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Sample records for af2 clonal complex

  1. African 2, a Clonal Complex of Mycobacterium bovis Epidemiologically Important in East Africa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M. Carmen; Müller, Borna; Hailu, Elena; Asiimwe, Benon; Kremer, Kristin; Dale, James; Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Hilty, Markus; Rigouts, Leen; Firdessa, Rebuma; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Ngandolo, Bongo Nare Richard; Bruchfeld, Judith; Boschiroli, Laura; Müller, Annélle; Sahraoui, Naima; Pacciarini, Maria; Cadmus, Simeon; Joloba, Moses; van Soolingen, Dick; Michel, Anita L.; Djønne, Berit; Aranaz, Alicia; Zinsstag, Jakob; van Helden, Paul; Portaels, Françoise; Kazwala, Rudovick; Källenius, Gunilla; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Aseffa, Abraham; Gordon, Stephen V.; Smith, Noel H.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies. PMID:21097608

  2. The evidence for clonal spreading of quinolone resistance with a particular clonal complex of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovač, J; Cadež, N; Lušicky, M; Nielsen, E Møller; Ocepek, M; Raspor, P; Možina, S Smole

    2014-12-01

    Campylobacter is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and it represents a significant public health risk of increasing severity due to its escalating resistance to clinically important quinolone and macrolide antibiotics. As a zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter is transmitted along the food chain and naturally cycles from environmental waters, feedstuff, animals and food to humans. We determined antibiotic resistance profiles, as well as multilocus sequence types and flaA-SVR types for 52 C. jejuni isolated in Slovenia from human, animal, raw and cured chicken meat and water samples. Twenty-eight different sequence types, arranged in ten clonal complexes, three new allele types and five new sequence types were identified, indicating the relatively high diversity in a small group of strains. The assignment of strains from different sources to the same clonal complexes indicates their transmission along the food supply chain. The most prevalent clonal complex was CC21, which was also the genetic group with 95% of quinolone-resistant strains. Based on the genetic relatedness of these quinolone-resistant strains identified by polymerase chain reaction with a mismatch amplification mutation assay and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene, we conclude that the high resistance prevalence observed indicates the local clonal spread of quinolone resistance with CC21.

  3. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection.

  4. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  5. Clonal complexity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis can hamper diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Herranz, Marta; Navarro, Yurena; Ruiz Serrano, María Jesús; Miralles, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2017-02-15

    Clonal complexity is increasingly accepted in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, including mixed infections by ≥2 strains, which usually occur in settings with a high burden of tuberculosis and/or a high risk of overexposure to infected patients. Mixed infections can hamper diagnostic procedures: obtaining an accurate antibiogram is difficult when the susceptibility patterns of the strains differ. Here, we show how mixed infections can also prove challenging for other diagnostic procedures, even outside settings where mixed infections are traditionally expected. We show how an unnoticed mixed infection in an HIV-positive patient diagnosed in Madrid, Spain, with differences in the representativeness of the coinfecting strains in different sputum samples, markedly complicated the resolution of a laboratory cross-contamination false-positivity alert.

  6. Whole body clonality analysis in an aggressive STLV-1 associated leukemia (ATLL) reveals an unexpected clonal complexity.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Jocelyn; Alais, Sandrine; Marçais, Ambroise; Bruneau, Julie; Melamed, Anat; Gadot, Nicolas; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Hermine, Olivier; Melot, Sandrine; Lacoste, Romain; Bangham, Charles R; Mahieux, Renaud

    2017-03-28

    HTLV-1 causes Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) in humans. We describe an ATL-like disease in a 9 year-old female baboon naturally infected with STLV-1 (the simian counterpart of HTLV-1), with a lymphocyte count over 10(10)/L, lymphocytes with abnormal nuclear morphology, and pulmonary and skin lesions. The animal was treated with a combination of AZT and alpha interferon. Proviral load (PVL) was measured every week. Because the disease continued to progress, the animal was euthanized. Abnormal infiltrates of CD3(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes and Tax-positive cells were found by histological analyses in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. PVL was measured and clonal diversity was assessed by LM-PCR (Ligation-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reaction) and high throughput sequencing, in blood during treatment and in 14 different organs. The highest PVL was found in lymph nodes, spleen and lungs. One major clone and a number of intermediate abundance clones were present in blood throughout the course of treatment, and in organs. These results represent the first multi-organ clonality study in ATLL. We demonstrate a previously undescribed clonal complexity in ATLL. Our data reinforce the usefulness of natural STLV-1 infection as a model of ATLL.

  7. SNP/RD typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains reveals local and worldwide disseminated clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Hendriks, Amber C A; Freyee, Benthe; McEvoy, Christopher R E; van Crevel, Reinout; Boeree, Martin J; van Helden, Paul; Warren, Robin M; Siezen, Roland J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    The Beijing strain is one of the most successful genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis worldwide and appears to be highly homogenous according to existing genotyping methods. To type Beijing strains reliably we developed a robust typing scheme using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and regions of difference (RDs) derived from whole-genome sequencing data of eight Beijing strains. SNP/RD typing of 259 M. tuberculosis isolates originating from 45 countries worldwide discriminated 27 clonal complexes within the Beijing genotype family. A total of 16 Beijing clonal complexes contained more than one isolate of known origin, of which two clonal complexes were strongly associated with South African origin. The remaining 14 clonal complexes encompassed isolates from different countries. Even highly resolved clonal complexes comprised isolates from distinct geographical sites. Our results suggest that Beijing strains spread globally on multiple occasions and that the tuberculosis epidemic caused by the Beijing genotype is at least partially driven by modern migration patterns. The SNPs and RDs presented in this study will facilitate future molecular epidemiological and phylogenetic studies on Beijing strains.

  8. Identification of high-risk enterococcal clonal complexes: global dispersion and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Leavis, Helen L; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2006-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium spread dramatically in hospital settings in the USA in the 1990s and reached endemicity at the turn of the century. Similarly, rising prevalence rates are currently observed in several European countries, with prevalence rates of greater than 10% reported in seven of these. On the basis of multilocus sequence typing (MLST), the population structure of E. faecium was elucidated and the existence of a distinct high-risk enterococcal clonal complex, designated clonal complex-17 (CC17), which is associated with the majority of hospital outbreaks and clinical infections in five continents, was revealed. This complex is correlated with ampicillin and quinolone resistance and with the presence of a putative pathogenicity island. Preliminary MLST data suggest that similar hospital-adapted complexes might also exist in E. faecalis.

  9. Systematic Survey of Clonal Complexity in Tuberculosis at a Populational Level and Detailed Characterization of the Isolates Involved ▿

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Yurena; Herranz, Marta; Pérez-Lago, Laura; Martínez Lirola, Miguel; Ruiz-Serrano, Maria Jesús; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2011-01-01

    Clonally complex infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis are progressively more accepted. Studies of their dimension in epidemiological scenarios where the infective pressure is not high are scarce. Our study systematically searched for clonally complex infections (mixed infections by more than one strain and simultaneous presence of clonal variants) by applying mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit (MIRU)–variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis to M. tuberculosis isolates from two population-based samples of respiratory (703 cases) and respiratory-extrapulmonary (R+E) tuberculosis (TB) cases (71 cases) in a context of moderate TB incidence. Clonally complex infections were found in 11 (1.6%) of the respiratory TB cases and in 10 (14.1%) of those with R+E TB. Among the 21 cases with clonally complex TB, 9 were infected by 2 independent strains and the remaining 12 showed the simultaneous presence of 2 to 3 clonal variants. For the 10 R+E TB cases with clonally complex infections, compartmentalization (different compositions of strains/clonal variants in independent infected sites) was found in 9 of them. All the strains/clonal variants were also genotyped by IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, which split two MIRU-defined clonal variants, although in general, it showed a lower discriminatory power to identify the clonal heterogeneity revealed by MIRU-VNTR analysis. The comparative analysis of IS6110 insertion sites between coinfecting clonal variants showed differences in the genes coding for a cutinase, a PPE family protein, and two conserved hypothetical proteins. Diagnostic delay, existence of previous TB, risk for overexposure, and clustered/orphan status of the involved strains were analyzed to propose possible explanations for the cases with clonally complex infections. Our study characterizes in detail all the clonally complex infections by M. tuberculosis found in a systematic survey and contributes to the

  10. Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro Secretion of Alpha Toxin (hla) Correlates with the Affiliation to Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Stieber, Bettina; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The alpha toxin of Staphylococcus aureus is a pore forming toxin that penetrates host cell membranes causing osmotic swelling, rupture, lysis and subsequently cell death. Haemolysin alpha is toxic to a wide range of different mammalian cells; i.e., neurotoxic, dermonecrotic, haemolytic, and it can cause lethality in a wide variety of animals. In this study, the in vitro alpha toxin production of 648 previously genotyped isolates of S. aureus was measured quantitatively using antibody microarrays. Isolates originated from medical and veterinary settings and were selected in order to represent diverse clonal complexes and defined clinical conditions. Generally, the production of alpha toxin in vitro is related to the clonal complex affiliation. For clonal complexes CC22, CC30, CC45, CC479, CC705 and others, invariably no alpha toxin production was noted under the given in vitro conditions, while others, such as CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15 or CC96 secreted variable or high levels of alpha toxin. There was no correlation between alpha toxin yield and clinical course of the disease, or between alpha toxin yield and host species. PMID:24940872

  11. A Small Number of Phylogenetically Distinct Clonal Complexes Dominate a Coastal Vibrio cholerae Population

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Paul C.; Orata, Fabini D.; Barlow, E. Jed; Kauffman, Kathryn M.; Case, Rebecca J.; Polz, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is a ubiquitous aquatic microbe in temperate and tropical coastal areas. It is a diverse species, with many isolates that are harmless to humans, while others are highly pathogenic. Most notable among them are strains belonging to the pandemic O1/O139 serogroup lineage, which contains the causative agents of cholera. The environmental selective regimes that led to this diversity are key to understanding how pathogens evolve in environmental reservoirs. A local population of V. cholerae and its close relative Vibrio metoecus from a coastal pond and lagoon system was extensively sampled during two consecutive months across four size fractions (480 isolates). In stark contrast to previous studies, the observed population was highly clonal, with 60% of V. cholerae isolates falling into one of five clonal complexes, which varied in abundance in the short temporal scale sampled. V. cholerae clonal complexes had significantly different distributions across size fractions and the two environments sampled, the pond and the lagoon. Sequencing the genomes of 20 isolates representing these five V. cholerae clonal complexes revealed different evolutionary trajectories, with considerable variations in gene content with potential ecological significance. Showing genotypic differentiation and differential spatial distribution, the dominant clonal complexes are likely ecologically divergent. Temporal variation in the relative abundance of these complexes suggests that transient blooms of specific clones could dominate local diversity. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae is commonly found in coastal areas worldwide, with only a single group of this bacterium capable of causing severe cholera outbreaks. However, the potential to evolve the ability to cause disease exists in many strains of this species in its aquatic reservoir. Understanding how pathogenic bacteria evolve requires the study of their natural environments. By extensive sampling in a geographically

  12. Complex Antigens Elicit Diverse Patterns of Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve towards increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens – Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin – in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naïve B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early “winners” were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection. PMID:26948373

  13. Immune complex formation and in situ B-cell clonal expansion in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Kinloch, Andrew; Henderson, Scott G; Shaaya, Mark; Chong, Anita S; Clark, Marcus R; Awad, Issam A

    2014-07-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) represent clusters of dilated vascular channels, predisposing to hemorrhagic stroke and seizures. They are associated with defective blood brain barrier, hemorrhages of different ages and a robust inflammatory cell infiltrate. We report for the first time evidence of co-localized IgG and complement membrane attack complexes in CCM lesions. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells are aggregated with CD20(+) B-cells. And IgG repertoire analyses demonstrate in situ B-cell clonal expansion and antigen-driven affinity maturation in CCMs. These results suggest an organ-intrinsic adaptive immune response in CCMs that should be further characterized as a potential therapeutic target.

  14. Identification of a novel genomic island specific to hospital-acquired clonal complex 17 Enterococcus faecium isolates.

    PubMed

    Heikens, Esther; van Schaik, Willem; Leavis, Helen L; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2008-11-01

    Hospital-acquired clonal complex 17 (CC17) Enterococcus faecium strains are genetically distinct from indigenous strains and are enriched with resistance genes and virulence genes. We identified a genomic island in CC17 E. faecium tentatively encoding a metabolic pathway involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism, which may provide a competitive advantage over the indigenous E. faecium microbiota.

  15. Evolution and comparative genomics of Campylobacter jejuni ST-677 clonal complex.

    PubMed

    Kivistö, Rauni I; Kovanen, Sara; Skarp-de Haan, Astrid; Schott, Thomas; Rahkio, Marjatta; Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2014-09-04

    Campylobacter is the most common bacterial cause of gastroenteritis in the European Union with over 200,000 laboratory-confirmed cases reported annually. This is the first study to describe findings related to comparative genomics analyses of the sequence type (ST)-677 clonal complex (CC), a Campylobacter jejuni lineage associated with bacteremia cases in humans. We performed whole-genome sequencing, using Illumina HiSeq sequencing technology, on five related ST-677 CC isolates from two chicken farms to identify microevolution taking place at the farms. Our further aim was to identify novel putative virulence determinants from the ST-677 CC genomes. For this purpose, clinical isolates of the same CC were included in comparative genomic analyses against well-known reference strains of C. jejuni. Overall, the ST-677 CC was recognized as a highly clonal lineage with relatively small differences between the genomes. Among the farm isolates differences were identified mainly in the lengths of the homopolymeric tracts in genes related to the capsule, lipo-oligosaccharide, and flagella. We identified genomic features shared with C. jejuni subsp. doylei, which has also been shown to be associated with bacteremia in humans. These included the degradation of the cytolethal distending toxin operon and similarities between the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis loci. The phase-variable GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.47) (wcbK, CAMP1649), associated with the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis locus, may play a central role in ST-677 CC conferring acid and serum resistance during different stages of infection. Homology-based searches revealed several additional novel features and characteristics, including two putative type Vb secretion systems and a novel restriction modification/methyltransferase gene cluster, putatively associated with pathogenesis and niche adaptation.

  16. Sequence Type 4821 Clonal Complex Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis in China, 1978–2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bingqing; Xu, Zheng; Du, Pengcheng; Xu, Li; Sun, Xiaofang; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains belonging to sequence type 4821 clonal complex (CC4821), a hyperinvasive lineage first identified for serogroup C in 2003, have been increasingly isolated in China. We characterized the outer membrane protein genes of 48 serogroup B and 214 serogroup C strains belonging to CC4821 and analyzed the genomic sequences of 22 strains. Four serogroup B strains had porin A (i.e., PorA), PorB, and ferric enterobactin transport (i.e., FetA) genotypes identical to those for serogroup C. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomic sequences showed that the 22 CC4821 strains from patients and healthy carriers were unevenly clustered into 2 closely related groups; each group contained serogroup B and C strains. Serogroup B strains appeared variable at the capsule locus, and several recombination events had occurred at uncertain breakpoints. These findings suggest that CC4821 serogroup C N. meningitidis is the probable origin of highly pathogenic CC4821 serogroup B strains. PMID:25989189

  17. Spreading of AbaR-type genomic islands in multidrug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii strains belonging to different clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Stietz, María Silvina; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Jeric, Paola; Limansky, Adriana S; Márquez, Carolina; Bello, Helia; Catalano, Mariana; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of AbaR-type genomic island in multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) strains circulating in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile, we studied 51 MDRAb isolates recovered from several hospitals over 30 years. AbaR-type genomic resistance islands were found in 36 MDRAb isolates since 1986 till now. MLST technique allowed us to identify the presence of four different Clonal Complexes (109, 104, 119, 113) among the positive AbaR-type island positive strains. This is the first description of AbaR-type islands in the CC104 and CC113 that are the most widespread Clonal Complexes in Argentina. In addition, PCR mapping exposed different arrays to those previously described, evidencing the plasticity of this island. Our results evidence a widespread distribution of the AbaR-type genomic islands along the time in the MDRAb population, including the epidemic global clone 1 (GC1) as well as different clonal complexes to those already described in the literature.

  18. Population structure of hyperinvasive serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by multilocus boxB sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    Rakov, Alexey V.; Ubukata, Kimiko; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2011-01-01

    At least four outbreaks of invasive disease caused by serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae have occurred in the United States over the past two decades. We studied the population structure of this clonal complex using a sample of 203 outbreak and surveillance isolates that were collected over 22 years from 34 US states and eight other countries. Conventional multilocus sequence typing identified five types and distinguished a single outbreak from the others. To improve typing resolution, multilocus boxB sequence typing (MLBT) was developed from 10 variable boxB minisatellite loci. MLBT identified 86 types and distinguished between each of the four outbreaks. Diversity across boxB loci tended to be positively correlated with repeat array size and, overall, best fit the infinite alleles mutation model. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium was strong, but pairwise disequilibrium decreased with the physical distance between loci and was strongest in one large region of the chromosome, indicating recent recombinations. Two major clusters were identified in the sample, and they were differentiated geographically, as western and more easterly US clusters, and temporally, as clusters that predominated before and after the licensure of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The diversity and linkage disequilibrium within these two clusters also differed, suggesting different population dynamics. MLBT revealed hidden aspects of the population structure of these hyperinvasive pneumococci, and it may provide a useful adjunct tool for outbreak investigations, surveillance, and population genetics studies of other pneumococcal clonal complexes. PMID:21888992

  19. Evolutionary blueprint for host- and niche-adaptation in Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30

    PubMed Central

    McGavin, Martin J.; Arsic, Benjamin; Nickerson, Nicholas N.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30 has caused infectious epidemics for more than 60 years, and, therefore, provides a model system to evaluate how evolution has influenced the disease potential of closely related strains. In previous multiple genome comparisons, phylogenetic analyses established three major branches that evolved from a common ancestor. Clade 1, comprised of historic pandemic phage type 80/81 methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and Clade 2 comprised of contemporary community acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) were hyper-virulent in murine infection models. Conversely, Clade 3 strains comprised of contemporary hospital associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and clinical MSSA exhibited attenuated virulence, due to common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) that abrogate production of α-hemolysin Hla, and interfere with signaling of the accessory gene regulator agr. We have now completed additional in silico genome comparisons of 15 additional CC30 genomes in the public domain, to assess the hypothesis that Clade 3 has evolved to favor niche adaptation. In addition to SNP's that influence agr and hla, other common traits of Clade 3 include tryptophan auxotrophy due to a di-nucleotide deletion within trpD, a premature stop codon within isdH encoding an immunogenic cell surface protein involved in iron acquisition, loss of a genomic toxin–antitoxin (TA) addiction module, acquisition of S. aureus pathogenicity islands SaPI4, and SaPI2 encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin tst, and increased copy number of insertion sequence ISSau2, which appears to target transcription terminators. Compared to other Clade 3 MSSA, S. aureus MN8, which is associated with Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, exhibited a unique ISSau2 insertion, and enhanced production of toxic shock syndrome toxin encoded by SaPI2. Cumulatively, our data support the notion that Clade 3 strains are following an evolutionary blueprint toward niche-adaptation. PMID:22919639

  20. Farm-specific lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 in Danish pig farms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, C; Larsen, J; Moodley, A; Nielsen, J P; Skov, R L; Andreasen, M; Guardabassi, L

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Dust and pigs at five age groups were sampled in six Danish MRSA-positive pig farms. MRSA CC398 was isolated from 284 of the 391 samples tested, including 230 (74%) animal and 54 (68%) environmental samples. PFGE analysis of a subset of 48 isolates, including the six strains previously isolated from farm workers, revealed the existence of farm-specific pulsotypes. With a single exception, human, environmental and porcine isolates originating from the same farm clustered together in the PFGE cluster analysis, indicating that spread of MRSA CC398 in Danish pig farms is mainly due to clonal dissemination of farm-specific lineages that can be discriminated by PFGE. This finding has important implications for planning future epidemiological studies investigating the spread of CC398 in pig farming.

  1. Hospital Dissemination of tst-1-Positive Clonal Complex 5 (CC5) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Zheng, Yi; Mediavilla, Jose. R.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry. N.; Song, Yajun; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is one of the most prevalent clinical pathogens isolated from hospital settings, and has increasingly identified in community settings. In China, the SCCmecIII-ST239 strains are disseminated in different geographic regions, accounting for >75% of all MRSA isolates in some national studies. Here we characterized 150 non-duplicate MRSA isolates collected from February 2012 to May 2013 in a tertiary hospital in Suzhou, Eastern China, to explore the molecular epidemiology. All isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing, and detection of genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1). Representative genotypes were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using BD Phoenix™ Automated Microbiology System. Molecular typing identified 11 clonal complex (CC) and 28 spa types, with the CC5-spa t002 (29.3%) and CC239-spa t037 (14.7%) being the most prevalent. SCCmec types II, III, IV, and V were identified in 33.3, 21.3, 23.3, and 21.3% of all isolates, respectively. PVL genes (lukF/S-PV) were detected in 11.3% of all isolates and from 6 CCs (5, 8, 59, 88, 239, and 398). The TSST-1 gene (tst) was detected in 18.0% of the all isolates, predominantly in CC5 (96.3%). All the tst-1-positve CC5 isolates were spa t002. Eighteen patients died within 30 days of hospitalization, and the in-hospital 30-day mortality was 12.0%. Multivariable analysis showed that 60 years old (odds ratio [OR] = 7.2, P = 0.026), cancer diagnosis (OR = 9.6, P = 0.022), and MRSA isolate carriage of tst-1 (OR = 62.5, P < 0.001) were independent factors associated with 30-day mortality. Our study revealed unique MRSA dissemination patterns in our hospital in comparison to those of other regions in China. The finding that tst-1-positive CC5 strains were associated with higher mortality highlights the need for strict infection control measures in

  2. Spatiotemporal Co-existence of Two Mycobacterium ulcerans Clonal Complexes in the Offin River Valley of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Aboagye, Samuel; Kerber, Sarah; Danso, Emelia; Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Asare, Prince; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R.; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Röltgen, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, comparative genome sequence analysis of African Mycobacterium ulcerans strains isolated from Buruli ulcer (BU) lesion specimen has revealed a very limited genetic diversity of closely related isolates and a striking association between genotype and geographical origin of the patients. Here, we compared whole genome sequences of five M. ulcerans strains isolated in 2004 or 2013 from BU lesions of four residents of the Offin river valley with 48 strains isolated between 2002 and 2005 from BU lesions of individuals residing in the Densu river valley of Ghana. While all M. ulcerans isolates from the Densu river valley belonged to the same clonal complex, members of two distinct clonal complexes were found in the Offin river valley over space and time. The Offin strains were closely related to genotypes from either the Densu region or from the Asante Akim North district of Ghana. These results point towards an occasional involvement of a mobile reservoir in the transmission of M. ulcerans, enabling the spread of bacteria across different regions. PMID:27434064

  3. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  4. The clinical impact of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of the clonal complex 398 for humans.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Ballhausen, Britta; Kahl, Barbara C; Köck, Robin

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) strains in particular of the clonal complex (CC) 398 have emerged in many parts of the world especially in areas with a high density of pig farming. In those regions, farmworkers and other individuals with professional contact to livestock are very frequently colonized with LA-MRSA. These persons are the presumably source for LA-MRSA transmission to household members and other parts of the human population. Altogether, colonization and/or infection of these individuals lead to the introduction of LA-MRSA into hospitals and other healthcare facilities. Since LA-MRSA CC398 have been found to be specifically adapted to their animal hosts in terms of the equipment with virulence factors, their pathogenicity to human patients is a matter of debate with first reports about clinical cases. Meanwhile, case reports, case series and few studies have demonstrated the capability of LA-MRSA to cause all types of infections attributed to S. aureus in general including fatal courses. Human infections observed comprise e.g. bacteremia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis and many manifestations of skin and soft tissue infections. However, inpatients affected by MRSA CC398 generally show different demographic (e.g. younger, shorter length of hospital stay) and clinical characteristics (e.g. less severe complications) which may explain or at least contribute to a lower disease burden of LA-MRSA compared to other MRSA clonal lineages.

  5. Clonal Complex 17 Group B Streptococcus strains causing invasive disease in neonates and adults originate from the same genetic pool

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ramoutar, Erin; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Melano, Roberto G.; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of group B Streptococcus (GBS) neonatal disease, particularly late-onset disease, is associated with strains of serotype III, clonal complex (CC) 17. CC17 strains also cause invasive infections in adults. Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships of isolates recovered from neonatal and adult CC17 invasive infections. We performed whole-genome-based phylogenetic analysis of 93 temporally and geographically matched CC17 strains isolated from both neonatal and adult invasive infections in the metropolitan region of Toronto/Peel, Canada. We also mined the whole-genome data to reveal mobile genetic elements carrying antimicrobial resistance genes. We discovered that CC17 GBS strains causing neonatal and adult invasive disease are interspersed and cluster tightly in a phylogenetic tree, signifying that they are derived from the same genetic pool. We identified limited variation due to recombination in the core CC17 genome. We describe that loss of Pilus Island 1 and acquisition of different mobile genetic elements carrying determinants of antimicrobial resistance contribute to CC17 genetic diversity. Acquisition of some of these mobile genetic elements appears to correlate with clonal expansion of the strains that possess them. Our results provide a genome-wide portrait of the population structure and evolution of a major disease-causing clone of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:26843175

  6. Use of amplified-fragment length polymorphism to study the ecology of Campylobacter jejuni in environmental water and to predict multilocus sequence typing clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; St-Pierre, Karen; Frost, Eric; Arbeit, Robert D; Michaud, Sophie

    2012-04-01

    We determined the genetic variability among water isolates of Campylobacter jejuni by using amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Across a highly diverse collection of isolates, AFLP clusters did not correlate with MLST clonal complexes, suggesting that AFLP is not reliable for deciphering population genetic relationships and may be problematic for larger epidemiologic analyses.

  7. Particular Distribution of Enterobacter cloacae Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection within Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on biochemical properties, Enterobacter cloacae represents a large complex of at least 13 variant species, subspecies, and genotypes that progressively identified as the most species causing hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine the relevance between phylogenetically related strains within the E. cloacae complex and the frequency of urinary tract infection caused by them. Methods: A 268-bp fragment was obtained from hsp60 gene for 50 clinical E. cloacae isolates from urine cultures of inpatients that admitted to six hospitals in Tehran, Iran during December 2012 to November 2013. The 107 nucleotide sequences were analyzed and the evolutionary distances of sequences were computed and neighbor-joining tree was calculated. Results: It showed that all of the genetic clusters have not an equal involvement in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. Three superior clusters were found, together representing more than two third (80%) of the isolates (cluster VI with 25 members; clusters III and VIII with 9 and 6 members, respectively) and some genetic clusters were absent (IV, X, XII, and xiii), some of which are supposed to be associated with plants and no human infection has been reported. Conclusions: This study, for the first time, reports the unequal contribution of E. cloacae complex subspecies and clusters in urinary tract infections in Iran and together with studies from other countries suggest that the subspecies of E.hormaechei subsp. Oharae is the most prevalent E. cloacae complex subspecies regardless of country under study. PMID:26498349

  8. Moraxella catarrhalis Macrolide-Resistant Isolates Are Highly Concentrated in Two MLST Clonal Complexes -CCN10 and CC363.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xu, He-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Sha; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    To gain some insights into the molecular evolution of Moraxella catarrhalis macrolide resistance, PCR and sequencing analysis of the 23S rRNA gene, copB typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed on 181 M. catarrhalis isolates. The isolates were obtained from children (n = 47) and adults (n = 134) presenting with respiratory disease in the years 2010-2014. Macrolide resistance was highly age-related, and nucleotide position alterations at A2330T could be detected in all macrolide-resistant isolates. copB 0 and copB NT (non-typable) were only found in macrolide-susceptible isolates from adults. Furthermore, copB I/III was the main type in adult or macrolide-susceptible isolates, while copB II was the most common type in children or macrolide-resistant isolates. Twenty-two different MLST clusters (sharing 7 of the 8 identical loci) were detected and only four likely primary founders (ST224, ST363, STN08, and STN10) which belong to clonal complex (CC) 224, CC363, CCN08, and CCN10, were detected, respectively. Macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates were highly concentrated in two CCs (CCN10 and CC363), which indicates some potential evolutionary advantage or co-evolution to some extent. However, further studies are needed to fully elucidate the evolution of CCN10 and CC363 in macrolide resistance.

  9. Time-Scaled Evolutionary Analysis of the Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, C. L.; McAdam, P. R.; van Bunnik, B. A. D.; Girvan, E. K.; Edwards, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. R.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) is associated with disease in humans and livestock, and its origins and transmission have generated considerable interest. We performed a time-scaled phylogenetic analysis of CC398, including sequenced isolates from the United Kingdom (Scotland), along with publicly available genomes. Using state-of-the-art methods for mapping traits onto phylogenies, we quantified transitions between host species to identify sink and source populations for CC398 and employed a novel approach to investigate the gain and loss of antibiotic resistance in CC398 over time. We identified distinct human- and livestock-associated CC398 clades and observed multiple transmissions of CC398 from livestock to humans and between countries, lending quantitative support to previous reports. Of note, we identified a subclade within the livestock-associated clade comprised of isolates from hospital environments and newborn babies, suggesting that livestock-associated CC398 is capable of onward transmission in hospitals. In addition, our analysis revealed significant differences in the dynamics of resistance to methicillin and tetracycline related to contrasting historical patterns of antibiotic usage between the livestock industry and human medicine. We also identified significant differences in patterns of gain and loss of different tetracycline resistance determinants, which we ascribe to epistatic interactions between the resistance genes and/or differences in the modes of inheritance of the resistance determinants. PMID:25239891

  10. Moraxella catarrhalis Macrolide-Resistant Isolates Are Highly Concentrated in Two MLST Clonal Complexes -CCN10 and CC363

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xu, He-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Sha; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    To gain some insights into the molecular evolution of Moraxella catarrhalis macrolide resistance, PCR and sequencing analysis of the 23S rRNA gene, copB typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed on 181 M. catarrhalis isolates. The isolates were obtained from children (n = 47) and adults (n = 134) presenting with respiratory disease in the years 2010–2014. Macrolide resistance was highly age-related, and nucleotide position alterations at A2330T could be detected in all macrolide-resistant isolates. copB 0 and copB NT (non-typable) were only found in macrolide-susceptible isolates from adults. Furthermore, copB I/III was the main type in adult or macrolide-susceptible isolates, while copB II was the most common type in children or macrolide-resistant isolates. Twenty-two different MLST clusters (sharing 7 of the 8 identical loci) were detected and only four likely primary founders (ST224, ST363, STN08, and STN10) which belong to clonal complex (CC) 224, CC363, CCN08, and CCN10, were detected, respectively. Macrolide-resistant M. catarrhalis isolates were highly concentrated in two CCs (CCN10 and CC363), which indicates some potential evolutionary advantage or co-evolution to some extent. However, further studies are needed to fully elucidate the evolution of CCN10 and CC363 in macrolide resistance. PMID:28239374

  11. A phylogenomic framework for assessing the global emergence and evolution of clonal complex 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Baines, Sarah L.; Carter, Glen P.; Heffernan, Helen; French, Nigel P.; Ren, Xiaoyun; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter; Kwong, Jason; Stinear, Timothy P.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    Distinct clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have emerged as important causes of infection in individuals who have exposure to livestock (livestock-associated MRSA; LA-MRSA). Clonal complex 398 (CC398) is the most prevalent LA-MRSA clone, and has been reported from several geographical settings, including Europe, the Americas and Asia. To understand the factors contributing to the global dissemination of this clone, we analysed CC398 MRSA isolates from New Zealand (NZ), a geographically isolated country with an economy strongly dependent on livestock farming. We supplemented the NZ CC398 MRSA collection with global datasets of CC398 MRSA and CC398 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. Here, we demonstrate multiple sporadic incursions of CC398 MRSA into NZ, as well as recent importation and spread of a swine-associated clade related to the European LA-MRSA lineage. Within a larger global phylogenomic framework, Bayesian modelling suggested that this NZ clade emerged in the late 2000s, with a probable origin in swine from Western Europe. Elucidating the factors responsible for the incursion and spread of LA-MRSA in geographically distant regions, such as NZ, provides important insights into global pathways of S. aureus transmission, and will inform strategies to control importation and spread. PMID:28348878

  12. Patterns, sources and ecological implications of clonal diversity in apomictic Ranunculus carpaticola (Ranunculus auricomus complex, Ranunculaceae).

    PubMed

    Paun, O; Greilhuber, J; Temsch, E M; Hörandl, E

    2006-04-01

    Sources and implications of genetic diversity in agamic complexes are still under debate. Population studies (amplified fragment length polymorphisms, microsatellites) and karyological methods (Feulgen DNA image densitometry and flow cytometry) were employed for characterization of genetic diversity and ploidy levels of 10 populations of Ranunculus carpaticola in central Slovakia. Whereas two diploid populations showed high levels of genetic diversity, as expected for sexual reproduction, eight populations are hexaploid and harbour lower degrees of genotypic variation, but maintain high levels of heterozygosity at many loci, as is typical for apomicts. Polyploid populations consist either of a single AFLP genotype or of one dominant and a few deviating genotypes. genotype/genodive and character incompatibility analyses suggest that genotypic variation within apomictic populations is caused by mutations, but in one population probably also by recombination. This local facultative sexuality may have a great impact on regional genotypic diversity. Two microsatellite loci discriminated genotypes separated by the accumulation of few mutations ('clone mates') within each AFLP clone. Genetic diversity is partitioned mainly among apomictic populations and is not geographically structured, which may be due to facultative sexuality and/or multiple colonizations of sites by different clones. Habitat differentiation and a tendency to inhabit artificial meadows is more pronounced in apomictic than in sexual populations. We hypothesize that maintenance of genetic diversity and superior colonizing abilities of apomicts in temporally and spatially heterogeneous environments are important for their distributional success.

  13. Studying clonal dynamics in response to cancer therapy using high-complexity barcoding.

    PubMed

    Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Ruddy, David A; Krishnamurthy Radhakrishna, Viveksagar; Caushi, Justina X; Zhao, Rui; Hims, Matthew M; Singh, Angad P; Kao, Iris; Rakiec, Daniel; Shaw, Pamela; Balak, Marissa; Raza, Alina; Ackley, Elizabeth; Keen, Nicholas; Schlabach, Michael R; Palmer, Michael; Leary, Rebecca J; Chiang, Derek Y; Sellers, William R; Michor, Franziska; Cooke, Vesselina G; Korn, Joshua M; Stegmeier, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Resistance to cancer therapies presents a significant clinical challenge. Recent studies have revealed intratumoral heterogeneity as a source of therapeutic resistance. However, it is unclear whether resistance is driven predominantly by pre-existing or de novo alterations, in part because of the resolution limits of next-generation sequencing. To address this, we developed a high-complexity barcode library, ClonTracer, which enables the high-resolution tracking of more than 1 million cancer cells under drug treatment. In two clinically relevant models, ClonTracer studies showed that the majority of resistant clones were part of small, pre-existing subpopulations that selectively escaped under therapeutic challenge. Moreover, the ClonTracer approach enabled quantitative assessment of the ability of combination treatments to suppress resistant clones. These findings suggest that resistant clones are present before treatment, which would make up-front therapeutic combinations that target non-overlapping resistance a preferred approach. Thus, ClonTracer barcoding may be a valuable tool for optimizing therapeutic regimens with the goal of curative combination therapies for cancer.

  14. Complexity of the human memory B-cell compartment is determined by the versatility of clonal diversification in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Budeus, Bettina; Schweigle de Reynoso, Stefanie; Przekopowitz, Martina; Hoffmann, Daniel; Seifert, Marc; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-09-22

    Our knowledge about the clonal composition and intraclonal diversity of the human memory B-cell compartment and the relationship between memory B-cell subsets is still limited, although these are central issues for our understanding of adaptive immunity. We performed a deep sequencing analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain genes from biological replicates, covering more than 100,000 memory B lymphocytes from two healthy adults. We reveal a highly similar B-cell receptor repertoire among the four main human IgM(+) and IgG(+) memory B-cell subsets. Strikingly, in both donors, 45% of sequences could be assigned to expanded clones, demonstrating that the human memory B-cell compartment is characterized by many, often very large, B-cell clones. Twenty percent of the clones consisted of class switched and IgM(+)(IgD(+)) members, a feature that correlated significantly with clone size. Hence, we provide strong evidence that the vast majority of Ig mutated B cells--including IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells--are post-germinal center (GC) memory B cells. Clone members showed high intraclonal sequence diversity and high intraclonal versatility in Ig class and IgG subclass composition, with particular patterns of memory B-cell clone generation in GC reactions. In conclusion, GC produce amazingly large, complex, and diverse memory B-cell clones, equipping the human immune system with a versatile and highly diverse compartment of IgM(+)(IgD(+)) and class-switched memory B cells.

  15. Automated categorization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates into different clonal complexes by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Camoez, M; Sierra, J M; Dominguez, M A; Ferrer-Navarro, M; Vila, J; Roca, I

    2016-02-01

    Early identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) dominant clones involved in infection and initiation of adequate infection control measures are essential to limit MRSA spread and understand MRSA population dynamics. In this study we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) for the automated discrimination of the major MRSA lineages (clonal complexes, CC) identified in our hospital during a 20-year period (1990-2009). A collection of 82 well-characterized MRSA isolates belonging to the four main CCs (CC5, CC8, CC22 and CC398) was split into a reference set (n = 36) and a validation set (n = 46) to generate pattern recognition models using the ClinProTools software for the identification of MALDI-TOF/MS biomarker peaks. The supervised neural network (SNN) model showed the best performance compared with two other models, with sensitivity and specificity values of 100% and 99.11%, respectively. Eleven peaks (m/z range: 3278-6592) with the highest separation power were identified and used to differentiate all four CCs. Validation of the SNN model using ClinProTools resulted in a positive predictive value (PPV) of 99.6%. The specific contribution of each peak to the model was used to generate subtyping reference signatures for automated subtyping using the BioTyper software, which successfully classified MRSA isolates into their corresponding CCs with a PPV of 98.9%. In conclusion, we find this novel automated MALDI-TOF/MS approach to be a promising, powerful and reliable tool for S. aureus typing.

  16. Clonality and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex Isolates Collected from Cystic Fibrosis Patients during 1998-2013 in Bern, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Agnese; Isis, Enver; Tinguely, Regula; Endimiani, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, we analyzed the clonality and susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates (n=55) collected during 1998-2013 from 44 Swiss cystic fibrosis (CF)-patients. B. cenocepacia (n=28) and B. multivorans (n=14) were mainly of sequence type (ST) 833 and ST874, respectively; B. contaminans isolates were of ST102. Overall, the following MIC50/90s (mg/l) were obtained: piperacillin/tazobactam (≤ 4/≥ 128), ticarcillin/clavulanate (≥ 256/≥256), ceftazidime (2/≥ 32), aztreonam (16/≥ 32), meropenem (2/8), tobramycin (8/≥ 16), minocycline (≤ 1/16), levofloxacin (≤ 0.5/≥ 16), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (≤ 0.5/4). This is the first survey providing information on the clonality of Bcc detected in Switzerland. Species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests should always be routinely performed to adapt more targeted therapies.

  17. Dispersion of Multidrug-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Isolates Belonging to Major Clonal Complexes in Different Portuguese Settings▿

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Coque, Teresa M.; Peixe, Luísa

    2009-01-01

    The population structure of 56 Enterococcus faecium isolates selected from a collection of enterococci from humans, animals, and the environment in Portugal (1997 to 2007) was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing. We identified 41 sequence types clustering into CC17, CC5, CC9, CC22 and CC94, all clonal lineages comprising isolates from different hosts. Our findings highlight the role of community-associated hosts as reservoirs of enterococci able to cause human infections. PMID:19447948

  18. Targeted vaccination of teenagers following continued rapid endemic expansion of a single meningococcal group W clone (sequence type 11 clonal complex), United Kingdom 2015.

    PubMed

    Campbell, H; Saliba, V; Borrow, R; Ramsay, M; Ladhani, S N

    2015-07-16

    Since the epidemiological year 2009/10, the United Kingdom has experienced a year-on-year increase in meningococcal group W (MenW) disease due to rapid expansion of a single endemic hyper-virulent strain belonging to sequence type 11 clonal complex (cc). This strain was identified among cases diagnosed across all regions and was not linked to travel abroad. Consequently, an adolescent MenACWY conjugate vaccination programme for 13-18 year-olds will be introduced in August 2015, with priority given to 17-18 year-olds (school leavers).

  19. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex.

    PubMed

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Blom, Jochen; Manning, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation.

  20. Molecular analysis and distribution of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates belonging to clonal complex 17 in a tertiary care center in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterococcus faecium has recently emerged as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen involved in outbreaks worldwide. A high rate of resistance to different antibiotics has been associated with virulent clonal complex 17 isolates carrying the esp and hyl genes and the purK1 allele. Results Twelve clinical vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) isolates were obtained from pediatric patients at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG). Among these VREF isolates, 58.3% (7/12) were recovered from urine, while 41.7% (5/12) were recovered from the bloodstream. The VREF isolates showed a 100% rate of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, gentamicin, rifampicin, erythromycin and teicoplanin. In addition, 16.7% (2/12) of the isolates were resistant to linezolid, and 66.7% (8/12) were resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the vanA gene in all 12 VREF isolates, esp in 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates and hyl in 50% (6/12) of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis via molecular typing was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and demonstrated 44% similarity among the VREF isolates. MLST analysis identified four different sequence types (ST412, ST757, ST203 and ST612). Conclusion This study provides the first report of multidrug-resistant VREF isolates belonging to clonal complex 17 from a tertiary care center in Mexico City. Multidrug resistance and genetic determinants of virulence confer advantages among VREF in the colonization of their host. Therefore, the prevention and control of the spread of nosocomial infections caused by VREF is crucial for identifying new emergent subclones that could be challenging to treat in subsequent years. PMID:24330424

  1. Clonal complexes 104, 109 and 113 playing a major role in the dissemination of OXA-carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Clímaco, Eduardo Carneiro; Oliveira, Milena Locci de; Pitondo-Silva, André; Oliveira, Murilo Gomes; Medeiros, Micheli; Lincopan, Nilton; da Costa Darini, Ana Lúcia

    2013-10-01

    Carbapenem resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from clinical settings in Brazil has increased dramatically in the last 10 years due to the emergence and dissemination of OXA-type carbapenemase encoding genes. This study aimed to characterize the presence of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDL)-encoding genes and clonal complexes playing a major role in the dissemination of OXA-carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii in Southeast Brazil. A total of 74 A. baumannii strains isolated from patients admitted to 4 hospitals in Southeast Brazil were analyzed. Molecular characterization of strains revealed that 67 strains carried blaOXA-23 (72%), blaOXA-143 (25%) or both genes (3%). PFGE analysis identified 12 PFGE clusters, grouping 26 pulsotypes. Two PFGE clusters were predominant, comprising more than 66% of OXA-producing A. baumannii isolates. Among 23 representative strains characterized by MLST-UO (Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme - University of Oxford, http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/), 14 different STs were identified, of which six were confirmed as novel sequence types (designated as STs 402-407). Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complexes CC104,CC109 or CC113, whereas three STs were singletons (ST339, 403 and 407). In conclusion, the presence of blaOXA-23- and blaOXA-143-like genes was not related to specific ST/CC, suggesting that the dissemination of OXA-carbapenemase-encoding genes may involve different STs, in which the spread of OXA-23-like is most likely due to mobile elements (i.e., plasmids). In this regard, CC104, CC109 and CC113 played a major role as predominant CDHL-carrying clones, instead of CC92, which was not identified.

  2. Long-Term Colonization of the Cystic Fibrosis Lung by Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria: Epidemiology, Clonal Variation, and Genome-Wide Expression Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Carla P.; dos Santos, Sandra C.; Madeira, Andreia; Mira, Nuno P.; Moreira, Ana S.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Long-term respiratory infections with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients generally lead to a more rapid decline in lung function and, in some cases, to a fatal necrotizing pneumonia known as the “cepacia syndrome.” Bcc bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and are recognized as serious opportunistic pathogens that are virtually impossible to eradicate from the CF lung, posing a serious clinical threat. The epidemiological survey of Bcc bacteria involved in respiratory infections at the major Portuguese CF Treatment Center at Santa Maria Hospital, in Lisbon, has been carried out by our research group for the past 16 years, covering over 500 clinical isolates where B. cepacia and B. cenocepacia are the predominant species, with B. stabilis, B. contaminans, B. dolosa, and B. multivorans also represented. The systematic and longitudinal study of this CF population during such an extended period of time represents a unique case–study, comprehending 41 Bcc-infected patients (29 pediatric and 12 adult) of whom around 70% have been persistently colonized between 7 months and 9 years. During chronic infection, the CF airways represent an evolving ecosystem, with multiple phenotypic variants emerging from the clonal population and becoming established in the patients’ airways as the result of genetic adaptation. Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms involved is crucial for an improved therapeutic outcome of chronic infections in CF. This review focuses on our contribution to the understanding of these adaptive mechanisms based on extensive phenotypic, genotypic, and genome-wide expression approaches of selected Bcc clonal variants obtained during long-term colonization of the CF airways. PMID:22919578

  3. Identification of different clonal complexes and diverse amino acid substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) associated with borderline oxacillin resistance in Canadian Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeya; Lee, Mark J S; Louie, Lisa; Jacob, Latha; Simor, Andrew E; Louie, Marie; McGavin, Martin J

    2006-12-01

    Borderline oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (BORSA) exhibit oxacillin MIC values of 1-8 microg ml(-1), but lack mecA, which encodes the low-affinity penicillin-binding protein (PBP)2a. The relationship of the BORSA phenotype with specific genetic backgrounds was assessed, as well as amino acid sequence variation in the normal PBP2. Among 38 BORSA, 26 had a common PFGE profile of genomic DNA, and were multilocus sequence type (ST)25. The other isolates were genetically diverse. Complete pbp2 sequences were determined for three BORSA, corresponding to ST25, ST1 and ST47, which were selected on the basis of lacking blaZ-encoded beta-lactamase. The essential transpeptidase-domain-encoding segment of pbp2 was also sequenced from seven additional ST25 isolates. Amino acid substitutions occurred in the transpeptidase domain of all BORSA, irrespective of clonal type. A Gln(629)-->Pro substitution was common to all ST25 BORSA, but most could be distinguished from one another by additional unique substitutions in the transpeptidase domain. The ST1 and ST47 isolates also possessed unique substitutions in the transpeptidase domain. Plasmid-mediated expression of pbp2 from an ST25 or ST1 isolate in S. aureus RN6390 increased its oxacillin MIC from 0.25 to 4 microg ml(-1), while pbp2 from a susceptible strain, ATCC 25923, had no effect. Therefore, different amino acid substitutions in PBP2 of diverse BORSA lineages contribute to borderline resistance. The predominant ST25 lineage was not related to any of the five clonal complexes that contain meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), suggesting that ST25 cannot readily acquire mecA-mediated resistance.

  4. vanA-containing E. faecium isolates of clonal complex CC17 in clinical and environmental samples in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Elhani, Dalèle; Klibi, Naouel; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Hassan, Meriem; Asli Mohamed, Selim; Ben Said, Laila; Mahjoub, Aouini; Ben Slama, Karim; Jemli, Boutheina; Bellaj, Ridha; Barguellil, Farouk; Torres, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-eight vancomycin (VA)-resistant enterococci isolated from different patients (n = 16) and also from the environment (n = 12) were recovered in a Tunisian military hospital during 2012-2013. The mechanisms of resistance to VA and to other antibiotics as well as the presence of esp and hyl virulence genes were determined in these isolates by PCR, being their clonal relationship analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). VA resistance mechanisms detected were as follows (species-patient/environment): vanA (Enterococcus faecium, 13/5), vanC1 (Enterococcus gallinarum, 3/0), and vanC2 (Enterococcus casseliflavus, 0/7). Most of the VA-resistant enterococci presented a multiresistance phenotype and harbored different resistance genes (erm(B), tet(M), tet(L), ant(6)-Ia, aac(6')-aph(2"), aph(3')-IIIa, and catA). The PFGE revealed the presence of 3 clones (A, B, C) and 1 closely related pattern (A1) among the 13 vanA-containing E. faecium isolates of patients showing 11 of them the A-A1 patterns. The clone A was also detected in all 5 environmental vanA-containing E. faecium isolates. Strains did not contain esp or hyl virulence genes. Multilocus sequence typing was performed in 4 E. faecium isolates representative of the 4 detected pulsotypes (A, A1, B, and C), and 2 different sequence types were identified (ST18 and ST80), both of them included in clonal complex CC17. These strains contained the IS16 element and showed ampicillin and ciprofloxacin resistance. VA resistance could be an emerging problem in Tunisia, and this is one of the first cases described so far in this country.

  5. INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

    2013-12-10

    Spectra from the “at-line” spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the “odd” shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it “odd” shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

  6. Occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, and distribution of enterococcal clonal complex 17 from animals and human beings in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ka Hee; Hwang, Sun Young; Moon, Bo Youn; Park, Young Kyung; Shin, Sook; Hwang, Cheol-Yong; Park, Yong Ho

    2012-09-01

    Enterococci are major zoonotic bacteria that cause opportunistic infections in human beings and animals. Moreover, pathogenic strains can be disseminated between human beings and animals, particularly companion animals that come into frequent contact with people. Recently, Enterococcus faecium clonal complex 17 (CC17) has emerged as a pandemic clone. Most CC17 strains are ampicillin resistant and possess virulence genes such as esp and hyl. Despite the possible dissemination of CC17 between human beings and animals, prevalence data about CC17 in animals is limited. In the present study, the phenotypes and genotypes of antimicrobial resistance were compared, as well as virulence gene profiles from 184 enterococci strains isolated from chickens, pigs, companion animals, and human patients in Korea. Ampicillin-resistant E. faecium (AREF) strains were selected, and multilocus sequence typing was performed to investigate the dispersion of CC17 among animals and human beings. The companion animal and human isolates showed high resistance rates to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin, whereas food animal isolates showed high tetracycline and erythromycin resistance rates. Ampicillin-resistant E. faecium was only detected in human (21/21 E. faecium, 100%) and companion animal (3/5 E. faecium, 60%) isolates, and all human AREF strains and 1 canine AREF strain were confirmed as CC17. In conclusion, the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, and the distribution of enterococcal CC17 in companion animal enterococcal strains were similar to those of human strains rather than to those of food animal strains.

  7. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) Clonal Complex (CC) 398 Isolated from UK Animals belong to European Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenaxi; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Kearns, Angela M.; Doumith, Michel; Butaye, Patrick R.; Argudín, M. Angeles; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Pichon, Bruno; AbuOun, Manal; Rogers, Jon; Ellis, Richard J.; Teale, Christopher; Anjum, Muna F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013 and 2015, whole genome sequences (WGS) of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases ccr C S. aureus protein A (spa)-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR), heavy metal (HMR), and disinfectant (DR) resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harbored resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harboring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbor φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009) present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the 12 UK LA

  8. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) Clonal Complex (CC) 398 Isolated from UK Animals belong to European Lineages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenaxi; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Kearns, Angela M; Doumith, Michel; Butaye, Patrick R; Argudín, M Angeles; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Pichon, Bruno; AbuOun, Manal; Rogers, Jon; Ellis, Richard J; Teale, Christopher; Anjum, Muna F

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013 and 2015, whole genome sequences (WGS) of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases ccr C S. aureus protein A (spa)-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR), heavy metal (HMR), and disinfectant (DR) resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harbored resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harboring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbor φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009) present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the 12 UK LA

  9. Low strain, long life creep fatigue of AF2-1DA and INCO 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakker, A. B.; Cowles, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two aircraft turbine disk alloys, GATORIZED AF2-DA and INCO 718 were evaluated for their low strain long life creep-fatigue behavior. Static (tensile and creep rupture) and cyclic properties of both alloys were characterized. The cntrolled strain LCF tests were conducted at 760 C (1400 F) and 649 C (1200 F) for AF2-1DA and INCO 718, respectively. Hold times were varied for tensile, compressive and tensile/compressive strain dwell (relaxation) tests. Stress (creep) hold behavior of AF2-1DA was also evaluated. Generally, INCO 718 exhibited more pronounced reduction in cyclic life due to hold than AF2-1DA. The percent reduction in life for both alloys for strain dwell tests was greater at low strain ranges (longer life regime). Changing hold time from 0 to 0.5, 2.0 and 15.0 min. resulted in corresponding reductions in life. The continuous cycle and cyclic/dwell initiation failure mechanism was predominantly transgranular for AF2-1DA and intergranular for INCO 718.

  10. Clonal distribution and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolates in blood.

    PubMed

    Feodoroff, Benjamin; de Haan, Caroline P A; Ellström, Patrik; Sarna, Seppo; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2013-10-01

    Campylobacter jejuni bacteria are highly diverse enteropathogens. Seventy-three C. jejuni isolates from blood collected in Finland were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing and serum resistance. Approximately half of the isolates belonged to the otherwise uncommon sequence type 677 clonal complex. Isolates of this clonal complex were more resistant than other isolates to human serum.

  11. In vitro high-capacity assay to quantify the clonal heterogeneity in trilineage potential of mesenchymal stem cells reveals a complex hierarchy of lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie C; Phinney, Donald G; Lacey, Michelle R; Barrilleaux, Bonnie L; Meyertholen, Kristin E; O'Connor, Kim C

    2010-04-01

    In regenerative medicine, bone marrow is a promising source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for a broad range of cellular therapies. This research addresses a basic prerequisite to realize the therapeutic potential of MSCs by developing a novel high-capacity assay to quantify the clonal heterogeneity in potency that is inherent to MSC preparations. The assay utilizes a 96-well format to (1) classify MSCs according to colony-forming efficiency as a measure of proliferation capacity and trilineage potential to exhibit adipo-, chondro-, and osteogenesis as a measure of multipotency and (2) preserve a frozen template of MSC clones of known potency for future use. The heterogeneity in trilineage potential of normal bone marrow MSCs is more complex than previously reported: all eight possible categories of trilineage potential were detected. In this study, the average colony-forming efficiency of MSC preparations was 55-62%, and tripotent MSCs accounted for nearly 50% of the colony-forming cells. The multiple phenotypes detected in this study infer a more convoluted hierarchy of lineage commitment than described in the literature. Greater cell amplification, colony-forming efficiency, and colony diameter for tri- versus unipotent clones suggest that MSC proliferation may be a function of potency. CD146 may be a marker of multipotency, with approximately 2-fold difference in mean fluorescence intensity between tri- and unipotent clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of the efficacy of MSC therapies. The in vitro assay described herein will likely have numerous applications given the importance of heterogeneity to the therapeutic potential of MSCs.

  12. Clonal Complexes and Diversity of Exotoxin Gene Profiles in Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients in a Spanish Hospital▿

    PubMed Central

    Argudín, M. A.; Mendoza, M. C.; Méndez, F. J.; Martín, M. C.; Guerra, B.; Rodicio, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies have allowed the identification of the methicillin (meticillin)-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) clonal complexes (CCs) and clones of Staphylococcus aureus circulating in a Spanish hospital recently. Of 81 isolates tested, 32.1% were MRSA. Most of them carried staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IVc (88.5%) and belonged to CC5 (88.5%; multilocus sequence typing types ST125 [mainly associated with spa type t067], ST5, and ST228). A higher diversity was found among MSSA isolates (67.9%). Eighty percent shared the genetic background of major MRSA lineages (CC5 [38.2%; ST125 and ST5], CC30 [25.5%; ST30], CC45 [14.5%; ST45 and ST47], and CC8 [1.8%; ST8]), but CC12, CC15, CC51, and CC59 were also detected. Many exotoxin genes were present in each of the 81 isolates, independent of whether they were involved in sepsis (11 to 22) or other types of infections (13 to 21), and they appeared in 73 combinations. The relevant data are that (i) all isolates were positive for hemolysin and leukotoxin genes (98.8% for lukED and 25.9% for lukPV); (ii) all contained an enterotoxin gene cluster (egc with or without seu), frequently with one or more genes encoding classical enterotoxins; (iii) about half were positive for tst and 95% were positive for exfoliatin-encoding genes (eta, etb, and/or etd); and (iv) the four agr groups were detected, with agrII (55.6%) and agrIII (23.5%) being the most frequent. Taken together, results of the present study suggest a frequent acquisition and/or loss of exotoxin genes, which may be mediated by efficient intralineage transfer of mobile genetic elements and exotoxin genes therein and by eventual breakage of interlineage barriers. PMID:19458176

  13. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP.

  14. Imported and intensive care unit-born Acinetobacter baumannii clonal complexes: one-year prospective cohort study in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natacha; Martins, Ianick Souto; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Girão, Valeria Brígido de Carvalho; Coelho-Souza, Talita; Maralhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Cacci, Luciana Camila; de Figueiredo, Miriam Perez; Dias, Rubens Clayton Silva; Costa-Lourenço, Ana Paula Ramalho; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Dalla-Costa, Libera; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the frequency and possible sources of colonization and infection by Acinetobacter in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and characterize the isolates for relatedness to internationally and locally disseminated lineages. Patients consecutively admitted to the ICU from April 2007 to April 2008 were screened for colonization and infection. Species were identified by rpoB sequencing. The presence of acquired and intrinsic carbapenemase genes was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Strains were typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using the schemes hosted at the University of Oxford (UO) and Institut Pasteur (IP). Of 234 patients, 98 (42%) had at least one specimen positive for the Acinetobacter isolate, and 24 (10%) had infection. A total of 22 (92%) infections were caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and one each (4%) by Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter berezinae. A. baumannii isolates from 60 patients belonged to RAPD types that corresponded to MLST clonal complexes (CCs) 109/1 (UO/IP scheme, known as International Clone I), CC 110/110 (UO/IP), CC 113/79 (UO/IP), and CC 104/15 (UO/IP). Most CCs were carbapenem resistant and carried the bla(OXA-23)-like gene. Strains were introduced by patients transferred from other wards of the same hospital (11 patients, 18%) or acquired from cross-transmission within the ICU (49 patients, 82%). A. nosocomialis lineage sequence type 260 colonized 10% of the whole study population. A. baumannii have become established in this hospital as a part of a global epidemic of successful clones. Once introduced into the hospital, such clones have become entrenched among patients in the ICU.

  15. Clonal spread and accumulation of β-lactam resistance determinants in Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates from infection and colonization in patients at a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Adriane Borges; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira; Barros, Josineide Ferreira; Antunes, Marcelo Maranhão; Barbosa de Castro, Célia Maria Machado; Lopes, Ana Catarina Souza

    2017-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae complex are the two species of this genus most involved in healthcare-associated infections that are ESBL and carbapenemase producers. This study characterized, phenotypically and genotypically, 51 isolates of E. aerogenes and E. cloacae complex originating from infection or colonization in patients admitted to a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, by antimicrobial susceptibility profile, analysis of β-lactamase genes (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaKPC, blaVIM, blaIMP and blaSPM), PCR and DNA sequencing, plasmid profile and ERIC-PCR. In both species, the genes blaTEM, blaCTX-M and blaKPC were detected. The DNA sequencing confirmed the variants blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-15 and blaKPC-2 in isolates. More than one gene conferring resistance in the isolates, including the detection of the three previously cited genes in strains isolated from infection sites, was observed. The detection of blaCTX-M was more frequent in isolates from infection sites than from colonization. The gene blaKPC predominated in E. cloacae complex isolates obtained from infections; however, in E. aerogenes isolates, it predominated in samples obtained from colonization. A clonal relationship among all of E. aerogenes isolates was detected by ERIC-PCR. The majority of E. cloacae complex isolates presented the same ERIC-PCR pattern. Despite the clonal relation presented by the isolates using ERIC-PCR, different plasmid and resistance profiles and several resistance genes were observed. The clonal dissemination and the accumulation of β-lactam resistance determinants presented by the isolates demonstrated the ability of E. aerogenes and E. cloacae complex, obtained from colonization and infection, to acquire and maintain different resistance genes.

  16. Clonal reproduction in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305–E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest. PMID:26195774

  17. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-11-20

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  18. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  19. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nosocomial infections in a tertiary-care facility: emergence of new clonal complexes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Senok, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Al-Saedan, R; Somily, A

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continue to be reported. This study was carried out to characterize MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. MRSA isolates causing nosocomial infections (n = 117) obtained from 2009-2015 at a tertiary-care facility in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray (Alere Technologies, Jena, Germany). Fourteen clonal complexes (CC) were identified, with the most common being CC80 (n = 35), CC6 (n = 15), CC5 (n = 13) and CC22 (n = 12). With the exception of nine ST239 MRSA-III isolates, all others were of community-associated MRSA lineages. The following strains are identified for the first time in Saudi Arabia: ST8-MRSA-IV [PVL(+)/ACME(+)], USA300 (n = 1); ST72-MRSA-IV USA700 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-IV, [PVL(+)/edinA(+)], WA MRSA-121 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-V+SCCfus, WA MRSA-14/109 (n = 2), CC97-MRSA-IV, WA MRSA-54/63; CC2250/2277-MRSA-IV and WA MRSA-114. CC15-MRSA (n = 3) was identified for the first time in clinical infection in Saudi Arabia. None of the isolates harboured vancomycin resistance genes, while genes for resistance to mupirocin and quaternary ammonium compounds were found in one and nine isolates respectively. Fifty-seven isolates (48.7%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. While the staphylokinase (sak) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn) genes were present in over 95% of the isolates, only 37.6% had the chemotaxis-inhibiting protein (chp) gene. Increasing occurrence of community-acquired MRSA lineages plus emergence of pandemic and rare MRSA strains is occurring in our setting. Strict infection control practices are important to limit the dissemination of these MRSA strains.

  20. How Clonal Is Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Feil, Edward J.; Cooper, Jessica E.; Grundmann, Hajo; Robinson, D. Ashley; Enright, Mark C.; Berendt, Tony; Peacock, Sharon J.; Smith, John Maynard; Murphy, Michael; Spratt, Brian G.; Moore, Catrin E.; Day, Nicholas P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen and represents a growing public health burden owing to the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant clones, particularly within the hospital environment. Despite this, basic questions about the evolution and population biology of the species, particularly with regard to the extent and impact of homologous recombination, remain unanswered. We address these issues through an analysis of sequence data obtained from the characterization by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 334 isolates of S. aureus, recovered from a well-defined population, over a limited time span. We find no significant differences in the distribution of multilocus genotypes between strains isolated from carriers and those from patients with invasive disease; there is, therefore, no evidence from MLST data, which index variation within the stable “core” genome, for the existence of hypervirulent clones of this pathogen. Examination of the sequence changes at MLST loci during clonal diversification shows that point mutations give rise to new alleles at least 15-fold more frequently than does recombination. This contrasts with the naturally transformable species Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which alleles change between 5- and 10-fold more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that homologous recombination does contribute toward the evolution of this species over the long term. Finally, we note a striking excess of nonsynonymous substitutions in comparisons between isolates belonging to the same clonal complex compared to isolates belonging to different clonal complexes, suggesting that the removal of deleterious mutations by purifying selection may be relatively slow. PMID:12754228

  1. Enhancing cancer clonality analysis with integrative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is understood that cancer is a clonal disease initiated by a single cell, and that metastasis, which is the spread of cancer from the primary site, is also initiated by a single cell. The seemingly natural capability of cancer to adapt dynamically in a Darwinian manner is a primary reason for therapeutic failures. Survival advantages may be induced by cancer therapies and also occur as a result of inherent cell and microenvironmental factors. The selected "more fit" clones outmatch their competition and then become dominant in the tumor via propagation of progeny. This clonal expansion leads to relapse, therapeutic resistance and eventually death. The goal of this study is to develop and demonstrate a more detailed clonality approach by utilizing integrative genomics. Methods Patient tumor samples were profiled by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and RNA-seq on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 and methylation profiling was performed on the Illumina Infinium 450K array. STAR and the Haplotype Caller were used for RNA-seq processing. Custom approaches were used for the integration of the multi-omic datasets. Results Reported are major enhancements to CloneViz, which now provides capabilities enabling a formal tumor multi-dimensional clonality analysis by integrating: i) DNA mutations, ii) RNA expressed mutations, and iii) DNA methylation data. RNA and DNA methylation integration were not previously possible, by CloneViz (previous version) or any other clonality method to date. This new approach, named iCloneViz (integrated CloneViz) employs visualization and quantitative methods, revealing an integrative genomic mutational dissection and traceability (DNA, RNA, epigenetics) thru the different layers of molecular structures. Conclusion The iCloneViz approach can be used for analysis of clonal evolution and mutational dynamics of multi-omic data sets. Revealing tumor clonal complexity in an integrative and quantitative manner facilitates improved mutational

  2. Dissemination of blaKPC-2 by the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae clonal complex 258 clones (ST258, ST11, ST437) and plasmids (IncFII, IncN, IncL/M) among Enterobacteriaceae species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo Neves; Curiao, Tânia; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Longo, Juliana Mucedola; Clímaco, Eduardo Carneiro; Martinez, Roberto; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Basile-Filho, Aníbal; Evaristo, Marco Antônio; Del Peloso, Pedro F; Ribeiro, Vanessa Bley; Barth, Afonso Luis; Paula, Milena Cristina; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Darini, Ana Lúcia da Costa; Coque, Teresa M

    2011-07-01

    This article reports the spread of bla(KPC-2) in the Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro states, facilitated by globally spread K. pneumoniae clonal complex 258 (CC258) clones (ST258, ST11, and ST437) and a diversity of plasmids (IncFII, IncN, and IncL/M, two untypeable plasmids carrying Tn4401a or Tn4401b) successfully disseminated among species of the Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii). It also constitutes the first description of sequence type 258 (ST258) in Brazil, which was associated with a nosocomial hospital outbreak in Ribeirao Preto city.

  3. Hot Isostatic Pressing/Heat Treatment of Cast Superalloy AF2-1DA, Radial Turbine Wheels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    showing typical 19 shrinkage porosity Mag: 400X Etch: Electrolytic oxalic acid 10 Microstructure of HIPped AF2-1DA alloy 29 Mag: 400X Etch...Electrolytic oxalic acid 11 Microstructure of HIPped AF2-1DA alloy note 30 void formations form incipient melting after 2250OF hip Mag: 400X Etch: Electrolytic... oxalic acid V a.w LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued) Figure Title Page 12 Microstructure of HIPped AF2-1DA showing effects 31 of solution heat

  4. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling

  5. Clonality Testing in Veterinary Medicine: A Review With Diagnostic Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Keller, S M; Vernau, W; Moore, P F

    2016-07-01

    The accurate distinction of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations can present challenges. Given the different prognoses and treatment strategies, a correct diagnosis is crucial. Molecular clonality assays assess rearranged lymphocyte antigen receptor gene diversity and can help differentiate reactive from neoplastic lymphoid proliferations. Molecular clonality assays are commonly used to assess atypical, mixed, or mature lymphoid proliferations; small tissue fragments that lack architecture; and fluid samples. In addition, clonality testing can be utilized to track neoplastic clones over time or across anatomic sites. Molecular clonality assays are not stand-alone tests but useful adjuncts that follow clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic assessment. Even though clonality testing provides valuable information in a variety of situations, the complexities and pitfalls of this method, as well as its dependency on the experience of the interpreter, are often understated. In addition, a lack of standardized terminology, laboratory practices, and interpretational guidelines hinders the reproducibility of clonality testing across laboratories in veterinary medicine. The objectives of this review are twofold. First, the review is intended to familiarize the diagnostic pathologist or interested clinician with the concepts, potential pitfalls, and limitations of clonality testing. Second, the review strives to provide a basis for future harmonization of clonality testing in veterinary medicine by providing diagnostic guidelines.

  6. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the "semiclonal model" or of "epidemic clonality," demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model.

  7. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Thomas C; Peralta, Eigen R; Aarreberg, Lauren D; Gao, Nina J; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as "central" interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, "peripheral" interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly of RNA

  8. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  9. The population genetics of clonal and partially clonal diploids.

    PubMed Central

    Balloux, François; Lehmann, Laurent; de Meeûs, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The consequences of variable rates of clonal reproduction on the population genetics of neutral markers are explored in diploid organisms within a subdivided population (island model). We use both analytical and stochastic simulation approaches. High rates of clonal reproduction will positively affect heterozygosity. As a consequence, nearly twice as many alleles per locus can be maintained and population differentiation estimated as F(ST) value is strongly decreased in purely clonal populations as compared to purely sexual ones. With increasing clonal reproduction, effective population size first slowly increases and then points toward extreme values when the reproductive system tends toward strict clonality. This reflects the fact that polymorphism is protected within individuals due to fixed heterozygosity. Contrarily, genotypic diversity smoothly decreases with increasing rates of clonal reproduction. Asexual populations thus maintain higher genetic diversity at each single locus but a lower number of different genotypes. Mixed clonal/sexual reproduction is nearly indistinguishable from strict sexual reproduction as long as the proportion of clonal reproduction is not strongly predominant for all quantities investigated, except for genotypic diversities (both at individual loci and over multiple loci). PMID:12930767

  10. Xylella fastidiosa CoDiRO strain associated with the olive quick decline syndrome in southern Italy belongs to a clonal complex of the subspecies pauca that evolved in Central America.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterium transmitted by xylem-fluid-feeding Hemiptera insects, causes economic losses of both woody and herbaceous plant species. A Xyl. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain, namely CoDiRO, was recently found to be associated with the 'olive quick decline syndrome' in southern Italy (i.e. Apulia region). Recently, some Xyl. fastidiosa strains intercepted in France from Coffea spp. plant cuttings imported from Central and South America were characterized. The introduction of infected plant material from Central America in Apulia was also postulated even though an ad hoc study to confirm this hypothesis is lacking. In the present study, we assessed the complete and draft genome of 27 Xyl. fastidiosa strains. Through a genome-wide approach, we confirmed the occurrence of three subspecies within Xyl. fastidiosa, namely fastidiosa, multiplex and pauca, and demonstrated the occurrence of a genetic clonal complex of four Xyl. fastidiosa strains belonging to subspecies pauca which evolved in Central America. The CoDiRO strain displayed 13 SNPs when compared with a strain isolated in Costa Rica from Coffea sp. and 32 SNPs when compared with two strains obtained from Nerium oleander in Costa Rica. These results support the close relationships of the two strains. The four strains in the clonal complex contain prophage-like genes in their genomes. This study strongly supports the possibility of the introduction of Xyl. fastidiosa in southern Italy via coffee plants grown in Central America. The data also stress how the current global circulation of agricultural commodities potentially threatens the agrosystems worldwide.

  11. RNA structure replaces the need for U2AF2 in splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Ling; Taggart, Allison J.; Lim, Kian Huat; Cygan, Kamil J.; Ferraris, Luciana; Creton, Robbert; Huang, Yen-Tsung; Fairbrother, William G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure plays an integral role in catalytic, ribosomal, small nuclear, micro, and transfer RNAs. Discovering a prevalent role for secondary structure in pre-mRNAs has proven more elusive. By utilizing a variety of computational and biochemical approaches, we present evidence for a class of nuclear introns that relies upon secondary structure for correct splicing. These introns are defined by simple repeat expansions of complementary AC and GT dimers that co-occur at opposite boundaries of an intron to form a bridging structure that enforces correct splice site pairing. Remarkably, this class of introns does not require U2AF2, a core component of the spliceosome, for its processing. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this mechanism was present in the ancestral vertebrate lineage prior to the divergence of tetrapods from teleosts. While largely lost from land dwelling vertebrates, this class of introns is found in 10% of all zebrafish genes. PMID:26566657

  12. RNA structure replaces the need for U2AF2 in splicing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ling; Taggart, Allison J; Lim, Kian Huat; Cygan, Kamil J; Ferraris, Luciana; Creton, Robbert; Huang, Yen-Tsung; Fairbrother, William G

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure plays an integral role in catalytic, ribosomal, small nuclear, micro, and transfer RNAs. Discovering a prevalent role for secondary structure in pre-mRNAs has proven more elusive. By utilizing a variety of computational and biochemical approaches, we present evidence for a class of nuclear introns that relies upon secondary structure for correct splicing. These introns are defined by simple repeat expansions of complementary AC and GT dimers that co-occur at opposite boundaries of an intron to form a bridging structure that enforces correct splice site pairing. Remarkably, this class of introns does not require U2AF2, a core component of the spliceosome, for its processing. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this mechanism was present in the ancestral vertebrate lineage prior to the divergence of tetrapods from teleosts. While largely lost from land dwelling vertebrates, this class of introns is found in 10% of all zebrafish genes.

  13. Emergence of carbapenem non-susceptible multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains of clonal complexes 103(B) and 92(B) harboring OXA-type carbapenemases and metallo-β-lactamases in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Saranathan, Rajagopalan; Vasanth, Vaidyanathan; Vasanth, Thamodharan; Shabareesh, Pidathala Raghavendra Venkata; Shashikala, P; Devi, Chandrakesan Sheela; Kalaivani, Ramakrishnan; Asir, Johny; Sudhakar, Pagal; Prashanth, K

    2015-05-01

    The molecular epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii obtained from a south Indian tertiary care hospital were investigated by repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Analysis of resistant determinants was achieved by PCR screening for the presence of genes encoding OXA-carbapenemases, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and efflux pumps. REP-PCR generated around eight clusters of high heterogeneity; of these, two major clusters (I and V) appeared to be clonal in origin. Analysis of representative isolates from different clusters by MLST revealed that most of the isolates belonged to sequence type 103 of CC103(B) . Second most prevalent ST belonged to clonal complex (CC) 92(B) which is also referred to as international clone II. Most of the isolates were multi-drug resistant, being susceptible only to polymyxin-B and newer quinolones. Class D β-lactamases such as blaOXA-51-like (100%), blaOXA-23-like (56.8%) and blaOXA-24-like (14.8%) were found to be predominant, followed by a class B β-lactamase, namely blaIMP-1 (40.7%); none of the isolates had blaOXA-58 like, blaNDM-1 or blaSIM-1 . Genes of efflux-pump adeABC were predominant, most of isolates being biofilm producers that were PCR-positive for autoinducer synthase gene (>94%). Carbapenem non-susceptible isolates were highly diverse and present throughout the hospital irrespective of type of ward or intensive care unit. Although previous reports have documented diverse resistant mechanisms in A. baumannii, production of MBL and OXA-type of carbapenamases were found to be the predominant mechanism(s) of carbapenem resistance identified in strains isolated from Southern India.

  14. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited

    PubMed Central

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the “semiclonal model” or of “epidemic clonality,” demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model. PMID:26195766

  15. The clonal origin and clonal evolution of epithelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sergio Britto; Novelli, Marco; Wright, Nicholas A

    2000-01-01

    While the origin of tumours, whether from one cell or many, has been a source of fascination for experimental oncologists for some time, in recent years there has been a veritable explosion of information about the clonal architecture of tumours and their antecedents, stimulated, in the main, by the ready accessibility of new molecular techniques. While most of these new results have apparently confirmed the monoclonal origin of human epithelial (and other) tumours, there are a significant number of studies in which this conclusion just cannot be made. Moreover, analysis of many articles show that the potential impact of such considerations as patch size and clonal evolution on determinations of clonality have largely been ignored, with the result that a number of these studies are confounded. However, the clonal architecture of preneoplastic lesions provide some interesting insights — many lesions which might have been hitherto regarded as hyperplasias are apparently clonal in derivation. If this is indeed true, it calls into some question our hopeful corollary that a monoclonal origin presages a neoplastic habitus. Finally, it is clear, for many reasons, that methods of analysis which involve the disaggregation of tissues, albeit microdissected, are far from ideal and we should be putting more effort into techniques where the clonal architecture of normal tissues, preneoplastic and preinvasive lesions and their derivative tumours can be directly visualized in situ. PMID:10762440

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius Strain AF2, a Producer of Cellulose, Isolated from Kombucha Tea

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; González-García, Laura Natalia; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius strain AF2, which was isolated from Kombucha tea and is capable of producing cellulose, although at lower levels compared to another bacterium from the same environment, K. rhaeticus strain AF1. PMID:26634755

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius Strain AF2, a Producer of Cellulose, Isolated from Kombucha Tea.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; González-García, Laura Natalia; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Goldman, Gustavo H; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M

    2015-12-03

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Komagataeibacter intermedius strain AF2, which was isolated from Kombucha tea and is capable of producing cellulose, although at lower levels compared to another bacterium from the same environment, K. rhaeticus strain AF1.

  18. Prenylation inhibitors stimulate both estrogen receptor α transcriptional activity through AF-1 and AF-2 and estrogen receptor β transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Cestac, Philippe; Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Médale-Giamarchi, Claire; Rochaix, Philippe; Balaguer, Patrick; Favre, Gilles; Faye, Jean-Charles; Doisneau-Sixou, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    Introduction We showed in a previous study that prenylated proteins play a role in estradiol stimulation of proliferation. However, these proteins antagonize the ability of estrogen receptor (ER) α to stimulate estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent transcriptional activity, potentially through the formation of a co-regulator complex. The present study investigates, in further detail, how prenylated proteins modulate the transcriptional activities mediated by ERα and by ERβ. Methods The ERE-β-globin-Luc-SV-Neo plasmid was either stably transfected into MCF-7 cells or HeLa cells (MELN cells and HELN cells, respectively) or transiently transfected into MCF-7 cells using polyethylenimine. Cells deprived of estradiol were analyzed for ERE-dependent luciferase activity 16 hours after estradiol stimulation and treatment with FTI-277 (a farnesyltransferase inhibitor) or with GGTI-298 (a geranylgeranyltransferase I inhibitor). In HELN cells, the effect of prenyltransferase inhibitors on luciferase activity was compared after transient transfection of plasmids coding either the full-length ERα, the full-length ERβ, the AF-1-deleted ERα or the AF-2-deleted ERα. The presence of ERα was then detected by immunocytochemistry in either the nuclei or the cytoplasms of MCF-7 cells. Finally, Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme treatment was used to determine the involvement of Rho proteins in ERE-dependent luciferase activity. Results FTI-277 and GGTI-298 only stimulate ERE-dependent luciferase activity in stably transfected MCF-7 cells. They stimulate both ERα-mediated and ERβ-mediated ERE-dependent luciferase activity in HELN cells, in the presence of and in the absence of estradiol. The roles of both AF-1 and AF-2 are significant in this effect. Nuclear ERα is decreased in the presence of prenyltransferase inhibitors in MCF-7 cells, again in the presence of and in the absence of estradiol. By contrast, cytoplasmic ERα is mainly decreased after treatment with FTI

  19. Activation function 2 (AF-2) of retinoic acid receptor and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor: presence of a conserved autonomous constitutive activating domain and influence of the nature of the response element on AF-2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, B; Saunders, M; Gaudon, C; Roy, B; Losson, R; Chambon, P

    1994-01-01

    A motif essential for the transcriptional activation function 2 (AF-2) present in the E region of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) alpha has been characterized as an amphipathic alpha-helix whose main features are conserved between transcriptionally active members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This conserved motif, which can activate autonomously in the absence of ligand in animal and yeast cells, can be swapped between nuclear receptors without affecting the ligand dependency for activation of transcription, thus indicating that a ligand-dependent conformational change is necessary to reveal the AF-2 activation potential within the E region of the nuclear receptor. Interestingly, we show that the precise nature of the direct repeat response element to which RAR/RXR heterodimers are bound can affect the activity of the AF-2s of the heterodimeric partners, as well as the relative efficiency with which all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids activate the RAR partner. Images PMID:7957103

  20. Impact of clonal competition for peptide-MHC complexes on the CD8[superscript +] T-cell repertoire selection in a persistent viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, Katherine K.; Fulton, Zara; Cooper, Leanne; Silins, Sharon L.; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Miles, John J.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-04-29

    CD8{sup +} T-cell responses to persistent viral infections are characterized by the accumulation of an oligoclonal T-cell repertoire and a reduction in the naive T-cell pool. However, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains elusive. Here we show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8{sup +} T cells recognizing distinct epitopes from the pp65 protein and restricted through an identical HLA class I allele (HLA B*3508) exhibited either a highly conserved public T-cell repertoire or a private, diverse T-cell response, which was uniquely altered in each donor following in vitro antigen exposure. Selection of a public T-cell receptor (TCR) was coincident with an atypical major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide structure, in that the epitope adopted a helical conformation that bulged from the peptide-binding groove, while a diverse TCR profile was observed in response to the epitope that formed a flatter, more 'featureless' landscape. Clonotypes with biased TCR usage demonstrated more efficient recognition of virus-infected cells, a greater CD8 dependency, and were more terminally differentiated in their phenotype when compared with the T cells expressing diverse TCR. These findings provide new insights into our understanding on how the biology of antigen presentation in addition to the structural features of the pMHC-I might shape the T-cell repertoire and its phenotype.

  1. The Emergence and Spread of Multiple Livestock-Associated Clonal Complex 398 Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains among Animals and Humans in the Republic of Ireland, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gráinne I.; Abbott, Yvonne; Burns, Aisling; Leonard, Finola; McManus, Brenda A.; O’Connell, Brian; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex (CC) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are associated with carriage and infection among animals and humans but only a single case of CC398 MRSA has been reported in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). The present study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CC398 MRSA (n = 22) and MSSA (n = 10) from animals and humans in the ROI from 2010–2014. Isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarray profiling and PCR for CC398-associated resistance genes. All MRSA underwent SCCmec IV or V subtyping. Four distinct CC398-MRSA incidents were identified from (i) a man in a nursing home (spa type t011-SCCmec IVa, immune evasion complex (IEC) negative), (ii) a horse and veterinarian who had recently travelled to Belgium (t011-IVa, IEC positive), (iii) pigs (n = 9) and farm workers (n = 9) on two farms, one which had been restocked with German gilts and the other which was a finisher farm (t034-VT, IEC negative, 3/9 pigs; t011- VT, IEC negative, 6/9 pigs & 9/9 farm workers), and (iv) a child who had worked on a pig farm in the UK (t034-VT, IEC negative). Isolates also carried different combinations of multiple resistance genes including erm(A), erm(B), tet(K), tet(M) & tet(L), fexA, spc, dfrG, dfrK aacA-aphD and aadD further highlighting the presence of multiple CC398-MRSA strains. CC398 MSSA were recovered from pigs (n = 8) and humans (n = 2). CC398 MSSA transmission was identified among pigs but zoonotic transmission was not detected with animal and human isolates exhibiting clade-specific traits. This study highlights the importation and zoonotic spread of CC398 MRSA in the ROI and the spread of CC398 MSSA among pigs. Increased surveillance is warranted to prevent further CC398 MRSA importation and spread in a country that was considered CC398 MRSA free. PMID:26886749

  2. The Emergence and Spread of Multiple Livestock-Associated Clonal Complex 398 Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Strains among Animals and Humans in the Republic of Ireland, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Gráinne I; Abbott, Yvonne; Burns, Aisling; Leonard, Finola; McManus, Brenda A; O'Connell, Brian; Coleman, David C; Shore, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Clonal complex (CC) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are associated with carriage and infection among animals and humans but only a single case of CC398 MRSA has been reported in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). The present study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CC398 MRSA (n = 22) and MSSA (n = 10) from animals and humans in the ROI from 2010-2014. Isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarray profiling and PCR for CC398-associated resistance genes. All MRSA underwent SCCmec IV or V subtyping. Four distinct CC398-MRSA incidents were identified from (i) a man in a nursing home (spa type t011-SCCmec IVa, immune evasion complex (IEC) negative), (ii) a horse and veterinarian who had recently travelled to Belgium (t011-IVa, IEC positive), (iii) pigs (n = 9) and farm workers (n = 9) on two farms, one which had been restocked with German gilts and the other which was a finisher farm (t034-VT, IEC negative, 3/9 pigs; t011-VT, IEC negative, 6/9 pigs & 9/9 farm workers), and (iv) a child who had worked on a pig farm in the UK (t034-VT, IEC negative). Isolates also carried different combinations of multiple resistance genes including erm(A), erm(B), tet(K), tet(M) & tet(L), fexA, spc, dfrG, dfrK aacA-aphD and aadD further highlighting the presence of multiple CC398-MRSA strains. CC398 MSSA were recovered from pigs (n = 8) and humans (n = 2). CC398 MSSA transmission was identified among pigs but zoonotic transmission was not detected with animal and human isolates exhibiting clade-specific traits. This study highlights the importation and zoonotic spread of CC398 MRSA in the ROI and the spread of CC398 MSSA among pigs. Increased surveillance is warranted to prevent further CC398 MRSA importation and spread in a country that was considered CC398 MRSA free.

  3. Endovascular Infections Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Are Linked to Clonal Complex-Specific Alterations in Binding and Invasion Domains of Fibronectin-Binding Protein A as Well as the Occurrence of fnbB

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan Q.; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K.; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N.; Fowler, Vance G.; Rude, Thomas; DiBartola, Alex C.; Lins, Roberto D.; Abdel-Hady, Wessam; Bayer, Arnold S.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus involve interactions with fibronectin present as extracellular matrix or surface ligand on host cells. We examined the expression, structure, and binding activity of the two major S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPA, FnBPB) in 10 distinct, methicillin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with either persistent or resolving bacteremia. The persistent bacteremia isolates (n = 5) formed significantly stronger bonds with immobilized fibronectin as determined by dynamic binding measurements performed with atomic force microscopy. Several notable differences were also observed when the results were grouped by clonal complex 5 (CC5) strains (n = 5) versus CC45 strains (n = 5). Fibronectin-binding receptors on CC5 formed stronger bonds with immobilized fibronectin (P < 0.001). The fnbA gene was expressed at higher levels in CC45, whereas fnbB was found in only CC5 isolates. The fnbB gene was not sequenced because all CC45 isolates lacked this gene. Instead, comparisons were made for fnbA, which was present in all 10 isolates. Sequencing of fnbA revealed discrete differences within high-affinity, fibronectin-binding repeats (FnBRs) of FnBPA that included (i) 5-amino-acid polymorphisms in FnBR-9, FnBR-10, and FnBR-11 involving charged or polar side chains, (ii) an extra, 38-amino-acid repeat inserted between FnBR-9 and FnBR-10 exclusively seen in CC45 isolates, and (iii) CC5 isolates had the SVDFEED epitope in FnBR-11 (a sequence shown to be essential for fibronectin binding), while this sequence was replaced in all CC45 isolates with GIDFVED (a motif known to favor host cell invasion at the cost of reduced fibronectin binding). These complementary sequence and binding data suggest that differences in fnbA and fnbB, particularly polymorphisms and duplications in FnBPA, give S. aureus two distinct advantages in human endovascular infections: (i) FnBPs similar to that of CC5 enhance ligand binding and

  4. Endovascular infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are linked to clonal complex-specific alterations in binding and invasion domains of fibronectin-binding protein A as well as the occurrence of fnbB.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan Q; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Fowler, Vance G; Rude, Thomas; DiBartola, Alex C; Lins, Roberto D; Abdel-Hady, Wessam; Lower, Steven K; Bayer, Arnold S

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus involve interactions with fibronectin present as extracellular matrix or surface ligand on host cells. We examined the expression, structure, and binding activity of the two major S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPA, FnBPB) in 10 distinct, methicillin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with either persistent or resolving bacteremia. The persistent bacteremia isolates (n = 5) formed significantly stronger bonds with immobilized fibronectin as determined by dynamic binding measurements performed with atomic force microscopy. Several notable differences were also observed when the results were grouped by clonal complex 5 (CC5) strains (n = 5) versus CC45 strains (n = 5). Fibronectin-binding receptors on CC5 formed stronger bonds with immobilized fibronectin (P < 0.001). The fnbA gene was expressed at higher levels in CC45, whereas fnbB was found in only CC5 isolates. The fnbB gene was not sequenced because all CC45 isolates lacked this gene. Instead, comparisons were made for fnbA, which was present in all 10 isolates. Sequencing of fnbA revealed discrete differences within high-affinity, fibronectin-binding repeats (FnBRs) of FnBPA that included (i) 5-amino-acid polymorphisms in FnBR-9, FnBR-10, and FnBR-11 involving charged or polar side chains, (ii) an extra, 38-amino-acid repeat inserted between FnBR-9 and FnBR-10 exclusively seen in CC45 isolates, and (iii) CC5 isolates had the SVDFEED epitope in FnBR-11 (a sequence shown to be essential for fibronectin binding), while this sequence was replaced in all CC45 isolates with GIDFVED (a motif known to favor host cell invasion at the cost of reduced fibronectin binding). These complementary sequence and binding data suggest that differences in fnbA and fnbB, particularly polymorphisms and duplications in FnBPA, give S. aureus two distinct advantages in human endovascular infections: (i) FnBPs similar to that of CC5 enhance ligand binding and

  5. Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Awasaki, Takeshi; Schroeder, Mark David; Long, Fuhui; Yang, Jacob S.; He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Wu, Gloria Yueh-Yi; Peng, Hanchuan; Myers, Gene; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. Results By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often co-innervate the same local neuropil(s) and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. Conclusions These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain. PMID:23541733

  6. Clonality-climate relationships along latitudinal gradient across China: adaptation of clonality to environments.

    PubMed

    Ye, Duo; Hu, Yukun; Song, Minghua; Pan, Xu; Xie, Xiufang; Liu, Guofang; Ye, Xuehua; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Plant clonality, the ability of a plant species to reproduce itself vegetatively through ramets (shoot-root units), occurs in many plant species and is considered to be more frequent in cold or wet environments. However, a deeper understanding on the clonality-climate relationships along large geographic gradients is still scarce. In this study we revealed the clonality-climate relationships along latitudinal gradient of entire China spanning from tropics to temperate zones using clonality data for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities. Structural equation modeling (SEM) showed that, in general, the preponderance of clonality increased along the latitudinal gradient towards cold, dry or very wet environments. However, the distribution of clonality in China was significantly but only weakly correlated with latitude and four climatic factors (mean annual temperature, temperature seasonality, mean annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality). Clonality of woody and herbaceous species had opposite responses to climatic variables. More precisely, woody clonality showed higher frequency in wet or climatically stable environments, while herbaceous clonality preferred cold, dry or climatically instable environments. Unexplained variation in clonality may be owed to the influences of other environmental conditions and to different clonal strategies and underlying traits adopted by different growth forms and phylogenetic lineages. Therefore, in-depth research in terms of more detailed clonal growth form, phylogeny and additional environmental variables are encouraged to further understand plant clonality response to climatic and/or edaphic conditions.

  7. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist “mate finding,” particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants. PMID:26195747

  8. Clonality as a driver of spatial genetic structure in populations of clonal tree species.

    PubMed

    Dering, Monika; Chybicki, Igor Jerzy; Rączka, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Random genetic drift, natural selection and restricted gene dispersal are basic factors of the spatial genetic structure (SGS) in plant populations. Clonal reproduction has a profound effect on population dynamics and genetic structure and thus emerges as a potential factor in contributing to and modelling SGS. In order to assess the impact of clonality on SGS we studied clonal structure and SGS in the population of Populus alba. Six hundred and seventy-two individuals were mapped and genotyped with 16 nuclear microsatellite markers. To answer the more general question regarding the relationship between SGS and clonality we used Sp statistics, which allows for comparisons of the extent of SGS among different studies, and the comparison of published data on SGS in clonal and non-clonal tree species. Sp statistic was extracted for 14 clonal and 27 non-clonal species belonging to 7 and 18 botanical families, respectively. Results of genetic investigations conducted in the population of P. alba showed over-domination of clonal reproduction, which resulted in very low clonal diversity (R = 0.12). Significant SGS was found at both ramet (Sp = 0.095) and genet level (Sp = 0.05) and clonal reproduction was indicated as an important but not sole driving factor of SGS. Within-population structure, probably due to family structure also contributed to high SGS. High mean dominance index (D = 0.82) indicated low intermingling among genets. Literature survey revealed that clonal tree species significantly differ from non-clonal species with respect to SGS, having 2.8-fold higher SGS. This led us to conclude that clonality is a life-history trait that can have deep impact on processes acting in populations of clonal tree species leading to significant SGS.

  9. Ecological Consequences of Clonal Integration in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenghong; Liu, Jian; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Clonal plants are widespread throughout the plant kingdom and dominate in diverse habitats. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environment is pervasive at multiple scales, even at scales relevant to individual plants. Clonal integration refers to resource translocation and information communication among the ramets of clonal plants. Due to clonal integration, clonal plant species possess a series of peculiar attributes: plasticity in response to local and non-local conditions, labor division with organ specialization for acquiring locally abundant resources, foraging behavior by selective placement of ramets in resource-rich microhabitats, and avoidance of intraclonal competition. Clonal integration has very profound ecological consequences for clonal plants. It allows them to efficiently cope with environmental heterogeneity, by alleviating local resource shortages, buffering environmental stresses and disturbances, influencing competitive ability, increasing invasiveness, and altering species composition and invasibility at the community level. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of research on the ecological consequences of plant clonal integration based on a large body of literature. We also attempt to propose perspectives for future research. PMID:27446093

  10. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  11. Clonal Integration Enhances the Performance of a Clonal Plant Species under Soil Alkalinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil. PMID:25790352

  12. Clonal integration enhances the performance of a clonal plant species under soil alkalinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Yang, Gaowen; Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil.

  13. How clonal are human mitochondria?

    PubMed Central

    Eyre-Walker, A; Smith, N H; Smith, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees constructed using human mitochondrial sequences contain a large number of homoplasies. These are due either to repeated mutation or to recombination between mitochondrial lineages. We show that a tree constructed using synonymous variation in the protein coding sequences of 29 largely complete human mitochondrial molecules contains 22 homoplasies at 32 phylogenetically informative sites. This level of homoplasy is very unlikely if inheritance is clonal, even if we take into account base composition bias. There must either be 'hypervariable' sites or recombination between mitochondria. We present evidence which suggests that hypervariable sites do not exist in our data. It therefore seems likely that recombination has occurred between mitochondrial lineages in humans. PMID:10189711

  14. Complementary DNA cloning, sequence analysis, and tissue transcription profile of a novel U2AF2 gene from the Chinese Banna mini-pig inbred line.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Huo, J L; Miao, Y W; Cheng, W M; Zeng, Y Z

    2013-04-02

    U2 small nuclear RNA auxiliary factor 2 (U2AF2) is an important gene for pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher eukaryotes. In this study, the Banna mini-pig inbred line (BMI) U2AF2 coding sequence (CDS) was cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The U2AF2 complete CDS was amplified using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique based on the conserved sequence information of cattle and known highly homologous swine expressed sequence tags. This novel gene was deposited into the National Center for Biotechnology Information database (Accession No. JQ839267). Sequence analysis revealed that the BMI U2AF2 coding sequence consisted of 1416 bp and encoded 471 amino acids with a molecular weight of 53.12 kDa. The protein sequence has high sequence homology with U2AF65 of 6 species - Homo sapiens (100%), Equus caballus (100%), Canis lupus (100%), Macaca mulatta (99.8%), Bos taurus (74.4%), and Mus musculus (74.4%). The phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that BMI U2AF65 has a closer genetic relationship with B. taurus U2AF65 than with U2AF65 of E. caballus, C. lupus, M. mulatta, H. sapiens, and M. musculus. RT-PCR analysis showed that BMI U2AF2 was most highly expressed in the brain; moderately expressed in the spleen, lung, muscle, and skin; and weakly expressed in the liver, kidney, and ovary. Its expression was nearly silent in the spinal cord, nerve fiber, heart, stomach, pancreas, and intestine. Three microRNA target sites were predicted in the CDS of BMI U2AF2 messenger RNA. Our results establish a foundation for further insight into this swine gene.

  15. Differential ligand-dependent interactions between the AF-2 activating domain of nuclear receptors and the putative transcriptional intermediary factors mSUG1 and TIF1.

    PubMed Central

    vom Baur, E; Zechel, C; Heery, D; Heine, M J; Garnier, J M; Vivat, V; Le Douarin, B; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1996-01-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system we report the isolation of a novel mouse protein, mSUG1, that interacts with retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) both in yeast cells and in vitro in a ligand- and AF-2 activating domain (AF-2 AD)-dependent manner and show that it is a structural and functional homologue of the essential yeast protein SUG1. mSUG1 also efficiently interacts with other nuclear receptors, including oestrogen (ER), thyroid hormone (TR), Vitamin D3 (VDR) and retinoid X (RXR) receptors. By comparing the interaction properties of these receptors with mSUG1 and TIF1, we demonstrate that: (i) RXR alpha efficiently interacts with TIF1, but not with mSUG1, whereas TR alpha interacts much more efficiently with mSUG1 than with TIF1, and RAR alpha, VDR and ER efficiently interact with mSUG1 and TIF1; (ii) the amphipathic alpha-helix core of the AF-2 AD is differentially involved in interactions of RAR alpha with mSUG1 and TIF1; (iii) the AF-2 AD cores of RAR alpha and ER are similarly involved in their interaction with TIF1, but not with mSUG1. Thus, the interaction interfaces between the different receptors and either mSUG1 or TIF1 may vary depending on the nature of the receptor and the putative mediator of its AF-2 function. We discuss the possibility that mSUG1 and TIF1 may mediate the transcriptional activity of the AF-2 of nuclear receptors through different mechanisms. Images PMID:8598193

  16. PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

    2012-07-26

    Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

  17. Epigenetic Memory as a Basis for Intelligent Behavior in Clonal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Latzel, Vít; Rendina González, Alejandra P.; Rosenthal, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally induced epigenetic change enables plants to remember past environmental interactions. If this memory capability is exploited to prepare plants for future challenges, it can provide a basis for highly sophisticated behavior, considered intelligent by some. Against the backdrop of an overview of plant intelligence, we hypothesize: (1) that the capability of plants to engage in such intelligent behavior increases with the additional level of complexity afforded by clonality, and; (2) that more faithful inheritance of epigenetic information in clonal plants, in conjunction with information exchange and coordination between connected ramets, is likely to enable especially advanced intelligent behavior in this group. We therefore further hypothesize that this behavior provides ecological and evolutionary advantages to clonal plants, possibly explaining, at least in part, their widespread success. Finally, we suggest avenues of inquiry to enable assessing intelligent behavior and the role of epigenetic memory in clonal species. PMID:27630664

  18. Epigenetic Memory as a Basis for Intelligent Behavior in Clonal Plants.

    PubMed

    Latzel, Vít; Rendina González, Alejandra P; Rosenthal, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally induced epigenetic change enables plants to remember past environmental interactions. If this memory capability is exploited to prepare plants for future challenges, it can provide a basis for highly sophisticated behavior, considered intelligent by some. Against the backdrop of an overview of plant intelligence, we hypothesize: (1) that the capability of plants to engage in such intelligent behavior increases with the additional level of complexity afforded by clonality, and; (2) that more faithful inheritance of epigenetic information in clonal plants, in conjunction with information exchange and coordination between connected ramets, is likely to enable especially advanced intelligent behavior in this group. We therefore further hypothesize that this behavior provides ecological and evolutionary advantages to clonal plants, possibly explaining, at least in part, their widespread success. Finally, we suggest avenues of inquiry to enable assessing intelligent behavior and the role of epigenetic memory in clonal species.

  19. Enforced Clonality Confers a Fitness Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Jana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    In largely clonal plants, splitting of a maternal plant into potentially independent plants (ramets) is usually spontaneous; however, such fragmentation also occurs in otherwise non-clonal species due to application of external force. This process might play an important yet largely overlooked role for otherwise non-clonal plants by providing a mechanism to regenerate after disturbance. Here, in a 5-year garden experiment on two short-lived, otherwise non-clonal species, Barbarea vulgaris and Barbarea stricta, we compared the fitness of plants fragmented by simulated disturbance (“enforced ramets”) both with plants that contemporaneously originate in seed and with individuals unscathed by the disturbance event. Because the ability to regrow from fragments is related to plant age and stored reserves, we compared the effects of disturbance applied during three different ontogenetic stages of the plants. In B. vulgaris, enforced ramet fitness was higher than the measured fitness values of both uninjured plants and plants established from seed after the disturbance. This advantage decreased with increasing plant age at the time of fragmentation. In B. stricta, enforced ramet fitness was lower than or similar to fitness of uninjured plants and plants grown from seed. Our results likely reflect the habitat preferences of the study species, as B. vulgaris occurs in anthropogenic, disturbed habitats where body fragmentation is more probable and enforced clonality thus more advantageous than in the more natural habitats preferred by B. stricta. Generalizing from our results, we see that increased fitness yielded by enforced clonality would confer an evolutionary advantage in the face of disturbance, especially in habitats where a seed bank has not been formed, e.g., during invasion or colonization. Our results thus imply that enforced clonality should be taken into account when studying population dynamics and life strategies of otherwise non-clonal species in disturbed

  20. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies from WHT/AF2-WYFFOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Lewis, J.; Hartke, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present preliminary results from our chemo-dynamical survey of two Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, Draco and Ursa Minor. The two galaxies have similar radial velocities and reside in close proximity in the outskirts of the Milky Way halo, yet exhibit noteworthy differences in their morphologies. We obtained spectroscopic data with AF2-WYFFOS on the WHT for several hundred red-giant-branch (RGB) candidates in each galaxy out to its tidal radius, from which we have identified approximately 100 velocity members in each system. Metallicities are determined for the individual RGB stars using the Ca II triplet lines. Whereas Ursa Minor shows an RGB population of well-mixed metallicities, a clear gradient is observed in Draco, in which the outer regions host stars of lower [Fe/H]. Such differences may be a reflection of their differing morphologies, with Ursa Minor having been tidally stirred to give rise to both its highly elongated shape and a more mixed [Fe/H] distribution.

  1. Evidence for impaired retinoic acid receptor-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2 cofactor activity in human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moghal, N; Neel, B G

    1995-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is required for normal airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. One of the earliest events following the exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to RA is the strong induction of RA receptor beta (RAR beta) mRNA. Previous work established that many lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors display abnormal RAR beta mRNA expression, most often absence or weak expression of the RAR beta 2 isoform, even after RA treatment. Restoration of RAR beta 2 into RAR beta-negative lung cancer cell lines has been reported to inhibit tumorigenicity. Since RAR beta 2 inactivation may contribute to lung cancer, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of defective RAR beta 2 expression. Nuclear run-on assays and transient transfections with RAR beta 2 promoter constructs indicate the presence of trans-acting transcriptional defects in most lung cancer cell lines, which map to the RA response element (RARE). These defects cannot be complemented by RAR-retinoid X receptor cotransfection and can be separated into two types: (i) one affecting transcription from direct repeat RAREs, but not palindromic RAREs, and (ii) another affecting transcription from both types of RARE. Studies using chimeras between RAR alpha, TR alpha, and other transcription factors suggest the existence of novel RAR-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2-specific cofactors, which are necessary for high levels of transcription. Furthermore, these factors may be frequently inactivated in human lung cancer. PMID:7791800

  2. Clinical impact of clonal and subclonal TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nadeu, Ferran; Delgado, Julio; Royo, Cristina; Baumann, Tycho; Stankovic, Tatjana; Pinyol, Magda; Jares, Pedro; Navarro, Alba; Martín-García, David; Beà, Sílvia; Salaverria, Itziar; Oldreive, Ceri; Aymerich, Marta; Suárez-Cisneros, Helena; Rozman, Maria; Villamor, Neus; Colomer, Dolors; López-Guillermo, Armando; González, Marcos; Alcoceba, Miguel; Terol, Maria José; Colado, Enrique; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Enjuanes, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have revealed the complex clonal heterogeneity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The acquisition and selection of genomic aberrations may be critical to understanding the progression of this disease. In this study, we have extensively characterized the mutational status of TP53, SF3B1, BIRC3, NOTCH1, and ATM in 406 untreated CLL cases by ultra-deep next-generation sequencing, which detected subclonal mutations down to 0.3% allele frequency. Clonal dynamics were examined in longitudinal samples of 48 CLL patients. We identified a high proportion of subclonal mutations, isolated or associated with clonal aberrations. TP53 mutations were present in 10.6% of patients (6.4% clonal, 4.2% subclonal), ATM mutations in 11.1% (7.8% clonal, 1.3% subclonal, 2% germ line mutations considered pathogenic), SF3B1 mutations in 12.6% (7.4% clonal, 5.2% subclonal), NOTCH1 mutations in 21.8% (14.2% clonal, 7.6% subclonal), and BIRC3 mutations in 4.2% (2% clonal, 2.2% subclonal). ATM mutations, clonal SF3B1, and both clonal and subclonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter time to first treatment irrespective of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region gene (IGHV) mutational status. Clonal and subclonal TP53 and clonal NOTCH1 mutations predicted for shorter overall survival together with the IGHV mutational status. Clonal evolution in longitudinal samples mainly occurred in cases with mutations in the initial samples and was observed not only after chemotherapy but also in untreated patients. These findings suggest that the characterization of the subclonal architecture and its dynamics in the evolution of the disease may be relevant for the management of CLL patients. PMID:26837699

  3. Advances for Studying Clonal Evolution in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Wendl, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The “clonal evolution” model of cancer emerged and “evolved” amid ongoing advances in technology, especially in recent years during which next generation sequencing instruments have provided ever higher resolution pictures of the genetic changes in cancer cells and heterogeneity in tumors. It has become increasingly clear that clonal evolution is not a single sequential process, but instead frequently involves simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones that co-exist because they are of similar fitness or are spatially separated. Co-evolution of subclones also occurs when they complement each other’s survival advantages. Recent studies have also shown that clonal evolution is highly heterogeneous: different individual tumors of the same type may undergo very different paths of clonal evolution. New methodological advancements, including deep digital sequencing of a mixed tumor population, single cell sequencing, and the development of more sophisticated computational tools, will continue to shape and reshape the models of clonal evolution. In turn, these will provide both an improved framework for the understanding of cancer progression and a guide for treatment strategies aimed at the elimination of all, rather than just some, of the cancer cells within a patient. PMID:23353056

  4. The N-terminal part of TIF1, a putative mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function (AF-2) of nuclear receptors, is fused to B-raf in the oncogenic protein T18.

    PubMed Central

    Le Douarin, B; Zechel, C; Garnier, J M; Lutz, Y; Tora, L; Pierrat, P; Heery, D; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) bound to response elements mediate the effects of cognate ligands on gene expression. Their ligand-dependent activation function, AF-2, presumably acts on the basal transcription machinery through intermediary proteins/mediators. We have isolated a mouse nuclear protein, TIF1, which enhances RXR and RAR AF-2 in yeast and interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with several NRs in yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in vitro. Remarkably, these interactions require the amino acids constituting the AF-2 activating domain conserved in all active NRs. Moreover, the oestrogen receptor (ER) AF-2 antagonist hydroxytamoxifen cannot promote ER-TIF1 interaction. We propose that TIF1, which contains several conserved domains found in transcriptional regulatory proteins, is a mediator of ligand-dependent AF-2. Interestingly, the TIF1 N-terminal moiety is fused to B-raf in the mouse oncoprotein T18. Images PMID:7744009

  5. Phenotypic plasticity and specialization in clonal versus non-clonal plants: A data synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlioglu, Fatih; Bonser, Stephen P.

    2016-11-01

    Reproductive strategies can be associated with ecological specialization and generalization. Clonal plants produce lineages adapted to the maternal habitat that can lead to specialization. However, clonal plants frequently display high phenotypic plasticity (e.g. clonal foraging for resources), factors linked to ecological generalization. Alternately, sexual reproduction can be associated with generalization via increasing genetic variation or specialization through rapid adaptive evolution. Moreover, specializing to high or low quality habitats can determine how phenotypic plasticity is expressed in plants. The specialization hypothesis predicts that specialization to good environments results in high performance trait plasticity and specialization to bad environments results in low performance trait plasticity. The interplay between reproductive strategies, phenotypic plasticity, and ecological specialization is important for understanding how plants adapt to variable environments. However, we currently have a poor understanding of these relationships. In this study, we addressed following questions: 1) Is there a relationship between phenotypic plasticity, specialization, and reproductive strategies in plants? 2) Do good habitat specialists express greater performance trait plasticity than bad habitat specialists? We searched the literature for studies examining plasticity for performance traits and functional traits in clonal and non-clonal plant species from different habitat types. We found that non-clonal (obligate sexual) plants expressed greater performance trait plasticity and functional trait plasticity than clonal plants. That is, non-clonal plants exhibited a specialist strategy where they perform well only in a limited range of habitats. Clonal plants expressed less performance loss across habitats and a more generalist strategy. In addition, specialization to good habitats did not result in greater performance trait plasticity. This result was

  6. Role of the essential yeast protein PSU1 in p6anscriptional enhancement by the ligand-dependent activation function AF-2 of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudon, C; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) can function as ligandinducible transregulators in both mammalian and yeast cells, indicating that important features of transcriptional control have been conserved throughout evolution. We report here the isolation and characterization of an essential yeast protein of unknown function, PSU1, which exhibits properties expected for a co-activator/mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function AF-2 present in the ligand-binding domain (LBD, region E) of NRs. PSU1 interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with the LBD of several NRs, including retinoic acid (RARalpha), retinoid X (RXRalpha), thyroid hormone (TRalpha), vitamin D3 (VDR) and oestrogen (ERalpha) receptors. Importantly, both in yeast and in vitro, these interactions require the integrity of the AF-2 activating domain. When tethered to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, PSU1 can activate transcription on its own. By using yeast reporter cells that express PSU1 conditionally, we show that PSU1 is required for transactivation by the AF-2 of ERalpha. Taken together these data suggest that in yeast, PSU1 is involved in ligand-dependent transactivation by NRs. Sequence analysis revealed that in addition to a highly conserved motif found in a family of MutT-related proteins, PSU1 contains several alpha-helical leucine-rich motifs sharing the consensus sequence LLxPhiL (x, any amino acid; Phi, hydrophobic amino acid) in regions that elicit either transactivation or NR-binding activity. PMID:10205176

  7. Stochastic simulation of clonal growth in the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima.

    PubMed

    Cain, M L; Pacala, S W; Silander, J A

    1991-12-01

    As clonal plants grow they move through space. The movement patterns that result can be complex and difficult to interpret without the aid of models. We developed a stochastic simulation model of clonal growth in the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima. Our model was calibrated with field data on the clonal expansion of both seedlings and established clones, and model assumptions were verified by statistical analyses.When simulations were based on empirical distributions with long rhizome lengths, there was greater dispersal, less leaf overlap, and less spatial aggregation than when simulations were based on distributions with comparatively short rhizome lengths. For the field data that we utilized, variation in rhizome lengths had a greater effect than variation for either branching angles or "rhizome initiation points" (see text). We also found that observed patterns of clonal growth in S. altissima did not cause the formation of "fairy rings". However, simulations with an artificial distribution of branching angles demonstrate that "fairy rings" can result solely from a plant's clonal morphology.Stochastic simulation models that incorporated variation in rhizome lengths, branching angles, and rhizome initiation points produced greater dispersal and less leaf overlap than deterministic models. Thus, variation for clonal growth parameters may increase the efficiency of substrate exploration by increasing the area covered and by decreasing the potential for intraclonal competition. We also demonstrated that ramet displacements were slightly, but consistently lower in stochastic simulation models than in random-walk models. This difference was due to the incorporation of details on rhizome bud initiation into stochastic simulation models, but not random-walk models. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of deterministic, stochastic simulation, and random-walk models of clonal growth.

  8. Evolutionary perspectives on clonal reproduction in vertebrate animals.

    PubMed

    Avise, John C

    2015-07-21

    A synopsis is provided of different expressions of whole-animal vertebrate clonality (asexual organismal-level reproduction), both in the laboratory and in nature. For vertebrate taxa, such clonal phenomena include the following: human-mediated cloning via artificial nuclear transfer; intergenerational clonality in nature via parthenogenesis and gynogenesis; intergenerational hemiclonality via hybridogenesis and kleptogenesis; intragenerational clonality via polyembryony; and what in effect qualifies as clonal replication via self-fertilization and intense inbreeding by simultaneous hermaphrodites. Each of these clonal or quasi-clonal mechanisms is described, and its evolutionary genetic ramifications are addressed. By affording an atypical vantage on standard vertebrate reproduction, clonality offers fresh perspectives on the evolutionary and ecological significance of recombination-derived genetic variety.

  9. Evolutionary perspectives on clonal reproduction in vertebrate animals

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.

    2015-01-01

    A synopsis is provided of different expressions of whole-animal vertebrate clonality (asexual organismal-level reproduction), both in the laboratory and in nature. For vertebrate taxa, such clonal phenomena include the following: human-mediated cloning via artificial nuclear transfer; intergenerational clonality in nature via parthenogenesis and gynogenesis; intergenerational hemiclonality via hybridogenesis and kleptogenesis; intragenerational clonality via polyembryony; and what in effect qualifies as clonal replication via self-fertilization and intense inbreeding by simultaneous hermaphrodites. Each of these clonal or quasi-clonal mechanisms is described, and its evolutionary genetic ramifications are addressed. By affording an atypical vantage on standard vertebrate reproduction, clonality offers fresh perspectives on the evolutionary and ecological significance of recombination-derived genetic variety. PMID:26195735

  10. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol A.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST clusters were congruent with MLST-defined clonal groups, which had various degrees of diversity at the whole-genome level. Notably, cgMLST could distinguish among outbreak strains and epidemiologically unrelated strains of the same clonal group, which could not be achieved using classic MLST schemes. The precise selection of cgMLST gene targets may not be critical for the general identification of clonal groups and outbreak strains. cgMLST analyses further identified outbreak strains, including those associated with recent outbreaks linked to contaminated French-style cheese, Hispanic-style cheese, stone fruit, caramel apple, ice cream, and packaged leafy green salad, as belonging to major clonal groups. We further developed lineage-specific cgMLST schemes, which can include accessory genes when core genomes do not possess sufficient diversity, and this provided additional resolution over species-specific cgMLST. Analyses of isolates from different common-source listeriosis outbreaks revealed various degrees of diversity, indicating that the numbers of allelic differences should always be combined with cgMLST clustering and epidemiological evidence to define a listeriosis outbreak. IMPORTANCE Classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting internal fragments of 6 to 8 genes that define clonal complexes or epidemic clones have been widely employed to study L. monocytogenes biodiversity and its relation to pathogenicity potential and epidemiology. We demonstrated

  11. Clonal Architecture of Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Defined by Single-Cell Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Andrew E. O.; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Miller, Christopher A.; Fulton, Robert; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Eades, William C.; Elliott, Kevin; Heath, Sharon; Westervelt, Peter; Ding, Li; Conrad, Donald F.; White, Brian S.; Shao, Jin; Link, Daniel C.; DiPersio, John F.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been used to infer the clonality of heterogeneous tumor samples. These analyses yield specific predictions—the population frequency of individual clones, their genetic composition, and their evolutionary relationships—which we set out to test by sequencing individual cells from three subjects diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia, each of whom had been previously characterized by whole genome sequencing of unfractionated tumor samples. Single-cell mutation profiling strongly supported the clonal architecture implied by the analysis of bulk material. In addition, it resolved the clonal assignment of single nucleotide variants that had been initially ambiguous and identified areas of previously unappreciated complexity. Accordingly, we find that many of the key assumptions underlying the analysis of tumor clonality by deep sequencing of unfractionated material are valid. Furthermore, we illustrate a single-cell sequencing strategy for interrogating the clonal relationships among known variants that is cost-effective, scalable, and adaptable to the analysis of both hematopoietic and solid tumors, or any heterogeneous population of cells. PMID:25010716

  12. Clonal architecture of secondary acute myeloid leukemia defined by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew E O; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Miller, Christopher A; Fulton, Robert; Fulton, Lucinda L; Eades, William C; Elliott, Kevin; Heath, Sharon; Westervelt, Peter; Ding, Li; Conrad, Donald F; White, Brian S; Shao, Jin; Link, Daniel C; DiPersio, John F; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J; Walter, Matthew J; Graubert, Timothy A

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been used to infer the clonality of heterogeneous tumor samples. These analyses yield specific predictions-the population frequency of individual clones, their genetic composition, and their evolutionary relationships-which we set out to test by sequencing individual cells from three subjects diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia, each of whom had been previously characterized by whole genome sequencing of unfractionated tumor samples. Single-cell mutation profiling strongly supported the clonal architecture implied by the analysis of bulk material. In addition, it resolved the clonal assignment of single nucleotide variants that had been initially ambiguous and identified areas of previously unappreciated complexity. Accordingly, we find that many of the key assumptions underlying the analysis of tumor clonality by deep sequencing of unfractionated material are valid. Furthermore, we illustrate a single-cell sequencing strategy for interrogating the clonal relationships among known variants that is cost-effective, scalable, and adaptable to the analysis of both hematopoietic and solid tumors, or any heterogeneous population of cells.

  13. 'Sharpe', a clonal plum rootstock for peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sharpe clonal rootstock for peach is jointly released for grower trial by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA), and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Sharpe, previously tested as FLA1-1, was discovered in the wild and appears to be a hybrid of Chickas...

  14. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Cancer.gov

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  15. Clonal Interference in the Evolution of Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Strelkowa, Natalja; Lässig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal influenza A virus undergoes rapid evolution to escape human immune response. Adaptive changes occur primarily in antigenic epitopes, the antibody-binding domains of the viral hemagglutinin. This process involves recurrent selective sweeps, in which clusters of simultaneous nucleotide fixations in the hemagglutinin coding sequence are observed about every 4 years. Here, we show that influenza A (H3N2) evolves by strong clonal interference. This mode of evolution is a red queen race between viral strains with different beneficial mutations. Clonal interference explains and quantifies the observed sweep pattern: we find an average of at least one strongly beneficial amino acid substitution per year, and a given selective sweep has three to four driving mutations on average. The inference of selection and clonal interference is based on frequency time series of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which are obtained from a sample of influenza genome sequences over 39 years. Our results imply that mode and speed of influenza evolution are governed not only by positive selection within, but also by background selection outside antigenic epitopes: immune adaptation and conservation of other viral functions interfere with each other. Hence, adapting viral proteins are predicted to be particularly brittle. We conclude that a quantitative understanding of influenza’s evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics must be based on all genomic domains and functions coupled by clonal interference. PMID:22851649

  16. Punctuated Copy Number Evolution and Clonal Stasis in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruli; Davis, Alexander; McDonald, Thomas O.; Sei, Emi; Shi, Xiuqing; Wang, Yong; Tsai, Pei-Ching; Casasent, Anna; Waters, Jill; Zhang, Hong; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Michor, Franziska; Navin, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of breast cancer; however, our knowledge of how these complex genomic rearrangements evolve during tumorigenesis is limited. In this study we developed a highly multiplexed single-nucleus-sequencing method to investigate copy number evolution in triple-negative breast cancer patients. We sequenced 1000 single cells from 12 patients and identified 1–3 major clonal subpopulations in each tumor that shared a common evolutionary lineage. We also identified a minor subpopulation of non-clonal cells that were classified as: 1) metastable, 2) pseudo-diploid, or 3) chromazemic. Phylogenetic analysis and mathematical modeling suggest that these data are unlikely to be explained by the gradual accumulation of copy number events over time. In contrast, our data challenge the paradigm of gradual evolution, showing that the majority of copy number aberrations are acquired at the earliest stages of tumor evolution, in short punctuated bursts, followed by stable clonal expansions that form the tumor mass. PMID:27526321

  17. How Past and Present Influence the Foraging of Clonal Plants?

    PubMed Central

    Louâpre, Philipe; Bittebière, Anne-Kristel; Clément, Bernard; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Mony, Cendrine

    2012-01-01

    Clonal plants spreading horizontally and forming a network structure of ramets exhibit complex growth patterns to maximize resource uptake from the environment. They respond to spatial heterogeneity by changing their internode length or branching frequency. Ramets definitively root in the soil but stay interconnected for a varying period of time thus allowing an exchange of spatial and temporal information. We quantified the foraging response of clonal plants depending on the local soil quality sampled by the rooting ramet (i.e. the present information) and the resource variability sampled by the older ramets (i.e. the past information). We demonstrated that two related species, Potentilla reptans and P. anserina, responded similarly to the local quality of their environment by decreasing their internode length in response to nutrient-rich soil. Only P. reptans responded to resource variability by decreasing its internode length. In both species, the experience acquired by older ramets influenced the plastic response of new rooted ramets: the internode length between ramets depended not only on the soil quality locally sampled but also on the soil quality previously sampled by older ramets. We quantified the effect of the information perceived at different time and space on the foraging behavior of clonal plants by showing a non-linear response of the ramet rooting in the soil of a given quality. These data suggest that the decision to grow a stolon or to root a ramet at a given distance from the older ramet results from the integration of the past and present information about the richness and the variability of the environment. PMID:22675539

  18. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  19. Consequences of clonality for sexual fitness: Clonal expansion enhances fitness under spatially restricted dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Van Drunen, Wendy E.; van Kleunen, Mark; Dorken, Marcel E.

    2015-01-01

    Clonality is a pervasive feature of sessile organisms, but this form of asexual reproduction is thought to interfere with sexual fitness via the movement of gametes among the modules that comprise the clone. This within-clone movement of gametes is expected to reduce sexual fitness via mate limitation of male reproductive success and, in some cases, via the production of highly inbred (i.e., self-fertilized) offspring. However, clonality also results in the spatial expansion of the genetic individual (i.e., genet), and this should decrease distances gametes and sexually produced offspring must travel to avoid competing with other gametes and offspring from the same clone. The extent to which any negative effects of clonality on mating success might be offset by the positive effects of spatial expansion is poorly understood. Here, we develop spatially explicit models in which fitness was determined by the success of genets through their male and female sex functions. Our results indicate that clonality serves to increase sexual fitness when it is associated with the outward expansion of the genet. Our models further reveal that the main fitness benefit of clonal expansion might occur through the dispersal of offspring over a wider area compared with nonclonal phenotypes. We conclude that, instead of interfering with sexual reproduction, clonal expansion should often serve to enhance sexual fitness. PMID:26195748

  20. Serogroup and Clonal Characterization of Czech Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Strains Isolated from 1971 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jandova, Zuzana; Musilek, Martin; Vackova, Zuzana; Kozakova, Jana; Krizova, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Background This study presents antigenic and genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis strains recovered from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in the Czech Republic in 1971–2015. Material and Methods A total of 1970 isolates from IMD, referred to the National Reference Laboratory for Meningococcal Infections in 1971–2015, were studied. All isolates were identified and characterized by conventional biochemical and serological tests. Most isolates (82.5%) were characterized by multilocus sequence typing method. Results In the study period 1971–2015, the leading serogroup was B (52.4%), most often assigned to clonal complexes cc32, cc41/44, cc18, and cc269. A significant percentage of strains were of serogroup C (41.4%), with high clonal homogeneity due to hyperinvasive complex cc11, which played an important role in IMD in the Czech Republic in the mid-1990s. Serogroup Y isolates, mostly assigned to cc23, and isolates of clonally homogeneous serogroup W have also been recovered more often over the last years. Conclusion The incidence of IMD and distribution of serogroups and clonal complexes of N. meningitidis in the Czech Republic varied over time, as can be seen from the long-term monitoring, including molecular surveillance data. Data from the conventional and molecular IMD surveillance are helpful in refining the antimeningococcal vaccination strategy in the Czech Republic. PMID:27936105

  1. Single-cell mutational profiling and clonal phylogeny in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Nicola E.; Ermini, Luca; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Vijayaraghavan, Gowri; Titley, Ian; Ford, Anthony; Campbell, Peter; Kearney, Lyndal; Greaves, Mel

    2013-01-01

    The development of cancer is a dynamic evolutionary process in which intraclonal, genetic diversity provides a substrate for clonal selection and a source of therapeutic escape. The complexity and topography of intraclonal genetic architectures have major implications for biopsy-based prognosis and for targeted therapy. High-depth, next-generation sequencing (NGS) efficiently captures the mutational load of individual tumors or biopsies. But, being a snapshot portrait of total DNA, it disguises the fundamental features of subclonal variegation of genetic lesions and of clonal phylogeny. Single-cell genetic profiling provides a potential resolution to this problem, but methods developed to date all have limitations. We present a novel solution to this challenge using leukemic cells with known mutational spectra as a tractable model. DNA from flow-sorted single cells is screened using multiplex targeted Q-PCR within a microfluidic platform allowing unbiased single-cell selection, high-throughput, and comprehensive analysis for all main varieties of genetic abnormalities: chimeric gene fusions, copy number alterations, and single-nucleotide variants. We show, in this proof-of-principle study, that the method has a low error rate and can provide detailed subclonal genetic architectures and phylogenies. PMID:24056532

  2. Determinants of Daphnia clonal diversity in lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasa, J.; Mort, M.

    1987-07-01

    Populations of Daphnia show high clonal diversity in large lakes. Hypothetically, this diversity may be maintained by either intrinsic population mechanisms such as reproductive strategies or by structuring properties of habitat such as heterogeneity and associated scale differences. To discriminate between these two classes of factors the authors have applied a predictive hierarchichal model to clone data from 9 northern German lakes (46 clones; N=1236). The model operated reliably by using ecological ranges (a course measure of heterogeneity) of taxa. Concordance of observed patterns and predictions of the model would favor the heterogeneity hypothesis, while the opposite result would suggest greater influence of population-based mechanisms in explaining clonal diversity/abundance patterns. The results of their analysis point towards habitat heterogeneity as the dominant determinant of diversity and abundance structure of Daphnia populations in lakes.

  3. Clonal Astrocytic Response to Cortical Injury

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Llaves, Raúl; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are a heterogeneous population of glial cells with multifaceted roles in the central nervous system. Recently, the new method for the clonal analysis Star Track evidenced the link between astrocyte heterogeneity and lineage. Here, we tested the morphological response to mechanical injury of clonally related astrocytes using the Star Track approach, which labels each cell lineage with a specific code of colors. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses at 7 days post injury revealed a variety of morphological changes that were different among distinct clones. In many cases, cells of the same clone responded equally to the injury, suggesting the dependence on their genetic codification (intrinsic response). However, in other cases cells of the same clone responded differently to the injury, indicating their response to extrinsic factors. Thus, whereas some clones exhibited a strong morphological alteration or a high proliferative response to the injury, other clones located at similar distances to the lesion were apparently unresponsive. Concurrence of different clonal responses to the injury reveals the importance of the development determining the astrocyte features in response to brain injuries. These features should be considered to develop therapies that affect glial function. PMID:24040158

  4. AF-2 activity and recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to the estrogen receptor depend on a lysine residue conserved in nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Henttu, P M; Kalkhoven, E; Parker, M G

    1997-01-01

    Hormone-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors depends on the presence of a conserved C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix (helix 12) in the ligand-binding domain. Here we show that a lysine residue, which is conserved in most nuclear receptors in the predicted helix 3, is also required for estrogen-dependent transactivation. The replacement of lysine 366 with alanine appreciably reduced activation function 2 (AF-2) activity without affecting steroid- or DNA-binding activity in the mouse estrogen receptor. The mutation dramatically reduced the ability of the receptor to bind steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) but had no effect on receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP-140) binding, indicating that while their sites of interaction overlap, they are not entirely consistent and in keeping with the proposal that the recruitment of coactivators, such as SRC-1, is required for AF-2 activity. Although the function of RIP-140 remains to be established, RIP-140 appears to be capable of recruiting the basal transcription machinery, since overexpression of the protein markedly increased the transcriptional activity of the mutant receptor. Since the lysine residue is conserved, we propose that it is required, together with residues in helix 12, to form the surface by which members of the nuclear receptor family interact with coactivators. PMID:9121431

  5. Intratumor diversity and clonal evolution in cancer--a skeptical standpoint.

    PubMed

    Gisselsson, David

    2011-01-01

    Clonal evolution in cancer is intimately linked to the concept of intratumor cellular diversity, as the latter is a prerequisite for Darwinian selection at the micro-level. It has been frequently suggested in the literature that clonal evolution can be promoted by an elevated rate of mutation in tumor cells, so-called genomic instability, the mechanisms of which are now becoming increasingly well characterized. However, several issues need clarification before the presumably complex relationship between mutation rate, intratumor diversity, and clonal evolution can be understood sufficiently well to translate into models that predict the course of tumor disease. In particular, it has to be clarified which of the proposed mechanisms for genomic instability that are able to generate daughter cells with sufficient viability to form novel clones, how clones with different genomic changes differ phenotypically from each other, and what the selective forces are that guide competition among diverse clones in different microenvironments. Furthermore, standardized measurements of mutation rates at the chromosome level, as well as genotypic and phenotypic diversity, are essential to compare data from different studies. Finally, the relationship between clonal variation brought about by genomic instability, on the one hand, and cellular differentiation hierarchies, on the other hand, should be explored to put genomic instability in the context of the tumor stem cell hypothesis.

  6. Current Approaches and Future Perspectives for In Vivo Clonal Tracking of Hematopoietic Cells.

    PubMed

    Scala, Serena; Leonardelli, Lorena; Biasco, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, clonal tracking has gained the center stage as a unique technology capable to unveil population dynamics and hierarchical relationships in vivo. We here highlighted the main open questions related to the in vivo clonal behavior of hematopoietic cells with a particular focus on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and T cells as main targets of cell- and gene-therapies. We walked through the current methods applied for tracing in vivo dynamics and functions of hematopoietic cells in animal models and we described the results of early studies conducted on humans. We specifically focused our attention on the recent use of retroviral/lentiviral vector Integration Site (IS) analyses to follow stably marked clones and their progeny in vivo. We showed how this molecular tracking method can be successfully employed in human studies to unveil the clonal behavior of hematopoietic cells, describing pioneering works conducted on samples from gene therapy treated patients. Clonal tracking through IS identification still comes with a complex wet-experimental protocol and technical/analytical constraints. In this regard, we reviewed the features of the available computational tools for the identification and quantification of ISs and we highlighted the potential future improvements of IS-based tracking, as this technology is becoming a major source of information on in vivo fate and survival of engineered cells in humans.

  7. Genetic variation in fitness within a clonal population of a plant RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Héctor; Elena, Santiago F

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing observation in evolutionary virology is that RNA virus populations are highly polymorphic, composed by a mixture of genotypes whose abundances in the population depend on complex interaction between fitness differences, mutational coupling and genetic drift. It was shown long ago, though in cell cultures, that most of these genotypes had lower fitness than the population they belong, an observation that explained why single-virion passages turned on Muller's ratchet while very large population passages resulted in fitness increases in novel environments. Here we report the results of an experiment specifically designed to evaluate in vivo the fitness differences among the subclonal components of a clonal population of the plant RNA virus tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV). Over 100 individual biological subclones from a TEV clonal population well adapted to the natural tobacco host were obtained by infectivity assays on a local lesion host. The replicative fitness of these subclones was then evaluated during infection of tobacco relative to the fitness of large random samples taken from the starting clonal population. Fitness was evaluated at increasing number of days post-inoculation. We found that at early days, the average fitness of subclones was significantly lower than the fitness of the clonal population, thus confirming previous observations that most subclones contained deleterious mutations. However, as the number of days of viral replication increases, population size expands exponentially, more beneficial and compensatory mutations are produced, and selection becomes more effective in optimizing fitness, the differences between subclones and the population disappeared.

  8. Effects of patch contrast and arrangement on benefits of clonal integration in a rhizomatous clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of light and soil water resources usually spatially co-vary in natural habitats, and the spatial pattern of such co-variation may affect the benefits of physiological integration between connected ramets of clonal plants. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew connected or disconnected ramet pairs [consisting of a proximal (relatively old) and a distal (relative young) ramet] of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica in four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal vs. parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch contrast (high vs. low contrast of light and water). Biomass of the proximal part, distal part and clonal fragment of I. japonica were all significantly greater in the intact than in the severed treatment, in the parallel than in the reciprocal patchiness treatment and in the high than in the low contrast treatment, but the effect of severing the connection between ramet pairs did not depend on patch arrangement or contrast. Severing the connection decreased number of ramets of the distal part and the clonal fragment in the parallel patchiness arrangement, but not in the reciprocal patchiness arrangement. Therefore, the spatial arrangement of resource patches can alter the effects of clonal integration on asexual reproduction in I. japonica. PMID:27759040

  9. Differential Clonal Expansion in an Invading Cell Population: Clonal Advantage or Dumb Luck?

    PubMed

    Newgreen, Donald F; Zhang, Dongcheng; Cheeseman, Bevan L; Binder, Benjamin J; Landman, Kerry A

    2017-01-01

    In neoplastic cell growth, clones and subclones are variable both in size and mutational spectrum. The largest of these clones are believed to represent those cells with mutations that make them the most "fit," in a Darwinian sense, for expansion in their microenvironment. Thus, the degree of quantitative clonal expansion is regarded as being determined by innate qualitative differences between the cells that originate each clone. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling and clonal labelling experiments applied to the developmental model system of the forming enteric nervous system, we describe how cells which are qualitatively identical may consistently produce clones of dramatically different sizes: most clones are very small while a few clones we term "superstars" contribute most of the cells to the final population. The basis of this is minor stochastic variations ("luck") in the timing and direction of movement and proliferation of individual cells, which builds a local advantage for daughter cells that is cumulative. This has potentially important consequences. In cancers, especially before strongly selective cytotoxic therapy, the assumption that the largest clones must be the cells with deterministic proliferative ability may not always hold true. In development, the gradual loss of clonal diversity as "superstars" take over the population may erode the resilience of the system to somatic mutations, which may have occurred early in clonal growth.

  10. Extensive clonal spread and extreme longevity in saw palmetto, a foundation clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuki K; Horner, Liana M; Kubota, Toshiro; Keller, Nathan A; Abrahamson, Warren G

    2011-09-01

    The lack of effective tools has hampered out ability to assess the size, growth and ages of clonal plants. With Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) as a model, we introduce a novel analytical framework that integrates DNA fingerprinting and mathematical modelling to simulate growth and estimate ages of clonal plants. We also demonstrate the application of such life-history information of clonal plants to provide insight into management plans. Serenoa is an ecologically important foundation species in many Southeastern United States ecosystems; yet, many land managers consider Serenoa a troublesome invasive plant. Accordingly, management plans have been developed to reduce or eliminate Serenoa with little understanding of its life history. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms, we genotyped 263 Serenoa and 134 Sabal etonia (a sympatric non-clonal palmetto) samples collected from a 20 × 20 m study plot in Florida scrub. Sabal samples were used to assign small field-unidentifiable palmettos to Serenoa or Sabal and also as a negative control for clone detection. We then mathematically modelled clonal networks to estimate genet ages. Our results suggest that Serenoa predominantly propagate via vegetative sprouts and 10,000-year-old genets may be common, while showing no evidence of clone formation by Sabal. The results of this and our previous studies suggest that: (i) Serenoa has been part of scrub associations for thousands of years, (ii) Serenoa invasion are unlikely and (ii) once Serenoa is eliminated from local communities, its restoration will be difficult. Reevaluation of the current management tools and plans is an urgent task.

  11. Kin Recognition in a Clonal Fish, Poecilia formosa

    PubMed Central

    Makowicz, Amber M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can distinguish between different clonal lineages, associating with genetically identical, sister clones, and use multiple sensory modalities. Also, they scale their aggressive behaviors according to the relatedness to other females: they are more aggressive to non-related clones. Our results demonstrate that even in species with very small genetic differences between individuals, kin recognition can be adaptive. Their discriminatory abilities and regulation of costly behaviors provides a powerful example of natural selection in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:27483372

  12. Clonal Evolution Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis Transformed to Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Daniel A.C.; Miller, Christopher A.; McLellan, Michael D.; Fulton, Robert S.; Moore, Deborah M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Oh, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal architecture in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is poorly understood. Here we report genomic analyses of a patient with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) transformed to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on PMF and sAML diagnosis samples, with skin included as a germline surrogate. Deep sequencing validation was performed on the WGS samples and an additional sample obtained during sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Clustering analysis of 649 validated somatic single nucleotide variants revealed four distinct clonal groups, each including putative driver mutations. The first group (including JAK2 and U2AF1), representing the founding clone, included mutations with high frequency at all three disease stages. The second clonal group (including MYB) was present only in PMF, suggesting the presence of a clone that was dispensable for transformation. The third group (including ASXL1) contained mutations with low frequency in PMF and high frequency in subsequent samples, indicating evolution of the dominant clone with disease progression. The fourth clonal group (including IDH1 and RUNX1) was acquired at sAML transformation and was predominantly absent at sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Taken together, these findings illustrate the complex clonal dynamics associated with disease evolution in MPNs and sAML. PMID:25252869

  13. Antioxidant activities from different rosemary clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lan; Narasimhamoorthy, Brindha; Zhao, Liuqing; Greaves, John A; Schroeder, William D

    2016-06-15

    Rosemary extract is widely used in food industry and carnosic acid is reported to be the major component that is responsible for its antioxidant activities. However, it is unclear how the numerous plant metabolites interact and contribute to the overall antioxidant activity. In this study, with poultry fat as the model food system, rosemary extract from six clonal lines were evaluated that each represented a different genetic variant. As expected, rosemary extract with higher carnosic acid content had higher antioxidant activity. However, rosemary extract which had carnosic acid removed retained a significant amount of activity. Furthermore, when the individual contributions of carnosic acid and the portion without carnosic acid were evaluated separately, neither was shown to be responsible for the overall level of its stabilization effect from rosemary extract as a whole entity. The interactions among different plant metabolites have a major impact on the overall antioxidant capabilities of rosemary extract.

  14. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis implies a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Chassain, Benoît; Lemée, Ludovic; Didi, Jennifer; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Brisse, Sylvain; Pons, Jean-Louis; Pestel-Caron, Martine

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is recognized as one of the major pathogenic species within the genus Staphylococcus, even though it belongs to the coagulase-negative group. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 87 S. lugdunensis isolates from various clinical and geographic sources by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, dat, ddl, gmk, ldh, recA, and yqiL). The number of alleles ranged from four (gmk and ldh) to nine (yqiL). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 20 different sequence types (STs) and five clonal complexes. The 20 STs lacked correlation with geographic source. Isolates recovered from hematogenic infections (blood or osteoarticular isolates) or from skin and soft tissue infections did not cluster in separate lineages. Penicillin-resistant isolates clustered mainly in one clonal complex, unlike glycopeptide-tolerant isolates, which did not constitute a distinct subpopulation within S. lugdunensis. Phylogenies from the sequences of the seven individual housekeeping genes were congruent, indicating a predominantly mutational evolution of these genes. Quantitative analysis of the linkages between alleles from the seven loci revealed a significant linkage disequilibrium, thus confirming a clonal population structure for S. lugdunensis. This first MLST scheme for S. lugdunensis provides a new tool for investigating the macroepidemiology and phylogeny of this unusually virulent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus.

  15. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-08

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  16. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the infarcted lymph node syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Belding, P J; Feddersen, R M; Lutz, C T; Goeken, J A; Kemp, J D; Dick, F R

    1991-07-01

    The authors report a case of complete lymph node infarction in which a specific etiology could not be determined by morphologic or immunophenotypic studies; however, clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin gene was demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization of DNA extracted from the necrotic tissue. A subsequent lymph node biopsy later was diagnosed as malignant lymphoma, using morphologic, immunophenotypic and genotypic criteria. Identical clonally rearranged bands were present in DNA from both the infarcted nodal and the subsequent tissue biopsies. In the setting of lymph node necrosis, gene rearrangement studies may provide diagnostic information concerning clonality, even if morphologic and immunophenotypic studies are indeterminate for a lymphoproliferative process.

  17. Effects of clonal integration on the invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides under heterogeneous and homogeneous water availability

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Liu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, living in heterogeneous or homogeneous habitats. To understand how clonal integration affects the performance of these plants in different habitat conditions, an 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted: ramet pairs of A. philoxeroides were grown in two habitats, either heterogeneous or homogeneous in water availability, with the stolon connections either severed or kept intact. Under heterogeneous water availability, compared with ramets in homogeneous habitats, clonal integration significantly promoted the growth and photosynthetic performance of water-stressed apical ramets, whereas it only increased the photosynthetic performance but did not affect the growth of water-stressed basal ramets. Moreover, clonal integration markedly increased the root/shoot ratios of ramets grown in habitats with high water supply but decreased it under low water availability. Under homogeneous water availability, stolon connection (clonal integration) did not influence the growth, photosynthetic performance and biomass allocation of water-stressed ramets, but it significantly promoted the growth of well-watered ramets in both apical and basal sections. These findings deepen our understanding of the bidirectional and differentiated (mainly acropetal) clonal integration of A. philoxeroides, suggesting that the invasive plant A. philoxeroides can benefit from clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats. PMID:27416868

  18. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    PubMed

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease.

  19. Clonal integration in Ludwigia hexapetala under different light regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological integration among ramets of invasive plant species may support their colonization and spread in novel aquatic environments where growth-limiting resources are spatially heterogeneous. Under contrasting light conditions, we investigated how clonal integration influences growth, biomass...

  20. Clonal Expansion (CE) Models in Cancer Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer arises when cells accumulate sufficient critical mutations. Carcinogens increase the probability of mutation during cell division or promote clonal expansion within stages. Multistage CE models recapitulate this process and provide a framework for incorporating relevant da...

  1. Breast Cancer Brain Metastases: Clonal Evolution in Clinical Context

    PubMed Central

    Saunus, Jodi M.; McCart Reed, Amy E.; Lim, Zhun Leong; Lakhani, Sunil R.

    2017-01-01

    Brain metastases are highly-evolved manifestations of breast cancer arising in a unique microenvironment, giving them exceptional adaptability in the face of new extrinsic pressures. The incidence is rising in line with population ageing, and use of newer therapies that stabilise metastatic disease burden with variable efficacy throughout the body. Historically, there has been a widely-held view that brain metastases do not respond to circulating therapeutics because the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) restricts their uptake. However, emerging data are beginning to paint a more complex picture where the brain acts as a sanctuary for dormant, subclinical proliferations that are initially protected by the BBB, but then exposed to dynamic selection pressures as tumours mature and vascular permeability increases. Here, we review key experimental approaches and landmark studies that have charted the genomic landscape of breast cancer brain metastases. These findings are contextualised with the factors impacting on clonal outgrowth in the brain: intrinsic breast tumour cell capabilities required for brain metastatic fitness, and the neural niche, which is initially hostile to invading cells but then engineered into a tumour-support vehicle by the successful minority. We also discuss how late detection, abnormal vascular perfusion and interstitial fluid dynamics underpin the recalcitrant clinical behaviour of brain metastases, and outline active clinical trials in the context of precision management. PMID:28098771

  2. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (<5%). Whole-genome sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (<12% diagnostic events were retained at recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  3. Clonal distribution of bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Katarzyna; Piórkowska, Anna; Kasprzyk, Joanna; Bronk, Marek; Świeć, Krystyna

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections (BSI) and diseases that may be caused by hematogenous spread. The staphylococcal adhesin, for which the association with the infections emerging as a complication of septicemia has been well documented, is a bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp). The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of a bbp gene in S. aureus bloodstream isolates associated with BSI and to investigate to what degree the distribution of this gene is linked to the clonality of the population. Spa typing, used in order to explore the genetic population structure of the isolates, yielded 29 types. Six spa clusters and seven singletons were identified. The most frequent was spa clonal complex CC021 associated with MLST CC30 (38%). The bbp gene was found in 47% of isolates. Almost all isolates (95%) clustered in spa clonal complex CC021 were positive for this gene. All isolates carrying the bbp gene were sensitive to methicillin, and if clustered in the spa CC021, belonged to agr group III. Our study shows that Bbp is not strictly associated with BSI. However, one may conclude that for clonally related S. aureus strains most commonly causing BSI, the risk of Bbp-mediated complications of septicemia is expected to be higher than for other strains.

  4. The population structure of Mycobacterium bovis in Great Britain: Clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Noel H.; Dale, James; Inwald, Jacqueline; Palmer, Si; Gordon, Stephen V.; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Smith, John Maynard

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed 11,500 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis (the cause of tuberculosis in cattle and other mammals) isolated in Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland)] and characterized by spoligotype. Genetic exchange between cells is rare or absent in strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex so that, by using spoligotypes, it is possible to recognize “clones” with a recent common ancestor. The distribution of variable numbers of tandem repeats types in the most common clone in the data set is incompatible with random mutation and drift. The most plausible explanation is a series of “clonal expansions,” and this interpretation is supported by the geographical distribution of different genotypes. We suggest that the clonal expansion of a genotype is caused either by the spread of a favorable mutation, together with all other genes present in the ancestral cell in which the mutation occurred, or by the invasion of a novel geographical region by a limited number of genotypes. A similar pattern is observed in M. tuberculosis (the main cause of tuberculosis in humans). The significance of clonal expansion in other bacteria that have recombination is discussed. PMID:14657373

  5. Roles of Clonal Integration in both Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijie; Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that clonal integration can promote the performance of clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats, but the roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats were rarely studied simultaneously. Ramet pairs of Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb were placed in two habitats either heterogeneous or homogeneous in soil nutrient availability, with stolon connections left intact or severed. Total biomass, total length of stolons, and number of new ramets of distal (relatively young) ramets located in low-nutrient environments were significantly greater when the distal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from proximal (relatively old) ramets located in high-nutrient environments. Total length of stolons of proximal ramets growing in low-nutrient environments was significantly higher when the proximal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from the distal ramets growing in high-nutrient environments, but stolon connection did not affect total biomass or number of new ramets of the proximal ramets. Stolon severing also did not affect the growth of the whole ramet pairs in heterogeneous environments. In homogeneous high-nutrient environments stolon severing promoted the growth of the proximal ramets and the ramet pairs, but in homogeneous low-nutrient environments it did not affect the growth of the proximal or distal ramets. Hence, for A. philoxeroides, clonal fragmentation appears to be more advantageous than clonal integration in resource-rich homogeneous habitats, and clonal integration becomes beneficial in heterogeneous habitats. Our study contributes to revealing roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats and expansion patterns of invasive clonal plants such as A. philoxeroides in multifarious habitats. PMID:27200026

  6. Genetic variation in fitness within a clonal population of a plant RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Héctor; Elena, Santiago F.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing observation in evolutionary virology is that RNA virus populations are highly polymorphic, composed by a mixture of genotypes whose abundances in the population depend on complex interaction between fitness differences, mutational coupling and genetic drift. It was shown long ago, though in cell cultures, that most of these genotypes had lower fitness than the population they belong, an observation that explained why single-virion passages turned on Muller’s ratchet while very large population passages resulted in fitness increases in novel environments. Here we report the results of an experiment specifically designed to evaluate in vivo the fitness differences among the subclonal components of a clonal population of the plant RNA virus tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV). Over 100 individual biological subclones from a TEV clonal population well adapted to the natural tobacco host were obtained by infectivity assays on a local lesion host. The replicative fitness of these subclones was then evaluated during infection of tobacco relative to the fitness of large random samples taken from the starting clonal population. Fitness was evaluated at increasing number of days post-inoculation. We found that at early days, the average fitness of subclones was significantly lower than the fitness of the clonal population, thus confirming previous observations that most subclones contained deleterious mutations. However, as the number of days of viral replication increases, population size expands exponentially, more beneficial and compensatory mutations are produced, and selection becomes more effective in optimizing fitness, the differences between subclones and the population disappeared. PMID:27774299

  7. Clonal structure and genetic diversity of three desert phreatophytes.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Beatrix; Zhang, Ximing; Bruelheide, Helge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess clone sizes of three perennial desert plant species with AFLP markers and to relate them to clonal and genetic diversity and to hydroecology. The study was carried out at the southern rim of the Taklamakan Desert, where sexual regeneration is only possible shortly after rare flooding events, resulting in rarely established cohorts with subsequent extensive vertical growth and horizontal clonal spread. In this environment, repeated seedling establishment is excluded. We expected decreasing clonal and genetic diversity with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table and a common response pattern among all study species. Maximum sizes of Populus euphratica and Alhagi sparsifolia clones were 121 ha and 6.1 ha, respectively, while Tamarix ramosissima clones reached a maximum size of only 38 m(2). In P. euphratica and A. sparsifolia, clonal diversity declined with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table, while genetic diversity remained unaffected. Tamarix ramosissima differed from the other species because of a much smaller clonality. Clone size and clonal diversity were found to be good proxy variables for clone age. Despite the considerable age of the clones, genetic diversity is maintained in the populations.

  8. BubbleTree: an intuitive visualization to elucidate tumoral aneuploidy and clonality using next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Kuziora, Michael; Creasy, Todd; Lai, Zhongwu; Morehouse, Christopher; Guo, Xiang; Sebastian, Yinong; Shen, Dong; Huang, Jiaqi; Dry, Jonathan R; Xue, Feng; Jiang, Liyan; Yao, Yihong; Higgs, Brandon W

    2016-02-29

    Tumors are characterized by properties of genetic instability, heterogeneity, and significant oligoclonality. Elucidating this intratumoral heterogeneity is challenging but important. In this study, we propose a framework, BubbleTree, to characterize the tumor clonality using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. BubbleTree simultaneously elucidates the complexity of a tumor biopsy, estimating cancerous cell purity, tumor ploidy, allele-specific copy number, and clonality and represents this in an intuitive graph. We further developed a three-step heuristic method to automate the interpretation of the BubbleTree graph, using a divide-and-conquer strategy. In this study, we demonstrated the performance of BubbleTree with comparisons to similar commonly used tools such as THetA2, ABSOLUTE, AbsCN-seq and ASCAT, using both simulated and patient-derived data. BubbleTree outperformed these tools, particularly in identifying tumor subclonal populations and polyploidy. We further demonstrated BubbleTree's utility in tracking clonality changes from patients' primary to metastatic tumor and dating somatic single nucleotide and copy number variants along the tumor clonal evolution. Overall, the BubbleTree graph and corresponding model is a powerful approach to provide a comprehensive spectrum of the heterogeneous tumor karyotype in human tumors. BubbleTree is R-based and freely available to the research community (https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/BubbleTree.html).

  9. Extreme clonal uniformity of Phoxinus eos/neogaeus gynogens (pisces: Cyprinidae) among variable habitats in northern Minnesota beaver ponds.

    PubMed Central

    Elder, J F; Schlosser, I J

    1995-01-01

    Genetic surveys of parthenogenetic vertebrate populations have demonstrated a common pattern of relatively high degrees of clonal variation and the coexistence of numerous clones. In striking contrast, the Phoxinus eos/Phoxinus neogaeus/hybrid gynogen complex of cyprinid fishes exhibits no clonal variation within a northern Minnesota drainage characterized by successional beaver ponds. Gynogens were sampled from three habitats in each of four different pond types in a single drainage in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. The abundance of gynogens relative to sexual dace varied with pond type, being least common in deep upland ponds and most common in shallow, collapsed, lowland ponds (13.4% and 48.6%, respectively). Simple-sequence multilocus DNA fingerprinting of 464 individual gynogens detected one, and only one, clone. DNA fingerprints, generated sequentially by using three oligonucleotide probes, (CAC)5, (GACA)4, and the Jeffreys' 33.15 probe, all revealed the same unprecedented lack of variation. The extreme lack of clonal diversity in these gynogens across a range of habitat types does not fit the general pattern of high clonal diversity found within populations of other vertebrate parthenogens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7761438

  10. An Invasive Clonal Plant Benefits from Clonal Integration More than a Co-Occurring Native Plant in Nutrient-Patchy and Competitive Environments

    PubMed Central

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  11. An invasive clonal plant benefits from clonal integration more than a co-occurring native plant in nutrient-patchy and competitive environments.

    PubMed

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  12. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions.

  13. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  14. Clonal selection versus clonal cooperation: the integrated perception of immune objects

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Analogies between the immune and nervous systems were first envisioned by the immunologist Niels Jerne who introduced the concepts of antigen "recognition" and immune "memory". However, since then, it appears that only the cognitive immunology paradigm proposed by Irun Cohen, attempted to further theorize the immune system functions through the prism of neurosciences. The present paper is aimed at revisiting this analogy-based reasoning. In particular, a parallel is drawn between the brain pathways of visual perception and the processes allowing the global perception of an "immune object". Thus, in the visual system, distinct features of a visual object (shape, color, motion) are perceived separately by distinct neuronal populations during a primary perception task. The output signals generated during this first step instruct then an integrated perception task performed by other neuronal networks. Such a higher order perception step is by essence a cooperative task that is mandatory for the global perception of visual objects. Based on a re-interpretation of recent experimental data, it is suggested that similar general principles drive the integrated perception of immune objects in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). In this scheme, the four main categories of signals characterizing an immune object (antigenic, contextual, temporal and localization signals) are first perceived separately by distinct networks of immunocompetent cells.  Then, in a multitude of SLO niches, the output signals generated during this primary perception step are integrated by TH-cells at the single cell level. This process eventually generates a multitude of T-cell and B-cell clones that perform, at the scale of SLOs, an integrated perception of immune objects. Overall, this new framework proposes that integrated immune perception and, consequently, integrated immune responses, rely essentially on clonal cooperation rather than clonal selection. PMID:27830060

  15. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of clonal diploids: a quick overview and a short DIY (do it yourself) notice.

    PubMed

    De Meeûs, Thierry; Lehmann, Laurent; Balloux, François

    2006-03-01

    In this short review we report the basic notions needed for understanding the population genetics of clonal diploids. We focus on the consequences of clonality on the distribution of genetic diversity within individuals, between individuals and between populations. We then summarise how to detect clonality in mainly sexual populations, conversely, how to detect sexuality in mainly clonal populations and also how genetic differentiation between populations is affected by clonality in diploids. This information is then used for building recipes on how to analyse and interpret genetic polymorphism data in molecular epidemiology studies of clonal diploids.

  17. Prevalence of cry2-type genes in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates recovered from diverse habitats in India and isolation of a novel cry2Af2 gene toxic to Helicoverpa armigera (cotton boll worm).

    PubMed

    Katara, Jawahar Lal; Kaur, Sarvjeet; Kumari, Gouthami Krishna; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Insecticidal cry and vip genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been used for control of lepidopteran insects in transgenic crops. However, novel genes are required for gene pyramiding to delay evolution of resistance to the currently deployed genes. Two PCR-based techniques were employed for screening of cry2-type genes in 129 Bt isolates from diverse habitats in India and 27 known Bt strains. cry2Ab-type genes were more prevalent than cry2Aa- and cry2Ac-type genes. Correlation between source of isolates and abundance of cry2-type genes was not observed. Full-length cry2A-type genes were amplified by PCR from 9 Bt isolates and 4 Bt strains. The genes from Bt isolates SK-758 from Sorghum grain dust and SK-793 from Chilli seeds warehouse, Andhra Pradesh, were cloned and sequenced. The gene from SK-758 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866915) was novel, while that from SK-793 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866914) was identical to the cry2Ab1 gene. The Bacillus thuringiensis Nomenclature Committee ( http://www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/home/Neil_Crickmore/Bt/toxins2.html ) named these genes cry2Af2 and cry2Ab16, respectively. The cry2Af2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be toxic towards Helicoverpa armigera. The cry2Af2 gene will be useful for pyramiding in transgenic crops.

  18. Reproductive clonality in protozoan pathogens--truth or artefact?

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2014-09-01

    The debate around the frequency and importance of genetic exchange in parasitic protozoa is now several decades old. Recently, fresh assertions have been made that predominant clonal evolution explains the population structures of several key protozoan pathogens. Here, we present an alternative perspective. On the assumption that much apparent clonality may be an artefact of inadequate sampling and study design, we review current research to define why sex might be so difficult to detect in protozoan parasite populations. In doing so, we contrast laboratory models of genetic exchange in parasitic protozoa with natural patterns of genetic diversity and consider the fitness advantage of sex at different evolutionary scales. We discuss approaches to improve the accuracy of efforts to characterize genetic exchange in the field. We also examine the implications of the first population genomic studies for the debate around sex and clonality in parasitic protozoa and discuss caveats for the future.

  19. Establishment of functional clonal lines of neurons from mouse neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Augusti-Tocco, G; Sato, G

    1969-09-01

    Clonal lines of neurons were obtained in culture from a mouse neuroblastoma. The neuroblastoma cells were adapted to culture growth by the animal-culture alternate passage technique and cloned after single-cell plating. The clonal lines retained the ability to form tumors when injected back into mice. A striking morphological change was observed in the cells adapted to culture growth; they appeared as mature neurons, while the cells of the tumor appeared as immature neuroblasts. Acetylcholinesterase and the enzymes for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, cholineacetylase and tyrosine hydroxylase were assayed in the tumor and compared with brain levels; tyrosine hydroxylase was found to be particularly high, as described previously in human neuroblastomas. The three enzymes were found in the clonal cultures at levels comparable to those found in the tumors. Similarly, there were no remarkable differences between the three clones examined.

  20. Is Having Clonal Cytogenetic Abnormalities the Same as Having Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Farina, Mirko; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Daniella; Marchina, Eleonora; Gale, Robert Peter

    2016-01-01

    A finding of cytogenetic abnormalities, even when these are clonal and even when the abnormalities are typically associated with leukaemia, is not the same as a person having leukaemia. We describe a person who had acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and achieved a complete haematological remission and who then had persistent and transient clonal cytogenetic abnormalities for 22 years but no recurrence of leukaemia. These data suggest that clones of myeloid cells with mutations and capable of expanding to levels detectable by routine cytogenetic analyses do not all eventuate in leukaemia, even after a prolonged observation interval. The possibility of incorrectly diagnosing a person as having leukaemia becomes even greater when employing more sensitive techniques to detect mutations such as by polymerase chain reaction and whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing. Caution is needed when interpreting clonal abnormalities in AML patients with normal blood and bone marrow parameters.

  1. Enumeration of Neural Stem Cells Using Clonal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Gunaseelan; Yu, Yuan Hong; Tham, Muly; Gan, Hui Theng; Ramasamy, Srinivas; Sankaran, Shvetha; Hariharan, Srivats; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to self-renew and generate the three major neural lineages — astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes. NSCs and neural progenitors (NPs) are commonly cultured in vitro as neurospheres. This protocol describes in detail how to determine the NSC frequency in a given cell population under clonal conditions. The protocol begins with the seeding of the cells at a density that allows for the generation of clonal neurospheres. The neurospheres are then transferred to chambered coverslips and differentiated under clonal conditions in conditioned medium, which maximizes the differentiation potential of the neurospheres. Finally, the NSC frequency is calculated based on neurosphere formation and multipotency capabilities. Utilities of this protocol include the evaluation of candidate NSC markers, purification of NSCs, and the ability to distinguish NSCs from NPs. This method takes 13 days to perform, which is much shorter than current methods to enumerate NSC frequency. PMID:27768074

  2. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R.; Lau, Chiu T.; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L.; Kate, Fiebo J. W. ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C.; Naber, Anton H. J.; van Oijen, Arnoud H. A. M.; Baak, Lubbertus C.; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J. M.; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Graham, Trevor A.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm2 (95% CI: 0.09–4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of ‘benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  3. An Expanded Lateral Interactive Clonal Selection Algorithm and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shangce; Dai, Hongwei; Zhang, Jianchen; Tang, Zheng

    Based on the clonal selection principle proposed by Burnet, in the immune response process there is no crossover of genetic material between members of the repertoire, i. e., there is no knowledge communication during different elite pools in the previous clonal selection models. As a result, the search performance of these models is ineffective. To solve this problem, inspired by the concept of the idiotypic network theory, an expanded lateral interactive clonal selection algorithm (LICS) is put forward. In LICS, an antibody is matured not only through the somatic hypermutation and the receptor editing from the B cell, but also through the stimuli from other antibodies. The stimuli is realized by memorizing some common gene segment on the idiotypes, based on which a lateral interactive receptor editing operator is also introduced. Then, LICS is applied to several benchmark instances of the traveling salesman problem. Simulation results show the efficiency and robustness of LICS when compared to other traditional algorithms.

  4. Biofilm formation in invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates is associated with the clonal lineage.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Preneshni R; Karayem, Karayem; Hoek, Kim G P; Harvey, Justin; Wasserman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the genetic background of Staphylococcus aureus to biofilm formation is poorly understood. We investigated the association between the genetic background and the biofilm forming ability of clinical invasive S. aureus isolates. Secondary objectives included investigating any correlation with biofilm formation and methicillin resistance or the source of bacteraemia. The study was conducted at a 1300-bed tertiary hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. S. aureus isolates obtained from blood cultures between January 2010 and January 2012 were included. Genotypic characterization was performed by PFGE, spa typing, SCCmec typing and MLST. Thirty genotypically unique strains were assessed for phenotypic biofilm formation with the microtitre plate assay. All isolates were tested in triplicate and an average optical density, measured at a wavelength of 490 nm, was determined. The biofilm forming ability of isolates with A490 ≤ 0.17 were considered non-adherent, A490 > 0.17 'weak positive' and A490 > 0.34 'strong positive'. Fifty seven percent of isolates formed biofilms. Weak biofilm formation occurred in 40% (n = 12) and strong biofilm formation in 17% (n = 5) of isolates. All 5 isolates capable of strong biofilm formation belong to one spa clonal complex (spa-CC 064). Strains from spa-CC 064 were capable of higher biofilm formation than other spa clonal complexes (p = 0.00002). These 5 strains belonged to MLST CC5 and CC8. Biofilm formation correlates with the spa clonal lineage in our population of invasive S. aureus strains. Biofilm formation did not correlate with methicillin resistance and was not related to the source of bacteraemia.

  5. [Clonality lymphoid study through rearrangement analysis of antigen receptor].

    PubMed

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás; Olaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    As a rule, malignant lymphoid proliferations are clonal. While most of the time the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic examination and auxiliary techniques, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, there are situations in which there are dominant clones whose analysis are important, such as occur in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality in lymphoid lesions, i.e. the analysis of rearrangements of antigen receptor genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based tests.

  6. Is pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) a clonal disorder?

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, M; Bhavnani, M; Stewart, A; Roberts, B E; Geary, G C

    1993-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon disorder, many cases lacking a well defined aetiology. This report describes three cases of PRCA (two idiopathic and one associated with B-CLL) who were investigated to assess the possibility of their PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The results show that one patient had evidence of T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma chain rearrangement, and the other had a TCR delta chain rearrangement. These two cases raise the possibility of PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-cells and further studies are warranted.

  7. Generation of clonal zebrafish line by androgenesis without egg irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jilun; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of clonal zebrafish will facilitate large-scale genetic screening and help us to overcome other biological and biotechnological challenges due to their isogenecity. However, protocols for the development of clonal lines have not been optimized. Here, we sought to develop a novel method for generation of clonal zebrafish by androgenesis induced by cold shock. Androgenetic zebrafish doubled haploids (DHs) were induced by cold shock of just-fertilized eggs, and the eggs were then heat shocked to double the chromosome set. The yield rate of putative DHs relative to the total number of eggs used was 1.10% ± 0.19%. Microsatellite genotyping of the putative DHs using 30 loci that covered all 25 linkage groups detected no heterozygous loci, confirming the homozygosity of the DHs. Thus, a clonal line was established from sperm of a DH through a second cycle of cold-shock androgenesis and heat-shock chromosome doubling, followed by genetic verification of the isogenic rate confirming the presence of identical DNA fingerprints by using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. In addition, our data provided important insights into the cytological mechanisms of cold-shock–induced androgenesis. PMID:26289165

  8. Clonal Outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Eastern Panama

    PubMed Central

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Baro, Nicholas K.; Calzada, Jose E.; Santamaria, Ana M.; Daniels, Rachel; Wong, Wesley; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Socrates; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Marti, Matthias; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the source of resurgent parasites is paramount to a strategic, successful intervention for malaria elimination. Although the malaria incidence in Panama is low, a recent outbreak resulted in a 6-fold increase in reported cases. We hypothesized that parasites sampled from this epidemic might be related and exhibit a clonal population structure. We tested the genetic relatedness of parasites, using informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms and drug resistance loci. We found that parasites were clustered into 3 clonal subpopulations and were related to parasites from Colombia. Two clusters of Panamanian parasites shared identical drug resistance haplotypes, and all clusters shared a chloroquine-resistance genotype matching the pfcrt haplotype of Colombian origin. Our findings suggest these resurgent parasite populations are highly clonal and that the high clonality likely resulted from epidemic expansion of imported or vestigial cases. Malaria outbreak investigations that use genetic tools can illuminate potential sources of epidemic malaria and guide strategies to prevent further resurgence in areas where malaria has been eliminated. PMID:25336725

  9. Phenotypic differences among three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three major clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum present in North America and Europe named NA1, NA2, and EU1. Twenty-three isolates representing all three lineages were evaluated for phenotype including (i) aggressiveness on detached Rhododendron leaves and (ii) growth rate at minimum, ...

  10. Stem cell clonality -- theoretical concepts, experimental techniques, and clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Ingmar; Bystrykh, Leonid; Eaves, Connie; Roeder, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Here we report highlights of discussions and results presented at an International Workshop on Concepts and Models of Stem Cell Organization held on July 16th and 17th, 2012 in Dresden, Germany. The goal of the workshop was to undertake a systematic survey of state-of-the-art methods and results of clonality studies of tissue regeneration and maintenance with a particular emphasis on the hematopoietic system. The meeting was the 6th in a series of similar conceptual workshops, termed StemCellMathLab,(2) all of which have had the general objective of using an interdisciplinary approach to discuss specific aspects of stem cell biology. The StemCellMathLab 2012, which was jointly organized by the Institute for Medical Informatics and Biometry, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology and the Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, brought together 32 scientists from 8 countries, with scientific backgrounds in medicine, cell biology, virology, physics, computer sciences, bioinformatics and mathematics. The workshop focused on the following questions: (1) How heterogeneous are stem cells and their progeny? and (2) What are the characteristic differences in the clonal dynamics between physiological and pathophysiological situations? In discussing these questions, particular emphasis was placed on (a) the methods for quantifying clones and their dynamics in experimental and clinical settings and (b) general concepts and models for their description. In this workshop summary we start with an introduction to the current state of clonality research and a proposal for clearly defined terminology. Major topics of discussion include clonal heterogeneity in unperturbed tissues, clonal dynamics due to physiological and pathophysiological pressures and conceptual and technical issues of clone quantification. We conclude that an interactive cross-disciplinary approach to research in this

  11. Dissemination of Clonally Related Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase CTX-M-15

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Ângela; Carattoli, Alessandra; Poirel, Laurent; Pitout, Johann; Peixe, Luísa; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Nordmann, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed 43 CTX-M-15–producing Escherichia coli isolates and 6 plasmids encoding the blaCTX-M-15 gene from Canada, India, Kuwait, France, Switzerland, Portugal, and Spain. Most isolates belonged to phylogroups B2 (50%) and D (25%). An EC-B2 strain of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 131 was detected in all countries; other B2 isolates corresponded to ST28, ST405, ST354, and ST695 from specific areas. EC-D strains were clonally unrelated but isolates from 3 countries belonged to ST405. All CTX-M-15 plasmids corresponded to IncFII group with overrepresentation of 3 HpaI-digested plasmid DNA profiles (A, B and C; 85–120kb, similarity >70%). Plasmid A was detected in EC-B2 strains (ST131, ST354, or ST405), plasmid C was detected in B2 and D strains, and plasmid B was confined to worldwide-disseminated ST131. Most plasmids contained blaOXA-1, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, and blaTEM-1. Worldwide dissemination of CTX-M-15 seems to be determined by clonal complexes ST131 and ST405 and multidrug-resistant IncFII plasmids. PMID:18258110

  12. Colonization history and clonal richness of asexual Daphnia in periglacial habitats of contrasting age in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Haileselasie, Tsegazeabe H; Mergeay, Joachim; Weider, Lawrence J; Jeppesen, Erik; De Meester, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Due to climate change, Arctic ice sheets are retreating. This leads to the formation of numerous new periglacial ponds and lakes, which are being colonized by planktonic organisms such as the water flea Daphnia. This system provides unique opportunities to test genotype colonization dynamics and the genetic assemblage of populations. Here, we studied clonal richness of the Daphnia pulex species complex in novel periglacial habitats created by glacial retreat in the Jakobshavn Isbrae area of western Greenland. Along a 10 km transect, we surveyed 73 periglacial habitats out of which 61 were colonized by Daphnia pulex. Hence, for our analysis, we used 21 ponds and 40 lakes in two clusters of habitats differing in age (estimated <50 years vs. >150 years). We tested the expectation that genetic diversity would be low in recently formed (i.e. young), small habitats, but would increase with increasing age and size. We identified a total of 42 genetically distinct clones belonging to two obligately asexual species of the D. pulex species complex: D. middendorffiana and the much more abundant D. pulicaria. While regional clonal richness was high, most clones were rare: 16 clones were restricted to a single habitat and the five most widespread clones accounted for 68% of all individuals sampled. On average, 3·2 clones (range: 1-12) coexisted in a given pond or lake. There was no relationship between clonal richness and habitat size when we controlled for habitat age. Whereas clonal richness was statistically higher in the cluster of older habitats when compared with the cluster of younger ponds and lakes, most young habitats were colonized by multiple genotypes. Our data suggest that newly formed (periglacial) ponds and lakes are colonized within decades by multiple genotypes via multiple colonization events, even in the smallest of our study systems (4 m(2) ).

  13. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  14. A Novel Hybrid Clonal Selection Algorithm with Combinatorial Recombination and Modified Hypermutation Operators for Global Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingjing; Jing, Honglei

    2016-01-01

    Artificial immune system is one of the most recently introduced intelligence methods which was inspired by biological immune system. Most immune system inspired algorithms are based on the clonal selection principle, known as clonal selection algorithms (CSAs). When coping with complex optimization problems with the characteristics of multimodality, high dimension, rotation, and composition, the traditional CSAs often suffer from the premature convergence and unsatisfied accuracy. To address these concerning issues, a recombination operator inspired by the biological combinatorial recombination is proposed at first. The recombination operator could generate the promising candidate solution to enhance search ability of the CSA by fusing the information from random chosen parents. Furthermore, a modified hypermutation operator is introduced to construct more promising and efficient candidate solutions. A set of 16 common used benchmark functions are adopted to test the effectiveness and efficiency of the recombination and hypermutation operators. The comparisons with classic CSA, CSA with recombination operator (RCSA), and CSA with recombination and modified hypermutation operator (RHCSA) demonstrate that the proposed algorithm significantly improves the performance of classic CSA. Moreover, comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms shows that the proposed algorithm is quite competitive. PMID:27698662

  15. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  16. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher A.; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E.; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J.; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A.; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER− ‘collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  17. Clonal yeast biofilms can reap competitive advantages through cell differentiation without being obligatorily multicellular.

    PubMed

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Hanghøj, Kristian Ebbesen; Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2016-11-16

    How differentiation between cell types evolved is a fundamental question in biology, but few studies have explored single-gene phenotypes that mediate first steps towards division of labour with selective advantage for groups of cells. Here, we show that differential expression of the FLO11 gene produces stable fractions of Flo11(+) and Flo11(-) cells in clonal Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilm colonies on medium with intermediate viscosity. Differentiated Flo11(+/-) colonies, consisting of adhesive and non-adhesive cells, obtain a fourfold growth advantage over undifferentiated colonies by overgrowing glucose resources before depleting them, rather than depleting them while they grow as undifferentiated Flo11(-) colonies do. Flo11(+/-) colonies maintain their structure and differentiated state by switching non-adhesive cells to adhesive cells with predictable probability. Mixtures of Flo11(+) and Flo11(-) cells from mutant strains that are unable to use this epigenetic switch mechanism produced neither integrated colonies nor growth advantages, so the condition-dependent selective advantages of differentiated FLO11 expression can only be reaped by clone-mate cells. Our results show that selection for cell differentiation in clonal eukaryotes can evolve before the establishment of obligate undifferentiated multicellularity, and without necessarily leading to more advanced organizational complexity.

  18. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The changes that occur in cell dynamics following oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the impact of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, were competent to initiate tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. Interestingly, this difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase of symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is not only dependent on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  19. Clonal forestry, heterosis and advanced-generation breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report discusses the clonal planting stock offers many advantages to the forest products industry. Advanced-generation breeding strategies should be designed to maximize within-family variance and at the same time allow the capture of heterosis. Certainly there may be a conflict in the choice of breeding strategy based on the trait of interest. It may be that the majority of the traits express heterosis due to overdominance. Alternatively, disease resistance is expressed as the lack of a specific metabolite or infection court then the homozygous recessive genotype may be the most desirable. Nonetheless, as the forest products industry begins to utilize the economic advantages of clonal forestry, breeding strategies will have to be optimized for these commercial plant materials. Here, molecular markers can be used to characterize the nature of heterosis and therefore define the appropriate breeding strategy.

  20. Clonal propagation of chemically uniform fennel plants through somatic embryoids.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Fukui, H; Tabata, M

    1987-02-01

    Somatic embryoids obtained from cell suspension cultures of fennel in Linsmaier-Skoog medium containing 2,4-D and kinetin readily developed into plantlets when plated on a hormone-free agar medium. These plants were transplanted to the field to be tested for the uniformity of the chemically as well as the morphologically important characteristics of fruits. The results of field trials conducted for two years have confirmed that the clonal plants derived from somatic embryoids are remarkably uniform in all the characteristics examined in comparison with the control plants propagated through seeds. It is suggested, therefore, that the quality control of fennel fruits used for spice or medicine could be achieved by means of clonal propagation through somatic embryoids.

  1. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-02

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin.

  2. Clonal Analysis of the Microbiota of Severe Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Kanasi, E.; Dewhirst, F.E.; Chalmers, N.I.; Kent, R.; Moore, A.; Hughes, C.V.; Pradhan, N.; Loo, C.Y.; Tanner, A.C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Severe early childhood caries is a microbial infection that severely compromises the dentition of young children. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota of severe early childhood caries. Methods Dental plaque samples from 2- to 6-year-old children were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing, and by specific PCR amplification for Streptococcus mutans and Bifidobacteriaceae species. Results Children with severe caries (n = 39) had more dental plaque and gingival inflammation than caries-free children (n = 41). Analysis of phylotypes from operational taxonomic unit analysis of 16S rRNA clonal metalibraries from severe caries and caries-free children indicated that while libraries differed significantly (p < 0.0001), there was increased diversity than detected in this clonal analysis. Using the Human Oral Microbiome Database, 139 different taxa were identified. Within the limits of this study, caries-associated taxa included Granulicatella elegans (p < 0.01) and Veillonella sp. HOT-780 (p < 0.01). The species associated with caries-free children included Capnocytophaga gingivalis (p < 0.01), Abiotrophia defectiva (p < 0.01), Lachnospiraceae sp. HOT-100 (p < 0.05), Streptococcus sanguinis (p < 0.05) and Streptococcus cristatus (p < 0.05). By specific PCR, S. mutans (p < 0.005) and Bifidobacteriaceae spp. (p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with severe caries. Conclusion Clonal analysis of 80 children identified a diverse microbiota that differed between severe caries and caries-free children, but the association of S. mutans with caries was from specific PCR analysis, not from clonal analysis, of samples. PMID:20861633

  3. Distinguishing between Incomplete Lineage Sorting and Genomic Introgressions: Complete Fixation of Allospecific Mitochondrial DNA in a Sexually Reproducing Fish (Cobitis; Teleostei), despite Clonal Reproduction of Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Choleva, Lukas; Musilova, Zuzana; Kohoutova-Sediva, Alena; Paces, Jan; Rab, Petr; Janko, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing between hybrid introgression and incomplete lineage sorting causing incongruence among gene trees in that they exhibit topological differences requires application of statistical approaches that are based on biologically relevant models. Such study is especially challenging in hybrid systems, where usual vectors mediating interspecific gene transfers - hybrids with Mendelian heredity - are absent or unknown. Here we study a complex of hybridizing species, which are known to produce clonal hybrids, to discover how one of the species, Cobitis tanaitica, has achieved a pattern of mito-nuclear mosaic genome over the whole geographic range. We appplied three distinct methods, including the method using solely the information on gene tree topologies, and found that the contrasting mito-nuclear signal might not have resulted from the retention of ancestral polymorphism. Instead, we found two signs of hybridization events related to C. tanaitica; one concerning nuclear gene flow and the other suggested mitochondrial capture. Interestingly, clonal inheritance (gynogenesis) of contemporary hybrids prevents genomic introgressions and non-clonal hybrids are either absent or too rare to be detected among European Cobitis. Our analyses therefore suggest that introgressive hybridizations are rather old episodes, mediated by previously existing hybrids whose inheritance was not entirely clonal. Cobitis complex thus supports the view that the type of resulting hybrids depends on a level of genomic divergence between sexual species. PMID:24971792

  4. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  5. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called “rearrangement” forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called “affinity maturation.” The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem “clonal family inference.” In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM) framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets. PMID:27749910

  6. Competitive equivalence maintains persistent inter-clonal boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, David L

    2005-01-01

    Clear boundaries often separate adjacent conspecific competitors. These boundaries may reflect bordering animal territories or regions of inter-organism contact in mobile and non-mobile organisms, respectively. Sessile, clonal organisms often form persistent inter-clonal boundaries despite great variation in competitive ability among genotypes within a population. I show that neighboring clones in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima and three species of the marine hydroid genus Hydractinia are more evenly matched in terms of competitive ability than expected by chance. Hypotheses of genetic relatedness or similar environmental regime shared by neighboring clones are inconsistent with the observed similarities between adjacent competitors in one or both taxa. Instead, inter-clonal borders evidently persist as standoffs between evenly matched competitors. Large differences in competitive ability between bordering clones were rarely observed, suggesting that dominant clones quickly displace or eliminate others in competitive mismatches. This ecological parallel between taxa (i.e., competitive equivalence) exists despite several fundamental differences (e.g., geographical distribution, habitat, body size, longevity), suggesting that competitive equivalence may be a widespread determinant of boundary persistence between adjacent competitors.

  7. Temporal invariance and clonal uniformity of brain and cerebrospinal IgG, IgA, and IgM in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG and oligoclonal IgG bands on electrophoresis are valuable clinical markers for B cell proliferation in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Using two- dimensional electrophoresis, (2DE) we have established that the humoral immune response in MS brain is characterized by finite clonal complexity for the major Ig classes. An important question is whether this immune response is clonally stable or varies with time, related to the development of new lesions and random entry of B cells into the MS brain. To investigate this, we performed serial electrophoretic studies on CSF obtained from 19 patients with MS; the intervals ranged from 7 to 12 yr, with a mean of 8 yr. These analyses included studies of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and revealed that the humoral immune response in MS is clonally stable over long periods. Spontaneous fluctuations or reduction in CSF IgG levels by drugs did not qualitatively affect B cell clonal proliferation in MS brain, in that dominant bands and spots were not obliterated. It has been asserted that IgG synthesis in MS is nonsense antibody because the spectotypes of IgG isolated from different regions of MS brains differ. Factors other than clonal heterogeneity could account for differences found using one-dimensional analysis. B cell clonal products resolve into unique and well-resolved spots by 2DE; the method is uniquely suitable for analysis of restricted immune responses. Therefore, Ig were isolated from 11 regions of three MS brains and the 2DE patterns were compared. The similarity of the 2DE patterns indicate unequivocally that major clones are distributed uniformly although some clones are more prominent in some brain areas. IgA and IgM isolated from the same areas also showed similar patterns. Furthermore, the patterns of light and heavy chains in brain regions differed from serum but were similar to the autologous CSF, providing new evidence that CSF IgG in MS derives from synthesis

  8. Clonal structure of the introduced freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Prosobranchia: Hydrobiidae), as revealed by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Hauser, L; Carvalho, G R; Hughes, R N; Carter, R E

    1992-07-22

    Multi-locus DNA fingerprints were obtained from individuals of the hydrobiid snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (= P. jenkinsi), by using an RNA derivative (pSPT 18.15) of Jeffrey's 33.15 minisatellite core sequence. Whole-body homogenization of snails yielded 3.21 +/- 0.09 micrograms DNA per individual, producing complex profiles comprising 12-22 fragments within the 1.0-20.0 kilobase (kb) size range. Fingerprints from natural and experimental populations identified three distinct clonal genotypes corresponding to morphological strains A, B and C, with only rare mutational variants. Mother-offspring comparisons of genetic fingerprints revealed genetic stability during apomictic parthenogenesis. Data support the notion that British populations of P. antipodarum comprise three widespread obligate parthenogenetic clones resulting from a mid-19th Century introduction from Australasia. The present-day low levels of genotypic diversity are discussed in relation to the typical occurrence of P. antipodarum in man-made or immature habitats.

  9. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  10. Clonal integration of Fragaria orientalis in reciprocal and coincident patchiness resources: cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying

    2013-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to experience different levels of resources. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clonal plants can reciprocally translocate resources between ramets in heterogeneous environments. But little is known about the interaction between benefits of clonal integration and patterns of resource heterogeneity in different patches, i.e., coincident patchiness or reciprocal patchiness. We hypothesized that clonal integration will show different effects on ramets in different patches and more benefit to ramets under reciprocal patchiness than to those under coincident patchiness, as well as that the benefit from clonal integration is affected by the position of proximal and distal ramets under reciprocal or coincident patchiness. A pot experiment was conducted with clonal fragments consisting of two interconnected ramets (proximal and distal ramet) of Fragaria orientalis. In the experiment, proximal and distal ramets were grown in high or low availability of resources, i.e., light and water. Resource limitation was applied either simultaneously to both ramets of a clonal fragment (coincident resource limitation) or separately to different ramets of the same clonal fragment (reciprocal resource limitation). Half of the clonal fragments were connected while the other half were severed. From the experiment, clonal fragments growing under coincident resource limitation accumulated more biomass than those under reciprocal resource limitation. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, the support from proximal ramets to distal ramets was stronger than that from distal ramets to proximal ramets. Through division of labour, clonal fragments of F. orientalis benefited more in reciprocal patchiness than in coincident patchiness. While considering biomass accumulation and ramets production, coincident patchiness were more favourable to clonal plant F. orientalis.

  11. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    PubMed

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  12. Clonality and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Isolates from Food Animals and Other Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kin-Hung; Lai, Eileen L.; Law, Pierra Y. T.; Chan, Pui-Ying; Ho, Alex Y. M.; Ng, Tak-Keung; Yam, Wing-Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Out of 3,081 animals studied, 24.9% of pigs, 4.7% of chickens, 6.3% of dogs, 10.5% of cats, and 7.1% of rodents were Staphylococcus aureus positive. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was high in pigs (animals, 21.3%; batches, 46.5%), with all MRSA isolates and most methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates belonging to clonal complex 9 (CC9) and being multidrug resistant. The predominant S. aureus CCs among dog and cat isolates were similar. Among rodent isolates, CC398 predominated, with spa t034 the most frequent spa type detected. PMID:22895044

  13. Clonality and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates from food animals and other animals.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Chow, Kin-Hung; Lai, Eileen L; Law, Pierra Y T; Chan, Pui-Ying; Ho, Alex Y M; Ng, Tak-Keung; Yam, Wing-Cheong

    2012-11-01

    Out of 3,081 animals studied, 24.9% of pigs, 4.7% of chickens, 6.3% of dogs, 10.5% of cats, and 7.1% of rodents were Staphylococcus aureus positive. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was high in pigs (animals, 21.3%; batches, 46.5%), with all MRSA isolates and most methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates belonging to clonal complex 9 (CC9) and being multidrug resistant. The predominant S. aureus CCs among dog and cat isolates were similar. Among rodent isolates, CC398 predominated, with spa t034 the most frequent spa type detected.

  14. Clonality, recombination, and hybridization in the plumbing-inhabiting human pathogen Fusarium keratoplasticum inferred from multilocus sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent work has shown that Fusarium species and genotypes most commonly associated with human infections, particularly of the cornea (mycotic keratitis), are the same as those most commonly isolated from plumbing systems. The species most dominant in plumbing biofilms is Fusarium keratoplasticum, a cosmopolitan fungus known almost exclusively from animal infections and biofilms. To better understand its diversity and population dynamics, we developed and utilized a nine-locus sequence-based typing system to make inferences about clonality, recombination, population structure, species boundaries and hybridization. Results High levels of genetic diversity and evidence for recombination and clonality were detected among 75 clinical and 156 environmental isolates of Fusarium keratoplasticum. The multilocus sequence typing system (MLST) resolved 111 unique nine-locus sequence types (STs). The single locus bifactorial determinants of mating compatibility (mating types MAT1-1 and MAT1-2), were found in a ratio of 70:30. All but one of the 49 isolates of the most common ST (FSSC 2d-2) came from human infections, mostly of the cornea, and from biofilms associated with contact lenses and plumbing surfaces. Significant levels of phylogenetic incongruence were found among loci. Putative clonal relationships among genotypes were estimated, showing a mixture of large clonal complexes and unrelated singletons. Discordance between the nuclear ribosomal rRNA and other gene genealogies is consistent with introgression of ribosomal RNA alleles of phylogenetic species FSSC 9 into F. keratoplasticum. No significant population subdivision based on clinical versus non-clinical sources was found. Conclusions Incongruent phylogenetic trees and the presence of both mating types within otherwise identical STs were observed, providing evidence for sexuality in F. keratoplasticum. Cryptic speciation suggested in a published three-locus MLST system was not supported with the addition

  15. Clonal distribution of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Girlich, Delphine; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme including 7 housekeeping genes was used to evaluate whether the current spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolates worldwide might be associated to specific successful clones. Fifty E. cloacae clinical isolates of worldwide origin, with various β-lactamase content, and recovered at different periods of time were studied. Forty-four sequence types were identified, highlighting a high clonal diversity with 3 main lineages. This study revealed that a precise identification of the isolates by sequencing of the chromosomal ampC gene of E. cloacae would provide a significant added value to improve the reliability of the MLST scheme.

  16. Clonal expansion of the macrolide resistant ST386 within pneumococcal serotype 6C in France.

    PubMed

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002-2003) to the PCV13 era (2010-2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter.

  17. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  18. Clonal Dissemination of Enterobacter cloacae Harboring blaKPC-3 in the Upper Midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Melissa L.; Shaw, Kristin M.; Dobbins, Ginette; Snippes Vagnone, Paula M.; Harper, Jane E.; Boxrud, Dave; Lynfield, Ruth; Aziz, Maliha; Price, Lance B.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CP-CRE, are an emerging threat to human and animal health, because they are resistant to many of the last-line antimicrobials available for disease treatment. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter cloacae harboring blaKPC-3 recently was reported in the upper midwestern United States and implicated in a hospital outbreak in Fargo, North Dakota (L. M. Kiedrowski, D. M. Guerrero, F. Perez, R. A. Viau, L. J. Rojas, M. F. Mojica, S. D. Rudin, A. M. Hujer, S. H. Marshall, and R. A. Bonomo, Emerg Infect Dis 20:1583–1585, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2009.140344). In early 2009, the Minnesota Department of Health began collecting and screening CP-CRE from patients throughout Minnesota. Here, we analyzed a retrospective group of CP-E. cloacae isolates (n = 34) collected between 2009 and 2013. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis revealed that 32 of the strains were clonal, belonging to the ST171 clonal complex and differing collectively by 211 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and it revealed a dynamic clone under positive selection. The phylogeography of these strains suggests that this clone existed in eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota prior to 2009 and subsequently was identified in the Minneapolis and St. Paul metropolitan area. All strains harbored identical IncFIA-like plasmids conferring a CP-CRE phenotype and an additional IncX3 plasmid. In a single patient with multiple isolates submitted over several months, we found evidence that these plasmids had transferred from the E. cloacae clone to an Escherichia coli ST131 bacterium, rendering it as a CP-CRE. The spread of this clone throughout the upper midwestern United States is unprecedented for E. cloacae and highlights the importance of continued surveillance to identify such threats to human health. PMID:26438492

  19. Clonal expansion of antitumor T cells in breast cancer correlates with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Miran; Tarhan, Yunus Emre; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Sasa, Mitsunori; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Kalari, Krishna R.; Suman, Vera J.; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei; Boughey, Judy C.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of tumor plays a critical role in therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. Cancer tissues are composed of a complex network between anti-tumor and pro-tumor immune cells and molecules; therefore a comprehensive analysis of the tumor immune condition is imperative for better understanding of the roles of the immune microenvironment in anticancer treatment response. In this study, we performed T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis of tumor infiltrating T cells (TILs) in cancer tissues of pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) from 19 breast cancer patients; five cases showed CR (complete response), ten showed PR (partial response), and four showed SD/PD (stable disease/progressive disease) to the treatment. From the TCR sequencing results, we calculated the diversity index of the TCRβ chain and found that clonal expansion of TILs could be detected in patients who showed CR or PR to NAC. Noteworthy, the diversity of TCR was further reduced in the post-NAC tumors of CR patients. Our quantitative RT-PCR also showed that expression ratio of CD8/Foxp3 was significantly elevated in the post-NAC tumors of CR cases (p=0.0032), indicating that antitumor T cells were activated and enriched in these tumors. Collectively, our findings suggest that the clonal expansion of antitumor T cells may be a critical factor associated with response to chemotherapy and that their TCR sequences might be applicable for the development of TCR-engineered T cells treatment for individual breast cancer patients when their tumors relapse. PMID:27278091

  20. Clonal Dissemination of Enterobacter cloacae Harboring blaKPC-3 in the Upper Midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Melissa L; Shaw, Kristin M; Dobbins, Ginette; Snippes Vagnone, Paula M; Harper, Jane E; Boxrud, Dave; Lynfield, Ruth; Aziz, Maliha; Price, Lance B; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Carbapenemase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CP-CRE, are an emerging threat to human and animal health, because they are resistant to many of the last-line antimicrobials available for disease treatment. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter cloacae harboring blaKPC-3 recently was reported in the upper midwestern United States and implicated in a hospital outbreak in Fargo, North Dakota (L. M. Kiedrowski, D. M. Guerrero, F. Perez, R. A. Viau, L. J. Rojas, M. F. Mojica, S. D. Rudin, A. M. Hujer, S. H. Marshall, and R. A. Bonomo, Emerg Infect Dis 20:1583-1585, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2009.140344). In early 2009, the Minnesota Department of Health began collecting and screening CP-CRE from patients throughout Minnesota. Here, we analyzed a retrospective group of CP-E. cloacae isolates (n = 34) collected between 2009 and 2013. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis revealed that 32 of the strains were clonal, belonging to the ST171 clonal complex and differing collectively by 211 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and it revealed a dynamic clone under positive selection. The phylogeography of these strains suggests that this clone existed in eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota prior to 2009 and subsequently was identified in the Minneapolis and St. Paul metropolitan area. All strains harbored identical IncFIA-like plasmids conferring a CP-CRE phenotype and an additional IncX3 plasmid. In a single patient with multiple isolates submitted over several months, we found evidence that these plasmids had transferred from the E. cloacae clone to an Escherichia coli ST131 bacterium, rendering it as a CP-CRE. The spread of this clone throughout the upper midwestern United States is unprecedented for E. cloacae and highlights the importance of continued surveillance to identify such threats to human health.

  1. Plant traits and ecosystem effects of clonality: a new research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonal plants spread laterally by spacers between their ramets (shoot–root units); these spacers can transport and store resources. While much is known about how clonality promotes plant fitness, we know little about how different clonal plants influence ecosystem functions related to carbon, nutrient and water cycling. Approach The response–effect trait framework is used to formulate hypotheses about the impact of clonality on ecosystems. Central to this framework is the degree of correspondence between interspecific variation in clonal ‘response traits’ that promote plant fitness and interspecific variation in ‘effect traits’, which define a plant's potential effect on ecosystem functions. The main example presented to illustrate this concept concerns clonal traits of vascular plant species that determine their lateral extension patterns. In combination with the different degrees of decomposability of litter derived from their spacers, leaves, roots and stems, these clonal traits should determine associated spatial and temporal patterns in soil organic matter accumulation, nutrient availability and water retention. Conclusions This review gives some concrete pointers as to how to implement this new research agenda through a combination of (1) standardized screening of predominant species in ecosystems for clonal response traits and for effect traits related to carbon, nutrient and water cycling; (2) analysing the overlap between variation in these response traits and effect traits across species; (3) linking spatial and temporal patterns of clonal species in the field to those for soil properties related to carbon, nutrient and water stocks and dynamics; and (4) studying the effects of biotic interactions and feedbacks between resource heterogeneity and clonality. Linking these to environmental changes may help us to better understand and predict the role of clonal plants in modulating impacts of climate change and human activities on

  2. Semi-automated rep-PCR for rapid differentiation of major clonal groups of Escherichia coli meningitis strains.

    PubMed

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bidet, Philippe; Mahjoub, Farah; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Ait-Ifrane, Shadia; Courroux, Céline; Bingen, Edouard

    2009-08-01

    DiversiLab, a semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) device, is a highly integrated platform designed for rapid bacterial genotyping. Here, we evaluated the capacity of the DiversiLab system to determine the genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli neonatal meningitis (ECNM) strains and to identify clonal groups. We analyzed 80 isolates representative of the diversity of ECNM strains in Europe and North America and 52 E. coli reference (ECOR) strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A, D, and B2. All the strains had previously been characterized by means of multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The DiversiLab dendrogram clustered all but 8 of the strains according to their phylogenetic groups. After defining a rep-PCR type complex (RPTc) based on an average similarity threshold of 95% between rep-PCR types, we observed excellent agreement between RPTc and sequence type complexes (STc) in groups D and B2. In group A, rep-PCR typing was more discriminative than MLST, dividing the 25 ECOR group A strains into 19 RPTc, compared to only 10 STc. In the highly virulent clonal group B2(1), mainly composed of O1, O2, O18, and O45:K1 strains, the DiversiLab system individualized a particular subgroup of O2:K1 strains. In addition, among O18:K1 strains the system identified a particular genetic background associated with pathogenicity island II(J96)-like domains. Thus, the DiversiLab system is a rapid and powerful tool for identifying and discriminating clonal groups among ECNM strains.

  3. trans-Platinum(II) complex of 3-aminoflavone - synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and biological activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabijańska, Małgorzata; Studzian, Kazimierz; Szmigiero, Leszek; Rybarczyk-Pirek, Agnieszka J; Pfitzner, Arno; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Zyner, Elżbieta; Ochocki, Justyn

    2015-01-21

    This paper describes the synthesis of trans-bis-(3-aminoflavone)dichloridoplatinum(ii) (trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2; TCAP) for use as a potential anticancer compound, and the evaluation of its structure by elemental and spectral analyses, and X-ray crystallography. The complex demonstrated a significant cytotoxic effect against human and murine cancer cell lines, as well as weaker toxicity towards healthy cells (human peripheral blood lymphocytes) in comparison with cisplatin. Various biochemical and morphological methods confirm that the proapoptotic activity of trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2 is markedly higher than the reference cisplatin. Our results suggest that trans-Pt(3-af)2Cl2 may have a different antitumour specificity from that of cisplatin.

  4. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  5. Clonality and intracellular polyploidy in virus evolution and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Moreno, Elena; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-07-21

    In the present article we examine clonality in virus evolution. Most viruses retain an active recombination machinery as a potential means to initiate new levels of genetic exploration that go beyond those attainable solely by point mutations. However, despite abundant recombination that may be linked to molecular events essential for genome replication, herein we provide evidence that generation of recombinants with altered biological properties is not essential for the completion of the replication cycles of viruses, and that viral lineages (near-clades) can be defined. We distinguish mechanistically active but inconsequential recombination from evolutionarily relevant recombination, illustrated by episodes in the field and during experimental evolution. In the field, recombination has been at the origin of new viral pathogens, and has conferred fitness advantages to some viruses once the parental viruses have attained a sufficient degree of diversification by point mutations. In the laboratory, recombination mediated a salient genome segmentation of foot-and-mouth disease virus, an important animal pathogen whose genome in nature has always been characterized as unsegmented. We propose a model of continuous mutation and recombination, with punctuated, biologically relevant recombination events for the survival of viruses, both as disease agents and as promoters of cellular evolution. Thus, clonality is the standard evolutionary mode for viruses because recombination is largely inconsequential, since the decisive events for virus replication and survival are not dependent on the exchange of genetic material and formation of recombinant (mosaic) genomes.

  6. Quantum-inspired immune clonal algorithm for global optimization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Licheng; Li, Yangyang; Gong, Maoguo; Zhang, Xiangrong

    2008-10-01

    Based on the concepts and principles of quantum computing, a novel immune clonal algorithm, called a quantum-inspired immune clonal algorithm (QICA), is proposed to deal with the problem of global optimization. In QICA, the antibody is proliferated and divided into a set of subpopulation groups. The antibodies in a subpopulation group are represented by multistate gene quantum bits. In the antibody's updating, the general quantum rotation gate strategy and the dynamic adjusting angle mechanism are applied to accelerate convergence. The quantum not gate is used to realize quantum mutation to avoid premature convergences. The proposed quantum recombination realizes the information communication between subpopulation groups to improve the search efficiency. Theoretical analysis proves that QICA converges to the global optimum. In the first part of the experiments, 10 unconstrained and 13 constrained benchmark functions are used to test the performance of QICA. The results show that QICA performs much better than the other improved genetic algorithms in terms of the quality of solution and computational cost. In the second part of the experiments, QICA is applied to a practical problem (i.e., multiuser detection in direct-sequence code-division multiple-access systems) with a satisfying result.

  7. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  8. The genome of the clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroi

    PubMed Central

    Oxley, Peter R.; Ji, Lu; Fetter-Pruneda, Ingrid; McKenzie, Sean K.; Li, Cai; Hu, Haofu; Zhang, Guojie; Kronauer, Daniel J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Social insects are important models for social evolution and behavior. However, in many species experimental control over important factors that regulate division of labor, such as genotype and age, is limited [1, 2]. Furthermore, most species have fixed queen and worker castes, making it difficult to establish causality between the molecular mechanisms that underlie reproductive division of labor, the hallmark of insect societies [3]. Here we present the genome of the queenless clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroi, a powerful new study system that does not suffer from these constraints. Using cytology and RAD-Seq, we show that C. biroi reproduces via automixis with central fusion and that heterozygosity is lost extremely slowly. As a consequence, nestmates are almost clonally related (r=0.996). Workers in C. biroi colonies synchronously alternate between reproduction and brood care, and young workers eclose in synchronized cohorts. We show that genes associated with division of labor in other social insects are conserved in C. biroi and dynamically regulated during the colony cycle. With unparalleled experimental control over an individual’s genotype and age, and the ability to induce reproduction and brood care [4, 5], C. biroi has great potential to illuminate the molecular regulation of division of labor. PMID:24508170

  9. Rapid contemporary evolution and clonal food web dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laura E; Becks, Lutz; Ellner, Stephen P; Hairston, Nelson G; Yoshida, Takehito; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2009-06-12

    Character evolution that affects ecological community interactions often occurs contemporaneously with temporal changes in population size, potentially altering the very nature of those dynamics. Such eco-evolutionary processes may be most readily explored in systems with short generations and simple genetics. Asexual and cyclically parthenogenetic organisms such as microalgae, cladocerans and rotifers, which frequently dominate freshwater plankton communities, meet these requirements. Multiple clonal lines can coexist within each species over extended periods, until either fixation occurs or a sexual phase reshuffles the genetic material. When clones differ in traits affecting interspecific interactions, within-species clonal dynamics can have major effects on the population dynamics. We first consider a simple predator-prey system with two prey genotypes, parametrized with data from a well-studied experimental system, and explore how the extent of differences in defence against predation within the prey population determine dynamic stability versus instability of the system. We then explore how increased potential for evolution affects the community dynamics in a more general community model with multiple predator and multiple prey genotypes. These examples illustrate how microevolutionary 'details' that enhance or limit the potential for heritable phenotypic change can have significant effects on contemporaneous community-level dynamics and the persistence and coexistence of species.

  10. The evolution of two mutations during clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Haeno, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yoh; Michor, Franziska

    2007-12-01

    Knudson's two-hit hypothesis proposes that two genetic changes in the RB1 gene are the rate-limiting steps of retinoblastoma. In the inherited form of this childhood eye cancer, only one mutation emerges during somatic cell divisions while in sporadic cases, both alleles of RB1 are inactivated in the growing retina. Sporadic retinoblastoma serves as an example of a situation in which two mutations are accumulated during clonal expansion of a cell population. Other examples include evolution of resistance against anticancer combination therapy and inactivation of both alleles of a metastasis-suppressor gene during tumor growth. In this article, we consider an exponentially growing population of cells that must evolve two mutations to (i) evade treatment, (ii) make a step toward (invasive) cancer, or (iii) display a disease phenotype. We calculate the probability that the population has evolved both mutations before it reaches a certain size. This probability depends on the rates at which the two mutations arise; the growth and death rates of cells carrying none, one, or both mutations; and the size the cell population reaches. Further, we develop a formula for the expected number of cells carrying both mutations when the final population size is reached. Our theory establishes an understanding of the dynamics of two mutations during clonal expansion.

  11. Clonal population structure of Colombian sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Márquez, E; Arcos-Burgos, M; Triana, O; Moreno, J; Jaramillo, N

    1998-12-01

    Isoenzyme variability and evidence of genetic exchange were evaluated in 75 wild stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi obtained from different hosts from 5 geographical regions within the endemic area in Colombia. Cluster analysis of genetic variability was attempted. Thirty-three multilocus enzyme genotypes (clonets) were identified from 75 stocks, 27 of which clustered with zymodeme Z1 and 6 with zymodeme Z3. Two stocks isolated from human infections showed the potential risk to rural communities in Colombia. The stocks exhibited departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations, including both fixed heterozygote and fixed homozygote demes, where both segregation and recombination were absent. To inspect for population subdivision that might falsely imply clonality in these stocks, Wright's F statistics were calculated. Theta values (Fst) were significantly different from 0 when 33 clonets, 27 Z1-like clonets, and 5 geographical subpopulations were compared; thus, a significant amount of divergence has occurred between and within them. In addition, linkage disequilibrium was detected for most possible pairwise comparisons of loci. In conclusion, the above results all support a scenario of long-term clonal evolution in Colombian sylvatic T. cruzi populations.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of B cell clonality in Sjögren's syndrome patients: a diagnostic tool of clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, L M; Castillo, D; Aguilera, S O

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by clonal B cell attack of the exocrine glands and dysregulated expression of B cell-activating factor (BAFF). Based upon the current data of increased rates of lymphoid malignancy, as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with SS, we propose the detection of clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene in those patients as a predictor of malignant clonal expansion. To test our proposal, we examined the IgH clonal rearrangements in SS patients (60) and healthy control subjects (42) having chronic non-specific sialadenitis, to determine the presence of clonal B cells in minor labial salivary glands (MSG) of SS patients. Clonal B cell expansion was assessed by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays: (i) semi-nested PCR, against sequences encoding framework regions FR3, FR2 and FR1c of the variable chain IgH gene in B cells present in the MSG infiltrate; and (ii) the PCR–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique, against the major and minor breakpoint regions of the Bcl-2 oncogene coupled with a variable segment of the IgH to assess the Bcl-2/JH translocation. When FR3, FR2 and FR1c primers were employed, we detected B cell monoclonality in 87% of the SS patients and 19% of the control subjects. The association between inflammation severity of the MSG pattern and the presence of B cell clonality was found to be statistically significant (P < 0·01). We concluded that the presence of B cell clonality in MSG can be used as a index of an altered microenvironment favouring the development of lymphoma in SS patients. PMID:20408860

  13. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  14. Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection.

    PubMed

    Paczesniak, D; Adolfsson, S; Liljeroos, K; Klappert, K; Lively, C M; Jokela, J

    2014-02-01

    According to the Red Queen hypothesis for sex, parasite-mediated selection against common clones counterbalances the reproductive advantage of asexual lineages, which would otherwise outcompete sexual conspecifics. Such selection on the clonal population is expected to lead to a faster clonal turnover in habitats where selection by parasites is stronger. We tested this prediction by comparing the genetic structure of clonal and sexual populations of freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum between years 2003 and 2007 in three depth-specific habitats in Lake Alexandrina (South Island, New Zealand). These habitats differ in the risk of infection by castrating trematodes and in the relative proportion of sexual individuals. As predicted, we found that the clonal structure changed significantly in shallow and mid-water habitats, where prevalence of infection was high, but not in the deep habitat, where parasite prevalence was low. Additionally, we found that both clonal diversity and evenness of the asexual population declined in the shallow habitat. In contrast, the genetic structure (based on F-statistics) of the coexisting sexual population did not change, which suggests that the change in the clonal structure cannot be related to genetic changes in the sexual population. Finally, the frequency of sexuals had no effect on the diversity of the sympatric clonal population. Taken together, our results show a more rapid clonal turnover in high-infection habitats, which gives support for the Red Queen hypothesis for sex.

  15. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytica...

  16. Standardizing the Nomenclature for Clonal Lineages of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages based on a range of molecular marker systems. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of lineages. Here we name clonal lineages of P. ramor...

  17. A novel clonality assay for the assessment of canine T cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stefan M; Moore, Peter F

    2012-01-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based clonality assays are an important tool to differentiate neoplastic from reactive lymphocyte populations. A recent description of the canine T cell receptor γ locus identified a large number of formerly unknown genes, and determined the locus topology consisting of 8 cassettes with up to 3 variable (V) genes, 2 joining (J) genes and one constant (C) gene each. Given that these data were not available when existing canine T cell clonality assays were developed, it is likely that they will fail to detect a subset of clonal lymphocyte populations. The objective of this study was to gauge the potential of canine T cell clonality assays to detect all rearranged T cell receptor γ genes and to develop an improved clonality assay. The primer sequences of existing clonality assays were aligned to the reference sequences of all rearranged genes and genes were scored as to the likelihood of being recognized by a primer. All four assays likely recognized subgroup Vγ2 and Vγ6 genes but 3 out of 4 assays were unlikely to detect subgroup Vγ3 and Vγ7 genes. All assays likely recognized Jγx-2 genes, but only two assays were likely to detect most Jγx-1 genes. Two assays had forward primers located as close as four nucleotides to the junctional region. A new multiplex PCR was designed with all primers combined in a single tube. An alternative primer set allowed identification of variable gene usage through gene specific forward primers. The coverage of all rearranged genes facilitated the detection of multiple clonal rearrangements per neoplastic sample. The new assay detected clonal DNA at a concentration of 5% within polyclonal background but detection thresholds were dependent on the gene usage of clonal rearrangements as well as the position of the clonal peak in respect to the polyclonal background. The new multiplex assay recognized 12/12 (100%) of confirmed neoplastic samples as compared to 2/12 (17%) by an existing assay. On a

  18. SNP-based differentiation of Phytophthora infestans clonal lineages using locked nucleic acid probes and high resolution melt analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of the devastating late blight disease of potato and tomato, exhibits a clonal reproductive lifestyle in North America. Phenotypes such as fungicide sensitivity and host preference are conserved among individuals within clonal lineages, while substantial phenotypic ...

  19. Analysis of allelic expression patterns in clonal somatic cells by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Reinius, Björn; Mold, Jeff E; Ramsköld, Daniel; Deng, Qiaolin; Johnsson, Per; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Frisén, Jonas; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Cellular heterogeneity can emerge from the expression of only one parental allele. However, it has remained controversial whether, or to what degree, random monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (aRME) is mitotically inherited (clonal) or stochastic (dynamic) in somatic cells, particularly in vivo. Here we used allele-sensitive single-cell RNA-seq on clonal primary mouse fibroblasts and freshly isolated human CD8(+) T cells to dissect clonal and dynamic monoallelic expression patterns. Dynamic aRME affected a considerable portion of the cells' transcriptomes, with levels dependent on the cells' transcriptional activity. Notably, clonal aRME was detected, but it was surprisingly scarce (<1% of genes) and mainly affected the most weakly expressed genes. Consequently, the overwhelming majority of aRME occurs transiently within individual cells, and patterns of aRME are thus primarily scattered throughout somatic cell populations rather than, as previously hypothesized, confined to patches of clonally related cells.

  20. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  1. Relative clonal proportions over time in mixed-genotype infections of the lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alice Flynn; Schall, Jos J

    2011-06-01

    Vertebrate hosts of malaria parasites (Plasmodium) often harbour two or more genetically distinct clones of a single species, and interaction among these co-existing clones can play an important role in Plasmodium biology. However, how relative clonal proportions vary over time in a host is still poorly known. Experimental mixed-clone infections of the lizard malaria parasite, Plasmodium mexicanum, were followed in its natural host, the western fence lizard using microsatellite markers to determine the relative proportions of two to five co-existing clones over time (2-3 months). Results for two markers, and two PCR primer pairs for one of those, matched very closely, supporting the efficacy of the method. Of the 54 infections, 67% displayed stable relative clonal proportions, with the others showing a shift in proportions, usually with one clone outpacing the others. Infections with rapidly increasing or slowly increasing parasitemia were stable, showing that all clones within these infections reproduced at the same rapid or slow rate. Replicate infections containing the same clones did not always reveal the same growth rate, final parasitemia or dominant clone; thus there was no clone effect for these life history measures. The rate of increase in parasitemia was not associated with stable versus unstable relative proportions, but infections with four to five clones were more likely to be unstable than those with two to three clones. This rare look into events in genetically complex Plasmodium infections suggests that parasite clones may be interacting in complex and unexpected ways.

  2. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-01-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  3. Clonal analysis of human tumors with M27 beta, a highly informative polymorphic X chromosomal probe.

    PubMed Central

    Fey, M F; Peter, H J; Hinds, H L; Zimmermann, A; Liechti-Gallati, S; Gerber, H; Studer, H; Tobler, A

    1992-01-01

    The clonality of human tumors can be studied by X inactivation/methylation analysis in female patients heterozygous for X-linked DNA polymorphisms. We present a detailed study on clonal tumor analysis with M27 beta, a highly informative probe detecting a polymorphic X chromosomal locus, DXS255. The polymorphism detected at this locus is due to variable numbers of tandem repeats. The rate of constitutional heterozygosity detected by M27 beta was 88%. Normal tissue from gastrointestinal mucosa and thyroid showed random, hence polyclonal, patterns. Nonrandom clonal X inactivation was detected in all 22 malignant neoplasms that had been shown to be clonal by other DNA markers, such as antigen receptor gene rearrangements or clonal loss of heterozygosity at 17p and other loci. 16/48 normal blood leukocyte samples (33%) showed considerably skewed X inactivation patterns. Comparison of blood leukocytes and normal tissue indicated that in a given individual, X inactivation patterns may be tissue specific. M27 beta was used to study the clonal composition of 13 benign thyroid nodules from 12 multinodular goiters with rapid recent growth, traditionally termed "adenomas." Nine of them were clonal, whereas four nodules and tissue from a case of Graves' goiter were not, indicating that some, but not all, such thyroid nodules may represent true clonal neoplasms. The M27 beta probe permits one to study the clonal composition by the X inactivation approach of a wide variety of solid tumors from most female patients. As a control, normal tissue homologous to the tumor type of interest is preferable to DNA from blood leukocytes, since the latter may show nonrandom X inactivation patterns in a fairly high proportion of cases. M27 beta may, therefore, be of limited use for the clonal analysis of neoplasms derived from hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:1349026

  4. Demographic consequences of greater clonal than sexual reproduction in Dicentra canadensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hua; Miriti, Maria N; Goodell, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Clonality is a widespread life history trait in flowering plants that may be essential for population persistence, especially in environments where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. Frequent clonal reproduction, however, could hinder sexual reproduction by spatially aggregating ramets that compete with seedlings and reduce inter-genet pollination. Nevertheless, the role of clonality in relation to variable sexual reproduction in population dynamics is often overlooked. We combined population matrix models and pollination experiments to compare the demographic contributions of clonal and sexual reproduction in three Dicentra canadensis populations, one in a well-forested landscape and two in isolated forest remnants. We constructed stage-based transition matrices from 3 years of census data to evaluate annual population growth rates, λ. We used loop analysis to evaluate the relative contribution of different reproductive pathways to λ. Despite strong temporal and spatial variation in seed set, populations generally showed stable growth rates. Although we detected some pollen limitation of seed set, manipulative pollination treatments did not affect population growth rates. Clonal reproduction contributed significantly more than sexual reproduction to population growth in the forest remnants. Only at the well-forested site did sexual reproduction contribute as much as clonal reproduction to population growth. Flowering plants were more likely to transition to a smaller size class with reduced reproductive potential in the following year than similarly sized nonflowering plants, suggesting energy trade-offs between sexual and clonal reproduction at the individual level. Seed production had negligible effects on growth and tuber production of individual plants. Our results demonstrate that clonal reproduction is vital for population persistence in a system where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. The bias toward clonality may be driven by low fitness returns

  5. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands.

  6. Integrating Clonal Selection and Deterministic Sampling for Efficient Associative Classification

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Samir A. Mohamed; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Ammar, Reda A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Associative Classification (AC) algorithms typically search for all possible association rules to find a representative subset of those rules. Since the search space of such rules may grow exponentially as the support threshold decreases, the rules discovery process can be computationally expensive. One effective way to tackle this problem is to directly find a set of high-stakes association rules that potentially builds a highly accurate classifier. This paper introduces AC-CS, an AC algorithm that integrates the clonal selection of the immune system along with deterministic data sampling. Upon picking a representative sample of the original data, it proceeds in an evolutionary fashion to populate only rules that are likely to yield good classification accuracy. Empirical results on several real datasets show that the approach generates dramatically less rules than traditional AC algorithms. In addition, the proposed approach is significantly more efficient than traditional AC algorithms while achieving a competitive accuracy. PMID:24500504

  7. Clonal mixtures of Salix - a control measure for rust

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, A.R.; Dawson, W.M.; Allen C.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Willow grown in short rotation coppice can be used as a renewable energy source. However, disease caused by Melampsora epitea var. epitea can be a severely limiting factor on its productivity. Populations of this pathogen in N. Ireland have been shown to be composed of at least fourteen pathotypes. Pathotype composition was influenced by time, age and clone. Fungicides were unacceptable to control disease, therefore the use of clonal mixtures was employed as an alternative strategy. When grown in mixtures the onset of disease was delayed, its build up slowed and final levels reduced. This was reflected in increased yield. Current work investigating the effect of planting density and increasing mixture diversity indicates that neither have a major impact on disease.

  8. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M; Cox, Roger D

    2015-04-17

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity.

  9. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  10. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  11. Negative plant soil feedback explaining ring formation in clonal plants.

    PubMed

    Cartenì, Fabrizio; Marasco, Addolorata; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Rietkerk, Max; Giannino, Francesco

    2012-11-21

    Ring shaped patches of clonal plants have been reported in different environments, but the mechanisms underlying such pattern formation are still poorly explained. Water depletion in the inner tussocks zone has been proposed as a possible cause, although ring patterns have been also observed in ecosystems without limiting water conditions. In this work, a spatially explicit model is presented in order to investigate the role of negative plant-soil feedback as an additional explanation for ring formation. The model describes the dynamics of the plant biomass in the presence of toxicity produced by the decomposition of accumulated litter in the soil. Our model qualitatively reproduces the emergence of ring patterns of a single clonal plant species during colonisation of a bare substrate. The model admits two homogeneous stationary solutions representing bare soil and uniform vegetation cover which depend only on the ratio between the biomass death and growth rates. Moreover, differently from other plant spatial patterns models, but in agreement with real field observations of vegetation dynamics, we demonstrated that the pattern dynamics always lead to spatially homogeneous vegetation covers without creation of stable Turing patterns. Analytical results show that ring formation is a function of two main components, the plant specific susceptibility to toxic compounds released in the soil by the accumulated litter and the decay rate of these same compounds, depending on environmental conditions. These components act at the same time and their respective intensities can give rise to the different ring structures observed in nature, ranging from slight reductions of biomass in patch centres, to the appearance of marked rings with bare inner zones, as well as the occurrence of ephemeral waves of plant cover. Our results highlight the potential role of plant-soil negative feedback depending on decomposition processes for the development of transient vegetation patterns.

  12. Clonal analysis of delayed karyotypic abnormalities and gene mutations in radiation-induced genetic instability.

    PubMed Central

    Grosovsky, A J; Parks, K K; Giver, C R; Nelson, S L

    1996-01-01

    Many tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal instability, but karyotypic alterations will be significant in carcinogenesis only by influencing specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor loci within the affected chromosomal segments. In this investigation, the specificity of chromosomal rearrangements attributable to radiation-induced genomic instability is detailed, and a qualitative and quantitative correspondence with mutagenesis is demonstrated. Chromosomal abnormalities preferentially occurred near the site of prior rearrangements, resulting in complex abnormalities, or near the centromere, resulting in deletion or translocation of the entire chromosome arm, but no case of an interstitial chromosomal deletion was observed. Evidence for chromosomal instability in the progeny of irradiated cells also included clonal karyotypic heterogeneity. The persistence of instability was demonstrated for at least 80 generations by elevated mutation rates at the heterozygous, autosomal marker locus tk. Among those TK- mutants that showed a loss of heterozygosity, a statistically significant increase in mutation rate was observed only for those in which the loss of heterozygosity encompasses the telomeric region. This mutational specificity corresponds with the prevalence of terminal deletions, additions, and translocations, and the absence of interstitial deletions, in karyotypic analysis. Surprisingly, the elevated rate of TK- mutations is also partially attributable to intragenic base substitutions and small deletions, and DNA sequence analysis of some of these mutations is presented. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to be the most significant indicators of a high rate of persistent genetic instability which correlates with increased rates of both intragenic and chromosomal-scale mutations at tk. PMID:8887655

  13. Ice age cloning--comparison of the Quaternary evolutionary histories of sexual and clonal forms of spiny loaches (Cobitis; Teleostei) using the analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Janko, K; Culling, M A; Ráb, P; Kotlík, P

    2005-09-01

    Recent advances in population history reconstruction offered a powerful tool for comparisons of the abilities of sexual and clonal forms to respond to Quaternary climatic oscillations, ultimately leading to inferences about the advantages and disadvantages of a given mode of reproduction. We reconstructed the Quaternary historical biogeography of the sexual parental species and clonal hybrid lineages within the Europe-wide hybrid complex of Cobitis spiny loaches. Cobitis elongatoides and Cobitis taenia recolonizing Europe from separated refuges met in central Europe and the Pontic region giving rise to hybrid lineages during the Holocene. Cobitis elongatoides due to its long-term reproductive contact with the remaining parental species of the complex--C. tanaitica and C. spec.--gave rise to two clonal hybrid lineages probably during the last interglacial or even earlier, which survived the Würmian glaciation with C. elongatoides. These lineages followed C. elongatoides postglacial expansion and probably decreased its dispersal rate. Our data indicate the frequent origins of asexuality irrespective of the parental populations involved and the comparable dispersal potential of diploid and triploid lineages.

  14. Detecting truly clonal alterations from multi-region profiling of tumours

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Benjamin; Traulsen, Arne; Sottoriva, Andrea; Dingli, David

    2017-01-01

    Modern cancer therapies aim at targeting tumour-specific alterations, such as mutations or neo-antigens, and maximal treatment efficacy requires that targeted alterations are present in all tumour cells. Currently, treatment decisions are based on one or a few samples per tumour, creating uncertainty on whether alterations found in those samples are actually present in all tumour cells. The probability of classifying clonal versus sub-clonal alterations from multi-region profiling of tumours depends on the earliest phylogenetic branching event during tumour growth. By analysing 181 samples from 10 renal carcinoma and 11 colorectal cancers we demonstrate that the information gain from additional sampling falls onto a simple universal curve. We found that in colorectal cancers, 30% of alterations identified as clonal with one biopsy proved sub-clonal when 8 samples were considered. The probability to overestimate clonal alterations fell below 1% in 7/11 patients with 8 samples per tumour. In renal cell carcinoma, 8 samples reduced the list of clonal alterations by 40% with respect to a single biopsy. The probability to overestimate clonal alterations remained as high as 92% in 7/10 renal cancer patients. Furthermore, treatment was associated with more unbalanced tumour phylogenetic trees, suggesting the need of denser sampling of tumours at relapse. PMID:28344344

  15. Clonal diversity and estimation of relative clone age: application to agrobiodiversity of yam (Dioscorea rotundata)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonal propagation is a particular reproductive system found in both the plant and animal kingdoms, from human parasites to clonally propagated crops. Clonal diversity provides information about plant and animal evolutionary history, i.e. how clones spread, or the age of a particular clone. In plants, this could provide valuable information about agrobiodiversity dynamics and more broadly about the evolutionary history of a particular crop. We studied the evolutionary history of yam, Dioscorea rotundata. In Africa, Yam is cultivated by tuber clonal propagation. Results We used 12 microsatellite markers to identify intra-clonal diversity in yam varieties. We then used this diversity to assess the relative ages of clones. Using simulations, we assessed how Approximate Bayesian Computation could use clonal diversity to estimate the age of a clone depending on the size of the sample, the number of independent samples and the number of markers. We then applied this approach to our particular dataset and showed that the relative ages of varieties could be estimated, and that each variety could be ranked by age. Conclusions We give a first estimation of clone age in an approximate Bayesian framework. However the precise estimation of clone age depends on the precision of the mutation rate. We provide useful information on agrobiodiversity dynamics and suggest recurrent creation of varietal diversity in a clonally propagated crop. PMID:24219837

  16. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients. PMID:27246203

  17. Clonal reproduction shapes evolution in the lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense.

    PubMed

    Falk, Bryan G; Glor, Richard E; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-06-01

    The preponderant clonal evolution hypothesis (PCE) predicts that frequent clonal reproduction (sex between two clones) in many pathogens capable of sexual recombination results in strong linkage disequilibrium and the presence of discrete genetic subdivisions characterized by occasional gene flow. We expand on the PCE and predict that higher rates of clonal reproduction will result in: (1) morphologically cryptic species that exhibit (2) low within-species variation and (3) recent between-species divergence. We tested these predictions in the Caribbean lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense using 63 single-infection samples in lizards collected from across the parasite's range, and sequenced them at two mitochondrial, one apicoplast, and five nuclear genes. We identified 11 provisionally cryptic species within P. floridense, each of which exhibits low intraspecific variation and recent divergence times between species (some diverged approximately 110,000 years ago). Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that clonal reproduction can profoundly affect diversification of species capable of sexual recombination, and suggest that clonal reproduction may have led to a large number of unrecognized pathogen species. The factors that may influence the rates of clonal reproduction among pathogens are unclear, and we discuss how prevalence and virulence may relate to clonal reproduction.

  18. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-06-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients.

  19. Clonal Plasticity of Aquatic Plant Species Submitted to Mechanical Stress: Escape versus Resistance Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Puijalon, Sara; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Van Groenendael, Jan; Bornette, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The plastic alterations of clonal architecture are likely to have functional consequences, as they affect the spatial distribution of ramets over patchy environments. However, little is known about the effect of mechanical stresses on the clonal growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clonal plasticity induced by mechanical stress consisting of continuous water current encountered by aquatic plants. More particularly, the aim was to test the capacity of the plants to escape this stress through clonal plastic responses. Methods The transplantation of ramets of the same clone in two contrasting flow velocity conditions was carried out for two species (Potamogeton coloratus and Mentha aquatica) which have contrasting clonal growth forms. Relative allocation to clonal growth, to creeping stems in the clonal biomass, number and total length of creeping stems, spacer length and main creeping stem direction were measured. Key Results For P. coloratus, plants exposed to water current displayed increased total length of creeping stems, increased relative allocation to creeping stems within the clonal dry mass and increased spacer length. For M. aquatica, plants exposed to current displayed increased number and total length of creeping stems. Exposure to current induced for both species a significant increase of the proportion of creeping stems in the downstream direction to the detriment of creeping stems perpendicular to flow. Conclusions This study demonstrates that mechanical stress from current flow induced plastic variation in clonal traits for both species. The responses of P. coloratus could lead to an escape strategy, with low benefits with respect to sheltering and anchorage. The responses of M. aquatica that may result in a denser canopy and enhancement of anchorage efficiency could lead to a resistance strategy. PMID:18854376

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus hominis (MRSHo): Low Clonality and Reservoirs of SCCmec Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Bouchami, Ons; Ben Hassen, Assia; de Lencastre, Herminia; Miragaia, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus hominis (MRSHo) are important human pathogens in immunocompromised patients. However, little is known regarding its population structure and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) content. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the population structure and the SCCmec content of S. hominis, 34 MRSHo and 11 methicillin-susceptible S. hominis (MSSHo) from neutropenic patients collected over a 3-year period were studied. The genetic backgrounds of S. hominis isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and SCCmec types were determined by PCR. Cassette chromosome recombinases (ccr) were characterized by PCR and ccrB sequencing. The 34 S. hominis isolates were classified into as many as 28 types and 32 subtypes (SID = 99.82%); clonal dissemination was occasionally observed. The main SCCmec structures identified were SCCmec type VI (4B) (20%), SCCmec VIII (4A) (15%), and a new SCCmec composed of mec complex A in association with ccrAB1 (38%); 27% of the isolates harbored non-typeable SCCmec. Overall, a high prevalence of mec complex A (73.5%), ccrAB1 (50%) and ccrAB4 (44%) were found. Importantly, ccrB1 and ccrB4 from both MRSHo and MSSHo showed a high nucleotide sequence homology with those found in S. aureus SCCmec I, VI and VIII respectively (>95%). Conclusions/Significance The S. hominis population showed a limited clonality and a low genetic diversity in the allotypes of ccr and classes of mec complex. Moreover, our data suggest that S. hominis might have been a privileged source of mec complex A, ccrB1 and ccrB4, for the assembly of primordial SCCmec types. PMID:21760926

  1. Clonal analysis of meningococci during a 26 year period prior to the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Christopher B; Diggle, Mathew A; Davies, Robert L; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a public health burden in the UK and elsewhere. Invasive Neisseria meningitidis, isolated in Scotland between 1972 and 1998, were characterised retrospectively to examine the serogroup and clonal structure of the circulating population. 2607 isolates causing invasive disease were available for serogroup and MLST analysis whilst 2517 were available for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis only. Serogroup distribution changed from year to year but serogroups B and C were dominant throughout. Serogroup B was dominant throughout the 1970s and early 1980s until serogroup C became dominant during the mid-1980s. The increase in serogroup C was not associated with one particular sequence type (ST) but was associated with a number of STs, including ST-8, ST-11, ST-206 and ST-334. This is in contrast to the increase in serogroup C disease seen in the 1990s that was due to expansion of the ST-11 clonal complex. While there was considerable diversity among the isolates (309 different STs among the 2607 isolates), a large proportion of isolates (59.9%) were associated with only 10 STs. These data highlight meningococcal diversity over time and the need for ongoing surveillance during the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines.

  2. Microsatellites within the feline androgen receptor are suitable for X chromosome-linked clonality testing in archival material.

    PubMed

    Farwick, Nadine M; Klopfleisch, Robert; Gruber, Achim D; Weiss, Alexander Th A

    2017-04-01

    Objectives A hallmark of neoplasms is their origin from a single cell; that is, clonality. Many techniques have been developed in human medicine to utilise this feature of tumours for diagnostic purposes. One approach is X chromosome-linked clonality testing using polymorphisms of genes encoded by genes on the X chromosome. The aim of this study was to determine if the feline androgen receptor gene was suitable for X chromosome-linked clonality testing. Methods The feline androgen receptor gene was characterised and used to test clonality of feline lymphomas by PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Results Clonality of the feline lymphomas under study was confirmed and the gene locus was shown to represent a suitable target in clonality testing. Conclusions and relevance Because there are some pitfalls of using X chromosome-linked clonality testing, further studies are necessary to establish this technique in the cat.

  3. Clonal relationships among bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maslow, J N; Whittam, T S; Gilks, C F; Wilson, R A; Mulligan, M E; Adams, K S; Arbeit, R D

    1995-07-01

    The clonal relationships among 187 bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli from 179 patients at Boston, Mass., Long Beach, Calif., and Nairobi, Kenya, were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), analysis of polymorphisms associated with the ribosomal operon (ribotyping), and serotyping. MLEE based on 20 enzymes resolved 101 electrophoretic types (ETs), forming five clusters; ribotyping resolved 56 distinct patterns concordant with the analysis by MLEE. The isolates at each study site formed a genetically diverse group and demonstrated similar clonal structures, with the same small subset of lineages accounting for the majority of isolates at each site. Moreover, two ribotypes accounted for approximately 30% of the isolates at each study site. One cluster contained the majority (65%) of isolates and, by direct comparison of the ETs and ribotypes of individual isolates, was genetically indistinguishable from the largest cluster for each of two other collections of E. coli causing pyelonephritis and neonatal meningitis (R. K. Selander, T. K. Korhonen, V. Väisänen-Rhen, P. H. Williams, P. E. Pattison, and D. A. Caugent, Infect. Immun. 52:213-222, 1986; M. Arthur, C. E. Johnson, R. H. Rubin, R. D. Arbeit, C. Campanelli, C. Kim, S. Steinbach, M. Agarwal, R. Wilkinson, and R. Goldstein, Infect. Immun. 57:303-313, 1989), thus defining a virulent set of lineages. The isolates within these virulent lineages typically carried DNA homologous to the adhesin operon pap or sfa and the hemolysin operon hly and expressed O1, O2, O4, O6, O18, O25, or O75 antigens. DNA homologous to pap was distributed among isolates of each major cluster, whereas hly was restricted to isolates of two clusters, typically detected in pap-positive strains, and sfa was restricted to isolates of one cluster, typically detected in pap- and hly-positive strains. The occurrence of pap-positive isolates in the same geographically and genetically divergent lineages suggests that this

  4. Clonality in myeloproliferative disorders: Analysis by means of polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, D.G.; Blanchard, K.L.; Levy, J.; Perrin, S.; Bunn, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The myeloproliferative syndromes are acquired disorders of hematopoiesis that provide insights into the transition from somatic cell mutation to neoplasia. The clonal origin of specific blood cells can be assessed in patients with X chromosome-linked polymorphisms, taking advantage of random inactivation of the X chromosome. The authors have adapted the PCR for determination of clonality on as few as 100 cells, including individual colonies grown in culture. Amplifying a polymorphic portion of the X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene after selective digestion of the active X chromosome with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme gave results fully concordant with standard Southern blotting of DNA samples form normal (polyclonal) polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) as well as clonal PMN from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and polycythemia vera (PCV). They have used this technique to demonstrate heterogeneity of lineage involvement in patients with PCV. The same clinical phenotype may arise from clonal proliferation of different hematopoietic progenitors.

  5. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  6. T-cell stimuli independently sum to regulate an inherited clonal division fate

    PubMed Central

    Marchingo, J. M.; Prevedello, G.; Kan, A.; Heinzel, S.; Hodgkin, P. D.; Duffy, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of antigen and costimulation, T cells undergo a characteristic response of expansion, cessation and contraction. Previous studies have revealed that population-level reproducibility is a consequence of multiple clones exhibiting considerable disparity in burst size, highlighting the requirement for single-cell information in understanding T-cell fate regulation. Here we show that individual T-cell clones resulting from controlled stimulation in vitro are strongly lineage imprinted with highly correlated expansion fates. Progeny from clonal families cease dividing in the same or adjacent generations, with inter-clonal variation producing burst-size diversity. The effects of costimulatory signals on individual clones sum together with stochastic independence; therefore, the net effect across multiple clones produces consistent, but heterogeneous population responses. These data demonstrate that substantial clonal heterogeneity arises through differences in experience of clonal progenitors, either through stochastic antigen interaction or by differences in initial receptor sensitivities. PMID:27869196

  7. Detectable clonal mosaicism from birth to old age and its relationship to cancer.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Rice, Kenneth; Doheny, Kimberly F; Zelnick, Leila R; McHugh, Caitlin P; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Amos, Chris; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Li-e; Lee, Jeffrey E; Barnes, Kathleen C; Hansel, Nadia N; Mathias, Rasika; Daley, Denise; Beaty, Terri H; Scott, Alan F; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scharpf, Rob B; Bierut, Laura J; Hartz, Sarah M; Landi, Maria Teresa; Freedman, Neal D; Goldin, Lynn R; Ginsburg, David; Li, Jun; Desch, Karl C; Strom, Sara S; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Ingles, Sue A; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Monroe, Kristine R; Heit, John A; de Andrade, Mariza; Armasu, Sebastian M; Regnier, Cynthia; Lowe, William L; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Marazita, Mary L; Feingold, Eleanor; Murray, Jeffrey C; Melbye, Mads; Feenstra, Bjarke; Kang, Jae H; Wiggs, Janey L; Jarvik, Gail P; McDavid, Andrew N; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Mirel, Daniel B; Crenshaw, Andrew; Sharopova, Nataliya; Wise, Anastasia; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David R; Levine, David M; Zheng, Xiuwen; Udren, Jenna I; Bennett, Siiri; Nelson, Sarah C; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Conomos, Matthew P; Heagerty, Patrick; Manolio, Teri; Pasquale, Louis R; Haiman, Christopher A; Caporaso, Neil; Weir, Bruce S

    2012-05-06

    We detected clonal mosaicism for large chromosomal anomalies (duplications, deletions and uniparental disomy) using SNP microarray data from over 50,000 subjects recruited for genome-wide association studies. This detection method requires a relatively high frequency of cells with the same abnormal karyotype (>5-10%; presumably of clonal origin) in the presence of normal cells. The frequency of detectable clonal mosaicism in peripheral blood is low (<0.5%) from birth until 50 years of age, after which it rapidly rises to 2-3% in the elderly. Many of the mosaic anomalies are characteristic of those found in hematological cancers and identify common deleted regions with genes previously associated with these cancers. Although only 3% of subjects with detectable clonal mosaicism had any record of hematological cancer before DNA sampling, those without a previous diagnosis have an estimated tenfold higher risk of a subsequent hematological cancer (95% confidence interval = 6-18).

  8. Temporal dynamics of genotypic diversity reveal strong clonal selection in the aphid Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, C

    2006-01-01

    Parthenogenetic organisms often harbour substantial genotypic diversity. This diversity may be the result of recurrent formations of new clones, or it may be maintained by environmental heterogeneity acting on ecological differences among clones. In aphids, both processes may be important because obligate and cyclical parthenogens can form mixed populations. Using microsatellites, I analysed the temporal dynamics of clonal diversity in such a population of the aphid Myzus persicae over a 1-year period. The frequency distribution of clonal genotypes was very skewed, with many rare and few common clones. The relative frequencies of common clones underwent strong and rapid changes indicative of intense clonal selection. Differences in their host associations suggest that these shifts may partly be caused by changes in the abundance of annual host plants. Other selective factors of potential importance are also discussed. New, sexually produced genotypes made a minor contribution to clonal diversity, consistent with the observed heterozygote excess characteristic of predominantly asexual populations in M. persicae.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of Plasmodium falciparum clonally variant gene expression during development in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Yerbanga, Rakiswendé S.; Lefèvre, Thierry; Cohuet, Anna; Rowley, M. Jordan; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Corces, Victor G.

    2017-01-01

    P. falciparum phenotypic plasticity is linked to the variant expression of clonal multigene families such as the var genes. We have examined changes in transcription and histone modifications that occur during sporogonic development of P. falciparum in the mosquito host. All var genes are silenced or transcribed at low levels in blood stages (gametocyte/ring) of the parasite in the human host. After infection of mosquitoes, a single var gene is selected for expression in the oocyst, and transcription of this gene increases dramatically in the sporozoite. The same PF3D7_1255200 var gene was activated in 4 different experimental infections. Transcription of this var gene during parasite development in the mosquito correlates with the presence of low levels of H3K9me3 at the binding site for the PF3D7_1466400 AP2 transcription factor. This chromatin state in the sporozoite also correlates with the expression of an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that has previously been shown to promote var gene transcription during the intraerythrocytic cycle in vitro. Expression of both the sense protein-coding transcript and the antisense lncRNA increase dramatically in sporozoites. The findings suggest a complex process for the activation of a single particular var gene that involves AP2 transcription factors and lncRNAs. PMID:28091569

  10. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections.

  11. Metalaxyl Resistance in Phytophthora infestans: Assessing Role of RPA190 Gene and Diversity Within Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Matson, Michael E H; Small, Ian M; Fry, William E; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-12-01

    Prior work has shown that the inheritance of resistance to metalaxyl, an oomycete-specific fungicide, is complex and may involve multiple genes. Recent research indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene encoding RPA190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, confers resistance to metalaxyl (or mefenoxam) in some isolates of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Using both DNA sequencing and high resolution melt assays for distinguishing RPA190 alleles, we show here that the SNP is absent from certain resistant isolates of P. infestans from North America, Europe, and Mexico. The SNP is present in some members of the US-23 and US-24 clonal lineages, but these tend to be fairly sensitive to the fungicide based on artificial media and field test data. Diversity in the level of sensitivity, RPA190 genotype, and RPA190 copy number was observed in these lineages but were uncorrelated. Controlled laboratory crosses demonstrated that RPA190 did not cosegregate with metalaxyl resistance from a Mexican and British isolate. We conclude that while metalaxyl may be used to control many contemporary strains of P. infestans, an assay based on RPA190 will not be sufficient to diagnose the sensitivity levels of isolates.

  12. Autoimmunity since the 1957 clonal selection theory: a little acorn to a large oak.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on autoimmunity is examined from the launch of clonal selection theory 1957-1959. Crucial elements then were 'forbidden clones' of immunocytes as agents of tissue damage, somatic mutations that generated such clones and 'homeostatic mechanisms' that controlled them. The understanding of autoimmunity over the succeeding 50 years has expanded immensely, and many more diseases now come under this rubric. Examined here are current problems of definition including 'adaptive' and 'innate' types of autoimmunity, estimations of population burdens of autoimmune diseases, the nature of autoepitopes in the context of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65, and the complexities of immune tolerance and the genetic influences thereon, leading to the nomination of multiple 'tolerance/autoimmunity' genes as critical components of pathogenesis. Burnet's concept of mutagenesis as a basic feature of various pathologies including autoimmunity is given a contemporary focus, his views on deletional tolerance have been well vindicated, his 'forbidden clones' remain as unphysiological as before albeit phenotypically resembling normal lymphocytes, and his 'homeostatic mechanisms' can be now interpreted in terms of immunoregulatory networks.

  13. Clonal dominance among T-lymphocyte infiltrates in arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, I.; Stegagno, M.; Wright, K.A.; Krane, S.M.; Amento, E.P.; Colvin, R.B.; Duquesnoy, R.J.; Kurnick, J.T.

    1988-02-01

    Synovial membranes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as other types of chronic destructive inflammatory arthritis contain infiltrates of activated T lymphocytes that probably contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. In an effort to elucidate the nature of these infiltrates, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-responsive T lymphocytes were grown out of synovial fragments from 14 patients undergoing surgery for advanced destructive inflammatory joint disease. Eleven of the samples examined were from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis, while three others were obtained from individuals with clinical osteoarthritis. Southern blot analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) ..beta..-chain genes in 13 of 14 cultures showed distinct rearrangements, indicating that each culture was characterized by the predominance of a limited number of clones. T-cell populations from peripheral blood stimulated with a variety of activators and expanded with IL-2 did not demonstrate evidence of similar clonality in long-term culture. These results suggest that a limited number of activated T-cell clones predominate at the site of tissue injury in rheumatoid synovial membranes as well as in other types of destructive inflammatory joint disease. Further characterization of these T-cell clones may aid our understanding of the pathogenesis of these rheumatic disorders.

  14. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  15. T cell fate and clonality inference from single cell transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O.; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The enormous sequence diversity within T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires allows specific TCR sequences to be used as lineage markers for T cells that derive from a common progenitor. We have developed a computational method, called TraCeR, to reconstruct full-length, paired TCR sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA-seq by combining existing assembly and alignment programs with “combinatorial recombinome” sequences comprising all possible TCR combinations. We validate this method to quantify its accuracy and sensitivity. Inferred TCR sequences reveal clonal relationships between T cells whilst the cells’ complete transcriptional landscapes can be quantified from the remaining RNA-seq data. This provides a powerful tool to link T cell specificity with functional response and we demonstrate this by determining the distribution of members of expanded T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model. Members of the same clonotype span early activated CD4+ T cells, as well as mature effector and memory cells. PMID:26950746

  16. Quantifying Clonal and Subclonal Passenger Mutations in Cancer Evolution.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Ivana; Gerold, Jeffrey M; Nowak, Martin A

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority of mutations in the exome of cancer cells are passengers, which do not affect the reproductive rate of the cell. Passengers can provide important information about the evolutionary history of an individual cancer, and serve as a molecular clock. Passengers can also become targets for immunotherapy or confer resistance to treatment. We study the stochastic expansion of a population of cancer cells describing the growth of primary tumors or metastatic lesions. We first analyze the process by looking forward in time and calculate the fixation probabilities and frequencies of successive passenger mutations ordered by their time of appearance. We compute the likelihood of specific evolutionary trees, thereby informing the phylogenetic reconstruction of cancer evolution in individual patients. Next, we derive results looking backward in time: for a given subclonal mutation we estimate the number of cancer cells that were present at the time when that mutation arose. We derive exact formulas for the expected numbers of subclonal mutations of any frequency. Fitting this formula to cancer sequencing data leads to an estimate for the ratio of birth and death rates of cancer cells during the early stages of clonal expansion.

  17. Plasmid and clonal interference during post horizontal gene transfer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, S; Perez Pantoja, D; Bravo, I G

    2017-02-16

    Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high-copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions. This conflict between cellular fitness and plasmid spread sets the scene for multilevel selection processes. We have engineered a system to study the short-term evolutionary impact of different synonymous versions of a plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance gene. Applying experimental evolution under different selection conditions and deep sequencing allowed us to show rapid local adaptation to the presence of antibiotic and to the specific version of the resistance gene transferred. We describe the presence of clonal interference at two different levels: at the within-cell level, because a single cell can carry several plasmids, and at the between-cell level, because a bacterial population may contain several clones carrying different plasmids and displaying different fitness in the presence/absence of antibiotic. Understanding the within-cell and between-cell dynamics of plasmids after horizontal gene transfer is essential to unravel the dense network of mobile elements underlying the worldwide threat to public health of antibiotic resistance.

  18. Decoding astrocyte heterogeneity: New tools for clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Bribián, A; Figueres-Oñate, M; Martín-López, E; López-Mascaraque, L

    2016-05-26

    The importance of astrocyte heterogeneity came out as a hot topic in neurosciences especially over the last decades, when the development of new methodologies allowed demonstrating the existence of big differences in morphological, neurochemical and physiological features between astrocytes. However, although the knowledge about the biology of astrocytes is increasing rapidly, an important characteristic that remained unexplored, until the last years, has been the relationship between astrocyte lineages and cell heterogeneity. To fill this gap, a new method called StarTrack was recently developed, a powerful genetic tool that allows tracking astrocyte lineages forming cell clones. Using StarTrack, a single astrocyte progenitor and its progeny can be specifically labeled from its generation, during embryonic development, to its final fate in the adult brain. Because of this specific labeling, astrocyte clones, exhibiting heterogeneous morphologies and features, can be easily analyzed in relation to their ontogenetic origin. This review summarizes how astrocyte heterogeneity can be decoded studying the embryonic development of astrocyte lineages and their clonal relationship. Finally, we discuss about some of the challenges and opportunities emerging in this exciting area of investigation.

  19. Clonal competition with alternating dominance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Keats, Jonathan J.; Chesi, Marta; Egan, Jan B.; Garbitt, Victoria M.; Palmer, Stephen E.; Braggio, Esteban; Van Wier, Scott; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Baker, Angela S.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Carpten, John D.; Barrett, Michael; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that tumors can follow several evolutionary paths over a patient's disease course. With the use of serial genomic analysis of samples collected at different points during the disease course of 28 patients with multiple myeloma, we found that the genomes of standard-risk patients show few changes over time, whereas those of cytogenetically high-risk patients show significantly more changes over time. The results indicate the existence of 3 temporal tumor types, which can either be genetically stable, linearly evolving, or heterogeneous clonal mixtures with shifting predominant clones. A detailed analysis of one high-risk patient sampled at 7 time points over the entire disease course identified 2 competing subclones that alternate in a back and forth manner for dominance with therapy until one clone underwent a dramatic linear evolution. With the use of the Vk*MYC genetically engineered mouse model of myeloma we modeled this competition between subclones for predominance occurring spontaneously and with therapeutic selection. PMID:22498740

  20. Adapting clinical paradigms to the challenges of cancer clonal evolution.

    PubMed

    Murugaesu, Nirupa; Chew, Su Kit; Swanton, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer branched evolution may affect biomarker validation, clinical outcome, and emergence of drug resistance. The changing spatial and temporal nature of cancer subclonal architecture during the disease course suggests the need for longitudinal prospective studies of cancer evolution and robust and clinically implementable pathologic definitions of intratumor heterogeneity, genetic diversity, and chromosomal instability. Furthermore, subclonal heterogeneous events in tumors may evade detection through conventional biomarker strategies and influence clinical outcome. Minimally invasive methods for the study of cancer evolution and new approaches to clinical study design, incorporating understanding of the dynamics of tumor clonal architectures through treatment and during acquisition of drug resistance, have been suggested as important areas for development. Coordinated efforts will be required by the scientific and clinical trial communities to adapt to the challenges of detecting infrequently occurring somatic events that may influence clinical outcome and to understand the dynamics of cancer evolution and the waxing and waning of tumor subclones over time in advanced metastatic epithelial malignancies.

  1. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  2. Bacterial diversity of symptomatic primary endodontic infection by clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Letícia Maria Menezes; Montagner, Francisco; Ribeiro, Adriana Costa; Mayer, Márcia Alves Pinto; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to explore the bacterial diversity of 10 root canals with acute apical abscess using clonal analysis. Samples were collected from 10 patients and submitted to bacterial DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning, and sequencing. A bacterial genomic library was constructed and bacterial diversity was estimated. The mean number of taxa per canal was 15, ranging from 11 to 21. A total of 689 clones were analyzed and 76 phylotypes identified, of which 47 (61.84%) were different species and 29 (38.15%) were taxa reported as yet-uncultivable or as yet-uncharacterized species. Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis were the most frequently detected species, followed by Dialister invisus, Phocaeicola abscessus, the uncharacterized Lachnospiraceae oral clone, Porphyromonas spp., and Parvimonas micra. Eight phyla were detected and the most frequently identified taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (43.5%), followed by Bacteroidetes (22.5%) and Proteobacteria (13.2%). No species was detected in all studied samples and some species were identified in only one case. It was concluded that acute primary endodontic infection is characterized by wide bacterial diversity and a high intersubject variability was observed. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, were the most frequently detected microorganisms.

  3. Emerging sporotrichosis is driven by clonal and recombinant Sporothrix species

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, GSybren; Zhang, Yu; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis, caused by agents of the fungal genus Sporothrix, occurs worldwide, but the infectious species are not evenly distributed. Sporothrix propagules usually gain entry into the warm-blooded host through minor trauma to the skin from contaminated plant debris or through scratches or bites from felines carrying the disease, generally in the form of outbreaks. Over the last decade, sporotrichosis has changed from a relatively obscure endemic infection to an epidemic zoonotic health problem. We evaluated the impact of the feline host on the epidemiology, spatial distribution, prevalence and genetic diversity of human sporotrichosis. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers revealed large structural genetic differences between S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii populations, suggesting that the interplay of host, pathogen and environment has a structuring effect on the diversity, frequency and distribution of Sporothrix species. Phylogenetic data support a recent habitat shift within S. brasiliensis from plant to cat that seems to have occurred in southeastern Brazil and is responsible for its emergence. A clonal structure was found in the early expansionary phase of the cat–human epidemic. However, the prevalent recombination structure in the plant-associated pathogen S. schenckii generates a diversity of genotypes that did not show any significant increase in frequency as etiological agents of human infection over time. These results suggest that closely related pathogens can follow different strategies in epidemics. Thus, species-specific types of transmission may require distinct public health strategies for disease control. PMID:26038739

  4. Plastic reproductive strategies in a clonal marine invertebrate.

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Tamara M

    2003-01-01

    Plastic reproductive allocation may allow individuals to maximize their fitness when conditions vary. Mate availability is one condition that may determine the fitness of an individual's allocation strategy. Using a variety of methods, I detected evidence of plastic allocation to asexual (clonal) reproduction in response to mate availability in the brittle star Ophiactis savignyi. There were more mature individuals in populations in which both sexes were present, and clones from these populations had fewer clone-mates than clones from single-sex populations. Animals placed with mates in a field experiment divided less frequently than animals without a mate. These findings demonstrate that animals reduce their allocation to asexual reproduction when mates are present and when a loss of fecundity associated with cloning would decrease offspring production. This plasticity is probably adaptive because it maximizes sexual-reproductive potential when fertilization is more likely, but maximizes survival of the clone when mates are absent and gametes are unlikely to be converted to offspring. PMID:14667344

  5. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  6. Quantifying Clonal and Subclonal Passenger Mutations in Cancer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Ivana; Gerold, Jeffrey M.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of mutations in the exome of cancer cells are passengers, which do not affect the reproductive rate of the cell. Passengers can provide important information about the evolutionary history of an individual cancer, and serve as a molecular clock. Passengers can also become targets for immunotherapy or confer resistance to treatment. We study the stochastic expansion of a population of cancer cells describing the growth of primary tumors or metastatic lesions. We first analyze the process by looking forward in time and calculate the fixation probabilities and frequencies of successive passenger mutations ordered by their time of appearance. We compute the likelihood of specific evolutionary trees, thereby informing the phylogenetic reconstruction of cancer evolution in individual patients. Next, we derive results looking backward in time: for a given subclonal mutation we estimate the number of cancer cells that were present at the time when that mutation arose. We derive exact formulas for the expected numbers of subclonal mutations of any frequency. Fitting this formula to cancer sequencing data leads to an estimate for the ratio of birth and death rates of cancer cells during the early stages of clonal expansion. PMID:26828429

  7. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and pyrosequencing for the characterization of the dentine caries-associated microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Schweifing, Kathrin; Banerjee, Avijit; Wade, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas, and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture. PMID:25429361

  8. Longevity of clonal plants: why it matters and how to measure it

    PubMed Central

    de Witte, Lucienne C.; Stöcklin, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Background Species' life-history and population dynamics are strongly shaped by the longevity of individuals, but life span is one of the least accessible demographic traits, particularly in clonal plants. Continuous vegetative reproduction of genets enables persistence despite low or no sexual reproduction, affecting genet turnover rates and population stability. Therefore, the longevity of clonal plants is of considerable biological interest, but remains relatively poorly known. Scope Here, we critically review the present knowledge on the longevity of clonal plants and discuss its importance for population persistence. Direct life-span measurements such as growth-ring analysis in woody plants are relatively easy to take, although, for many clonal plants, these methods are not adequate due to the variable growth pattern of ramets and difficult genet identification. Recently, indirect methods have been introduced in which genet size and annual shoot increments are used to estimate genet age. These methods, often based on molecular techniques, allow the investigation of genet size and age structure of whole populations, a crucial issue for understanding their viability and persistence. However, indirect estimates of clonal longevity are impeded because the process of ageing in clonal plants is still poorly understood and because their size and age are not always well correlated. Alternative estimators for genet life span such as somatic mutations have recently been suggested. Conclusions Empirical knowledge on the longevity of clonal species has increased considerably in the last few years. Maximum age estimates are an indicator of population persistence, but are not sufficient to evaluate turnover rates and the ability of long-lived clonal plants to enhance community stability and ecosystem resilience. In order to understand the dynamics of populations it will be necessary to measure genet size and age structure, not only life spans of single individuals, and to

  9. Differential Influence of Clonal Integration on Morphological and Growth Responses to Light in Two Invasive Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Schooler, Shon S.; Van Klinken, Rieks D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims In contrast to seeds, high sensitivity of vegetative fragments to unfavourable environments may limit the expansion of clonal invasive plants. However, clonal integration promotes the establishment of propagules in less suitable habitats and may facilitate the expansion of clonal invaders into intact native communities. Here, we examine the influence of clonal integration on the morphology and growth of ramets in two invasive plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides and Phyla canescens, under varying light conditions. Methods In a greenhouse experiment, branches, connected ramets and severed ramets of the same mother plant were exposed under full sun and 85% shade and their morphological and growth responses were assessed. Key results The influence of clonal integration on the light reaction norm (connection×light interaction) of daughter ramets was species-specific. For A. philoxeroides, clonal integration evened out the light response (total biomass, leaf mass per area, and stem number, diameter and length) displayed in severed ramets, but these connection×light interactions were largely absent for P. canescens. Nevertheless, for both species, clonal integration overwhelmed light effect in promoting the growth of juvenile ramets during early development. Also, vertical growth, as an apparent shade acclimation response, was more prevalent in severed ramets than in connected ramets. Finally, unrooted branches displayed smaller organ size and slower growth than connected ramets, but the pattern of light reaction was similar, suggesting mother plants invest in daughter ramets prior to their own branches. Conclusions Clonal integration modifies light reaction norms of morphological and growth traits in a species-specific manner for A. philoxeroides and P. canescens, but it improves the establishment of juvenile ramets of both species in light-limiting environments by promoting their growth during early development. This factor may be partially

  10. PyClone: statistical inference of clonal population structure in cancer.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Khattra, Jaswinder; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Ha, Gavin; Aparicio, Samuel; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Shah, Sohrab P

    2014-04-01

    We introduce PyClone, a statistical model for inference of clonal population structures in cancers. PyClone is a Bayesian clustering method for grouping sets of deeply sequenced somatic mutations into putative clonal clusters while estimating their cellular prevalences and accounting for allelic imbalances introduced by segmental copy-number changes and normal-cell contamination. Single-cell sequencing validation demonstrates PyClone's accuracy.

  11. Chromosome aberrations of clonal origin are present in astronauts' blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Durante, M.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome translocations remain in peripheral blood cells over many years, and can potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low-dose rate exposures. However, several recent studies have indicated that some individuals possess clones of cells with balanced chromosome abnormalities, which can result in an overestimation of damage and, therefore, influence the accuracy of dose calculations. We carefully examined the patterns of chromosome damage found in the blood lymphocytes of twelve astronauts, and also applied statistical methods to screen for the presence of potential clones. Cells with clonal aberrations were identified in three of the twelve individuals. These clonal cells were present in samples collected both before and after space flight, and yields are higher than previously reported for healthy individuals in this age range (40-52 years of age). The frequency of clonal damage appears to be even greater in chromosomes prematurely condensed in interphase, when compared with equivalent analysis in metaphase cells. The individuals with clonal aberrations were followed-up over several months and the yields of all clones decreased during this period. Since clonal aberrations may be associated with increased risk of tumorigenesis, it is important to accurately identify cells containing clonal rearrangements for risk assessment as well as biodosimetry. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [15N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes. PMID:26904051

  13. Gene Loss Dominates As a Source of Genetic Variation within Clonal Pathogenic Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-07-10

    Some of the most dangerous pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Yersinia pestis evolve clonally. This means that little or no recombination occurs between strains belonging to these species. Paradoxically, although different members of these species show extreme sequence similarity of orthologous genes, some show considerable intraspecies phenotypic variation, the source of which remains elusive. To examine the possible sources of phenotypic variation within clonal pathogenic bacterial species, we carried out an extensive genomic and pan-genomic analysis of the sources of genetic variation available to a large collection of clonal and nonclonal pathogenic bacterial species. We show that while nonclonal species diversify through a combination of changes to gene sequences, gene loss and gene gain, gene loss completely dominates as a source of genetic variation within clonal species. Indeed, gene loss is so prevalent within clonal species as to lead to levels of gene content variation comparable to those found in some nonclonal species that are much more diverged in their gene sequences and that acquire a substantial number of genes horizontally. Gene loss therefore needs to be taken into account as a potential dominant source of phenotypic variation within clonal bacterial species.

  14. Resource heterogeneity, soil fertility, and species diversity: effects of clonal species on plant communities.

    PubMed

    Eilts, J Alexander; Mittelbach, Gary G; Reynolds, Heather L; Gross, Katherine L

    2011-05-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in soil resources is widely thought to promote plant species coexistence, and this mechanism figures prominently in resource-ratio models of competition. However, most experimental studies have found that nutrient enhancements depress diversity regardless of whether nutrients are uniformly or heterogeneously applied. This mismatch between theory and empirical pattern is potentially due to an interaction between plant size and the scale of resource heterogeneity. Clonal plants that spread vegetatively via rhizomes or stolons can grow large and may integrate across resource patches, thus reducing the positive effect of small-scale resource heterogeneity on plant species richness. Many rhizomatous clonal species respond strongly to increased soil fertility, and they have been hypothesized to drive the descending arm of the hump-shaped productivity-diversity relationship in grasslands. We tested whether clonals reduce species richness in a grassland community by manipulating nutrient heterogeneity, soil fertility, and the presence of rhizomatous clonal species in a 6-year field experiment. We found strong and consistent negative effects of clonals on species richness. These effects were greatest at high fertility and when soil resources were applied at a scale at which rhizomatous clonals could integrate across resource patches. Thus, we find support for the hypothesis that plant size and resource heterogeneity interact to determine species diversity.

  15. Production and verification of a 2nd generation clonal group of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jilun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yufen; Sun, Zhaohui; Si, Fei; Jiang, Xiufeng; Liu, Haijin

    2016-01-01

    Clonal fishes are useful tools in biology and aquaculture studies due to their isogenicity. In Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), a group of homozygous clones was created by inducing meiogynogenesis in eggs from a mitogynogenetic homozygous diploid. As the clones reached sexual maturity, meiogynogenesis was again induced in order to produce a 2nd generation clonal group of Japanese flounder. After 3 months, there were 611 healthy, surviving individuals. Twenty-four microsatellite markers, that covered all the linkage groups of Japanese flounder, were used to identify the homozygosity of the 2nd generation clones; no heterozygous locus was detected. This indicates that the production of a 2nd generation clonal group of Japanese flounder was successful. Restriction-site DNA associated sequencing at the genomic level also confirmed the homozygosity and clonality of the 2nd generation clonal group. Furthermore, these 2nd generation clones had a small coefficient of variation for body shape indices at 210 days of age and showed a high degree of similarity in body characteristics among individuals. The successful production of 2nd generation clones has laid the foundation for the large-scale production of clonal Japanese flounder. PMID:27767055

  16. Pityriasis lichenoides: a clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia; Crowson, A Neil; Kovatich, Al; Burns, Frank

    2002-08-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides (PL) is a papulosquamous disorder often considered a form of reactive dermatosis and classified with small plaque parapsoriasis (digitate dermatosis). However, some patients with PL have developed large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) and mycosis fungoides (MF), and lymphoid atypia and T-cell clonality have been reported in lesions of PL. We set out to explore the possibility that PL is a form of T-cell dyscrasia. Cases were selected by natural language search from an outpatient dermatopathology database; 35 cases were reviewed and clinicians and patients were contacted. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were examined and immunophenotyping was carried out on paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue using antibodies to CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD20, CD30, and CD56. In paraffin-embedded tissue, T-cell receptor (TCR)-gamma chain rearrangement was sought through polymerase chain reaction single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. There were 14 males and 21 females with a mean age of 40 years held clinically to have PL chronica (PLC) (28 cases) and/or PL et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA) (7 cases). Five patients developed large atrophic poikilodermatous and/or annular plaques compatible with MF and/or LPP in a background of typical PLC. All biopsies showed tropism of lymphocytes to an epidermis manifesting psoriasiform hyperplasia, dyskeratosis, parakeratosis, and intraepithelial collections of Langerhans' cells and lymphocytes mimicking Pautrier's microabascesses. Epidermal atrophy, dermal fibroplasia, poikilodermatous alterations, and a dominance of intraepidermal cerebriform cells were seen only in patients with chronic persistent disease (i.e., PLC) and in some cases corresponded with clinical progression to MF. All cases had a T cell-dominant infiltrate, with a CD7 deletion in 21 of 32 biopsies examined; the CD7-negative cells were typically the largest and most atypical forms, often in a cohesive array within the upper layers of

  17. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Mills, Richael O; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Ghana were investigated; isolates from healthy children in Tamale and isolates from both healthy and children attending the outpatient department at a hospital in Accra. The isolates were previously identified and characterized by Gram staining, serotyping and susceptibility to penicillin. In this study, isolates of the common serotype 19F were further investigated by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Overall, 14 different Sequence Types (STs) were identified by MLST, of which nine were novel based on the international MLST database. Two clones within serotype 19F seem to circulate in Ghana, a known ST (ST 4194) and a novel ST (ST 9090). ST 9090 was only found in healthy children in Accra, whereas ST 4194 was found equally in all children studied. In the MLST database, other isolates of ST 4194 were also associated with serotype 19F, and these isolates came from other West African countries. The majority of isolates were penicillin intermediate resistant. In conclusion, two clones within serotype 19F were found to be dominating in pneumococcal carriage in Accra and Tamale in Ghana. Furthermore, it seems as though the clonal distribution of serotype 19F may be different from what is currently known in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones.

  18. FREQUENT CLONALITY IN FUCOIDS (FUCUS RADICANS AND FUCUS VESICULOSUS; FUCALES, PHAEOPHYCEAE) IN THE BALTIC SEA(1).

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Kerstin; Johansson, Daniel; Larsson, Karl H; Huenchuñir, Cecilia J; Perus, Jens; Forslund, Helena; Kautsky, Lena; Pereyra, Ricardo T

    2011-10-01

    Asexual reproduction by cloning may affect the genetic structure of populations, their potential to evolve, and, among foundation species, contributions to ecosystem functions. Macroalgae of the genus Fucus are known to produce attached plants only by sexual recruitment. Recently, however, clones of attached plants recruited by asexual reproduction were observed in a few populations of Fucus radicans Bergström et L. Kautsky and F. vesiculosus L. inside the Baltic Sea. Herein we assess the distribution and prevalence of clonality in Baltic fucoids using nine polymorphic microsatellite loci and samples of F. radicans and F. vesiculosus from 13 Baltic sites. Clonality was more common in F. radicans than in F. vesiculosus, and in both species it tended to be most common in northern Baltic sites, although variation among close populations was sometimes extensive. Individual clonal lineages were mostly restricted to single or nearby locations, but one clonal lineage of F. radicans dominated five of 10 populations and was widely distributed over 550 × 100 km of coast. Populations dominated by a few clonal lineages were common in F. radicans, and these were less genetically variable than in other populations. As thalli recruited by cloning produced gametes, a possible explanation for this reduced genetic variation is that dominance of one or a few clonal lineages biases the gamete pool resulting in a decreased effective population size and thereby loss of genetic variation by genetic drift. Baltic fucoids are important habitat-forming species, and genetic structure and presence of clonality have implications for conservation strategies.

  19. Clonal Patch Size and Ramet Position of Leymus chinensis Affected Reproductive Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive allocation is critically important for population maintenance and usually varies with not only environmental factors but also biotic ones. As a typical rhizome clonal plant in China's northern grasslands, Leymus chinensis usually dominates the steppe communities and grows in clonal patches. In order to clarify the sexual reproductive allocation of L. chinensis in the process of the growth and expansion, we selected L. chinensis clonal patches of a range of sizes to examine the reproductive allocation and allometric growth of the plants. Moreover, the effects of position of L. chinensis ramets within the patch on their reproductive allocation were also examined. Clonal patch size and position both significantly affected spike biomass, reproductive tiller biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio. From the central to the marginal zone, both the spike biomass and reproductive tiller biomass displayed an increasing trend in all the five patch size categories except for reproductive tiller biomass in 15–40m2 category. L. chinensis had significantly larger SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio in marginal zone than in central zone of clonal patches that are larger than 15 m2 in area. Regression analysis showed that the spike biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio were negatively correlated with clonal patch size while patch size showed significantly positive effect on SEED/SPIKE biomass ratio, but the reproductive tiller biomass and SEED/TILLER biomass ratio were not dependent on clonal patch size. The relationships between biomass of spike and reproductive tiller, between mature seed biomass and spike biomass and between mature seed biomass and reproductive tiller biomass were significant allometric for all or some of patch size categories, respectively. The slopes of all these allometric relationships were significantly different from 1. The allometric growth of L. chinensis is patch size-dependent. This finding will be helpful for developing appropriate practices for

  20. Phylogenetic meta-analysis of the functional traits of clonal plants foraging in changing environments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiu-Fang; Song, Yao-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Pan, Xu; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Foraging behavior, one of the adaptive strategies of clonal plants, has stimulated a tremendous amount of research. However, it is a matter of debate whether there is any general pattern in the foraging traits (functional traits related to foraging behavior) of clonal plants in response to diverse environments. We collected data from 97 published papers concerning the relationships between foraging traits (e.g., spacer length, specific spacer length, branch intensity and branch angle) of clonal plants and essential resources (e.g., light, nutrients and water) for plant growth and reproduction. We incorporated the phylogenetic information of 85 plant species to examine the universality of foraging hypotheses using phylogenetic meta-analysis. The trends toward forming longer spacers and fewer branches in shaded environments were detected in clonal plants, but no evidence for a relation between foraging traits and nutrient availability was detected, except that there was a positive correlation between branch intensity and nutrient availability in stoloniferous plants. The response of the foraging traits of clonal plants to water availability was also not obvious. Additionally, our results indicated that the foraging traits of stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to resource availability than those of rhizomatous plants. In consideration of plant phylogeny, these results implied that the foraging traits of clonal plants (notably stoloniferous plants) only responded to light intensity in a general pattern but did not respond to nutrient or water availability. In conclusion, our findings on the effects of the environment on the foraging traits of clonal plants avoided the confounding effects of phylogeny because we incorporated phylogeny into the meta-analysis.

  1. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  2. Clonal growth and fine-scale genetic structure in tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus: Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Dodd, Richard S; Mayer, Wasima; Nettel, Alejandro; Afzal-Rafii, Zara

    2013-01-01

    The combination of sprouting and reproduction by seed can have important consequences on fine-scale spatial distribution of genetic structure (SGS). SGS is an important consideration for species' restoration because it determines the minimum distance among seed trees to maximize genetic diversity while not prejudicing locally adapted genotypes. Local environmental conditions can be expected to influence levels of clonal spread and SGS, particularly in the case of disturbance regimes such as fire. Here, we characterize fine-scale genetic structure and clonal spread in tanoak from drier upland sites and more mesic lowland woodlands. Clonal spread was a significant mode of stand development, but spread was limited on average to about 5-6 m. Gene dispersal was decomposed into clonal and sexual components. The latter varied according to whether it was estimated from all ramets with the clonal component removed or for a single ramet per genet. We used the difference in these 2 estimates of gene dispersal as a measure of the effect of clonality on effective population size in this species. Although upland sites had a greater number of ramets per genet, most of the other indices computed were not significantly different. However, they tended to show greater heterozygote excess and shorter gene dispersal distances than the lowland sites. The average distance among inferred sibships on upland sites was approximately at the scale of maximum clonal range. This was not the case on lowland sites, where sibs were more dispersed. We recommend minimum distances among seed trees to avoid selecting clones and to maximize genetic diversity for restoration.

  3. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  4. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  5. GeneScanning analysis of Ig/TCR gene rearrangements to detect clonality in canine lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Calzolari, Claudia; Turba, Maria E; Bettini, Giuliano; Famigli-Bergamini, Paolo

    2009-01-15

    The diagnosis of canine lymphoma is achieved using morphological and immunological methods. In a certain percentage of cases, difficulties in making a definitive diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders may occur despite extensive immunophenotyping. Therefore, additional diagnostics, such as molecular assessment of Ig/TCR gene rearrangements clonality, may confirm the final diagnosis. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and heteroduplex analysis have already been proven to be suitable for detecting clonality but are cumbersome and labor-intensive. In the present study, GeneScanning analysis of PCR products originating from different primer sets targeting different regions of Ig and TCR was validated in improving sensitivity as well as in reducing the turnaround time of gene rearrangement assays. GeneScanning exploits 5' fluorescently labelled primers for the automated and fast analysis of PCR products either as singleplex or multiplex runs. Initially, the assay was set up using DNA purified from normal tissues (n=6), hyperplastic/reactive tissues (n=10) and a small set of immunophenotyped lymphoma samples (n=12). The optimized methods were then used in a large set of 96 canine lymphoma samples. Normal and hyperplastic/reactive lymphoid tissues showed typically polyclonal or, occasionally, oligoclonal PCR products. Lymphoma samples showed monoclonal peaks arranged as a single or, occasionally, a double narrow base peak sometimes embedded in a polyclonal background. In all immunophenotyped cases, an Ig or TCR clonal finding corresponded to B- and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Overall, 94/96 (97.9%) samples showed clonal Ig/TCR clonal rearrangements among which clonal Ig was found in 61/96 (63.5%) of samples and clonal TCR in 33/35 Ig negative samples (34.4% of all cases). In one out of ten randomly chosen cases, both Ig and TCR clonal gene rearrangements were found. Among the factors affecting assay accuracy, DNA quality has been shown to be critical and the

  6. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Richard; Harismendy, Olivier; Pu, Minya; Crain, Brian; Yost, Shawn; Frazer, Kelly A.; Rana, Brinda; Hasteh, Farnaz; Wallace, Anne; Parker, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal) pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC) mutations/ # total HC mutations). Methods Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48) and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value <0.01), across renal cell, testicular, and colorectal cancer. The CLS test correctly classified all validation samples but one, which it appears may have been incorrectly classified in the published data. As proof-of-concept we then applied the CLS test to two new cases of invasive synchronous bilateral breast cancer at our institution, each with one hormone receptor positive (ER+/PR+/HER2-) lobular and one triple negative ductal carcinoma. High confidence mutations were identified by exome sequencing and results were validated using deep targeted sequencing. The first tumor pair had CLS of 81% (p-value < 10–15), supporting clonality. In the second pair, no common mutations of 184 variants were validated (p-value >0.99), supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the

  7. Spatial Genetic Structure and Clonal Diversity in an Alpine Population of Salix herbacea (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Christoph; Schurm, Sophia; Poschlod, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Many alpine plant species combine clonal and sexual reproduction to minimize the risks of flowering and seed production in high mountain regions. The spatial genetic structure and diversity of these alpine species is strongly affected by different clonal strategies (phalanx or guerrilla) and the proportion of generative and vegetative reproduction. Methods The clonal structure of the alpine plant species Salix herbacea was investigated in a 3 × 3 m plot of an alpine meadow using microsatellite (simple sequence repeat; SSR) analysis. The data obtained were compared with the results of a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Key Results SSR analysis, based on three loci and 16 alleles, revealed 24 different genotypes and a proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0·18. Six SSR clones were found consisting of at least five samples, 17 clones consisting of more than two samples and seven single genotypes. Mean clone size comprising at least five samples was 0·96 m2, and spatial autocorrelation analysis showed strong similarity of samples up to 130 cm. RAPD analysis revealed a higher level of clonal diversity but a comparable number of larger clones and a similar spatial structure. Conclusions The spatial genetic structure as well as the occurrence of single genotypes revealed in this study suggests both clonal and sexual propagation and repeated seedling recruitment in established populations of S. herbacea and is thus suggestive of a relaxed phalanx strategy. PMID:17242040

  8. The association between polyploidy and clonal reproduction in diploid and tetraploid Chamerion angustifolium.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Sarah J; Husband, Brian C

    2013-04-01

    Clonal reproduction is associated with the incidence of polyploidy in flowering plants. This pattern may arise through selection for increased clonality in polyploids compared to diploids to reduce mixed-ploidy mating. Here, we test whether clonal reproduction is greater in tetraploid than diploid populations of the mixed-ploidy plant, Chamerion angustifolium, through an analysis of the size and spatial distribution of clones in natural populations using AFLP genotyping and a comparison of root bud production in a greenhouse study. Natural tetraploid populations (N = 5) had significantly more AFLP genotypes (x¯ = 10.8) than diploid populations (x¯ = 6.0). Tetraploid populations tended to have fewer ramets per genotype and fewer genotypes with >1 ramet. In a spatial autocorrelation analysis, ramets within genotypes were more spatially aggregated in diploid populations than in tetraploid populations. In the greenhouse, tetraploids allocated 90.4% more dry mass to root buds than diploids, but tetraploids produced no more root buds and 44% fewer root buds per unit root mass than diploids. Our results indicate that clonal reproduction is significant in most populations, but tetraploid populations are not more clonal than diploids, nor are their clones more spatially aggregated. As a result, tetraploids may be less sheltered from mixed-ploidy mating and diploids more exposed to inbreeding, the balance of which could influence the establishment of tetraploids in diploid populations.

  9. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four -stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a ‘parallel’ evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a ‘stepwise’ evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  10. TNFα facilitates clonal expansion of JAK2V617F positive cells in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Aichberger, Karl J.; Luty, Samuel B.; Bumm, Thomas G.; Petersen, Curtis L.; Doratotaj, Shirin; Vasudevan, Kavin B.; LaTocha, Dorian H.; Yang, Fei; Press, Richard D.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Pahl, Heike L.; Silver, Richard T.; Agarwal, Anupriya; O'Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.; Bagby, Grover C.

    2011-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα are elevated in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Here we reveal a central role for TNFα in promoting clonal dominance of JAK2V617F expressing cells in MPN. We show that JAK2V617F kinase regulates TNFα expression in cell lines and primary MPN cells and TNFα expression is correlated with JAK2V617F allele burden. In clonogenic assays, normal controls show reduced colony formation in the presence of TNFα while colony formation by JAK2V617F-positive progenitor cells is resistant or stimulated by exposure to TNFα. Ectopic JAK2V617F expression confers TNFα resistance to normal murine progenitor cells and overcomes inherent TNFα hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia complementation group C deficient progenitors. Lastly, absence of TNFα limits clonal expansion and attenuates disease in a murine model of JAK2V617F-positive MPN. Altogether our data are consistent with a model where JAK2V617F promotes clonal selection by conferring TNFα resistance to a preneoplastic TNFα sensitive cell, while simultaneously generating a TNFα-rich environment. Mutations that confer resistance to environmental stem cell stressors are a recognized mechanism of clonal selection and leukemogenesis in bone marrow failure syndromes and our data suggest that this mechanism is also critical to clonal selection in MPN. PMID:21860020

  11. Clonal haematopoiesis harbouring AML-associated mutations is ubiquitous in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew L.; Challen, Grant A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Druley, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal haematopoiesis is thought to be a rare condition that increases in frequency with age and predisposes individuals to haematological malignancy. Recent studies, utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS), observed haematopoietic clones in 10% of 70-year olds and rarely in younger individuals. However, these studies could only detect common haematopoietic clones—>0.02 variant allele fraction (VAF)—due to the error rate of NGS. To identify and characterize clonal mutations below this threshold, here we develop methods for targeted error-corrected sequencing, which enable the accurate detection of clonal mutations as rare as 0.0003 VAF. We apply these methods to study serially banked peripheral blood samples from healthy 50–60-year-old participants in the Nurses' Health Study. We observe clonal haematopoiesis, frequently harbouring mutations in DNMT3A and TET2, in 95% of individuals studied. These clonal mutations are often stable longitudinally and present in multiple haematopoietic compartments, suggesting a long-lived haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell of origin. PMID:27546487

  12. Quantitative stability of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell clonal output in rhesus macaques receiving transplants.

    PubMed

    Koelle, Samson J; Espinoza, Diego A; Wu, Chuanfeng; Xu, Jason; Lu, Rong; Li, Brian; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2017-03-16

    Autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells lentivirally labeled with unique oligonucleotide barcodes flanked by sequencing primer targets enables quantitative assessment of the self-renewal and differentiation patterns of these cells in a myeloablative rhesus macaque model. Compared with other approaches to clonal tracking, this approach is highly quantitative and reproducible. We documented stable multipotent long-term hematopoietic clonal output of monocytes, granulocytes, B cells, and T cells from a polyclonal pool of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in 4 macaques observed for up to 49 months posttransplantation. A broad range of clonal behaviors characterized by contribution level and biases toward certain cell types were extremely stable over time. Correlations between granulocyte and monocyte clonalities were greatest, followed by correlations between these cell types and B cells. We also detected quantitative expansion of T cell-biased clones consistent with an adaptive immune response. In contrast to recent data from a nonquantitative murine model, there was little evidence for clonal succession after initial hematopoietic reconstitution. These findings have important implications for human hematopoiesis, given the similarities between macaque and human physiologies.

  13. Properties of calcium and potassium currents of clonal adrenocortical cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The ionic currents of clonal Y-1 adrenocortical cells were studied using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. These cells had two major current components: a large outward current carried by K ions, and a small inward Ca current. The Ca current depended on the activity of two populations of Ca channels, slow (SD) and fast (FD) deactivating, that could be separated by their different closing time constants (at -80 mV, SD, 3.8 ms, and FD, 0.13 ms). These two kinds of channels also differed in (a) activation threshold (SD, approximately - 50 mV; FD, approximately -20 mV), (b) half-maximal activation (SD, between -15 and -10 mV; FD between +10 and +15 mV), and (c) inactivation time course (SD, fast; FD, slow). The total amplitude of the Ca current and the proportion of SD and FD channels varied from cell to cell. The amplitude of the K current was strongly dependent on the internal [Ca2+] and was almost abolished when internal [Ca2+] was less than 0.001 microM. The K current appeared to be independent, or only slightly dependent, of Ca influx. With an internal [Ca2+] of 0.1 microM, the activation threshold was -20 mV, and at +40 mV the half- time of activation was 9 ms. With 73 mM external K the closing time constant at -70 mV was approximately 3 ms. The outward current was also modulated by internal pH and Mg. At a constant pCa gamma a decrease of pH reduced the current amplitude, whereas the activation kinetics were not much altered. Removal of internal Mg produced a drastic decrease in the amplitude of the Ca-activated K current. It was also found that with internal [Ca2+] over 0.1 microM the K current underwent a time- dependent transformation characterized by a large increase in amplitude and in activation kinetics. PMID:2539432

  14. Progenitor genotyping reveals a complex clonal architecture in a subset of CALR-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah; Wright, Casey M; Scott, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    The identification of acquired CALR mutations in patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) has meant that disease-initiating mutations can now be detected in about 90% of all patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Here, we show that only those CALR mutations that cause a +1 frameshift, thereby altering the carboxy-terminus of calreticulin, promote cytokine independence in vitro; in-frame deletions were not functional, and are unlikely to be the pathogenetic mutation underlying some MPN cases. Expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, was also necessary for factor-independence. Although the CALR mutations are considered to occur only in JAK2 V617F-negative cases and in a heterozygous state, progenitor genotyping revealed that this is not always true. Notably, CALR mutation-positive MPNs can be polyclonal: in one case, two distinct CALR mutation-positive subpopulations could be identified; in another, separate populations of JAK2 V617F-positive and CALR-mutated cells were present. Mitotic recombination involving chromosome 19 in a third instance resulted in the emergence of a CALR mutation-homozygous subclone. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that occasional patients with CALR mutation-positive ET or MF carry other MPN-initiating genetic mutations (including JAK2 V617F), acquire "secondary mutations" before or after the CALR mutation, or evolve over time to being CALR mutation-homozygous.

  15. Genome-scale investigation of phenotypically distinct but nearly clonal Trichoderma strains

    PubMed Central

    Weld, Richard J.; Cox, Murray P.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; McLean, Kirstin L.; Stewart, Alison; Steyaert, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological control agents (BCA) are beneficial organisms that are applied to protect plants from pests. Many fungi of the genus Trichoderma are successful BCAs but the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Trichoderma cf. atroviride strain LU132 is a remarkably effective BCA compared to T. cf. atroviride strain LU140 but these strains were found to be highly similar at the DNA sequence level. This unusual combination of phenotypic variability and high DNA sequence similarity between separately isolated strains prompted us to undertake a genome comparison study in order to identify DNA polymorphisms. We further investigated if the polymorphisms had functional effects on the phenotypes. The two strains were clearly identified as individuals, exhibiting different growth rates, conidiation and metabolism. Superior pathogen control demonstrated by LU132 depended on its faster growth, which is a prerequisite for successful distribution and competition. Genome sequencing identified only one non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) between the strains. Based on this SNP, we successfully designed and validated an RFLP protocol that can be used to differentiate LU132 from LU140 and other Trichoderma strains. This SNP changed the amino acid sequence of SERF, encoded by the previously undescribed single copy gene “small EDRK-rich factor” (serf). A deletion of serf in the two strains did not lead to identical phenotypes, suggesting that, in addition to the single functional SNP between the nearly clonal Trichoderma cf. atroviride strains, other non-genomic factors contribute to their phenotypic variation. This finding is significant as it shows that genomics is an extremely useful but not exhaustive tool for the study of biocontrol complexity and for strain typing. PMID:27190719

  16. Biofilm formation of Brazilian MRSA strains: Prevalence of biofilm determinants and clonal profiles.

    PubMed

    Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Campos, Paola Amaral de; Camilo, Nayara Caroline; Royer, Sabrina; Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Naves, Karinne Spirandelli Carvalho; Martins, Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Henriques, Mariana; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo P; Botelho, Cláudia; Oliveira, Rosário; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-02-09

    Biofilms plays an important role in medical device-related infections. This study aimed to determine the factors that influence adherence and biofilm production, as well as the relationship between strong biofilm production and genetic determinants in clinical isolates of MRSA. Fifteen strains carrying different chromosomal cassettes, recovered from patients hospitalized were selected: five SCCmecII, five SCCmecIII and five SCCmecIV. The SCCmec type, agr group and the presence of the virulence genes (bbp, clfA, icaA, icaD, fnbB, bap, sasC and IS256) were assessed by PCR. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) techniques also were performed. The initial adhesion and biofilm formation were examined by quantitative assays. The surface tension and hydrophobicity of the strains were measured by contact angle technique to evaluate the association between these parameters and adhesion ability. SCCmecIII and IV strains were less hydrophilic, with a high value for the electron acceptor parameter and higher adhesion in comparison with SCCmecII strains. Only SCCmecIII strains could be characterized as strong biofilm producers. The PFGE showed five major pulsotypes (A-E) however, biofilm production was related to the dissemination of one specific PFGE clone (C) belonging to MLST ST239 (BECC, Brazilian epidemic clonal complex). The genes agrI, fnbB and IS256 in SCCmecIII strains, were considered as genetic determinants associated with strong biofilm-formation by an ica-independent biofilm pathway. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm production as an aggravating factor potentially involved in the persistence and severity of infections caused by multidrug-resistant MRSA belonging to this genotype.

  17. Streptococcus suis in invasive human infections in Poland: clonality and determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, A; Molska, E; Janas, K; Skoczyńska, A; Stefaniuk, E; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of Streptococcus suis human invasive isolates, collected in Poland by the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. Isolates obtained from 21 patients during 2000-2013 were investigated by phenotypic tests, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), analysis of the TR9 locus from the multilocus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of SmaI-digested DNA. Determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analysed by sequencing. All isolates represented sequence type 1 (ST1) and were suggested to be serotype 2. PFGE and analysis of the TR9 locus allowed the discrimination of four and 17 types, respectively. Most of the isolates were haemolysis- and DNase-positive, and around half of them formed biofilm. Genes encoding suilysin, extracellular protein factor, fibronectin-binding protein, muramidase-released protein, surface antigen one, enolase, serum opacity factor and pili were ubiquitous in the studied group, while none of the isolates carried sequences characteristic for the 89K pathogenicity island. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, gentamicin, linezolid, vancomycin and daptomycin. Five isolates (24 %) were concomitantly non-susceptible to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and harboured the tet(O) and erm(B) genes; for one isolate, lsa(E) and lnu(B) were additionally detected. Streptococcus suis isolated in Poland from human invasive infections belongs to a globally distributed clonal complex of this pathogen, enriched in virulence markers. This is the first report of the lsa(E) and lnu(B) resistance genes in S. suis.

  18. Clonal expansion to anaplasia in Wilms` tumors is associated with p53 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, J.; Beckwith, B.; Bardeesy, N. |

    1994-09-01

    The genetics of Wilms` tumor (WT), a pediatric malignancy of the kidney, is complex. Three loci are implicated in WT initiation and include the WT1 tumor suppressor gene (residing at 11p13), an 11p15 locus, and a non-11p locus. As well, allelic loss at 16q24 in {approximately}20% of sporadic WTs suggests the location of (an) additional gene(s) involved in tumor progression. Initiation and progression in WTs is associated with multiple histological variants. Anaplasia is a rare WT subtype associated with poor prognosis and defined by enlarged and multipolar mitotic figures, a threefold nuclear enlargement (compared with adjacent nuclei of the same cell type), and hyperchromasia of the enlarged nuclei. We have previously demonstrated that p53 gene mutations are exclusively associated with anaplastic WTs, being absent from a large number of non-anaplastic WTs analyzed. To determine if such mutations are involved in clonal progression to anaplasia, we performed a retrospective analysis of histologically defined sections from tumor specimens. Six of ten WTs demonstrated p53 mutations by PCR-single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. Two of these samples were paired, consisting of geographically demarcated anaplastic cells embedded within a non-anaplastic tumor bed. In these cases, p53 mutations were only present in the anaplastic region of the tumor. An overall decrease in the number of apoptotic cells was found associated with the anaplastic tumor region, compared to adjacent non-anaplastic tumor bed. These results indicate that p53 mutations arise during progression to anaplasia late in Wilms` tumor etiology and are associated with a more aggressive form of this cancer.

  19. Using dendritic cells to evaluate how Burkholderia cenocepacia clonal isolates from a chronically infected cystic fibrosis patient subvert immune functions.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe Cabral, M; Pereira, Marília; Silva, Zélia; Iria, Inês; Coutinho, Carla; Lopes, Andreia; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Videira, Paula A

    2017-04-01

    Infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria is a threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, commonly leading to a fatal pneumonia, the cepacia syndrome. It causes a massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and leucocyte recruitment to airway epithelium without resolving infection and contributing to tissue lesion. To dissect how Bcc bacteria subvert the immune response, we developed a co-culture model with human dendritic cells (DCs) and B. cenocepacia clonal variants isolated from a chronically infected CF patient, who died with cepacia syndrome. We demonstrated that the two late variants were sevenfold and 17-fold (respectively) more internalized by DCs than the variant that initiated infection. The late variants showed improved survival within DCs (60.29 and 52.82 CFU/DC) compared to the initial variant (0.38 CFU/DC). All clonal isolates induced high expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α and IL-1β. This pro-inflammatory trait was significantly more pronounced in DCs infected with the late variants than in DCs infected with the variant that initiated patient's infection. All infected DCs failed to upregulate maturation markers, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD83. Nevertheless, these infected DCs activated approximately twice more T cells than non-infected DCs. Similar T cell activation was observable with respective conditioned media, suggesting a non-antigen-specific activation. Our data indicate that during prolonged infection, B. cenocepacia acquires ability to survive intracellularly, inducing inflammation, while refraining DC's maturation and stimulating non-antigen-specific T cell responses. The co-culture model here developed may be broadly applied to study B. cenocepacia-induced immunomodulation.

  20. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin, and linezolid MIC creep in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is associated with clonality

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Lin, Yu-Chun; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the susceptibility trend of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin, and linezolid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood isolates of different clones over an 11-year period. From 2000 to 2010, all bloodstream MRSA isolates from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan were prospectively collected. Three periods, namely 2000 to 2001, 2004 to 2005, and 2010, were included and 124 MRSA isolates were selected from each period. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by E-test. All the isolates were molecularly characterized. MRSA molecular epidemiology evolved from 1 predominant pulsotype (type A) to 5 major pulsotypes of 3 clonal complexes (CC). Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin MICs creep were observed, particularly for pulsotype A-CC 239-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) III though its prevalence dramatically decreased since 2004 to 2005. Throughout the study period, the overall vancomycin modal MIC was stable at 1.5 mg/L, but teicoplanin and linezolid modal MIC increased to 2 and 2 mg/L, respectively. Isolates with teicoplanin and linezolid ≧ 2 ug/mL belonged to multiple clones. Pulsotype F-ST5-SCCmec II with a high rate of teicoplanin MIC ≧ 2 ug/mL continued clonal spread. Teicoplanin MIC had a high correlation with linezolid MIC. Molecular epidemiology MRSA bloodstream isolates in northern Taiwan evolved from 2000 throughout 2010, which was subsequently associated with the changing distribution of antibiotic MICs. While vancomycin MIC level remained unchanged, teicoplanin, daptomycin, and linezolid MIC levels increased. The impact of these changes on clinical treatment response deserves further investigations. PMID:27741120

  1. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1–infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor–NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7. Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1–infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. PMID:28115366

  2. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated.

  3. Sexual recombination punctuated by outbreaks and clonal expansions predicts Toxoplasma gondii population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Michael E.; Sundar, Natarajan

    2009-01-01

    The cosmopolitan parasitic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is capable of infecting essentially any warm-blooded vertebrate worldwide, including most birds and mammals, and establishes chronic infections in one-third of the globe’s human population. The success of this highly prevalent zoonosis is largely the result of its ability to propagate both sexually and clonally. Frequent genetic exchanges via sexual recombination among extant parasite lineages that mix in the definitive felid host produces new lines that emerge to expand the parasite’s host range and cause outbreaks. Highly successful lines spread clonally via carnivorism and in some cases sweep to pandemic levels. The extent to which sexual reproduction versus clonal expansion shapes Toxoplasma’s current, global population genetic structure is the central question this review will attempt to answer. PMID:19217909

  4. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi.

    PubMed

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  5. Different Growth Promoting Effects of Endophytic Bacteria on Invasive and Native Clonal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhi-Cong; Fu, Wei; Wan, Ling-Yun; Cai, Hong-Hong; Wang, Ning; Qi, Shan-Shan; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP) effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of Wedelia trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets’ growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion. PMID:27252722

  6. ClonalFrameML: Efficient Inference of Recombination in Whole Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is an important evolutionary force in bacteria, but it remains challenging to reconstruct the imports that occurred in the ancestry of a genomic sample. Here we present ClonalFrameML, which uses maximum likelihood inference to simultaneously detect recombination in bacterial genomes and account for it in phylogenetic reconstruction. ClonalFrameML can analyse hundreds of genomes in a matter of hours, and we demonstrate its usefulness on simulated and real datasets. We find evidence for recombination hotspots associated with mobile elements in Clostridium difficile ST6 and a previously undescribed 310kb chromosomal replacement in Staphylococcus aureus ST582. ClonalFrameML is freely available at http://clonalframeml.googlecode.com/. PMID:25675341

  7. Clonal structure affects the assembling behavior in the Japanese queenless ant Pristomyrmex punctatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Yudai; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Hiraoka, Tuyosi; Obara, Yoshiaki; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2007-10-01

    The queenless ant Pristomyrmex punctatus (Hymenoptera: Myrmicinae) has a unique society that differs from those of other typical ants. This species does not have a queen, and the workers lay eggs and produce their clones parthenogenetically. However, a colony of these ants does not always comprise members derived from a single clonal line. In this study, we examined whether P. punctatus changes its “assembling behavior” based on colony genetic structure. We prepared two subcolonies—a larger one comprising 200 individuals and a smaller one comprising 100 individuals; these subcolonies were established from a single stock colony. We investigated whether these subcolonies assemble into a single nest. The genetically monomorphic subcolonies (single clonal line) always fused into a single nest; however, the genetically polymorphic subcolonies (multiple clonal lines) did not tend to form a single colony. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the colony genetic structure significantly affects social viscosity in social insects.

  8. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  9. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  10. Intraspecific competition and light effect on reproduction of Ligularia virgaurea, an invasive native alpine grassland clonal herb.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Ge-Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Du, Guo-Zhen; He, Gui-Yong

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between sexual reproduction and clonal growth in clonal plants often shows up at the ramet level. However, only a few studies focus on the relationship at the genet level, which could finally account for evolution. The sexual reproduction and clonal growth of Ligularia virgaurea, a perennial herb widely distributed in the alpine grasslands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, were studied under different competition intensities and light conditions at the genet level through a potted experiment. The results showed that: (1) sexual reproduction did not depend on density or light, and increasing clonal growth with decreasing density and increasing light intensity indicated that intraspecific competition and light intensity may affect the clonal life history of L. virgaurea; (2) both sexual reproduction and clonal growth show a positive linear relationship with genet size under different densities and light conditions; (3) a threshold size is required for sexual reproduction and no evidence of a threshold size for clonal growth under different densities and light conditions; (4) light level affected the allocation of total biomass to clonal and sexual structures, with less allocation to clonal structures and more allocation to sexual structures in full sunlight than in shade; (5) light determined the onset of sexual reproduction, and the genets in the shade required a smaller threshold size for sexual reproduction to occur than the plants in full sunlight; and (6) no evidence was found of trade-offs between clonal growth and sexual reproduction under different densities and light conditions at the genet level, and the positive correlation between two reproductive modes indicated that these are two integrated processes. Clonal growth in this species may be viewed as a growth strategy that tends to maximize genet fitness.

  11. Model Based Analysis of Clonal Developments Allows for Early Detection of Monoclonal Conversion and Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Thielecke, Lars; Glauche, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    The availability of several methods to unambiguously mark individual cells has strongly fostered the understanding of clonal developments in hematopoiesis and other stem cell driven regenerative tissues. While cellular barcoding is the method of choice for experimental studies, patients that underwent gene therapy carry a unique insertional mark within the transplanted cells originating from the integration of the retroviral vector. Close monitoring of such patients allows accessing their clonal dynamics, however, the early detection of events that predict monoclonal conversion and potentially the onset of leukemia are beneficial for treatment. We developed a simple mathematical model of a self-stabilizing hematopoietic stem cell population to generate a wide range of possible clonal developments, reproducing typical, experimentally and clinically observed scenarios. We use the resulting model scenarios to suggest and test a set of statistical measures that should allow for an interpretation and classification of relevant clonal dynamics. Apart from the assessment of several established diversity indices we suggest a measure that quantifies the extension to which the increase in the size of one clone is attributed to the total loss in the size of all other clones. By evaluating the change in relative clone sizes between consecutive measurements, the suggested measure, referred to as maximum relative clonal expansion (mRCE), proves to be highly sensitive in the detection of rapidly expanding cell clones prior to their dominant manifestation. This predictive potential places the mRCE as a suitable means for the early recognition of leukemogenesis especially in gene therapy patients that are closely monitored. Our model based approach illustrates how simulation studies can actively support the design and evaluation of preclinical strategies for the analysis and risk evaluation of clonal developments. PMID:27764218

  12. Tc1 clonal T cell expansion during chronic graft-versus-host disease-associated hypereosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Clave, Emmanuel; Xhaard, Aliénor; Douay, Corrine; Adès, Lionel; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Robin, Marie; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2014-05-01

    Although hypereosinophilia (HE) associated with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has long been recognized, biological data on this phenomenon are scarce. Here we compare patients with chronic GVHD with HE together with a clonal T cell expansion and control patients with acute or chronic GVHD but without HE. These clonal expansions share a CD8(+) TC1 phenotype rather than a CD4(+) Th2 profile. In contrast to the drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, these allogeneic CD8(+) clones do not recognize the epitopes of herpesviruses. Furthermore, these TC1 clones do not produce IL-17 as described in the DRESS syndrome.

  13. The two-mutant problem: clonal interference in evolutionary graph theory.

    PubMed

    Paley, Chris; Taraskin, Sergei; Elliott, Stephen

    2010-10-01

    In large asexual populations, clonal interference, whereby different beneficial mutations compete to fix in the population simultaneously, may be the norm. Results extrapolated from the spread of individual mutations in homogeneous backgrounds are found to be misleading in such situations: clonal interference severely inhibits the spread of beneficial mutations. In contrast with results gained in systems with just one mutation striving for fixation at any one time, the spatial structure of the population is found to be an important factor in determining the fixation probability when there are two beneficial mutations.

  14. Preponderance of clonality triggers loss of sex in Bulbophyllum bicolor, an obligately outcrossing epiphytic orchid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Qun; Gale, Stephan W; Kumar, Pankaj; Saunders, Richard M K; Sun, Mei; Fischer, Gunter A

    2017-04-08

    Vegetative propagation (clonal growth) conveys several evolutionary advantages that positively affect life history fitness and is a widespread phenomenon among angiosperms that also reproduce sexually. However, a bias towards clonality can interfere with sexual reproduction and lead to sexual extinction, although a dearth of effective genetic tools and mathematical models for clonal plants has hampered assessment of these impacts. Using the endangered tropical epiphytic or lithophytic orchid Bulbophyllum bicolor as a model, we integrated an examination of breeding system with 12 microsatellite loci and models valid for clonal species to test for the 'loss of sex' and infer likely consequences for long-term reproductive dynamics. Bagging experiments and field observations revealed B. bicolor to be self-incompatible and pollinator-dependent, with an absence of fruit-set over four years. Challenging the assumptions that clonal populations can be as genotypically diverse as sexually reproducing ones and that clonality does not greatly influence genetic structure, just 22 multilocus genotypes were confirmed among all 15 extant natural populations, 12 of the populations were found to be monoclonal and all three multiclonal ones exhibited a distinct phalanx clonal architecture. Our results suggest that all B. bicolor populations depend overwhelmingly on clonal growth for persistence, with a concomitant loss of sex due to an absence of pollinators and a lack of mating opportunities at virtually all sites, both of which are further entrenched by habitat fragmentation. Such cryptic life history impacts, potentially contributing to extinction debt, could be widespread among similarly fragmented, outcrossing tropical epiphytes, demanding urgent conservation attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. 20q- clonality in a case of oral sweet syndrome and myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Katherine; Gill, Ryan M; McMahon, Patrick; Chigurupati, Radhika; Siddiqi, Imran; Fox, Lindy; Damon, Lloyd; McCalmont, Timothy H; Jordan, Richard; Wolf, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a patient with myelodysplasia who had Sweet syndrome of the oral cavity. An atypical myeloid immunophenotype was present in the gingival biopsy specimen and in a concurrent bone marrow specimen. Fluorescence in situ hybridization performed on the gingival biopsy specimen demonstrated the same del(20q) cytogenetic abnormality present in the bone marrow, confirming the presence of a clonally related myeloid proliferation in both tissues. This is the first reported case of Sweet syndrome and myelodysplasia in which the chromosomal abnormality was identified in the neutrophilic infiltrate, confirming the neutrophilic infiltrate to be clonally related to the underlying myeloid neoplasm.

  16. Age-related EBV positive clonal B-cell Lymphoid proliferation (EBV+-DLBCL)

    PubMed Central

    Doukas-Alexiou, Marina; Stoufi, Eleana; Kittas, Christos; Pangalis, Gerasimos; Laskaris, George

    2017-01-01

    The Ebstein Barr virus(EBV), herpes virus 5 has been associated with lymphoproliferative disordrers. Age-related EBV+ B-LPD is defined as an EBV+ clonal B-cell lymphoid proliferation or EBV+-DLBCL developing in patients over the age of 40 years in the absence of any known immunodeficiency and without an underlying T-cell lymphoma1. We present a case of EBV+ clonal B-cell lymphoid proliferation. Key words:Oral mucosa ulcer, EBV+-DLBCL, age related. PMID:28149483

  17. Synchrony of clonal cell proliferation and contiguity of clonally related cells: production of mosaicism in the ventricular zone of developing mouse neocortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed clonal cell proliferation in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the early developing mouse neocortex with a replication-incompetent retrovirus encoding human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP). The retrovirus was injected into the lateral ventricles on embryonic day 11 (E11), i.e., at the onset of neuronogenesis. Three days postinjection, on E14, a total of 259 AP-labeled clones of various sizes were found in 7 fetal brains. There are approximately 7 cell cycles between E11 and E14 (), and there is a 1-2 cell cycle delay between retroviral injection and the production of a retrovirally labeled "founder" cell; thus, we estimate that the "age" of the clones was about 5-6 cell cycles. Almost one-half of the clones (48.3%) identified were pure proliferating clones containing cells only in the VZ. Another 18.5% contained both proliferating and postproliferative cells, and 33.2% contained only postproliferative cells. It was striking that over 90% of the clonally related proliferating cells occurred in clusters of two or more apparently contiguous cells, and about 73% of the proliferating cells occurred in clusters of three or more cells. Regardless of the number of cells in the clone, these clusters were tightly packed and confined to a single level of the VZ. This clustering of proliferating cells indicates that clonally related cells maintain neighbor-neighbor relationships as they undergo interkinetic nuclear migration and progress through several cell cycles, and, as a result, the ventricular zone is a mosaic of small clusters of clonally related and synchronously cycling cells. In addition, cells in the intermediate zone and the cortical plate were also frequently clustered, indicating that they became postproliferative at a similar time and that the output of the VZ is influenced by its mosaic structure.

  18. Clonally related Burkholderia contaminans among ventilated patients without cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Amy E; Chitnis, Amit S; Xiang, Nan; Scaletta, Joseph M; Geist, Robert; Schwartz, Jennifer; Dement, Jamie; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Lipuma, John J; O'Connell, Heather; Noble-Wang, Judith; Kallen, Alexander J; Hunt, D Charles

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a cluster of 10 Burkholderia cepacia complex-positive cultures among ventilated patients and those with a tracheostomy in an acute care hospital. Isolates from 5 patients had outbreak-strain-related Burkholderia contaminans. Isolates of B. cepacia complex unrelated to the outbreak strain were cultured from a sink drain. The investigation identified practices that might have led to contamination of patient respiratory care supplies with tap water, which might have contributed to the cluster.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a university hospital in Nepal reveals the emergence of a novel epidemic clonal lineage.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Shovita; Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Ohara, Hiroshi; Shimada, Kayo; Satou, Kazuhito; Teruya, Kuniko; Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Sherchand, Jeevan Bdr; Rijal, Basista Psd; Hirano, Takashi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has become a serious medical problem worldwide. To clarify the genetic and epidemiological properties of MDR A. baumannii strains isolated from a medical setting in Nepal, 246 Acinetobacter spp. isolates obtained from different patients were screened for MDR A. baumannii by antimicrobial disk susceptibility testing. Whole genomes of the MDR A. baumannii isolates were sequenced by MiSeq™ (Illumina), and the complete genome of one isolate (IOMTU433) was sequenced by PacBio RS II. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from single nucleotide polymorphism concatemers. Multilocus sequence types were deduced and drug resistance genes were identified. Of the 246 Acinetobacter spp. isolates, 122 (49.6%) were MDR A. baumannii, with the majority being resistant to aminoglycosides, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones but not to colistin and tigecycline. These isolates harboured the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA as well as bla(NDM-1), bla(OXA-23) or bla(OXA-58). MDR A. baumannii isolates belonging to clonal complex 1 (CC1) and CC2 as well as a novel clonal complex (CC149) have spread throughout a medical setting in Nepal. The MDR isolates harboured genes encoding carbapenemases (OXA and NDM-1) and a 16S rRNA methylase (ArmA).

  20. Phenotypic plasticity or speciation? A case from a clonal marine organism

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Clonal marine organisms exhibit high levels of morphological variation. Morphological differences may be a response to environmental factors but also they can be attributed to accumulated genetic differences due to disruption of gene flow among populations. In this study, we examined the extensive morphological variation (of 14 characters) in natural populations observed in the gorgonian Eunicea flexuosa, a widely distributed Caribbean octocoral. Eco-phenotypic and genetic effects were evaluated by reciprocal transplants of colonies inhabiting opposite ends of the depth gradient and analysis of population genetics of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, respectively. Results Significant differences (P < 0.001) in 14 morphological traits were found among colonies inhabiting 12 locations distributed in seven reefs in southwest Puerto Rico. Results from principal component analysis indicated the presence of two groups based on depth distribution, suggesting the presence of two discrete morphotypes (i.e. shallow type < 5 m and deep type > 17 m). A discriminant function analysis based on a priori univariate and multivariate analyses (which separated the colonies in morphotypes) correctly classified 93% of the colonies for each environment. Light, water motion and sediment transport might influence the distribution of the two morphotypes. Reaction norms of morphological characters of colonies reciprocally transplanted showed gradual significant changes through the 15 months of transplantation. Sclerites of shallow water colonies became larger when transplanted to deeper environments and vice versa, but neither of the two transplanted groups overlapped with the residents' morphology. Genetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggested that such discrete morphology and non-overlapping phenotypic plasticity is correlated with the presence of two independent evolutionary lineages. The distribution of the lineages is non-random and may be related to

  1. Structural Basis for Clonal Diversity of the Public T Cell Response to a Dominant Human Cytomegalovirus Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinbo; Gao, Mingming; Chen, Guobing; Pierce, Brian G.; Lu, Jinghua; Weng, Nan-ping; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous and persistent human pathogen that is kept in check by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Individuals expressing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A2 produce cytotoxic T lymphocytes bearing T cell receptors (TCRs) that recognize the immunodominant CMV epitope NLVPMVATV (NLV). The NLV-specific T cell repertoire is characterized by a high prevalence of TCRs that are frequently observed in multiple unrelated individuals. These public TCRs feature identical, or nearly identical, complementarity-determining region 3α (CDR3α) and/or CDR3β sequences. The TCRs may express public CDR3α motifs alone, public CDR3β motifs alone, or dual public CDR3αβ motifs. In addition, the same public CDR3α motif may pair with different CDR3β motifs (and the reverse), giving rise to highly diverse NLV-specific TCR repertoires. To investigate the structural underpinnings of this clonal diversity, we determined crystal structures of two public TCRs (C7 and C25) in complex with NLV·HLA-A2. These TCRs utilize completely different CDR3α and CDR3β motifs that, in addition, can associate with multiple variable α and variable β regions in NLV-specific T cell repertoires. The C7·NLV·HLA-A2 and C25·NLV·HLA-A2 complexes exhibit divergent TCR footprints on peptide-MHC such that C25 is more focused on the central portion of the NLV peptide than is C7. These structures combined with molecular modeling show how the public CDR3α motif of C25 may associate with different variable α regions and how the public CDR3α motif of C7 may pair with different CDR3β motifs. This interchangeability of TCR V regions and CDR3 motifs permits multiple structural solutions to binding an identical peptide-MHC ligand and thereby the generation of a clonally diverse public T cell response to CMV. PMID:26429912

  2. OCCURRENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI CLONAL GROUP A IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolates of Escherichia coli belonging to clonal group A (CGA), a recently described disseminated cause of drug-resistant urinary tract infections in humans, were present in four of seven sewage effluents collected from geographically dispersed areas of the United States. ...

  3. Measuring genetic diversity and purity of cranberry clonal cultivars using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) are an economically important fruit crop in North America, which are grown from clonally preserved and propagated cultivars. Growers usually select cultivars for their operation based on the know attributes of each cultivar in order to best fit their particul...

  4. Analyzing clonal fidelity of micropropagated Psidium guajava L. plants using simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micropropagation of Psidium guajava L. (guava) is a viable alternative to currently adopted techniques for large-scale plant propagation of commercial cultivars. Assessment of clonal fidelity in micropropagated plants is the first step towards ensuring genetic uniformity in mass production of planti...

  5. A simple model for the influence of habitat resource availability on lateral clonal spread

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Martin; Smyčka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Plant clonal spread is ubiquitous and of great interest, owing both to its key role in plant community assembly and its suitability for plant behaviour research. However, mechanisms that govern spreading distance are not well known. Here we link spacer costs and below-ground competition in a simple model of growth in a homogeneous below-ground environment, in which optimal distance between ramets is based on minimizing the sum of these costs. Using this model, we predict a high prevalence of clonal growth that does not employ spacers in resource-poor environments and a nonlinear increase in spreading distance in response to increasing below-ground resource availability. Analysis of database data on clonal growth in relationship to below-ground resource availability revealed that patterns of the spread based on stolons is compatible with the model's predictions. As expected, model prediction failed for rhizomatous species, where spacer sizes are likely to be selected mainly to play roles other than spread. The model's simplicity makes it useful as a null model in testing hypotheses about the effects of environmental heterogeneity on clonal spread. PMID:25833862

  6. Clonality and micro-diversity of a nationwide spreading genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takayuki; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Tamaru, Aki; Seto, Junji; Ahiko, Tadayuki; Yamamoto, Kaori; Hase, Atushi; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission routes can be estimated from genotypic analysis of clinical isolates from patients. In Japan, still a middle-incidence country of TB, a unique genotype strain designated as 'M-strain' has been isolated nationwide recently. To ascertain the history of the wide spread of the strain, 10 clinical isolates from different areas were subjected to genome-wide analysis based on deep sequencers. Results show that all isolates possessed common mutations to those of referential strains. The greatest number of accumulated single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from the oldest coalescence was 13 nucleotides, indicating high clonality of these isolates. When an SNV common to the isolates was used as a surrogate marker of the clone, authentic clonal isolates with variation in a reliable subset of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) genotyping method can be selected successfully from clinical isolates populations of M. tuberculosis. When the authentic clones can also be assigned to sub-clonal groups by SNVs derived from the genomic comparison, they are classifiable into three sub-clonal groups with a bias of geographical origins. Feedback from genomic analysis of clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis to genotypic markers will be an efficient strategy for the big data in various settings for public health actions against TB.

  7. Clonal population structures are derived from various population processes in the protistan oyster parasite Perkinsus marinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population genetic analysis of genotypes comprised of seven microsatellite loci revealed clonal genetic patterns in each of four populations of the protistan estuarine parasite Perkinsus marinus. Each locus was amplified directly from DNA extracted from infected oysters collected from four geographi...

  8. Vigor rating and brix for first clonal selection stage of the Canal Point Cultivar Development Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genetic variability in agronomic performance will help optimize breeding and selection strategies. Vigor ratings and Brix data were collected from the 2009 and 2010 clones in the first clonal selection stage (Stage I) of the Canal Point (CP) sugar...

  9. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  10. Linkage analysis and map construction in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-15

    In this study, we considered four categories of molecular markers based on the number of distinguishable alleles at the marker locus and the number of distinguishable genotypes in clonal F1 progenies. For two marker loci, there are nine scenarios that allow the estimation of female, male, and/or combined recombination frequencies. In a double cross population derived from four inbred lines, five categories of markers are classified and another five scenarios are present for recombination frequency estimation. Theoretical frequencies of identifiable genotypes were given for each scenario, from which the maximum likelihood estimates of one or more of the three recombination frequencies could be estimated. If there was no analytic solution, then Newton-Raphson method was used to acquire a numerical solution. We then proposed to use an algorithm in Traveling Salesman Problem to determine the marker order. Finally, we proposed a procedure to build the two haploids of the female parent and the two haploids of the male parent in clonal F1. Once the four haploids were built, clonal F1 hybrids could be exactly regarded as a double cross population. Efficiency of the proposed methods was demonstrated in simulated clonal F1 populations and one actual maize double cross. Extensive comparisons with software JoinMap4.1, OneMap, and R/qtl show that the methodology proposed in this article can build more accurate linkage maps in less time.

  11. Detectable clonal mosaicism from birth to old age and its relationship to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Rice, Kenneth; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Zelnick, Leila R.; McHugh, Caitlin P.; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Amos, Chris; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Li-e; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Mathias, Rasika; Daley, Denise; Beaty, Terri H.; Scott, Alan F.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scharpf, Rob B.; Bierut, Laura J.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Freedman, Neal D.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Ginsburg, David; Li, Jun; Desch, Karl C.; Strom, Sara S.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Ingles, Sue A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Monroe, Kristine R; Heit, John A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Regnier, Cynthia; Lowe, William L.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Marazita, Mary L.; Feingold, Eleanor; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Melbye, Mads; Feenstra, Bjarke; Kang, Jae H.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Jarvik, Gail P.; McDavid, Andrew N.; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Crenshaw, Andrew; Sharopova, Nataliya; Wise, Anastasia; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David R.; Levine, David M.; Zheng, Xiuwen; Udren, Jenna I; Bennett, Siiri; Nelson, Sarah C.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Conomos, Matthew P.; Heagerty, Patrick; Manolio, Teri; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Caporaso, Neil; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal mosaicism for large chromosomal anomalies (duplications, deletions and uniparental disomy) was detected using SNP microarray data from over 50,000 subjects recruited for genome-wide association studies. This detection method requires a relatively high frequency of cells (>5–10%) with the same abnormal karyotype (presumably of clonal origin) in the presence of normal cells. The frequency of detectable clonal mosaicism in peripheral blood is low (<0.5%) from birth until 50 years of age, after which it rises rapidly to 2–3% in the elderly. Many of the mosaic anomalies are characteristic of those found in hematological cancers and identify common deleted regions that pinpoint the locations of genes previously associated with hematological cancers. Although only 3% of subjects with detectable clonal mosaicism had any record of hematological cancer prior to DNA sampling, those without a prior diagnosis have an estimated 10-fold higher risk of a subsequent hematological cancer (95% confidence interval = 6–18). PMID:22561516

  12. Clonality and serotypes of Streptococcus mutans among children by multilocus sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Stephanie S.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A.; Childers, Noel K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) have demonstrated that Streptococcus mutans isolates are genetically diverse. Our laboratory previously demonstrated clonality of S. mutans using MLST but could not discount the possibility of sampling bias. In this study, the clonality of randomly selected S. mutans plaque isolates from African American children was examined using MLST. Serotype and presence of collagen-binding proteins (CBP) cnm/cbm were also assessed. One hundred S. mutans isolates were randomly selected for MLST analysis. Sequence analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were generated using START2 and MEGA. Thirty-four sequence types (ST) were identified of which 27 were unique to this population. Seventy-five percent of the isolates clustered into 16 clonal groups. Serotypes observed were c (n=84), e (n=3), and k (n=11). The prevalence of S. mutans isolates serotype k was notably high at 17.5%. All isolates were cnm/cbm negative. The clonality of S. mutans demonstrated in this study illustrates the importance of localized populations studies and are consistent with transmission. The prevalence of serotype k, a recently proposed systemic pathogen, observed in this study is higher than reported in most populations and is the first report of S. mutans serotype k in a US population. PMID:26443288

  13. Clonal and spatial genetic structure within populations of a coastal plant, Carex kobomugi (Cyperaceae).

    PubMed

    Ohsako, Takanori

    2010-03-01

    Clarification of clonal growth pattern is critical for understanding the population dynamics and reproductive system evolution of clonal plant species. The contribution of clonality to the spatial genetic structure (SGS) within populations is also an important issue. I examined the spatial distribution of genetic variability within two populations of the coastal plant Carex kobomugi using seven microsatellite loci. Genotyping of 226 and 140 ramets within 14 × 40 m and 14 × 34 m plots on two populations revealed 36 and 33 multilocus genotypes, respectively. To quantify the extent of intermingling among clones, for each genet, I calculated the dominance of ramets belonging to a particular genet within a spatial range of the genet. Furthermore, I analyzed spatial distribution of genotypes within 2 × 2 m and 1 × 2 m quadrats using second-order spatial statistics. These analyses indicated that clones are highly intermingled, suggesting a low level of spatial interaction among clones. Spatial autocorrelation analysis of kinship coefficient including all pairs of ramets showed significantly stronger SGS than analysis considering only pairs between different genets. I conclude that clonal propagation largely contributes to SGS at a fine scale.

  14. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  15. Comparison of stem morphology and anatomy of two alfalfa clonal lines exhibiting divergent cell wall composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous research, two alfalfa clonal lines (252, 1283) were identified that exhibited environmentally stable differences in stem cell walls. Compared to stems of 1283, stems of 252 have a higher cell wall concentration and greater amounts of lignin and cellulose but reduced levels of pectic suga...

  16. Reduced Inhomogeneity of Angelica acutiloba Plants Propagated Clonally Through Somatic Embryoids.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Fukui, H; Tabata, M

    1988-02-01

    Clonal plants propagated from a single plant of a commercial variety of ANGELICA ACUTILOBA (Umbelliferae) through somatic embryoids induced in cell suspension cultures proved to be significantly more uniform with respect to the contents of medicinally important chemical constituents (ligustilide and choline) of the root when compared with seed-propagated plants.

  17. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  18. Clonal genetic structure and diversity in populations of an aquatic plant with combined vs. separate sexes.

    PubMed

    Yakimowski, Sarah B; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2014-06-01

    Clonality is often implicated in models of the evolution of dioecy, but few studies have explicitly compared clonal structure between plant sexual systems, or between the sexes in dioecious populations. Here, we exploit the occurrence of monoecy and dioecy in clonal Sagittaria latifola (Alismataceae) to evaluate two main hypotheses: (i) clone sizes are smaller in monoecious than dioecious populations, because of constraints imposed on clone size by costs associated with geitonogamy; (ii) in dioecious populations, male clones are larger and flower more often than female clones because of sex-differential reproductive costs. Differences in clone size and flowering could result in discordance between ramet- and genet-based sex ratios. We used spatially explicit sampling to address these hypotheses in 10 monoecious and 11 dioecious populations of S. latifolia at the northern range limit in Eastern North America. In contrast to our predictions, monoecious clones were significantly larger than dioecious clones, probably due to their higher rates of vegetative growth and corm production, and in dioecious populations, there was no difference in clone size between females and males; ramet- and genet-based sex ratios were therefore highly correlated. Genotypic diversity declined with latitude for both sexual systems, but monoecious populations exhibited lower genotypic richness. Differences in life history between the sexual systems of S. latifolia appear to be the most important determinants of clonal structure and diversity.

  19. Poppr: an R package for genetic analysis of populations with mixed (clonal/sexual) reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poppr is an R package for analysis of population genetic data. It extends the adegenet package and provides several novel tools, particularly with regard to analysis of data from admixed, clonal, and/or sexual populations. Currently, poppr can be used for dominant/codominant and haploid/diploid gene...

  20. Background and initial evaluations of recently introduced cultivars distributed by the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) distributes budwood of new, potentially important commercial citrus cultivars as they are re- leased from quarantine after completing a thorough “Variety Introduction (VI)” disease testing and therapy program. This article is the second in a seri...

  1. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  2. Ephemeral clonal integration in Calathea marantifolia (Marantaceae): Evidence of diminished integration over time.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, David P; da S L Sternberg, Leonel

    2009-02-01

    A major advantage of clonal growth forms is the intergenerational transfer of resources through vascular connections (clonal integration). Connections linking ramets can be persistent or ephemeral. For species with ephemeral connections, whether the extent of clonal integration changes over time is unclear. To address this issue, we tracked water movement using an isotopic label and assessed the demographic performance of parent and offspring ramets over time in a severing experiment. Our study system was the understory herb Calathea marantifolia, which has parent ramets that produce vegetative bulbils (clonal offspring) that pass through distinct pre- and post-rooting stages. Little water was transported between parents and offspring, and the direction of movement was primarily from parent to pre-rooting offspring. Anatomical observations of inter-ramet connections showed that vascular bundles were twice as abundant in parent stems compared to inter-ramet connections. Severing inter-ramet connections reduced the growth of offspring ramets but not parents. Survival of pre-rooting offspring was reduced by 10% due to severing, but post-rooting offspring were not affected. Our results suggest that offspring ramets of C. marantifolia are weaned from their parent as they progress from pre- to post-rooting stages.

  3. Floral variation and environmental heterogeneity in a tristylous clonal aquatic of the Pantanal wetlands of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leme da Cunha, Nicolay; Fischer, Erich; Lorenz-Lemke, Aline P.; Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The balance between stochastic forces and frequency-dependent mating largely governs style morph frequencies in heterostylous populations. In clonal species, deviations from equal morph ratios often result from founder events and unfavourable conditions for sexual reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether different flooding regimes, because of their influence on sexual vs. clonal reproduction, are associated with regional variation in morph frequencies and floral trait differentiation in populations of the clonal, tristylous, aquatic Eichhornia azurea (Pontederiaceae) in the Pantanal wetlands of Brazil. Methods Style morph frequencies were sampled from 73 populations distributed across four flooding regimes differing in depth and duration. Measurements of flower size, sex-organ dimension, pollen size and pollen production were made in selected populations, and pollinator assemblages and their functional traits were recorded. Key Results Most populations of E. azurea were tristylous (78 %), but the majority exhibited uneven morph ratios. The frequency of the mid-styled morph was significantly lower than that of the long- and short-styled morphs. Morph evenness was positively associated with population size but not with flooding regime. There were significant phenotypic differences among flooding regimes for all floral traits, including populations with reduced flower size, sex-organ length and smaller pollen. Pollinator assemblages varied with flood duration. Conclusions The similar morph structure and evenness of populations, regardless of flooding regime, suggest that sexual reproduction and clonal dispersal are sufficiently common to prevent the signature of founder events from dominating in a region. However, the pervasive occurrence of biased morph ratios in most populations suggests that many are in a non-equilibrium state. The reduced frequency of the mid-styled morph in trimorphic and dimorphic populations may be

  4. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Rechkina, Elena; Chan, Diana; Muradova, Mariya; Haile, Helen Ghirmai; Radey, Matthew; Weissman, Scott; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Johnson, James R; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture) antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  5. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Rechkina, Elena; Chan, Diana; Muradova, Mariya; Haile, Helen Ghirmai; Radey, Matthew; Weissman, Scott; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Johnson, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture) antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients’ urine within 25–35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care. PMID:28350870

  6. [Effects of light intensity contrast on clonal integration of Spartina anglica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xing-Xing; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Luo, Fang-Li; Zhu, Rui; Xu, Xi-Yi; Li, Hong-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a greenhouse experiment to test how clonal integration affected the growth responses of Spartina anglica to light intensity heterogeneity in light availability and whether such effects depended on contrast light intensity. The experiment had three homogeneous treatments and two heterogeneous treatments. In the homogeneous treatments, both ramets of a connected ramet pair were unshaded (high light intensity), moderately shaded (medium light intensity, 70% of the high light intensity) and deeply shaded (low light intensity, 30% of the high light intensity). In the heterogeneous treatments, one ramet of a pair was unshaded, but its connected ramet was either moderately shaded (low light intensity contrast) or deeply shaded (high light intensity contrast). In the homogeneous treatments, biomass of S. anglica was significantly higher in the high light intensity treatment than in the medium and low light intensity treatments. Number of leaves, root length, and total biomass were significantly higher in the shaded ramet in the heterogeneous treatment with low light intensity contrast than in the ramet in the homogeneous treatment with medium light intensity. Final size and mass were not significantly different between the unshaded ramet in the heterogeneous treatment with low light intensity contrast and the ramets in the homogeneous high light intensity treatment. These results suggested that clonal integration benefitted a shaded ramet with little cost to an unshaded ramet when contrast in light intensity was low. However, effects of clonal integration were not significant when contrast was high. It therefore appeared that effects of clonal integration on the growth of S. anglica did not increase with increasing light intensity contrast. In natural habitats, clonal integration might improve growth of S. anglica when its ramets are moderately shaded by other plants but not when they are deeply shaded.

  7. Post-irradiation somatic mutation and clonal stabilisation time in the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, F; Williams, G T; Appleton, M A; Dixon, M F; Harris, M; Williams, E D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal crypts are clonal units in which somatic mutation of marker genes in stem cells leads to crypt restricted phenotypic conversion initially involving part of the crypt, later the whole crypt. Studies in mice show that the time taken for the great majority of mutated crypts to be completely converted, the clonal stabilisation time, is four weeks in the colon and 21 weeks in the ileum. Differences in the clonal stabilisation time between tissues and species are thought to reflect differences in stem cell organisation and crypt kinetics. AIM: To study the clonal stabilisation time in the human colorectum. METHODS: Stem cell mutation can lead to crypt restricted loss of O-acetylation of sialomucins in subjects heterozygous for O-acetyltransferase gene activity. mPAS histochemistry was used to visualise and quantify crypts partially or wholly involved by the mutant phenotype in 21 informative cases who had undergone colectomy up to 34 years after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Radiotherapy was followed by a considerable increase in the discordant crypt frequency that remained significantly increased for many years. The proportion of discordant crypts showing partial involvement was initially high but fell to normal levels about 12 months after irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Crypts wholly involved by a mutant phenotype are stable and persistent while partially involved crypts are transient. The clonal stabilisation time is approximately one year in the human colon compared with four weeks in the mouse. The most likely reason for this is a difference in the number of stem cells in a crypt stem cell niche, although differences in stem cell cycle time and crypt fission may also contribute. These findings are of relevance to colorectal gene therapy and carcinogenesis in stem cell systems. PMID:8944567

  8. Evaluation of clonal herbs of Lamiaceae species for management of diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-In I; Vattem, Dhiraj A; Shetty, Kalidas

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, we screened 7 clonal lines from single seed phenotypes of Lamiaceae family for the inhibition of alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Water extracts of oregano had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibition activity (93.7%), followed by chocolate mint (85.9%) and lemon balm (83.9%). Sage (78.4 %), and three different clonal lines of rosemary: rosemary LA (71.4%), rosemary 6 (68.4%) and rosemary K-2 (67.8%) also showed significant alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracts was compared to selected specific phenolics detected in the extracts using HPLC. Catechin had the highest alpha-glucosidase inhibitiory activity (99.6 %) followed by caffeic acid (91.3 %), rosmarinic acid (85.1%) and resveratrol (71.1 %). Catechol (64.4%), protocatechuic acid (55.7%) and quercetin (36.9%) also exhibited significant alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Results suggested that alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the clonal extracts correlated to the phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of the extracts. The clonal extracts of the herbs and standard phenolics tested in this study did not have any effect on the alpha-amylase activity. We also investigated the ability of the clonal extracts to inhibit rabbit lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). The water extracts of rosemary, rosemary LA had the highest ACE inhibitory activity (90.5%), followed by lemon balm (81.9%) and oregano (37.4 %). Lower levels of ACE inhibition were observed with ethanol extracts of oregano (18.5 %) and lemon balm (0.5 %). Among the standard phenolics only resveratrol (24.1 %), hydroxybenzoic acid (19.3 %) and coumaric acid (2.3 %) had ACE inhibitory activity.

  9. Clonal multipotency of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells between mesodermal and ectodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The differentiation potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) after in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation has been extensively studied. However, the clonal multipotency of MDSCs has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that single skeletal muscle-derived CD34-/CD45- (skeletal muscle-derived double negative [Sk-DN]) cells exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, vasculogenic, and neural cell lineages after in vivo single cell-derived single sphere implantation and in vitro clonal single cell culture. Muscles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were enzymatically dissociated and sorted based on CD34 and CD45. Sk-DN cells were clone-sorted into a 96-well plate and were cultured in collagen-based medium with basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor for 14 days. Individual colony-forming units (CFUs) were then transplanted directly into severely damaged muscle together with 1 x 10(5) competitive carrier Sk-DN cells obtained from wild-type mice muscle expanded for 5 days under the same culture conditions using 35-mm culture dishes. Four weeks after transplantation, implanted GFP+ cells demonstrated differentiation into endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, and neural cell (Schwann cell) lineages. This multipotency was also confirmed by expression of mRNA markers for myogenic (MyoD, myf5), neural (Musashi-1, Nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, peripheral myelin protein-22, Nucleostemin), and vascular (alpha-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, tyrosine kinase-endothelial) stem cells by clonal (single-cell derived) single-sphere reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Approximately 70% of clonal CFUs exhibited expression of all three cell lineages. These findings support the notion that Sk-DN cells are a useful tool for damaged muscle-related tissue reconstitution by synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  10. Perception of neighboring plants by rhizomes and roots: morphological manifestations of a clonal plant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Pyke, David A.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    A previous study showed that clonal morphology of the rhizomatous grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus (Scibner & J.G. Smith Gould) was influenced more by neighbouring root systems than by the local distribution of nutrients. In this study we determine whether individual rhizomes or roots of E. lanceolatus perceive neighbouring root systems and how this is manifested in morphological responses of E. lanceolatus clones. Elymus lanceolatus was grown in the same bin with Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) A. Love or Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) Schult. plants. Elymus lanceolatus was separated from its neighbours by different barriers. The barriers allowed either only E. lanceolatus roots; only a single E. lanceolatus primary rhizome; or both roots and rhizomes to contact the neighbour root system. When only a single E. lanceolatus primary rhizome with potentially developing branching rhizomes made contact with the neighbour, the clonal structure of E. lanceolatus was modified more with P. spicata as the neighbour than with A. desertorum. With root contact of E. lanceolatus alone there was a similar effect with the neighbouring plants, but there was a more marked inhibitory effect on E. lanceolatus clonal growth with P. spicata than with A. desertorum, compared with the treatment with only a single rhizome in contact with the neighbour. Root resource competition in the unconstrained treatment (roots and rhizomes) between neighbouring plant and E. lanceolatus was more apparent with A. desertorum than with P. spicata. This study is one of the first to document that rhizome and root contact of a clonal plant with its neighbours may induce different clonal responses depending on the species of neighbour.

  11. Effects of nutrient patches and root systems on the clonal plasticity of a rhizomatous grass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Pyke, David A.; Caldwell, M.M.; Durham, S.

    1998-01-01

    Clonal plant foraging has been examined primarily on individual clones exposed to resource-poor and resource-rich environments. We designed an experiment to examine the clonal foraging behavior of the rhizomatous grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus under the influence of neighboring plant root systems in a heterogeneous nutrient environment. Individual Elymus clones were planted in large bins together with one of three neighboring grass species, Agropyron desertorum, Pseudoroegneria spicata, or Bromus tectorum, which differ in rooting density and growth activity. The position of Elymus clones was manipulated so rhizomes encountered a short-duration nutrient patch and subsequently root systems of the neighboring plants. Unexpectedly, the morphological plasticity of the perennial grass Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus was influenced by the presence of the neighboring species much more than by the local nutrient enrichments, although nutrient patches did amplify some of the foraging responses. Elymus rhizomes branched readily and initiated large daughter plants as they encountered the low-density root systems of Pseudoroegneria. When Elymus encountered the fine, dense root systems of the annual Bromus, clonal expansion was initially reduced. Yet, after the short growing season of Bromus, Elymus resumed clonal expansion and produced several daughter plants. Elymus clones were most constrained by the fine, dense root systems of Agropyron desertorum. In this case, a few, long rhizomes avoided the densely rooted soil environment by growing aboveground as stolons crossing over the Agropyron tussocks. Elymus clonal biomass was largest in neighborhoods of Pseudoroegneria, intermediate in neighborhoods with Bromus, and smallest in neighborhoods with Agropyron. The latter were approximately half the size of those in the Pseudoroegneria environments. Elymus growth could not be explained by simple resource competition alone; other mechanisms must have been involved in

  12. Molecular clonality relationships in initial carcinomas, ipsilateral breast failures, and distant metastases in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy: evidence suggesting that some distant metastases are derived from ipsilateral breast failures and that metastases can metastasize.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S; Vicini, Frank A; Hunter, Susan; Odish, Eva; Forbes, Suzy; Kestin, Larry L

    2005-07-01

    We studied the clonality relationships in invasive breast carcinomas, ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs), and distant metastases (DMs) using a polymerase chain reaction-loss of heterozygosity (LOH) clonality assay to determine whether IBFs can be the source of DMs. Six cases of initial carcinomas, IBFs, and DMs were identified. Carcinoma DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and analyzed with 20 markers. In 2 cases, the LOH pattern suggested the DM directly resulted from the IBF. In 2 cases, the initial carcinoma, IBF, and DM were one progressive, genetically unstable process. Separate subclones in the initial carcinoma gave rise to the IBF and DM in 1 case, and the DM derived from a second IBF in 1 case. The relationships of initial carcinomas, IBFs, and DMs are complex. DMs seem to be the direct result of IBFs in some cases. Some carcinomas seem to be composed of subclones with different and unrelated IBF and DM potential.

  13. Heterogeneous water supply affects growth and benefits of clonal integration between co-existing invasive and native Hydrocotyle species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Bai, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Shi-Qi; Yao, Bin; Wang, Wen; Luo, Fang-Li

    2016-01-01

    Spatial patchiness and temporal variability in water availability are common in nature under global climate change, which can remarkably influence adaptive responses of clonal plants, i.e. clonal integration (translocating resources between connected ramets). However, little is known about the effects of spatial patchiness and temporal heterogeneity in water on growth and clonal integration between congeneric invasive and native Hydrocotyle species. In a greenhouse experiment, we subjected severed or no severed (intact) fragments of Hydrocotyle vulgaris, a highly invasive species in China, and its co-existing, native congener H. sibthorpioides to different spatial patchiness (homogeneous and patchy) and temporal interval (low and high interval) in water supply. Clonal integration had significant positive effects on growth of both species. In the homogeneous water conditions, clonal integration greatly improved the growth in fragments of both species under low interval in water. However, in the patchy water conditions, clonal integration significantly increased growth in both ramets and fragments of H. vulgaris under high interval in water. Therefore, spatial patchiness and temporal interval in water altered the effects of clonal integration of both species, especially for H. vulgaris. The adaptation of H. vulgaris might lead to invasive growth and potential spread under the global water variability. PMID:27439691

  14. Apomixis in agriculture: the quest for clonal seeds.

    PubMed

    Spillane, C; Steimer, A; Grossniklaus, U

    2001-12-01

    Apomixis, or asexual reproduction through seeds, is a natural trait that could have an immense positive impact on crop production. Apomictic breeding strategies could allow the fixation and indefinite propagation of any desired genotype, however complex. Apomicts display a wide variety of developmental mechanisms, which can be viewed as a short-circuiting of sexual development. Gametophytic and sporophytic apomixis are distinguished by the developmental origin of apomictically derived embryos. Genetic studies suggest that individual elements of gametophytic apomixis, such as apomeiosis and parthenogenesis, are either controlled by one or two dominant Mendelian factors. As recombination around apomeiosis loci is suppressed, it is currently not known how complex these loci are. Much less is known regarding the genetic control of sporophytic apomixis but initial studies suggest a complex genetic control. Genetic analyses of sexual reproduction in plant model systems have identified genes that, when mutated, display elements of apomixis. Such studies help in the identification of candidate genes and promoters that can be used for the de novo engineering of apomixis through biotechnology. Molecular genetic studies in apomictic and sexual systems will generate the knowledge necessary for the engineering of conditional apomixis technology. Approaches encouraging collaboration and widespread dissemination of the acquired knowledge will constitute the most innovative route to the development, deployment and acceptance of apomixis technology in agriculture.

  15. 1H-NMR-Based Endometabolome Profiles of Burkholderia cenocepacia Clonal Variants Retrieved from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana S.; Lourenço, Artur B.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    During cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic lung infections, bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are exposed for several years to a stressful and changing environment. These environmental challenges results in genetic changes of the initial infecting strain with the consequent diversification of genotypes and phenotypes. The exploitation of functional and comparative genomic approaches has suggested that such diversification is associated with massive metabolic remodeling but these alterations are poorly understood. In the present work, we have explored a high resolution 1H-NMR-based metabolomic approach coupled to multivariate analysis to compare the endometabolome of three B. cenocepacia clonal variants retrieved from a CF patient from the onset of infection (IST439) until death with cepacia syndrome after 3.5 years (IST4113 and IST4134), to complement former proteomic and transcriptomic analyses. A fourth clonal variant (IST4129) retrieved from the same CF patient when the clinical condition worsened during the last months of life, was also examined since it was found to lack the third replicon. The metabolomic profiles obtained, based on the complete 1H-NMR spectra, highlight the separation of the four clonal variants examined, the most distinct profile corresponding to IST4129. Results indicate a variable content of several amino acids in the different isolates examined and suggest that glycolysis and the glyoxylate shunt are favored in late variants. Moreover, the concentration of two metabolites with demonstrated cellular protective functions against stress, glycine-betaine and trehalose, is different in the different isolates examined. However, no clear correlation could be established between their content and stress tolerance. For example, IST4113, previously found to be the most resistant variant to antimicrobials of different classes, exhibits low levels of trehalose and glycine-betaine but the highest resistance to heat and oxidative stress

  16. How Clonal Is Clonal? Genome Plasticity across Multicellular Segments of a "Candidatus Marithrix sp." Filament from Sulfidic, Briny Seafloor Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Fadeev, Eduard; Joye, Samantha B; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Marithrix" is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria). This genus of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 μm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, "Candidatus Marithrix" was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the "Candidatus Marithrix" genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98 and 100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes-the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or "intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity" (ISH) events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament.

  17. Fine-scale genetic analysis of Daphnia host populations infected by two virulent parasites - strong fluctuations in clonal structure at small temporal and spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Petrusek, Adam; Seda, Jaromir; Wolinska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Numerous theoretical studies suggest that parasites impose a strong selection pressure on their host, driving genetic changes within host populations. Yet evidence of this process in the wild is scarce. In the present study we surveyed, using high resolution microsatellite markers, the genetic structure of cyclically parthenogenetic Daphnia hosts within two different Daphnia communities belonging to the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex. One community, consisting of a single host species, was infected with the protozoan parasite Caullerya mesnili. The second community consisted of two parental Daphnia spp. and their hybrids, and was infected with the yeast parasite Metschnikowia. Significant differences in the clonal composition between random and infected sub-samples of Daphnia were detected on several occasions within both communities, indicating that host genotypes differ in resistance to both parasites. In addition, one parental species in the multi-taxon community was consistently under-infected, compared with the other taxa. Overall, our field data confirm that infection patterns are strongly affected by host genetic composition in various Daphnia-microparasite systems. Thus, parasite-driven selection operates in natural Daphnia populations and microparasites influence the clonal structure of host populations.

  18. Molecular clonality determination of ipsilateral recurrence of invasive breast carcinomas after breast-conserving therapy: comparison with clinical and biologic factors.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S; Vicini, Frank A; Hunter, Susan; Odish, Eva; Forbes, Suzy; Kraus, Daniel; Kestin, Larry L

    2005-05-01

    We established clonality relationships between invasive ipsilateral breast failures (IBFs; local recurrences) and initial invasive carcinomas using a molecular polymerase chain reaction loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay for 26 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy for invasive carcinoma with no distant metastases (DMs) before the IBE LOH was +/- 50% allelic loss. Eighteen IBFs (69%) were related clonally to initial carcinomas; 8 (31%) were clonally distinct, second primary carcinomas. IBFs and initial invasive carcinomas were morphologically similar in 6 (75%) of 8 clonally different cases. Clinical IBF classification and molecular assay results differed in 11 cases (42%). The mean intervals to IBF were 4.7 years in related and 8.7 years in different cases (P = .013). In 6 patients, DMs developed; 5 had related IBFs. In related IBF cases, the mean increase in fractional allelic loss (FAL) of IBFs associated with DMs was 18.9% compared with 7.6% in cases unassociated with DMs (P = .004). Molecular assays can accurately establish the clonality of most IBFs. Morphologic comparison and clinical IBF classification are unreliable methods of determining clonality. Clonally related IBFs occurred sooner than clonally different IBFs. Patients with clonally related IBFs are the main pool in which DMs occur Not all clonally related IBFs have the same DM association; those with large FAL gains were associated with DMs. Molecular clonality assays may provide a reliable means of identifying patients who might benefit from systemic chemotherapy at the time of IBF.

  19. Histological Transformation and Progression in Follicular Lymphoma: A Clonal Evolution Study

    PubMed Central

    Mottok, Anja; Boyle, Merrill; Tan, King; Meissner, Barbara; Bashashati, Ali; Roth, Andrew; Shumansky, Karey; Nielsen, Cydney; Giné, Eva; Moore, Richard; Morin, Ryan D.; Sehn, Laurie H.; Tousseyn, Thomas; Dogan, Ahmet; Scott, David W.; Steidl, Christian; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent, yet incurable B cell malignancy. A subset of patients experience an increased mortality rate driven by two distinct clinical end points: histological transformation and early progression after immunochemotherapy. The nature of tumor clonal dynamics leading to these clinical end points is poorly understood, and previously determined genetic alterations do not explain the majority of transformed cases or accurately predict early progressive disease. We contend that detailed knowledge of the expansion patterns of specific cell populations plus their associated mutations would provide insight into therapeutic strategies and disease biology over the time course of FL clinical histories. Methods and Findings Using a combination of whole genome sequencing, targeted deep sequencing, and digital droplet PCR on matched diagnostic and relapse specimens, we deciphered the constituent clonal populations in 15 transformation cases and 6 progression cases, and measured the change in clonal population abundance over time. We observed widely divergent patterns of clonal dynamics in transformed cases relative to progressed cases. Transformation specimens were generally composed of clones that were rare or absent in diagnostic specimens, consistent with dramatic clonal expansions that came to dominate the transformation specimens. This pattern was independent of time to transformation and treatment modality. By contrast, early progression specimens were composed of clones that were already present in the diagnostic specimens and exhibited only moderate clonal dynamics, even in the presence of immunochemotherapy. Analysis of somatic mutations impacting 94 genes was undertaken in an extension cohort consisting of 395 samples from 277 patients in order to decipher disrupted biology in the two clinical end points. We found 12 genes that were more commonly mutated in transformed samples than in the preceding FL tumors, including TP53, B2

  20. Evidence for viable, non-clonal but fatherless Boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Johnson, Daniel H; Moore, Sharon; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2011-04-23

    Parthenogenesis in vertebrates is considered an evolutionary novelty. In snakes, all of which exhibit genetic sex determination with ZZ : ZW sex chromosomes, this rare form of asexual reproduction has failed to yield viable female WW offspring. Only through complex experimental manipulations have WW females been produced, and only in fish and amphibians. Through microsatellite DNA fingerprinting, we provide the first evidence of facultative parthenogenesis in a Boa constrictor, identifying multiple, viable, non-experimentally induced females for the first time in any vertebrate lineage. Although the elevated homozygosity of the offspring in relation to the mother suggests that the mechanism responsible may be terminal fusion automixis, no males were produced, potentially indicating maternal sex chromosome hemizygosity (WO). These findings provide the first evidence of parthenogenesis in the family Boidae (Boas), and suggest that WW females may be more common within basal reptilian lineages than previously assumed.

  1. Characterization of a complex glucocorticoid response unit in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, E; Stromstedt, P E; Quinn, P G; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Granner, D K

    1990-01-01

    The minimal DNA sequence required for glucocorticoid induction of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells was defined. This novel glucocorticoid response unit (GRU) spans about 110 base pairs (bp) and includes two receptor-binding elements plus two accessory factor-binding elements. Purified glucocorticoid receptor bound to two regions (GR1 and GR2) between -395 and -349 bp relative to the transcription start site. Factors in crude rat liver nuclear extract bound to DNA in the regions -455 to -431 and -420 to -403 bp, which are designated accessory factor 1 (AF1) and accessory factor 2 (AF2) elements, respectively. Gel retardation analysis revealed that at least two proteins bound to AF1 and that they were distinct from the protein(s) that bound to AF2. Various combinations of GR1, GR2, AF1, and AF2 were fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and cotransfected with a glucocorticoid receptor expression plasmid (pSVGR1) into H4IIE cells to identify the functional GRU. Neither the glucocorticoid receptor binding region nor the accessory factor binding region alone was sufficient to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness. The two components of the glucocorticoid receptor binding region functioned independently, and each accounted for half of the maximal response, provided the accessory factor elements were present. Similarly, deletion of either AF1 or AF2 diminished glucocorticoid induction of the PEPCK gene to approximately half of the maximum. We propose that the complex PEPCK gene GRU provides the stringent regulation required of this critical enzyme in liver. Images PMID:2388623

  2. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  3. The cellular and molecular toxicity of lead in primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    First, steady state kinetic models of lead metabolism and calcium homeostasis were developed in both primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells. Secondly, the effect of lead on cellular calcium homeostasis was determined. Finally, the effect of lead on 1,25 (OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induced production of osteocalcin, a protein synthesized and secreted by osteoblasts, was investigated. Lead metabolism in osteoblastic bone cells was characterized by three intracellular pools. The largest of these, S{sub 3}, included mitochondrial lead and accounted for 70 percent of total cell lead in primary osteoblastic bone cells and 85 percent of total lead in clonal osteoblastic bone cells. None of the kinetic pools were saturated at lead concentrations up to 100 {mu}M lead. Calcium homeostasis in osteoblastic bone cells was also described by a three compartment, intracellular kinetic model.

  4. Interaction between clonal plasma cells and the immune system in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Perez-Andres, M; Almeida, J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Moro, M J; Garcia-Marcos, M A; Moreno, I; Dominguez, M; Galende, J; Heras, N; Gonzalez, M I; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2004-01-01

    The term "monoclonal gammopathy" (MG) includes a group of clonal plasma cell disorders, which show heterogeneous clinical behavior. While multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukemia (PCL) are incurable malignant diseases, most patients with MG of undetermined significance (MGUS) show an indolent/benign clinical course. Evidence has accumulated which supports the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in MG. Accordingly, the survival, drug-resistance and proliferation of MM cells have been shown to be largely dependent on a supportive microenvironment. Among the different environment-associated parameters, those related to the status/activity of the immune system are particularly relevant. This review focuses on the different ways clonal plasma cells (PC) interact with the immune system in different models of MG, to characterize crucial events in the development and progression of MG. These advances may support the design of novel therapeutic approaches in patients with MG.

  5. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  6. The impact of clonal mixing on the evolution of social behaviour in aphids.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2010-06-07

    Reports of substantial clonal mixing measured in social aphid colonies seem, on the face of it, to rule out population structure as an explanation of this enigmatic insect's social behaviour. To clarify how selection operates in aphids, and to disentangle direct and indirect fitness components, we present a model of the life cycle of a typical colony-dwelling aphid. The model incorporates ecological factors and includes a trade-off between investing in social behaviour and investing in reproduction. Our focus on inclusive fitness contrasts with previous approaches that optimize colony output. Through deriving a variant of Hamilton's rule, we show that a simple relationship can be established between the patch-carrying capacity and immigration rates into patches. Our results indicate that the levels of clonal mixing reported are not inconsistent with social behaviour. We discuss our model in terms of the evolutionary origins of social behaviour in aphids.

  7. Automated tissue m-FISH analysis workstation for identification of clonally related cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrowski, Piotr; Lam, Wan; Ling, Victor; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum

    2008-02-01

    We have developed an automated multicolour high-throughput multi-colour Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (FISH) scanning system for examining Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) 5-10μm thick tissue specimens and analyzing their FISH spot signals at the individual cell level and then as clonal populations using cell-cell architecture (spatial distributions). Using FISH probes targeting genomic areas deemed significant to chemotherapy resistance, we aim to identify clonal subpopulations of cells in tissue samples likely to be resistant to cis-platinum/vinorelbine chemotherapy. The scanning system consists of automatic image acquisition, cell nuclei segmentation, spot counting and measuring the spatial distribution and connectivity of cells with specific genetic profiles across the entire section using architectural tools to provide the scoring system.

  8. Spliceosomal gene mutations in myelodysplasia: molecular links to clonal abnormalities of hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daichi; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of the myeloid malignancies and clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that may give rise to these disorders have identified that mutations in genes encoding core spliceosomal proteins and accessory regulatory splicing factors are among the most common targets of somatic mutations. These spliceosomal mutations often occur in a mutually exclusive manner with one another and, in aggregate, account for the most frequent class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in particular. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the effects of several of these mutations on splicing and splice site recognition, functional connections linking the mechanistic changes in splicing induced by these mutations to the phenotypic consequences of clonal and aberrant hematopoiesis are not yet well defined. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanistic and biological effects of spliceosomal gene mutations in MDSs as well as the regulation of splicing throughout normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27151974

  9. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  10. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore.

    PubMed

    Costello, John H; Colin, Sean P; Gemmell, Brad J; Dabiri, John O; Sutherland, Kelly R

    2015-09-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labour in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole-colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning, whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but, more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater-distributed propulsion vehicle design.

  11. Clonally Related Forebrain Interneurons Disperse Broadly across Both Functional Areas and Structural Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H; Cobbs, Lucy V; Bandler, Rachel C; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-09-02

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum, and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute.

  12. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore

    PubMed Central

    Costello, John H.; Colin, Sean P.; Gemmell, Brad J.; Dabiri, John O.; Sutherland, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labour in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole-colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning, whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but, more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater-distributed propulsion vehicle design. PMID:26327286

  13. The Tasmanian devil transcriptome reveals Schwann cell origins of a clonally transmissible cancer.

    PubMed

    Murchison, Elizabeth P; Tovar, Cesar; Hsu, Arthur; Bender, Hannah S; Kheradpour, Pouya; Rebbeck, Clare A; Obendorf, David; Conlan, Carly; Bahlo, Melanie; Blizzard, Catherine A; Pyecroft, Stephen; Kreiss, Alexandre; Kellis, Manolis; Stark, Alexander; Harkins, Timothy T; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Woods, Gregory M; Hannon, Gregory J; Papenfuss, Anthony T

    2010-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil, a marsupial carnivore, is endangered because of the emergence of a transmissible cancer known as devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). This fatal cancer is clonally derived and is an allograft transmitted between devils by biting. We performed a large-scale genetic analysis of DFTD with microsatellite genotyping, a mitochondrial genome analysis, and deep sequencing of the DFTD transcriptome and microRNAs. These studies confirm that DFTD is a monophyletic clonally transmissible tumor and suggest that the disease is of Schwann cell origin. On the basis of these results, we have generated a diagnostic marker for DFTD and identify a suite of genes relevant to DFTD pathology and transmission. We provide a genomic data set for the Tasmanian devil that is applicable to cancer diagnosis, disease evolution, and conservation biology.

  14. Development of microsatellite markers for the clonal shrub Orixa japonica (Rutaceae) using 454 sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Setsuko, Suzuki; Sugai, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for a dioecious shrub, Orixa japonica (Rutaceae). Because O. japonica vigorously propagates by vegetative growth, microsatellite markers can be used to identify clonal relationships among its ramets. Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were identified by 454 next-generation sequencing. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity for each locus among four populations ranged from two to 10 and from 0.140 to 0.875, respectively. Five of the 16 loci showed a low null allele frequency. Because Orixa is a monotypic genus, cross-amplification in a consubfamilial species, Skimmia japonica, was tested, and only one locus showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers developed for O. japonica contribute to clone identification for studies examining the clonal structure and true sex ratio in the wild. Moreover, five markers that have a low null allele frequency can also be used for estimating mating systems or performing parentage analysis. PMID:27785383

  15. Multi-jet propulsion organized by clonal development in a colonial siphonophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, John; Colin, Sean; Gemmell, Brad; Dabiri, John; Sutherland, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    Physonect siphonophores are colonial cnidarians that are pervasive predators in many neritic and oceanic ecosystems. Physonects employ multiple, clonal medusan individuals, termed nectophores, to propel an aggregate colony. Here we show that developmental differences between clonal nectophores of the physonect Nanomia bijuga produce a division of labor in thrust and torque production that controls direction and magnitude of whole colony swimming. Although smaller and less powerful, the position of young nectophores near the apex of the nectosome allows them to dominate torque production for turning whereas older, larger and more powerful individuals near the base of the nectosome contribute predominantly to forward thrust production. The patterns we describe offer insight into the biomechanical success of an ecologically important and widespread colonial animal group, but more broadly, provide basic physical understanding of a natural solution to multi-engine organization that may contribute to the expanding field of underwater distributed propulsion vehicle design.

  16. Characterization of Clonality of Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Human B Lymphoproliferative Disease in Mice with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakamine, Hirokazu; Masih, Aneal S.; Okano, Motohiko; Taguchi, Yuichi; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Davis, Jack R.; Mahloch, Mark L.; Beisel, Kirk W.; Kleveland, Kimberly; Sanger, Warren G.; Purtilo, David T.

    1993-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy and understanding of the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) occurring in immunosuppressed transplant recipients (post-transplantation LPD), clonality of Epstein-Barr virus-induced human LPDs in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency was examined by analyzing: 1) human immunoglobulin genes and their products, 2) the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus DNA, and 3) genetic alteration of c-myc or bcl-2 genes. A spectrum of clonality was found in the LPDs comparable with that reported for post-transplantation LPDs, although rearrangements of c-myc or bcl-2 genes were not detected. It is confirmed that this system is useful in terms of clonality for understanding the early phases in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation LPD or LPD in immune deficient patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:8380952

  17. Geographically structured populations of Cryptococcus neoformans Variety grubii in Asia correlate with HIV status and show a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Khayhan, Kantarawee; Hagen, Ferry; Pan, Weihua; Simwami, Sitali; Fisher, Matthew C; Wahyuningsih, Retno; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Ikeda, Reiko; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Khan, Ziauddin; Ip, Margaret; Imran, Darma; Sjam, Ridhawati; Sriburee, Pojana; Liao, Wanqing; Chaicumpar, Kunyaluk; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Meyer, Wieland; Trilles, Luciana; van Iersel, Leo J J; Meis, Jacques F; Klaassen, Corné H W; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an important fungal disease in Asia with an estimated 140,000 new infections annually the majority of which occurs in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS. Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii (serotype A) is the major causative agent of this disease. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using the ISHAM MLST consensus scheme for the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex was used to analyse nucleotide polymorphisms among 476 isolates of this pathogen obtained from 8 Asian countries. Population genetic analysis showed that the Asian C. neoformans var. grubii population shows limited genetic diversity and demonstrates a largely clonal mode of reproduction when compared with the global MLST dataset. HIV-status, sequence types and geography were found to be confounded. However, a correlation between sequence types and isolates from HIV-negative patients was observed among the Asian isolates. Observations of high gene flow between the Middle Eastern and the Southeastern Asian populations suggest that immigrant workers in the Middle East were originally infected in Southeastern Asia.

  18. Inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion mediates fisetin-exerted prevention of adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngyi; Bae, Eun Ju

    2013-11-01

    Adipocytes are the key player in adipose tissue inflammation and subsequent systemic insulin resistance and its development involves complex process of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes. Fistein, a polyphenol flavonoid, is known to exert anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of fisetin on adipocyte proliferation and differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line and its mechanism of action. We found that fisetin inhibits adipocyte differentiation in a concentration dependent manner, which were evidenced by Oil Red O staining and the protein expression of mature adipocyte marker genes fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Moreover, the proliferation of preadipocytes was also markedly suppressed by treatment of fisetin for 24 and 48 h in the differentiation medium. We also found that fisetin inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was largely due to the effect on mitotic clonal expansion. Fisetin suppression of preadipocyte proliferation at early stage of differentiation was accompanied by the changes of expression of a series of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Altogether, our results suggest that the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation by fisetin may be at least in part mediated by cell cycle arrest during adipogenesis.

  19. Clonal spread and interspecies transmission of clinically relevant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli of ST410--another successful pandemic clone?

    PubMed

    Schaufler, Katharina; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Wöhrmann, Michael; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz; Müller, Kerstin; Kola, Axel; Fruth, Angelika; Ewers, Christa; Guenther, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing multi-resistant Escherichia coli have been on the rise for years. Initially restricted to mostly a clinical context, recent findings prove their prevalence in extraclinical settings independent of the original occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. To get further insights into the complex ecology of potentially clinically relevant ESBL-producing E. coli, 24 isolates from wild birds in Berlin, Germany, and 40 ESBL-producing human clinical E. coli isolates were comparatively analyzed. Isolates of ST410 occurred in both sample groups (six). In addition, three ESBL-producing E. coli isolates of ST410 from environmental dog feces and one clinical dog isolate were included. All 10 isolates were clonally analyzed showing almost identical macrorestriction patterns. They were chosen for whole-genome sequencing revealing that the whole-genome content of these 10 E. coli isolates showed a very high genetic similarity, differing by low numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms only. This study gives initial evidence for a recent interspecies transmission of a new successful clone of ST410 E. coli between wildlife, humans, companion animals and the environment. The results underline the zoonotic potential of clinically relevant multi-resistant bacteria found in the environment as well as the mandatory nature of the 'One Health' approach.

  20. Remediation of blowouts by clonal plants in Maqu degraded alpine grasslands of northwest China.

    PubMed

    Kang, JianJun; Zhao, WenZhi; Zhao, Ming

    2017-03-01

    The sand-fixation of plants is considered to be the most effective and fundamental measure in desertification control in many arid and semi-arid regions. Carex brunnescens (Carex spp) and Leymus secalinus (Leymus), two perennial clonal herbs native to the Maqu degraded alpine areas of northwest China, are dominant and constructive species in active sand dunes that have excellent adaptability to fix sand dunes found to date. In order to study the ability and mechanism of sandland blowout remediation by two clone plants C. brunnescens and L. secalinus, the artificially emulated blowouts were set up in the populations of two clonal plants in the field. The results showed that both C. brunnescens and L. secalinus produced more new ramets in the artificially emulated blowouts than in the natural conditions, suggesting that the two clonal plants had strong ability in blowouts remediation; while the biomass, number of leaves and height of new ramets in the artificially emulated blowouts were less than in the natural conditions due to the restriction of poor nutrients in the artificially emulated blowouts. The ability of blowouts remediation by C. brunnescens was stronger than L. secalinus, as it generated more new ramets than L. secalinus in the process of blowouts remediation. The new ramets of L. secalinus in the blowouts remediation were mainly generated by the buds in the rhizomes which spread from outside of the blowouts; while those of C. brunnescens were generated both by the buds in the rhizomes which spread from outside, and by the buds in the rhizomes inside which were freed from dormancy in the deeper soil under wind erosion conditions. These findings suggest that through rapid clonal expansion capability, C. brunnescens and L. secalinus exhibited strong ability in blowouts remediation which can be one of the most effective strategies to restore and reconstruct degraded vegetations in Maqu alpine areas of northwest China.

  1. Geographic and habitat origin influence biomass production and storage translocation in the clonal plant Aegopodium podagraria.

    PubMed

    D'Hertefeldt, Tina; Eneström, Johanna M; Pettersson, Lars B

    2014-01-01

    Through physiological integration, clonal plants can support ramets in unfavourable patches, exploit heterogeneously distributed resources and distribute resources that are taken up over large areas. Physiological integration generally increases in adverse conditions, but it is not well known which factors determine the evolution of physiological integration. The aim of this study was to investigate if clonal plants from Southern and Northern populations of the clonal herb Aegopodium podagraria differed in physiological integration in terms of translocation of carbon to the rhizomes, and in biomass production using a reciprocal transplant experiment. Aegopodium podagraria from shaded conditions have been suggested to share more resources than clones from open conditions and therefore, plants from forest and open populations within the Southern and Northern regions were included. The regional growing conditions greatly affected biomass production. Plants grown in North Sweden produced more biomass and allocated more biomass to shoots, while plants grown in South Sweden allocated more biomass to rhizomes. There was a regional origin effect as plants originating from North Sweden produced more biomass in both regions. Within the Northern region, plants from shaded habitats translocated more (14)C to the rhizomes, suggesting more storage there than in plants from open habitats. In addition to genetic differentiation in biomass production between Northern and Southern populations, probably as a response to a shorter growing season in the North, there appeared to be genetic differentiation in physiological integration within the Northern region. This shows that both regional and local conditions need to be taken into account in future studies of genetic differentiation of physiological integration in clonal plants.

  2. B cell clonality in gastric lymphoid tissues of patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, G F; Sorrentino, D; De Vita, S; Casatta, L; Labombarda, A; Avellini, C; Dolcetti, R; Di Luca, D; Beltrami, C A; Boiocchi, M; Bartoli, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in the stomach and of a possible antigen driven proliferation, in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). METHODS: Twenty one patients with primary SS and 80 dyspeptic controls underwent upper endoscopy. Lymphoid tissue and Helicobacter pylori were assessed by histopathological analysis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) genome were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA amplification. Two PCR VDJ procedures were used to detect immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangement. RESULTS: Organised MALT was found in 33.3% of the patients, compared with 21.5% of the controls (NS). H pylori infection was seen in 71% of patients and 63% of controls. Genomic EBV or HHV-6 was found in a minor portion of SS gastric tissues. B cell expansion was detected in nine of the 21 patients. Infectious agents in the stomach might have contributed to B cell clonality only in 55.5% of the cases. No strict relationship was found between lymphoid follicles and clonality. CONCLUSION: Lymphoid accumulation in the gastric mucosa is common in Sjögren's syndrome, but full evidence for an antigen driven B cell expansion could not be demonstrated. Only a portion of those with clonal B cell expansion had evidence of an infectious agent. Other unknown infectious agents or factors related to the underlying disease (autoantigen) and its tissue environment may have a further role as possible causes of B clonal expansion in the gastric mucosa. Images PMID:8660105

  3. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  4. Geographic and Habitat Origin Influence Biomass Production and Storage Translocation in the Clonal Plant Aegopodium podagraria

    PubMed Central

    D′Hertefeldt, Tina; Eneström, Johanna M.; Pettersson, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    Through physiological integration, clonal plants can support ramets in unfavourable patches, exploit heterogeneously distributed resources and distribute resources that are taken up over large areas. Physiological integration generally increases in adverse conditions, but it is not well known which factors determine the evolution of physiological integration. The aim of this study was to investigate if clonal plants from Southern and Northern populations of the clonal herb Aegopodium podagraria differed in physiological integration in terms of translocation of carbon to the rhizomes, and in biomass production using a reciprocal transplant experiment. Aegopodium podagraria from shaded conditions have been suggested to share more resources than clones from open conditions and therefore, plants from forest and open populations within the Southern and Northern regions were included. The regional growing conditions greatly affected biomass production. Plants grown in North Sweden produced more biomass and allocated more biomass to shoots, while plants grown in South Sweden allocated more biomass to rhizomes. There was a regional origin effect as plants originating from North Sweden produced more biomass in both regions. Within the Northern region, plants from shaded habitats translocated more 14C to the rhizomes, suggesting more storage there than in plants from open habitats. In addition to genetic differentiation in biomass production between Northern and Southern populations, probably as a response to a shorter growing season in the North, there appeared to be genetic differentiation in physiological integration within the Northern region. This shows that both regional and local conditions need to be taken into account in future studies of genetic differentiation of physiological integration in clonal plants. PMID:24427305

  5. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m−3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m−3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network. PMID:26301826

  6. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  7. Against the odds: complete outcrossing in a monoecious clonal seagrass Posidonia australis (Posidoniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Gecan, Ilena; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Kendrick, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Seagrasses are marine, flowering plants with a hydrophilous pollination strategy. In these plants, successful mating requires dispersal of filamentous pollen grains through the water column to receptive stigmas. Approximately 40 % of seagrass species are monoecious, and therefore little pollen movement is required if inbreeding is tolerated. Outcrossing in these species is further impacted by clonality, which is variable, but can be extensive in large, dense meadows. Despite this, little is known about the interaction between clonal structure, genetic diversity and mating systems in hydrophilous taxa. Methods Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were used to characterize genetic diversity, clonal structure, mating system and realized pollen dispersal in two meadows of the temperate, monoecious seagrass, Posidonia australis, in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. Key Results Within the two sampled meadows, genetic diversity was moderate among the maternal shoots (R = 0·45 and 0·64) and extremely high in the embryos (R = 0·93–0·97). Both meadows exhibited a highly clumping (or phalanx) structure among clones, with spatial autocorrelation analysis showing significant genetic structure among shoots and embryos up to 10–15 m. Outcrossing rates were not significantly different from one. Pollen dispersal distances inferred from paternity assignment averaged 30·8 and 26·8 m, which was larger than the mean clone size (12·8 and 13·8 m). Conclusions These results suggest highly effective movement of pollen in the water column. Despite strong clonal structure and moderate genetic diversity within meadows, hydrophilous pollination is an effective vector for completely outcrossed offspring. The different localized water conditions at each site (highly exposed conditions vs. weak directional flow) appear to have little influence on the success and pattern of successful pollination in the two meadows. PMID:24812250

  8. Light limitation and litter of an invasive clonal plant, Wedelia trilobata, inhibit its seedling recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shan-Shan; Dai, Zhi-Cong; Miao, Shi-Li; Zhai, De-Li; Si, Chun-Can; Huang, Ping; Wang, Rui-Ping; Du, Dao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Invasive clonal plants have two reproduction patterns, namely sexual and vegetative propagation. However, seedling recruitment of invasive clonal plants can decline as the invasion process proceeds. For example, although the invasive clonal Wedelia trilobata (Asteraceae) produces numerous seeds, few seedlings emerge under its dense population canopy in the field. In this study it is hypothesized that light limitation and the presence of a thick layer of its own litter may be the primary factors causing the failure of seedling recruitment for this invasive weed in the field. Methods A field survey was conducted to determine the allocation of resources to sexual reproduction and seedling recruitment in W. trilobata. Seed germination was also determined in the field. Effects of light and W. trilobata leaf extracts on seed germination and seedling growth were tested in the laboratory. Key Results Wedelia trilobata blooms profusely and produces copious viable seeds in the field. However, seedlings of W. trilobata were not detected under mother ramets and few emerged seedlings were found in the bare ground near to populations. In laboratory experiments, low light significantly inhibited seed germination. Leaf extracts also decreased seed germination and inhibited seedling growth, and significant interactions were found between low light and leaf extracts on seed germination. However, seeds were found to germinate in an invaded field after removal of the W. trilobata plant canopy. Conclusions The results indicate that lack of light and the presence of its own litter might be two major factors responsible for the low numbers of W. trilobata seedlings found in the field. New populations will establish from seeds once the limiting factors are eliminated, and seeds can be the agents of long-distance dispersal; therefore, prevention of seed production remains an important component in controlling the spread of this invasive clonal plant. PMID:24825293

  9. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia.

    PubMed

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m-3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m-3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network.

  10. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract associated with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Kemp, J D; Goeken, J A; Mitros, F A; Platz, C E; Dick, F R

    1990-09-01

    The authors report a case of common variable immunodeficiency associated with nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract in which a clonal population of lymphoid cells was detected by immunophenotypic and genotypic studies on tissue obtained by colonoscopic biopsy. The patient has been followed up for more than 50 months without clinical, radiographic, or pathologic evidence of lymphoma. The significance of clonal rearrangement in the setting of immunodeficiency and the role of genotypic studies in defining lymphoid malignancy are discussed.

  11. High frequency of clonal IG and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenting; Qiu, Tian; Zeng, Linshu; Zheng, Bo; Ying, Jianming; Feng, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms from hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues no longer required the absence of clonal B-cell/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. It is true that the clonal B-cell/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements have been identified in rare cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, such as those with or following lymphoma/leukemia or in some sporadic histiocytic/dendritic cell sarcomas, but the clonal features of such group of tumor are still not clear. Here we investigated the clonal status of 33 samples including Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (IDCS) and histiocytic sarcoma (HS). Among them, twenty-eight cases were sporadic without current or past lymphoma/leukemia. Three cases were found with a past history of T-cell lymphoma, one case was followed by extraosseous plasmacytoma, and one case was found with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Our results showed that there was a high frequency of clonal IG and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in these cases. Notably, 4 cases of LCH and 2 cases of FDCS showed both B and T cell receptor gene rearrangements concurrently. One case of FDCS synchronous with DLBCL showed identical clonal IGH in both tumor populations and clonal TCRβ in FDCS alone. No matter if the presence of clonal receptor gene rearrangements was associated with the tumor origin or tumorigenesis, it might serve as a novel tumor marker for developing target therapy. PMID:27823979

  12. Clonal analysis of NRAS activating mutations in KIT-D816V systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Todd M.; Maric, Irina; Simakova, Olga; Bai, Yun; Ching Chan, Eunice; Olivares, Nicolas; Carter, Melody; Maric, Dragan; Robyn, Jamie; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperating genetic events are likely to contribute to the phenotypic diversity of KIT-D816V systemic mastocytosis. In this study, 44 patients with KIT-D816V systemic mastocytosis were evaluated for coexisting NRAS, KRAS, HRAS or MRAS mutations. Activating NRAS mutations were identified in 2 of 8 patients with advanced disease. NRAS mutations were not found in patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis. To better understand the clonal evolution of mastocytosis, we evaluated the cell compartments impacted by the NRAS and KIT mutations. Clonal mast cells harbored both mutations. KIT-D816V was not detected in bone marrow CD34+ progenitors, whereas the NRAS mutation was present. These findings suggest that NRAS mutations may have the potential to precede KIT-D816V in clonal development. Unlike other mature lineages, mast cell survival is dependent on KIT and the presence of these two activating mutations may have a greater impact on the expansion of this cell compartment and in resultant disease severity. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00044122, NCT00001756) PMID:21134978

  13. Clonal integration facilitates the colonization of drought environments by plant invaders.

    PubMed

    Lechuga-Lago, Yaiza; Sixto-Ruiz, Marta; Roiloa, Sergio R; González, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasion represents one of the main threats for biodiversity conservation at the global scale. Identifying the mechanisms underlying the process of biological invasions is a crucial objective in the prediction of scenarios of future invasions and the mitigation of their impacts. In this sense, some plant attributes might better explain the success of invasive plant species than others. Recently, clonal growth has been identified as an attribute that could contribute to the invasiveness of plants. In this experiment, we aim to determine the effect of physiological integration (one of the most striking attributes associated with clonal growth) in the performance (at morphological and physiological levels) of the aggressive invader Carpobrotus edulis, when occupying stressful environments. To achieve this objective we performed a greenhouse experiment in which apical ramets of C. edulis were water-stressed and the connection with the basal ramets was either left intact (physiological integration is allowed) or severed (physiological integration is impeded). Our results show that clonal integration allowed apical ramets to buffer drought stress in terms of photochemical activity, and as a consequence, to increase their growth in comparison with severed apical ramets. Interestingly, this increase in biomass was mainly due to the production of aboveground structures, increasing the spread along the soil surface, and consequently having important implications for the colonization success of new environments by this aggressive invader.

  14. Protocol for the clonal analysis of NK cell effector functions by multi-parameter flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schönberg, Kathrin; Hejazi, Maryam; Uhrberg, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide a first line of defense against viral infections and prepare the ground for subsequent action of virus-specific T cells in a concerted way. Human NK cells use a sophisticated system of inhibitory and stimulatory receptors of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family, which are expressed in a clonally distributed manner. Several studies suggest that KIR play a critical role in NK cell-mediated protection against HCV and HIV infection. As each NK cell expresses an individual set of KIR receptors that enables them to sense differences in HLA class I expression, classical measurement of NK cell function by analysis of target cell killing does not enable one to define and isolate the clinically relevant NK cell effector subsets. Here, we have developed a flow cytometry-based protocol to measure cytolytic activity together with KIR expression at a clonal level. Combined analysis of KIR expression in conjunction with cell surface mobilization of CD107 enables precise enumeration of cytolytic NK cells with defined specificity for HLA class I. Moreover, via inclusion of intracellular perforin or alternatively granzyme B, NK cells with deficient loading of cytotoxic granula can be identified. The present protocol enables identification and isolation of cytotoxic NK cells on a clonal level and enables reliable measurement in healthy as well as in pathological settings such as virus infection and hematological disease.

  15. Clonal integration facilitates the colonization of drought environments by plant invaders

    PubMed Central

    Lechuga-Lago, Yaiza; Sixto-Ruiz, Marta; Roiloa, Sergio R.; González, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasion represents one of the main threats for biodiversity conservation at the global scale. Identifying the mechanisms underlying the process of biological invasions is a crucial objective in the prediction of scenarios of future invasions and the mitigation of their impacts. In this sense, some plant attributes might better explain the success of invasive plant species than others. Recently, clonal growth has been identified as an attribute that could contribute to the invasiveness of plants. In this experiment, we aim to determine the effect of physiological integration (one of the most striking attributes associated with clonal growth) in the performance (at morphological and physiological levels) of the aggressive invader Carpobrotus edulis, when occupying stressful environments. To achieve this objective we performed a greenhouse experiment in which apical ramets of C. edulis were water-stressed and the connection with the basal ramets was either left intact (physiological integration is allowed) or severed (physiological integration is impeded). Our results show that clonal integration allowed apical ramets to buffer drought stress in terms of photochemical activity, and as a consequence, to increase their growth in comparison with severed apical ramets. Interestingly, this increase in biomass was mainly due to the production of aboveground structures, increasing the spread along the soil surface, and consequently having important implications for the colonization success of new environments by this aggressive invader. PMID:27154623

  16. UbC-StarTrack, a clonal method to target the entire progeny of individual progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, María; García-Marqués, Jorge; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Clonal cell analysis defines the potential of single cells and the diversity they can produce. To achieve this, we have developed a novel adaptation of the genetic tracing strategy, UbC-StarTrack, which attributes a specific and unique color-code to single neural precursors, allowing all their progeny to be tracked. We used integrable fluorescent reporters driven by a ubiquitous promoter in PiggyBac-based vectors to achieve inheritable and stable clonal cell labeling. In addition, coupling this to an inducible Cre-LoxP system avoids the expression of non-integrated reporters. To assess the utility of this system, we first analyzed images of combinatorial expression of fluorescent reporters in transfected cells and their progeny. We also validated the efficiency of the UbC-StarTrack to trace cell lineages through in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo strategies. Finally, progenitors located in the lateral ventricles were targeted at embryonic or postnatal stages to determine the diversity of neurons and glia they produce, and their clonal relationships. In this way we demonstrate that UbC-StarTrack can be used to identify all the progeny of a single cell and that it can be employed in a wide range of contexts. PMID:27654510

  17. Further clonal expansion of T cells upon rechallenge of superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-01-01

    Superantigens are known to induce clonal anergy and/or deletion in reactive T cells peripherally. This study was undertaken to investigate the T-cell status early after exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in vivo and in vitro. At the peak of clonal expansion following the administration of 5 microg SEA (i.e., 2 days after the injection), C57BL/6 mice were rechallenged with the same dose of SEA in vivo. The secondary stimulation augmented clonal expansion of the T cells bearing Vbeta3 and Vbeta11 in both CD4+ and CD8+ populations. In vitro restimulation of the spleen cells taken from the SEA-primed mice also induced further expansion of the Vbeta3+ T cells during 2 days of culturing, whereas without restimulation, a marked reduction of Vbeta3+ T cells occurred. The spleen cells from the SEA-primed mice were hyper-reactive to in vitro restimulation with SEA as measured by 3H-TdR uptake on day 1 of culturing, but augmented proliferation leveled off thereafter. By day 3, the values of 3H-TdR uptake were less than 20% of those of the controls in which spleen cells from native mice were stimulated with SEA in vitro. These results suggest that T cells exposed to SEA in vivo are still capable of proliferating upon SEA rechallenge, but subsequently, the proliferation starts to wane.

  18. High-Level Clonal FGFR Amplification and Response to FGFR Inhibition in a Translational Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Babina, Irina S.; Herrera-Abreu, Maria Teresa; Tarazona, Noelia; Peckitt, Clare; Kilgour, Elaine; Smith, Neil R.; Geh, Catherine; Rooney, Claire; Cutts, Ros; Campbell, James; Ning, Jian; Fenwick, Kerry; Swain, Amanda; Brown, Gina; Chua, Sue; Thomas, Anne; Johnston, Stephen R.D.; Ajaz, Mazhar; Sumpter, Katherine; Gillbanks, Angela; Watkins, David; Chau, Ian; Popat, Sanjay; Cunningham, David; Turner, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    FGFR1 and FGFR2 are amplified in many tumor types, yet what determines response to FGFR inhibition in amplified cancers is unknown. In a translational clinical trial, we show that gastric cancers with high-level clonal FGFR2 amplification have a high response rate to the selective FGFR inhibitor AZD4547, whereas cancers with subclonal or low-level amplification did not respond. Using cell lines and patient-derived xenograft models, we show that high-level FGFR2 amplification initiates a distinct oncogene addiction phenotype, characterized by FGFR2-mediated transactivation of alternative receptor kinases, bringing PI3K/mTOR signaling under FGFR control. Signaling in low-level FGFR1-amplified cancers is more restricted to MAPK signaling, limiting sensitivity to FGFR inhibition. Finally, we show that circulating tumor DNA screening can identify high-level clonally amplified cancers. Our data provide a mechanistic understanding of the distinct pattern of oncogene addiction seen in highly amplified cancers and demonstrate the importance of clonality in predicting response to targeted therapy. Significance Robust single-agent response to FGFR inhibition is seen only in high-level FGFR-amplified cancers, with copy-number level dictating response to FGFR inhibition in vitro, in vivo, and in the clinic. High-level amplification of FGFR2 is relatively rare in gastric and breast cancers, and we show that screening for amplification in circulating tumor DNA may present a viable strategy to screen patients. PMID:27179038

  19. Genetic diversity in three invasive clonal aquatic species in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elodea canadensis, Egeria densa and Lagarosiphon major are dioecious clonal species which are invasive in New Zealand and other regions. Unlike many other invasive species, the genetic variation in New Zealand is very limited. Clonal reproduction is often considered an evolutionary dead end, even though a certain amount of genetic divergence may arise due to somatic mutations. The successful growth and establishment of invasive clonal species may be explained not by adaptability but by pre-existing ecological traits that prove advantageous in the new environment. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure in the North Island of New Zealand using AFLPs and related the findings to the number of introductions and the evolution that has occurred in the introduced area. Results Low levels of genetic diversity were found in all three species and appeared to be due to highly homogeneous founding gene pools. Elodea canadensis was introduced in 1868, and its populations showed more genetic structure than those of the more recently introduced of E. densa (1946) and L. major (1950). Elodea canadensis and L. major, however, had similar phylogeographic patterns, in spite of the difference in time since introduction. Conclusions The presence of a certain level of geographically correlated genetic structure in the absence of sexual reproduction, and in spite of random human dispersal of vegetative propagules, can be reasonably attributed to post-dispersal somatic mutations. Direct evidence of such evolutionary events is, however, still insufficient. PMID:20565861

  20. Liver cell adenoma: A case report with clonal analysis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Su, Qin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ai-Ning; Zhu, Shao-Jun; Feng, Ying-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of liver cell adenoma (LCA) in a 33-year-old female patient with special respect to its clonality status, pathogenic factors and differential diagnosis. The case was examined by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and a clonality assay based on X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism in female somatic tissues and polymorphism at androgen receptor focus. The clinicopathological features of the reported cases from China and other countries were compared. The lesion was spherical, sizing 2 cm in its maximal dimension. Histologically, it was composed of cells arranged in cords, most of which were two-cell-thick and separated by sinusoids. Focal fatty change and excessive glycogen storage were observed. The tumor cells were round or polygonal in shape, resembling the surrounding parenchymal cells. Mitosis was not found. No portal tract, central vein or ductule was found within the lesion. The tumor tissue showed a positive reaction for cytokeratin (CK) 18, but not for CK19, vimentin, estrogen and progesterone receptors. Monoclonality was demonstrated for the lesion, confirming the diagnosis of an LCA. Clonality analysis is helpful for its distinction from focal nodular hyperplasia. PMID:16610069

  1. Clonal fluctuation within the haematopoietic system of mice reconstituted with retrovirus-infected stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, R; Keller, G

    1987-01-01

    The clonal make-up of the haematopoietic system of mice reconstituted with retrovirus-infected bone marrow cells was analysed at two different points in time following reconstitution. We have found that under these conditions, the haematopoietic system consists of clones that persist throughout the 5 month course of the experiment as well as those which undergo temporal changes. The various changes that we have observed included the appearance of a new clone(s) in all lineages, the loss of a clone from some lineages and the shift in the appearance of a clone from one lineage to another. In addition, we provide evidence which suggests that the clonal make-up of the thymus changes with time; early after reconstitution it consists of many clones, whereas at the later time-points it contains a limited number of predominant clones. These studies document the dramatic clonal changes which occur within the various lineages for a long time following reconstitution and highlight the difficulty in demonstrating lineage-specific stem cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2832146

  2. Genotyping the clonal structure of a gorgonian coral, Junceella juncea (Anthozoa: Octocorallia), using microsatellite loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Fan, Tung-Yung; Dai, Chang-Feng

    2005-11-01

    The identification of different clones is fundamental to the study of population structure among organisms with mixed reproductive modes such as cnidarians. However, due to the low genetic variation of coral mtDNA and contamination by zooxanthellate DNA, very few molecular markers are available for studying the clonal structure of cnidarians. Herein we used four polymorphic loci of microsatellite DNA isolated from a zooxanthellae-free octocoral, Junceella juncea, to study its clonal structure in seven populations collected from three localities in Taiwan. In total, 40 multilocus genotypes were found among 152 colonies, and the number of genotypes (clones) identified in the seven populations ranged from 2 to 16. Each of the 40 multilocus genotypes was restricted to a single population, even where adjacent populations were only 100 m distant. The ratio of observed to expected genotypic diversity (Go:Ge) ranged from 0.217 to 0.650, and Go showed a significant departure from Ge ( p<0.05) at each site indicating that asexual fragmentation may play a major role in the maintenance of established populations. Mean relatedness ( R) values showed that genotypes within reefs were more closely related than those between regions. The results indicate that microsatellites are useful for discerning the clonal structures among and within populations at different spatial scales.

  3. Identification and characterization of an immunophilin expressed during the clonal expansion phase of adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, W C; Li, T K; Bierer, B E; McKnight, S L

    1995-01-01

    Mouse 3T3-L1 cells differentiate into fat-laden adipocytes in response to a cocktail of adipogenic hormones. This conversion process occurs in two discrete steps. During an early clonal expansion phase, confluent 3T3-L1 cells proliferate and express the products of the beta and delta members of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors. The cells subsequently arrest mitotic growth, induce the expression of the alpha form of C/EBP, and acquire the morphology of fully differentiated adipocytes. Many of the genes induced during the terminal phase of adipocyte conversion are directly activated by C/EBP alpha, and gratuitous expression of this transcription factor is capable of catalyzing adipose conversion in a number of different cultured cell lines. The genetic program undertaken during the clonal expansion phase of 3T3-L1 differentiation, controlled in part by C/EBP beta and C/EBP delta, is less clearly understood. To study the molecular events occurring during clonal expansion, we have identified mRNAs that selectively accumulate during this phase of adipocyte conversion. One such mRNA encodes an immunophilin hereby designated FKBP51. In this report we provide the initial molecular characterization of FKBP51. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479941

  4. Characterisation and clonal dissemination of OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Tabriz, northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Peymani, Amir; Higgins, Paul G; Nahaei, Mohammad-Reza; Farajnia, Safar; Seifert, Harald

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics and molecular epidemiology of carbapenemase genes amongst 68 imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from Imam Reza Hospital (Tabriz, Iran) during a 17-month period were studied. All 68 isolates were typed using sequence group-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the clonal relationship of isolates with known international clonal lineages. Repetitive sequence-based PCR was further performed with representative isolates of each clone. PCR and sequencing were performed to detect OXA-type carbapenemases and class 1, 2 and 3 integron genes as well as to confirm the presence of insertion sequence ISAba1 upstream of bla(OXA-23) and bla(OXA-51-like) genes. Sixty-four isolates (94%) belonged to international clone (IC) II, two isolates (3%) belonged to IC I and two isolates (3%) did not belong to known international clones. All isolates carried bla(OXA-51-like), bla(OXA-23) and class 1 integron genes. No other acquired bla(OXA) genes or class 2 or 3 integron genes were detected. Sequence analysis confirmed the presence of bla(OXA-23) as well as the bla(OXA-51-like) variants bla(OXA-66), bla(OXA-69) and bla(OXA-88). ISAba1 was present upstream of the bla(OXA-23) gene in all of the isolates. Clonal spread of OXA-23-producing A. baumannii emphasises the need for appropriate infection control measures to prevent further spread of these multidrug-resistant organisms.

  5. Monitoring clonal evolution and resistance to EGFR blockade in the blood of metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Buscarino, Michela; Corti, Giorgio; Cassingena, Andrea; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Ponzetti, Agostino; Cremolini, Chiara; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Lamba, Simona; Hobor, Sebastijan; Avallone, Antonio; Valtorta, Emanuele; Rospo, Giuseppe; Medico, Enzo; Motta, Valentina; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Veronese, Silvio; Budillon, Alfredo; Montagut, Clara; Racca, Patrizia; Marsoni, Silvia; Falcone, Alfredo; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease governed by clonal evolution1. Genotyping CRC tissue is employed for therapeutic purposes but this approach has significant limitations. A tissue sample represents a single snapshot in time, is subjected to selection bias due to tumor heterogeneity, and can be difficult to obtain. We exploited circulating DNA (ctDNA) to genotype colorectal tumors and track clonal evolution during therapies with the anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab. We identified genomic alterations in KRAS, NRAS, MET, ERBB2, FLT3, EGFR and MAP2K1 in ctDNA of patients with primary or acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Mutant RAS clones, which rise in blood during EGFR blockade, decline upon withdrawal of anti-EGFR antibodies indicating that clonal evolution continues beyond clinical progression. Pharmacogenomic analysis of CRC cells, which had acquired resistance to cetuximab, reveals that upon antibody withdrawal KRAS clones decay, while the population regains drug sensitivity. ctDNA profiles of patients who benefit from multiple challenging with anti-EGFR antibodies exhibit pulsatile levels of mutant KRAS. These results reveal that the CRC genome adapts dynamically to intermittent drug schedules and provide a molecular explanation for the efficacy of re-challenge therapies based on EGFR blockade. PMID:26030179

  6. Clonal and territorial development of the pancreas as revealed by eGFP-labelled mouse chimeras.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Daniel; Jockusch, Harald

    2010-10-01

    The clonal structure of the pancreas was analysed in neonatal and adult mouse chimeras in which one partner displayed cell patches expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Coherent growth during pancreatic histogenesis was suggested by the presence of large eGFP-labelled acinar clusters rather than a scattered distribution of individual labelled acinar cells. The adult chimeric pancreas contained monophenotypic acini, whereas surprisingly 5% of acini in neonates were polyclonal. Monophenotypic acini presumably arose by coherent expansion leading to large 3D patches and may not be monoclonal. Islets of Langerhans were oligoclonal at both ages investigated. The proportion of eGFP positive cells within islets did not correlate with that of the surrounding acinar tissue indicating clonal independence of islets from their neighbourhood. The patterns observed argue against a secondary contribution of blood-borne progenitor/stem cells to the acinar compartment during tissue turnover. The different clonal origins of acini and islets are integrated into a model of pancreatic histogenesis.

  7. Genetic uniformity characterizes the invasive spread of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), a clonal aquatic plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Ye; Zhang, Da-Yong; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2010-05-01

    Aquatic plant invasions are often associated with long-distance dispersal of vegetative propagules and prolific clonal reproduction. These reproductive features combined with genetic bottlenecks have the potential to severely limit genetic diversity in invasive populations. To investigate this question we conducted a global scale population genetic survey using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers of the world's most successful aquatic plant invader -Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth). We sampled 1140 ramets from 54 populations from the native (South America) and introduced range (Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, Central America and the Caribbean). Although we detected 49 clones, introduced populations exhibited very low genetic diversity and little differentiation compared with those from the native range, and approximately 80% of introduced populations were composed of a single clone. A widespread clone ('W') detected in two Peruvian populations accounted for 70.9% of the individuals sampled and dominated in 74.5% of the introduced populations. However, samples from Bangladesh and Indonesia were composed of different genotypes, implicating multiple introductions to the introduced range. Nine of 47 introduced populations contained clonal diversity suggesting that sexual recruitment occurs in some invasive sites where environmental conditions favour seedling establishment. The global patterns of genetic diversity in E. crassipes likely result from severe genetic bottlenecks during colonization and prolific clonal propagation. The prevalence of the 'W' genotype throughout the invasive range may be explained by stochastic sampling, or possibly because of pre-adaptation of the 'W' genotype to tolerate low temperatures.

  8. Asexuality alone does not explain the success of clonal forms in insects with geographical parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lundmark, Magnus; Saura, Anssi

    2006-12-01

    Asexual forms of invertebrates are relatively common. They are often more successful than their sexual progenitors. Especially in insects, the pattern called geographical parthenogenesis shows that asexuality is important in speciation and ecological adaptation. In geographical parthenogenesis the clones have a wider distribution than the sexual forms they originate from. This indicates that they have a broader niche they may utilize successfully. The cause of this apparent success is, however, hard to come by as the term asexuality covers separate phenomena that are hard to disentangle from the mode of reproduction itself. Asexual insects are often polyploid, of hybrid origin, or both and these phenomena have been argued to explain the distribution patterns better than clonality. In this study we survey the literature on arthropods with geographical parthenogenesis in an attempt to clarify what evidence there is for the different phenomena explaining the success of the clonal forms. We focus on the few species where knowledge of distribution of different ploidy levels allows for a distinction of contributions from different phenomena to be made. Our survey support that asexuality is not the only factor underlying the success of all asexuals. Evidence about the importance of a hybrid origin of the clones is found to be meagre as the origin of clones is unknown in the majority of cases. Asexuality, hybridity and polyploidy are intertwined phenomena that each and all may contribute to the success of clonal taxa. Polyploidy, however, emerges as the most parsimonious factor explaining the success of these asexual invertebrate taxa.

  9. Aneurysmal Lesions of Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Contain Clonally Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Song; White, John V.; Lin, Wan Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Solomides, Charalambos; Evans, Kyle; Ntaoula, Nectaria; Nwaneshiudu, Ifeyinwa; Gaughan, John; Monos, Dimitri S.; Oleszak, Emilia L.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with often life-threatening consequences. This vascular disorder is responsible for 1–2% of all deaths in men aged 65 years or older. Autoimmunity may be responsible for the pathogenesis of AAA. Although it is well documented that infiltrating T cells are essentially always present in AAA lesions, little is known about their role in the initiation and/or progression of the disease. To determine whether T cells infiltrating AAA lesions contain clonally expanded populations of T cells, we amplified β-chain TCR transcripts by the nonpalindromic adaptor–PCR/Vβ-specific PCR and/or Vβ-specific PCR, followed by cloning and sequencing. We report in this article that aortic abdominal aneurysmal lesions from 8 of 10 patients with AAA contained oligoclonal populations of T cells. Multiple identical copies of β-chain TCR transcripts were identified in these patients. These clonal expansions are statistically significant. These results demonstrate that αβ TCR+ T lymphocytes infiltrating aneurysmal lesions of patients with AAA have undergone proliferation and clonal expansion in vivo at the site of the aneurysmal lesion, in response to unidentified self- or nonself Ags. This evidence supports the hypothesis that AAA is a specific Ag–driven T cell disease. PMID:24752442

  10. Fine-scale adaptation in a clonal sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Craig D H; Ayre, David J

    2008-06-01

    Local adaptation in response to fine-scale spatial heterogeneity is well documented in terrestrial ecosystems. In contrast, in marine environments local adaptation has rarely been documented or rigorously explored. This may reflect real or anticipated effects of genetic homogenization, resulting from widespread dispersal in the sea. However, evolutionary theory predicts that for the many benthic species with complex life histories that include both sexual and asexual phases, each parental habitat patch should become dominated by the fittest and most competitive clones. In this study we used genotypic mapping to show that within headlands, clones of the sea anemone Actinia tenebrosa show restricted distributions to specific habitats despite the potential for more widespread dispersal. On these same shores we used reciprocal transplant experiments that revealed strikingly better performance of clones within their natal rather than foreign habitats as judged by survivorship, asexual fecundity, and growth. These findings highlight the importance of selection for fine-scale environmental adaptation in marine taxa and imply that the genotypic structure of populations reflects extensive periods of interclonal competition and site-specific selection.

  11. Infection by the systemic fungus Epichloë glyceriae alters clonal growth of its grass host, Glyceria striata.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jean J; Clay, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Parasites and pathogens are hypothesized to change host growth, reproduction and/or behaviour to increase their own transmission. However, studies which clearly demonstrate that parasites or pathogens are directly responsible for changes in hosts are lacking. We previously found that infection by the systemic fungus Epichloë glyceriae was associated with greater clonal growth by its host, Glyceria striata. Whether greater clonal growth resulted directly from pathogen infection or indirectly from increased likelihood of infection for host genotypes with greater clonal growth could not be determined because only naturally infected and uninfected plants were used. In this study, we decoupled infection and host genotype to evaluate the role of pathogen infection on host development and clonal growth. We found that total biomass production did not differ for clones of the same genotype, but infected clones allocated more biomass to clonal growth. Disinfected clones had more tillers and a greater proportion of their biomass in the mother ramet. Infected clones produced fewer tillers but significantly more and longer stolons than disinfected clones. These results support the hypothesis that pathogen infection directly alters host development. Parasite alteration of clonal growth patterns might be advantageous to the persistence and spread of host plants in some ecological conditions. PMID:12908979

  12. Wotherspoon criteria combined with B cell clonality analysis by advanced polymerase chain reaction technology discriminates covert gastric marginal zone lymphoma from chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, M; Oeschger, S; Barth, T F E; Loddenkemper, C; Cogliatti, S B; Marx, A; Wacker, H‐H; Feller, A C; Bernd, H‐W; Hansmann, M‐L; Stein, H; Möller, P

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is a well defined B cell lymphoma yet often impossible to distinguish from severe chronic gastritis on morphological grounds alone. Therefore, it was suggested to use the clonality of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (H) genes, as detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as a decisive criterion. However, there is controversy as to whether B cell clonality also exists in chronic gastritis, hence rendering this approach futile at present. Methods An expert panel re‐examined the histology and immunohistochemistry of a total of 97 cases of gastric biopsies, including clearcut marginal zone lymphoma, chronic gastritis, and ambiguous cases, applying the Wotherspoon criteria on the basis of haematoxylin‐eosin and CD20 immunostainings. In addition, a new and advanced PCR system for detection of clonal IgH gene rearrangements was independently applied in two institutions in each case. Results The overall IgH clonality assessments of both institutions were in total agreement. Overt lymphoma (Wotherspoon score 5) was clonal in 24/26 cases. Chronic gastritis (Wotherspoon scores 1 and 2) was not clonal in 52/53 cases; the clonal case being Wotherspoon score 2. Of 18 cases with ambiguous histology (Wotherspoon scores 3 and 4) four were clonal. Conclusions Using advanced PCR technology, clonal gastritis is extremely rare, if it exists at all. Thus B cell clonality in Wotherspoon 3 and 4 cases is regarded as suitable for definitively diagnosing gastric marginal zone lymphoma. PMID:16423889

  13. Ruminant rhombencephalitis-associated Listeria monocytogenes alleles linked to a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis complex.

    PubMed

    Balandyté, Lina; Brodard, Isabelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna; Abril, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the most important food-borne pathogens and is well adapted to persist in the environment. To gain insight into the genetic relatedness and potential virulence of L. monocytogenes strains causing central nervous system (CNS) infections, we used multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) to subtype 183 L. monocytogenes isolates, most from ruminant rhombencephalitis and some from human patients, food, and the environment. Allelic-profile-based comparisons grouped L. monocytogenes strains mainly into three clonal complexes and linked single-locus variants (SLVs). Clonal complex A essentially consisted of isolates from human and ruminant brain samples. All but one rhombencephalitis isolate from cattle were located in clonal complex A. In contrast, food and environmental isolates mainly clustered into clonal complex C, and none was classified as clonal complex A. Isolates of the two main clonal complexes (A and C) obtained by MLVA were analyzed by PCR for the presence of 11 virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlD, inlE, inlF, inlG, inlJ, and inlC2H). Virulence gene analysis revealed significant differences in the actA, inlF, inlG, and inlJ allelic profiles between clinical isolates (complex A) and nonclinical isolates (complex C). The association of particular alleles of actA, inlF, and newly described alleles of inlJ with isolates from CNS infections (particularly rhombencephalitis) suggests that these virulence genes participate in neurovirulence of L. monocytogenes. The overall absence of inlG in clinical complex A and its presence in complex C isolates suggests that the InlG protein is more relevant for the survival of L. monocytogenes in the environment.

  14. Extensive Capsule Locus Variation and Large-Scale Genomic Recombination within the Klebsiella pneumoniae Clonal Group 258.

    PubMed

    Wyres, Kelly L; Gorrie, Claire; Edwards, David J; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Hsu, Li Yang; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Zadoks, Ruth; Baker, Stephen; Holt, Kathryn E

    2015-04-10

    Klebsiella pneumoniae clonal group (CG) 258, comprising sequence types (STs) 258, 11, and closely related variants, is associated with dissemination of the K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC). Hospital outbreaks of KPC CG258 infections have been observed globally and are very difficult to treat. As a consequence, there is renewed interest in alternative infection control measures such as vaccines and phage or depolymerase treatments targeting the K. pneumoniae polysaccharide capsule. To date, 78 immunologically distinct capsule variants have been described in K. pneumoniae. Previous investigations of ST258 and a small number of closely related strains suggested that capsular variation was limited within this clone; only two distinct ST258 capsule polysaccharide synthesis (cps) loci have been identified, both acquired through large-scale recombination events (>50 kb). In contrast to previous studies, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the broader K. pneumoniae CG258 (n = 39). We identified 11 different cps loci within CG258, indicating that capsular switching is actually common within the complex. We observed several insertion sequences (IS) within the cps loci, and show further intraclone diversification of two cps loci through IS activity. Our data also indicate that several large-scale recombination events have shaped the genomes of CG258, and that definition of the complex should be broadened to include ST395 (also reported to harbor KPC). As only the second report of extensive intraclonal cps variation among Gram-negative bacterial species, our findings alter our understanding of the evolution of these organisms and have key implications for the design of control measures targeting K. pneumoniae capsules.

  15. Detection of Clonally Expanded Hepatocytes in Chimpanzees with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mason, William S.; Low, Huey-Chi; Xu, Chunxiao; Aldrich, Carol E.; Scougall, Catherine A.; Grosse, Arend; Clouston, Andrew; Chavez, Deborah; Litwin, Samuel; Peri, Suraj; Jilbert, Allison R.; Lanford, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    During a hepadnavirus infection, viral DNA integrates at a low rate into random sites in the host DNA, producing unique virus-cell junctions detectable by inverse nested PCR (invPCR). These junctions serve as genetic markers of individual hepatocytes, providing a means to detect their subsequent proliferation into clones of two or more hepatocytes. A previous study suggested that the livers of 2.4-year-old woodchucks (Marmota monax) chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus contained at least 100,000 clones of >1,000 hepatocytes (W. S. Mason, A. R. Jilbert, and J. Summers, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:1139-1144, 2005). However, possible correlations between sites of viral-DNA integration and clonal expansion could not be explored because the woodchuck genome has not yet been sequenced. In order to further investigate this issue, we looked for similar clonal expansion of hepatocytes in the livers of chimpanzees chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Liver samples for invPCR were collected from eight chimpanzees chronically infected with HBV for at least 20 years. Fifty clones ranging in size from ∼35 to 10,000 hepatocytes were detected using invPCR in 32 liver biopsy fragments (∼1 mg) containing, in total, ∼3 × 107 liver cells. Based on searching the analogous human genome, integration sites were found on all chromosomes except Y, ∼30% in known or predicted genes. However, no obvious association between the extent of clonal expansion and the integration site was apparent. This suggests that the integration site per se is not responsible for the outgrowth of large clones of hepatocytes. PMID:19535448

  16. Clonal types of Toxoplasma gondii among immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Irene; Kwofie, Kofi Dadzie; Blay, Emmanuel Awusah; Osei, Joseph Harold Nyarko; Frempong, Kwadwo Kyeremeh; Koku, Roberta; Ghansah, Anita; Lartey, Margaret; Suzuki, Takashi; Boakye, Daniel Adjei; Koram, Kwadwo Ansah; Ohta, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    There are three major clonal lineages, types I, II, and III, of Toxoplasma gondii known to cause human toxoplasmosis worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii infections have, however, not been genotyped in Ghana. This study detected the clonal types infecting immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana. Blood samples were obtained from 148 HIV seropositive pre-antiretroviral therapy individuals (0 ≤ CD4(+) T-cell count/μl blood ≤ 200) at the Fevers Unit and 149 HIV seronegative apparently healthy blood donors at the blood bank, all of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Genomic DNA was extracted and multilocus genotyping conducted by nested PCR-RFLP analysis using GRA6, SAG3, and BTUB gene markers. Among the HIV seropositive participants, 54.7% (81/148) were T. gondii DNA positive for any of the markers. Out of the 81, 42.0% (34) were positive for SAG3 only, 30.9% (25) for GRA6 only, 24.7% (20) for both SAG3 and GRA6, and 2.5% (2) for SAG3, GRA6, and BTUB. Overall, 93.8% of the positives were of clonal type II, 1.2% type I, while 4.9% (4) were atypical or mixed types (I and II). In the healthy blood donors, prevalence of T. gondii DNA positivity was 3.4% (5/149) by SAG3 and/or GRA6; among them, 60.0% (3/5) were type I, and the remaining 40.0%, type II. This study showed a relatively high prevalence of active T. gondii infections in immune compromised patients and low prevalence in immune competent individuals in Accra. Type II was highly prevalent. Detection of T. gondii in blood donors raises public health concerns and screening for T. gondii should be considered.

  17. Extensive telomere erosion is consistent with localised clonal expansions in Barrett’s metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rhiannon E.; Rowson, Jan; Grimstead, Julia W.; Keith, W. Nicol; Jenkins, Gareth J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus is a premalignant metaplastic condition that predisposes patients to the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. However, only a minor fraction of Barrett’s oesophagus patients progress to adenocarcinoma and it is thus essential to determine bio-molecular markers that can predict the progression of this condition. Telomere dysfunction is considered to drive clonal evolution in several tumour types and telomere length analysis provides clinically relevant prognostic and predictive information. The aim of this work was to use high-resolution telomere analysis to examine telomere dynamics in Barrett’s oesophagus. Telomere length analysis of XpYp, 17p, 11q and 9p, chromosome arms that contain key cancer related genes that are known to be subjected to copy number changes in Barrett’s metaplasia, revealed similar profiles at each chromosome end, indicating that no one specific telomere is likely to suffer preferential telomere erosion. Analysis of patient matched tissues (233 samples from 32 patients) sampled from normal squamous oesophagus, Z-line, and 2 cm intervals within Barrett’s metaplasia, plus oesophago-gastric junction, gastric body and antrum, revealed extensive telomere erosion in Barrett’s metaplasia to within the length ranges at which telomere fusion is detected in other tumour types. Telomere erosion was not uniform, with distinct zones displaying more extensive erosion and more homogenous telomere length profiles. These data are consistent with an extensive proliferative history of cells within Barrett’s metaplasia and are indicative of localised clonal growth. The extent of telomere erosion highlights the potential of telomere dysfunction to drive genome instability and clonal evolution in Barrett’s metaplasia. PMID:28362812

  18. Defense signaling among interconnected ramets of a rhizomatous clonal plant, induced by jasmonic-acid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Song; Lei, Ning-Fei; Liu, Qing

    2011-07-01

    Resource sharing between ramets of clonal plants is a well-known phenomenon that allows stoloniferous and rhizomatous species to internally transport water, mineral nutrients and carbohydrates from sites of high supply to sites of high demand. Moreover, vascular ramet connections are likely to provide an excellent means to share substances other than resources, such as defense signals. In a greenhouse experiment, the rhizomatous sedge Carex alrofusca, consisting of integrated ramets of different ages, was used to study the transmission of defense signals through belowground rhizome connections in response to local spray with jasmonic-acid. A feeding preference test with the caterpillar Gynaephora rnenyuanensis was employed to assess benefits of rhizome connections on defense signaling. Young ramets were more responsive to jasmonic-acid treatment than middle-aged or old ramets. Condensed tannin content in the foliage of young ramets showed a significant increase and soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen content showed marginally significant decreases in the 1 mM jasmonic-acid treatment but not in control and/or 0.0001 mM jasmonic-acid treatments. The caterpillar G. rnenyuanensis preferentially grazed young ramets. After a localized spray of 1 mM jasmonic-acid, the leaf area of young ramets consumed by herbivores was greatly reduced. We propose that defense signals may be transmitted through physical connections (stolon or rhizome) among interconnected ramets of clonal plants. Induced resistance to herbivory may selectively enhance the protection of more vulnerable and valuable plant tissues and confer a significant benefit to clonal plants by a modular risk-spreading strategy, equalizing ontogenetic differences of unevenly-aged ramets in chemical defense compounds and nutritional properties of tissue.

  19. Physiological integration ameliorates negative effects of drought stress in the clonal herb Fragaria orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Sammul, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to establish ramets in sites of contrasting resource status. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clones in heterogeneous environments can act as cooperative systems--effects of stress on one ramet can be ameliorated by another connected ramet inhabiting benign conditions. But little is known about the effects of patch contrast on physiological integration of clonal plants and no study has addressed its effects on physiological traits like osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates and antioxidant enzymes. We examined the effect of physiological integration on survival, growth and stress indicators such as osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and antioxidant enzymes in a clonal plant, Fragaria orientalis, growing in homogenous and heterogeneous environments differing in patch contrast of water availability (1 homogeneous (no contrast) group; 2 low contrast group; 3 high contrast group). Drought stress markedly reduced the survival and growth of the severed ramets of F. orientalis, especially in high contrast treatments. Support from a ramet growing in benign patch considerably reduced drought stress and enhanced growth of ramets in dry patches. The larger the contrast between water availability, the larger the amount of support the depending ramet received from the supporting one. This support strongly affected the growth of the supporting ramet, but not to an extent to cause increase in stress indicators. We also found indication of costs related to maintenance of physiological connection between ramets. Thus, the net benefit of physiological integration depends on the environment and integration between ramets of F. orientalis could be advantageous only in heterogeneous conditions with a high contrast.

  20. Long telomeres are associated with clonality in wild populations of the fissiparous starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Cisneros, A; Pérez-Portela, R; Almroth, B C; Degerman, S; Palacín, C; Sköld, H Nilsson

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres usually shorten during an organism's lifespan and have thus been used as an aging and health marker. When telomeres become sufficiently short, senescence is induced. The most common method of restoring telomere length is via telomerase reverse transcriptase activity, highly expressed during embryogenesis. However, although asexual reproduction from adult tissues has an important role in the life cycles of certain species, its effect on the aging and fitness of wild populations, as well as its implications for the long-term survival of populations with limited genetic variation, is largely unknown. Here we compare relative telomere length of 58 individuals from four populations of the asexually reproducing starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina. Additionally, 12 individuals were used to compare telomere lengths in regenerating and non-regenerating arms, in two different tissues (tube feet and pyloric cecum). The level of clonality was assessed by genotyping the populations based on 12 specific microsatellite loci and relative telomere length was measured via quantitative PCR. The results revealed significantly longer telomeres in Mediterranean populations than Atlantic ones as demonstrated by the Kruskal–Wallis test (K=24.17, significant value: P-value<0.001), with the former also characterized by higher levels of clonality derived from asexual reproduction. Telomeres were furthermore significantly longer in regenerating arms than in non-regenerating arms within individuals (pyloric cecum tissue: Mann–Whitney test, V=299, P-value<10−6; and tube feet tissue Student's t=2.28, P-value=0.029). Our study suggests that one of the mechanisms responsible for the long-term somatic maintenance and persistence of clonal populations is telomere elongation. PMID:25990879

  1. Panmictic and Clonal Evolution on a Single Patchy Resource Produces Polymorphic Foraging Guilds

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Wayne M.; Salter, Richard; Lyons, Andrew J.; Sippl-Swezey, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We develop a stochastic, agent-based model to study how genetic traits and experiential changes in the state of agents and available resources influence individuals’ foraging and movement behaviors. These behaviors are manifest as decisions on when to stay and exploit a current resource patch or move to a particular neighboring patch, based on information of the resource qualities of the patches and the anticipated level of intraspecific competition within patches. We use a genetic algorithm approach and an individual’s biomass as a fitness surrogate to explore the foraging strategy diversity of evolving guilds under clonal versus hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. We first present the resource exploitation processes, movement on cellular arrays, and genetic algorithm components of the model. We then discuss their implementation on the Nova software platform. This platform seamlessly combines the dynamical systems modeling of consumer-resource interactions with agent-based modeling of individuals moving over a landscapes, using an architecture that lays transparent the following four hierarchical simulation levels: 1.) within-patch consumer-resource dynamics, 2.) within-generation movement and competition mitigation processes, 3.) across-generation evolutionary processes, and 4.) multiple runs to generate the statistics needed for comparative analyses. The focus of our analysis is on the question of how the biomass production efficiency and the diversity of guilds of foraging strategy types, exploiting resources over a patchy landscape, evolve under clonal versus random hermaphroditic sexual reproduction. Our results indicate greater biomass production efficiency under clonal reproduction only at higher population densities, and demonstrate that polymorphisms evolve and are maintained under random mating systems. The latter result questions the notion that some type of associative mating structure is needed to maintain genetic polymorphisms among individuals

  2. Clonal Diversity of Nosocomial Epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Pilar; Valdezate, Sylvia; Medina-Pascual, Maria J.; Rubio, Virginia; Vindel, Ana; Saez-Nieto, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major pathogens involved in nosocomial outbreaks. The clonal diversity of 729 epidemic strains isolated from 19 Spanish hospitals (mainly from intensive care units) was analyzed over an 11-year period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identified 58 PFGE types that were subjected to susceptibility testing, rpoB gene sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). All PFGE types were multidrug resistant; colistin was the only agent to which all pathogens were susceptible. The 58 PFGE types were grouped into 16 clones based on their genetic similarity (cutoff of 80%). These clones were distributed into one major cluster (cluster D), three medium clusters (clusters A, B, and C), and three minor clusters (clusters E, F, and G). The rpoB gene sequencing and MLST results reflected a clonal distribution, in agreement with the PFGE results. The MLST sequence types (STs) (and their percent distributions) were as follows: ST-2 (47.5%), ST-3 (5.1%), ST-15 (1.7%), ST-32 (1.7%), ST-79 (13.6%), ST-80 (20.3%), and ST-81 (10.2%). ST-79, ST-80, and ST-81 and the alleles cpn60-26 and recA29 are described for the first time. International clones I, II, and III were represented by ST-81, ST-2, and ST-3, respectively. ST-79 and ST-80 could be novel emerging clones. This work confirms PFGE and MLST to be complementary tools in clonality studies. Here PFGE was able to demonstrate the monoclonal pattern of most outbreaks, the inter- and intrahospital transmission of bacteria, and their endemic persistence in some wards. MLST allowed the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of Spanish clones to be monitored and permitted international comparisons to be made. PMID:21177889

  3. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug’s effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34+CD38− cell–derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Mexico: antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation and clonal diversity.

    PubMed

    Flores-Treviño, Samantha; Gutiérrez-Ferman, Jessica Lizzeth; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Estrada-Rivadeneyra, Diego; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge M; Camacho-Ortíz, Adrián; Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Garza-González, Elvira

    2014-11-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen associated with high mortality. Our aim was to examine antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm production and clonal relatedness of clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. S. maltophilia isolates were collected between 2006 and 2013 from two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by the broth microdilution method. PCR was used to determine the presence of β-lactamase genes L1 and L2. Biofilm formation was assessed with crystal violet staining. Clonal relatedness was determined by PFGE. Among the 119 collected S. maltophilia isolates, 73 (61.3%) were from the respiratory tract. Resistance levels exceeded 75% for imipenem, meropenem, ampicillin, aztreonam, gentamicin and tobramycin. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 32.8%. L1 and L2 genes were detected in 77.1% (91/118) and 66.9% (79/118) of isolates, respectively. All S. maltophilia strains were able to produce biofilms. Strains were classified as weak (47.9%, 57/119), moderate (38.7%, 46/119), or strong (13.4%, 16/119) biofilm producers. A total of 89 distinct PFGE types were identified and 21.6% (22/102) of the isolates were distributed in nine clusters. This is the first study in Mexico to reveal characteristics of clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. Clonal diversity data indicate low cross-transmission of S. maltophilia in a hospital setting. The high antibiotic resistance underscores the need for continuous surveillance of S. maltophilia in hospital settings in Mexico.

  5. A predictive relationship between population and genetic sex ratios in clonal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLetchie, D. Nicholas; García-Ramos, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Sexual reproduction depends on mate availability that is reflected by local sex ratios. In species where both sexes can clonally expand, the population sex ratio describes the proportion of males, including clonally derived individuals (ramets) in addition to sexually produced individuals (genets). In contrast to population sex ratio that accounts for the overall abundance of the sexes, the genetic sex ratio reflects the relative abundance of genetically unique mates, which is critical in predicting effective population size but is difficult to estimate in the field. While an intuitive positive relationship between population (ramet) sex ratio and genetic (genet) sex ratio is expected, an explicit relationship is unknown. In this study, we determined a mathematical expression in the form of a hyperbola that encompasses a linear to a nonlinear positive relationship between ramet and genet sex ratios. As expected when both sexes clonally have equal number of ramets per genet both sex ratios are identical, and thus ramet sex ratio becomes a linear function of genet sex ratio. Conversely, if sex differences in ramet number occur, this mathematical relationship becomes nonlinear and a discrepancy between the sex ratios amplifies from extreme sex ratios values towards intermediate values. We evaluated our predictions with empirical data that simultaneously quantified ramet and genet sex ratios in populations of several species. We found that the data support the predicted positive nonlinear relationship, indicating sex differences in ramet number across populations. However, some data may also fit the null model, which suggests that sex differences in ramet number were not extensive, or the number of populations was too small to capture the curvature of the nonlinear relationship. Data with lack of fit suggest the presence of factors capable of weakening the positive relationship between the sex ratios. Advantages of this model include predicting genet sex ratio using

  6. Understanding the wide geographic range of a clonal perennial grass: plasticity versus local adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Xingliang; Niu, Haishan

    2016-01-01

    Both phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation may allow widely distributed plant species to either acclimate or adapt to environmental heterogeneity. Given the typically low genetic variation of clonal plants across their habitats, phenotypic plasticity may be the primary adaptive strategy allowing them to thrive across a wide range of habitats. In this study, the mechanism supporting the widespread distribution of the clonal plant Leymus chinensis was determined, i.e. phenotypic plasticity or local specialization in water use efficiency (WUE; reflected by foliar δ13C). To test whether plasticity is required for the species to thrive in different habitats, samples were collected across its distribution in the Mongolian steppe, and a controlled watering experiment was conducted with two populations at two different sites. Five populations were also transplanted from different sites into a control environment, and the foliar δ13C was compared between the control and original habitats, to test for local specialization in WUE. Results demonstrated decreased foliar δ13C with increasing precipitation during controlled watering experiments, with divergent responses between the two populations assessed. Change in foliar δ13C (−3.69 ‰) due to water addition was comparable to fluctuations of foliar δ13C observed in situ (−4.83 ‰). Foliar δ13C differed by −0.91 ‰ between two transplanted populations; however, this difference was not apparent between the two populations when growing in their original habitats. Findings provide evidence that local adaptation affects foliar δ13C much less than phenotypic plasticity. Thus, plasticity in WUE is more important than local adaptation in allowing the clonal plant L. chinensis to occupy a wide range of habitats in the Mongolian steppe. PMID:26644341

  7. Phenotypic Responses of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant Buchloe dactyloides to Scale-Dependent Nutrient Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Sun, Zhen-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Clonal plants could modify phenotypic responses to nutrients heterogeneously distributed both in space and time by physiological integration. It will take times to do phenotypic responses to modifications which are various in different growth periods. An optimal phenotype is reached when there is a match between nutrient conditions and foraging ability. A single plantlet of Buchloe dactyloides with two stolons was transplanted into heterogeneous nutrient conditions. One stolon grew in homogeneous nutrient patch, while the other cultured in different scales of heterogeneous nutrient patches. As compared to the other nutrient treatment, heterogeneous nutrient treatments with small scale of 25×25 cm resulted in a higher biomass, and larger number of ramets, clumps and stolons in B. dactyloides at both genet and clonal fragment levels. Significant differences of number of ramets, clumps and stolons were detected at the rapid growth stage, but not in the early stage of the experiment. Foraging ability was more efficient in heterogeneous than in homogeneous nutrient conditions as assessed by higher root mass and root to shoot ratio. Different nutrient treatments did not prompt significant differences in internode and root length. Physiological integration significantly increased biomass, but did not influence other growth or morphological characters. These results suggest that physiological integration modifies phenotypic plasticity of B. dactyloides for efficient foraging of nutrients in heterogeneous nutrient conditions. These effects are more pronounced at genet and clonal fragment levels when the patch scale is 25×25 cm. Time is a key factor when phenotypic plasticity of B. dactyloides in heterogeneous nutrient conditions is examined. PMID:23826285

  8. Ex Uno Plures: Clonal Reinforcement Drives Evolution of a Simple Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Margie; Wenger, Jared; Kroll, Evgueny; Adams, Julian; Sherlock, Gavin; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of genetics is to define the relationship between phenotype and genotype, while a major goal of ecology is to identify the rules that govern community assembly. Achieving these goals by analyzing natural systems can be difficult, as selective pressures create dynamic fitness landscapes that vary in both space and time. Laboratory experimental evolution offers the benefit of controlling variables that shape fitness landscapes, helping to achieve both goals. We previously showed that a clonal population of E. coli experimentally evolved under continuous glucose limitation gives rise to a genetically diverse community consisting of one clone, CV103, that best scavenges but incompletely utilizes the limiting resource, and others, CV101 and CV116, that consume its overflow metabolites. Because this community can be disassembled and reassembled, and involves cooperative interactions that are stable over time, its genetic diversity is sustained by clonal reinforcement rather than by clonal interference. To understand the genetic factors that produce this outcome, and to illuminate the community's underlying physiology, we sequenced the genomes of ancestral and evolved clones. We identified ancestral mutations in intermediary metabolism that may have predisposed the evolution of metabolic interdependence. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the lineages that gave rise to this community diverged early, as CV103 shares only one Single Nucleotide Polymorphism with the other evolved clones. Underlying CV103's phenotype we identified a set of mutations that likely enhance glucose scavenging and maintain redox balance, but may do so at the expense of carbon excreted in overflow metabolites. Because these overflow metabolites serve as growth substrates that are differentially accessible to the other community members, and because the scavenging lineage shares only one SNP with these other clones, we conclude that this lineage likely served as an

  9. Cutaneous basal cell carcinosarcomas: evidence of clonality and recurrent chromosomal losses.

    PubMed

    Harms, Paul W; Fullen, Douglas R; Patel, Rajiv M; Chang, Dannie; Shalin, Sara C; Ma, Linglei; Wood, Benjamin; Beer, Trevor W; Siddiqui, Javed; Carskadon, Shannon; Wang, Min; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Fisher, Gary J; Andea, Aleodor

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcomas are heterogeneous group of tumors composed of malignant epithelial and mesenchymal components. Although mutation analyses have identified clonal changes between these morphologically disparate components in some subtypes of cutaneous carcinosarcoma, few cases have been analyzed thus far. To our knowledge, copy number variations (CNVs) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) have not been investigated in cutaneous carcinosarcomas. We analyzed 4 carcinosarcomas with basal cell carcinoma and osteosarcomatous components for CNVs/CN-LOH by comparative genomic hybridization/single-nucleotide polymorphism array, TP53 hot spot mutations by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing, and TP53 genomic rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization. All tumors displayed multiple CNV/CN-LOH events (median, 7.5 per tumor). Three of 4 tumors displayed similar CNV/CN-LOH patterns between the epithelial and mesenchymal components within each tumor, supporting a common clonal origin. Recurrent changes included allelic loss at 9p21 (CDKN2A), 9q (PTCH1), and 17p (TP53). Allelic losses of chromosome 16 including CDH1 (E-cadherin) were present in 2 tumors and were restricted to the sarcomatous component. TP53 mutation analysis revealed an R248L mutation in both epithelial and mesenchymal components of 1 tumor. No TP53 rearrangements were identified. Our findings indicate that basal cell carcinosarcomas harbor CNV/CN-LOH changes similar to conventional basal cell carcinoma, with additional changes including recurrent 9p21 losses and a relatively high burden of copy number changes. In addition, most cutaneous carcinosarcomas show evidence of clonality between epithelial and mesenchymal components.

  10. Molecular genetic evidence for unifocal origin of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer and for minor clonal divergence.

    PubMed Central

    Abeln, E. C.; Kuipers-Dijkshoorn, N. J.; Berns, E. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Fleuren, G. J.; Cornelisse, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    Detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA flow cytometry (FCM) were used to trace the origin of bilateral ovarian cancer from 16 patients. From each tumour the DNA index (DI) and LOH patterns for chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 11, 17, 18, 22 and X were determined with 36 microsatellite markers. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded as well as frozen specimens were used. Flow cytometric cell sorting was used to enrich tumour cells for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-driven LOH analysis. Analysis of the LOH data showed that in 12 of the 16 cases concordance was observed for all informative markers, namely retention of heterozygosity (ROH) or loss of identical alleles in both tumour samples. In four cases discordant LOH patterns were observed. In two cases the discordant LOH was found for one of the chromosomes tested while other LOH patterns clearly indicated a unifocal origin. This suggests limited clonal divergence. In the other two cases all LOH patterns were discordant, most likely indicating an independent origin. The number of chromosomes showing LOH ranged from 0 to 6. Comparison of DNA FCM and the LOH data showed that the latter technique has a higher sensitivity for the detection of a unifocal origin. In 14/16 cases evidence was found for a unifocal origin, while in two cases clonal divergence was found at LOH level and in two other cases clonal divergence at DNA ploidy level. In 12 cases the complete observed allelotype had developed before the formation of metastases, including the two cases showing a large DNA ploidy difference. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7577492

  11. Physiological Integration Ameliorates Negative Effects of Drought Stress in the Clonal Herb Fragaria orientalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying; Sammul, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to establish ramets in sites of contrasting resource status. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clones in heterogeneous environments can act as cooperative systems – effects of stress on one ramet can be ameliorated by another connected ramet inhabiting benign conditions. But little is known about the effects of patch contrast on physiological integration of clonal plants and no study has addressed its effects on physiological traits like osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates and antioxidant enzymes. We examined the effect of physiological integration on survival, growth and stress indicators such as osmolytes, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and antioxidant enzymes in a clonal plant, Fragaria orientalis, growing in homogenous and heterogeneous environments differing in patch contrast of water availability (1 homogeneous (no contrast) group; 2 low contrast group; 3 high contrast group). Drought stress markedly reduced the survival and growth of the severed ramets of F. orientalis, especially in high contrast treatments. Support from a ramet growing in benign patch considerably reduced drought stress and enhanced growth of ramets in dry patches. The larger the contrast between water availability, the larger the amount of support the depending ramet received from the supporting one. This support strongly affected the growth of the supporting ramet, but not to an extent to cause increase in stress indicators. We also found indication of costs related to maintenance of physiological connection between ramets. Thus, the net benefit of physiological integration depends on the environment and integration between ramets of F. orientalis could be advantageous only in heterogeneous conditions with a high contrast. PMID:22957054

  12. Epidemiological tracking and population assignment of the non-clonal bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Dale, Julia; Price, Erin P; Hornstra, Heidie; Busch, Joseph D; Mayo, Mark; Godoy, Daniel; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Baker, Anthony; Foster, Jeffrey T; Wagner, David M; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warner, Jeffrey; Spratt, Brian G; Peacock, Sharon J; Currie, Bart J; Keim, Paul; Pearson, Talima

    2011-12-01

    Rapid assignment of bacterial pathogens into predefined populations is an important first step for epidemiological tracking. For clonal species, a single allele can theoretically define a population. For non-clonal species such as Burkholderia pseudomallei, however, shared allelic states between distantly related isolates make it more difficult to identify population defining characteristics. Two distinct B. pseudomallei populations have been previously identified using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). These populations correlate with the major foci of endemicity (Australia and Southeast Asia). Here, we use multiple Bayesian approaches to evaluate the compositional robustness of these populations, and provide assignment results for MLST sequence types (STs). Our goal was to provide a reference for assigning STs to an established population without the need for further computational analyses. We also provide allele frequency results for each population to enable estimation of population assignment even when novel STs are discovered. The ability for humans and potentially contaminated goods to move rapidly across the globe complicates the task of identifying the source of an infection or outbreak. Population genetic dynamics of B. pseudomallei are particularly complicated relative to other bacterial pathogens, but the work here provides the ability for broad scale population assignment. As there is currently no independent empirical measure of successful population assignment, we provide comprehensive analytical details of our comparisons to enable the reader to evaluate the robustness of population designations and assignments as they pertain to individual research questions. Finer scale subdivision and verification of current population compositions will likely be possible with genotyping data that more comprehensively samples the genome. The approach used here may be valuable for other non-clonal pathogens that lack simple group-defining genetic characteristics

  13. Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ERG-/SPINK1- ERG+/SPINK1- RPA 80% RRP or RP or ERG+/SPINK1- ERG/SPINK1 IHC C H &E H &E ERG/SPINK1 IHC D Figure 1 B Figure 1. Clonal evaluation of...Examples of Hematoxylin and eosin ( H &E) stained and dual ERG/SPINK1 IHC discontinuously involved prostate biopsy cores from two cases are shown. In C , both...SUBJECT TERMS Multiclonality, ERG, SPINK1, immunohistochemistry, active surveillance, prostate biopsy, prostatectomy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  14. Synapse formation between clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells and striated muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P; Christian, C; Nirenberg, M

    1976-01-01

    Clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells were shown to form synapses with cultured, striated muscle cells. The properties of the synapses between hybrid and muscle cells were similar to those of the normal, neuromuscular synapse at an early stage of development. The number of synapses formed and the efficiency of transmission across synapses were found to be regulated, apparently independently, by components in the culture medium. Under appropriate conditions synapses were found with 20% of the hybrid-muscle cell pairs examined; thus, the hybrid cells form synapses with relatively high frequency. Images PMID:1061105

  15. The relative importance of sexual reproduction versus clonal spread in an aridland bunchgrass.

    PubMed

    Liston, A; Wilson, B L; Robinson, W A; Doescher, P S; Harris, N R; Svejcar, T

    2003-10-01

    Festuca idahoensis (Idaho fescue) is a perennial caespitose grass, common in semi-arid rangelands of the Intermountain West. To determine how individuals are recruited into a population, we studied two long-term monitoring plots that were established in 1937 at the Northern Great Basin Experimental Range in southeastern Oregon. The plots measured 3.05x3.05 m, and were located approximately 30 m apart. One plot was ungrazed, the other was subject to moderate levels of cattle grazing. The number of F. idahoensis plants in both plots increased ten-fold between 1937 and 1996, but whether this was due primarily to reproduction by seed or clonal fragmentation was unknown. In 1996, we mapped and sampled 160 plants of F. idahoensis. We used dominant inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers and codominant allozyme markers in order to identify genetic individuals and measure genetic diversity. Both plots were characterized by high levels of genetic and clonal diversity. When information from ISSRs, allozymes and sample location were combined, 126 genets were recognized, each consisting of one to four samples (ramets). By measuring the diameter of clones surrounding plants that were present in 1937, we estimated that clonal spread occurred at a rate of approximately 3.7 cm per decade, and thus was of secondary importance in the maintenance and increase of F. idahoensis stands. Sexual reproduction, rather than clonal fragmentation, accounted for most of the recruitment of new plants into these plots. The grazed plot had fewer ramets, genotypes, and clones than the ungrazed plot, but the ramets were significantly larger. Levels of genetic diversity did not differ in the grazed and ungrazed plots, but there was some evidence for a small, but significant level of genetic differentiation between the two. The results also indicate that F. idahoensis has the potential to be a long-lived species with some individuals persisting in excess of 60 years. This study demonstrates how

  16. Advances in the understanding and clinical management of mastocytosis and clonal mast cell activation syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clonal mast cell activation syndromes and indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin involvement are two emerging entities that sometimes might be clinically difficult to distinguish, and they involve a great challenge for the physician from both a diagnostic and a therapeutic point of view. Furthermore, final diagnosis of both entities requires a bone marrow study; it is recommended that this be done in reference centers. In this article, we address the current consensus and guidelines for the suspicion, diagnosis, classification, treatment, and management of these two entities. PMID:27909577

  17. Clonal relationship among Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Scrascia, Maria; Pugliese, Nicola; Maimone, Francesco; Mohamud, Kadigia A; Grimont, Patrick A D; Materu, Sadiki F; Pazzani, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    One hundred and three Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, selected to represent the cholera outbreaks which occurred in Somalia in 1998-1999, were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, ribotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility. All strains showed a unique amplified DNA pattern and 2 closely related ribotypes (B5a and B8a), among which B5a was the more frequently identified. Ninety-one strains were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim, conferred, except for spectinomycin, by a conjugative plasmid IncC. These findings indicated that the group of strains active in Somalia in the late 1990s had a clonal origin.

  18. Clonal dissemination of multilocus sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase - producing K. pneumoniae in a Chinese teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kangde; Chen, Xu; Li, Chunsheng; Yu, Zhongmin; Zhou, Qi; Yan, Yuzhong

    2015-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae has disseminated rapidly in China. We aimed to analyze the molecular epidemiology of four KPC-producing K. pneumoniae strains isolated from a suspected clonal outbreak during a 3-month period and to track the dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumonia retrospectively. We created antimicrobial susceptibility profiles using an automated broth microdilution system and broth microdilution methods. We screened carbapenemase and KPC phenotypes using the modified Hodge test and meropenem-boronic acid (BA) disk test, respectively. We identified β-lactamase genes with PCR and sequencing. We investigated clonal relatedness for epidemiological comparison using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). All isolates expressed multidrug resistance and yielded positive results for the modified Hodge and meropenem-BA disk tests. The isolates all carried blaKPC -2 , and coproduced CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. PFGE and MLST showed that the isolates were clonally related. The PFGE patterns of these isolates had ≥90% similarity. We found a single clone, sequence type (ST) 11, and its typical dissemination mode resembled clonal spread. The dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is clonally related and there is probable local transmission of a successful ST11 clone.

  19. Animal and human Staphylococcus aureus associated clonal lineages and high rate of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius novel lineages in Spanish kennel dogs: predominance of S. aureus ST398.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Benito, Daniel; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam

    2013-10-25

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP) are gaining interest to track the evolution of emerging methicillin-resistant strains in animals and humans. We focused on the characterization of the methicillin-susceptible coagulase-positive staphylococci (MSCoPS) recovered from nasal samples of 98 healthy kennel-dogs. Isolates were typed by spa, agr, MLST and SmaI/ApaI-PFGE. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence profiles were investigated. Presence of the human-associated Immune-Evasion-Cluster (IEC) genes was analyzed in MSSA. Twenty-four MSSA, 16 MSSP and one MS Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans were obtained. Thirteen spa-types and 12 sequence-types (STs) were detected among MSSA, with ST398 predominance (7/24, 29.2%). MSSA isolates were enclosed within 6 clonal complexes (no. of isolates): CC5 (8), CC398 (7), CC88 (4), CC45 (2), CC133 (1), and CC22 (1), and one singleton. High clonal diversity was observed among MSSP, and 14 STs (10 of them new) were detected. Twelve (50%) MSSA and 12 (75%) MSSP isolates showed resistance to at least one of the tested antimicrobials, with low MSSA penicillin resistance (5 isolates) and high MSSP tetracycline resistance (9 isolates). MSSA isolates ST398, ST133, ST1 and ST2329[new] were susceptible to all antimicrobials and were the only ones lacking the scn, chp and/or sak IEC genes. High diversity of enterotoxin genes was detected among non-ST398/ST133 MSSA isolates. MSSP showed a more homogeneous virulence genes profile. Our results give evidence that dogs can be S. aureus carriers of not only typical human associated lineages but also lineages commonly detected among other animal species. Continue surveillance on CoPS in dogs is required to unveil their role in the dissemination of clones adapted to other animal species.

  20. Asexual reproduction does not produce clonal populations of the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C. D. H.; Ayre, D. J.; Miller, K. J.

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the relationship between genotypic diversity, the mode of production of brooded larvae and disturbance in a range of reef habitats, in order to resolve the disparity between the reproductive mode and population structure reported for the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis. Within 14 sites across six habitats, the ratio of the observed ( G o) to the expected ( G e) genotypic diversity ranged from 69 to 100% of that expected for random mating. At three other sites in two habitats the G o /G e ranged from 35 to 53%. Two of these sites were recently bleached, suggesting that asexual recruitment may be favoured after disturbance. Nevertheless, our data suggest that brooded larvae, from each of five habitats surveyed, were asexually produced. While clonal recruitment may be important in disturbed habitats, the lack of clonality detected, both in this and earlier surveys of 40 other sites, implies that a disturbance is normally insufficient to explain this species’ continued investment in clonal reproduction.

  1. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  2. ANGUSTIFOLIA3 signaling coordinates proliferation between clonally distinct cells in leaves.

    PubMed

    Kawade, Kensuke; Horiguchi, Gorou; Usami, Takeshi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2013-05-06

    Coordinated proliferation between clonally distinct cells via inter-cell-layer signaling largely determines the size and shape of plant organs. Nonetheless, the signaling mechanism underlying this coordination in leaves remains elusive because of a lack of understanding of the signaling molecule (or molecules) involved. ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3, also called GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR1) encodes a putative transcriptional coactivator with homology to human synovial sarcoma translocation protein. AN3 transcripts accumulate in mesophyll cells but are not detectable in leaf epidermal cells. However, we found here that in addition to mesophyll cells, epidermal cells of an3 leaves show defective proliferation. This spatial difference between the accumulation pattern of AN3 transcripts and an3 leaf phenotype is explained by AN3 protein movement across cell layers. AN3 moves into epidermal cells after being synthesized within mesophyll cells and helps control epidermal cell proliferation. Interference with AN3 movement results in abnormal leaf size and shape, indicating that AN3 signaling is indispensable for normal leaf development. AN3 movement does not require type II chaperonin activity, which is needed for movement of some mobile proteins. Taking these findings together, we present a novel model emphasizing the role of mesophyll cells as a signaling source coordinating proliferation between clonally independent leaf cells.

  3. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  4. Genetic Structure in Dwarf Bamboo (Bashania fangiana) Clonal Populations with Different Genet Ages

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing-qing; Song, Hui-xing; Zhou, Shi-qiang; Yang, Wan-qin; Li, De-sheng; Chen, Jin-song

    2013-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints were used to reveal genotypic diversity of dwarf bamboo (Bashania fangiana) clonal populations with two different genet ages (≤30 years versus >70 years) at Wolong National Natural Reserve, Sichuan province, China. We generated AFLP fingerprints for 96 leaf samples, collected at 30 m intervals in the two populations, using ten selective primer pairs. A total of 92 genotypes were identified from the both populations. The mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes (G/N) was 0.9583 (0.9375 to 0.9792) and Simpson's index of diversity (D) was 0.9982 (0.9973 to 0.9991). So, two B. fangiana populations were multiclonal and highly diverse. The largest single clone may occur over a distance of about 30 m. Our results demonstrated that the genotypic diversity and genet density of B. fangiana clonal population did not change significantly (47 versus 45) with genet aging and low partitioned genetic differentiation was between the two populations (Gst = 0.0571). The analysis of molecular variance consistently showed that a large proportion of the genetic variation (87.79%) existed among the individuals within populations, whereas only 12.21% were found among populations. In addition, the high level of genotypic diversity in the two populations implies that the further works were needed to investigate the reasons for the poor seed set in B. fangiana after flowering. PMID:24244360

  5. Reproductive strategies and isolation-by-demography in a marine clonal plant along an eutrophication gradient.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Silvia; Romero, Javier; Pérez, Marta; Manent, Pablo; Mascaró, Oriol; Serrão, Ester A; Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe

    2014-12-01

    Genetic diversity in clonal organisms includes two distinct components, (i) the diversity of genotypes or clones (i.e. genotypic richness) in a population and (ii) that of the alleles (i.e. allelic and gene diversity within populations, and differentiation between populations). We investigated how population differentiation and genotypic components are associated across a gradient of eutrophication in a clonal marine plant. To that end, we combined direct measurements of sexual allocation (i.e. flower and seed counts) and genotypic analyses, which are used as an estimator of effective sexual reproduction across multiple generations. Genetic differentiation across sites was also modelled according to a hypothesis here defined as isolation-by-demography, in which we use population-specific factors, genotypic richness and eutrophication that are hypothesized to affect the source-sink dynamics and thus influence the genetic differentiation between a pair of populations. Eutrophic populations exhibited lower genotypic richness, in agreement with lower direct measurements of sexual allocation and contemporaneous gene flow. Genetic differentiation, while not explained by distance, was best predicted by genotypic richness and habitat quality. A multiple regression model using these two predictors was considered the best model (R(2) = 0.43). In this study, the relationship between environment and effective sexual-asexual balance is not simply (linearly) predicted by direct measurements of sexual allocation. Our results indicate that population-specific factors and the isolation-by-demography model should be used more often to understand genetic differentiation.

  6. Cryptosporidium,Giardia, Cryptococcus, Pneumocystis genetic variability: cryptic biological species or clonal near-clades?

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2014-04-01

    An abundant literature dealing with the population genetics and taxonomy of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Pneumocystis spp., and Cryptococcus spp., pathogens of high medical and veterinary relevance, has been produced in recent years. We have analyzed these data in the light of new population genetic concepts dealing with predominant clonal evolution (PCE) recently proposed by us. In spite of the considerable phylogenetic diversity that exists among these pathogens, we have found striking similarities among them. The two main PCE features described by us, namely highly significant linkage disequilibrium and near-clading (stable phylogenetic clustering clouded by occa