especially cancer and stem cells, in a population is important to cell biology. We have demonstrated that the Laser-Enabled Analysis and Processing (LEAP, Cyntellect Inc., San Diego, CA) instrument can be used to efficiently produce clones by photoablative dilution. The LEAP instrument performs automated fluorescence imaging and real-time image analysis to classify cells. The instrument also features a pulsed laser that gives it the ability to purify a sample by eliminating unwanted cells via laser ablation or UV-induced apoptosis. In photoablative dilution, rare cells are deposited into a multiwell plate at 10 cells per well. Then one cell is chosen to clone, and the other cells present in the well are eliminated by laser ablation. We have successfully used LEAP to produce single cell clones in 95% of wells (originally containing 5+/-2.1 cells/well). While photoablative dilution is a very effective way of producing clonal cultures, it has a fundamental limitation in the low number of cells that can be processed. This can be overcome by performing a pre-enrichment to increase the frequency of the rare cells to be cloned. Another enrichment strategy is flow cytometry based cell sorting. Flow sorting can provide greater than 104 fold enrichment and cells can be sorted directly into a multiwell plate. With pre-enrichment, photoablative dilution can be used to clonally isolate rare cells. This is especially important in cases where the total number of potentially rare cells recovered by first stage enrichment sorting is only 10-200 cells. Such a situation which would normally preclude second pass sorting for purity by the high-throughput first stage cell separation technology.

  2. Understanding the wide geographic range of a clonal perennial grass: plasticity versus local adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Xingliang; Niu, Haishan

    2016-01-01

    Both phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation may allow widely distributed plant species to either acclimate or adapt to environmental heterogeneity. Given the typically low genetic variation of clonal plants across their habitats, phenotypic plasticity may be the primary adaptive strategy allowing them to thrive across a wide range of habitats. In this study, the mechanism supporting the widespread distribution of the clonal plant Leymus chinensis was determined, i.e. phenotypic plasticity or local specialization in water use efficiency (WUE; reflected by foliar δ13C). To test whether plasticity is required for the species to thrive in different habitats, samples were collected across its distribution in the Mongolian steppe, and a controlled watering experiment was conducted with two populations at two different sites. Five populations were also transplanted from different sites into a control environment, and the foliar δ13C was compared between the control and original habitats, to test for local specialization in WUE. Results demonstrated decreased foliar δ13C with increasing precipitation during controlled watering experiments, with divergent responses between the two populations assessed. Change in foliar δ13C (−3.69 ‰) due to water addition was comparable to fluctuations of foliar δ13C observed in situ (−4.83 ‰). Foliar δ13C differed by −0.91 ‰ between two transplanted populations; however, this difference was not apparent between the two populations when growing in their original habitats. Findings provide evidence that local adaptation affects foliar δ13C much less than phenotypic plasticity. Thus, plasticity in WUE is more important than local adaptation in allowing the clonal plant L. chinensis to occupy a wide range of habitats in the Mongolian steppe. PMID:26644341

  3. Panmictic and Clonal Evolution on a Single Patchy Resource Produces Polymorphic Foraging Guilds

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.; Salter, Richard; Lyons, Andrew J.; Sippl-Swezey, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We develop a stochastic, agent-based model to study how genetic traits and experiential changes in the state of agents and available resources influence individuals’ foraging and movement behaviors. These behaviors are manifest as decisions on when to stay and exploit a current resource patch or move to a particular neighboring patch, based on information of the resource qualities of the patches and the anticipated level of intraspecific competition within patches. We use a genetic algorithm approach and an individual’s biomass as a fitness surrogate to explore the foraging strategy diversity of evolving guilds under clonal versus hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. We first present the resource exploitation processes, movement on cellular arrays, and genetic algorithm components of the model. We then discuss their implementation on the Nova software platform. This platform seamlessly combines the dynamical systems modeling of consumer-resource interactions with agent-based modeling of individuals moving over a landscapes, using an architecture that lays transparent the following four hierarchical simulation levels: 1.) within-patch consumer-resource dynamics, 2.) within-generation movement and competition mitigation processes, 3.) across-generation evolutionary processes, and 4.) multiple runs to generate the statistics needed for comparative analyses. The focus of our analysis is on the question of how the biomass production efficiency and the diversity of guilds of foraging strategy types, exploiting resources over a patchy landscape, evolve under clonal versus random hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. Our results indicate greater biomass production efficiency under clonal reproduction only at higher population densities, and demonstrate that polymorphisms evolve and are maintained under random mating systems. The latter result questions the notion that some type of associative mating structure is needed to maintain genetic polymorphisms among individuals

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Mexico: antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation and clonal diversity.

    PubMed

    Flores-Treviño, Samantha; Gutiérrez-Ferman, Jessica Lizzeth; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Estrada-Rivadeneyra, Diego; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge M; Camacho-Ortíz, Adrián; Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Garza-González, Elvira

    2014-11-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen associated with high mortality. Our aim was to examine antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm production and clonal relatedness of clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. S. maltophilia isolates were collected between 2006 and 2013 from two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by the broth microdilution method. PCR was used to determine the presence of β-lactamase genes L1 and L2. Biofilm formation was assessed with crystal violet staining. Clonal relatedness was determined by PFGE. Among the 119 collected S. maltophilia isolates, 73 (61.3%) were from the respiratory tract. Resistance levels exceeded 75% for imipenem, meropenem, ampicillin, aztreonam, gentamicin and tobramycin. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 32.8%. L1 and L2 genes were detected in 77.1% (91/118) and 66.9% (79/118) of isolates, respectively. All S. maltophilia strains were able to produce biofilms. Strains were classified as weak (47.9%, 57/119), moderate (38.7%, 46/119), or strong (13.4%, 16/119) biofilm producers. A total of 89 distinct PFGE types were identified and 21.6% (22/102) of the isolates were distributed in nine clusters. This is the first study in Mexico to reveal characteristics of clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. Clonal diversity data indicate low cross-transmission of S. maltophilia in a hospital setting. The high antibiotic resistance underscores the need for continuous surveillance of S. maltophilia in hospital settings in Mexico. PMID:25165124

  5. Panmictic and Clonal Evolution on a Single Patchy Resource Produces Polymorphic Foraging Guilds.

    PubMed

    Getz, Wayne M; Salter, Richard; Lyons, Andrew J; Sippl-Swezey, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We develop a stochastic, agent-based model to study how genetic traits and experiential changes in the state of agents and available resources influence individuals' foraging and movement behaviors. These behaviors are manifest as decisions on when to stay and exploit a current resource patch or move to a particular neighboring patch, based on information of the resource qualities of the patches and the anticipated level of intraspecific competition within patches. We use a genetic algorithm approach and an individual's biomass as a fitness surrogate to explore the foraging strategy diversity of evolving guilds under clonal versus hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. We first present the resource exploitation processes, movement on cellular arrays, and genetic algorithm components of the model. We then discuss their implementation on the Nova software platform. This platform seamlessly combines the dynamical systems modeling of consumer-resource interactions with agent-based modeling of individuals moving over a landscapes, using an architecture that lays transparent the following four hierarchical simulation levels: 1.) within-patch consumer-resource dynamics, 2.) within-generation movement and competition mitigation processes, 3.) across-generation evolutionary processes, and 4.) multiple runs to generate the statistics needed for comparative analyses. The focus of our analysis is on the question of how the biomass production efficiency and the diversity of guilds of foraging strategy types, exploiting resources over a patchy landscape, evolve under clonal versus random hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. Our results indicate greater biomass production efficiency under clonal reproduction only at higher population densities, and demonstrate that polymorphisms evolve and are maintained under random mating systems. The latter result questions the notion that some type of associative mating structure is needed to maintain genetic polymorphisms among individuals

  6. Understanding the wide geographic range of a clonal perennial grass: plasticity versus local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Xingliang; Niu, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Both phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation may allow widely distributed plant species to either acclimate or adapt to environmental heterogeneity. Given the typically low genetic variation of clonal plants across their habitats, phenotypic plasticity may be the primary adaptive strategy allowing them to thrive across a wide range of habitats. In this study, the mechanism supporting the widespread distribution of the clonal plant Leymus chinensis was determined, i.e. phenotypic plasticity or local specialization in water use efficiency (WUE; reflected by foliar δ(13)C). To test whether plasticity is required for the species to thrive in different habitats, samples were collected across its distribution in the Mongolian steppe, and a controlled watering experiment was conducted with two populations at two different sites. Five populations were also transplanted from different sites into a control environment, and the foliar δ(13)C was compared between the control and original habitats, to test for local specialization in WUE. Results demonstrated decreased foliar δ(13)C with increasing precipitation during controlled watering experiments, with divergent responses between the two populations assessed. Change in foliar δ(13)C (-3.69 ‰) due to water addition was comparable to fluctuations of foliar δ(13)C observed in situ (-4.83 ‰). Foliar δ(13)C differed by -0.91 ‰ between two transplanted populations; however, this difference was not apparent between the two populations when growing in their original habitats. Findings provide evidence that local adaptation affects foliar δ(13)C much less than phenotypic plasticity. Thus, plasticity in WUE is more important than local adaptation in allowing the clonal plant L. chinensis to occupy a wide range of habitats in the Mongolian steppe. PMID:26644341

  7. Long telomeres are associated with clonality in wild populations of the fissiparous starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cisneros, A; Pérez-Portela, R; Almroth, B C; Degerman, S; Palacín, C; Sköld, H Nilsson

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres usually shorten during an organism's lifespan and have thus been used as an aging and health marker. When telomeres become sufficiently short, senescence is induced. The most common method of restoring telomere length is via telomerase reverse transcriptase activity, highly expressed during embryogenesis. However, although asexual reproduction from adult tissues has an important role in the life cycles of certain species, its effect on the aging and fitness of wild populations, as well as its implications for the long-term survival of populations with limited genetic variation, is largely unknown. Here we compare relative telomere length of 58 individuals from four populations of the asexually reproducing starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina. Additionally, 12 individuals were used to compare telomere lengths in regenerating and non-regenerating arms, in two different tissues (tube feet and pyloric cecum). The level of clonality was assessed by genotyping the populations based on 12 specific microsatellite loci and relative telomere length was measured via quantitative PCR. The results revealed significantly longer telomeres in Mediterranean populations than Atlantic ones as demonstrated by the Kruskal-Wallis test (K=24.17, significant value: P-value<0.001), with the former also characterized by higher levels of clonality derived from asexual reproduction. Telomeres were furthermore significantly longer in regenerating arms than in non-regenerating arms within individuals (pyloric cecum tissue: Mann-Whitney test, V=299, P-value<10(-6); and tube feet tissue Student's t=2.28, P-value=0.029). Our study suggests that one of the mechanisms responsible for the long-term somatic maintenance and persistence of clonal populations is telomere elongation. PMID:25990879

  8. Phenotypic Responses of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant Buchloe dactyloides to Scale-Dependent Nutrient Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Sun, Zhen-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Clonal plants could modify phenotypic responses to nutrients heterogeneously distributed both in space and time by physiological integration. It will take times to do phenotypic responses to modifications which are various in different growth periods. An optimal phenotype is reached when there is a match between nutrient conditions and foraging ability. A single plantlet of Buchloe dactyloides with two stolons was transplanted into heterogeneous nutrient conditions. One stolon grew in homogeneous nutrient patch, while the other cultured in different scales of heterogeneous nutrient patches. As compared to the other nutrient treatment, heterogeneous nutrient treatments with small scale of 25×25 cm resulted in a higher biomass, and larger number of ramets, clumps and stolons in B. dactyloides at both genet and clonal fragment levels. Significant differences of number of ramets, clumps and stolons were detected at the rapid growth stage, but not in the early stage of the experiment. Foraging ability was more efficient in heterogeneous than in homogeneous nutrient conditions as assessed by higher root mass and root to shoot ratio. Different nutrient treatments did not prompt significant differences in internode and root length. Physiological integration significantly increased biomass, but did not influence other growth or morphological characters. These results suggest that physiological integration modifies phenotypic plasticity of B. dactyloides for efficient foraging of nutrients in heterogeneous nutrient conditions. These effects are more pronounced at genet and clonal fragment levels when the patch scale is 25×25 cm. Time is a key factor when phenotypic plasticity of B. dactyloides in heterogeneous nutrient conditions is examined. PMID:23826285

  9. The Resistance Mechanism and Clonal Distribution of Tigecycline-Nonsusceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chulsoo; Yoon, Sang Sun; Yong, Tae Soon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Tigecycline is one of the drugs used to treat multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) infections, including complicated skin and soft tissue infections, complicated intra-abdominal infection, and community-acquired pneumonia in the Republic of Korea. However, since its commercial release, K. pneumoniae resistance against tigecycline has been reported, and there is a serious concern about the spread of tigecycline resistant bacteria. Materials and Methods In this study, we collected and analyzed 342 isolates from 23 hospitals in the Republic of Korea to determine the mechanisms of tigecycline susceptibility and their clonal types. The hospitals include several from each province in the Republic of Korea, except Jeju, an island province, and nonsusceptibility among the isolates was tested by the disk diffusion method. In our lab, susceptibility was checked again using the broth dilution method, and clonal types were determined using the multilocus sequence typing protocol. Real-time PCR was performed to measure the ramR mutation in the isolates nonsusceptible to tigecycline, which would suggest an increased expression of the AcrAB multidrug pump. Results Fifty-six K. pneumoniae isolates were found to be nonsusceptible, 16% of the 342 collected. Twenty-seven and nine isolates of the tigecycline nonsusceptible isolates had mutations in the ramR and rpsJ genes, respectively; while 18 nonsusceptible isolates harbored the tetA gene. Comparison of isolates with and without ramR mutation showed a significant statistical difference (p<0.05) for expression of AcrAB. Moreover, the most common clonal types, as observed in our study, appear to be ST11 and ST789. Conclusion Several dominate clonal types infer tigecycline resistance to K. pneumoniae, including ST11, ST768, ST15, ST23, ST48, and ST307. There does not seem to be a transferrable medium, such as plasmid, for the resistance yet, although mutation of the ramR gene may be a common event

  10. High Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene from Flow-Sorted B Cell Sub-Populations Define the Dynamics of Follicular Lymphoma Clonal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carlotti, Emanuela; Wrench, David; Rosignoli, Guglielmo; Marzec, Jacek; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Hazanov, Lena; Michaeli, Miri; Hallam, Simon; Chaplin, Tracy; Iqbal, Sameena; Calaminici, Maria; Young, Bryan; Mehr, Ramit; Campbell, Peter; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of evolution of Follicular Lymphoma (FL) clones during disease progression is important for monitoring and targeting this tumor effectively. Genetic profiling of serial FL biopsies and examples of FL transmission following bone marrow transplant suggest that this disease may evolve by divergent evolution from a common ancestor cell. However where this ancestor cell resides and how it evolves is still unclear. The analysis of the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) is traditionally used for tracking the physiological clonal evolution of B cells within the germinal center and allows to discriminate those cells that have just entered the germinal center and display features of ancestor cells from those B cells that keep re-circulating across different lymphoid organs. Here we investigated the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin gene (IgH-VH) in 4 flow-sorted B cells subpopulations belonging to different stages of differentiation, from sequential lymph node biopsies of cases displaying diverse patterns of evolution, using the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. We observed an unexpectedly high level of clonality, with hundreds of distinct tumor subclones in the different subpopulations from the same sample, the majority detected at a frequency <10−2. By using a lineage trees analysis we observed in all our FL and t-FL cases that the oligoclonal FL population was trapped in a narrow intermediate stage of maturation that maintains the capacity to undergo SHM, but was unable to further differentiate. The presence of such a complex architecture highlights challenges currently encountered in finding a cure for this disease. PMID:26325507

  11. Evidence of a clonal expansion of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in adults as in children assessed by the DiversiLab® system.

    PubMed

    Hurmic, O; Grall, N; Al Nakib, M; Poyart, C; Grondin, S; Ploy, M-C; Varon, E; Raymond, J

    2014-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A was the main serotype responsible for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the Paris area in 2007 and 2009 in both adults and children. To verify if a particular clone is emerging, we determined the populational structure of S. pneumoniae isolates. Eighty-four S. pneumoniae strains responsible for invasive infections isolated from 52 adults and 32 children hospitalized in Parisian hospitals were analyzed. Capsular typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the semi-automated repetitive sequence-based (rep-PCR) DiversiLab® System. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was also performed on 26 strains (ten selected strains after cluster analysis and 16 control strains). In 2007 and 2009, S. pneumoniae serotype 19A represented, respectively, 28.6 % and 25 % of the serotypes involved in IPDs in children and 13 % and 13.7 % in adults. The rep-PCR DiversiLab® analysis showed that the 84 S. pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates were distributed in five clusters and four unique rep-PCR types. Overall, 77/84 (91.6 %) S. pneumoniae 19A serotypes grouped into three main genetically related clusters (71/77 belonged to the cluster I). The five other strains exhibited different profiles. Using MLST, we demonstrated that most strains of the main cluster belonged to clonal complex (CC) 230, sequence type (ST) 276. However, for the other strains, the DiversiLab® method cannot be used to predict to which ST a strain belongs. The DiversiLab® method allowed us to identify the clonal expansion of S. pneumoniae serotype 19A strains isolated from both children and adults in 2007 and 2009. PMID:24930040

  12. High Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene from Flow-Sorted B Cell Sub-Populations Define the Dynamics of Follicular Lymphoma Clonal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, Emanuela; Wrench, David; Rosignoli, Guglielmo; Marzec, Jacek; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Hazanov, Lena; Michaeli, Miri; Hallam, Simon; Chaplin, Tracy; Iqbal, Sameena; Calaminici, Maria; Young, Bryan; Mehr, Ramit; Campbell, Peter; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of evolution of Follicular Lymphoma (FL) clones during disease progression is important for monitoring and targeting this tumor effectively. Genetic profiling of serial FL biopsies and examples of FL transmission following bone marrow transplant suggest that this disease may evolve by divergent evolution from a common ancestor cell. However where this ancestor cell resides and how it evolves is still unclear. The analysis of the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) is traditionally used for tracking the physiological clonal evolution of B cells within the germinal center and allows to discriminate those cells that have just entered the germinal center and display features of ancestor cells from those B cells that keep re-circulating across different lymphoid organs. Here we investigated the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin gene (IgH-VH) in 4 flow-sorted B cells subpopulations belonging to different stages of differentiation, from sequential lymph node biopsies of cases displaying diverse patterns of evolution, using the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. We observed an unexpectedly high level of clonality, with hundreds of distinct tumor subclones in the different subpopulations from the same sample, the majority detected at a frequency <10-2. By using a lineage trees analysis we observed in all our FL and t-FL cases that the oligoclonal FL population was trapped in a narrow intermediate stage of maturation that maintains the capacity to undergo SHM, but was unable to further differentiate. The presence of such a complex architecture highlights challenges currently encountered in finding a cure for this disease. PMID:26325507

  13. Clonal evolution in CLL patients as detected by FISH versus chromosome banding analysis, and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Kotkowska, Aleksandra; Blonski, Jerzy Z; Siemieniuk-Rys, Monika; Ziolkowska, Ewelina; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof; Robak, Tadeusz; Korycka-Wolowiec, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of new aberrations during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) named clonal evolution (CE) is usually detected by one of the two methods: chromosome banding analysis (CBA) and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH). The purpose of this study was to compare the usefulness of FISH and CBA for detecting CE and to evaluate its influence on clinical outcome. FISH and CBA were performed at two time points: baseline and follow-up. Thirty-eight previously untreated patients with CLL were included in this study. CBA and I-FISH revealed CE in 15 (39.5%) and 10 (26.3%) patients, respectively. High-risk CE was detected in six cases by CBA and in five cases by I-FISH. In four cases with CE-dependent 17p abnormalities detected by CBA, metaphase FISH was needed for the confirmation of 17p13.1 deletion. Time from first-line to second-line treatment (TTST) and overall survival (OS) did not differ between patients with and without CE, irrespective of the CE-detecting method used. However, shorter OS (P = 0.043) and TTST (P = 0.006) were observed for the patients with potentially relevant CE (rCE) detected by CBA, in which acquired aberrations were present in at least 20% of undivided cells and/or changed baseline karyotype to abnormal or complex and were not resulting from 13q deletion. Our results suggest that some, but not all, CE-dependent aberrations detected by CBA influence clinical outcome. Moreover, I-FISH, which was aimed at detecting aberrations of prognostic significance, was found to be more precise than CBA in their detection, especially TP53 deletion. PMID:24138550

  14. Diversity of Prophage DNA Regions of Streptococcus agalactiae Clonal Lineages from Adults and Neonates with Invasive Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Mazen; van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Valentin-Domelier, Anne-Sophie; Quentin, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic position and prophage DNA content of the genomes of 142 S. agalactiae (group-B streptococcus, GBS) isolates responsible for bacteremia and meningitis in adults and neonates were studied and compared. The distribution of the invasive isolates between the various serotypes, sequence types (STs) and clonal complexes (CCs) differed significantly between adult and neonatal isolates. Use of the neighbor-net algorithm with the PHI test revealed evidence for recombination in the population studied (PHI, P = 2.01×10−6), and the recombination-mutation ratio (R/M) was 6∶7. Nevertheless, the estimated R/M ratio differed between CCs. Analysis of the prophage DNA regions of the genomes of the isolates assigned 90% of the isolates to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified per isolate varied from 2.6 for the isolates of prophage DNA group E to 4.0 for the isolates of prophage DNA group C. The isolates from adults and neonates with invasive diseases were distributed differently between the various prophage DNA groups (P<0.00001). Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B. Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P<0.00001). All the ST-1 and CC1 isolates, mostly of serotype V, belonged to the prophage DNA group C, whereas 84% of the ST-17 and CC17 isolates, all of serotype III, belonged to prophage DNA groups A and B. These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates. PMID:21633509

  15. Asexual reproduction does not produce clonal populations of the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C. D. H.; Ayre, D. J.; Miller, K. J.

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the relationship between genotypic diversity, the mode of production of brooded larvae and disturbance in a range of reef habitats, in order to resolve the disparity between the reproductive mode and population structure reported for the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis. Within 14 sites across six habitats, the ratio of the observed ( G o) to the expected ( G e) genotypic diversity ranged from 69 to 100% of that expected for random mating. At three other sites in two habitats the G o /G e ranged from 35 to 53%. Two of these sites were recently bleached, suggesting that asexual recruitment may be favoured after disturbance. Nevertheless, our data suggest that brooded larvae, from each of five habitats surveyed, were asexually produced. While clonal recruitment may be important in disturbed habitats, the lack of clonality detected, both in this and earlier surveys of 40 other sites, implies that a disturbance is normally insufficient to explain this species’ continued investment in clonal reproduction.

  16. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  17. Pure red cell aplasia associated with malignant thymoma, myasthenia gravis, polyclonal large granular lymphocytosis and clonal thymic T cell expansion.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, S I; Schofield, K P; Sivakumaran, M; Short, M; Pumphrey, R S

    1994-01-01

    A case with the triad of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), myasthenia gravis, and malignant thymoma is reported. There was a clonal proliferation of T cells within the thymoma, as demonstrated by a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement. However, despite a large granular lymphocytosis, clonality could not be shown in the peripheral blood either before or after thymectomy. There was no evidence of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 7 (HTLV1) infection. It is postulated that the clonal thymic T cell population secreted cytokine(s), which stimulated the polyclonal proliferation of large granular lymphocytes, which in turn suppressed erythropoiesis. Thymectomy removed the stimulus to the large granular lymphocytes and hence there was a resurgence of erythropoiesis. Images PMID:8089232

  18. A Monomorphic Haplotype of Chromosome Ia Is Associated with Widespread Success in Clonal and Nonclonal Populations of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asis; Miller, Natalie; Roos, David S.; Dubey, J. P.; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Dardé, Marie Laure; Ajioka, James W.; Rosenthal, Benjamin; Sibley, L. David

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of animals that also causes a zoonotic infection in humans. Previous studies have revealed a strongly clonal population structure that is shared between North America and Europe, while South American strains show greater genetic diversity and evidence of sexual recombination. The common inheritance of a monomorphic version of chromosome Ia (referred to as ChrIa*) among three clonal lineages from North America and Europe suggests that inheritance of this chromosome might underlie their recent clonal expansion. To further examine the diversity and distribution of ChrIa, we have analyzed additional strains with greater geographic diversity. Our findings reveal that the same haplotype of ChrIa* is found in the clonal lineages from North America and Europe and in older lineages in South America, where sexual recombination is more common. Although lineages from all three continents harbor the same conserved ChrIa* haplotype, strains from North America and Europe are genetically separate from those in South America, and these respective geographic regions show limited evidence of recent mixing. Genome-wide, array-based profiling of polymorphisms provided evidence for an ancestral flow from particular older southern lineages that gave rise to the clonal lineages now dominant in the north. Collectively, these data indicate that ChrIa* is widespread among nonclonal strains in South America and has more recently been associated with clonal expansion of specific lineages in North America and Europe. These findings have significant implications for the spread of genetic loci influencing transmission and virulence in pathogen populations. PMID:22068979

  19. Effects of lead contamination on the clonal propagative ability of Phragmites australis (common reed) grown in wet and dry environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Zhang, J W; Yang, Y H; Li, X Y; Lin, J X; Li, Z L; Cheng, L Y; Wang, J F; Mu, C S; Wang, A X

    2015-07-01

    Clonal propagation is important for the survival and maintenance of the common reed Phragmites australis. Pot culture experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of lead (Pb) concentration (0, 500, 1500, 3000, 4500 mg·kg(-1) ) and water stress on the clonal reproductive ability of this species. The Pb concentration found in plant organs, in decreasing order, was roots >shoots >rhizomes. There was a negative relationship between the growth of clonal propagative modules (excluding axillary shoot buds) and Pb concentrations, which caused a decrease in biomass, rhizome growth and number of axillary and apical rhizome buds. Daughter axillary shoots exhibited a tolerance strategy, with no significant change in their number; the axillary and apical rhizome buds, daughter apical rhizome shoots and rhizomes exhibited compensatory growth during the late stage of Pb (excluding 4500 mg·kg(-1) ) treatment in a wet environment. Pb applications above 500 mg·kg(-1) reduced these parameters significantly in the drought treatment, except for the number of axillary shoot buds, which did not change. Our results indicate that clonal propagative resistance to Pb contamination can occur via tolerance strategies, compensatory growth and a Pb allocation strategy, enabling these reeds to maintain population stability in wet environments. However, clonal modular growth and reproductive ability were inhibited significantly by the interaction between drought and Pb, which would cause a decline in P. australis populations in a dry environment. Lead concentrations of 4500 and 500 mg·kg(-1) in soils might meet or exceed the Pb tolerance threshold of clonally propagated reeds in wet and dry environments, respectively. PMID:25683495

  20. Higher clonal integration in the facultative epiphytic fern Selliguea griffithiana growing in the forest canopy compared with the forest understorey

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Liu, Wen-Yao; Yu, Fei-Hai; Song, Liang; Xu, Xing-Liang; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Zheng, Yu-Long; Li, Yang-Ping; Gong, He-De; Chen, Ke; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin-Hua; Lu, Shu-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The advantage of clonal integration (resource sharing between connected ramets of clonal plants) varies and a higher degree of integration is expected in more stressful and/or more heterogeneous habitats. Clonal facultative epiphytes occur in both forest canopies (epiphytic habitats) and forest understories (terrestrial habitats). Because environmental conditions, especially water and nutrients, are more stressful and heterogeneous in the canopy than in the understorey, this study hypothesizes that clonal integration is more important for facultative epiphytes in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Methods In a field experiment, an examination was made of the effects of rhizome connection (connected vs. disconnected, i.e. with vs. without clonal integration) on survival and growth of single ramets, both young and old, of the facultative epiphytic rhizomatous fern Selliguea griffithiana (Polypodiaceae) in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. In another field experiment, the effects of rhizome connection on performance of ramets were tested in small (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) plots in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. Key Results Rhizome disconnection significantly decreased survival and growth of S. griffithiana in both experiments. The effects of rhizome disconnection on survival of single ramets and on ramet number and growth in plots were greater in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Conclusions Clonal integration contributes greatly to performance of facultative epiphytic ferns, and the effects were more important in forest canopies than in forest understories. The results therefore support the hypothesis that natural selection favours genotypes with a higher degree of integration in more stressful and heterogeneous environments. PMID:26050068

  1. Dissecting the clonal origins of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia by single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gawad, Charles; Koh, Winston; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers have substantial genomic heterogeneity within a given tumor, and to fully understand that diversity requires the ability to perform single cell analysis. We performed targeted sequencing of a panel of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), deletions, and IgH sequences in 1,479 single tumor cells from six acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. By accurately segregating groups of cooccurring mutations into distinct clonal populations, we identified codominant clones in the majority of patients. Evaluation of intraclonal mutation patterns identified clone-specific punctuated cytosine mutagenesis events, showed that most structural variants are acquired before SNVs, determined that KRAS mutations occur late in disease development but are not sufficient for clonal dominance, and identified clones within the same patient that are arrested at varied stages in B-cell development. Taken together, these data order the sequence of genetic events that underlie childhood ALL and provide a framework for understanding the development of the disease at single-cell resolution. PMID:25425670

  2. Effects of clonal fragmentation on intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous floating plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Xu, Y-S; Dong, B-C; Xue, W; Yu, F-H

    2014-11-01

    Disturbance is common and can fragment clones of plants. Clonal fragmentation may affect the density and growth of ramets so that it could alter intraspecific competition. To test this hypothesis, we grew one (low density), five (medium density) or nine (high density) parent ramets of the floating invasive plant Pistia stratiotes in buckets, and newly produced offspring ramets were either severed (with fragmentation) or remained connected to parent ramets (no fragmentation). Increasing density reduced biomass of the whole clone (i.e. parent ramet plus its offspring ramets), showing intense intraspecific competition. Fragmentation decreased biomass of offspring ramets, but increased biomass of parent ramets and the whole clone, suggesting significant resource translocation from parent to offspring ramets when clones were not fragmented. There was no interaction effect of density x fragmentation on biomass of the whole clone, and fragmentation did not affect competition intensity index. We conclude that clonal fragmentation does not alter intraspecific competition between clones of P. stratiotes, but increases biomass production of the whole clone. Thus, fragmentation may contribute to its interspecific competitive ability and invasiveness, and intentional fragmentation should not be recommended as a measure to stop the rapid growth of this invasive species. PMID:24661501

  3. Intratumoral heterogeneity: Clonal cooperation in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Neelakantan, Deepika; Drasin, David J; Ford, Heide L

    2015-01-01

    Although phenotypic intratumoral heterogeneity was first described many decades ago, the advent of next-generation sequencing has provided conclusive evidence that in addition to phenotypic diversity, significant genotypic diversity exists within tumors. Tumor heterogeneity likely arises both from clonal expansions, as well as from differentiation hierarchies existent in the tumor, such as that established by cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-CSCs. These differentiation hierarchies may arise due to genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, or microenvironmental influences. An additional differentiation hierarchy within epithelial tumors may arise when only a few tumor cells trans-differentiate into mesenchymal-like cells, a process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Again, this process can be influenced by both genetic and non-genetic factors. In this review we discuss the evidence for clonal interaction and cooperation for tumor maintenance and progression, particularly with respect to EMT, and further address the far-reaching effects that tumor heterogeneity may have on cancer therapy. PMID:25482627

  4. Microevolution during an Anthrax outbreak leading to clonal heterogeneity and penicillin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ågren, Joakim; Finn, Maria; Bengtsson, Björn; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is a bacterial disease primarily affecting grazing animals but it can also cause severe disease in humans. We have used genomic epidemiology to study microevolution of the bacterium in a confined outbreak in cattle which involved emergence of an antibiotic-resistant phenotype. At the time of death, the animals contained a heterogeneous population of Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs), some being clonal but most being subclonal. We found that independent isolates from the same carcass had similar levels of SNV differences as isolates from different animals. Furthermore the relative levels of subclonal populations were different in different locations in the same carcass. The heterogeneity appeared to be derived in part from heterogeneity in the infectious dose. The resistance phenotype was linked to clonal mutations in an anti-sigma factor gene and in one case was preceded by an acquisition of a hypermutator phenotype. In another animal, small subclonal populations were observed with counteracting mutations that had turned off the resistance genes. In summary, this study shows the importance of accounting for both acquired and inherited heterogeneity when doing high-resolution infection tracing and when estimating the risks associated with penicillin treatment. PMID:24551231

  5. Clonal Analysis of Newborn Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cell Proliferation and Development in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy123

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; McAuliffe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hippocampal dentate granule cells are among the few neuronal cell types generated throughout adult life in mammals. In the normal brain, new granule cells are generated from progenitors in the subgranular zone and integrate in a typical fashion. During the development of epilepsy, granule cell integration is profoundly altered. The new cells migrate to ectopic locations and develop misoriented “basal” dendrites. Although it has been established that these abnormal cells are newly generated, it is not known whether they arise ubiquitously throughout the progenitor cell pool or are derived from a smaller number of “bad actor” progenitors. To explore this question, we conducted a clonal analysis study in mice expressing the Brainbow fluorescent protein reporter construct in dentate granule cell progenitors. Mice were examined 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, a treatment that leads to the development of epilepsy. Brain sections were rendered translucent so that entire hippocampi could be reconstructed and all fluorescently labeled cells identified. Our findings reveal that a small number of progenitors produce the majority of ectopic cells following status epilepticus, indicating that either the affected progenitors or their local microenvironments have become pathological. By contrast, granule cells with “basal” dendrites were equally distributed among clonal groups. This indicates that these progenitors can produce normal cells and suggests that global factors sporadically disrupt the dendritic development of some new cells. Together, these findings strongly predict that distinct mechanisms regulate different aspects of granule cell pathology in epilepsy. PMID:26756038

  6. Clonal redemption of autoantibodies by somatic hypermutation away from self-reactivity during human immunization.

    PubMed

    Reed, Joanne H; Jackson, Jennifer; Christ, Daniel; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2016-06-27

    Clonal anergy is an enigmatic self-tolerance mechanism because no apparent purpose is served by retaining functionally silenced B cells bearing autoantibodies. Human autoantibodies with IGHV4-34*01 heavy chains bind to poly-N-acetyllactosamine carbohydrates (I/i antigen) on erythrocytes and B lymphocytes, cause cold agglutinin disease, and are carried by 5% of naive B cells that are anergic. We analyzed the specificity of three IGHV4-34*01 IgG antibodies isolated from healthy donors immunized against foreign rhesus D alloantigen or vaccinia virus. Each IgG was expressed and analyzed either in a hypermutated immune state or after reverting each antibody to its unmutated preimmune ancestor. In each case, the preimmune ancestor IgG bound intensely to normal human B cells bearing I/i antigen. Self-reactivity was removed by a single somatic mutation that paradoxically decreased binding to the foreign immunogen, whereas other mutations conferred increased foreign binding. These data demonstrate the existence of a mechanism for mutation away from self-reactivity in humans. Because 2.5% of switched memory B cells use IGHV4-34*01 and >43% of these have mutations that remove I/i binding, clonal redemption of anergic cells appears efficient during physiological human antibody responses. PMID:27298445

  7. Negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie phenotypic heterogeneity in a clonal microbial population.

    PubMed

    Healey, David; Axelrod, Kevin; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Genetically identical cells in microbial populations often exhibit a remarkable degree of phenotypic heterogeneity even in homogenous environments. Such heterogeneity is commonly thought to represent a bet-hedging strategy against environmental uncertainty. However, evolutionary game theory predicts that phenotypic heterogeneity may also be a response to negative frequency-dependent interactions that favor rare phenotypes over common ones. Here we provide experimental evidence for this alternative explanation in the context of the well-studied yeast GAL network. In an environment containing the two sugars glucose and galactose, the yeast GAL network displays stochastic bimodal activation. We show that in this mixed sugar environment, GAL-ON and GAL-OFF phenotypes can each invade the opposite phenotype when rare and that there exists a resulting stable mix of phenotypes. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the resulting stable mix of phenotypes is not necessarily optimal for population growth. We find that the wild-type mixed strategist GAL network can invade populations of both pure strategists while remaining uninvasible by either. Lastly, using laboratory evolution we show that this mixed resource environment can directly drive the de novo evolution of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity from a pure strategist population. Taken together, our results provide experimental evidence that negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie the phenotypic heterogeneity found in clonal microbial populations. PMID:27487817

  8. Prevalence and Clonal Dissemination of Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Akya, Alisha; Salimi, Afsaneh; Nomanpour, Bizhan; Ahmadi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial infections. The emergence and dissemination of metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) has contributed to the high rate of resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and the clonal dissemination of MBL- producing P. aeruginosa isolates collected from major hospitals in Kermanshah. Materials and Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the minimal inhibitory concentrations. The MBLs were investigated using the Double-Disk Synergy Test (DDST) and Polymerase Chain Reaction. Molecular typing was performed by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Of the 60 P. aeruginosa isolates included in this study, 30 (50%) were resistant to Gentamicin, 38 (63.3%) to Piperacillin, 42 (70%) to Ceftazidime, and 45 (75%) to Cefepime. Twenty-nine (48.3%) isolates were MBL producers in the DDST test. Five (8.3%) isolates were positive for the VIM gene. PFGE analysis among the MBL producers revealed 12 distinct clonal patterns. Conclusions: The inter- and intra-hospital dissemination of resistant clones is a matter of concern and is an indicator of the level of the improvement and surveillance of standard hygiene, particularly disinfection and hand washing before and after contact with patients. Given the emergence of MBL-producing strains, surveillance has become an important procedure to control the transmission of resistant strains. PMID:26421137

  9. Clonality of T cell and phenotypically undefined lymphoid neoplasms: the value of genotypic analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, E; Stacey, G N; Howell, W M; Jones, D B; Smith, J L

    1990-01-01

    The value of genotypic analysis for routine assessment of leukaemia and lymphoma was shown by the findings in a selected series of 30 cases. T cell receptor (TcR) gene rearrangements were observed in six out of nine cases of CD3+ CD8+ lymphocytoses and provided clear evidence for clonality in this group. The T cell proliferations in two of the remaining cases masked B cell lymphocytic leukaemia and hairy cell leukaemia, while in the third case no cause was found for the polyclonal proliferation. Heterogeneity of phenotype and genotype were observed in peripheral T cell lymphomas: one out of six cases showed TcR gene rearrangement, one case retained its germline configuration, a further case masked B cell lymphoma and the remainder were polyclonal. Genotypic analysis was helpful in the analysis of a tumour of mixed T cell and myeloid phenotype which was shown to be germline for TcR and immunoglobulin genes, consistent with a myeloid origin. Two histiocytic tumours were found to have clonal rearrangement of TcR genes. Nine out of 11 B cell tumours showed immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. It is concluded that genetic analyses are useful in the analysis of T cell, histiocytic, and B cell tumours in which an immunoglobulin phenotype cannot be defined. Images PMID:2143202

  10. Clonal expansion of lung V delta 1+ T cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, J M; Newman, L S; Wang, Y; King, T E; Kotzin, B L

    1993-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in involved tissues. To investigate a potential role for gamma/delta T cells in the pathogenesis of pulmonary sarcoidosis, we studied lung and blood T cells from patients for preferential expression of particular gamma/delta T cell receptors. An abnormally high percentage of gamma/delta cells was found in the blood of some patients. However, the increased percentage did not reflect an increase in absolute number, and appeared to be secondary to a decrease in T cells expressing alpha/beta receptors. Furthermore, as in normals, the circulating gamma/delta cells in patients predominantly expressed V gamma 9/V delta 2 receptors, a subset that was not enriched at the site of disease. In contrast, in the lung, an increased percentage of gamma/delta cells expressing V delta 1 was found in a subset of patients. Importantly, these cells demonstrated evidence of prior activation by selectively expanding in vitro in the presence of interleukin 2. Furthermore, an analysis of junctional region sequences revealed their clonal nature. These clonal expansions of V delta 1+ cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis provide evidence for a disease process that involves specific recognition of a local antigen by T cells, and contributes new information regarding the nature of the as yet undefined antigenic stimulus. PMID:8423227

  11. Genetic hierarchy and temporal variegation in the clonal history of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Pierre; Zhang, Yanyan; Tang, Ruoping; Joulin, Virginie; Boutroux, Hélène; Pronier, Elodie; Moatti, Hannah; Flandrin, Pascale; Marzac, Christophe; Bories, Dominique; Fava, Fanny; Mokrani, Hayat; Betems, Aline; Lorre, Florence; Favier, Rémi; Féger, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Douay, Luc; Legrand, Ollivier; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystèle; Louache, Fawzia; Delhommeau, François

    2016-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) initiating pre-leukaemic lesions can be identified through three major hallmarks: their early occurrence in the clone, their persistence at relapse and their ability to initiate multilineage haematopoietic repopulation and leukaemia in vivo. Here we analyse the clonal composition of a series of AML through these characteristics. We find that not only DNMT3A mutations, but also TET2, ASXL1 mutations, core-binding factor and MLL translocations, as well as del(20q) mostly fulfil these criteria. When not eradicated by AML treatments, pre-leukaemic cells with these lesions can re-initiate the leukaemic process at various stages until relapse, with a time-dependent increase in clonal variegation. Based on the nature, order and association of lesions, we delineate recurrent genetic hierarchies of AML. Our data indicate that first lesions, variegation and treatment selection pressure govern the expansion and adaptive behaviour of the malignant clone, shaping AML in a time-dependent manner. PMID:27534895

  12. Quantification of clonal heterogeneity of mesenchymal progenitor cells in dental pulp and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Jodie; Sloan, Alastair J; Waddington, Rachel J

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the expression of "classical" stem cell markers, the proliferative capacity and differentiation ability of clonal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations isolated from animal matched dental pulp (DP) and bone marrow (BM) of rats. MSCs were derived from the aforementioned tissues, with immature MSCs selected for by preferential fibronectin-adherence and resultant single-cell derived clonal populations culture expanded. Colony forming efficiencies were 12 times greater for DP clones compared with BM clones. Expansion of isolated colonies, however, was 5 times more successful for BM clones. All clones exceeded 40 population doublings (PDs) and all exhibited periods of high and low proliferative rates. PDs were approximately 1.5 times higher for BM clones. All BM clones readily differentiated towards osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Of the three DP clones analysed, all demonstrated osteogenesis, albeit with reduced efficiency compared to BM clones. One clone demonstrated adipogenesis and one clone chodrogenesis. qPCR determined quantifiable differences in Msx2, Vcam2 and Mcam with no clone showing similarity to another. The expression of a specific mesenchymal marker did not predict proliferative or differentiation potential. These results also suggest lineage restriction of the DP clones. PMID:25158183

  13. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24896777

  14. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock lizard Darevskia dahlia.

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  15. Clonal Diversity and Clone Formation in the Parthenogenetic Caucasian Rock Lizard Darevskia dahli

    PubMed Central

    Vergun, Andrey A.; Martirosyan, Irena A.; Semyenova, Seraphima K.; Omelchenko, Andrey V.; Petrosyan, Varos G.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Tokarskaya, Olga N.; Korchagin, Vitaly I.; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotype