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Sample records for afar triple junction

  1. Mantle structure beneath the Afar triple junction derived from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallacher, R. J.; Keir, D.; Harmon, N.; Stuart, G. W.; Leroy, S. D.; Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Wondem, A. A.; Gezahegn, B. G.; Ogubazghi, G.

    2013-12-01

    Continental breakup in Afar is generally magma-rich and occurs near the triple junction of the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Red Sea rift and the Main Ethiopian rift (MER). Hypotheses for the source of magmatism associated with this rifting include elevated mantle temperatures resulting from northward migration of hot African Superplume material, and also due to phases of increased decompression melting from rapid plate thinning. To evaluate these hypotheses we conducted a surface wave tomographic experiment using 571 events and 290 stations from 15 seismic networks deployed over the past 12 years. From these data we produced a 3D shear velocity model which constrains the upper 350 km of the Earth, including the lithosphere and uppermost asthenosphere where melt is produced. At 30-100 second periods, our images show a significant (~0.1 km/s) decrease in velocity from the rift flanks into the Afar depression, showing the signature of breakup between Africa and Arabia is still present throughout the mantle. Within Afar, seismic velocities are low, with particularly localised slow anomalies at the 40-second period, beneath the Asal rift (3.57 km/s), Ayelu segment of MER (3.63 km/s) and Dabbahu rift (3.63 km/s) and fast velocities on the rift flanks (3.70-3.80 km/s). These slow anomalies show localised decompression melting and intrusion beneath the rift axis of Afar. Low velocities are also present throughout the mantle beneath the northern section of the MER and in the GOA. Our results show that the mantle beneath Afar still preserves structure from rifting 30 Ma. In addition our results show that localised plate thinning beneath zones of strain focus magmatism to a narrow rift axis.

  2. The Afar triple junction accommodation zone from InSAR derived strain and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Strain and seismicity show us the mode by which deformation is accommodated in rifting continents. Here we present a combined analysis of InSAR derived strain maps and seismicity of the Afar triple junction from 2006 to 2010. Our analysis shows that that the plate spreading motion is accommodated in different modes. A dogbone-shaped seismicity and strain distribution dominates the northern Red Sea branch of the triple junction, likely as a result of repeated dike intrusions 2005-2010. East of the triple junction, in the Gulf of Aden branch the strain and seismicity distribution appears decoupled. The strain focuses across the central part of several overlapping rifts, while the seismicity mainly occurs at the rift tips. Conversely, the Main Ethiopian Rift branch shows a narrow and elongated zone of both high strain and seismicity. The pattern suggests that the recent history of magmatic intrusions in the northern branch and mainly tectonic extension in the other branches creates a diverse triple junction accommodation zone.

  3. Surface wave tomography across Afar, Ethiopia: Crustal structure at a rift triple-junction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidarelli, M.; Stuart, G.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J. M.; Ayele, A.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Afar Depression in northeast Africa contains the rift triple-junction between the Nubia, Arabia and Somalia plates. We analyze Rayleigh wave group velocity from 250 regional earthquakes recorded by 40 broadband stations to study the crustal structure across Afar and adjacent plateau regions in northern Ethiopia. The dispersion velocities are inverted to obtain surface wave tomographic maps for periods between 5 and 25 seconds, sensitive to approximately the top 30 km of the lithosphere. The tomographic maps show a significant low dispersion velocity anomaly (>20%) within the upper crust, below the site of recent dyke intrusions (2005-present) in the Dabbahu and Manda-Hararo magmatic segments. Similar low velocity regions are imaged where magma intrusion in the Afar crust has been inferred over the last decade from seismicity or volcanic eruptions. We invert two group velocity curves to compare the S-wave velocity structure of the crust within an active magmatic segment with that of adjacent areas; the active region has a low velocity zone (Vs ˜ 3.2 km/s), between about 6-12 km, which we infer to be due to the presence of partial melt within the lower crust.

  4. New geodetic measurements in central Afar constraining the Arabia-Somalia-Nubia triple junction kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, C.; Deprez, A.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.; Lewi, E.; Grandin, R.; Calais, E.; Wright, T. J.; Bendick, R. O.; Pagli, C.; Peltzer, G.; de Chabalier, J. B.; Ibrahim Ahmed, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Afar Depression is an extraordinary submerged laboratory where the crustal mechanisms involved in the active rifting process can be studied. But the crustal movements at the regional scale are complicated by being the locus of the meeting of three divergent plate boundaries: the oceanic spreading ridges of the Red Sea and the Aden Ridge and the intra-continental East-African Rift (EAR). We present here the first GPS measurements conducted in a new network in Central Afar, complementing existing networks in Eritrea, around the Manda-Harraro 2005-2010 active segment, in the Northern part of the EAR and in Djibouti. Even if InSAR data were appropriate for mapping the deformation field, the results are difficult to interpret for analyzing the regional kinematics because of the atmospheric conditions, the lack of complete data catalogue, the acquisition configuration and the small velocity variations. Therefore, our measurements in the new sites are crucial to obtain an accurate velocity field over the whole depression, and focus specifically on the spatial organization of the deformation to characterize the tripe junction. These first results show that a small part of the motion of the Somalia plate with respect to the Nubia plate or the Arabia plate (2-3 mm/yr) occurs south of the Tadjura Gulf and East of the Adda-do segment in Southern Afar. The complex kinematic pattern involves a clockwise rotation of this Southeastern part of the Afar rift and can be related to the significant seismic activity regularly recorded in the region of Jigjiga (northern Somalia-Ethiopia border). The western continuation of the Aden Ridge into Afar extends West of the Asal rift segment and does not reach the young active segment of Manda-Inakir (MI). A slow gradient of velocity is observed across the Dobi Graben and across the large systems of faults between Lake Abhe and the MI rift segment. A striking change of the velocity direction occurs in the region of Assaïta, west of Lake

  5. Assessment of Late Quaternary strain partitioning in the Afar Triple Junction: Dobe and Hanle grabens, Ethiopia and Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polun, S. G.; Stockman, M. B.; Hickcox, K.; Horrell, D.; Tesfaye, S.; Gomez, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    As the only subaerial exposure of a ridge - ridge - ridge triple junction, the Afar region of Ethiopia and Djibouti offers a rare opportunity to assess strain partitioning within this type of triple junction. Here, the plate boundaries do not link discretely, but rather the East African rift meets the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts in a zone of diffuse normal faulting characterized by a lack of magmatic activity, referred to as the central Afar. An initial assessment of Late Quaternary strain partitioning is based on faulted landforms in the Dobe - Hanle graben system in Ethiopia and Djibouti. These two extensional basins are connected by an imbricated accommodation zone. Several fault scarps occur within terraces formed during the last highstand of Lake Dobe, around 5 ka - they provide a means of calibrating a numerical model of fault scarp degradation. Additional timing constraints will be provided by pending exposure ages. The spreading rates of both grabens are equivalent, however in Dobe graben, extension is partitioned 2:1 between northern, south dipping faults and the southern, north dipping fault. Extension in Hanle graben is primarily focused on the north dipping Hanle fault. On the north margin of Dobe graben, the boundary fault bifurcates, where the basin-bordering fault displays a significantly higher modeled uplift rate than the more distal fault, suggesting a basinward propagation of faulting. On the southern Dobe fault, surveyed fault scarps have ages ranging from 30 - 5 ka with uplift rates of 0.71, 0.47, and 0.68 mm/yr, suggesting no secular variation in slip rates from the late Plestocene through the Holocene. These rates are converted into horizontal stretching estimates, which are compared with regional strain estimated from velocities of relatively sparse GPS data.

  6. Tectonics of the Afar triple junction from InSAR and GPS derived strain maps and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, Carolina; Ebinger, Cynthia; Yun, Sang-Ho; Keir, Derek; Wang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Strain and seismicity show us the mode by which deformation is accommodated in rifting continents. Here we present a combined analysis of InSAR and GPS derived strain maps and seismicity to understand the tectonics of the current Afar triple junction plate boundary zone. Our results show that that the plate spreading motion is accommodated in different ways in the Red Sea Rift after jumping southeastward along the Gulf of Aden Rift. At the Red Sea Rift, extension and shear are coupled with seismicity, occurring both along-rift but also in areas off-rift. In the Gulf of Aden Rift extension and normal faulting occur in the central parts of the rifts while at the rifts tips strike-slip earthquakes are observed. The extensional strains occur over a broad zone encompassing several overlapping rifts. Conversely the strike-slip earthquakes are focused along a narrow EW trending lineament. The pattern suggests that the recent history of magmatic intrusions in the Red Sea Rift still dominates the plate boundary deformation inducing earthquakes even in areas off-rift and with no previous faults mapped. On the other hand, in the Gulf of Aden Rift our strain and seismicity maps are consistent mainly with extensional tectonics occurring over an exceptionally broad zone (over 200 km). We interpret the strike-slip earthquakes observed at the rift tips as the result of shearing at the rifts tips where the extension terminates against continental lithosphere.

  7. Triple junction distributions in polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.; Kumar, M.; Schwartz, A.J.

    1999-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that some material properties can be enhanced by grain boundary engineering, i.e., the systematic modifications in the topology of the microstructure through thermomechanical processing. Experimental observations have shown that the microstructural parameter likely responsible for improved properties is the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). It has been suggested that improvements in the fractions of special boundaries as defined by the coincident site lattice model (1) are necessary, but not fully sufficient to cause property improvements. For example, it has been observed that cracks propagating along interconnected networks of random grain boundaries can be arrested (2) when intersecting a triple junction where the remaining two pathways are special boundaries. Therefore, it is of interest to characterize microstructures in terms of the distributions of triple junction types. A simple method to describe a triple junction is by the types of grain boundaries intersecting at that junction [special vs. random, as described by the coincident site lattice (CSL) model]. The distribution of 0-CSL, 1-CSL, 2-CSL and 3-CSL triple junctions in the microstructure can then be plotted as a function of the fraction of special boundaries. Such data has been collected using orientation-imaging microscopy (OIM) (3--5) for oxygen-free-electronic (ofe)-Cu and Inconel 600 over a range of special fraction of grain boundaries. These results have been compared with theoretical models considering isolated triple junctions and invoking the {Sigma}-product rule (6) where {Sigma} is the inverse density of coincident lattice sites (7).

  8. The Sinai triple junction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent; Armijo, Rolando; Tapponnier, Paul

    1987-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a more detailed analysis of the kinematics of the Sinai triple junction (Courtillot et al., 1987). Accurate kinematic data are lacking along the Red Sea and they can be supplemented by bathymetric, topographic and geological data pertaining to the three arms of the entirely continental Sinai triple junction. Motions across the northern Red Sea and along the Gulf of Elat are an order of magnitude larger than across the Gulf of Suez. The direction of motion there remains a major uncertainty. A possible kinematic model is highlighted, in which right-lateral strike-slip motion and small pull-apart basins occur along the Gulf of Suez, in agreement with recent field observations in Egypt. Early Miocene is marked by major geodynamical changes all along the northern boundaries of the African and Indian plates. We suggest that rifting in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Gulf of Suez was initiated at the end of the first phase of continental extrusion of Indochina, when the Tibetan plateau began to rise and spreading in the South China Sea came to a halt.

  9. On the auxiliary lattices and dislocation reactions at triple junctions.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2002-03-01

    Coincidence site and displacement shift complete lattices of triple junctions are analysed. Dislocation reactions at triple junctions are considered. It is shown that in alpha=1 junctions no trapped residual triple-junction dislocation is geometrically necessary for dislocation transmission between adjoining grain boundaries. However, the situation is different for alpha (unequal) 1 triple junctions, where in some cases the residual dislocation cannot leave the triple junction for a grain boundary without generating a stacking-fault-like defect.

  10. Afar and ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The excellent ERTS-1 imagery of the Afar region of Ethiopia permits a preliminary revision to the analysis of the structures of this triple-rift junction, and also revisions to the outcrops of some lithological formations. The fault-belts of the Afar floor can now be mapped in fine detail. The Danakil horst is identified to be limited on its western side against Afar by a major fault-line, and it seems unlikely that the horst is the exposed, easterly portion of a west-dipping sialic block underlying all northern Afar. The Salt Plain appears to be a true graben. The Ethiopian plateau-Afar margin consists of a series of right-offset sectors, the offsets being marked by silicic volcanic centers. The nature of these offsets is related to the vexed question of cross-rift faulting. Such faulting is identifiable on the ERTS-1 imagery, both on the Afar floor, and in the monoclinally warped western margin. The significance of this faulting, though subordinate to the tensional faults of the fault-belts, awaits elucidation.

  11. Triple junction motion and grain microstructure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gottstein, G. . E-mail: gottstein@imm.rwth-aachen.de; Ma, Y.; Shvindlerman, L.S.

    2005-03-01

    The classical concepts of grain growth in polycrystals are based on the dominant role of grain boundaries. This is reflected by the well known von Neumann-Mullins relation. According to this approach triple junctions do not affect grain boundary motion, and their role in grain growth is reduced to maintaining the thermodynamically prescribed equilibrium angles at the lines where boundaries meet. In the current study the experimental data of triple junction mobility are considered with respect to the process of grain growth in 2D systems, in particular with regard to the controlling kinetics. When boundary kinetics prevails grain growth in a polycrystal complies with the von Neumann-Mullins relation. When grain growth is governed by the mobility of triple junctions the kinetics change, and the von Neumann-Mullins relation does not hold anymore. This is the more pronounced the smaller the triple junction mobility. We present a generalized theory of 2D grain growth including a limited triple junction mobility. In this concept the criterion {lambda} plays a central role. It reflects the ratio of boundary to triple junction mobility but is proportional to the grain size as well. The generalized von Neumann-Mullins relation can be expressed in terms of {lambda}. For small values of {lambda}, conspicuous changes of microstructure evolution during grain growth and of microstructural stability are predicted. The theoretical predictions are compared to results of computer simulations by a virtual vertex model.

  12. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  13. Grain boundary hardening and triple junction hardening in polycrystalline molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki . E-mail: skoba@ashitech.ac.jp; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2005-02-01

    The grain boundary and triple junction hardenings in molybdenum with different carbon content were studied in connection with the character and the connectivity of grain boundaries at triple junctions by the micro-indentation test. The triple junction hardening is smaller at the junctions composed of low-angle and {sigma} boundaries than at the junctions composed of random boundaries. This difference in the hardening depending on the grain boundary connectivity becomes more significant with a decrease in carbon content in molybdenum.

  14. Geometrical theory of triple junctions of CSL boundaries.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2001-07-01

    When three grain boundaries having misorientations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) meet at a triple junction, a common (triple-junction) CSL is formed. A theory is developed as a set of theorems establishing the relationships between the geometrical parameters of the grain-boundary and triple-junction CSLs. Application of the theory is demonstrated in detail for the case of the cubic crystal system. It is also shown how the theory can be extended to an arbitrary crystal lattice.

  15. Triple junction polymer solar cells for photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Esiner, Serkan; van Eersel, Harm; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-06-01

    A triple junction polymer solar cell in a novel 1 + 2 type configuration provides photoelectrochemical water splitting in its maximum power point at V ≈ 1.70 V with an estimated solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency of 3.1%. The triple junction cell consists of a wide bandgap front cell and two identical small bandgap middle and back cells.

  16. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  17. The effect of triple-junction drag on grain growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gottstein, G.; King, A.H.; Shvindlerman, L.S.

    2000-01-24

    Current theories of grain growth presume that grain boundary migration is the rate-limiting step, and either explicitly or implicitly assume that triple junctions can always move with sufficient speed to accommodate the changing positions of the grain boundaries. Following from some recent observations of triple-junction drag effects in tricrystals of zinc and in molecular dynamics models, an analytical theory is developed to explore the effects of triple-junction drag upon grain growth, for a two-dimensional solid. The theory is developed in the framework of the Von Neumann-Mullins formulation, and demonstrates that drag effects operating exclusively at the triple junctions result in a retardation of grain growth. The stability of six-sided grains in the isotropic, drag-free case of the Von Neumann-Mullins analysis is successively extended to grains of 6 {+-} N sides, where N increases with the strength of the triple-junction drag.

  18. Triple junction and grain boundary character distributions in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, P.; Miller, W.A.; Aust, K.T.

    1997-08-01

    Triple junction and grain boundary orientations were obtained by electron backscattered diffraction in high purity aluminium and copper, and in copper-bismuth alloys, and were then characterized using the CSL, CAD and I-line (O-lattice) geometrical models. A computer simulation was also performed and compared to the experimental results. Relationships were established between triple junction and grain boundary character distributions using both experimental and computer simulated results. A general trend was observed which shows an increase in special triple junction character density with increasing special grain boundary character content. An increased frequency of low angle and twin boundaries is shown to lead to an increase in the I-line triple junction density.

  19. Seismic Migration Imaging of the Lithosphere beneath the Afar Rift System, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. T. Y.; Chen, C. W.; Rychert, C.; Harmon, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Afar Rift system in east Africa is an ideal natural laboratory for investigating the incipient continental rifting, an essential component of plate tectonics. The Afar Rift is situated at the triple junction of three rifts, namely the southern Red Sea Rift, Gulf of Aden Rift and Main Ethiopian Rift (MER). The ongoing continental rifting at Afar transitions to seafloor spreading toward the southern Red Sea. The tectonic evolution of Afar is thought to be influenced by a mantle plume, but how the plume affects and interacts with the Afar lithosphere remains elusive. In this study, we use array seismic data to produce high-resolution migration images of the Afar lithosphere from scattered teleseismic wavefields to shed light on the lithospheric structure and associated tectonic processes. Our preliminary results indicate the presence of lithospheric seismic discontinuities with depth variation across the Afar region. Beneath the MER axis, we detect a pronounced discontinuity at 55 km depth, characterized by downward fast-to-slow velocity contrast, which appears to abruptly deepen to 75 km depth to the northern flank of MER. This discontinuity may be interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Beneath the Ethiopian Plateau, on the other hand, a dipping structure with velocity increase is identified at 70-90 km depth. Further synthesis of observations from seismic tomography, receiver functions, and seismic anisotropy in the Afar region will offer better understanding of tectonic significance of the lithospheric discontinuities.

  20. Efficient tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Furlan, Alice; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-04-17

    We demonstrate tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 8.9% and 9.6% that use a newly designed, high molecular weight, small band gap semiconducting polymer and a matching wide band gap polymer.

  1. Large-area, triple junction a-Si alloy production

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Jansen, K.; Johnson, B.; Willing, F.; Raquet, J.; Kloss, T.; Morris, J.; Weiss, P.; Yang, L.; Hainsworth, M.C.; Ashenfelter, W.; Stabinsky, B.; Twesme, E.; Chen, L.F.; O'Dowd, J. )

    1994-06-30

    Amorphous silicon alloy based triple junction 0.1 m[sup 2] modules with initial efficiencies greater than 11% have been produced using manufacturing equipment. Scale-up of equipment to process substrates 0.56 m[sup 2] in area is nearly complete.

  2. Efficient tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Furlan, Alice; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2013-04-17

    We demonstrate tandem and triple-junction polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 8.9% and 9.6% that use a newly designed, high molecular weight, small band gap semiconducting polymer and a matching wide band gap polymer. PMID:23544881

  3. 40.8% Efficient Inverted Triple-Junction Solar Cell with Two Independently Metamorphic Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Olavarria, W. J.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 40.8% at 326 suns concentration is demonstrated in a monolithically grown, triple-junction III-V solar cell structure in which each active junction is composed of an alloy with a different lattice constant chosen to maximize the theoretical efficiency. The semiconductor structure was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy in an inverted configuration with a 1.83 eV Ga{sub .51}In{sub .49}P top junction lattice-matched to the GaAs substrate, a metamorphic 1.34 eV In{sub .04}Ga{sub .96}As middle junction, and a metamorphic 0.89 eV In{sub .37}Ga{sub .63}As bottom junction. The two metamorphic junctions contained approximately 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} and 2-3 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} threading dislocations, respectively.

  4. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, M. Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V.; Song, X.; Wilde, G.

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, 〈d〉, of ∼35 and ∼44 nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d ≥ 35 nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500⋅D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420 K to 470 K.

  5. Velocity selection problem in the presence of the triple junction.

    PubMed

    Brener, E A; Hüter, C; Pilipenko, D; Temkin, D E

    2007-09-01

    Melting of a bicrystal along the grain boundary is discussed. A triple junction plays a crucial role in the velocity selection problem in this case. In some range of the parameters an entirely analytical solution of this problem is given. This allows us to present a transparent picture of the structure of the selection theory. We also discuss the selection problem in the case of the growth of a "eutectoid dendrite."

  6. Geochemical evidence of mantle reservoir evolution during progressive rifting along the western Afar margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Mohr, Paul; Dosso, Laure; Hall, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The Afar triple junction, where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and African Rift System extension zones converge, is a pivotal domain for the study of continental-to-oceanic rift evolution. The western margin of Afar forms the southernmost sector of the western margin of the Red Sea rift where that margin enters the Ethiopian flood basalt province. Tectonism and volcanism at the triple junction had commenced by ˜31 Ma with crustal fissuring, diking and voluminous eruption of the Ethiopian-Yemen flood basalt pile. The dikes which fed the Oligocene-Quaternary lava sequence covering the western Afar rift margin provide an opportunity to probe the geochemical reservoirs associated with the evolution of a still active continental margin. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals that the western Afar margin dikes span the entire history of rift evolution from the initial Oligocene flood basalt event to the development of focused zones of intrusion in rift marginal basins. Major element, trace element and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf) data demonstrate temporal geochemical heterogeneities resulting from variable contributions from the Afar plume, depleted asthenospheric mantle, and African lithosphere. The various dikes erupted between 31 Ma and 22 Ma all share isotopic signatures attesting to a contribution from the Afar plume, indicating this initial period in the evolution of the Afar margin was one of magma-assisted weakening of the lithosphere. From 22 Ma to 12 Ma, however, diffuse diking during continued evolution of the rift margin facilitated ascent of magmas in which depleted mantle and lithospheric sources predominated, though contributions from the Afar plume persisted. After 10 Ma, magmatic intrusion migrated eastwards towards the Afar rift floor, with an increasing fraction of the magmas derived from depleted mantle with less of a lithospheric signature. The dikes of the western Afar margin reveal that magma generation processes during the evolution of this continental rift margin

  7. Stress field during early magmatism in the Ali Sabieh Dome, Djibouti, SE Afar rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sue, Christian; Le Gall, Bernard; Daoud, Ahmed Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The so-called Ali Sabieh range, SE Afar rift, exhibits an atypical antiform structure occurring in the overall extensional tectonic context of the Afar triple junction. We dynamically analyzed the brittle deformation of this specific structural high using four different methods in order to better constrain the tectonic evolution of this key-area in the Afar depression. Paleostress inversions appear highly consistent using the four methods, which a posteriori validates this approach. Computed paleostress fields document two major signals: an early E-W extensional field, and a later transcurrent field, kinematically consistent with the previous one. The Ali Sabieh range may have evolved continuously during Oligo-Miocene times from large-scale extensional to transcurrent tectonism, as the result of probable local stress permutation between σ1 and σ2 stress axes.

  8. Hydrothermal Exploration at the Chile Triple Junction - ABE's last adventure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Shank, T. M.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Blackman, D. K.; Brown, K. M.; Baumberger, T.; Früh-Green, G.; Greene, R.; Saito, M. A.; Sylva, S.; Nakamura, K.; Stanway, J.; Yoerger, D. R.; Levin, L. A.; Thurber, A. R.; Sellanes, J.; Mella, M.; Muñoz, J.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.; Inspire Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In February and March 2010 we conducted preliminary exploration for hydrothermal plume signals along the East Chile Rise where it intersects the continental margin at the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ). This work was conducted as one component of our larger NOAA-OE funded INSPIRE project (Investigation of South Pacific Reducing Environments) aboard RV Melville cruise MV 1003 (PI: Andrew Thurber, Scripps) with all shiptime funded through an award of the State of California to Andrew Thurber and his co-PI's. Additional support came from the Census of Marine Life (ChEss and CoMarge projects). At sea, we conducted a series of CTD-rosette and ABE autonomous underwater vehicle operations to prospect for and determine the nature of any seafloor venting at, or adjacent to, the point where the the East Chile Rise subducts beneath the continental margin. Evidence from in situ sensing (optical backscatter, Eh) and water column analyses of dissolved CH4, δ3He and TDFe/TDMn concentrations document the presence of two discrete sites of venting, one right at the triple junction and the other a further 10km along axis, north of the Triple Junction, but still within the southernmost segment of the East Chile Rise. From an intercomparison of the abundance of different chemical signals we can intercompare likely characteristics of these differet source sites and also differentiate between them and the high methane concentrations released from cold seep sites further north along the Chile Margin, both with the CTJ region and also at the Concepcion Methane Seep Area (CMSA). This multi-disciplinary and international collaboration - involving scientists from Chile, the USA, Europe and Japan - can serve as an excellent and exciting launchpoint for wide-ranging future investigations of the Chile Triple Junction area - the only place on Earth where an oceanic spreading center is being actively subducted beneath a continent and also the only place on Earth where all known forms of deep

  9. High efficiency triple-junction amorphous solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, T.; Terazono, S.; Sasaki, H.; Kawabata, K.; Itagaki, T.

    A fabrication technique for high-efficiency triple-junction a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H pin solar cells is described. The interfacial characteristics of the a-SiGe:H pin cell, which is used for the bottom cell, have been improved by inserting graded bandgap layers at both p/i and n/i interfaces. The photoconductivity of the a-SiGe:H film, prepared by diluting the silane and germane discharge with a large amount of H2 gas, has also been improved. For the a-Si:H pin cell, Vocs as high as 0.99 V have been achieved by optimizing deposition conditions for the microc-Si:H p-layer and a-Si:H i-layer. Thickness of each layer in the triple-junction cell has been adjusted to get maximum output current. A cell with conversion efficiency of 10.6 percent has been obtained for a cell size of 100 sq cm.

  10. Counter-rotating microplates at the Galapagos triple junction.

    PubMed

    Klein, Emily M; Smith, Deborah K; Williams, Clare M; Schouten, Hans

    2005-02-24

    An 'incipient' spreading centre east of (and orthogonal to) the East Pacific Rise at 2 degrees 40' N has been identified as forming a portion of the northern boundary of the Galapagos microplate. This spreading centre was described as a slowly diverging, westward propagating rift, tapering towards the East Pacific Rise. Here we present evidence that the 'incipient rift' has also rifted towards the east and opens anticlockwise about a pivot at its eastern end. The 'incipient rift' then bounds a second microplate, north of the clockwise-rotating Galapagos microplate. The Galapagos triple junction region, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, thus consists of two counter-rotating microplates partly separated by the Hess Deep rift. Our kinematic solution for microplate motion relative to the major plates indicates that the two counter-rotating microplates may be treated as rigid blocks driven by drag on the microplates' edges3.

  11. Effect of triple junction on fatigue crack growth in copper and copper-3 at.% aluminium tricrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, A.; Hashimoto, S.

    1997-02-15

    It has been well understood that many properties of polycrystals depend on both characteristics of grain boundaries (GBs) and triple junctions. Cu and Cu-Al belong to the most extensively studied group of metals in the field of fatigue in the last 20 years. However, triple junctions in these materials have been scarcely studied from the viewpoint of their mechanical properties and fatigue, in particular. The question of what effect the GB junction has on fatigue crack behavior in different materials remains unanswered. The bicrystals are widely used for examination of interfaces in materials, but they do not adequately represent the behavior of polycrystals. Tricrystals are believed to be most suitable for investigation of the structure and properties of triple junctions. The purpose of the present work is to examine the effect of triple junction on the fatigue crack behavior in Cu and Cu-Al tricrystals having adjoined {Sigma}3-{Sigma}3-{Sigma}9 boundaries of the same geometry.

  12. In-situ investigation of grain boundary and triple junction kinetics in aluminium-10 p.p.m. magnesium.

    PubMed

    Mattissen, D; Waerø, A; Molodov, D A; Shvindlerman, L S; Gottstein, G

    2004-03-01

    A special technique for in-situ observation and recording of triple junction motion is introduced. The described method makes it possible to study the motion of connected grain boundaries, i.e. triple junctions and their geometry. The results of an investigation of the steady-state motion of grain boundary systems with triple junctions in aluminium-magnesium are presented. The analysed triple junctions show a distinctive deviation of contact angle from the equilibrium value 120 degrees as assumed for the deviation of the Von Neumann-Mullins relation. The type of triple junction can have an essential influence on grain boundary motion and thus on grain growth.

  13. An efficient triple-junction polymer solar cell having a power conversion efficiency exceeding 11%.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yoshimura, Ken; Ohya, Kenichiro; You, Jingbi; Gao, Jing; Hong, Zirou; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-27

    Tandem solar cells have the potential to improve photon conversion efficiencies (PCEs) beyond the limits of single-junction devices. In this study, a triple-junction tandem design is demonstrated by employing three distinct organic donor materials having bandgap energies ranging from 1.4 to 1.9 eV. Through optical modeling, balanced photon absorption rates are achieved and, thereby, the photo-currents are matched among the three subcells. Accordingly, an efficient triple-junction tandem organic solar cell can exhibit a record-high PCE of 11.5%.

  14. An efficient triple-junction polymer solar cell having a power conversion efficiency exceeding 11%.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yoshimura, Ken; Ohya, Kenichiro; You, Jingbi; Gao, Jing; Hong, Zirou; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-27

    Tandem solar cells have the potential to improve photon conversion efficiencies (PCEs) beyond the limits of single-junction devices. In this study, a triple-junction tandem design is demonstrated by employing three distinct organic donor materials having bandgap energies ranging from 1.4 to 1.9 eV. Through optical modeling, balanced photon absorption rates are achieved and, thereby, the photo-currents are matched among the three subcells. Accordingly, an efficient triple-junction tandem organic solar cell can exhibit a record-high PCE of 11.5%. PMID:25043698

  15. Transition from slab to slabless: Results from the 1993 Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, B.C.; Godfrey, N.J.; Klemperer, S.L.; Lendl, C.; Trehu, A.M.; Henstock, T.J.; Levander, A.; Holl, J.E.; Meltzer, A.S.; Luetgert, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Three seismic refraction-reflection profiles, part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, allow us to compare and contrast crust and upper mantle of the North American margin before and after it is modified by passage of the Mendocino triple junction. Upper crustal velocity models reveal an asymmetric Great Valley basin overlying Sierran or ophiolitic rocks at the latitude of Fort Bragg, California, and overlying Sierran or Klamath rocks near Redding, California. In addition, the upper crustal velocity structure indicates that Franciscan rocks underlie the Klamath terrane east of Eureka, California. The Franciscan complex is, on average, laterally homogeneous and is thickest in the triple junction region. North of the triple junction, the Gorda slab can be traced 150 km inboard from the Cascadia subduction zone. South of the triple junction, strong precritical reflections indicate partial melt and/or metamorphic fluids at the base of the crust or in the upper mantle. Breaks in these reflections are correlated with the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, suggesting that these faults extend at least to the mantle. We interpret our data to indicate tectonic thickening of the Franciscan complex in response to passage of the Mendocino triple junction and an associated thinning of these rocks south of the triple junction due to assimilation into melt triggered by upwelling asthenosphere. The region of thickened Franciscan complex overlies a zone of increased scattering, intrinsic attenuation, or both, resulting from mechanical mixing of lithologies and/or partial melt beneath the onshore projection of the Mendocino fracture zone. Our data reveal that we have crossed the southern edge of the Gorda slab and that this edge and/or the overlying North American crust may have fragmented because of the change in stress presented by the edge.

  16. Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Derek; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C.J.; Kendall, J.-M.; Hammond, J.O.S.; Stuart, G.W.; Ayele, A.; Rowland, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

  17. The angular velocity of Nubia relative to Somalia and the location of the Nubia-Somalia-Antarctica triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Johnson, Benjamin C.; Gordon, Richard G.; Cowles, Sara M.; Argus, Donald F.

    2005-07-01

    A new analysis of geologically current plate motion across the Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and of the current location of the Nubia-Antarctica-Somalia triple junction is presented. Spreading rates averaged over the past 3.2 Myr are estimated from 103 well-distributed, nearly ridge-perpendicular profiles that cross the SWIR. All available bathymetric data are evaluated to estimate the azimuths and uncertainties of transform faults; six are estimated from multibeam data and 12 from precision depth recorder (PDR) data. If both the Nubian and Somalian component plates are internally rigid near the SWIR and if the Nubia-Somalia boundary is narrow where it intersects the SWIR, that intersection lies between ~26°E and ~32°E. Thus, the boundary is either along the spreading ridge segment just west of the Andrew Bain transform fault complex (ABTFC) or along some of the transform fault complex itself. These limits are narrower than and contained within limits of ~24°E to ~33°E previously found by Lemaux et al. from an analysis of the locations of magnetic anomaly 5. The data are consistent with a narrow boundary, but also consistent with a diffuse boundary as wide as ~700 km. The new Nubia-Somalia pole of rotation lies ~10° north of the Bouvet triple junction, which places it far to the southwest of southern Africa. The new angular velocity determined only from data along the SWIR indicates displacement rates of Somalia relative to Nubia of 3.6 +/- 0.5 mm yr-1 (95 per cent confidence limits) towards 176° (S04° E) between Somalia and Nubia near the SWIR, and of 8.3 +/- 1.9 mm yr-1 (95 per cent confidence limits) towards 121° (S59° E) near Afar. The new Nubia-Somalia angular velocity differs significantly from the Nubia-Somalia angular velocity estimated from Gulf of Aden and Red sea data. This significant difference has three main alternative explanations: (i) that the plate motion data have substantial unmodelled systematic errors, (ii) that the Nubian component

  18. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  19. The Environmental Performance at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) of High Efficiency Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert; Davis, Gregory; Distefano, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    A number of JPL missions, either active or in the p l d g stages, require the accurate LILT flew intensity - low temperate) climate of triple-junction solar. Although triple ignition LILT performance was reported as recently as 2002, there has been an evolutionary advance in cell technology by both U.S. space cell manufacturers that, for mission design purposes, effectively obsoletes the earlier data. As a result, JPL initiated a program to develop a database for the LILT performance of the new high performance triple junction solar cells. JPL obtained Emcore Advanced triple Juntion CIC assemblies and Spectrolab Ultra Triple Junction CIC assemblies. These cells were tested at temperature-intensity ranges designed to cover applications between 1 and 5.18 AU solar distances. 1 MeV electron irradiation from 25 E14 to 1 El5 w were performed on the cells to evaluate the combined effect of particulate radiation and LILT conditions. The effect of LILT conditions was observed to incur an increase in the variation of cell performances such that at simulted 5.18 AU conditions the average performance was approximately 30% with the best cells measuring between 32 and 34% efficiency. The 30% average efficiency compares with approximately 25% average efficiency measured on earlier technology triple junction solar cells.

  20. The Angular Velocity of Nubia Relative to Somalia and the Location of the Nubia-Somalia-Antarctica Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Johnson, B. C.; Gordon, R. G.; Cowles, S. M.; Argus, D. F.

    2003-12-01

    A new analysis of geologically current plate motion across the Southwest Indian Ridge and of the current location of the Nubia-Antarctica-Somalia triple junction is presented. We estimate spreading rates averaged over the past 3.2 Myr from 103 well-distributed, nearly ridge-perpendicular profiles crossing the Southwest Indian Ridge. We evaluate all available bathymetric data to estimate the azimuths and uncertainties of transform faults; six are estimated from multi-beam data and twelve from precision depth recorder data. If the Nubia-Somalia boundary is narrow where it intersects the Southwest Indian Ridge, that intersection lies between about 26° E and 32° E. This places it either along the spreading ridge segment just west of the Andrew Bain transform fault complex or along the transform fault complex itself. These limits are narrower than, and contained within, limits of about 24° E to 33° E previously found by Lemaux et al. (2002) from an analysis of the locations of magnetic anomaly 5. The data are consistent with a narrow boundary, but also consistent with a diffuse boundary as wide as about 700 km. The new Nubia-Somalia pole of rotation lies southwest of southern Africa and differs significantly from previously estimated poles, including that from data in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The new pole indicates displacement rates of Somalia relative to Nubia of 3.4 +/- 1.3\\ mm yr-1 (95% confidence limits) towards 176.8° between Somalia and Nubia near the Southwest Indian Ridge, and of 8.4 +/- 1.3\\ mm yr-1 (95% confidence limits) towards 118.5° near Afar.

  1. Death and Transfiguration of a Triple Junction in the South Atlantic

    PubMed

    Ligi; Bonatti; Bortoluzzi; Carrara; Fabretti; Penitenti; Gilod; Peyve; Skolotnev; Turko

    1997-04-11

    Three major lithospheric plates-Antarctic, South American, and African-meet in the South Atlantic near Bouvet Island where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), and the American Antarctic Ridge converge toward a fast evolving triple junction. A major magmatic pulse has recently built a new, swollen segment of the SWIR (Spiess Ridge) that is propagating toward the MAR at a rate of 4 to 5 centimeters per year, disrupting a former ridge-ridge-ridge (RRR) triple junction. A new triple junction will be established about 70 kilometers to the north when the propagating SWIR/Spiess segment will impact with the MAR, probably within the next 1 million years. The American Antarctic Ridge will take advantage of the MAR/SWIR duel by capturing an approximately 70-kilometer stretch of MAR, whereas the Antarctic plate will increase its size.

  2. Distributed deformation ahead of the Cocos-Nazca Rift at the Galapagos triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Zhu, Wen-lu; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Cann, Johnson R.

    2011-11-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is not a simple ridge-ridge-ridge (RRR) triple junction. The Cocos-Nazca Rift (C-N Rift) tip does not meet the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Instead, two secondary rifts form the link: Incipient Rift at 2°40‧N and Dietz Deep volcanic ridge, the southern boundary of the Galapagos microplate (GMP), at 1°10‧N. Recently collected bathymetry data are used to investigate the regional tectonics prior to the establishment of the GMP (∼1.5 Ma). South of C-N Rift a band of northeast-trending cracks cuts EPR-generated abyssal hills. It is a mirror image of a band of cracks previously identified north of C-N Rift on the same age crust. In both areas, the western ends of the cracks terminate against intact abyssal hills suggesting that each crack initiated at the EPR spreading center and cut eastward into pre-existing topography. Each crack formed a short-lived triple junction until it was abandoned and a new crack and triple junction initiated nearby. Between 2.5 and 1.5 Ma, the pattern of cracking is remarkably symmetric about C-N Rift providing support for a crack interaction model in which crack initiation at the EPR axis is controlled by stresses associated with the tip of the westward-propagating C-N Rift. The model also shows that offsets of the EPR axis may explain times when cracking is not symmetric. South of C-N Rift, cracks are observed on seafloor as old as 10.5 Ma suggesting that this triple junction has not been a simple RRR triple junction during that time.

  3. Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells consisting of identical subcells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haipeng; Bartynski, Andrew N; Greaney, Matthew J; Thompson, Mark E; Brutchey, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells with identical subcells based on P3HT:CdSe nanocrystal bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) are reported for the first time showing 2-fold and 3-fold increases of open-circuit voltage (VOC), respectively, relative to the single-junction cell. A combination of nanocrystalline ZnO and pH-neutral PEDOT:PSS is used as the interconnecting layer, and the thicknesses of subcells are optimized with the guidance of optical simulations. As a result, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) exhibits a significant increase from 2.0% (VOC = 0.57 V) in single-junction devices to 2.7% (champion 3.1%, VOC = 1.28 V) in tandem devices and 2.3% (VOC = 1.98 V) in triple-junction devices.

  4. Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells consisting of identical subcells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haipeng; Bartynski, Andrew N; Greaney, Matthew J; Thompson, Mark E; Brutchey, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Tandem and triple-junction polymer:nanocrystal hybrid solar cells with identical subcells based on P3HT:CdSe nanocrystal bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) are reported for the first time showing 2-fold and 3-fold increases of open-circuit voltage (VOC), respectively, relative to the single-junction cell. A combination of nanocrystalline ZnO and pH-neutral PEDOT:PSS is used as the interconnecting layer, and the thicknesses of subcells are optimized with the guidance of optical simulations. As a result, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) exhibits a significant increase from 2.0% (VOC = 0.57 V) in single-junction devices to 2.7% (champion 3.1%, VOC = 1.28 V) in tandem devices and 2.3% (VOC = 1.98 V) in triple-junction devices. PMID:25233268

  5. Nano-analysis of grain boundary and triple junction transport in nanocrystalline Ni/Cu.

    PubMed

    Reda Chellali, Mohammed; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Nanocrystalline materials are distinguished by a high density of structural defects and grain boundaries. Due to the small grain size, a particular defect of the grain boundary topology, the so-called triple junction takes a dominant role for grain growth and atomic transport. We demonstrate by atom probe tomography that triple junctions in nanocrystalline Cu have 100-300 times higher diffusivity of Ni than standard high angle grain boundaries. Also, a previously unexpected systematic variation of the grain boundary width with temperature is detected. The impurity segregation layer at the grain boundaries grows from the 0.7 nm at 563 K to 2.5 nm at 643 K. This variation is clearly not controlled by simple bulk diffusion. Taking this effect into consideration, the activation energies for Ni diffusion in triple junctions and grain boundaries in Cu can be determined to be (83 ± 10) and (120 ± 15) kJ/mol, respectively. Thus, triple junctions are distinguished by considerably lower activation energy with respect to grain boundaries.

  6. Simulation of the Mars surface solar spectra for optimized performance of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, Richard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five.

  7. Migration of grain boundaries and triple junctions in high-purity aluminum during annealing after slight cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wenhong; Wang, Weiguo; Fang, Xiaoying; Qin, Congxiang; Xing, Xiaoguang

    2015-09-15

    Grain orientations and grain boundary migrations near triple junctions in a high purity aluminum were analyzed by electron back scattered diffraction. The results indicate that there are good correlations between the Schmid factors or Taylor factors and the misorientation values of point to original point in grains near the triple junctions in a slightly deformed sample. Grains with higher Schmid factors or lower Taylor factors typically correspond to higher misorientation values near the triple junctions. In a subsequent annealing at 400 °C, both grain boundaries and triple junctions migrate, but the former leave ghost lines. During such migration, a grain boundary grows from the grain with lower Schmid factor (higher Taylor factor) into the grain with higher Schmid factor (lower Taylor factor). Usually, the amount of migration of a grain boundary is considerably greater than that of a triple junction, and the grain boundary becomes more curved after migration. These observations indicate that the triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundary migration. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline aluminum with fine grains about 30 μm were used. • Off-line in situ EBSD was used to identify TJs before and after annealing. • Grains with higher SFs have higher misorientation values near TJs after deformation. • Grain boundaries grow from hard grains into soft grains during annealing. • Triple junctions have drag effects on grain boundaries migration.

  8. Thermodynamic characterization of a triple-helical three-way junction containing a Hoogsteen branch point.

    PubMed

    Hüsler, P L; Klump, H H

    1995-09-10

    We have designed a Hoogsteen (HG) triple-helical three-way junction (ternary complex) constructed from three 33-mer oligonucleotides based on the same subset of sequences used for the Watson-Crick (WC) triple-helical three-way junction, characterized previously (P. L. Hüsler and H. H. Klump (1994) Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 313, 29-38). The junction differs primarily in the assembly of the branch point and the ends of the arms. The three oligonucleotides can each fold into a WC hairpin, linked by a four-member cytosine loop, each containing a homo-pyrimidine 10-mer single-strand extension. On lowering the pH (between 6 and 4), the extensions mutually associate to one of the other hairpins via Hoogsteen (HG) hydrogen bonding. Collectively, this process results in the formation of the branch point and the triple-helical arms. The HG triple-helical three-way junction is characterized by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, uv melting, and differential scanning calorimetry. The junction undergoes thermal unfolding in two distinct temperature regions. In the temperature range 15 to 50 degrees C loss of HG base pairing results in the dissociation of the three-way junction. Between 55 and 95 degrees C the resulting hairpins undergo further successive unfolding. The overall calorimetric unfolding enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the loss of HG base pairing are approximately equal to the sum of the enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the dissociation of the HG base pairing in the isolated arms (170.6 kcal.mol-1; 540.1 cal.mol-1.K-1). It is apparent from these results that in the proximity of the branch point the structure is not perturb or strain. This result is contrary to the results obtained for the WC triple-helical three-way and for three-way junctions constructed from canonical double-helical DNA. Complete folding of the junction requires either high Na+ (600 mM) ion concentrations or 40-60 mM Mg2+.

  9. Seismic studies of the southern Cascadia subduction zone near the Mendocino triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean Paul Sandifer

    2000-10-01

    Offshore northern California lies the southern Cascadia subduction zone, where oblique subduction of the Gorda plate interacts with Mendocino triple junction tectonics. Seismic images of the Gorda plate, Cascadia accretionary prism, and Eel River forearc basin record the tectonic evolution of the region. These images allow examination of the northward migrating triple junction's influence on internal deformation of the Gorda plate, accretionary processes within the prism, and tectonic history of the Eel River forearc basin. Examination of the accretionary prism shows that 90% of incoming Gorda basin sediments currently are being accreted to the margin while only 10% are being subducted. The outer forearc is experiencing little effect by the triple junction. Tectonic history of the Eel River forearc basin includes: uplift of the outer margin at ˜3 Ma, widespread outer basin erosion at ˜1 Ma, local erosion of the continental shelf at ˜500 ka, and collapse of the Klamath plateau region by ˜250 ka. The northward migrating triple junction affected the Eel River basin by ˜500 ka causing uplift, northward tilting, and erosion south of the basin. In addition, broad uplift of the southern basin forced Eel River sediment to be deposited both further north and to Dow out the Eel Canyon. Northward compression by the triple junction has deformed the southern Eel River basin to the northeast forming northwest-southeast oriented transpressional structures. The southern Gorda plate is internally deformed along northeast-southwest oriented left-lateral strike-slip faults, rotating clockwise, and fragmenting near the triple junction. Flow of the Gorda lithosphere around the rigid Pacific plate results in delamination of the Gorda crust allowing for fragments of Gorda crust to enter the slab-window and accrete to the base of the North American plate. The propagation of Gorda plate northeast-southwest deformation beneath the margin contrasts with the northwest

  10. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chong M.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Park, Seh K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-02

    Carbon-supported metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. In this paper, we report a novel method to deposit metal catalysts and metal oxide nanoparticles on two-dimensional graphene sheets to improve the catalytic performance and stability of the catalyst materials. The new synthesis method allows indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals to be directly grown on functionalized graphene sheets forming the ITO-graphene hybrids. Pt nanoparticles are then deposited to form a special triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Both experimental study and periodic density functional theory calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are stable at Pt-ITO-graphene triple junction points. The new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity. The reasons for the high stability and activity of Pt-ITO-graphene are analyzed.

  11. The Cape Mendocino, California, earthquakes of April 1992: Subduction at the triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppenheimer, D.; Beroza, G.; Carver, G.; Dengler, L.; Eaton, J.; Gee, L.; Gonzalez, F.; Jayko, A.; Li, W.H.; Lisowski, M.; Magee, M.; Marshall, G.; Murray, M.; McPherson, R.; Romanowicz, B.; Satake, K.; Simpson, R.; Somerville, P.; Stein, R.; Valentine, D.

    1993-01-01

    The 25 April 1992 magnitude 7.1 Cape Mendocino thrust earthquake demonstrated that the North America-Gorda plate boundary is seismogenic and illustrated hazards that could result from much larger earthquakes forecast for the Cascadia region. The shock occurred just north of the Mendocino Triple Junction and caused strong ground motion and moderate damage in the immediate area. Rupture initiated onshore at a depth of 10.5 kilometers and propagated up-dip and seaward. Slip on steep faults in the Gorda plate generated two magnitude 6.6 aftershocks on 26 April. The main shock did not produce surface rupture on land but caused coastal uplift and a tsunami. The emerging picture of seismicity and faulting at the triple junction suggests that the region is likely to continue experiencing significant seismicity.

  12. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    PubMed

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-01

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity.

  13. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    PubMed

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-01

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity. PMID:21302925

  14. Upper mantle temperature and the onset of extension and break-up in Afar, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, John J.; Ferguson, David J.; Goes, Saskia; Hammond, James O. S.; Calais, Eric; Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    It is debated to what extent mantle plumes play a role in continental rifting and eventual break-up. Afar lies at the northern end of the largest and most active present-day continental rift, where the East African Rift forms a triple junction with the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts. It has a history of plume activity yet recent studies have reached conflicting conclusions on whether a plume still contributes to current Afar tectonics. A geochemical study concluded that Afar is a mature hot rift with 80 km thick lithosphere, while seismic data have been interpreted to reflect the structure of a young, oceanic rift basin above mantle of normal temperature. We develop a self-consistent forward model of mantle flow that incorporates melt generation and retention to test whether predictions of melt chemistry, melt volume and lithosphere-asthenosphere seismic structure can be reconciled with observations. The rare-earth element composition of mafic samples at the Erta Ale, Dabbahu and Asal magmatic segments can be used as both a thermometer and chronometer of the rifting process. Low seismic velocities require a lithosphere thinned to 50 km or less. A strong positive impedance contrast at 50 to 70 km below the rift seems linked to the melt zone, but is not reproduced by isotropic seismic velocity alone. Combined, the simplest interpretation is that mantle temperature below Afar is still elevated at 1450 °C, rifting started around 22-23 Ma, and the lithosphere has thinned from 100 to 50 km to allow significant decompressional melting.

  15. A four-way junction with triple-helical arms: design, characterization, and stability.

    PubMed

    Makube, N; Klump, H H

    2000-05-01

    The formation of the four-way junction containing four triple-helical arms has been demonstrated using chemical methods (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and chemical footprinting using OsO(4) as a probe) and physical methods (UV absorbance melting and DSC). The junction J(T1T3) was assembled from two 20-mer purine strands and two 44-mer pyrimidine strands. To determine the contribution of the different arms to the stability of the complete structure of J(T1T3), the junction was compared to two simplified substructures, J(T1) and J(T3), respectively. Common to these complexes is the underlying double-helical four-way junction Js. Addition of Na(+) had a profound effect on stabilizing and subsequently folding the junctions into the stacked X-structures. The following results support the structure present: (i) The native polyacrylamide electrophoresis exhibits only a single band(s) corresponding to one species present when all four single strands are mixed in equal amounts. (ii) OsO(4) modifications were investigated at pH 5.0 and in the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) and 100 mM Na(+). There is no cleavage of thymine residues at the branch point and throughout the structure. (iii) The thermal unfolding of J(T1) and J(T3) illustrates that the triple-helical arms are more stable than the double-helical arms which are contained in these junctions and that J(T1T3) with four triple-helical arms is slightly more stable than J(T1) and J(T3). (iv) The calorimetric transition enthalpies determined for the arms of J(T1T3) are comparable to those associated with the unfolding of its corresponding arms in J(T1) and J(T3). The results also illustrate that the formation of the junctions is not restricted by the pH, [Na(+)], sequence composition of the arms, and/or the loop position.

  16. Simulation of the Mars Surface Solar Spectra for Optimized Performance of Triple-Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, RIchard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five. This provides confidence in future longer-term solar powered missions on the surface of Mars. However, the solar cells used on the rovers are not optimized for the Mars surface solar spectrum, which is attenuated at shorter wavelengths due to scattering by the dusty atmosphere. The difference between the Mars surface spectrum and the AM0 spectrum increases with solar zenith angle and optical depth. The recent results of a program between JPL and Spectrolab to optimize GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cells for Mars are presented. Initial characterization focuses on the solar spectrum at 60-degrees zenith angle at an optical depth of 0.5. The 60-degree spectrum is reduced to 1/6 of the AM0 intensity and is further reduced in the blue portion of the spectrum. JPL has modeled the Mars surface solar spectra, modified an X-25 solar simulator, and completed testing of Mars-optimized solar cells previously developed by Spectrolab with the modified X-25 solar simulator. Spectrolab has focused on the optimization of the higher efficiency Ultra Triple-Junction (UTJ) solar cell for Mars. The attenuated blue portion of the spectrum requires the modification of the top sub-cell in the GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cell for improved current balancing in the triple-junction cell. Initial characterization confirms the predicted increase in power and current matched operation for the Mars surface 60-degree zenith angle solar spectrum.

  17. Nonlocal magnetic configuration controlling realized in a triple-quantum-dot Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in a superconductor/triple-quantum-dot/superconductor junction in which the central dot is coupled to the superconductors. It is found that the supercurrent exhibits rich 0-π phase translations due to the interplay between interdot spin and electron correlations. Moreover, when the side dots are half-occupied, the nonlocal spin correlation between them, i.e., ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic, coincides well with the supercurrent phase. We thus consider such a system to be a promising candidate for controlling the nonlocal magnetic configuration based on the Josephson effect.

  18. Adaptive Phase-Field Modeling of Anisotropic Wetting with Line Tension at the Triple Junction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y; Lan, C W

    2015-09-01

    Line tension could affect the contact angle at triple junction, especially in micro- to nanoscale wetting. We have developed an adaptive phase-field model to consider the line tension quantitatively. This model is coupled to the smoothed boundary method for treating the contact line with the solid phase, while the volume constraint is imposed. Our calculated contact angles are in good agreement with the modified Young's equation. Further examples are illustrated for the anisotropic wetting on hydrophilic/hydrophobic stripes and rectangular grooves.

  19. Triple junction transport and the impact of grain boundary width in nanocrystalline Cu.

    PubMed

    Chellali, Mohammed Reda; Balogh, Zoltan; Bouchikhaoui, Houari; Schlesiger, Ralf; Stender, Patrick; Zheng, Lei; Schmitz, Guido

    2012-07-11

    Triple junctions (TJ), singular topological defects of the grain boundary (GB) structure, get a dominant role for grain growth and atomic transport in nanocrystalline matter. Here, we present detailed measurements by atom probe tomography, even of the temperature dependence of TJ transport of Ni in nanocrystalline Cu in the chemical regime of interdiffusion. An unexpected variation of the effective width of merging GBs with temperature is detected. It is demonstrated that proper measurement of TJ transport requires taking into account this remarkable effect. TJ diffusion is found to be a factor of about 200 faster than GB diffusion. Its activation energy amounts to only two-thirds of that of the GB.

  20. Theoretical consideration of III-V nanowire/Si triple-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Long; Li, Xinhua; Zhao, Zhifei; Bu, Shaojiang; Zeng, XueSong; Huang, Jin-hua; Wang, Yuqi

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we report theoretical consideration and simulation of a proposed III-V nanowire (NW)/Si triple-junction solar cell. The cell consists of two axially connected III-V NW subcells that are grown and electrically integrated on an active Si substrate. The optical properties of the cell are thoroughly analyzed by using the finite-difference time-domain method. It is found that NW subcells with optimized geometry have high absorption throughout their absorption region. Meanwhile, beyond the absorption edge of the top and middle NW subcells, the NWs act as an efficient antireflection coating for the bottom Si subcell due to the formation of an optical cavity within the NW layer. The physics responsible for the enhanced light harvesting process is qualitatively explained through modal analysis. In addition, we have shown that the condition of current matching in a III-V NW/Si multi-junction can be fulfilled by adjusting the diameter of the NWs. In order to study the current-voltage characteristics of the proposed cell, the optical generation profiles under AM1.5G illumination are incorporated into an electrical modeling. Our optoelectrical simulations indicate that, with an excellent current matching between subcells, the performance of the proposed structure is comparable with state-of-the-art multi-junction cells. The results presented here indicate that semiconductor NWs may provide a promising route toward high efficiency multi-junction solar cells.

  1. Ion-transfer- and photo-electrochemistry at liquid|liquid|solid electrode triple phase boundary junctions: perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marken, Frank; Watkins, John D; Collins, Andrew M

    2011-06-01

    Ion transfer at liquid|liquid junctions is one of the most fundamental processes in nature. It occurs coupled to simultaneous electron transfer at the line junction (or triple phase boundary) formed by the two liquids in contact to an electrode surface. The triple phase boundary can be assembled from a redox active microdroplet deposit of a water-immiscible liquid on a suitable electrode surface immersed into aqueous electrolyte. Ion transfer voltammetry measurements at this type of electrode allow both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for coupled ion and electron transfer processes to be obtained. This overview summarises some recent advances in understanding and application of triple phase boundary redox processes at organic liquid|aqueous electrolyte|working electrode junctions. The design of novel types of electrodes is considered based on (i) extended triple phase boundaries, (ii) porous membrane processes, (iii) hydrodynamic effects, and (iv) generator-collector triple phase boundary systems. Novel facilitated ion transfer processes and photo-electrochemical processes at triple phase boundary electrodes are proposed. Potential future applications of triple phase boundary redox systems in electrosynthesis, sensing, and light energy harvesting are indicated.

  2. Crustal shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes in the Hengill triple junction, southwest Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.; Miller, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hengill region in SW Iceland is an unstable ridge-ridge-transform triple junction between an active and a waning segment of the mid-Atlantic spreading center and a transform that is transgressing southward. The triple junction contains active and extinct spreading segments and a widespread geothermal area. We evaluated shear-wave birefringence for locally recorded upper-crustal earthquakes using an array of 30 three-component digital seismographs. Fast-polarization directions, ??, are mostly NE to NNE, subparallel to the spreading axis and probably caused by fissures and microcracks related to spreading. However, there is significant variability in ?? throughout the array. The lag from fast to slow S is not proportional to earthquake depth (ray length), being scattered at all depths. The average wave-speed difference between qS1 and qS2 in the upper 2-5 km of the crust is 2-5%. Our results suggest considerable heterogeneity or strong S scattering.

  3. Metal-oxide-junction, triple point cathodes in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, N. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hoff, B. W.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2008-06-15

    Triple point, defined as the junction of metal, dielectric, and vacuum, is the location where electron emission is favored in the presence of a sufficiently strong electric field. To exploit triple point emission, metal-oxide-junction (MOJ) cathodes consisting of dielectric ''islands'' over stainless steel substrates have been fabricated. The two dielectrics used are hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) for its high dielectric constant and magnesium oxide (MgO) for its high secondary electron emission coefficient. The coatings are deposited by ablation-plasma-ion lithography using a KrF laser (0-600 mJ at 248 nm) and fluence ranging from 3 to 40 J/cm{sup 2}. Composition and morphology of deposited films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Cathodes are tested on the Michigan Electron Long-Beam Accelerator with a relativistic magnetron, at parameters V=-300 kV, I=1-15 kA, and pulse lengths of 0.3-0.5 {mu}s. Six variations of the MOJ cathode are tested, and are compared against five baseline cases. It is found that particulate formed during the ablation process improves the electron emission properties of the cathodes by forming additional triple points. Due to extensive electron back bombardment during magnetron operation, secondary electron emission also may play a significant role. Cathodes exhibit increases in current densities of up to 80 A/cm{sup 2}, and up to 15% improvement in current start up time, as compared to polished stainless steel cathodes.

  4. Metal-oxide-junction, triple point cathodes in a relativistic magnetron.

    PubMed

    Jordan, N M; Gilgenbach, R M; Hoff, B W; Lau, Y Y

    2008-06-01

    Triple point, defined as the junction of metal, dielectric, and vacuum, is the location where electron emission is favored in the presence of a sufficiently strong electric field. To exploit triple point emission, metal-oxide-junction (MOJ) cathodes consisting of dielectric "islands" over stainless steel substrates have been fabricated. The two dielectrics used are hafnium oxide (HfO(x)) for its high dielectric constant and magnesium oxide (MgO) for its high secondary electron emission coefficient. The coatings are deposited by ablation-plasma-ion lithography using a KrF laser (0-600 mJ at 248 nm) and fluence ranging from 3 to 40 J/cm(2). Composition and morphology of deposited films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Cathodes are tested on the Michigan Electron Long-Beam Accelerator with a relativistic magnetron, at parameters V=-300 kV, I=1-15 kA, and pulse lengths of 0.3-0.5 micros. Six variations of the MOJ cathode are tested, and are compared against five baseline cases. It is found that particulate formed during the ablation process improves the electron emission properties of the cathodes by forming additional triple points. Due to extensive electron back bombardment during magnetron operation, secondary electron emission also may play a significant role. Cathodes exhibit increases in current densities of up to 80 A/cm(2), and up to 15% improvement in current start up time, as compared to polished stainless steel cathodes.

  5. Seismicity and crustal structure at the Mendocino triple junction, Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Dicke, M.

    1998-12-01

    A high level of seismicity at the Mendocino triple junction in Northern California reflects the complex active tectonics associated with the junction of the Pacific, North America, and Gorda plates. To investigate seismicity patterns and crustal structure, 6193 earthquakes recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) are relocated using a one-dimensional crustal velocity model. A near vertical truncation of the intense seismic activity offshore Cape Mendocino follows the strike of the Mattole Canyon fault and is interpreted to define the Pacific plate boundary. Seismicity along this boundary displays a double seismogenic layer that is attributed to interplate activity with the North America plate and Gorda plate. The interpretation of the shallow seismogenic zone as the North America - Pacific plate boundary implies that the Mendocino triple junction is situated offshore at present. Seismicity patterns and focal mechanisms for events located within the subducting Gorda pl ate are consistent with internal deformation on NE-SW and NW-SE trending rupture planes in response to north-south compression. Seismic sections indicate that the top of the Gorda plate locates at a depth of about 18 Km beneath Cape Mendocino and dips gently east-and southward. Earthquakes that are located in the Wadati-Benioff zone east of 236{sup o}E show a change to an extensional stress regime indicative of a slab pull force. This slab pull force and scattered seismicity within the contractional forearc region of the Cascadia subduction zone suggest that the subducting Gorda plate and the overriding North America plate are strongly coupled. The 1992 Cape Mendocino thrust earthquake is believed to have ruptured a blind thrust fault in the forearc region, suggesting that strain is accumulating that must ultimately be released in a potential M 8+ subduction earthquake.

  6. InGaP/GaAs and InGaAs mechanically-stacked triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Agui, T.

    1997-12-31

    Triple-junction cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of over 33% have been demonstrated. A planar type InGaP/GaAs monolithic dual-junction cell was fabricated on a semi-insulating FaAs substrate, which has high infra-red transparency. Then a dual-junction cell, with efficiency of 27--28%, was mechanically stacked on an InGaAs cell fabricated on an InP substrate. The bottom InGaAs cell showed an efficiency of 6.2% under the InGaP/GaAs cell, and a total efficiency of 33--34% was achieved for the four-terminal triple-junction cell.

  7. Block rotation and continental extension in Afar: A comparison to oceanic microplate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Gary D.; Stein, Seth; Engeln, Joseph F.

    1991-06-01

    The reorganization of oceanic spreading centers separating major plates often appears to occur by a process in which discrete microplates form and evolve by rift propagation. To see whether such microplate behavior has implications for continental rifting, we investigate the application of a microplate model to the Afar region at the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia triple junction. Studies of marine magnetic anomalies, volcanic ages, bathymetry, and seismicity suggest that the westward propagating Gulf of Aden spreading center has propagated into eastern Afar within the past 2 m.y., causing rifting and extension within the continent. We derive constraints on the extension history from the geometry and timing of rift formation and from paleomagnetic data indicating that Pliocene to Pleistocene age rocks have undergone a clockwise rotation of ˜11°. We suggest that the history of rifting, the rotation, and several other features of the regional geology can be described by combining features of an oceanic microplate model and the concept of rift localization previously proposed for Afar. In this scenario, motion occurring on several rifts within an extensional zone preceding the propagating spreading center is gradually transferred to a single rift. While motion is transferred, the overlap region between the growing and dying rifts acts as one or more microplates or blocks that rotate relative to the surrounding major plates. The rifting history and rotations in eastern Afar are thus related to the rift propagation and localization that occurs as the plate boundary evolves. Provided the constraints we use are appropriate, our model better describes the regional kinematics than alternative block models including one based on "bookshelf" faulting. If the tectonics of Afar are typical for continental breakup, they have interesting implications for the geometry of passive margins. In particular, asymmetric rifted margins can be produced if the final location of the rift axis is not

  8. Seismotectonics at the Trench-Trench-Trench triple junction off central Honshu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Tetsuzo; Takano, Takashi

    1989-03-01

    We study earthquakes in and near the TTT type triple junction off Boso peninsula, central Honshu, to elucidate the plate interaction in this area. The Pacific, North America (northeast Japan) and Philippine Sea plates meet at the junction of the Japan and Izu-Bonin Trenches, and the Sagami Trough. We determine focal mechanisms using WWSSN data. We also determine accurate focal depths by modeling body-waves. There is no serious trade-off between focal depth and source time function for the events treated in this study. The earthquake mechanisms and their focal depths show two major modes of deformation of the Pacific slab at the junction. One mode is represented by nearly vertical normal faults with strikes perpendicular to the Bonin Trench. This mode of faulting is dominant in regions south of the junction and characteristically the southwest block is downthrown. The other mode is represented by nearly vertical normal faults that strike parallel to the Japan Trench and indicate the northwest block is downthrown. This latter mode is dominant in regions north of the junction. The former mode may represent the accommodation of the slab geometry to the change in dip angle between the northeast Japan and Izu-Bonin arcs; the Izu-Bonin slab has a larger dip than that of the northeast Japan slab. The latter mode shows that normal faults parallel to the trench strike, usually seen in trench axis-outer rise regions, continue to occur further landward of the trench axis in the area just north of the junction. This might be caused by the loading of the Philippine Sea slab which penetrates between northeast Japan and the Pacific slab north of the Sagami Trough. Further north of these normal faults north of the junction, we find earthquakes which represent the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. This means that the Philippine Sea slab does not exist there. With the aid of earthquakes which represent the Philippine Sea-Pacific and Philippine Sea

  9. Seafloor Hydrothermal Activity at the Galapagos Triple Junction, East Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, G.; Tao, C.; Chen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Since the first discovery of black smokers on the Gaplapgaos spreading center, over 500 hydrothermal sites have been confirmed on the mid-ocean ridge, arc and back-arc settings (Beaulieu et al., 2013). However, the hydrothermal activity at triple-junction has not received much attention. Consequently, there are outstanding questions regarding the features of the hydrothermal system, and the effect of the hydrothermal circulation on the tectonic activity of the triple-junction. In 2009, the Chinese Dayang Cruise 21 discovered the Precious Stone field (PSF) on the Dietz Semount at the southern flank of the Galapagos triple junction (GTJ). Most studies of the GTJ focus on the topographictectonic and stresssimulation, which suggest that the GTJ had complex evoluation(Smith et al., 2011, 2013; Mitchell et al., 2011,Schouten et al., 2012). Water anomay were clear detected and samples of hydrothermal deposit and rocks were collected by TV-Grab (Figure.1). This study aims to understand the geological features of the PSF related hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal mineralization Three types of sedimentary hydrothermal deposits representing three different hydrothermal activity stages (Figure 1)are confirmed in the PSF: 1) sediments with native sulfur and pyrite clasts(Type I), 2) Fe—Mn oxides (Type II), and 3) clay minerals mainlynontronite(Type III). Type II sedimentsprecipitate early and the source comprises of clasts of distal hydrothermal plume. The nontronite-rich sediments propably derive from the low-temperature alteration of Fe—Mn oxides. Type 1 sediments are found on the active hydrothermal venting field. Hydrothermal plume Water anomaly were detected at the southewestern PSF. We observed widespreadsedimentary hydrothermal depositsin the western PSF, but no water anomaly. According to the results of five water anomaly dectection lines, we predicted the existence of three hydrothermal vents in the PSF. Seafloor type inversion Multi-beam backscatter data were

  10. Archaean triple junction as a plumbing system: an example from the eastern Pilbara craton (Western Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébaud, N.; Rey, P.; Philippot, P.

    2003-04-01

    It is largely accepted that the development of Archaean ore deposits is related to the mobilisation of fluids through the crust, their channelling along shear zones and concentration in domains bounded by zones of low permeability. In many Archaean cratons a number of modern studies argue that the regional structure, together with the characteristics of metamorphism and plutonism are compatible with the gravity-driven exhumation of granitic domes and sagduction of greenstone basins. Structural mapping in the Pilbara confirms that strain, in Archaean domes and basins, displays a large but coherent spatial variability. Planar fabric develops in domal position, planar-linear fabric develops at the contact between two granitic domes, and intense linear and vertical fabric develops at foliation triple junction where three or more granitic domes interact. We believe this network is the backbone element of an Archaean plumbing system that has channeled and concentrated ore bearing fluids. The Warawoonna syncline in the East Pilbara craton (Western Australia) offers a horizontal section through one spectacular example of triple junction. On the regional scale we have recognized a main drain along a shear zone characterized by a hydraulic breccia. A detailed sampling has been conducted across this breccia and bulk stable isotope (d18O) analyses conducted on mafic, ultramafic and felsic rocks show significant variations in its vicinity that is most likely the signature of fluid rock interaction. At the outcrop scale, the Warawoonna syncline is pervasively intruded by a few quartz veins generations one of which is oriented at high angle to the direction of maximum finite stretching. Fluid inclusions study (micro-thermometry, RAMAN spectroscopy) has been conducted on quartz veins. These preliminary analyses show primary and secondary populations of fluid inclusions with contrasted composition of the trapped phases (e.g. H2O-CO2, H2O, H2O-CO2-CH4…). This is consistent with a

  11. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting in the Red Sea Rift, Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Almadani, S.; Gao, S. S.; Elsheikh, A. A.; Cherie, S.; Thurmond, A. K.; Liu, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression is currently a unique locale for the investigation of crustal and mantle processes involved in the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. To provide high-quality images of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Red Sea Rift in Central Afar, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Here we report receiver function stacking results to investigate crustal properties of this presumably incipient oceanic rift. Stacking of approximately 2200 radial receiver functions along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22 km, ranging from nearly 18 km within the Red Sea Rift axis to approximately 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift axes. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios systematically decrease toward the northeast, ranging from 2.40 southwest of the Tendaho Graben to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to constrain a highly reduced average crustal P-velocity of 5.0 km/s within the rift axis, which is characterized by a melt percentage of ~11% confined primarily to the lower crust while the overlap zone contains relatively minor quantities of partial melt. An observed asymmetric distribution of high Vp/Vs values within the Tendaho Graben, as well as regionally maximum values on the southwestern rift flank, suggest crustal magmas either delivered from off-axis subcrustal magma chambers or as material present as residuum from the Red Sea Rift axis migration. Comparisons of these crustal properties beneath the Red Sea Rift and those found beneath mature mid-ocean ridges suggest the locus of extensional strain within the Central Afar is currently diffuse and in the process of localizing toward the Tendaho Graben accompanying the northeastward migration of the Afar Triple Junction.

  12. Degradation modeling of InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, S. I.; Lumb, M. P.; Messenger, S. R.; Hoheisel, R.; Affouda, C.; Scheiman, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Lorentzen, J.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental results on triple-junction solar cells irradiated by 3 MeV proton irradiation to very high damage levels are presented. The minority carrier transport properties were obtained through quantum efficiency and EBIC measurements and an analytical drift-diffusion solver was used in understanding the results for different degradation levels where multiple damage mechanisms are evident.

  13. Tectonics and evolution of the Juan Fernandez microplate at the Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic triple junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, S.; Larson, R. L.; Engein, J. F.; Lundgren, P.; Stein, S.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic and bathymetric profiles derived from the R/V Endeavor survey and focal mechanism studies for earthquakes on two of the Juan Fernandez microplate boundaries are analyzed. It is observed that the Nazca-Juan Fernandez pole is in the northern end of the microplate since the magnetic lineation along the East Ridge of the microplate fans to the south. The calculation of the relative motion of the Juan Fernandez-Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic four-plate system using the algorithm of Minster et al. (1974) is described. The development of tectonic and evolutionary models of the region is examined. The tectonic model reveals that the northern boundary of the Juan Fernandez microplate is a zone of compression and that the West Ridge and southwestern boundary are spreading obliquely; the evolutionary model relates the formation of the Juan Fernandez microplate to differential spreading rates at the triple junction.

  14. Triple junction magmatism: a geochemical study of Neogene volcanic rocks in western California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Inception of volcanism at late Oligocene to Recent centers in the eastern Coast Ranges of California (ECR suite) regularly decreases in age northward and is correlated with the northward migration of the transform-transform-trench Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). Miocene volcanism in the southern California basin (SCB suite) is spatially and temporally associated with the transform-ridge-trench Rivera triple junction (RTJ). The tholeiitic to calc-alkaline rocks in both suites were erupted through older trench melange while arc magmatism was occurring several hundred kilometers to the east. Therefore they are not related to subduction zone magmatism, but instead to interactions of the MTJ and RTJ with the continental margin. The ECR rocks, dominantly intermediate to silicic in composition, have relatively high ??18O values up to 11.3, 87Sr 86Sr ratios up to 0.7055, as well as relatively high Th contents, suggesting that crustal anatexis played a dominant role in their generation. Coupled crystal fractionation and crustal assimilation by an initially basaltic magma cannot explain the high ??18O values and 87Sr 86Sr ratios because greater than 95% of the basalt would need to crystallize. In contrast, the SCB rocks, dominantly mafic to intermediate in composition, have relatively low ??18O values down to 5.2 and 87Sr 86Sr ratios down to 0.7025 suggesting that these rocks were derived dominantly from a mantle source. Whether crustal anatexis occurs is determined largely by the type of stress a triple junction imposes upon the continental margin. Both the MTJ and RTJ are associated with high heat flow and magma fluxes from the mantle. The transform-transform-trench MTJ is associated with locally variable mild extension to compression and therefore allows pooling of basaltic magma in the crust to initiate crustal melting. The high rates of continental extension associated with the transform-ridge-trench RTJ prevents such pooling of magma. The space created by decoupling

  15. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O'Dowd, J. . Thin Film Div.)

    1993-04-01

    This report describes Solarex's work to advance its photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex will meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transport front contact; optimizing the laser patterning process; scaling up the semiconductor deposition process; improving the back-contact deposition; and scaling up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 1 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on scaling up components of the chemical vapor deposition system for deposition of the system contact, scaling up laser scribing techniques; triple-junction recipes for module production; and metal-oxide back contacts. The goal of these efforts is to adopt all portions of the manufacturing line to handle substrates larger than 0.37 m[sup 2].

  16. Characteristics of the Bab al Mandab-Northern Afar area of the southern Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.B. ); Sikander, A.H. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The southern Red Sea and adjacent Afar area represent an enigmatic portion of the Red Sea/Gulf of Aden basin system. Although the topographic rift shoulders of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden can be traced through this elbow, and appear to suggest that a similar width for the zone of extension is maintained across the region, the character of the floor of the rift zone changes. The distinctive character of the southern Red Sea-Afar area results in part from a topographically elevated region, possibly associated with the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden-East African rift triple junction. In addition, however, seismic data from offshore Ethiopia suggests that the distinctive character is due a complex pattern of rifting. The central axial trough of the Red Sea decreases in depth to the south toward the strait of Bab al Mandab, suggesting that rifting is dying out southward. Farther to the west at the same latitude, a major but narrow half-graben can be seen on seismic in the Gulf of Zula, bounded to the east by a large west-dipping normal fault. This structure continues south into the Danakil Depression of the Afar area. Between these two en echelon rift trends, the Danakil Alps form a long-lived high. Seismic data from the southern Red Sea of Ethiopia show southward thinning and pinch-out of the Miocene syn-rift evaporite sequence onto the northern Danakil block. Thus, it appears that the Danakil block has largely escaped Red Sea extension and subsidence. Instead, it forms a large unextended terrain located between overlapping en echelon rift trends, and may represent an accommodation zone structure associated with offset in the rift axis of the southern Red Sea.

  17. Power generation of series and series/parallel triple junction tandem solar cells derived from measured spectra in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Shunya; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-01

    A limiting efficiency of a solar cell changes according to the incident solar spectrum. With respect to a two-terminal triple junction tandem solar cell and interconnection of individual cells within it, the variation of limiting efficiency of a modified triple-tandem solar cell, in which two series-connected bottom cells are connected in parallel to the top cell, is lower than that of a conventional fully series-connected tandem cell. We calculate limiting efficiency of these two structures using measured solar spectra and meteorological condition at four different locations in Japan. It is shown that a triple junction tandem cell in a combination of series and parallel connections generates 7% larger amount of power than a series-connected cell does in average if these cells are optimized at airmass (AM) 1.5.

  18. Inverted GaInP/(In)GaAs/InGaAs Triple-Junction Solar Cells with Low-Stress Metamorphic Bottom Junctions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate high efficiency performance in two ultra-thin, Ge-free III-V semiconductor triple-junction solar cell device designs grown in an inverted configuration. Low-stress metamorphic junctions were engineered to achieve excellent photovoltaic performance with less than 3 x 106 cm-2 threading dislocations. The first design with band gaps of 1.83/1.40/1.00 eV, containing a single metamorphic junction, achieved 33.8% and 39.2% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 131 suns, respectively. The second design with band gaps of 1.83/1.34/0.89 eV, containing two metamorphic junctions achieved 33.2% and 40.1% efficiencies under the standard one-sun global spectrum and concentrated direct spectrum at 143 suns, respectively.

  19. Possible microplate generation at RRR triple junctions due to the non-circular finite motion of plates relative to each other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    First generation ideas of the kinematic stability of triple junctions lead to the common belief that the geometry of ridge-ridge-ridge (RRR) triple junctions remains constant over time under conditions of symmetric spreading. Given constant relative motion between each plate pair -- that is, the pole of plate relative motion is fixed to both plates in each pair during finite motion, as assumed in many accounts of plate kinematics -- there would be no boundary mismatch at the triple junction and no apparent kinematic reason why a microplate might develop there. But if, in a given RRR triple junction, the finite motion of one plate as observed from the other plate is not circular (as is generally the case, given the three-plate problem of plate kinematics), the geometry of the ridges and the triple junction will vary with time (Cronin, 1992, Tectonophys 207, 287-301). To explore the possible consequences of non-circular finite motion between plates at an RRR triple junction, a simple model was coded based on the cycloid finite-motion model (e.g., Cronin, 1987, Geology 15, 1006-1009) using NNR-MORVEL56 velocities for individual plates (Argus et al., 2011, G3 12, doi: 10.1029/2011GC003751). Initial assumptions include a spherical Earth, symmetric spreading, and constant angular velocities during the modeled finite time interval. The assumed-constant angular velocity vectors constitute a reference frame for observing finite plate motion. Typical results are [1] that the triple junction migrates relative to a coordinate system fixed to the angular-velocity vectors, [2] ridge axes rotates relative to each other, and [3] a boundary mismatch develops at the synthetic triple junction that might result in microplate nucleation. In a model simulating the Galapagos triple junction between the Cocos, Nazca and Pacific plates whose initial state did not include the Galapagos microplate, the mismatch gap was as much as ~3.4 km during 3 Myr of model displacement (see figure). The

  20. Efficient enhancement of hydrogen production by Ag/Cu2O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Feng; Shen, Shaohua; Fu, Yanming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Chang; Xing, Zhuo; Liu, Dan; Xiao, Xiangheng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Yichao; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-03-01

    Highly efficient semiconductor photoelectrodes for solar hydrogen production through photocatalytic water splitting are a promising and challenge solution to solve the energy problems. In this work, Ag/Cu2O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrode was designed and prepared. An increase of 11 times of photocurrent is achieved in the Ag/Cu2O/ZnO photoelectrode comparing to that of the Cu2O film. The high performance of the Ag/Cu2O/ZnO film is due to the optimized design of the tandem triple-junction structure, where the localized surface Plasmon resonance of Ag and the hetero-junctions efficiently absorb solar energy, produce, and separate electron-hole pairs in the photocathode.

  1. Triple-junction hybrid tandem solar cells with amorphous silicon and polymer-fullerene blends.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehee; Kim, Hyeok; Park, Jinjoo; Kim, Hyungchae; Yoon, Youngwoon; Kim, Sung-Min; Shin, Chonghoon; Jung, Heesuk; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kim, Honggon; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, BongSoo; Ko, Min Jae; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, Changsoon; Yi, Junsin; Han, Seunghee; Lee, Doh-Kwon

    2014-11-21

    Organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cells attract a considerable amount of attention due to their potential for realizing high efficiency photovoltaic devices at a low cost. Here, highly efficient triple-junction (TJ) hybrid tandem solar cells consisting of a double-junction (DJ) amorphous silicon (a-Si) cell and an organic photovoltaic (OPV) rear cell were developed. In order to design the TJ device in a logical manner, a simulation was carried out based on optical absorption and internal quantum efficiency. In the TJ architecture, the high-energy photons were utilized in a more efficient way than in the previously reported a-Si/OPV DJ devices, leading to a significant improvement in the overall efficiency by means of a voltage gain. The interface engineering such as tin-doped In2O3 deposition as an interlayer and its UV-ozone treatment resulted in the further improvement in the performance of the TJ solar cells. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 7.81% was achieved with an open-circuit voltage of 2.35 V. The wavelength-resolved absorption profile provides deeper insight into the detailed optical response of the TJ hybrid solar cells.

  2. Performance of High-Efficiency Advanced Triple-Junction Solar Panels for the LILT Mission Dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Sharma, Surya; Buitrago, Oscar; Sharps, Paul R.; Blok, Ron; Kroon, Martin; Jalink, Cees; Harris, Robin; Stella, Paul; Distefano, Sal

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Mission Dawn is designed to (LILT) conditions. operate within the solar system's Asteroid belt, where the large distance from the sun creates a low-intensity, low-temperature (LILT) condition. To meet the mission power requirements under LlLT conditions, very high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells were selected to power the spacecraft to be built by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) under contract with JPL. Emcore's InGaP/InGaAs/Ge advanced triple-junction (ATJ) solar cells, exhibiting an average air mass zero (AMO) efficiency of greater than 27.6% (one-sun, 28 C), were used to populate the solar panels [1]. The two solar array wings, to be built by Dutch Space, with 5 large- area panels each (total area of 36.4 sq. meters) are projected to produce between 10.3 kWe and 1.3 kWe of end-of life (EOL) power in the 1.0 to 3.0 AU range, respectively. The details of the solar panel design, testing and power analysis are presented.

  3. Triple-Junction Hybrid Tandem Solar Cells with Amorphous Silicon and Polymer-Fullerene Blends

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehee; Kim, Hyeok; Park, Jinjoo; Kim, Hyungchae; Yoon, Youngwoon; Kim, Sung-Min; Shin, Chonghoon; Jung, Heesuk; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kim, Honggon; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, BongSoo; Ko, Min Jae; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, Changsoon; Yi, Junsin; Han, Seunghee; Lee, Doh-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cells attract a considerable amount of attention due to their potential for realizing high efficiency photovoltaic devices at a low cost. Here, highly efficient triple-junction (TJ) hybrid tandem solar cells consisting of a double-junction (DJ) amorphous silicon (a-Si) cell and an organic photovoltaic (OPV) rear cell were developed. In order to design the TJ device in a logical manner, a simulation was carried out based on optical absorption and internal quantum efficiency. In the TJ architecture, the high-energy photons were utilized in a more efficient way than in the previously reported a-Si/OPV DJ devices, leading to a significant improvement in the overall efficiency by means of a voltage gain. The interface engineering such as tin-doped In2O3 deposition as an interlayer and its UV-ozone treatment resulted in the further improvement in the performance of the TJ solar cells. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 7.81% was achieved with an open-circuit voltage of 2.35 V. The wavelength-resolved absorption profile provides deeper insight into the detailed optical response of the TJ hybrid solar cells. PMID:25412648

  4. Triple-junction hybrid tandem solar cells with amorphous silicon and polymer-fullerene blends.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehee; Kim, Hyeok; Park, Jinjoo; Kim, Hyungchae; Yoon, Youngwoon; Kim, Sung-Min; Shin, Chonghoon; Jung, Heesuk; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kim, Honggon; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, BongSoo; Ko, Min Jae; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, Changsoon; Yi, Junsin; Han, Seunghee; Lee, Doh-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cells attract a considerable amount of attention due to their potential for realizing high efficiency photovoltaic devices at a low cost. Here, highly efficient triple-junction (TJ) hybrid tandem solar cells consisting of a double-junction (DJ) amorphous silicon (a-Si) cell and an organic photovoltaic (OPV) rear cell were developed. In order to design the TJ device in a logical manner, a simulation was carried out based on optical absorption and internal quantum efficiency. In the TJ architecture, the high-energy photons were utilized in a more efficient way than in the previously reported a-Si/OPV DJ devices, leading to a significant improvement in the overall efficiency by means of a voltage gain. The interface engineering such as tin-doped In2O3 deposition as an interlayer and its UV-ozone treatment resulted in the further improvement in the performance of the TJ solar cells. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 7.81% was achieved with an open-circuit voltage of 2.35 V. The wavelength-resolved absorption profile provides deeper insight into the detailed optical response of the TJ hybrid solar cells. PMID:25412648

  5. Transient cracks and triple junctions induced by Cocos-Nazca propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Mitchell, G. A.; Cann, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction where the Cocos, Nazca, and Pacific plates meet around the Galapagos microplate (GMP). On the Cocos plate, north of the large gore that marks the propagating Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift, a 250-km-long and 50-km-wide band of NW-SE-trending cracks crosscuts the N-S-trending abyssal hills of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These appear as a succession of minor rifts, accommodating some NE-SW extension of EPR-generated seafloor. The rifts successively intersected the EPR in triple junctions at distances of 50-100 km north of the tip of the C-N Rift. We proposed a simple crack interaction model to explain the location of the transient rifts and their junction with the EPR. The model predicts that crack locations are controlled by the stress perturbation along the EPR, induced by the dominant C-N Rift, and scaled by the distance of its tip to the EPR (Schouten et al., 2008). The model also predicts that tensile stresses are symmetric about the C-N Rift and thus, similar cracks should have occurred south of the C-N Rift prior to formation of the GMP about 1 Ma. There were no data at the time to test this prediction. In early 2009 (AT 15-41), we mapped an area on the Nazca plate south of the C-N rift out to 4 Ma. The new bathymetric data confirm the existence of a distinctive pattern of cracks south of the southern C-N gore that mirrors the pattern on the Cocos plate until about 1 Ma, and lends support to the crack interaction model. The envelope of the symmetric cracking pattern indicates that the distance between the C-N Rift tip and the EPR varied between 40 and 65 km during this time (1-4 Ma). The breakdown of the symmetry at 1 Ma accurately dates the onset of a southern plate boundary of the GMP, now Dietz Deep Rift. At present, the southern rift boundary of the GMP joins the EPR with a steep-sided, 80 km long ridge. This ridge releases the stress perturbation otherwise induced along the EPR by elastic

  6. Uplifted Neogene margin, southernmost Cascadia-Mendocino triple junction region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, K. R.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Carver, G. A.; Barron, J. A.; Sliter, W. V.; McDougall, K.

    1995-10-01

    Along a 10-km length of coast north of the Mendocino triple junction, a Neogene accretionary complex has been uplifted ≥2 km and tilted northward in response to the interaction of the southern Juan de Fuca (Gorda) plate with the older North American and Pacific plates. These plate interactions were accompanied by tectonic intercalation of Miocene to Pliocene deposits of the southern Cascadia forearc (Wildcat Group), with penetratively deformed Oligocene to Miocene accretionary prism deposits of the False Cape terrane (new name) and the Cretaceous to Eocene Coastal terrane of the Franciscan Complex. North of Cape Mendocino, more than 2 km of stratigraphic section of the accretionary False Cape terrane crops out at beach level in an east-west trending anticline and recumbent syncline. The folded False Cape rocks are juxtaposed with forearc deposits to the north along the subvertical Russ shear zone. To the south, a second subvertical shear zone truncates the False Cape terrane near the mouth of the Bear River. This North Bear River shear zone interleaves rocks of the False Cape and Coastal terranes with additional Neogene forearc deposits (the Bear River beds). South of the North Bear River shear zone, the Bear River beds crop out for about 5 km in a continuous folded and imbricated section that is again truncated to the south by a third subvertical shear zone. This South Bear River shear zone interleaves rocks of the Coastal terrane, the Bear River beds, and Pliocene to Pleistocene shelf deposits. Folding, tilting, and shear zone development reflect ongoing north-south crustal shortening that has occurred in response to interplate coupling and wedge thickening in the deforming Miocene and younger accretionary complex. The strain recorded in the accreted terranes and in the forearc overlap assemblage reflects a stress regime unlike that in the Cascadia fold-and-thrust belt north of the Eel River syncline. Thus the deformation pattern may be unique to the triple

  7. TTR triple junction evolution during plate convergence in the southern branch of the european variscan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M.; Fernandez, C.; Castro, A.

    2003-04-01

    The boundary between the Ossa-Morena and the South Portuguese zones (Iberian Massif) represents a major suture within the southern branch of the European Varis-can orogen. This suture resulted from the collision between the northern Iberian autochthon and the South Portuguese allochthon, and it is outlined by a WNW-ESE oriented, high grade band (the Aracena metamorphic belt, AMB). The main characteristics of the AMB are (1) the presence of a linear belt of MORB derived metabasites which shows a HT/LP inverted metamorphic gradient (Castro et al., 1996). This metamorphic event shows an age gradient (Castro et al., 1999), in such a way that younger ages have been obtained towards the east. (2) The occur-rence of a UHT/LP metamorphic event, related to an extensional deformation phase, affecting the former continental margin of the Iberian autochthon. (3) The existence of syn-to-post-tectonic noritic intrusions with boninite affinity composition, related to partial melting of a shallow mantle wedge (Castro et al., 1996). According to the mentioned characteristics the following tectonic model is pro-posed: (1) During the convergence between the Iberian autochthon and the South Portuguese allochthon, an oceanic ridge intersected the subduction zone giving place to a TTR triple junction, related to which a slab-free window formed and a thermal rebound took place. This triple junction migrated along the continental edge of the Iberian autochthon towards the east, generating a high-grade metamorphic belt (the AMB). (3) As the trailing oceanic plate subducted beneath the continental margin, it was heated up by the latter. In consequence, the upper levels of the oceanic sheet became dehydrated and were accreted to the base of the continental margin. The subduction plane migrated downwards and the oceanic metabasites together with the continental margin overthrusted the rest of the oceanic plate and the accretionary prism. (4) Once the trailing oceanic plate was totally

  8. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the Western Afar margin: new geochronological and structural data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Pik, Raphael; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie; Ayalew, Dereje; Denèle, Yoann

    2013-04-01

    The rift system in NW-Afar (Ethiopia) is part of the Nubia-Somalia-Arabia triple junction located above the Afar hot spot active mainly since Oligocene times. It represents a unique natural laboratory for field study of superficial and deep lithospheric structure and process interactions during the transition between rifting and oceanic spreading in magma-rich setting. Most past field studies in Afar focused on the recognition and correlation of Afar's volcano-stratigraphic record and led to models of margin development that stress out the major trends of volcanic structures and give accordingly the following chronological "big picture". (1) 2km-thick flood basalt province emplaced at ca. 30 Ma due to hot spot activity over Jurassic to Permian sedimentary rocks and basement. (2) Rifting started around 25-20 Ma with half graben and great escarpment formation along with localization of volcanic activity in highly faulted narrower basins followed by lithospheric flexure. (3) The deformation migrated toward the rift centre with the emplacement around 8-5 Ma of bi-modal volcanics later faulted. (4) A second pulse of flood-basalt, the so-called Stratoid series, started at 4 Ma, until 1 Ma. In this contribution, we present new structural field data and lavas (U-Th/He) datings along a cross-section from the marginal graben to the Manda-Hararo active rift axis. In the newly explored Sullu Adu ranges, which were previously thought to be made of 8 Ma Dahla Basalts Fm., we mapped normal faults arrays affecting a complex magmatic series. We dated highly tilted 30 Ma pre-rift basic and silicic volcanic rocks that are unconformably overlain by syn-rift volcanics (25 to 8 Ma). This pattern is in some places either masked by unconformable thick stratoid cover or strongly eroded by dense river drainage. However, it is preserved enough to suggest a lower-than-expected extension ratio and/or the presence of major normal faults controlling seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) emplacement

  9. Very thin and stable thin-film silicon alloy triple junction solar cells by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2016-08-01

    We present a silicon-based triple junction solar cell that requires a deposition time of less than 15 min for all photoactive layers. As a low-bandgap material, we used thin layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium with lower band gap than commonly used, which is possible due to the application of hot wire chemical vapor deposition. The triple junction cell shows an initial energy conversion efficiency exceeding 10%, and with a relative performance stability within 6%, the cell shows a high tolerance to light-induced degradation. With these results, we help to demonstrate that hot wire chemical vapor deposition is a viable deposition method for the fabrication of low-cost solar cells.

  10. Tension, cell shape and triple-junction angle anisotropy in the Drosophila germband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Monica; Hutson, M. Shane; Meyer, Christian; McDonald, Xena

    In the field of tissue mechanics, the embryonic development of Drosophila melanogaster offers many opportunities for study. One of Drosophila's most crucial morphogenetic stages is the retraction of an epithelial tissue called the germband. During retraction, the segments of the retracting germband, as well as the individual germband cells, elongate in response to forces from a connected tissue, the amnioserosa. Modeling of this elongation, based on tissue responses to laser wounding, has plotted the internal germband tension against the external amnioserosa stress, creating a phase space to determine points and regions corresponding to stable elongation. Although the resulting fits indicate a necessary opposition of internal and external forces, they are inconclusive regarding the exact balance. We will present results testing the model predictions by measuring cell shapes and the correlations between cell-edge directions and triple-junction angles. These measures resolve the ambiguity in pinpointing the internal-external force balance for each germband segment. Research was supported by NIH Grant Numbers 1R01GM099107 and 1R21AR068933.

  11. Pattern formation during diffusional transformations in the presence of triple junctions and elastic effects.

    PubMed

    Brener, E A; Boussinot, G; Hüter, C; Fleck, M; Pilipenko, D; Spatschek, R; Temkin, D E

    2009-11-18

    We compare different scenarios for dendritic melting of alloys with respect to the front propagation velocity. In contrast to conventional dendritic growth, selection can here be also due to the presence of a grain boundary or coherence strains, and the propagation speed is higher. The most favorable situation is partial melting, where two parabolic fronts, one melting and one solidifying interface, are moving together, since the process is then determined by diffusion in the thin liquid layer. There, and also in phase field simulations of melting in peritectic and eutectic systems, we observe a rotation of the triple junction relative to the growth direction. Finally, we discuss the role of elastic effects due to density and structural differences on solid-state phase transformations, and we find that they significantly alter the selection principles. In particular, we obtain free dendritic growth even with isotropic surface tension. This is investigated by Green's function methods and a phase field approach for growth in a channel and illustrated for the formation of a twin phase.

  12. Bioaccumulation of Hg, Cu, and Zn in the Azores triple junction hydrothermal vent fields food web.

    PubMed

    Colaço, A; Bustamante, P; Fouquet, Y; Sarradin, P M; Serrão-Santos, R

    2006-12-01

    In this work, mercury (Hg), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) concentrations and tissue distribution are determined in seven benthic invertebrates species (the key species) from the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) hydrothermal vent fields. The samples were collected from three hydrothermal vent fields--Menez Gwen, 840 m; Lucky Strike, 1700 m and Rainbow, 2300 m--near the Azores Triple Junction. These fields are characterized by different depths, geological context and chemical composition of the hydrothermal fluid, particularly the metal content, which is reflected by the metal concentrations in the organisms. Indeed, our results show that organisms from Menez Gwen presented the highest Hg concentrations, while those from Lucky Strike and Rainbow were richer in Cu and Zn. The potential transfer of these metals through two trophic links are also evaluated and include (1) the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus and the commensal worm Branchipolynoe seepensis, and (2) three different species of shrimps and the crab Segonzacia mesatlantica. No evidence of Hg biomagnification in either of the vent food chains is clearly observed but an increase in Hg accumulation from prey to predator in the crustacean food chain. The same pattern was observed for Cu and Zn, even though these metals are not known to be generally biomagnified in food chains.

  13. Can plasmonic Al nanoparticles improve absorption in triple junction solar cells?

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Pillai, S; Green, M A

    2015-07-03

    Plasmonic nanoparticles located on the illuminated surface of a solar cell can perform the function of an antireflection layer, as well as a scattering layer, facilitating light-trapping. Al nanoparticles have recently been proposed to aid photocurrent enhancements in GaAs photodiodes in the wavelength region of 400-900 nm by mitigating any parasitic absorption losses. Because this spectral region corresponds to the top and middle sub-cell of a typical GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple junction solar cell, in this work, we investigated the potential of similar periodic Al nanoparticles placed on top of a thin SiO2 spacer layer that can also serve as an antireflection coating at larger thicknesses. The particle period, diameter and the thickness of the oxide layers were optimised for the sub-cells using simulations to achieve the lowest reflection and maximum external quantum efficiencies. Our results highlight the importance of proper reference comparison, and unlike previously published results, raise doubts regarding the effectiveness of Al plasmonic nanoparticles as a suitable front-side scattering medium for broadband efficiency enhancements when compared to standard single-layer antireflection coatings. However, by embedding the nanoparticles within the dielectric layer, they have the potential to perform better than an antireflection layer and provide enhanced response from both the sub-cells.

  14. Self-powered and broadband photodetectors based on graphene/ZnO/silicon triple junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ching-Cheng; Zhan, Jun-Yu; Liao, Yu-Ming; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2016-08-01

    A self-powered photodetector with ultrahigh sensitivity, fast photoresponse, and wide spectral detectivity covering from 1000 nm to 400 nm based on graphene/ZnO/Si triple junctions has been designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. In this device, graphene serves as a transparent electrode as well as an efficient collection layer for photogenerated carriers due to its excellent tunability of Fermi energy. The ZnO layer acts as an antireflection layer to trap the incident light and enhance the light absorption. Furthermore, the insertion of the ZnO layer in between graphene and Si layers can create build-in electric field at both graphene/ZnO and ZnO/Si interfaces, which can greatly enhance the charge separation of photogenerated electron and hole pairs. As a result, the sensitivity and response time can be significantly improved. It is believed that our methodology for achieving a high-performance self-powered photodetector based on an appropriate design of band alignment and optical parameters can be implemented to many other material systems, which can be used to generate unique optoelectronic devices for practical applications.

  15. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  16. The nature, distribution, and origin of gas hydrate in the Chile Triple Junction region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, K.M.; Bangs, N.L.; Froelich, P.N.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    A bottom simulating reflector (BSR) is regionally distributed throughout much of the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) region. Downhole temperature and logging data collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 suggest that the seismic BSR is generated by low seismic velocities associated with the presence of a few percent free gas in a ??? 10 m thick zone just beneath the hydrate-bearing zone. The data also indicate that the temperature and pressure at the BSR best corresponds to the seawater/methane hydrate stability field. The origin of the large amounts of methane required to generate the hydrates is, however, problematic. Low total organic carbon contents and low alkalinities argue against significant in situ biogenic methanogenesis, but additional input from thermogenic sources also appears to be precluded. Increasing thermal gradients, associated with the approach of the spreading ridge system, may have caused the base of the hydrate stability field to migrate 300 m upwards in the sediments. We propose that the upward migration of the base of the stability field has concentrated originally widely dispersed hydrate patches into the more continuous hydrate body we see today. The methane can be concentrated if the gas hydrates can form from dissolved methane, transported into the hydrate zone via diffusion or fluid advection. A strong gradient may exist in dissolved methane concentration across the BSR leading to the steady reabsorbtion of the free gas zone during the upward migration of the BSR even in the absence of fluid advection.

  17. The Blow Up Method for Brakke Flows: Networks Near Triple Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Yoshihiro; Wickramasekera, Neshan

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a parabolic blow-up method to study the asymptotic behavior of a Brakke flow of planar networks (that is a 1-dimensional Brakke flow in a two dimensional region) weakly close in a space-time region to a static multiplicity 1 triple junction J. We show that such a network flow is regular in a smaller space-time region, in the sense that it consists of three curves coming smoothly together at a single point at 120{^{circ}} angles, staying smoothly close to J and moving smoothly. Using this result and White's stratification theorem, we deduce that whenever a Brakke flow of networks in a space-time region {{mathcal {R}}} has no static tangent flow with density {{≥q}2}, there exists a closed subset {{Σ subset {mathcal {R}}}} of parabolic Hausdorff dimension at most 1 such that the flow is classical in {{mathcal {R}}backslashΣ}, that is near every point in {{mathcal {R}}backslashΣ}, the flow, if non-empty, consists of either an embedded curve moving smoothly or three embedded curves meeting smoothly at a single point at 120{^{circ}} angles and moving smoothly. In particular, such a flow is classical at all times except for a closed set of times of ordinary Hausdorff dimension at most {1/2}.

  18. Optimization of alternate-strand triple helix formation at the 5'CpG3' and 5'GpC3' junction steps.

    PubMed

    Marchand, C; Sun, J S; Bailly, C; Waring, M J; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1998-09-22

    Oligonucleotide-directed triple helix formation normally requires a long tract of oligopyrimidine.oligopurine sequence. This limitation can be partially overcome by alternate-strand triple helix (or switch triple helix) formation which enables recognition of alternating oligopurine/oligopyrimidine sequences. The present work is devoted to the optimization of switch triple helix formation at the 5'CpG3' and 5'GpC3' junction steps by combination of base triplets in Hoogsteen and in reverse Hoogsteen configurations. Rational design by molecular mechanics was first carried out to study the geometrical constraints at different junction steps and to propose a "switch code" which would optimize the interactions at junctions. These predictions were further checked and validated experimentally by gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays. It was shown that the choice of an appropriate linker nucleotide in the switching third strand plays an important role in the interaction between oligonucleotides and alternating oligopurine/oligopyrimidine target sequences at different junctions: (i) the addition of a cytosine at the junction level in the oligonucleotide optimizes the crossover at the 5'CpG3' junction, whereas (ii) the best crossover at the 5'GpC3' junction step is achieved without any additional nucleotide. These results provide a useful guideline to extend double-stranded DNA sequence recognition by switch triple helix formation.

  19. Detailed Axial Morphology of the Chile Rise as it Approaches the Chile Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.; Henig, A. S.; Barroso, E.; Grevemeyer, I.; Thurber, A. R.; German, C. R.; Inspire Cruise Participants, T.

    2010-12-01

    New bathymetric mapping along the two southernmost Chile Rise spreading segments shows axial volcanic structure that had not been evident in prior data. On the first segment extending north from the triple junction, where the basement is not obscured by sediment, a narrow line of volcanic structures appears to track the center of the rift valley. However, the next segment north, which is offset almost 50 km along a transform fault, has axial volcanic features that vary in position within the rift valley. In the northern ~half of this segment, lineated small volcanic structures hug the eastern scarp of the rift whereas in the south they are apparent only along the western part of the valley floor. A classic ridge-transform intersection (RTI) nodal deep occurs at this southern end of the segment. The position of the basin is asymmetric relative to the axis, toward the ‘inside corner’ on the eastern side of the rift valley. It is intriguing that the nodal deep, which is often modeled as the result of viscous mantle upwelling and plate stresses at an RTI, is centered on the opposite side of the rift valley from where the most recent volcanic activity occurred. Presumably this reflects interplay between local magma plumbing and tectonic stresses. In addition to the local ridge-transform forces, regional factors associated with subduction along the edge of the Cocos plate may affect mantle flow, melting, and detailed plate kinematics. We will present maps that combine the new Simrad EM122 swath sonar data, obtained during cruise MV1003 aboard R/V Melville, with pre-existing German and Chilean bathymetric grids. We will also discuss some of the tectonic and magmatic implications of the observed detailed morphologic patterns. As one of the few areas on the globe where active subduction and spreading occur in close proximity, the southernmost Chile rise presents a natural laboratory for studying the manifestations of interaction between these processes.

  20. Development of a High Efficiency UVR/IRR Coverglass for Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John; Jones, Glenn; Hall, James

    2007-01-01

    Cover glasses have been a necessary and integral part of space solar arrays since their inception. The main function of the cover glass is to protect the underlying solar cell from the harsh radiation environment of space. They are formed either from fused silica or specially formulated ceria doped glass types that are resistant to radiation damage, for example Pilkington's CMX, CMG, CMO. Solar cells have steadily increased in performance over the past years, from Silicon cells through textured Silicon cells to GaAs cells and the multijunction cells of today. The optimum coverglass solution for each of these cells has been different. The glass itself has also evolved. In some cases it has had its expansion coefficient matched to the cell substrate material, and in addition, added value has been derived from the application of thin film optical coatings to the coverglass. In the majority of cases this has taken the form of a single layer of MgF2 which acts as an antireflection coating. There are also conductive coatings to address electrostatic discharge issues (ESD) and Ultra Violet Reflective (UVR) and Infrared Reflective (IRR) coatings designed for thermal enhancement. Each type of coating can be applied singly or in combination. This paper describes a new type of UVR/IRR (or blue red reflector BRR) specifically designed for triple junction solar cells. For space applications, where radiation is the principal mechanism for removing heat from the satellite, it is the emittance and solar absorptance that primarily determine the temperature of the array. It is therefore essential that any coatings designed to have an effect on the temperature by reducing the solar absorption have a minimal effect on the overall emittance.

  1. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  2. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  3. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.

    2014-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 µs to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  4. Denudation and topographic responses of coastal drainages near the Mendocino Triple Junction region (MTJ), northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, S.; Merritts, D. J.; Snyder, N. P.; Sanquini, A.; Fosdick, J. C.; Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's surface forms by interactions among surface processes, tectonics, climate, and underlying lithology. In an equilibrium landscape where denudation rates equal uplift rates, topography reflects the response of surface processes to spatial variations in uplift rates, climate, and rock erodibility. The Mendocino Triple Junction region (MTJ) in northern California has been investigated as a possible example of a dynamic equilibrium landscape. The region has formed in response to a range in uplift rates that spans an order of magnitude, with highest uplift rates closest to the MTJ. However, no study has explicitly shown that dynamic equilibrium exists between basin-wide denudation and rock uplift rates in the MTJ region. In this study, we measure 10Be- and 26Al-derived denudation rates from coastal drainage basins, and compare them with uplift rates inferred from marine terraces that were formed and preserved by uplift during the last ~305 ka. Denudation rates from a slowly uplifting zone range from 0.2-0.4 mm/yr, which are consistent with rock uplift rates over 305 ka. However, in the northern transition zone and King Range rapid uplift zone, denudation rates are potentially less than recent uplift rates inferred for the past ~72 ka, but close to previous uplift rates from 96-305 ka. This difference is likely related to a lagged response of hillslopes and tributaries to changes in uplift rates, and/or the uncertainties in rate estimates. Topographic analyses based on a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) also show potential disequilibrium features in the tributaries and hillslopes within drainage basins near the MTJ. This study suggests that measurements of both denudation and uplift rates are crucial in assessing the equilibrium state of landscapes and in understanding the topographic features made by surface and tectonic processes.

  5. Numerical modelling of triple-junction tectonics at Karlıova, Eastern Turkey, with implications for regional magma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Browning, John; Bazargan, Mohsen; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-10-01

    Few places on Earth are as tectonically active as the Karlıova region of eastern Turkey. In this region, complex interactions between the Arabian, Eurasian and Anatolian plates occur at the Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ). The relationship between tectonics and magma propagation in triple-junction tectonic settings is poorly understood. Here we present new field and numerical results on the mechanism of magma propagation at the KTJ. We explore the effects of crustal heterogeneity and anisotropy, in particular the geometry and mechanical properties of many faults and layers, on magma propagation paths under a variety of tectonic loadings. We propose that two major volcanic centres in the area, the Turnadağ volcano and the Varto caldera, are both fed by comparatively shallow magma chambers at depths of about 8 km, which, in turn, are fed by a single, much larger and deeper reservoir at about 15-18 km depth. By contrast, the nearby Özenç volcanic area is fed directly by the deeper reservoir. We present a series of two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical models showing that the present tectonic stresses encourage magma-chamber rupture and dyke injection. The results show that inversion tectonics encourages the formation of magma paths as potential feeder dykes. Our three-dimensional models allow us to explore the local stresses induced by complex loading conditions at the Karlıova triple junction, using an approach that can in future be applied to other similar tectonic regions. The numerical results indicate a great complexity in the potential magma (dyke) paths, resulting from local stresses generated by interaction between mechanical layers, major faults, and magma chambers. In particular, the results suggest three main controls on magma path formation and eventual eruptions at KTJ: (1) the geometry and attitude of the associated faults; (2) the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the crust; and (3) mechanical (stress) interactions between deep and shallow

  6. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  7. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  8. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  9. Results from an International Measurement Round Robin of III-V Triple Junction Solar Cells under Air Mass Zero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Chris; Goodbody, Chris; Baur, Carsten; Sharps, Paul; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Yoo, Henry; Sahlstrom, Ted; Walters, Robert; Lorentzen, Justin; Nocerino, John; Khan, Osman; Cravens, Robert; Valles, Juan; Toporow, Chantal; Gomez, Trinidad,; Bazan, Loreto Pazos; Bailey, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international measurement round robin of monolithic, triple-junction, GaInP/GaAs/Ge space solar cells. Eight laboratories representing national labs, solar cell vendors and space solar cell consumers, measured cells using in-house reference cells and compared those results to measurements made where each lab used the same set of reference cells. The results show that most of the discrepancy between laboratories is likely due to the quality of the standard cells rather than the measurement system or solar simulator used.

  10. Upper plate contraction north of the migrating Mendocino triple junction northern California: Implications for partitioning of strain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic measurement of permanent contraction across the Cascadia subduction margin constrains one component of the tectonic deformation along the convergent plate boundary, the component critical for the seismic hazard assessment of crustal faults. A comprehensive survey of active faults in onshore subduction margin rocks at the southern end of the Cascadia subduction zone indicates that these thrust faults accommodate ??10 mm/yr of convergence oriented 020??-045??. Seismotectonic models of subduction zones typically assign this upper plate strain to the estimate of aseismic slip on the megathrust. Geodetic models include this permanent crustal strain within estimates of elastic strain accumulation on the megathrust. Both types of models underestimate the seismic hazard associated with crustal faults. Subtracting the observed contraction from the plate convergence rate (40-50 mm/yr; directed 040??-055??) leaves 30-40 mm/yr of convergence to be partitioned between slip on the megathrust, contraction within the southern Juan de Fuca plate, and crustal contraction outside the subduction complex rocks. This simple estimate of slip partitioning neglects the discrepancy between the plate convergence and contraction directions in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction. The San Andreas and Cascadia limbs of the Mendocino triple junction are not collinear. The eastern edge of the broad San Andreas boundary is ??85 km east of the Cascadia subduction boundary, and across this zone the Pacific plate converges directly with the North America plate. The skewed orientation of crustal structures just north of the leading edge of the Pacific plate suggests that they are deforming in a hybrid stress field resulting from both Juan de Fuca-North America motion and Pacific-North America motion. The composite convergence direction (50 mm/yr: directed 023??) is consistent with the compressive stress axis (020??) inferred from focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes in the

  11. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, David; Zandt, George

    1994-12-01

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical mode spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6 N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which we interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be approximately 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping approximately 8 deg eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6 deg - 12 deg to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3 N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15 deg south of east to at least 123 W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. We interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. South of Cape Mendocino and southwest of the Garberville fault, high velocities indicative of oceanic crust are detected at 15 km depth. We interpret this

  12. The effect of the optical system on the electrical performance of III-V concentrator triple junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, R. D.; van Dyk, E. E.; Vorster, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    High Concentrated Photovoltaic (H-CPV) technologies utilize relatively inexpensive reflective and refractive optical components for concentration to achieve high energy yield. The electrical performance of H-CPV systems is, however, dependent on the properties and configuration of the optical components. The focus of this paper is to summarize the effect of the properties of the optical system on the electrical performance of a Concentrator Triple Junction (CTJ) InGaP/InGaAs/Ge cell. Utilizing carefully designed experiments that include spectral measurements and intensity profiles in the optical plane of the CTJ cell, the influence of photon absorption, Fresnel lens properties and chromatic aberration created by the optical system on the electrical performance of a CTJ cell is shown. From the results obtained, it is concluded that good characterization and understanding of the optical system's properties may add to improved design of future multi-junction devices.

  13. Seismotectonic Investigation of Karliova Triple Junction (KTJ) and the Surrounding Area : Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafat, D.; Kekovali, K.; Suvarikli, M.; Samut, M. D.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Tunc, B.; Yilmazer, M.; Gorgun, E.; Koseoglu Kusmezer, A.; Ogutcu, Z.; Gunes, Y.; Kara, M.; Kilic, K.; Comoglu, M.; Deniz, P.; Polat, R.; Kepekci, D.; Tunc, S.; Cok, O.; Gul, M.; Ozer, M.; Horasan, G.; Gulen, L.; Ocal, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Eastern Turkey is the most tectonically active region in Turkey. This region contains the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ) that is one of the most active tectonic zone and it has a long history of devastating earthquakes. At the same time EAFZ is the southeastern boundary of the Anatolian Block. EAFZ is a left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends between Karliova and Hazar Lake, in Eastern Turkey. The Karliova region is located between North-Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and EAFZ, and it shows high seismicity due to the active fault systems. The Karliova triple Junction (KTJ) where the NAFZ intersects the EAFZ is the most tectonically active region in Turkey. We do not have enough information about the seismic and seismotectonic features of the KTJ region. The lack of dense instrumental network have created difficulties in delineation of seismic sources. Previous scientific studies have suggested that the Yedisu Segment is a seismic gap, but it has not been characterized by detail studies. The Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) has increased the number of the seismic stations in the region since 2005. We are in the process of installing 7 more broad band (BB) seismic stations at the Karliova junction region where the two major fault zones intersect. Thus, the physical caharacteristics of the earthquake sources will be better characterized and their relations with the very complex active fault network in the region will be investigated in detail. Particularly, by analyzing focal mechanisms/MT solutions of the earthquakes with a magnitude of M>4.5, the deformation characteristics, earthquake occurrence patterns and the seismic gaps of the region will be revealed. Our study will include: The ongoing active deformation will be monitored in real-time, Different fault segment properties and their geometries will be characterized,Fault plane- MT solutions-Source parameters will be obtained,Monitoring of foreschock-afterschock activities of

  14. Lower plate deformation at the Chile Triple Junction from the paleomagnetic record (45°30'S-46°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagabrielle, Yves; Bourgois, Jacques; Dyment, Jerôme; Pelletier, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    During the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) cruise, geophysical surveys were conducted between 45°S and 48°S, in the region of the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), where the Nazca and Antarctica Plates are subducting beneath the South American Plate. Near the CTJ, the South Chile Rise (SCR), which separates the Nazca and Antarctica lower plates, consists of three spreading segments trending ~N160°, separated by a series of parallel fracture zones. The active spreading centers of the three segments consist of grabens with various widths and depths, bounded by steep fault scarps. We provide robust data showing that the SCR recorded remote and long-term effects of ridge subduction far from the subduction front. Magnetic profiles, multibeam bathymetric, and seismic data were acquired at intervals of 13 km along a N80°E direction across the SCR during the CTJ cruise of R/V L'Atalante. Deformation of the oceanic lithosphere includes (1) a segmentation of the spreading axes along strike, (2) some ridge jumps, and (3) local constriction and changes in trend of the fracture zone valleys. Off-axis volcanism is observed in places that may suggest a link with an abnormal stress field induced by ridge subduction. The tectonic and volcanic anomalies, which occurred in response to the subduction of the SCR1 axis, may be correlated with geochemical anomalies and slab fragmentation recognized by previous works.

  15. Oligonucleotides containing a lysine residue as 3'-3' junction for alternate strand triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Barone, G; De Napoli, L; Di Fabio, G; Giancola, C; Messere, A; Montesarchio, D; Petraccone, L; Piccialli, G

    2001-11-01

    Oligonucleotides with a 3'-3' inversion of polarity site assured by one lysine residue have been synthesized, characterized and used as third strands in alternate strand triple helix formation. UV melting studies and molecular mechanics calculations have been carried out to investigate the stability and the geometry of these new triplexes.

  16. Charge separation in subcells of triple-junction solar cells revealed by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tex, David M; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-11-30

    We measure the excitation-wavelength and power dependence of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) from the top InGaP subcell in a InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell. The wavelength-dependent data reveals that the PL decays are governed by charge separation. A fast single-exponential PL decay is observed at low excitation power densities, which is the charge separation under short-circuit condition. Under strong excitation a bi-exponential PL decay is observed. Its slow component appears at early times, followed by a faster component at late times. The slow decay is the carrier recombination of the subcell. The following fast component is the charge separation process under reduced built-in potential near the operating point. The subcells electrical conversion efficiency close to the operating point is evaluated using this decay time constant.

  17. Improved optical transmission and current matching of a triple-junction solar cell utilizing sub-wavelength structures.

    PubMed

    Chiu, M-Y; Chang, C-H; Tsai, M-A; Chang, F-Y; Yu, Peichen

    2010-09-13

    Sub-wavelength antireflective structures are fabricated on a silicon nitride passivation layer of a Ga₀.₅In₀.₅P/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell using polystyrene nanosphere lithography followed by anisotropic etching. The fabricated structures enhance optical transmission in the ultraviolet wavelength range, compared to a conventional single-layer antireflective coating (ARC). The transmission improvement contributes to an enhanced photocurrent, which is also verified by the external quantum efficiency characterization of the fabricated solar cells. Under one-sun illumination, the short-circuit current of a cell with sub-wavelength structures is enhanced by 46.1% and 3.4% due to much improved optical transmission and current matching, compared to cells without an ARC and with a conventional SiN(x) ARC, respectively. Further optimizations of the sub-wavelength structures including the periodicity and etching depth are conducted by performing comprehensive calculations based on a rigorous couple-wave analysis method.

  18. Majorana modes in a triple-terminal Josephson junction with embedded parallel-coupled double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Gao, Zhen; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in one triple-terminal junction with embedded parallel-coupled double quantum dots. It is found that the inter-superconductor supercurrent has opportunities to oscillate in period 4 π, with the adjustment of the phase differences among the superconductors. What is notable is that such a result is robust and independent of fermion parities, intradot Coulomb strength, and the dot-superconductor coupling manner. By introducing the concept of spinful many-particle Majorana modes, we present the analytical definition of the Majorana operator via superposing electron and hole operators. It can be believed that this work provide a simple but feasible proposal for the realization of Majorana modes in a nonmagnetic system.

  19. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  20. Dynamics of plume-triple junction interaction: Results from a series of three-dimensional numerical models and implications for the formation of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordevic, Mladen; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Mantle plumes rising in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges often generate anomalies in melt production and seafloor depth. This study investigates the dynamical interactions between a mantle plume and a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, using a parameter space approach and a suite of steady state, three-dimensional finite element numerical models. The top domain boundary is composed of three diverging plates, with each assigned half-spreading rates with respect to a fixed triple junction point. The bottom boundary is kept at a constant temperature of 1350°C except where a two-dimensional, Gaussian-shaped thermal anomaly simulating a plume is imposed. Models vary plume diameter, plume location, the viscosity contrast between plume and ambient mantle material, and the use of dehydration rheology in calculating viscosity. Importantly, the model results quantify how plume-related anomalies in mantle temperature pattern, seafloor depth, and crustal thickness depend on the specific set of parameters. To provide an example, one way of assessing the effect of conduit position is to calculate normalized area, defined to be the spatial dispersion of a given plume at specific depth (here selected to be 50 km) divided by the area occupied by the same plume when it is located under the triple junction. For one particular case modeled where the plume is centered in an intraplate position 100 km from the triple junction, normalized area is just 55%. Overall, these models provide a framework for better understanding plateau formation at triple junctions in the natural setting and a tool for constraining subsurface geodynamical processes and plume properties.

  1. Efficient enhancement of hydrogen production by Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Feng Chen, Chao; Liu, Chang; Xing, Zhuo; Liu, Dan; Xiao, Xiangheng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Yichao; Jiang, Changzhong; Shen, Shaohua; Fu, Yanming

    2015-03-23

    Highly efficient semiconductor photoelectrodes for solar hydrogen production through photocatalytic water splitting are a promising and challenge solution to solve the energy problems. In this work, Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO tandem triple-junction photoelectrode was designed and prepared. An increase of 11 times of photocurrent is achieved in the Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO photoelectrode comparing to that of the Cu{sub 2}O film. The high performance of the Ag/Cu{sub 2}O/ZnO film is due to the optimized design of the tandem triple-junction structure, where the localized surface Plasmon resonance of Ag and the hetero-junctions efficiently absorb solar energy, produce, and separate electron-hole pairs in the photocathode.

  2. Development of 1.25 eV InGaAsN for triple junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    LI,N.Y.; SHARPS,P.R.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Development of next generation high efficiency space monolithic multifunction solar cells will involve the development of new materials lattice matched to GaAs. One promising material is 1.05 eV InGaAsN, to be used in a four junction GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of such a device is 38--42%. Development of the 1.05 eV InGaAsN material for photovoltaic applications, however, has been difficult. Low electron mobilities and short minority carrier lifetimes have resulted in short minority carrier diffusion lengths. Increasing the nitrogen incorporation decreases the minority carrier lifetime. The authors are looking at a more modest proposal, developing 1.25 eV InGaAsN for a triple junction GaInP{sub 2}/InGaAsN/Ge device. The AMO theoretical efficiency of this device is 30--34%. Less nitrogen and indium are required to lower the bandgap to 1.25 eV and maintain the lattice matching to GaAs. Hence, development and optimization of the 1.25 eV material for photovoltaic devices should be easier than that for the 1.05 eV material.

  3. The Triple-Repeat Protein Anakonda Controls Epithelial Tricellular Junction Formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Byri, Sunitha; Misra, Tvisha; Syed, Zulfeqhar A; Bätz, Tilmann; Shah, Jimit; Boril, Lukas; Glashauser, Jade; Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Matzat, Till; Moussian, Bernard; Uv, Anne; Luschnig, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    In epithelia, specialized tricellular junctions (TCJs) mediate cell contacts at three-cell vertices. TCJs are fundamental to epithelial biology and disease, but only a few TCJ components are known, and how they assemble at tricellular vertices is not understood. Here we describe a transmembrane protein, Anakonda (Aka), which localizes to TCJs and is essential for the formation of tricellular, but not bicellular, junctions in Drosophila. Loss of Aka causes epithelial barrier defects associated with irregular TCJ structure and geometry, suggesting that Aka organizes cell corners. Aka is necessary and sufficient for accumulation of Gliotactin at TCJs, suggesting that Aka initiates TCJ assembly by recruiting other proteins to tricellular vertices. Aka's extracellular domain has an unusual tripartite repeat structure that may mediate self-assembly, directed by the geometry of tricellular vertices. Conversely, Aka's cytoplasmic tail is dispensable for TCJ localization. Thus, extracellular interactions, rather than TCJ-directed intracellular transport, appear to mediate TCJ assembly.

  4. Investigation of InGaP/(In)AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction top cells for smart stacked multijunction solar cells grown using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Mochizuki, Toru; Makita, Kikuo; Oshima, Ryuji; Matsubara, Koji; Okano, Yoshinobu; Niki, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We report high-quality InGaP/(In)AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction solar cells fabricated using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the first time. The triple-junction cells can be used as top cells for smart stacked multijunction solar cells. A growth temperature of 480 °C was found to be suitable for an (In)AlGaAs second cell to obtain high-quality tunnel junctions. The properties of AlGaAs solar cells were better than those of InAlGaAs solar cells when a second cell was grown at 480 °C. The high-quality InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell had an impressive open-circuit voltage of 3.1 V. This result indicates that high-performance InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs triple-junction solar cells can be fabricated using solid-source MBE.

  5. Development of high, stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.; Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.`s (ECD) research under this program. ECD researchers explored the deposition of a-Si at high rates using very-high-frequency plasma MHz, and compared these VHF i-layers with radio-frequency (RF) plasma-deposited i-layers. ECD conducted comprehensive research to develop a {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer using VHF deposition process with the objectives of establishing a wider process window for the deposition of high-quality p{sup +} materials and further enhancing their performance of a-Si solar cells by improving its p-layers. ECD optimized the deposition of the intrinsic a-Si layer and the boron-doped {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer to improve the V{sub oc}. Researchers deposited wide-bandgap a-Si films using high hydrogen dilution; investigated the deposition of the ZnO layer (for use in back-reflector) using a sputter deposition process involving metal Zn targets; and obtained a baseline fabrication for single-junction a-Si n-i-p devices with 10.6% initial efficiency and a baseline fabrication for triple-junction a-Si devices with 11.2% initial efficiency. ECD researchers also optimized the deposition parameters for a-SiGe with high Ge content; designed a novel structure for the p-n tunnel junction (recombination layer) in a multiple-junction solar cell; and demonstrated, in n-i-p solar cells, the improved stability of a-Si:H:F materials when deposited using a new fluorine precursor. Researchers investigated the use of c-Si(n{sup +})/a-Si alloy/Pd Schottky barrier device as a tool for the effective evaluation of photovoltaic performance on a-Si alloy materials. Through alterations in the deposition conditions and system hardware, researchers improved their understanding for the deposition of uniform and high-quality a-Si and a-SiGe films over large areas. ECD researchers also performed extensive research to optimize the deposition process of the newly constructed 5-MW back-reflector deposition machine.

  6. Development of high stable-efficiency, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Annual subcontract report, July 18, 1994--July 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) under a 3-year, cost-shared amorphous silicon (a-Si) research program to develop advanced technologies and to demonstrate stable 14%-efficient, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. The technologies developed under the program will then be incorporated into ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll deposition process to further enhance ECD`s photovoltaic manufacturing technology. In ECD`s solar cell design, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells are deposited onto stainless-steel substrates coated with Ag/ZnO back-reflector layers. This type of cell design enabled ECD to use a continuous roll- to-roll deposition process to manufacture a-Si PV materials in high volume at low cost. Using this cell design, ECD previously achieved 13.7% initial solar cell efficiency using the following features: (1) a triple-junction, two-band-gap, spectrum-splitting solar cell design; (2) a microcrystalline silicon p-layer; (3) a band-gap-profiled a- SiGe alloy as the bottom cell i-layer; (4) a high-performance AgZnO back-reflector; and (5) a high-performance tunnel junction between component cells. ECD also applied the technology into its 2-MW/yr a- Si production line and achieved the manufacturing of 4-ft{sup 2} PV modules with 8% stable efficiency. During this program, ECD is also further advancing its existing PV technology toward the goal of 14% stable solar cells by performing the following four tasks: (1) improving the stability of the intrinsic a-Si alloy materials; (2) improving the quality of low-band-gap a-SiGe alloy; (3) improving p{sup +} window layers, and (4) developing high stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells.

  7. Wide-angle seismic constraints on the evolution of the deep San Andreas plate boundary by Mendocino triple junction migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Henstock, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent wide-angle seismic observations that constrain the existence and structure of a mafic layer in the lower crust place strong constraints on the evolution of the San Andreas plate boundary system in northern and central California. Northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction and the subducted Juan de Fuca lithospheric slab creates a gap under the continent in the new strike-slip system. This gap must be filled by either asthenospheric upwelling or a northward migrating slab attached to the Pacific plate. Both processes emplace a mafic layer, either magmatic underplating or oceanic crust, beneath the California Coast Ranges. A slab of oceanic lithosphere attached to the Pacific plate is inconsistent with the seismic observation that the strike-slip faults cut through the mafic layer to the mantle, detaching the layer from the Pacific plate. The layer could only be attached to the Pacific plate if large vertical offsets and other complex structures observed beneath several strike-slip faults are original oceanic structures that are not caused by the faults. Otherwise, if oceanic slabs exist beneath California, they do not migrate north to fill the growing slab gap. The extreme heat pulse created by asthenospheric upwelling is inconsistent with several constraints from the seismic data, including a shallower depth to the slab gap than is predicted by heat flow models, seismic velocity and structure that are inconsistent with melting or metamorphism of the overlying silicic crust, and a high seismic velocity in the upper mantle. Yet either the Pacific slab model or the asthenospheric upwelling model must be correct. While the mafic material in the lower crust could have been emplaced prior to triple junction migration, the deeper slab gap must still be filled. A preexisting mafic layer does not reduce the inconsistencies of the Pacific slab model. Such material could, however, compensate for the decrease in mafic magma that would be produced if

  8. Silver nanoparticles induce tight junction disruption and astrocyte neurotoxicity in a rat blood–brain barrier primary triple coculture model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liming; Dan, Mo; Shao, Anliang; Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Cuiping; Yokel, Robert A; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Niwa, Masami; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) can enter the brain and induce neurotoxicity. However, the toxicity of Ag-NPs on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the underlying mechanism(s) of action on the BBB and the brain are not well understood. Method To investigate Ag-NP suspension (Ag-NPS)-induced toxicity, a triple coculture BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established. The BBB permeability and tight junction protein expression in response to Ag-NPS, NP-released Ag ions, and polystyrene-NP exposure were investigated. Ultrastructural changes of the microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Global gene expression of astrocytes was measured using a DNA microarray. Results A triple coculture BBB model of primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established, with the transendothelial electrical resistance values >200 Ω·cm2. After Ag-NPS exposure for 24 hours, the BBB permeability was significantly increased and expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 was decreased. Discontinuous TJs were also observed between microvascular endothelial cells. After Ag-NPS exposure, severe mitochondrial shrinkage, vacuolations, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and Ag-NPs were observed in astrocytes by TEM. Global gene expression analysis showed that three genes were upregulated and 20 genes were downregulated in astrocytes treated with Ag-NPS. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the 23 genes were associated with metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, response to stimuli, cell death, the MAPK pathway, and so on. No GO term and KEGG pathways were changed in the released-ion or polystyrene-NP groups. Ag-NPS inhibited the antioxidant defense of the astrocytes by increasing thioredoxin interacting protein, which inhibits the Trx system, and

  9. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  10. Criteria for the Design of GaInP/GaAs/Ge Triple-Junction Cells to Optimize Their Performance Outdoors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Kurtz, S.; Emery, K.; Young, M. S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper investigates which reference spectrum should be used to design GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells (at 300 K) in order to optimize their performance outdoors (at elevated temperatures). The outdoor performance is simulated using direct spectra from the recently proposed Module Energy Rating Procedure. We find that triple-junction cells designed for AM1.5D, low-AOD and AM1.5G standard spectra at 300 K all work well for maximizing daily energy production at elevated temperatures. AM1.5G cells are the best choice for midday power production, whereas AM1.5D cells are the best choice for power production during the morning and evening. Performance of cells optimized for a newly proposed Low-AOD spectrum is intermediate between these two extremes.

  11. Criteria for the Design of GaInP/GaAs/Ge Triple-Junction Cells to Optimize Their Performance Outdoors

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Kurtz, S.; Emery, K.; Young, M. S.

    2003-05-01

    This paper investigates which reference spectrum should be used to design GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells (at 300 K) in order to optimize their performance outdoors (at elevated temperatures). The outdoor performance is simulated using direct spectra from the recently proposed Module Energy Rating Procedure. We find that triple-junction cells designed for AM1.5D, low-AOD and AM1.5G standard spectra at 300 K all work well for maximizing daily energy production at elevated temperatures. AM1.5G cells are the best choice for midday power production, whereas AM1.5D cells are the best choice for power production during the morning and evening. Performance of cells optimized for a newly proposed Low-AOD spectrum is intermediate between these two extremes.

  12. Growth and Strain Evaluation of InGaP/InGaAs/Ge Triple-Junction Solar Cell Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhomoudi, Ibrahim A.

    2016-06-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been used for development of photovoltaic (PV) structures that enable enhanced efficiency for triple-junction solar cell (TJSC) devices. The in-plane strain, lattice match, surface defects, surface morphology, compositional uniformity, threading dislocations (TDs), and depth profile of each layer of the TJSC structure have been examined. The heteroepitaxial layers were found to be near lattice matched to the substrate with excellent coherence between the layers. The analysis explained that the indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) and indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) layers on germanium (Ge) substrate are a strained structure with purely tetragonal crystalline phase, which indicates that the TJSC structural layers could maintain high crystalline quality. The biaxial in-plane strain in each layer of the TJSC structure is compressive and varies in magnitude for each layer in the structure, being strongly influenced by the Ge substrate and the multiple epilayers of the PV structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show no TDs observed over a region with area of 500 nm2, with surface defect density less than 1 × 108 cm-2. No evidence of stacking faults and no visible defects of antiphase domains (APDs) at interfaces were observed, indicating adequate nucleation of epitaxial layers on the substrate and on subsequent growth layers. Furthermore, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis showed no significant Ge diffusion from the substrate into the TJSC structure.

  13. Landslides, threshold slopes, and the survival of relict terrain in the wake of the Mendocino Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Georgina; Miller, Scott; Roering, Joshua; Schmidt, David

    2016-04-01

    Establishing the coupled fluvial-hillslope response to uplift is critical for interpreting sediment fluxes, stream channel characteristics, hazard potential and topographic development. Threshold-slope models purport that landslide fluxes obtain a balance with river incision in response to rapid rock uplift, but a lack of observations and constraints in most settings prevents us from quantifying the process-linkages required for channels and hillslopes to adjust to tectonic forcing. We mapped landslides and knickpoints and extracted topographic metrics across the northern Californian Coast ranges, where the landscape is responding to a wave of rapid uplift related to the migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). We find a tightly coupled channel-landslide-hillslope response to uplift from catchment to regional scales. Locally, landslide erosion rates estimated from historical air photo analyses approach 1 mm yr-1, consistent with published cosmogenic nuclide and suspended sediment erosion rates as well as modeled isostatic uplift associated with crustal thickening proximal to the MTJ. Landslides are concentrated along channel reaches downstream of migrating knickpoints generated by base level fall at channel outlets and hillslope gradients and relief become invariant with the onset of significant landslide erosion. Following passage of the MTJ, this coupled response becomes inhibited by subsidence due to crustal thinning and landslide-derived coarse sediment delivery that suppresses catchment-wide channel incision and knickpoint migration. As a result, substantial portions of the landscape escape comprehensive adjustment to increased uplift and retain the signature of a gentle and slow-eroding relict landscape.

  14. Growth and Strain Evaluation of InGaP/InGaAs/Ge Triple-Junction Solar Cell Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhomoudi, Ibrahim A.

    2016-10-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been used for development of photovoltaic (PV) structures that enable enhanced efficiency for triple-junction solar cell (TJSC) devices. The in-plane strain, lattice match, surface defects, surface morphology, compositional uniformity, threading dislocations (TDs), and depth profile of each layer of the TJSC structure have been examined. The heteroepitaxial layers were found to be near lattice matched to the substrate with excellent coherence between the layers. The analysis explained that the indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) and indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) layers on germanium (Ge) substrate are a strained structure with purely tetragonal crystalline phase, which indicates that the TJSC structural layers could maintain high crystalline quality. The biaxial in-plane strain in each layer of the TJSC structure is compressive and varies in magnitude for each layer in the structure, being strongly influenced by the Ge substrate and the multiple epilayers of the PV structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show no TDs observed over a region with area of 500 nm2, with surface defect density less than 1 × 108 cm-2. No evidence of stacking faults and no visible defects of antiphase domains (APDs) at interfaces were observed, indicating adequate nucleation of epitaxial layers on the substrate and on subsequent growth layers. Furthermore, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis showed no significant Ge diffusion from the substrate into the TJSC structure.

  15. Terrace Formation in the Upper Headwater Region of the Mattole River Watershed Across the Mendocino Triple Junction, Northwest California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M.; Flanagan, S., II; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mattole River, in northwestern California, is located in a tectonically active and geologically complex area, the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), where the North American, Pacific and Gorda plates meet. The Mattole River does not follow the classic river "concave-up" profile. Instead, the river headwaters have wide valleys of low gradient fill, cut and strath terraces with deeply incised active channels. In fact, the river has a "convex-up" profile with a low gradient headwater leading to a higher gradient midcourse. Terrace formation in the upper headwater region of the Mattole River records times of disequilibrium of channel profile and incision as the river responds to changes that are, in large part, due to the passage of the northwardly migrating, thermally buoyant MTJ. In order to investigate the distribution and relative ages of terraces, detailed surveys of terrace surfaces and bedrock strath positions were conducted along four headwater tributaries: Thompson Creek, Baker Creek, Lost River and Ancestor Creek. Additionally, across the terraces, hand borings were excavated to bedrock to provide a three dimensional image of terrace thickness. Terrace morphology and stratigraphy provide information on terrace forming mechanisms and timing. This study includes high-resolution geomorphic data regarding the relation of Mattole headwater terraces to the MTJ, as well as provides more temporal information about the fluvial system's response to the ongoing northward migration of the MTJ.

  16. Orientation dependence of void growth at triple junction of grain boundaries in nanoscale tricrystal nickel film subjected to uniaxial tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Sun, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was performed in order to investigate the dependence of void growth on crystallographic orientation at the triple junction of grain boundaries in nanoscale tricrystal nickel film subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The nucleation, the emission and the transmission of Shockley partial dislocations play a predominant role in the growth of void at the triple junction of grain boundaries. The orientation factors of various slip systems are calculated according to Schmid law. The slip systems activated in a grain of tricrystal nickel film basically conform to Schmid law which is completely suitable for a single crystal. The activated slip systems play an important role in plastic deformation of nanoscale tricrystal nickel film subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The slip directions exhibit great difference among the activated slip systems such that the void is caused to be subjected to various stress conditions, which further leads to the difference in void growth among the tricrystal nickel films with different orientation distributions. It can be concluded that the grain orientation distribution has a significant influence on void growth at the triple junction of grain boundaries.

  17. Mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of solid surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities under the capillary and electromigration forces in anisotropic three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer

    2006-04-14

    A theory of irreversible thermodynamics of curved surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities is elaborated to give a full consideration of the effects of the specific surface Gibbs free energy anisotropy in addition to the diffusional anisotropy, on the morphological evolution of surfaces and interfaces in crystalline solids. To entangle this intricate problem, the internal entropy production associated with arbitrary virtual displacements of triple junction and ordinary points on the interfacial layers, embedded in a multicomponent, multiphase, anisotropic composite continuum system, is formulated by adapting a mesoscopic description of the orientation dependence of the chemical potentials in terms of the rotational degree of freedom of individual microelements. The rate of local internal entropy production resulted generalized forces and conjugated fluxes not only for the grain boundary triple junction transversal and longitudinal movements, but also for the ordinary points. The natural combination of the mesoscopic approach coupled with the rigorous theory of irreversible thermodynamics developed previously by the global entropy production hypothesis yields a well-posed, nonlinear, moving free-boundary value problem in two-dimensional (2D) space, as a unified theory. The results obtained for 2D space are generalized into the three-dimensional continuum by utilizing the invariant properties of the vector operators in connection with the descriptions of curved surfaces in differential geometry. This mathematical model after normalization and scaling procedures may be easily adapted for computer simulation studies without introducing any additional phenomenological system parameters (the generalized mobilities), other than the enlarged concept of the surface stiffness.

  18. Association of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake and seismicity near Summervile with a 12º bend in the East Coast fault system and triple-fault junctions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marple, R.; Miller, R.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data were integrated with other geophysical, geologic, and seismicity data to better determine the location and nature of buried faults in the Charleston, South Carolina, region. Our results indicate that the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake and seismicity near Summerville are related to local stresses caused by a 12?? bend in the East Coast fault system (ECFS) and two triple-fault junctions. One triple junction is formed by the intersection of the northwest-trending Ashley River fault with the two segments of the ECFS north and south of the bend. The other triple junction is formed by the intersection of the northeast-trending Summerville fault and a newly discovered northwest-trending Berkeley fault with the ECFS about 10 km north of the bend. The Summerville fault is a northwest-dipping border fault of the Triassic-age Jedburg basin that is undergoing reverse-style reactivation. This reverse-style reactivation is unusual because the Summerville fault parallels the regional stress field axis, suggesting that the reactivation is from stresses applied by dextral motion on the ECFS. The southwest-dip and reverse-type motion of the Berkeley fault are interpreted from seismicity data and a seismic-reflection profile in the western part of the study area. Our results also indicate that the East Coast fault system is a Paleozoic basement fault and that its reactivation since early Mesozoic time has fractured through the overlying allochthonous terranes.

  19. Upper plate responses to active spreading ridge/transform subduction: The tectonics, basin evolution, and seismicity of the Taita area, Chile Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.; Prior, D. ); Styles, P.; Murdie, R. ); Agar, S.; Turner, P. )

    1993-02-01

    Integrated field geophysical, structural and stratigraphic studies are attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and consequences of the Late Miocene-present day subduction of the Chile Ridge triple junction system. Preliminary data indicate a shallow plane of seismicity at about 15 km to 20 km depth below the Taitao peninsula. The depths correspond to the predicted depth range of subducted upper ocean crust. The calculated Bouguer anomaly map cannot be explained by the upper plate geology, suggesting that gravity is influenced by heterogeneities in the subducting oceanic plate. Seismic data imply that a subducted transform system underlying the inner Taitao Peninsula is still an active structure. A series of Middle-Late Tertiary sedimentary basins lie inboard of the triple junction. Within the Cosmelli basin, abrupt marine to continental facies transitions give clear evidence of base level changes. The amount of basinward shift of facies across sequence boundaries gets progressively greater up stratigraphy, indicating progressively greater base level changes. The lower part of the basin fill is folded and then thrusted eastward as a series of imbricates, while the overlying, greater thickness of fluvial sediments are only gently tilted westwards. We provisionally interpret this geometry to indicate that the early basin fill was deforming due to contractional tectonics while the later basin fill was being deposited. This complex basin history may reflect initiation and development of triple junction subduction.

  20. Structure of a triple helical DNA with a triplex-duplex junction.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S; Han, Z j; Liu, K; Miles, H T; Davies, D R

    1999-12-21

    Extended purine sequences on a DNA strand can lead to the formation of triplex DNA in which the third strand runs parallel to the purine strand. Triplex DNA structures have been proposed to play a role in gene expression and recombination and also have potential application as antisense inhibitors of gene expression. Triplex structures have been studied in solution by NMR, but have hitherto resisted attempts at crystallization. Here, we report a novel design of DNA sequences, which allows the first crystallographic study of DNA segment containing triplexes and its junction with a duplex. In the 1.8 A resolution structure, the sugar-phosphate backbone of the third strand is parallel to the purine-rich strand. The bases of the third strand associate with the Watson and Crick duplex via Hoogsteen-type interactions, resulting in three consecutive C(+).GC, BU.ABU (BU = 5-bromouracil), and C(+).GC triplets. The overall conformation of the DNA triplex has some similarity to the B-form, but is distinct from both A- and B-forms. There are large changes in the phosphate backbone torsion angles (particularly gamma) of the purine strand, probably due to the electrostatic interactions between the phosphate groups and the protonated cytosine. These changes narrow the minor groove width of the purine-Hoogsteen strands and may represent sequence-specific structural variations of the DNA triplex.

  1. Preparation of triple junction a-Si:H nip based solar cells at deposition rates of 10{angstrom}/s using a very high frequency technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Deng, X.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1999-07-01

    In an effort to find an alternative deposition method to the standard low deposition rate 13.56 MHz PECVD technique, the feasibility of using a 70 MHz rf plasma frequency to prepare a-Si:H based i-layer materials at high rates for nip based triple-junction solar cells has been tested. As a prelude to multi-junction cell fabrication, the deposition conditions used to make single-junction a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H cells using this Very High Frequency (VHF) method have been varied to optimize the material quality and the cell efficiencies. It was found that the efficiencies and the light stability for both a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction cells remain relatively constant as the i-layer deposition rate is varied from 1 to 10 {angstrom}/s. Also these stable efficiencies are similar to those for cells made at low deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s) using the standard 13.56 MHz PECVD technique and the same deposition equipment. Using the knowledge obtained in the fabrication of the single-junction devices, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction solar cells have been fabricated with all of the i-layers prepared using the VHF technique and deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s. Thin doped layers for these devices were prepared using the standard 13.56 MHz rf frequency and deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Pre-light soaked efficiencies of greater than 10% have been obtained for these cells prepared at the high rates. In addition, after 600 hrs. of light soaking under white light conditions, the cell efficiencies degraded by only 10--13%, values similar to the degree of degradation for high efficiency triple-junction cells made by the standard 13.56 MHz method using i-layer deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Thus, use of this VHF method in the production of large area a-Si:H based multi-junction solar modules will allow for higher i-layer deposition rates, higher module throughput and reduced module cost.

  2. Tectonics and geology of spreading ridge subduction at the Chile Triple Junction: a synthesis of results from Leg 141 of the Ocean Drilling Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrmann, J.H.; Lewis, S.D.; Cande, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    An active oceanic spreading ridge is being subducted beneath the South American continent at the Chile Triple Junction. This process has played a major part in the evolution of most of the continental margins that border the Pacific Ocean basin. A combination of high resolution swath bathymetric maps, seismic reflection profiles and drillhole and core data from five sites drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 141 provide important data that define the tectonic, structural and stratigraphic effects of this modern example of spreading ridge subduction. A change from subduction accretion to subduction erosion occurs along-strike of the South American forearc. This change is prominently expressed by normal faulting, forearc subsidence, oversteepening of topographic slopes and intensive sedimentary mass wasting, overprinted on older signatures of sediment accretion, overthrusting and uplift processes in the forearc. Data from drill sites north of the triple junction (Sites 859-861) show that after an important phase of forearc building in the early to late Pliocene, subduction accretion had ceased in the late Pliocene. Since that time sediment on the downgoing oceanic Nazca plate has been subducted. Site 863 was drilled into the forearc in the immediate vicinity of the triple junction above the subducted spreading ridge axis. Here, thick and intensely folded and faulted trench slope sediments of Pleistocene age are currently involved in the frontal deformation of the forearc. Early faults with thrust and reverse kinematics are overprinted by later normal faults. The Chile Triple Junction is also the site of apparent ophiolite emplacement into the South American forearc. Drilling at Site 862 on the Taitao Ridge revealed an offshore volcanic sequence of Plio-Pleistocene age associated with the Taitao Fracture Zone, adjacent to exposures of the Pliocene-aged Taitao ophiolite onshore. Despite the large-scale loss of material from the forearc at the triple junction

  3. The role of the Little salmon fault in accommodating deformation associated with the migration of the Mendocino triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, T. H.; Oswald, J.; Williams, T.; McPherson, R.

    2012-12-01

    The boundary between the southern terminus of the Cascadia subduction zone (Csz) and the northern termination of the San Andreas transform system presents a unique opportunity to investigate crustal deformation at a migrating triple junction. This boundary is the trench-transform-transform Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), the northwesterly migrating intersection of the Pacific, Gorda/Juan De Fuca, and the North American plates. We use recent and published geologic, geomorphic, geodetic, seismic, and other available geophysical data to characterize the on-shore areas north and south of the MTJ and propose a deformation model for the boundary where e-w subduction gives way to NW translation. North of the MTJ and at the southern end of the Csz, the fold and thrust belt associated with the subducting plate interface is manifest on-land as several zones of northeasterly convergent thrust faults. Observations indicate that faults, focal mechanisms and other stress field indicators systematically change strike as you move from north to south within the on-land portion of the fold and thrust belt. Features in the north demonstrate a more north northwesterly strike than the features in the south which tend to strike more northwesterly as they approach the latitude of the MTJ. This is particularly true for the southernmost fault of the fold and thrust belt, the Little salmon fault (Lsf) which changes strike from roughly N30W at its northern exposure to approximately East-west at its southern exposure over a distance of 27 km. Geologic and paleoseismic data suggests the LSF accommodates significantly more horizontal contraction than the other faults of the southern Csz fold and thrust belt. South of the MTJ the northern San Andreas fault system consists of three primary fault splays that accommodate about 80% of the total Pacific-North American plate boundary motion. The primary faults from west to east are the San Andreas, Maacama, and Bartlett Springs fault zones. Fault

  4. Middle Miocene paleotemperature anomalies within the Franciscan Complex of northern California: Thermo-tectonic responses near the Mendocino triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Underwood, M.B.; Shelton, K.L.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Laughland, M.M.; Solomon, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study documents three localities in the Franciscan accretionary complex of northern California, now adjacent to the San Andreas fault, that were overprinted thermally between 13.9 and 12.2 Ma: Point Delgada-Shelter Cove (King Range terrane); Bolinas Ridge (San Bruno Mountain terrane); and Mount San Bruno (San Bruno Mountain terrane). Vein assemblages of quartz, carbonate, sulfide minerals, and adularia were precipitated locally in highly fractured wall rock. Vitrinite reflectance (Rm) values and illite crystallinity decrease away from the zones of metalliferous veins, where peak wall-rock temperatures, as determined from Rm, were as high as 315??C. The ??18O values of quartz and calcite indicate that two separate types of fluid contributed to vein precipitation. Higher ??18O fluids produced widespread quartz and calcite veins that are typical of the regional paleothermal regime. The widespread veins are by-products of heat conduction and diffuse fluid flow during zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite-grade metamorphism, and we interpret their paleofluids to have evolved through dehydration reactions and/or extensive isotopic exchange with accreted Franciscan rocks. Lower ??18O fluids, in contrast, evolved from relatively high temperature exchange between seawater (or meteoric water) and basaltic and/or sedimentary host rocks; focused flow of those fluids resulted in local deposition of the metalliferous veins. Heat sources for the three paleothermal anomalies remain uncertain and may have been unrelated to one another. Higher temperature metalliferous fluids in the King Range terrane could have advected either from a site of ridge-trench interaction north of the Mendocino fracture zone or from a "slabless window" in the wake of the northward migrating Mendocino triple junction. A separate paradox involves the amount of Quaternary offset of Franciscan basement rocks near Shelter Cove by on-land faults that some regard as the main active trace of the San Andreas

  5. Tectonics and mechanism of a spreading ridge subduction at the Chile Triple Junction based on new marine geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Doi, A.; Kise, S.; Abe, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), an RTT-type triple junction located at 46°30'S off Taitao Peninsula, the western coast of Chile, is to be remarked in that the Chile Ridge, one of the typical mid-oceanic ridges that generate oceanic plates, is subducting underneath the South American continental plate. It is well known that earthquakes occur frequently off the Chilean coast. But earthquakes never occur on and around the CTJ and the fracture zones nearby (Tilmann et al., 2008). A thick crust is usually developed below an ordinary oceanic ridge. In this case the ridge never subducts due to the thick crust supported by the buoyancy of the mantle materials, even though the ridge reaches a trench. Or the subduction of the ridge may be delayed as compared with the case of the neighbouring sea floor. The purpose of this study is to solve the problem of the mechanism of a smooth subduction of the spreading ridge at the trench and the regional tectonics around the CTJ, mainly based on the marine geophysical data collected by the recent MR08-06 cruise by R/V MIRAI (Abe et al., AGU Fall 2009) and other cruise data from National Geophysical Data Center. Isostatic equilibrium in addition to the profiles of topography and gravity across the trench were examined on both sides of the CTJ. One of the principal results of this study is that ridge axis is associated with an axial deep covered with thick sediment unlike the case of typical ridge crests. The profiles of both topography and free air anomaly at Segment-I on Chile Ridge (just before subduction at Chile Trench) show quite different patterns from those at ordinary subduction zones. In addition, the topography of the seaward side is flat with poor relief and the abrupt landside slope is attached to the trench axis. To the south of the CTJ, the area of relatively negative free air anomaly reaches from the seaward side toward the fore-arc. This is due to the weight of the thick sediment accumulation apparently supplied from

  6. High Efficiency Triple-Junction Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Technology, Final Technical Report, 6 March 1998 - 15 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.

    2001-11-08

    This report describes the research program intended to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for developing high-performance, two-terminal multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells, and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. United Solar uses a spectrum-splitting, triple-junction cell structure. The top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy of {approx}1.8-eV bandgap to absorb blue photons. The middle cell uses an amorphous silicon germanium alloy ({approx}20% germanium) of {approx}1.6-eV bandgap to capture green photons. The bottom cell has {approx}40% germanium to reduce the bandgap to {approx}1.4-eV to capture red photons. The cells are deposited on a stainless-steel substrate with a predeposited silver/zinc oxide back reflector to facilitate light-trapping. A thin layer of antireflection coating is applied to the top of the cell to reduce reflection loss. The major research activities conducted under this program were: (1) Fundamental studies to improve our understanding of materials and devices; the work included developing and analyzing a-Si alloy and a-SiGe alloy materials prepared near the threshold of amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition and studying solar cells fabricated using these materials. (2) Deposition of small-area cells using a radio-frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (3) Deposition of small-area cells using a modified very high frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (4) Large-area cell research to obtain the highest module efficiency. (5) Optimization of solar cells and modules fabricated using production parameters in a large-area reactor.

  7. Seismic structure of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and accretionary prism north of the Mendocino triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulick, S.P.S.; Meltzer, A.M.; Clarke, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Four multichannel-seismic reflection profiles, collected as part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, image the toe of the southern Cascadia accretionary prism. Today, 250-600 m of sediment is subducting with the Gorda plate, and 1500-3200 m is accreting to the northern California margin. Faults imaged west and east of the deformation front show mixed structural vergence. A north-south trending, 20 km long portion of the central margin is landward vergent for the outer 6-8 km of the toe of the prism. This region of landward vergence exhibits no frontal thrust, is unusually steep and narrow, and is likely caused by a seaward-dipping backstop close to the deformation front. The lack of margin-wide preferred seaward vergence and wedge-taper analysis suggests the prism has low basal shear stress. The three southern lines image wedge-shaped fragments of oceanic crust 1.1-7.3 km in width and 250-700 m thick near the deformation front. These wedges suggest shortening and thickening of the upper oceanic crust. Discontinuities in the seafloor west of the prism provide evidence for mass wasting in the form of slump blocks and debris fans. The southernmost profile extends 75 km west of the prism imaging numerous faults that offset both the Gorda basin oceanic crust and overlying sediments. These high-angle faults, bounding basement highs, are interpreted as strike-slip faults reactivating structures originally formed at the spreading ridge. Northeast or northwest trending strike-slip faults within the basin are consistent with published focal mechanism solutions and are likely caused by north-south Gorda-Pacific plate convergence. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Middle Miocene swift migration of the TTT triple junction and rapid crustal growth in southwest Japan: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Gaku; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Yujin; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Koge, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    We review recent progress in geological and geophysical investigation in SW Japan, Nankai Trough, and Philippine Sea Plate (PSP), and propose a hypothesis for the Miocene tectonics in SW Japan driven by middle Miocene swift migration of the TTT (trench-trench-trench) triple junction. The new hypothesis is based on the new interpretations as follows. Near-trench magmatism in the outer zone of SW Japan is ascribed to a collision of proto-Izu arc in addition to the previous model of an oceanic ridge of the Shikoku Basin and hot PSP subduction. The indentation structures at Capes Ashizuri, Muroto in Shikoku, and Shiono on the Kii Peninsula were previously explained by "kink folding" due to recent E-W compression. We alternatively suppose the collision of the active arc or topographic peaks such as seamounts inferred from geological and experimental observations. The main crustal component in SW Japan is suggested to be of igneous plutonic rocks rather than the previous interpretation of Cretaceous to Tertiary accretionary complexes. This is typically illustrated in the outer zone to the north of Capes Ashizuri, Muroto, and Shiono from geophysical observation of gravity anomalies, velocity and resistivity, together with geological estimations of caldera age and the size of its root pluton. Episodic crustal growth due to intrusion of igneous rock and subduction of the PSP may have stopped after approximately 12 Ma and restarted at approximately 6 Ma. Our emphasis for this gap is a cessation and resurgence of subduction rather than the previous interpretation, i.e., decreasing of subduction rate.

  9. Arc lavas on both sides of a trench: Slab window effects at the Solomon Islands triple junction, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, John; Perfit, Michael; McInnes, Brent; Kamenov, George; Plank, Terry; Jonasson, Ian; Chadwick, Claire

    2009-03-01

    The Woodlark Spreading Center (WSC) is subducted at the San Cristobal trench, forming a triple junction at the New Georgia Group (NGG) arc in the Solomon Islands. WSC lavas are N-MORB at > 100 km from the trench, but with decreasing distance they have increasingly arc-like Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios, enrichments in Rb > K > Pb > Sr, and depletions in HFSE and Y. Within 50 km of the trench on the Simbo and Ghizo Ridges, many recovered samples are island arc tholeiites to medium-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites, and many have the same or similar major and trace element and isotopic characteristics as true arc lavas in the NGG on the other side of the trench. Previous investigations have concluded that these WSC lavas are the result of relic back arc mantle enrichments resulting from subduction of the Pacific plate prior to the late Miocene at the North Solomon trench, > 200 km to the north. However, the high-silica WSC lavas are more arc-like than those recovered from other distal back arcs, and are more voluminous, forming large submarine ridges and stratovolcanoes. We suggest that true arc mantle migrates across the plate boundary from the adjacent NGG arc through slab windows created by the subduction of the WSC. This leads to variable mixing between NGG arc and WSC N-MORB end-members, forming the transitional lavas recovered from the WSC. Lavas with similar arc-like characteristics have previously been recovered on the Chile Rise near where it is subducted at the Chile Trench, raising the possibility that such mantle transfer is a common phenomenon where active spreading centers are subducted. The presence of slab windows may also be responsible for the unusual forearc volcanism in the NGG, and melting of slab window margins may account for the presence of high-silica adakite-like lavas on the WSC.

  10. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  11. Analysis of Holocene Marine Terraces, Cape Mendocino to Mattole River, Northern California: Interpretations and Implications to Mendocino Triple Junction Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B.; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.; Vermeer, J.; Michalak, M.

    2015-12-01

    The southern terminus of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) of the Pacific Northwest terminates at the Mendocino Triple Junction, a region of elevated seismicity. Here, episodic, tectonically driven uplift is likely responsible for the formation of a suite of Holocene-aged marine terraces. In 1992, a M 7.1 thrust mainshock and two ~M 6.5 aftershocks occurred ~ 4 km offshore of Cape Mendocino resulting in ~1.4 m of uplift, measured from intertidal species stranded upon uplifted wave-cut platforms (Carver et al., 1994; Merritts, 1996). Using high resolution LiDAR data (NOAA, 2012), we constructed a detailed map of the uplifted 1992 wavecut platform and 9 adjacent higher terrace surfaces between Cape Mendocino and the mouth of the Mattole River. The risers associated with these surfaces are between 1 and 3 m high, similar to that of the 1992 event. This work offers insight into the upper plate crustal response to seismic events and inter-seismic periods in the tectonically complex southern end of the CSZ. By relating the elevations of the shoreline angles of these terraces to an established sea level curve (Gibbs, 1986) and a single absolute age on one terrace (Merritts, 1996) we estimate their ages of formation as all less than 6 ka. Eustatic sea level in the last 6 ka has been fairly stable indicating that these terraces formed during co-seismic uplift events. Marine terrace formation requires relative sea level stability thus there is no indication of vertical interseismic deformation along this portion of the subduction zone. This late Holocene behavior differs from other portions of the CSZ to the north where interseismic recovery has been documented. The presence of multiple, relatively small terrace risers in the last 6 ka suggests this portion of the subduction zone may rupture in smaller events on the megathrust or subsidiary faults.

  12. Triple and Quadruple Junctions Thermophotovoltaic Devices Lattice Matched to InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhusal, L.; Freundlich, A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion of IR radiation emanating from a radioisotope heat source is under consideration for deep space exploration. Ideally, for radiator temperatures of interest, the TPV cell must convert efficiently photons in the 0.4-0.7 eV spectral range. Best experimental data for single junction cells are obtained for lattice-mismatched 0.55 eV InGaAs based devices. It was suggested, that a tandem InGaAs based TPV cell made by monolithically combining two or more lattice mismatched InGaAs subcells on InP would result in a sizeable efficiency improvement. However, from a practical standpoint the implementation of more than two subcells with lattice mismatch systems will require extremely thick graded layers (defect filtering systems) to accommodate the lattice mismatch between the sub-cells and could detrimentally affect the recycling of the unused IR energy to the emitter. A buffer structure, consisting of various InPAs layers, is incorporated to accommodate the lattice mismatch between the high and low bandgap subcells. There are evidences that the presence of the buffer structure may generate defects, which could extend down to the underlying InGaAs layer. The unusual large band gap lowering observed in GaAs(1-x)N(x) with low nitrogen fraction [1] has sparked a new interest in the development of dilute nitrogen containing III-V semiconductors for long-wavelength optoelectronic devices (e.g. IR lasers, detector, solar cells) [2-7]. Lattice matched Ga1-yInyNxAs1-x on InP has recently been investigated for the potential use in the mid-infrared device applications [8], and it could be a strong candidate for the applications in TPV devices. This novel quaternary alloy allows the tuning of the band gap from 1.42 eV to below 1 eV on GaAs and band gap as low as 0.6eV when strained to InP, but it has its own limitations. To achieve such a low band gap using the quaternary Ga1-yInyNxAs1-x, either it needs to be strained on InP, which creates further

  13. Seismically imaging the Afar plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Ogubazghi, G.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plume related flood basalt volcanism in Ethiopia has long been cited to have instigated continental breakup in northeast Africa. However, to date seismic images of the mantle beneath the region have not produced conclusive evidence of a plume-like structure. As a result the nature and even existence of a plume in the region and its role in rift initiation and continental rupture are debated. Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie northeast Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 6 other regional experiments and global network stations across Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S- wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that the top 100km is dominated by focussed low velocity zones, likely associated with melt in the lithosphere/uppermost asthenosphere. Below these depths a broad SW-NE oriented sheet like upwelling extends down to the top of the transition zone. Within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. The nature of the transition zone anomalies suggests that small upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. Our images of secondary upwellings

  14. Evolution of the Gorda Escarpment, San Andreas fault and Mendocino triple junction from multichannel seismic data collected across the northern Vizcaino block, offshore northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godfrey, N.J.; Meltzer, A.S.; Klemperer, S.L.; Trehu, A.M.; Leitner, B.; Clarke, S.H.; Ondrus, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Gorda Escarpment is a north facing scarp immediately south of the Mendocino transform fault (the Gorda/Juan de Fuca-Pacific plate boundary) between 126??W and the Mendocino triple junction. It elevates the seafloor at the northern edge of the Vizcaino block, part of the Pacific plate, ??? 1.5 km above the seafloor of the Gorda/Juan de Fuca plate to the north. Stratigraphy interpreted from multichannel seismic data across and close to the Gorda Escarpment suggests that the escarpment is a relatively recent pop-up feature caused by north-south compression across the plate boundary. Close to 126??W. the Vizcaino block acoustic basement shallows and is overlain by sediments that thin north toward the Gorda Escarpment. These sediments are tilted south and truncated at the seafloor. By contrast, in a localized region at the eastern end of the Gorda Escarpment, close to the Mendocino triple junction, the top of acoustic basement dips north and is overlain by a 2-km-thick wedge of pre-11 Ma sedimentary rocks that thickens north, toward the Gorda Escarpment. This wedge of sediments is restricted to the northeast corner of the Vizcaino block. Unless the wedge of sediments was a preexisting feature on the Vizcaino block before it was transferred from the North American to the Pacific plate, the strong spatial correlation between the sedimentary wedge and the triple junction suggests the entire Vizcaino block, with the San Andreas at its eastern boundary, has been part of the Pacific plate since significantly before 11 Ma.

  15. Arabia-Somalia plate kinematics, evolution of the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg triple junction, and opening of the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Marc; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Petit, Carole; Huchon, Philippe; Al-Kathiri, Ali; Audin, Laurence; Beslier, Marie-Odile; D'Acremont, Elia; Fabbri, Olivier; Fleury, Jean-Marc; Khanbari, Khaled; Lepvrier, Claude; Leroy, Sylvie; Maillot, Bertrand; Merkouriev, Serge

    2010-04-01

    New geophysical data collected at the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg (AOC) triple junction between the Arabia, India, and Somalia plates are combined with all available magnetic data across the Gulf of Aden to determine the detailed Arabia-Somalia plate kinematics over the past 20 Myr. We reconstruct the history of opening of the Gulf of Aden, including the penetration of the Sheba Ridge into the African continent and the evolution of the triple junction since its formation. Magnetic data evidence three stages of ridge propagation from east to west. Seafloor spreading initiated ˜20 Myr ago along a 200 km-long ridge portion located immediately west of the Owen fracture zone. A second 500 km-long ridge portion developed westward up to the Alula-Fartak transform fault before Chron 5D (17.5 Ma). Before Chron 5C (16.0 Ma), a third 700 km-long ridge portion was emplaced between the Alula-Fartak transform fault and the western end of the Gulf of Aden (45°E). Between 20 and 16 Ma, the Sheba Ridge propagated over a distance of 1400 km at an extremely fast average rate of 35 cm yr-1. The ridge propagation resulted from the Arabia-Somalia rigid plate rotation about a stationary pole. Since Chron 5C (16.0 Ma), the spreading rate of the Sheba Ridge decreased first rapidly until 10 Ma and then more slowly. The evolution of the AOC triple junction is marked by a change of configuration around 10 Ma, with the formation of a new Arabia-India plate boundary. Part of the Arabian plate was then transferred to the Indian plate.

  16. Vertical triple-junction RGB optical sensor with signal processing based on the determination of the space-charge region borders.

    PubMed

    Tadić, Nikša; Schidl, Stefan; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-09-01

    A triple-junction RGB optical sensor with vertically stacked photodiodes and signal processing that provides precise values of the currents generated by blue, green, and red light is presented. The signal processing is based on the determination of the border depths of the space-charge regions of all three photodiodes. A current-mode implementation using current conveyors and variable-gain current amplifiers is introduced. The responsivities of all three photodiodes calculated using the proposed approach are in very good agreement with the measured results.

  17. Latest Paleozoic early Mesozoic structures in the central Oaxaca Terrane of southern Mexico: deformation near a triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno-Garcia, E.; Keppie, J. Duncan

    1999-01-01

    gravity sliding following amalgamation of Pangea, extensional rifting of the Yucatán Peninsula from southern Laurentia or intra-arc rifting associated with a Permo-Triassic arc within southern Mexico. The major N-S fold structures and E-vergent thrusting of the Oaxacan Complex over the Juárez Terrane may represent a response to (1) convergent subduction of the Kula and/or Farallon plates beneath western Mexico, (2) migration of a Gulf of Mexico-Yucatan-South America triple junction.

  18. Effects of ridge geometry on mantle dynamics in an oceanic triple junction region: Implications for the Azores Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.; Sankar, Ravi D.

    2010-09-01

    Plate boundary geometry can affect the nature of magmatism along a mid-ocean ridge. The Azores Plateau is located in a complex geological setting that includes a triple junction (TJ), an oblique and recently-formed ultra-slow-spreading ridge, a zone of diffuse seafloor deformation, a major fracture zone, and a postulated hotspot. The precise character of the hotspot is somewhat debated, as some lines of evidence indicate it may not be a classic deep-seated plume. However, seismic and gravity data suggest plateau crustal thicknesses of ˜ 8 km or more, implying some mechanism for excess melting. To assess the role of ridge geometry in creating the Azores Plateau, this study uses a finite element numerical model to isolate the effects of selected aspects of plate boundary configuration on mantle flow and melt production in a TJ kinematically similar to the Azores TJ. The model focuses on the slowest-spreading ridge in the TJ, analogous to the Terceira Rift. The effect of the varying ridge obliquity observed along the Terceira Rift is also assessed using an independent 1-D melting model. In general, relatively little melt production is predicted along the Terceira Rift analogue, except for regions closest to the TJ where the proximity of a faster-spreading ridge increases temperatures within the melting zone. In the 1-D melting model with mantle temperatures of 1350 °C, melt thicknesses of ˜ 2 km are calculated for the least oblique segments, while more oblique segments produce little to no melt. The presence of a long discontinuity (simulating the Gloria FZ) has little effect on mantle dynamics for axial distances < 350 km from the TJ, although crustal production is predicted to diminish to zero within ˜ 150 km of the discontinuity. When several ridge geometrical effects are combined (i.e., a TJ, time-limited spreading, a ridge discontinuity, and depressed spreading rates within ˜ 100 km of the TJ point), ˜ 2.5 km of variability in melt thickness can be produced

  19. Measuring earthquake source parameters in the Mendocino triple junction region using a dense OBS array: Implications for fault strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Subduction zones produce earthquakes on a set of faults that operate under a wide variety of conditions resulting from considerable variations in depth, temperature, rock type, and fluid pressure. These variations likely lead to variation in the stress levels that drives particular earthquakes and that in turn effects the magnitude of seismic shaking they produce. In the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region, intraplate faults within the mantle of the subducting plate fail regularly in energetic earthquakes while the adjacent thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone remains seismically quiet despite the likelihood that it operates at much lower levels of stress and strength. In 2012, as part of the Cascadia Initiative community experiment, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array was deployed in the MTJ area, providing unusually dense data covering both the inter- and intra-plate earthquakes. Combining these data with onshore networks, we detect and relocate 1137 earthquakes with a three dimensional velocity model. We perform detailed spectral and time domain analysis to study variations in earthquake source properties between the different types of faults. We observe a wide variability of stress drops and systematic lateral and depth variations in the earthquake source spectra resulting from the different types of tectonic fault systems in this region: intraplate faults within the subducted oceanic mantle, the Mendocino transform plate boundary fault, and the thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone. Some of the depth variability of source spectra can be explained by the expected increase in rupture velocity with depth. However, the overall variation in stress drop estimates is consistent with the highest stress drop earthquakes occurring in the depth range predicted by strength envelopes. Moreover, the earthquakes in the vicinity of the thrust interface, likely including some within the subducted oceanic crust, show clearly lower stress drops and

  20. A kinematic model for the development of the Afar Depression and its paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T. F.; Wheeler, W. H.; Often, M.

    2003-11-01

    The Afar Depression is a highly extended region of continental to transitional oceanic crust lying at the junction of the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and the Ethiopian rifts. We analyze the evolution of the Afar crust using plate kinematics and published crustal models to constrain the temporal and volumetric evolution of the rift basin. Our reconstruction constrains the regional-scale initial 3D geometry and subsequent extension and is well calibrated at the onset of rifting (˜20 Ma) and from the time of earliest documented sea-floor spreading anomalies (˜6 Ma Red Sea; ˜10 Ma Gulf of Aden). It also suggests the Danakil block is a highly extended body, having undergone between ˜200% and ˜400% stretch. Syn-rift sedimentary and magmatic additions to the crust are taken from the literature. Our analysis reveals a discrepancy: either the base of the crust has not been properly imaged, or a (plume-related?) process has somehow caused bulk removal of crustal material since extension began. Inferring subsidence history from thermal modeling and flexural considerations, we conclude subsidence in Afar was virtually complete by Mid Pliocene time. Our analysis contradicts interpretations of late (post 3 Ma) large (˜2 km) subsidence of the Hadar area near the Ethiopian Plateau, suggesting paleoclimatic data record regional, not local, climate change. Tectonic reconstruction (supported by paleontologic and isotopic data) suggests that a land bridge connected Africa and Arabia, via Danakil, up to the Early to Middle Pliocene. The temporal constraints on land bridge and escarpment morphology constrain Afar paleogeography, climate, and faunal migration routes. These constraints (particularly the development of geographic isolation) are fundamentally important for models evaluating and interpreting biologic evolution in the Afar, including speciation and human origins.

  1. Compound biomimetic structures for efficiency enhancement of Ga(0.5)In(0.5)P/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Mu-Min; Han, Hau-Vei; Hong, Chung-Yu; Hong, Kuo-Hsuan; Yang, Tung-Ting; Yu, Peichen; Wu, Yu-Rue; Yeh, Hong-Yih; Huang, Hong-Cheng

    2014-03-10

    Biomimetic nanostructures have shown to enhance the optical absorption of Ga(0.5)In(0.5)P/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells due to excellent antireflective (AR) properties that, however, are highly dependent on their geometric dimensions. In practice, it is challenging to control fabrication conditions which produce nanostructures in ideal periodic arrangements and with tapered side-wall profiles, leading to sacrificed AR properties and solar cell performance. In this work, we introduce compound biomimetic nanostructures created by depositing a layer of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) on top of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanostructures for triple junction solar cells. The device exhibits photogenerated current and power conversion efficiency that are enhanced by ~8.9% and ~6.4%, respectively, after deposition due to their improved antireflection characteristics. We further investigate and verify the optical properties of compound structures via a rigorous coupled wave analysis model. The additional SiO(2) layer not only improves the geometric profile, but also serves as a double-layer dielectric coating. It is concluded that the compound biomimetic nanostructures exhibit superior AR properties that are relatively insensitive to fabrication constraints. Therefore, the compound approach can be widely adopted for versatile optoelectronic devices and applications.

  2. Compound biomimetic structures for efficiency enhancement of Ga₀.₅In₀.₅P/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Mu-Min; Han, Hau-Vei; Hong, Chung-Yu; Hong, Kuo-Hsuan; Yang, Tung-Ting; Yu, Peichen; Wu, Yu-Rue; Yeh, Hong-Yih; Huang, Hong-Cheng

    2014-03-10

    Biomimetic nanostructures have shown to enhance the optical absorption of Ga₀.₅In₀.₅P/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells due to excellent antireflective (AR) properties that, however, are highly dependent on their geometric dimensions. In practice, it is challenging to control fabrication conditions which produce nanostructures in ideal periodic arrangements and with tapered side-wall profiles, leading to sacrificed AR properties and solar cell performance. In this work, we introduce compound biomimetic nanostructures created by depositing a layer of silicon dioxide (SiO₂) on top of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanostructures for triple junction solar cells. The device exhibits photogenerated current and power conversion efficiency that are enhanced by ~8.9% and ~6.4%, respectively, after deposition due to their improved antireflection characteristics. We further investigate and verify the optical properties of compound structures via a rigorous coupled wave analysis model. The additional SiO₂ layer not only improves the geometric profile, but also serves as a double-layer dielectric coating. It is concluded that the compound biomimetic nanostructures exhibit superior AR properties that are relatively insensitive to fabrication constraints. Therefore, the compound approach can be widely adopted for versatile optoelectronic devices and applications.

  3. Channel response to tectonic forcing: field analysis of stream morphology and hydrology in the Mendocino triple junction region, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Noah P.; Whipple, Kelin X.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Merritts, Dorothy J.

    2003-07-01

    An empirical calibration of the shear stress model for bedrock incision is presented, using field and hydrologic data from a series of small, coastal drainage basins near the Mendocino triple junction in northern California. Previous work comparing basins from the high uplift zone (HUZ, uplift rates around 4 mm/year) to ones in the low uplift zone (LUZ, ˜0.5 mm/year) indicates that the HUZ channels are about twice as steep for a given drainage area. This observation suggests that incision processes are more effective in the HUZ. It motivates a detailed field study of channel morphology in the differing tectonic settings to test whether various factors that are hypothesized to influence incision rates (discharge, channel width, lithology, sediment load) change in response to uplift or otherwise differ between the HUZ and LUZ. Analysis of regional stream gaging data for mean annual discharge and individual floods yields a linear relationship between discharge and drainage area. Increased orographic precipitation in the HUZ accounts for about a twofold increase in discharge in this area, corresponding to an assumed increase in the erosional efficiency of the streams. Field measurements of channel width indicate a power-law relationship between width and drainage area with an exponent of ˜0.4 and no significant change in width between the uplift rate zones, although interpretation is hampered by a difference in land use between the zones. The HUZ channel width dataset reveals a scaling break interpreted to be the transition between colluvial- and fluvial-dominated incision processes. Assessments of lithologic resistance using a Schmidt hammer and joint surveys show that the rocks of the study area should be fairly similar in their susceptibility to erosion. The HUZ channels generally have more exposed bedrock than those in the LUZ, which is consistent with protection by sediment cover inhibiting incision in the LUZ. However, this difference is likely the result of a

  4. Results of some initial space qualification testing on triple junction a-Si and CuInSe2 thin film solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.; Anspaugh, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    A series of environmental tests were completed on one type of triple junction a-Si and two types of CuInSe2 thin film solar cells. The environmental tests include electron irradiation at energies of 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 MeV, proton irradiation at energies of 0.115, 0.24, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 MeV, post-irradiation annealing at temperatures between 20 C and 60 C, long term exposure to air mass zero (AM0) photons, measurement of the cells as a function of temperature and illumination intensity, and contact pull strength tests. As expected, the cells are very resistant to electron and proton irradiation. However, when a selected cell type is exposed to low energy protons designed to penetrate to the junction region, there is evidence of more significant damage. A significant amount of recovery was observed after annealing in several of the cells. However, it is not permanent and durable, but merely a temporary restoration, later nullified with additional irradiation. Contact pull strengths measured on the triple junction a-Si cells averaged 667 grams, and pull strengths measured on the Boeing CuInSe2 cells averaged 880 grams. Significant degradation of all cell types was observed after exposure to a 580 hour photon degradation test, regardless of whether the cells had been unirradiated or irradiated (electrons or protons). Although one cell from one manufacturer lost approximately 60 percent of its power after the photon test, several other cells from this manufacturer did not degrade at all.

  5. Heterogeneity of neuromuscular junctions in striated muscle of human esophagus demonstrated by triple staining for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, alpha-bungarotoxin, and acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Kallmünzer, Bernd; Sörensen, Björn; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2006-05-01

    During studies on enteric co-innervation in the human esophagus, we found that not all acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-positive motor endplates stained for alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), respectively. Therefore, we probed for differences in neuromuscular junctions in human esophagus by using triple staining for VAChT, alpha-BT, and AChE followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis. To exclude that the results were caused by processing artifacts, we additionally examined the influence of a number of factors including post-mortem changes and the type and duration of fixation on the staining results. Four types of neuromuscular junction could be distinguished in human esophagus: type I with VAChT-positive and type II with VAChT-negative nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-positive and AChE-positive endplate area, type III with VAChT-positive nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-negative but AChE-positive endplate area, and type IV with VAChT-negative nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-negative but AChE-positive endplate area. On average, 32% of evaluated AChE-positive motor endplates were type I, 6% type II, 24% type III, and 38% type IV. Based on these results, we suggest that, in human esophagus, (1) the most reliable method for staining motor endplates is presently AChE histochemistry, (2) alpha-BT-sensitive and alpha-BT-resistant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors exist in neuromuscular junctions, and (3) different types of VAChT or transport mechanisms for acetylcholine probably exist in neuromuscular junctions.

  6. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual technical progress report, 17 March 1992--18 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O`Dowd, J.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes Solarex`s work to advance its photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex will meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transport front contact; optimizing the laser patterning process; scaling up the semiconductor deposition process; improving the back-contact deposition; and scaling up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 1 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on scaling up components of the chemical vapor deposition system for deposition of the system contact, scaling up laser scribing techniques; triple-junction recipes for module production; and metal-oxide back contacts. The goal of these efforts is to adopt all portions of the manufacturing line to handle substrates larger than 0.37 m{sup 2}.

  7. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual subcontract report, 17 March 1994--18 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Morris, J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-year subcontract to advance Solarex`s photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing technologies, reduce its hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. During the period covered by this report, Solarex focused on (1) improving deposition of the front contact, (2) investigating alternate feed stocks for the front contact, (3) maximizing throughput and area utilization for all laser scribes, (4) optimizing a-Si:H deposition equipment to achieve uniform deposition over large areas, (5) optimizing the triple-junction module fabrication process, (6) evaluating the materials to deposit the rear contact, and (7) optimizing the combination of isolation scribe and encapsulant to pass the wet high-potential test.

  8. Investigation of the radiation resistance of triple-junction a-Si:H alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 1.00 MeV proton irradiation on hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells is reported for the first time. The cells were designed for radiation resistance studies and included 0.35 cm(sup 2) active areas on 1.0 by 2.0 cm(sup 2) glass superstrates. Three cells were irradiated through the bottom contact at each of six fluences between 5.10E12 and 1.46E15 cm(sup -2). The effect of the irradiations was determined with light current-voltage measurements. Proton irradiation degraded the cell power densities from 8.0 to 98 percent for the fluences investigated. Annealing irradiated cells at 200 C for two hours restored the power densities to better than 90 percent. The cells exhibited radiation resistances which are superior to cells reported in the literature for fluences less than 1E14 cm(sup -2).

  9. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure ( P- T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  10. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-05-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure (P-T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  11. Broadband antireflection sub-wavelength structure of InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple junction solar cell with composition-graded SiNx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chen-Chen; Lo, Hsiao-Chieh; Lin, Yen-Ku; Yu, Hung-Wei; Tinh Tran, Binh; Lin, Kung-Liang; Chen, Yung Chang; Quan, Nguyen-Hong; Chang, Edward Yi; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh

    2015-05-01

    This work reports a fabrication strategy to improve the antireflective ability of a InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell, by combining a nano-templating technique and a chemical-synthesis approach. SiH4 and N2 were used as ammonia-free reaction gases in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to prepare Si3N4 as an original antireflective coating (ARC) layer with better chemical stability. Composition-graded SiNx was successfully integrated with sub-wavelength structure by modulating SiH4/N2 ratio during PECVD deposition, and followed by a controllable gold-nanoparticle masking technique on top of the solar cell. Finite-difference time-domain solution was employed to simulate and optimize the aspect-ratio of the ARC, under the condition of variable refractive index over a broad wavelength window, and followed by the masking technique to obtain the desired ARC dimension. This enabled a low light reflectance (<10%) over a broad spectral bandwidth (300-1800 nm) for the solar cell with excellent stability, because of the triple advantages of structural optimization, better chemical stability and graded refractive index of the ARC. The solar cell’s performance was tested and showed great competitiveness to those of forefront studies, suggesting the feasibility of the proposed technology.

  12. Root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in CPC-LIKE MYB double and triple mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takuji; Hayashi, Naoto; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, R3-type MYB genes, CAPRICE (CPC) and its family of genes including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ETC2 and CPC-LIKE MYB3 cooperatively regulate epidermal cell differentiation. Root hair formation is greatly reduced by a mutation in CPC, and try and etc1 enhance this phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate that CPC, TRY and ETC1 are also involved in root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction. The cpc try and cpc etc1 double mutants showed a reduced number of root hairs in that area. Additionally, the expression of ETC1::GUS was higher near this area. These results suggest that CPC family of genes also cooperatively regulates root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in unique ways.

  13. Root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in CPC-LIKE MYB double and triple mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Takuji; Hayashi, Naoto; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, R3-type MYB genes, CAPRICE (CPC) and its family of genes including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ETC2 and CPC-LIKE MYB3 cooperatively regulate epidermal cell differentiation. Root hair formation is greatly reduced by a mutation in CPC, and try and etc1 enhance this phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate that CPC, TRY and ETC1 are also involved in root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction. The cpc try and cpc etc1 double mutants showed a reduced number of root hairs in that area. Additionally, the expression of ETC1::GUS was higher near this area. These results suggest that CPC family of genes also cooperatively regulates root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in unique ways. PMID:26339713

  14. Exposed guyot from the afar rift, ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, E; Tazieff, H

    1970-05-29

    A series of originally submarine volcanoes has been found in the Afar Depression. Some of the volcanic structures are morphologically similar to oceanic guyots. One of them consists of strata of finely fragmented and pulverized basaltic glass. The fragmentation of the lava is probably the result of stream explosions taking place during the submarine eruption. The flat top of this guyot is considered to be a constructional feature; by analogy, it is suggested that not all oceanic guyots are necessarily the result of wave truncation of former volcanic islands.

  15. Exposed guyot from the afar rift, ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, E; Tazieff, H

    1970-05-29

    A series of originally submarine volcanoes has been found in the Afar Depression. Some of the volcanic structures are morphologically similar to oceanic guyots. One of them consists of strata of finely fragmented and pulverized basaltic glass. The fragmentation of the lava is probably the result of stream explosions taking place during the submarine eruption. The flat top of this guyot is considered to be a constructional feature; by analogy, it is suggested that not all oceanic guyots are necessarily the result of wave truncation of former volcanic islands. PMID:17833451

  16. Electrochemically synthesized broadband antireflective and hydrophobic GaOOH nanopillars for III-V InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jung Woo; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jun, Dong-Hwan; Heo, Jonggon; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Jin-Hong; Yu, Jae Su

    2014-03-10

    We report the efficiency enhancement of III-V InGaP/GaAs/ Ge triple-junction (TJ) solar cells using a novel structure, i.e., vertically-oriented gallium oxide hydroxide (GaOOH) nanopillars (NPs), as an antireflection coating. The optical reflectance properties of rhombus-shaped GaOOH NPs, which were synthesized by a simple, low-cost, and large-scalable electrochemical deposition method, were investigated, together with a theoretical analysis using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method. For the GaOOH NPs, the solar weighted reflectance of ~8.5% was obtained over a wide wavelength range of 300-1800 nm and their surfaces exhibited a high water contact angle of ~130° (i.e., hydrophobicity). To simply demonstrate the feasibility of device applications, the GaOOH NPs were incorporated into a test-grown InGaP/GaAs/Ge TJ solar cell structure. For the InGaP/GaAs/Ge TJ solar cell with broadband antireflective GaOOH NPs, the conversion efficiency (η) of ~16.47% was obtained, indicating an increased efficiency by 3.47% compared to the bare solar cell (i.e., η~13%).

  17. High-Efficiency Triple-Junction Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Technology; Annual Technical Progress Report, 6 March 1998--5 March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.

    1999-07-20

    This report describes the research performed during Phase I of this three-phase, three-year program. The research program is intended to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for developing high-performance, two-terminal multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. To improve efficiency, United Solar uses a spectral-splitting, triple-junction cell structure. In this configuration, the top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy of {approx}1.8 eV bandgap to absorb the blue photons. The middle cell uses an amorphous silicon germanium alloy ({approx}20% germanium) of {approx}1.6 eV bandgap to capture the green photons. The bottom cell has {approx}40% germanium to reduce the bandgap to {approx}1.4 eV to capture the red photons. The cells are deposited on stainless steel with a predeposited silver/zinc oxide back reflector to facilitate light trapping. A thin layer of antireflection coating is applied to the top of the cell to reduce reflection loss. During this year, research activities were carried out in the following four areas: (1) fundamental studies to improve our understanding of materials and devices, (2) small-area cell research to obtain the highest cell efficiency, (3) deposition of small-area cells using a modified very high frequency (MVHF) technique to obtain higher deposition rates, and (4) large-area cell research to obtain the highest module efficiency.

  18. Segregation vesicles, cylinders, and sheets in vapor-differentiated pillow lavas: examples from Tore-Madeira Rise and Chile Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Renaud; Caroff, Martial; Girardeau, Jacques; Cotten, Joseph; Guivel, Christèle

    2005-03-01

    We conducted a detailed field and laboratory study of internal segregation structures of two hand-size pillow lavas samples. They were dredged, respectively, on the Josephine seamount, Tore-Madeira Rise (TMR), and on a small quaternary volcanic edifice located on the continental edge of the trench close to the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ). Both pillows display a combination of four types of segregation structures (spherical vesicles, pipe vesicles, vesicle cylinders, and vesicle sheets) observed so far only within subaerial basalt flows typically 2-10 m thick. In particular, the samples offer a remarkable exposure of the transition between pipe vesicles and cylinders. We show that the vesicle sheets are not generated by the same mechanism in both occurrences; they do not seem to be connected to cylinders in the CTJ pillow as they are in the TMR pillow. The two pillows are geochemically distinct, the TMR being alkaline and the CTJ calc-alkaline. Two types of internal differentiation are proposed. The first one implies the extraction of the residual liquid from the host lava and transport towards the segregation structures, whereas the other one results from in situ crystallization within one given structure. In the latter case, glass composition is highly dependant on the nature of the neighbouring crystallizing minerals. The degree of crystallization required to produce a crystal framework strong enough for generating the segregation structures seems to be lower in pillows (ca. 25% crystallization) than in vapor-differentiated basaltic lava flows (35% crystallization).

  19. Large-area triple-junction a-Si alloy production scaleup. Annual subcontract report, 17 March 1993--18 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Morris, J.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this subcontract over its three-year duration is to advance Solarex`s photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex shall meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transparent front contact, by optimizing the laser patterning process, scaling-up the semiconductor deposition process, improving the back contact deposition, scaling-up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 2 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on improving deposition of the front contact, investigating alternate feed stocks for the front contact, maximizing throughput and area utilization for all laser scribes, optimizing a-Si:H deposition equipment to achieve uniform deposition over large-areas, optimizing the triple-junction module fabrication process, evaluating the materials to deposit the rear contact, and optimizing the combination of isolation scribe and encapsulant to pass the wet high potential test. Progress is reported on the following: Front contact development; Laser scribe process development; Amorphous silicon based semiconductor deposition; Rear contact deposition process; Frit/bus/wire/frame; Materials handling; and Environmental test, yield and performance analysis.

  20. A brief Oligocene period of flood volcanism in Yemen: Implications for the duration and rate of continental flood volcanism at the Afro-Arabian triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, J.; Snee, L.; Menzies, M.

    1996-01-01

    -Gulf of Aden rifting. The sequence of events - surface uplift (?), flood magmatism and subsequent upper crustal extension - in Yemen is consistent with the involvement of a mantle plume at the Afro-Arabian triple junction. However, the overall eruption rate for this flood volcanic province is only 0.03 km3/yr, much slower than that postulated for other plume-related provinces such as the Deccan or Siberian Traps, but perhaps comparable to the Parana??-Etendeka province, which also contains significant amounts of rhyolitic volcanic products like those of Yemen-Ethiopia. The highly variable eruption rates in individual provinces must reflect the very different character of individual plumes, or the control of lithospheric structure and plate tectonic stresses on the surface manifestations of plumes. The long duration of CFV and large amounts of rhyolitic volcanism at the Afro-Arabian triple junction may be attributed to the relatively slow separation of the African and Arabian plates compared with, for example, the rifting of India and the Deccan Traps.

  1. Development and characterization of high-efficiency Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge dual- and triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, N.H.; King, R.R.; Cavicchi, B.T.

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the characterization, analysis, and development of high-efficiency, radiation-resistant Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge dual-junction (DJ) and triple-junction (TJ) solar cells. DJ cells have rapidly transitioned from the laboratory to full-scale (325 kW/year) production at Spectrolab. Performance data for over 470,000 large-area (26.94 cm{sup 2}), thin (140 {micro}m) DJ solar cells grown on low-cost, high-strength Ge substrates are shown. Advances in next-generation triple-junction Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge cells with an active Ge component cell are discussed, giving efficiencies up to 26.7% (21.65-cm{sup 2} area), AM0, at 28 C. Final-to-final power ratios P/P{sub 0} of 0.83 were measured for these n-on-p DJ and TJ cells after irradiation with 10{sup 15} 1-MeV electrons/cm{sup 2}. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements are applied to double heterostructures grown with semiconductor layers and interfaces relevant to these multifunction solar cells, to characterize surface and bulk recombination and guide further device improvements. Dual-and triple-junction Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge cells are compared to competing space photovoltaic technologies, and found to offer 60--75% more end-of-life power than high-efficiency Si cells at a nominal array temperature of 60 C.

  2. Geology of the Eel River basin and adjacent region: Implications for late Cenozoic tectonics of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and Mendocino triple junction

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.H. Jr. )

    1992-02-01

    Two upper Cenozoic depositional sequences of principally marine strata about 4,000 m thick overlie accreted basement terranes of the Central and Coastal belts of the Franciscan Complex in the onshore-offshore Eel River basin of northwestern California. The older depositional sequence is early to middle Miocene in age and represents slope basin and slope-blanket deposition, whereas the younger sequence, later Miocene to middle Pleistocene in age, consists largely of forearc basin deposits. Youthful tectonic activity related to Gorda-North American plate convergence indicates an active Cascadia subduction zone and strong partial coupling between these plates. Structures of the northeastern margin of the Eel River basin are principally north-northwest-trending, east-northeast-dipping thrust and reverse faults that form imbricate thrust fans. The Coastal belt fault, the early Tertiary accretionary suture between the Franciscan Central and Coastal belts, can be traced from Arcata Bay northward offshore to the southern Oregon border. It is tentatively extended farther northward based on aeromagnetic data to an offshore position west of Cape Blanco. Thereafter, it may coincide with the offshore Fulmar fault. The Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) does not join the Mendocino transform fault at the commonly depicted offshore location of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). Instead, the CSZ extends southeastward around the southern Eel River basin and shoreward along Mendocino Canyon to join the Petrolia shear zone. Similarly, the Mendocino fault may extend shoreward via Mattole Canyon and join the Cooskie shear zone. These two shear zones intersect onshore north of the King Range, and the area of their intersection is the probable location of the MTJ.

  3. Morphology and growth history of Delgada Fan: implications for the Neogene evolution of Point Arena Basin and the Mendocino Triple Junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.E.; Cacchione, D.A.; Gardner, J.V.; McCulloch, D.S.; Masson, D.

    1989-01-01

    Long-range side scan (GLORIA) sonographs and seismic reflection data acquired during a survey of the western US Exclusive Economic Zone in 1984, coupled with information from Deep Sea Drilling Project sites, provide new insights into the growth and evolution of the Delgada Fan. Construction of the fan commenced in the latest Miocene (~6 Ma) following the filling of the Neogene Point Arena Basin. The large size of the fan is incompatible with the small present-day supply of sediment to the canyon system. The GLORIA data show the Delgada Fan to be a hybrid-type fan, exhibiting characteristics of both elongate and radial fans. The morphology and volume of the fan, along with evidence for a decline in accumulation rates on the lower fan during the Quaternary period, suggest that the fan experienced an early growth phase (latest Miocene and Pliocene) characterized by relatively rapid progradation of elongate fan lobes followed by a period (Quaternary) of slower growth that has featured a shift of depocenters to sites closer to the canyons and a transition to distributary channels bordered by less prominent levees and overbank deposits. We examine the growth of Delgada Fan in relation to the Neogene evolution of the North American-Pacific plate boundary using a series of paleogeographic reconstructions based on recently published time displacement histories of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), the San Andreas fault (SAF), and the Pacific plate, upon which the fan rests. The time displacement curves for the SAF and the MTJ suggest that the MTJ and Mendocino Fracture Zone overtook and passed Point Arena Basin at about 10 Ma when the basin lay immediately southwest of the present San Francisco Bay area. We suggest that the MTJ joined the SAF at approximately that time and location, thus making the SAF the master fault in the transform system. -from Authors

  4. Performance and reliability of a 30-kW triple-junction photovoltaic receiver for 500X concentrator dish or central receiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, P. J.; Lewandowski, A.; Lasich, J. B.

    2006-08-01

    Over the last 15 years, Solar Systems has developed a dense array receiver PV technology for 500X concentrator reflective dish applications. This concentrator PV technology has been successfully deployed at six different locations in Australia, counting for about 1 MWp of installed peak power. A new Multijunction III-V receiver to replace the current silicon Point-Contact solar cells has recently been developed. The new receiver technology is based on high-efficiency (> 32%) Concentrator Ultra Triple Junction (CUTJ) solar cells from Spectrolab, resulting in system power and energy performance improvement of more than 50% compared to the silicon cells. The 0.235 m2 concentrator PV receiver, designed for continuous 500X operation, is composed of 64 dense array modules, and made of series and parallel-connected solar cells, totaling approximately 1,500 cells. The individual dense array modules have been tested under high intensity pulsed light, as well as with concentrated sunlight at the Solar Systems research facility and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's High Flux Solar Furnace. The efficiency of the dense array modules ranges from 30% to 36% at 500X (50 W/cm2, AM1.5D low AOD, 21°C). The temperature coefficients for power, voltage and current, as well as the influence of Air Mass on the cell responsivity, were measured. The reliability of the dense array multijunction III-V modules has been studied with accelerated aging tests, such as thermal cycling, damp heat and high-temperature soak, and with real-life high-intensity exposure. The first 33-kWp multijunction III-V receiver was recently installed in a Solar Systems dish and tested in real-life 500X concentrated sunlight conditions. Receiver efficiencies of 30.3% and 29.0% were measured at Standard Operating Conditions and Normal Operating Conditions respectively.

  5. Recent rift-related volcanism in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, David J.; Barnie, Talfan D.; Pyle, David M.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Lewi, Elias; Kidane, Tesfaye; Carn, Simon; Hamling, Ian

    2010-04-01

    Rift zones are the most common magmatic environment on Earth. However opportunities to observe active rifting are rare, and consequently the volcanological characteristics of rift systems are not well understood. An ongoing phase of magmatic rifting along a section of the Red Sea system in Afar, Ethiopia, presents an exceptional opportunity to constrain relationships between volcanism and crustal growth. Here, by integrating analyses of satellite images (i.e. MODIS, OMI, ASTER, and ALI) with field observations, we characterise two recent (August 2007 and June 2009) basaltic fissure eruptions in Afar and evaluate the role and significance of volcanism in the rifting process. Both events were brief (36-72 h) and erupted 4.4-18 × 10 6 m 3 of lava from a fissure system 4-6.5 km in length. Data from the spaceborne Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) suggests total SO 2 emissions for each eruption of 26 ± 5 kt (2007) and 34 ± 7 kt (2009), consistent with complete degassing of the erupted magma volumes. Using geodetic models for the intrusive activity in Afar we estimate the partitioning of magma between intrusive and extrusive components, up to July 2009, to be ˜ 180:1. Comparing the first-order volcanic characteristics and the intrusive-extrusive volume balance for the Afar volcanism with data from the 1975-1984 Krafla rifting cycle (Iceland) suggests that the volcanic flux in Afar will rise significantly over the next few years as the stresses are increasingly relieved by dyking, and subsequent dykes are able to propagate more easily to the surface. As a consequence, basaltic fissure eruptions in this section of the Afar rift will become of increasing large magnitude as the rifting event matures over the next 5-10 yr. Using available models of magmatic rifting we forecast the likely size and location of future eruptions in Afar.

  6. Evolution of the Rodgers Creek–Maacama right-lateral fault system and associated basins east of the northward-migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wagner, David L.; Fleck, Robert J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Clahan, Kevin; Allen, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rodgers Creek–Maacama fault system in the northern California Coast Ranges (United States) takes up substantial right-lateral motion within the wide transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, over a slab window that has opened northward beneath the Coast Ranges. The fault system evolved in several right steps and splays preceded and accompanied by extension, volcanism, and strike-slip basin development. Fault and basin geometries have changed with time, in places with younger basins and faults overprinting older structures. Along-strike and successional changes in fault and basin geometry at the southern end of the fault system probably are adjustments to frequent fault zone reorganizations in response to Mendocino Triple Junction migration and northward transit of a major releasing bend in the northern San Andreas fault. The earliest Rodgers Creek fault zone displacement is interpreted to have occurred ca. 7 Ma along extensional basin-forming faults that splayed northwest from a west-northwest proto-Hayward fault zone, opening a transtensional basin west of Santa Rosa. After ca. 5 Ma, the early transtensional basin was compressed and extensional faults were reactivated as thrusts that uplifted the northeast side of the basin. After ca. 2.78 Ma, the Rodgers Creek fault zone again splayed from the earlier extensional and thrust faults to steeper dipping faults with more north-northwest orientations. In conjunction with the changes in orientation and slip mode, the Rodgers Creek fault zone dextral slip rate increased from ∼2–4 mm/yr 7–3 Ma, to 5–8 mm/yr after 3 Ma. The Maacama fault zone is shown from several data sets to have initiated ca. 3.2 Ma and has slipped right-laterally at ∼5–8 mm/yr since its initiation. The initial Maacama fault zone splayed northeastward from the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault zone, accompanied by the opening of several strike-slip basins, some of which were later uplifted and compressed

  7. The effect of an East Pacific Rise offset on the formation of secondary cracks ahead of the Cocos-Nazca Rift at the Galapagos Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Montesi, L. G.; Schouten, H.; Zhu, W.

    2011-12-01

    A succession of short-lived, E-W trending cracks at the Galapagos Triple Junction north and south of the Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift, has been explained by a simple crack interaction model. The locations of where the cracks initiate are controlled by tensile stresses generated at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) by two interacting cracks: One representing the north-south trending EPR, and the other the large, westward propagating C-N Rift, whose tip is separated from the EPR by a distance D. The model predicts symmetric cracking at the EPR north and south of the C-N Rift tip. Symmetry in the distribution of cracks north and south of the C-N Rift is observed and especially remarkable between 2.5 and 1.5 Ma when the rapid jumping of cracks toward the C-N Rift appears synchronous. The rapid jumping can be explained by decreasing D, which means that the tip of the C-N Rift was moving closer to the EPR. Symmetry of cracking breaks down at 1.5 Ma, however, with the establishment of the Dietz Deep Rift, the southern boundary of the Galapagos microplate. Symmetry of cracking also breaks down on older crust to the east between about 100 35'W and 100 45'W (about 2.6 Ma) where a rapid jumping of cracks toward the C-N Rift is observed in the south cracking region. There is no evidence of similar rapid jumping in the north cracking region. It could be simply that the response to changing the value of D is not always as predicted. It could also be that the shape of the EPR has not always been symmetric about the C-N Rift, as assumed in the model. Currently, an overlapping spreading center with a 15 km east-west offset between the limbs of the EPR has formed at 1 50'N. We assess the importance of the geometry of the EPR on the crack interaction model. The model has been modified to include a ridge offset similar to what is observed today. We find that the region of stress enhancement at the EPR (where cracks initiate) is subdued south of the C-N Rift tip because of the EPR offset. It is

  8. Volcanic architecture of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vye, C.; Smith, K.; Bateson, L.; Jordan, C.

    2010-12-01

    A new approach for rapidly mapping large volcanic areas has enabled identification of the spatial relationship between lava flows at the scale of single eruptive units, and the temporal development of faults associated with continental rifting. This integrated geological mapping approach involving remote sensing and three-dimensional image analysis has been applied to the Afar Region of the African Rift. We analyse topography and surface rock chemistry based false colour Landsat, ASTER and Lidar imagery within an immersive three-dimensional visualisation suite using SocetSet and Geovisionary software. This remote data is ground-proofed by the targeted field studies. This method is proving to be particularly successful in producing a subdivision of basaltic lava flows based on surface features and morphology of flow lobes where chemostratigraphic applications fail to identify individual eruption units. The high-resolution record has facilitated investigations of the style and size of fissure eruptions, their source, the processes affecting synchronous basaltic and felsic volcanic activity, and the style and duration of basaltic lava flow emplacement. The success of this technique is particularly significant when working in areas which are difficult to access, and may be applied in the future within environmentally or logistically challenging regions.

  9. Nematostatics of triple lines.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro D

    2003-01-01

    The Landau-de Gennes model for nematic liquid crystal bulk and interfaces has been extended to nematic triple lines involving the intersection of two isotropic fluids and one nematic liquid crystalline phase. A complete set of bulk, interface, and triple line force and torque balance equations has been formulated. The triple line force and torque balance equations have linear, interfacial, and bulk contributions. The bulk contributions appear as junction integrals, the surface contributions as junctions sums, and the line contributions as gradients of stresses. Reduction of dimensionality from three to one dimensional creates the following effects: (a) bulk terms enter interfacial balances as surface jumps and line balances as junction integrals, and (b) surface terms enter linear balances as junction sums. Line stress and torque equations are derived using classical liquid crystal models. The correspondence between line stress and line torque and their surface and bulk analogs is established. The triple line force and torque balance equations are use to analyze the contact angle in a nematic lens lying at the interface between two isotropic fluids, when the preferred surface orientation is tangential. The effect of anisotropy and long range elasticity on triple line phases is established. Under weak anchoring the contact angle is shown to be a function of the anchoring energy at the nematic-isotropic interface, while under strong anchoring conditions the contact angle is a function of the Peach-Koehler force that originates from bulk long range elasticity and acts on the triple line. The use of the complete set of balance equations removes the classical inconsistency in force balances at a contact line by properly taking into account long range (bulk gradient elasticity) and anisotropic (interfacial anchoring elasticity) effects.

  10. Future earthquake source faults on deep sea-floor around the Boso triple plate junction revealed by tectonic geomorphology using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Nakata, T.; Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Izumi, N.; Nishizawa, A.; Horiuchi, D.; Kido, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    Boso triple junction, which is the only example of a triple trench junction on earth, is located off the southeast of Boso peninsula, where the Izu-Bonin trench meets with the Japan trench and the Sagami trench. Boso submarine canyon, which is extended to Katsuuma basin about 7000m deep, forms an incised meander along the north side of Sagami trough. Taito spur separate Katsuuma basin from Bando abyssal basin about 9000m deep, where Japan trench meet with Isu-Bonin trench. In this paper, we present detailed stereo-paired topographic images produced from 0.002 degree (about 150m) DBEM (Digital Bathymetry Model), which processed from the depth sounding data obtained by Japan Coast Guard and JAMSTEC around Boso triple junction. It enables us to observe submarine geomorphology easily and precisely. We identified submarine active faults and other tectonic features related to subduction by using the similar standard for air-photo interpretation of inland active faults. We made more precise submarine active tectonic geomorphological map around Boso triple junction than that by previous workers. Numerous distinct faults on the so-called outer rise associated with subduction of Pacific plate are regarded as normal faulting as widely accepted. While the normal faults on the outer rise are parallel to the trench in the southern part of the Japan trench and the northern part of the Izu-Bonin trench, these normal faults around the east of the triple junction with NNW-SSE extend slightly oblique to the trench. The western margin of Bando abyssal basin is bounded by the thrust faults, which form east-facing 200-500m-high convex scarps associated with raised basin floor to the west of the scarp. These faults also deform Mogi submarine fan surface and uplift to the west along the extension of the scarp. The antecedent valley is extended for about 10km across Taito spur that is an active anticlinal ridge about 1000m high. Katsuura basin is surrounded by terraced former basin floor

  11. Use of very-high-frequency plasmas to prepare a-Si:H-based triple-junction solar cells at high deposition rates: Annual technical status report, 11 March 1998--11 March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Tsu, D.; Izu, M.

    1999-10-25

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during this phase of this subcontract. ECD researchers have made significant progress in advancing the very high frequency (VHF), high-rate technology. They demonstrated that 8.0% stable efficiencies can be achieved for a-Si:H cells whose i-layers are prepared at rates near 10 {angstrom}/s using the VHF technique. Presently, there is not a great difference in the performance of a-Si:H cells made using the VHF technique and i-layer deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s and that for cells made using the standard 13.56 MHz technique and rates near 1 {angstrom}/s in the same deposition system. In terms of the a-SiGe:H cells, researchers have completed a number of studies of devices with properties appropriate for middle-junction cells-that is, cells without Ag/ZnO back-reflectors having Voc values near 0.75V and Jsc values near 8.0 mA/cm{sup 2} when measured using AM1.5 light filtered using a 530-nm, low-band-pass filter. The stabilized proper ties for these cells prepared at i-layer rates near 10 {angstrom}/s are again similar to a-SiGe:H cells made using the same deposition hardware and the low-rate 13.56 MHz method. Establishing an initial 10.5% for a triple-junction cell whose i-layers are prepared at the high rates sets the baseline for ECD's future studies. The triple-junction cell degradation (10%--13%) with prolonged light soaking is similar to that regularly obtained for cells prepared at low i-layer deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s). This is important because the use of high-rate methods to prepare i-layers typically leads to less-stable materials and cells. Increasing the buffer-layer deposition rate to 6 {angstrom}/s leads to nearly a 15-min decrease in the total deposition time, whereas the increase in the n-layer and p-layer deposition rates both decrease the total time by 5 and 5.8 min, respectively. Thus, besides the i-layer growth rates, increasing the buffer layer growth

  12. Mantle Heterogeneity and Mixing Beneath the Bouvet Triple Junction Region: Hf Isotope Constraints from the Westernmost Southwest Indian Ridge (0-11deg.E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janney, P. E.; le Roex, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    We have undertaken new Hf (and supplementary Sr, Nd and Pb) isotope and trace element measurements of MORB from the westernmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR; 0 to 11 deg. E) in order to clarify mixing relationships and the effect of the Bouvet and other local hot spots on the composition of the upper mantle beneath the Bouvet Triple Junction (BTJ) region. The new data are fully consistent with the findings of previous studies (le Roex et al., J. Petrol., 1983; Kurz et al., GCA, 1998) that isotopic heterogeneity in this region is largely explained by mixing between a moderately depleted mantle source (i.e., ɛHf ≈ +14, ɛNd ≈ +9, 87Sr/86Sr ≈ 0.7026; 206Pb/204Pb ≈ 18.5) and an enriched component isotopically similar to Bouvet OIB. Unlike the pattern expressed by He isotopes (Kurz et al., GCA, 1998; Georgen et al., EPSL, 2003) the strength of the Bouvet hot spot signature in terms of Hf-Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios is not well correlated with distance from Bouvet Island along ridge, except in the most general sense. Some MORB from 0-11E do approach the Hf-Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition of Bouvet OIB. However, the most extreme isotopic compositions (with ɛHf values that are slightly lower than, and Nd and Pb isotope compositions that are equivalent to, those of Bouvet OIB), are actually found in MORB from the 11-16E oblique spreading segment of the SWIR (le Roex et al., CMP, 1992; Janney et al., J. Petrol., 2005), located further from Bouvet Island than the segments at 0-11E. The lack of a strong correlation between the radiogenic isotope ratios of SWIR MORB and proximity to the Bouvet hot spot in this region supports the notion that local conditions of melting of a lithologically heterogeneous mixture of enriched, Bouvet hot spot-derived and depleted mantle materials plays the dominant role in controlling the radiogenic isotope composition of western SWIR MORB (le Roex et al., CMP, 1992; Salters & Dick, Nature, 2002). The depleted mantle present beneath the western

  13. From Kings Peak to the Delgado submarine canyon: Tracking littoral inputs to the deep sea at the Mendocino Triple Junction, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, C. J.; Di Fiori, R. V.; Smith, M. E.; Mueller, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Gravel coarse enough to overcome viscous damping and impact bedrock underwater is thought prerequisite for incision of submarine canyons, yet with few exceptions, canyons off the California coast have headwalls >2 km offshore at the shelf edge and below storm wave base. This suggests effective disconnection from modern coarse littoral sediment fluxes, and implies they are relict Pleistocene features only actively incised during glacial periods. North of the Transverse Ranges only five submarine canyons approach shore closer than 500 m, and are coincident areas of rapid uplift. Although canyons occur adjacent to major upland-draining streams that transport coarse sediment, submarine canyon headwalls are often laterally offset from stream mouths by ~1-2 km. Coarse stream sediment thus requires littoral transport to enter canyon heads and induce incision. To better understand the evolution of coarse sediment through the littoral system, we measured the texture and composition of coarse sediment in streams and beaches directly onshore of the Delgado submarine canyon, which lies offshore of the fastest uplifting segment of the King Range and onshore the Mendocino Triple Junction. Adjacent to the Delgado Canyon inlet, coarse (d50 > 360 mm) sediment enters the littoral zone from three streams, and is transported alongshore in a predominantly southeast direction. Stream-derived alluvium is comprised of a poorly to moderately sorted mixture of angular to subrounded clasts of well-cemented sandstone (d50 = 256-725 mm) and fissile siliciclastic mudstone (d50 = 90-256 mm). Well sorted and rounded beach gravels adjacent to stream mouths are similarly coarse, and clasts larger than 1 m diameter extend 200-400 meters eastward from stream mouths. In contrast, sediment entering the littoral zone from hillslope erosion between streams is finer (d50 ~16 mm) and is exclusively comprised of pervasively-folded siliciclastic mudstone. Immediately adjacent the Delgado canyon headwall

  14. Oligonucleotides containing an acridine group covalently bonded to the nucleotide flanking the 3'-3' phosphodiester junction for alternate strand triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Bruno; Fattorusso, Caterina; Mayol, Luciano; Oliviero, Giorgia; Piccialli, Gennaro; Varra, Michela

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotides with a 3'-3' inversion of polarity and containing an acridine group attached to nucleotide base flanking the 3'-3' phosphodiester bon have been synthesized, characterized and used as third strand in alternate triple helix formation. CD melting studies and molecular mechanics calculations have been carried out to investigate these triplex structures.

  15. Triple-helical DNA as a reversible block of the branch point in a partially symmetrical DNA four-arm junction.

    PubMed

    Kirby, A W; Gaskin, M N; Antezana, M A; Goodman, S J; Myers, E; Bruist, M F

    1997-08-22

    DNA branch migration is a fundamental process in genetic recombination. A new model system has been developed for studying branch migration in a small synthetic four-arm junction. A mathematical method for describing branch-point movement by discrete steps in such junctions is also presented. The key to our experimental system is the ability to fix the location of the branch point during the assembly of the junction with a reversible block. The block is provided by a short oligonucleotide that forms triplex DNA adjacent to the initial location branch point at low pH. Raising the pH causes the triplex strand to dissociate, making the branch point free to migrate. Once mobile, the branch point can run off the end of the junction. The time-course for this runoff is consistent with a random walk of the branch point. If it is assumed that one migration step moves the branch point one base-pair, the time-course gives a rate constant for one step of 1.4 second-1 at 37 degrees C in 10 mM MgCl2, 50 mM NaCl. These values are consistent with other measurements of non-enzymatic branch migration. We have also monitored the spread of the branch points directly with T4 endonuclease VII. Using EcoRI restriction endonuclease, we have shown that the binding of this protein to the arms of the junction essentially blocks branch migration through the binding site. In these experiments Ca2+ replaces Mg2+, and the enzyme does not cleave the DNA. In vivo there must be a special process to get branch points to migrate past bound proteins.

  16. Upper Mantle Structure beneath Afar: inferences from surface waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.; Debayle, E.; Lepine, J.; Leveque, J.; Cara, M.; Ataley, A.; Sholan, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Afar hotspot is related to one of the most important plume from a geodynamic point of view. It has been advocated to be the surface expression of the South-West African Superswell. Below the lithosphere, the Afar plume might feed other hotspots in central Africa (Hadiouche et al., 1989; Ebinger & Sleep, 1998). The processes of interaction between crust, lithosphere and plume are not well understood. In order to gain insight into the scientific issue, we have performed a surface-wave tomography covering the Horn of Africa. A data set of 1404 paths for Rayleigh waves and 473 paths for Love waves was selected in the period range 45-200s. They were collected from the permanent IRIS and GEOSCOPE networks and from the PASSCAL experiment, in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia. Other data come from the broadband stations deployed in Ethiopia and Yemen in the framework of the French INSU program ``Horn of Africa''. The results presented here come from a path average phase velocities obtained with a method based on a least-squares minimization (Beucler et al., 2000). The local phase velocity distribution and the azimuthal anisotropy were simultaneously retrieved by using the tomographic technique of Montagner (1986). A correction of the data is applied according to the crustal structure of the 3SMAC model (Nataf & Ricard, 1996). We find low velocities down to 200 km depth beneath the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, Afars, the Ethiopian Plateau and southern Arabia. High velocities are present in the eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The anisotropy beneath Afar seems to be complex, but enables to map the flow pattern at the interface lithosphere-asthenosphere. The results presented here are complementary to those obtained by Debayle et al. (2001) at upper-mantle transition zone depths using waveform inversion of higher Rayle igh modes.

  17. Alternate-strand triple-helix formation by the 3'-3'-linked oligodeoxynucleotides with the intercalators at the junction point.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Y; Mikawa, M; Hoshika, S; Takeba, M; Kitade, Y; Matsuda, A

    2001-01-01

    3'-3'-Linked oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) with the anthraquinonyl group at the junction point were synthesized on a DNA synthesizer using a controlled pore glass (CPG), which has pentaerythritol carrying the intercalator at one of the four hydroxymethyl groups. Stability of the triplexes with the target duplexes was studied by thermal denaturation. The 3'-3'-linked ODNs with the anthraquinonyl group enhanced the thermal stability of the triplexes when compared with those without the intercalator and the unmodified nonamer. The inhibitory activity of the 3'-3'-linked ODNs against the cleavage of the target DNA by the restriction enzyme Hind III was tested. It was found that the 3'-3'-linked ODN with the anthraquinonyl group at the junction point inhibited the cleavage by the enzyme more effectively than the nonamer and the 3'-3'-linked ODN without the intercalator.

  18. Which mantle below the active rift segments in Afar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphael; Stab, Martin; Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Sarah, Medynski; Cloquet, Christophe; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Ayalew, Dereje; Chazot, Gilles; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of mantle sources beneath the Ethiopian volcanic province has long been discussed and debated with a long-lived controversy in identifying mantle reservoirs and locating them in the mantle. One interpretation of the isotopic composition of erupted lavas considers that the Afar mantle plume composition is best expressed by recent lavas from Afar and Gulf of Aden (e.g. Erta Ale, Manda Inakir and the 45°E torus anomaly on the Gulf of Aden) implying that all other volcanics (including other active segments and the initial flood basalt province) result from mixing of this plume component with additional lithospheric and asthenospheric components. A completely opposite view considers that the initial Oligocene continental flood basalts best represent the isotopic composition of the Afar mantle plume, which is subsequently mixed in various proportions with continental lithospheric mantle for generating some of the specific signature of Miocene and Quaternary volcanics. The precise and correct identification of mantle components involved in the generation of magmas is of particular importance because this is the only way to document the participation of mantle during extension and its potential role in break-up processes. In this contribution we provide new isotopic data for central Afar and we revisit the whole data set of the Ethiopian volcanic province in order to: (i) precisely identify the distinct mantle components implicated and (ii) discuss their location and evolution not only considering geochemical mixings, but also taking into account additional characteristics of erupted magmatic suites (volumes, location and relationships with amount of extension and segmentation). This new interpretation of geochemical data allows reconsidering the evolution of mantle in the course of rift evolution. In terms of mantle sources, two populations of active segments are frontally opposed in the volcanic province: those that share exactly the same composition with

  19. Nucleosides and nucleotides. 208. Alternate-strand triple-helix formation by the 3'-3'-linked oligodeoxynucleotides with the anthraquinonyl group at the junction point.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Y; Mikawa, M; Hoshika, S; Matsuda, A

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of 3'-3'-linked oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) with the anthraquinonyl group at the junction point is described. The ODNs were synthesized on a DNA synthesizer using a controlled pore glass (CPG) carrying pentaerythritol that has an intercalator at one of the four hydroxymethyl groups. Stability of the triplexes with the target duplexes was studied by thermal denaturation. The 3'-3'-linked ODNs with the anthraquinonyl group enhanced the thermal stability of the triplexes when compared with those without the intercalator and the unmodified nonamer 10. It was found that the ODNs 12 and 13 carrying the anthraquinonyl groups can form thermally stable triplexes by skipping two or three extra base pairs between two binding domains of the target duplexes. The ability of the 3'-3'-linked ODNs to inhibit cleavage of the target DNA 22 by the restriction enzyme Hind III was tested. It was found that the 3'-3'-linked ODN 16 with the anthraquinonyl group at the junction point inhibited the cleavage by the enzyme more effectively than the nonamer 14 and the 3'-3'-linked ODN 15 without the intercalator.

  20. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual subcontract report, 17 March 1993--18 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O`Dowd, J.; Ashenfelter, W.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes work to improve the efficiency of large-area, multi-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy modules. Equipment capable of producing modules up to 0.74 m{sup 2} in area is on line and process development has begun. Preliminary cost analysis/reduction has begun to ensure that these development efforts will result in a commercialization of the large-area technology. The approach was to transfer the high-efficiency multi-junction technology from R&D into the manufacturing environment by using three different substrate sizes. Initial attempts to transfer the multijunction silicon process were made using a 0.1-m{sup 2} substrate (approximately 1 ft{sup 2}). These efforts resulted in a module with a measured aperture area efficiency of 10.32%. Simultaneous with the transfer of the silicon technology, the most complicated aspect of the technology transfer, Solarex began process development techniques on large-area modules by using the 0.37-m{sup 2} substrates. These efforts resulted in modules with a total area efficiency of 7%. Finally, initial runs on substrates 0.74 m{sup 2} were made to debug the large-area equipment in preparation of transferring the knowledge gained in the processing of the smaller substrates.

  1. Exon/intron structure of the human alpha 3(IV) gene encompassing the Goodpasture antigen (alpha 3(IV)NC1). Identification of a potentially antigenic region at the triple helix/NC1 domain junction.

    PubMed

    Quinones, S; Bernal, D; García-Sogo, M; Elena, S F; Saus, J

    1992-10-01

    The Goodpasture antigen has been identified as the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of alpha 3(IV), a novel collagen IV chain (Saus, J., Wieslander, J., Langeveld, J., Quinones, S., and Hudson, B.G. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 13374-13380). In the present study, the exon/intron structure and sequence for 285 amino acids of human alpha 3(IV), comprising 53 amino acids of the triple-helical domain and the complete NC1 domain (232 amino acids), were determined. Based on the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the alpha 1(IV), alpha 2(IV), alpha 3(IV), and alpha 5(IV) NC1 domains, a phylogenetic tree was constructed which indicates that alpha 2(IV) was the first chain to evolve, followed by alpha 3(IV), and then by alpha 1(IV) and alpha 5(IV). The exon/intron structure of these domains is consistent with this evolution model. In addition, it appears that alpha 3(IV) changed most after diverging from the parental gene. Analysis of its primary structure reveals that, at the junction between the triple-helical and NC1 domains, there exists a previously unrecognized, highly hydrophilic region (GLKGKRGDSGSPATWTTR) which is unique to the human alpha 3(IV) chain, containing a cell adhesion motif (RGD) as an integral part of a sequence (KRGDSGSP) conforming to a number of protein kinase recognition sites. Based on primary structure data, we outline new aspects to be explored concerning the molecular basis of collagen IV function and Goodpasture syndrome.

  2. Analysis of bias voltage dependent spectral response in Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sogabe, Tomah Ogura, Akio; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2014-02-21

    Spectral response measurement plays great role in characterizing solar cell device because it directly reflects the efficiency by which the device converts the sunlight into an electrical current. Based on the spectral response results, the short circuit current of each subcell can be quantitatively determined. Although spectral response dependence on wavelength, i.e., the well-known external quantum efficiency (EQE), has been widely used in characterizing multijunction solar cell and has been well interpreted, detailed analysis of spectral response dependence on bias voltage (SR −V{sub bias}) has not been reported so far. In this work, we have performed experimental and numerical studies on the SR −V{sub bias} for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell. Phenomenological description was given to clarify the mechanism of operation matching point variation in SR −V{sub bias} measurements. The profile of SR−V{sub bias} curve was explained in detail by solving the coupled two-diode current-voltage characteristic transcend formula for each subcell.

  3. Investigation of GaInAs strain reducing layer combined with InAs quantum dots embedded in Ga(In)As subcell of triple junction GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge solar cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Senlin; Bi, Jingfeng; Li, Mingyang; Yang, Meijia; Song, Minghui; Liu, Guanzhou; Xiong, Weiping; Li, Yang; Fang, Yanyan; Chen, Changqing; Lin, Guijiang; Chen, Wenjun; Wu, Chaoyu; Wang, Duxiang

    2015-01-01

    The InAs/GaAs quantum dots structure embedded in GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge triple junction solar cell with and without Ga0.90In0.10As strain reducing layer was investigated. Conversion efficiency of 33.91% at 1,000 suns AM 1.5D with Ga0.90In0.10As strain reducing layer was demonstrated. A 1.19% improvement of the conversion efficiency was obtained via inserting the Ga0.90In0.10As strain reducing layer. The main contribution of this improvement was from the increase of the short-circuit current, which is caused by the reduction of the Shockley-Read-Hall recombination centers. Consequently, there was a decrease in open circuit voltage due to the lower thermal activation energy of confined carriers in Ga0.9In0.1As than GaAs and a reduction in the effective band gap of quantum dots.

  4. Post-rifting relaxation in the Afar region, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, Scott L.; Bennati, Laura; Calais, Eric; Buck, W. Roger; Hamling, Ian J.; Wright, Tim J.; Lewi, Elias

    2009-11-01

    Crustal accretion at divergent plate boundaries typically occurs via the periodic intrusion of dikes, but their emplacement and the associated deformation are rarely observed. The few existing observations at subaerial rifts show that these diking events are followed by a decadal-scale period with extension rates faster than the secular divergent plate motion. This transient accelerated deformation has been explained by continued subsurface magma injection or by relaxation, in the viscoelastic mantle, of the stress changes imparted by dike opening. For the first time, GPS measurements were collected within a few months of a rifting event at a major plate boundary, the September 2005, 60 km-long dike intrusion in the Dabbahu segment, Afar, Ethiopia. Extension rates for the first 3 years greatly exceed the plate motion (Nubia-Arabia) secular divergence rate, even at sites located more than 60 km from the rift axis. Here we show that these observations are consistent with stress relaxation in a viscoelastic upper mantle with a viscosity of about 5 × 1018 Pa·s overlain by a 12-14 km-thick elastic crust. The alternative model of continued diking requires continuous opening well below the Moho and is therefore unlikely. Instead, magma injection in Afar since June 2006 has taken the form of smaller discrete diking events, tapping into a mid-crustal melt reservoir under the segment center.

  5. Plate break-up geometry in SE-Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent; Le Gall, Bernard; Daoud, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    New structural data acquired in Djibouti strongly support the view of a magma-rich to magma-poor pair of conjugate margins developed in SE Afar since at least 9 Ma. Our model is illustrated by a crustal-scale transect that emphasizes the role of a two-stage extensional detachment fault system, with opposing senses of motion through time. The geometry and kinematics of this detachment fault pattern are mainly documented from lavas and fault dip data extracted from remote sensing imagery (Landsat ETM+, and corresponding DEM), further calibrated by field observations. Although expressed by opposite fault geometries, the two successive extensional events evidenced here are part of a two-stage continental extensional tear-system associated with the ongoing propagation of the Aden-Tadjoura oceanic axis to the NW. A flip-flop evolution of detachment faults accommodating lithosphere divergence has recently been proposed for the development of the Indian Ocean and continental margins (Sauter et al., 2013). However, the SE Afar evolution further suggests a radical and sudden change in lithosphere behavior during extension, from a long-term and widespread magmatic stage to a syn-sedimentary break-up stage where mantle melting concentrates along the future oceanic axis. Of special interest is the fact that a late and rapid stage of non-magmatic extension led to break-up, whose geometry triggered the location of the break-up axis and earliest oceanic accretion. New structural data acquired in Djibouti strongly support the view of a magma-rich to magma-poor pair of conjugate margins developed in SE Afar since at least 9 Ma. Our model is illustrated by a crustal-scale transect that emphasizes the role of a two-stage extensional detachment fault system, with opposing senses of motion through time. The geometry and kinematics of this detachment fault pattern are mainly documented from lavas and fault dip data extracted from remote sensing imagery (Landsat ETM+, and corresponding

  6. Analysis of Triggering of Earthquakes and Tremor in the Western U.S. due to the 2010 El Mayor Cucapah Earthquake and the Mw6.8 Mendocino Triple Junction Earthquake in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, R. L.; Polet, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that the passage of seismic waves from large earthquakes are able to trigger small earthquakes and tremor at regional distances. These small events may be detected by applying a high-pass filter to seismograms to remove the much larger ground motion amplitudes from the large distant earthquake. Our interests are in examining the local triggering of earthquakes and tremor throughout the West Coast of North America from the magnitude 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah 2010 earthquake and the magnitude 6.8 Northern California, March 10, 2014 earthquake, just north of the Mendocino Triple Junction. We will present the results of the analysis of waveform data from hundreds of seismometers throughout Southern California, Northern California, Oregon, Washington, as well as some stations bordering these states. Our preliminary results suggest that triggering of local earthquakes and tremor occurred for both earthquakes. In the case of the records of the Southern California stations for the El Mayor Cucapah 2010 earthquake, 27 stations showed triggering near the seismic station. 13 of these stations are located in or near known geothermal areas, while others were located along active faults and one offshore. While conducting this study, we detected an instrumental noise signal present in 63 of the Southern California seismograms for the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. Initially, the signal looked like a typical triggered event, yet with further investigation we found its likely cause to be instrumental noise. We plan to relate our observations of triggered seismicity and tremor to the tectonic environment to test the hypothesis that triggering and tremor most commonly occurs in volcanic and geothermal areas.

  7. Dyke intrusion dynamics during the ongoing rifting episode in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, E.; Grandin, R.; Nercessian, A.; Ayele, A.; Keir, D.; Doubre, C.; Socquet, A.; Lemarchand, A.

    2010-12-01

    Dyke intrusion is one of the main processes of crustal accretion occurring along magma-assisted divergent plate boundaries, in particular along Mid-Ocean Ridges. Seismology, through the analysis of earthquake migration coeval to dyke intrusion, is one of the few tools, with geodesy, which allows studying the dynamics of this fundamental process. In Afar (Ethiopia), the major Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rifting episode started in September 2005 with the intrusion a 60 km-long, 5 m-wide mega-dyke. Between June 2006 and May 2010, 13 smaller dykes (~10 km long) were emplaced, giving an outstanding opportunity to perform such studies. A few weeks after the rifting episode commenced, a regional seismological network of broadband stations was installed in Afar (part of a multinational project including UK, US and Ethiopia). In November 2007, in collaboration with the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University, IPGP (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris) installed a local telemetered seismological network including 5 short-period stations around the southern half of the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift. We focus here on the microseismicity related to five dyke intrusions, which occurred between June 2006 and February 2009. The dykes propagated away from the Walis magma reservoir (WMR, 12.3°N, 40.6°E) at velocities ranging from 0.5km/h to 2km/h. Earthquake migrations during dyke intrusions involved a narrow (less than 5 km wide), seismically-active strip around the dykes, and seem to show the following pattern: first, near the tip of the propagating dyke, probably in the damage zone, small to moderate earthquakes are detected. Subsequent, more energetic earthquakes may have been triggered only after sufficient dyke inflation had occurred. Earthquake sequences, which occurred north of WMR, migrated faster (~2km/h) than those that took place south of WMR (0.5-1km/h), and liberated a greater amount of seismic energy. This is in keeping with results of normal stress modeling

  8. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; White, A D; Goerz, D A; Javedani, J B; Houck, T L

    2007-08-13

    A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

  9. Spectral analysis of dike-induced earthquakes in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Shallow dike intrusions may be accompanied by fault slip above the dikes, a superposition which complicates seismic and geodetic data analyses. The diverse volcano-tectonic and low-frequency local earthquakes accompanying the 2005-2010 large-volume dike intrusions in the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift (Afar), some with fault displacements of up to 3 m at the surface, provide an opportunity to examine the relations among the earthquakes, dike intrusions, and surface ruptures. We apply the frequency index (FI) method to characterize the spectra of swarm earthquakes from six of the dikes. These earthquakes often have broad spectra with multiple peaks, making the usual peak frequency classification method unreliable. Our results show a general bimodal character with high FI earthquakes associated with deeper dikes (top > 3 km subsurface) and low FI earthquakes associated with shallow dikes, indicating that shallow dikes result in earthquakes with more low-frequency content and larger-amplitude surface waves. Low FI earthquakes are more common during dike emplacement, suggesting that interactions between the dike and faults may lead to lower FI. Taken together, likely source processes for low FI earthquakes are shallow hypocenters (<3 km) possibly with surface rupture, slow rupture velocities, and interactions with dike fluids. Strong site effects also heavily influence the earthquake spectral content. Additionally, our results suggest a continuum of spectral responses, implying either that impulsive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and the unusual, emergent earthquakes have similar source processes or that simple spectral analyses, such as FI, cannot distinguish different source processes.

  10. Visuality, mobility and the cosmopolitan: inhabiting the world from afar.

    PubMed

    Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Urry, John

    2006-03-01

    In earlier publications based on the research discussed in this article (e.g. Szerszynski and Urry 2002), we argued that an emergent culture of cosmopolitanism, refracted into different forms amongst different social groups, was being nurtured by a widespread 'banal globalism'--a proliferation of global symbols and narratives made available through the media and popular culture. In the current article we draw on this and other empirical research to explore the relationship between visuality, mobility and cosmopolitanism. First we describe the multiple forms of mobility that expand people's awareness of the wider world and their capacity to compare different places. We then chart the changing role that visuality has played in citizenship throughout history, noting that citizenship also involves a transformation of vision, an absenting from particular contexts and interests. We explore one particular version of that transformation--seeing the world from afar, especially in the form of images of the earth seen from space--noting how such images conventionally connote both power and alienation. We then draw on another research project, on place and vision, to argue that the shift to a cosmopolitan relationship with place means that humans increasingly inhabit their world only at a distance. PMID:16506999

  11. Visuality, mobility and the cosmopolitan: inhabiting the world from afar.

    PubMed

    Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Urry, John

    2006-03-01

    In earlier publications based on the research discussed in this article (e.g. Szerszynski and Urry 2002), we argued that an emergent culture of cosmopolitanism, refracted into different forms amongst different social groups, was being nurtured by a widespread 'banal globalism'--a proliferation of global symbols and narratives made available through the media and popular culture. In the current article we draw on this and other empirical research to explore the relationship between visuality, mobility and cosmopolitanism. First we describe the multiple forms of mobility that expand people's awareness of the wider world and their capacity to compare different places. We then chart the changing role that visuality has played in citizenship throughout history, noting that citizenship also involves a transformation of vision, an absenting from particular contexts and interests. We explore one particular version of that transformation--seeing the world from afar, especially in the form of images of the earth seen from space--noting how such images conventionally connote both power and alienation. We then draw on another research project, on place and vision, to argue that the shift to a cosmopolitan relationship with place means that humans increasingly inhabit their world only at a distance.

  12. The volcano seismic crisis in Afar, Ethiopia, starting September 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayele, Atalay; Jacques, Eric; Kassim, Mohammed; Kidane, Tesfaye; Omar, Ahmed; Tait, Stephen; Nercessian, Alexandre; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; King, Geoffrey

    2007-03-01

    We describe the seismo-volcanic crisis that occurred in northern Afar in late 2005, which involved 15 earthquakes greater than M5 and a small explosive silicic eruption from a vent called Da'Ure (at 12.651°N., 40.519°N) close to Dabbahu volcano. The purpose is to pull together the different sources of information into a coherent preliminary interpretation of what happened. The main geophysical data are the locations of the largest earthquakes, and a radar interferogram of unusually high quality that reveals injection of a 60 km long dyke with surface deformation expressed as normal faulting. Subsidence occurred around the Dabbahu volcanic edifice. Most of the dyke is likely to have been basaltic rather than silicic although the eruption was silicic. The volume of the subsidence represents at most 25% of the magma injected into the dyke. The silicic eruption was possibly triggered by interaction of basaltic magma with a shallow silicic reservoir. At about the same time as the eruption and dyking episode, some activity appears also to have taken place at the lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, some 150 km to the north of the eruption site. We evaluate the possibility that there may be some link by calculating stresses associated with opening of the fissure and looking at the activity of the lava lake as revealed by the thermal anomaly seen by weather satellites.

  13. Afar-wide Crustal Strain Field from Multiple InSAR Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Wright, T. J.; Wang, H.; Calais, E.; Bennati Rassion, L. S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Lewi, E.

    2010-12-01

    Onset of a rifting episode in the Dabbahu volcanic segment, Afar (Ethiopia), in 2005 renewed interest in crustal deformation studies in the area. As a consequence, an extensive geodetic data set, including InSAR and GPS measurements have been acquired over Afar and hold great potential towards improving our understanding of the extensional processes that operate during the final stages of continental rupture. The current geodetic observational and modelling strategy has focused on detailed, localised studies of dyke intrusions and eruptions mainly in the Dabbahu segment. However, an eruption in the Erta ‘Ale volcanic segment in 2008, and cluster of earthquakes observed in the Tat Ale segment, are testament to activity elsewhere in Afar. Here we make use of the vast geodetic dataset available to obtain strain information over the whole Afar depression. A systematic analysis of all the volcanic segments, including Dabbahu, Manda-Hararo, Alayta, Tat ‘Ale Erta Ale and the Djibouti deformation zone, is undertaken. We use InSAR data from multiple tracks together with available GPS measurements to obtain a velocity field model for Afar. We use over 300 radar images acquired by the Envisat satellite in both descending and ascending orbits, from 12 distinct tracks in image and wide swath modes, spanning the time period from October 2005 to present time. We obtain the line-of-sight deformation rates from each InSAR track using a network approach and then combine the InSAR velocities with the GPS observations, as suggested by Wright and Wang (2010) following the method of England and Molnar (1997). A mesh is constructed over the Afar area and then we solve for the horizontal and vertical velocities on each node. The resultant full 3D Afar-wide velocity field shows where current strains are being accumulated within the various volcanic segments of Afar, the width of the plate boundary deformation zone and possible connections between distinct volcanic segments on a

  14. Plume- Ridge Lithospheric Interactions: Cases of Afar (Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, J. P.; Stutzmann, E.; Sicilia, D.; Sebai, A.; Beucler, E.; Silveira, G.; Cara, M.; Debayle, E.; Leveque, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Detection of mantle plumes in geophysical and geochemical data is controversial and trigger vigorous debates. It remains unclear how plumes are formed, their origin at depth, and whether they act independently from plate tectonics. We may learn about the role of plumes in mantle dynamics by studying their interactions with lithosphere and crust below ridges and the way in which they perturb the flow pattern in the uppermost mantle. Several regional tomographic studies of seismic velocity and anisotropy around several hotspots were obtained during the last 2 years. Their lateral resolution is smaller than 1000km and they enable to make qualitative intercomparison between Afar (Horn of Africa Program), Azores (COSEA project) in the Atlantic, La Reunion in the Indian Ocean and Pacific provinces hotspots. These models demonstrate that there is not only one family of plumes but several ones. Some plumes are confined in the uppermost 200km but a few can originate in the transition zone and even at the Core-mantle Boundary for superplumes. Seismic anisotropy which is a good marker of deformation processes and mantle flow pattern, shows that the interaction between a plume and a ridge below the lithosphere can occur over distances larger than 1000km, via sublithospheric channels. The existence of LACs (Low Anisotropy Channels) below the Pacific plate seems to be intimately related to the active hotspots in Central Pacific and indicate a future reorganization of plate boundaries. Another important consequence of the interaction between plume and ridge is the triggering of secondary convection in the asthenosphere, which will be discussed during the presentation.

  15. the role of magmatism and segmentation in the structural evolution of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël; Quidelleur, Xavier; Ayalew, Dereje; Leroy, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    A common issue at volcanic passive margins (VPM) is the lack of observation of the structures that accommodate stretching and thinning. Indeed, the most distal parts and the Ocean-Continent Transition is often masked by thick seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) sequences. Some current challenges are then to know if the observed thinning fit the divergence (thinning vs dyking); and what is the rheological effect of magma supply that re-thickens the crust during extension? In the Central Afar magmatic rift (Ethiopia), the structures related to rifting since Oligocene are cropping out onshore and are well preserved. We present here a new structural model based on field data and lavas (U-Th/He and K/Ar) datings along a balanced cross-section of the Central Afar Western Margin. We mapped continent-ward normal fault array affecting highly tilted trapp series (29-30 Ma) unconformably overlain by tilted Oligo-Miocene (25-7 Ma) acid series. The main extensional and necking/thinning event took place during the end of this Miocene magmatic episode. The Pliocene flood basalt (Stratoid series) is erupted over an already thinned crust. The bulk extension for the Afar Western Margin is ß ~ 2.50. Our main findings are: - Oligo-Miocene deformation in Central Afar appears to be largely distributed through space and time ("magmatic wide rift"). It has been accommodated in a 200-300 km wide strip being a diffuse incipient plate boundary during the whole rifting history until the formation of present-day magmatic segments. There is a period of tectonic quiescence accompanied with few magma erupted at the surface between 25 Ma and 7 Ma. We suggest that tectonic and magmatic activity was focused at that time on the highly faulted Danakil block and Southern Red Sea, away from our study zone. - ß ~ 2.50 is higher than the thinning factor of ~1.30 observed in geophysical studies. We propose that the continental crust in Central Afar has been re-thickened during extension by the syn

  16. Neogene Structural Basins Beneath Santa Rosa Plain: Strike-Slip Basins Formed in Wake of the Mendocino Triple Junction During Initiation of the Rodgers Creek-Healdsburg Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, R. J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Fleck, R. J.; Langenheim, V. E.; McPhee, D. K.; Jachens, R. C.; Wagner, D. L.; McCabe, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Located on the Humboldt Plate, just N of the San Francisco Bay block, the Santa Rosa Plain (SRP) is a NW- oriented dissected lowland ~60 km long by 12 km wide, underlain by fault bounded Neogene basins containing syntectonic sedimentary and volcanic fills up to 2.5 km-thick. In response to lengthening of the transform margin ~7 to 5 Ma, Neogene strata now beneath the plain were dropped into extensional basins in a SE-tapered wedge-shaped block bounded on the SW by ~N 50° W-oriented faults of a proto-Hayward fault zone, and on the NE by newly initiated ~N 35°- 40°W-oriented faults of the Rodgers Creek-Healdsburg fault zone. Comparisons of the geologic, chronostratigraphic and geophysical frameworks of SRP with well constrained datasets used for Neogene reconstructions of the northern San Andreas Fault system indicates to us that the SRP and its buried basins are firmly tied to a strike-slip basin formational setting in the wake of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). Onshore and offshore datasets that integrate the geology and chronostratigraphy with geophysical data show that the MTJ at ~7 to 5 Ma was situated between the present latitudes of ~38.5° and ~39° N, opposite SRP. The SRP formed the delta of a large river that flowed toward the WNW, around a proto-Hayward fault-bounded bedrock promontory, into an estuary that adjoined the adjacent near shore and shelf of the margin. The modern Eel River basin, a deformed and uplifted remnant of the Cascadia Forearc margin just north of the present position of the MTJ, lies in a setting similar to the paleogeographic setting of the SRP. Closer examination, however, reveals two important differences between the SRP and MTJ settings. First, the ~6 to 9 Ma fluvial system that flowed NW across the Hayward fault from the east San Francisco Bay region onto SRP, also flowed across the San Andreas fault into submarine canyons of the Delgada Fan on the Pacific Plate, south of the MTJ. In contrast, sediment transported by the

  17. The deep seismic structure of the Ethiopia/Afar hotspot and the African superplume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Samantha E.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2013-07-01

    The Ethiopia/Afar hotspot has been frequently explained as an upper mantle continuation of the African superplume, with anomalous material in the lower mantle under southern Africa, rising through the transition zone beneath eastern Africa. However, the significantly larger amplitude low velocity anomaly in the upper mantle beneath Ethiopia/Afar, compared to the anomalies beneath neighboring regions, has led to questions about whether or not along-strike differences in the seismic structure beneath eastern Africa and western Arabia are consistent with the superplume interpretation. Here we present a new P-wave model of the hotspot's deep structure and use it to evaluate the superplume model. At shallow (< ˜400 km) depths, the slowest velocities are centered beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift, and we attribute these low velocities to decompression melting beneath young, thin lithosphere. At deeper depths, the low velocity structure trends to the northeast, and the locus of the low velocity anomaly is found beneath Afar. The northeast-trending structure with depth is best modeled by northeastward flow of warm superplume material beneath eastern Africa. The combined effects of shallow decompression melting and northeastward flow of superplume material explain why upper mantle velocities beneath Ethiopia/Afar are significantly slower than those beneath neighboring East Africa and western Arabia. The superplume interpretation can thus explain the deep seismic structure of the hotspot if the effects of both decompression melting and mantle flow are considered.

  18. Volatile Organic Compound Emission from Quercus suber, Quercus canariensis, and its hybridisation product Quercus afares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, S.; Bracho Nuñez, A.; Staudt, M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    Oaks represent one of the most important plant genera in the Northern hemisphere and include many intensively VOC emitting species. The major group constitutes the isoprene emitters, but also monoterpene emitters and non-emitters can be found. These variations in the oak species might partly be due to their propensity for inter- and intraspecific hybridisation. This study addresses the foliar VOC production of the former hybridisation product the deciduous Quercus afares and its parents, two very distant species: the evergreen monoterpene emitter Quercus suber and the deciduous isoprene emitter Quercus canariensis. The measurements were performed in Southern France, applying two different methods. Plants were investigated in situ in the field with a portable gas exchange measuring system as well as in the laboratory on cut branches with an adapted enclosure system. Quercus afares was found to be a monoterpene emitting species. However, the monoterpene emission was lower and the composition different to that of Quercus suber. Whereas Quercus suber trees belonged to the pinene type most individuals of Quercus afares were identified to represent a limonene type. Quercus canariensis emitted besides high amounts of isoprene also linalool and (Z)-3-hexenylacetate. Emissions from Quercus suber and Quercus afares were higher in the field measurements than in the laboratory on cut branches whereas Quercus canariensis exhibited lower isoprene emissions from cut branches. The results demonstrate the need of further emission studies on a plant species level.

  19. Ethnobotanical study of plants used in management of livestock health problems by Afar people of Ada’ar District, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The great majority of the Afar people of Ethiopia are pastoralists, highly dependent on livestock and livestock products. Livestock productivity is, however, frequently affected by different diseases. Although many districts in the Region have veterinary clinics, they lack basic facilities. As a result, the Afar people are still dependent on local materials, mainly plants, and traditional knowledge to manage livestock health problems. However, there is a serious threat to such local resources mainly due to recurrent drought and influence of modernization. Hence there is a need for proper documentation and evaluation of the existing ethnoveterinary knowledge in the Region. This study was aimed at documenting and analysing ethnoveterinary knowledge of people in Ada’ar District of the Afar Region associated with the use of plants. Methods The study involved interviewing selected knowledgeable Afar people in Ada’ar District on the use of plants to manage livestock ailments. Fidelity Level (FL) values were calculated for the reported medicinal plant to estimate their healing potentials. Specimens of reported medicinal plant were collected, identified and deposited at the National Herbarium, Addis Ababa University. Results The study revealed 49 medicinal plants as being used by the Afar people of Ada’ar District for the treatment of various livestock ailments, the majority of which (67.3%) were shrubs. Highest number of medicinal plants was used to treat blackleg, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), sudden sickness and pneumonia. Leaf was the most frequently sought plant part, accounting for 47% of the reported plants. All the medicnal plants used in the District were uncultivated ones growing in semi-disturbed and disturbed habitats as remnant plants and weeds. Cissus quadrangularis and Solanum incanum were the plants scoring the highest fidelity level values for their use to treat blackleg and respiratory tract problems, respectively. Conclusion

  20. Modes of rifting in magma-rich settings: Tectono-magmatic evolution of Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël.; Quidelleur, Xavier; Ayalew, Dereje; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in Afar (northern Ethiopia) has largely focused on the formation of the present-day ocean-continent transition at active segments (e.g., Manda Hararo). However, the Oligo-Miocene history of extension, from the onset of rifting at ~25 Ma to the eruption of the massive Stratoïd flood basalts at ~4 Ma, remains poorly constrained. Here we present new structural data and radiometric dating from Central Afar, obtained along a zone stretching from the undeformed Oligocene Ethiopian plateau to the Manda Hararo and Tat'Ale active volcanic segments. Basaltic and rhyolitic formations were mapped in two key areas corresponding to the proximal and distal parts of a half-rift. We present a balanced composite cross section of Central Afar, reconstructed using our new data and previously published geophysical data on the crustal structure. Our main findings are as follows: (1) Extension during the Mio-Pliocene corresponds to a "wide rift" style of rifting. (2) The lower crust has been underplated/intruded and rethickened during rifting by magmatic injection. (3) Our restoration points to the existence of midcrustal shear zones that have helped to distribute extension in the upper crust and to localize extension at depth in a necking zone. Moreover, we suggest that there is a close relationship between the location of a shear zone and the underplated/intruded material. In magma-rich environments such as Central Afar, breakup should be achieved once the initial continental crust has been completely replaced by the newly, magmatically accreted crust. Consequently, and particularly in Afar, crustal thickness is not necessarily indicative of breakup but instead reflects differences in tectono-magmatic regimes.

  1. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  2. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  3. The mantle sources beneath the Afar volcanic province and their interplay with extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphael; Stab, Martin; Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Medynski, Sarah; Cloquet, Christophe; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Chazot, Gilles; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of mantle sources beneath the Ethiopian volcanic province has long been discussed and debated with a long-lived controversy in identifying mantle reservoirs and locating them in the mantle. One interpretation of the isotopic composition of erupted lavas considers that the Afar mantle plume composition is best expressed by recent lavas from Afar and Gulf of Aden (e.g. Erta Ale, Manda Inakir and the 45°E torus anomaly on the Gulf of Aden) implying that all other volcanics (including other active segments and the initial flood basalt province) result from mixing of this plume component with additional lithospheric and asthenospheric components. A completely opposite view considers that the initial Oligocene continental flood basalts best represent the isotopic composition of the Afar mantle plume, which is subsequently mixed in various proportions with continental lithospheric mantle for generating some of the specific signature of Miocene and Quaternary volcanics. The precise and correct identification of mantle components involved in the generation of magmas is of particular importance because this is the only way to document the participation of mantle during extension and its potential role in break-up processes. In this contribution we provide new isotopic data for central Afar and we revisit the whole data set of the Ethiopian volcanic province and African/Arabian intraplate volcanics in order to: (i) precisely identify the distinct mantle components implicated, (ii) discuss their location and evolution in space and time, and (3) link the evolution of mantle with extensional processes beneath the Afar province. This new interpretation of geochemical data allows reconsidering the evolution of mantle in the course of rift evolution. In terms of mantle sources, two populations of active segments are frontally opposed in the volcanic province: those that share exactly the same composition with plume related CFBs (e.g. the Manda Hararo and the Main

  4. Uppermost mantle (Pn) velocity model for the Afar region, Ethiopia: an insight into rifting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, A. L.; Stuart, G. W.; Henderson, C. M.; Keir, D.; Hammond, J. O. S.

    2013-04-01

    The Afar Depression, Ethiopia, offers unique opportunities to study the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading because the process is occurring onland. Using traveltime tomography and data from a temporary seismic deployment, we describe the first regional study of uppermost mantle P-wave velocities (VPn). We find two separate low VPn zones (as low as 7.2 km s-1) beneath regions of localized thinned crust in northern Afar, indicating the existence of high temperatures and, potentially, partial melt. The zones are beneath and off-axis from, contemporary crustal magma intrusions in active magmatic segments, the Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo and Erta'Ale segments. This suggests that these intrusions can be fed by off-axis delivery of melt in the uppermost mantle and that discrete areas of mantle upwelling and partial melting, thought to characterize segmentation of the uppermost mantle at seafloor spreading centres, are initiated during the final stages of break-up.

  5. Bookshelf faulting and horizontal block rotations between overlapping rifts in southern Afar

    SciTech Connect

    Tapponnier, P.; Armijo, R.; Manighetti, I.; Courtillot, V. )

    1990-01-01

    Lateral slip on initially rift-parallel normal faults may be a particularly efficient mechanism to accommodate strain between overlapping oceanic rifts. It occurs in southern Afar, where clockwise block rotations result from distributed dextral shear between the overlapping Ghoubbet Asal-Manda Inakir and Manda Hararo-Abhe Bad rifts. Faulting observed during the 1969, Serdo earthquakes and on SPOT images is consistent with the shear being taken up by left-lateral slip on steep NW-SE striking faults, which formed as normal faults before extensional strain became localized in the two rifts. This bookshelf faulting accounts quantitatively for the 14.5{degree} {plus minus}7.5{degree} rotation documented by paleomagnetism in the 1.8 {plus minus}0.4 Ma old Afar stratoid basalts, given the 17.5 {plus minus}5 mm/yr rate of separation between Arabia and Somalia.

  6. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  7. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  8. Melting during late-stage rifting in Afar is hot and deep.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, D J; Maclennan, J; Bastow, I D; Pyle, D M; Jones, S M; Keir, D; Blundy, J D; Plank, T; Yirgu, G

    2013-07-01

    Investigations of a variety of continental rifts and margins worldwide have revealed that a considerable volume of melt can intrude into the crust during continental breakup, modifying its composition and thermal structure. However, it is unclear whether the cause of voluminous melt production at volcanic rifts is primarily increased mantle temperature or plate thinning. Also disputed is the extent to which plate stretching or thinning is uniform or varies with depth with the entire continental lithospheric mantle potentially being removed before plate rupture. Here we show that the extensive magmatism during rifting along the southern Red Sea rift in Afar, a unique region of sub-aerial transition from continental to oceanic rifting, is driven by deep melting of hotter-than-normal asthenosphere. Petrogenetic modelling shows that melts are predominantly generated at depths greater than 80 kilometres, implying the existence of a thick upper thermo-mechanical boundary layer in a rift system approaching the point of plate rupture. Numerical modelling of rift development shows that when breakup occurs at the slow extension rates observed in Afar, the survival of a thick plate is an inevitable consequence of conductive cooling of the lithosphere, even when the underlying asthenosphere is hot. Sustained magmatic activity during rifting in Afar thus requires persistently high mantle temperatures, which would allow melting at high pressure beneath the thick plate. If extensive plate thinning does occur during breakup it must do so abruptly at a late stage, immediately before the formation of the new ocean basin.

  9. Geology and palaeontology of the Late Miocene Middle Awash valley, Afar rift, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    WoldeGabriel, G; Haile-Selassie, Y; Renne, P R; Hart, W K; Ambrose, S H; Asfaw, B; Heiken, G; White, T

    2001-07-12

    The Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia's Afar rift has yielded abundant vertebrate fossils (approximately 10,000), including several hominid taxa. The study area contains a long sedimentary record spanning Late Miocene (5.3-11.2 Myr ago) to Holocene times. Exposed in a unique tectonic and volcanic transition zone between the main Ethiopian rift (MER) and the Afar rift, sediments along the western Afar rift margin in the Middle Awash provide a unique window on the Late Miocene of Ethiopia. These deposits have now yielded the earliest hominids, described in an accompanying paper and dated here to between 5.54 and 5.77 Myr. These geological and palaeobiological data from the Middle Awash provide fresh perspectives on hominid origins and early evolution. Here we show that these earliest hominids derive from relatively wet and wooded environments that were modulated by tectonic, volcanic, climatic and geomorphic processes. A similar wooded habitat also has been suggested for the 6.0 Myr hominoid fossils recently recovered from Lukeino, Kenya. These findings require fundamental reassessment of models that invoke a significant role for global climatic change and/or savannah habitat in the origin of hominids. PMID:11449271

  10. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    PubMed

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  11. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  12. A new model for the development of the active Afar volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pik, Raphaël; Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic passive margins, that represent more than the three quarters of continental margins worldwide, are privileged witnesses of the lithospheric extension processes thatform new oceanic basins. They are characterized by voluminous amounts of underplated, intruded and extruded magmas, under the form of massive lavas prisms (seaward-dipping reflectors, or SDR) during the course of thinning and stretching of the lithosphere, that eventually form the ocean-continent transition. The origin and mechanisms of formation of these objects are still largely debated today. We have focussed our attention in the last few years on the Afar volcanic province which represents an active analogue of such volcanic margins. We explored the structural and temporal relationships that exist between the development of the major thinning and stretching structures and the magmatic production in Central Afar. Conjugate precise fieldwork analysis along with lavas geochronology allowed us to revisit the timing and style of the rift formation, since the early syn-rift period of time in the W-Afar marginal area to present days. Extension is primarily accommodated over a wide area at the surface since the very initial periods of extension (~ 25 Ma) following the emplacement of Oligocene CFBs. We propose in our reconstruction of central Afar margin history that extension has been associated with important volumes of underplated mafic material that compensate crustal thinning. This has been facilitated by major crustal-scale detachments that help localize the thinning and underplating at depth. In line with this 'magmatic wide-rift' mode of extension, we demonstrate that episodic extension steps alternate with more protracted magmatic phases. The production of syn-rift massive flood basalts (~ 4 Ma) occurs after early thinning of both the crust and the lithosphere, which suggests that SDR formation, is controlled by previous tectonic event. We determined how the melting regime evolved in

  13. Triple Collision and Close Triple Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldvogel, Joerg

    In gravitational systems of point masses binary collisions are mathematically simple and well understood. Collisions of three or more particles are much more complicated, i.e. a dramatic increase of complexity occurs when the number N of particles involved in a collision increases from 2 to 3. Collisions of more than three particles seem to be of the same complexity as triple collisions. However, there are still unanswered questions concerning general N-body collisions.The reason for the complexity of triple collision is the inherent sensitivity to initial conditions for solutions passing near triple collision, even after a short time. Specifically, a solution passing near triple collision may change dramatically if the initial conditions prior to the close encounter are modified infinitesimally. In contrast, this is not the case for a binary collision.We use the planar three-body problem as a model in order to discuss the main features of triple collision of point masses and of its realistic counterpart, the close triple encounter. This comparatively simple model allows us to study all important aspects of close encounters of N > 2 gravitationally interacting point masses.In Chapters 1 and 2 we discuss classical results, beginning with the equations of motion, then studying relationships between the total angular momentum and triple collision. C. L. Siegel's famous series for triple collision solutions, one time considered the highlight of the theory of triple collision, conclude the traditional part of these lectures.Chapter 3 is devoted to studying the relationship between solutions engaging in a sharp triple collision and neighbouring solutions. The variational equation gives a rough idea of what is happening. A complete understanding can be achieved by means of R. McGehee's concept of the collision manifold, which arises by introducing special coordinates blowing up all possible states close to triple collision. In this context, possibilities of regularizing

  14. Crustal Structure of the Gulf of Aden Continental Margins, from Afar to Oman, by Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, F.; Weemstra, C.; Boschi, L.; Leroy, S. D.; Ren, Y.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Rolandone, F.; Ahmed, A.; Al Ganad, I.; Khanbari, K. M.; Doubre, C.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental rupture processes under mantle plume influence are still poorly known although extensively studied. The Gulf of Aden presents volcanic margins to the west, where they are influenced by the Afar hotspot, and non volcanic margins east of longitude 46° E. We imaged the crustal structure of the Gulf of Aden continental margins from Afar to Oman to evaluate the role of the Afar plume on the evolution of the passive margin and its extent towards the East. We use Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography to better understand the architecture and processes along the Gulf of Aden. This recent method, developed in the last decade, allows us to study the seismic signal propagating between two seismic stations. Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography is thus free from artifacts related to the distribution of earthquakes. We collected continuous records from about 200 permanent or temporary stations since 1999 to compute Rayleigh phase velocity maps over the Gulf of Aden.

  15. The August 2002 earthquake sequence in north Afar: Insights into the neotectonics of the Danakil microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayele, Atalay; Stuart, Graham; Bastow, Ian; Keir, Derek

    2007-06-01

    In August 2002, there was high seismic activity in Afar concentrated at the plateau margin of the northern Ethiopian rift east of Mekele, near the western part of the Danakil microplate. The spatial and temporal distributions of this seismic activity over four weeks indicate the NNW propagation of the Gulf of Aden rift across the Afar Depression towards the western Ethiopian plateau. Fault plane solutions for six larger earthquakes from the August 2002 sequence are estimated from moment tensor inversion of local broadband waveform data. The results show only normal faulting on NNW trending and NE dipping faults, which agree with tectonics of the area and distribution of aftershocks. No strike-slip component is observed in any of our fault plane solutions or those of other workers including Harvard CMT solutions in the region. Such motion would be indicative of oblique-slip deformation between the Nubian plate and the Danakil microplate consistent with counter-clockwise rotation of the microplate. Hypocentral depths of well-constrained events are 5-7 km, which is the approximate elastic plate thickness in the Main Ethiopian rift, possibly indicating the depth to the brittle-ductile transition zone in this part of the Afar Depression. The shallowness of the depth estimates agree with the macroseismic reports available from a wide area in northern Ethiopia. Potential future shallow crustal deformation may cause significant loss of human life and damage to property in the densely populated highland region around Mekele unless measures are taken in improving building standards. The b-value for this sequence is estimated to be 0.66 using a least squares fit, while it is 0.67 ± 0.16 from a maximum-likelihood approach. This estimated b-value is low or the frequency of occurrence of relatively larger magnitude events is high indicating that it is a highly stressed region as evidenced by the recent increase of the seismicity in the area.

  16. Mantle convection in the Middle East: Reconciling Afar upwelling, Arabia indentation and Aegean trench rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.; Jolivet, Laurent; Keskin, Mehmet

    2013-08-01

    The Middle East region represents a key site within the Tethyan domain where continental break-up, collision, backarc extension and escape tectonics are kinematically linked together. We perform global mantle circulation computations to test the role of slab pull and mantle upwellings as driving forces for the kinematics of the Arabia-Anatolia-Aegean (AAA) system, evaluating different boundary conditions and mantle density distributions as inferred from seismic tomography or slab models. Model results are compared with geodetically inferred crustal motions, residual topography, and shear wave splitting measurements. The AAA velocity field with respect to Eurasia shows an anti-clockwise toroidal pattern, with increasing velocities toward the Aegean trench. The best match to these crustal motions can be obtained by combining the effect of slab pull exerted in the Aegean with a mantle upwelling underneath Afar and, more generally, with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell. Neogene volcanism for AAA is widespread, not only in the extensional or subduction settings, but also within plates, such as in Syria-Jordan-Israel and in Turkey, with geochemical fingerprints similar of those of the Afar lava. In addition, morphological features show large uplifting domains far from plate boundaries. We speculate that the tectonic evolution of AAA is related to the progressive northward entrainment of upwelling mantle material, which is itself associated with the establishment of the downwelling part of a convection cell through the segmented Tethyan slab below the northern Zagros and Bitlis collision zone. The recently established westward flow dragged Anatolia and pushed the Aegean slab south-westward, thus accelerating backarc extension. Our model reconciles Afar plume volcanism, the collision in the Bitlis mountains and northern Zagros, and the rapid increase of Aegean trench rollback in a single coherent frame of large scale mantle

  17. Study of the deformation in Central Afar using InSAR NSBAS chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, A.; Doubre, C.; Grandin, R.; Saad, I.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression (East Africa) connects all three continental plates of Arabia, Somalia and Nubia plates. For over 20 Ma, the divergent motion of these plates has led to the formation of large normal faults building tall scarps between the high plateaus and the depression, and the development of large basins and an incipient seafloor spreading along a series of active volcano-tectonic rift segments within the depression. The space-time evolution of the active surface deformation over the whole Afar region remains uncertain. Previous tectonic and geodetic studies confirm that a large part of the current deformation is concentrated along these segments. However, the amount of extension accommodated by other non-volcanic basins and normal faulting remains unclear, despite significant micro-seismic activity. Due to the active volcanism, large transient displacements related to dyking sequence, notably in the Manda Hararo rift (2005-2010), increase the difficulty to characterize the deformation field over simple time and space scales. In this study, we attempt to obtain a complete inventory of the deformation within the whole Afar Depression and to understand the associated phenomena, which occurred in this singular tectonic environment. We study in particular, the behavior of the structures activated during the post-dyking stage of the rift segments. For this purpose, we conduct a careful processing of a large set of SAR ENVISAT images over the 2004-2010 period, we also use previous InSAR results and GPS data from permanent stations and from campaigns conducted in 1999, 2003, 2010, 2012 within a GPS network particularly dense along the Asal-Ghoubbet segment. In one hand, in the western part of Afar, the far-field response of the 2005-2010 dyke sequence appears to be the dominant surface motion on the mean velocity field. In an other hand, more eastward across the Asal-Ghoubbet rift, strong gradients of deformation are observed. The time series analysis of both In

  18. Multiple mantle upwellings through the transition zone beneath the Afar Depression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Stuart, G. W.; Thompson, D. A.; Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Goitom, B.; Ogubazghi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 7 other regional experiments and global network stations across Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S-wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. Estimates of transition zone thickness suggest that this is unlikely to be an artefact of mantle discontinuity topography as a transition zone of normal thickness underlies the majority of Afar and surrounding regions. However, a low velocity layer is evident directly above the 410 discontinuity, co-incident with some of the lowest seismic velocities suggesting that smearing of a strong low velocity layer of limited depth extent may contribute to the tomographic models in north-east Afar. The combination of seismic constraints suggests that small low temperature (<50K) upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. These, combined with possible evidence of melt above the 410 discontinuity can explain the seismic velocity models. Our images of secondary upwellings suggest that

  19. Evolution of Northeast Atlantic Magmatic Continental Margins from an Ethiopian-Afar Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. W.; Cornwell, D. G.; Ramsden, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major problems interpreting the evolution of magmatic continental margins is that the structure which should record the pre-magmatic evolution of the rift and which potentially influences the character of the rifting process is partially or completely obscured by thick basalt lava flows and sills. A limited number of deep reflection seismic profiles acquired with tuned seismic sources have penetrated the basalts and provide an image of the pre-magmatic structure, otherwise the principle data are lower resolution wide-angle/refraction profiles and potential field models which have greater uncertainties associated with them. In order to sidestep the imaging constraints we have examined the Ethiopian - Afar rift system to try to understand the rifting process. The Main Ethiopian rift contains an embryonic magmatic passive margin dominated by faulting at the margins of the rift and en-echelon magmatic zones at the centre. Further north toward Afar the rift becomes in-filled with extensive lava flows fed from fissure systems in the widening rift zone. This rift system provides, along its length, a series of 'snapshots' into the possible tectonic evolution of a magmatic continental margin. Deep seismic profiles crossing the NE Atlantic margins reveal ocean dipping reflector sequences (ODRS) overlying extended crust and lower crustal sill complexes of intruded igneous rock, which extend back beneath the continental margin. The ODRS frequently occur in fault bounded rift structures along the margins. We suggest, by analogy to the observations that can be made in the Ethiopia-Afar rift that these fault bounded basins largely form at the embryonic rift stage and are then partially or completely filled with lavas fed from fissures which are now observed as the ODRS. Also in the seismic profiles we identify volcanic constructs on the ODRS which we interpret as the equivalent of the present day fissure eruptions seen in Afar. The ocean ward dip on the ODRS is

  20. Triple Starr Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Braimbridge, M. V.; Clement, A. J.; Brown, A. Hedley; Sabar, E.; Mendel, D.

    1969-01-01

    Of nine patients who have had triple valve replacements for organic rheumatic triple valve disease two died in the postoperative period from inadequate myocardial reserve, and a third died four months later from cerebral embolism originating from clot on the left atrial wall. The remainder are well and, except for one, leading normal lives. Though cardiac transplantation has been recommended and used successfully for triple valve disease by Cooley, it is suggested that the long-term outlook today of triple valve replacement is likely to be better than that of transplantation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5809243

  1. Taking Triple Aim at the Triple Aim.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Stirling; Donaldson, Cam

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction to the USA, the Triple Aim is now being adopted in the healthcare systems of other advanced economies. Verma and Bhatia (2016) (V&B) argue that provincial governments in Canada now need to step up to the plate and lead on the implementation of a Triple Aim reform program here. Their proposals are wide ranging and ambitious, looking for governments to act as the "integrators" within the healthcare system, and lead the reforms. Our view is that, as a vision and set of goals for the healthcare system, the Triple Aim is all well and good, but as a pathway for system reform, as articulated by V&B, it misses the mark in at least three important respects. First, the emphasis on improvement driven by performance measurement and pay-for-performance is troubling and flies in the face of emerging evidence. Second, we know that scarcity can be recognized and managed, even in politically complex systems, and so we urge the Triple Aim proponents to embrace more fully notions of resource stewardship. Third, if we want to take seriously "population health" goals, we need to think very differently and consider broader health determinants; Triple Aim innovation targeted at healthcare systems will not deliver the goals. PMID:27009583

  2. Magnetotelluric imaging of upper crustal partial melt at Tendaho graben in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didana, Yohannes Lemma; Thiel, Stephan; Heinson, Graham

    2014-05-01

    We report on a recent magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the Manda Hararo magmatic segment (MHMS) within the Tendaho graben in the Afar Depression in northeastern Ethiopia. Twenty-two broadband MT sites with ˜1 km station spacing were deployed along a profile with the recorded data covering a period range from 0.003 s to 1000 s. A two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model reveals an upper crustal fracture zone (fault) and partial melt with resistivity of 1-10Ωm at a depth of >1 km. The partial melt has a maximum horizontal width of 15 km and extends to a depth of 15 km within the Afar Stratoid Series basalts. We estimate a melt fraction of about 13% based on geochemical and borehole data, and bulk resistivity from the 2-D MT inversion model. The interpreted upper crustal partial melt may have been formed by either a magma intrusion from mantle sources or a large volume of continental crust that has been fluxed by a small amount of mantle melt and heat. Within the MHMS and Tendaho graben, a magma intrusion is a plausible explanation for the upper crustal conductor. The inferred presence of a conductive fracture zone or fault with hydrothermal fluid and shallow heat sourcing magma reservoir also makes the Tendaho graben a promising prospect for the development of conventional hydrothermal geothermal energy.

  3. Grain Boundary Junctions in Microstructure Generated by Multiple Twinning

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Valerii Y.; Henager, Charles H.

    2003-10-01

    The microstructure of a Cu-Ni alloy after static recrystallization was investigated using electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope and the existence of orientationally related clusters of crystallites formed by multiple twinning has been established. Grain boundary and triple junction character within the clusters are analyzed. While the outer boundaries of the cluster are crystallographically random, all the inner boundaries have sigma 3^n misorientations. A newly developed crystallographic theory of triple junctions and multicrystallite ensembles consisting of CSL boundaries is used to describe the structure of the cluster. The presence of an alpha not egual to 1 triple junction is confirmed. Apparently, the mesostructure of recrystallized materials susceptible to annealing twinning consists

  4. Receiver function imaging of the onset of melting, implications for volcanism beneath the Afar Rift in contrast to hotspot environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, C. A.; Harmon, N.; Hammond, J. O.; Laske, G.; Kendall, J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Shearer, P. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Belachew, M.; Stuart, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Heating, melting, and stretching destroy continents at volcanic rifts. Mantle plumes are often invoked to thermally weaken the continental lithosphere and accommodate rifting through the influx of magma. However the relative effects of mechanical stretching vs. melt infiltration and weakening are not well quantified during the evolution of rifting. S-to-p (Sp) imaging beneath the Afar Rift and hotspot regions such as Hawaii provides additional constraints. We use data from the Ethiopia/Kenya Broadband Seismic Experiment (EKBSE), the Ethiopia Afar Geophysical Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE), a new UK/US led deployment of 46 stations in the Afar depression and surrounding area, and the PLUME experiment. We use two methodologies to investigate structure and locate robust features: 1) binning by conversion point and then simultaneous deconvolution in the frequency domain, and 2) extended multitaper followed by migration and stacking. We image a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~75 km beneath the flank of the Afar Rift vs. its complete absence beneath the rift, where the mantle lithosphere has been totally destroyed. Instead a strong velocity increase with depth at ~75 km depth matches geodynamic model predictions for a drop in melt percentage at the onset of decompression melting. The shallow depth of the onset of melting is consistent with a mantle potential temperature = 1350 - 1400°C, i.e., typical for adiabatic decompression melting. Therefore although a plume initially destroyed the mantle lithosphere, its influence directly beneath Afar today is minimal. Volcanism continues via adiabatic decompression melting assisted by strong melt buoyancy effects. This contrasts with a similar feature at much deeper depth, ~150 km, just west of Hawaii, where a deep thermal plume is hypothesized to impinge on the lithosphere. Improved high resolution imaging of rifting, ridges, and hotspots in a variety of stages and tectonic settings will increase constraints on the

  5. Mode of rifting in magmatic-rich setting: Tectono-magmatic evolution of the Central Afar rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël; Leroy, Sylvie; Ayalew, Dereje

    2014-05-01

    Observation of deep structures related to break-up processes at volcanic passive margins (VPM) is often a troublesome exercise: thick pre- to syn-breakup seaward-dipping reflectors (SDR) usually mask the continent-ocean boundary and hide the syn-rift tectonic structures that accommodate crustal stretching and thinning. Some of the current challenges are about clarifying 1) if tectonic stretching fits the observed thinning and 2) what is the effect of continuous magma supply and re-thickening of the crust during extension from a rheological point of view? The Afar region in Ethiopia is an ideal natural laboratory to address those questions, as it is a highly magmatic rift that is probably close enough to breakup to present some characteristics of VPM. Moreover, the structures related to rifting since Oligocene are out-cropping, onshore and well preserved. In this contribution, we present new structural field data and lavas (U-Th/He) datings along a cross-section from the Ethiopian Plateau, through the marginal graben down to the Manda-Hararo active rift axis. We mapped continent-ward normal fault array affecting highly tilted trapp series unconformably overlain by tilted Miocene (25-7 Ma) acid series. The main extensional and necking/thinning event took place during the end of this Miocene magmatic episode. It is itself overlain by flat lying Pliocene series, including the Stratoid. Balanced cross-sections of those areas allow us to constrain a surface stretching factor of about 2.1-2.9. Those findings have the following implications: - High beta factor constrained from field observations is at odd with thinning factor of ~1.3 predicted by seismic and gravimetric studies. We propose that the continental crust in Central Afar has been re-thickened by the emplacement of underplated magma and SDR. - The deformation in Central Afar appears to be largely distributed through space and time. It has been accommodated in a 200-300 km wide strip being a diffuse incipient

  6. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States. PMID:26267591

  7. Late Miocene hominin teeth from the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area, Afar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott W; Kleinsasser, Lynnette; Quade, Jay; Levin, Naomi E; McIntosh, William C; Dunbar, Nelia; Semaw, Sileshi; Rogers, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Since 2000, significant collections of Latest Miocene hominin fossils have been recovered from Chad, Kenya, and Ethiopia. These fossils have provided a better understanding of earliest hominin biology and context. Here, we describe five hominin teeth from two periods (ca. 5.4 Million-years-ago and ca. 6.3 Ma) that were recovered from the Adu-Asa Formation in the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area in the Afar, Ethiopia that we assign to either Hominina, gen. et sp. indet. or Ardipithecus kadabba. These specimens are compared with extant African ape and other Latest Miocene and Early Pliocene hominin teeth. The derived morphology of the large, non-sectorial maxillary canine and mandibular third premolar links them with later hominins and they are phenetically distinguishable and thus phyletically distinct from extant apes. PMID:25795338

  8. Magmatism on rift flanks: Insights from ambient noise phase velocity in Afar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Keir, Derek; Ren, Yong; Molinari, Irene; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. M.; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al; Goitom, Berhe; Ayele, Atalay

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continents in magmatic settings, the extension of the rift valley is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting and progressively migrate in space and time toward the spreading axis. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only the upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems but also both upper and lower crust beneath the rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occur at the surface. Magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process and may persist through to early seafloor spreading.

  9. Late Miocene hominin teeth from the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area, Afar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott W; Kleinsasser, Lynnette; Quade, Jay; Levin, Naomi E; McIntosh, William C; Dunbar, Nelia; Semaw, Sileshi; Rogers, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Since 2000, significant collections of Latest Miocene hominin fossils have been recovered from Chad, Kenya, and Ethiopia. These fossils have provided a better understanding of earliest hominin biology and context. Here, we describe five hominin teeth from two periods (ca. 5.4 Million-years-ago and ca. 6.3 Ma) that were recovered from the Adu-Asa Formation in the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area in the Afar, Ethiopia that we assign to either Hominina, gen. et sp. indet. or Ardipithecus kadabba. These specimens are compared with extant African ape and other Latest Miocene and Early Pliocene hominin teeth. The derived morphology of the large, non-sectorial maxillary canine and mandibular third premolar links them with later hominins and they are phenetically distinguishable and thus phyletically distinct from extant apes.

  10. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States.

  11. Evolution of the Main Ethiopian Rift in the frame of Afar and Kenya rifts propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Manetti, Piero; Mazzarini, Francesco; Abebe, Tsegaye; Pecskay, Zoltan

    2005-02-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) has a complex structural pattern composed of southern, central, and northern segments. Ages of onset of faulting and volcanism apparently indicate a heterogeneous time-space evolution of the segments, generally referred to as a northward progression of the rifting process. New structural, petrological, and geochronological data have been used to attempt reconciling the evolution of the distinct MER segments into a volcanotectonic scenario accounting for the propagation of the Afar and the Kenya Rifts. In this evolutionary model, extension affected the Southern MER in the early Miocene (20-21 Ma) due to the northward propagation of the Kenya Rift-related deformation. This event lasted until 11 Ma, then deformation decreased radically and was resumed in Quaternary times. In the late Miocene (11 Ma), deformation focused in the Northern MER forming a proto-rift that we consider as the southernmost propagation of Afar. No major extensional deformation affected the Central MER in this period, as testified by the emplacement at 12-8 Ma of extensive plateau basalts currently outcropping on both rift margins. Significant rift opening occurred in the Central MER during the Pliocene (˜5-3 Ma) with the eruption of voluminous ignimbritic covers (Nazret sequence) exposed both on the rift shoulders and on the rift floor. The apparent discrepancy between the heterogeneous propagation of the three MER segments could be reconciled by considering the opening of Central MER and the later reactivation of the Southern MER as due to a southward propagation of rifting triggered by counterclockwise rotation of the Somalian plate starting around 10 Ma.

  12. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W; Gasparini, Nicola; Ramirez Quiroz, Cesar Omar; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V; Radmilović, Velimir R; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-07-16

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies.

  13. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W.; Gasparini, Nicola; Quiroz, Cesar Omar Ramirez; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V.; Radmilović, Velimir R.; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-07-01

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies.

  14. A generic concept to overcome bandgap limitations for designing highly efficient multi-junction photovoltaic cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Li, Ning; Fecher, Frank W.; Gasparini, Nicola; Quiroz, Cesar Omar Ramirez; Bronnbauer, Carina; Hou, Yi; Radmilović, Vuk V.; Radmilović, Velimir R.; Spiecker, Erdmann; Forberich, Karen; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    The multi-junction concept is the most relevant approach to overcome the Shockley–Queisser limit for single-junction photovoltaic cells. The record efficiencies of several types of solar technologies are held by series-connected tandem configurations. However, the stringent current-matching criterion presents primarily a material challenge and permanently requires developing and processing novel semiconductors with desired bandgaps and thicknesses. Here we report a generic concept to alleviate this limitation. By integrating series- and parallel-interconnections into a triple-junction configuration, we find significantly relaxed material selection and current-matching constraints. To illustrate the versatile applicability of the proposed triple-junction concept, organic and organic-inorganic hybrid triple-junction solar cells are constructed by printing methods. High fill factors up to 68% without resistive losses are achieved for both organic and hybrid triple-junction devices. Series/parallel triple-junction cells with organic, as well as perovskite-based subcells may become a key technology to further advance the efficiency roadmap of the existing photovoltaic technologies. PMID:26177808

  15. Upper mantle structure of shear-waves velocities and stratification of anisotropy in the Afar Hotspot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.-P.; Cara, M.; Stutzmann, E.; Debayle, E.; Lépine, J.-C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Beucler, E.; Sebai, A.; Roult, G.; Ayele, A.; Sholan, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar area is one of the biggest continental hotspots active since about 30 Ma. It may be the surface expression of a mantle "plume" related to the African Superswell. Central Africa is also characterized by extensive intraplate volcanism. Around the same time (30 Ma), volcanic activity re-started in several regions of the African plate and hotspots such as Darfur, Tibesti, Hoggar and Mount Cameroon, characterized by a significant though modest volcanic production. The interactions of mantle upwelling with asthenosphere, lithosphere and crust remain unclear and seismic anisotropy might help in investigating these complex interactions. We used data from the global seismological permanent FDSN networks (GEOSCOPE, IRIS, MedNet, GEO- FON, etc.), from the temporary PASSCAL experiments in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia and a French deployment of 5 portable broadband stations surrounding the Afar Hotspot. A classical two-step tomographic inversion from surface waves performed in the Horn of Africa with selected Rayleigh wave and Love wave seismograms leads to a 3D-model of both S V velocities and azimuthal anisotropy, as well as radial SH/ SV anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of 500 km. The region is characterized by low shear-wave velocities beneath the Afar Hotspot, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and East of the Tanzania Craton to 400 km depth. High velocities are present in the Eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The results of this study enable us to rule out a possible feeding of the Central Africa hotspots from the "Afar plume" above 150-200 km. The azimuthal anisotropy displays a complex pattern near the Afar Hotspot. Radial anisotropy, although poorly resolved laterally, exhibits S H slower than S V waves down to about 150 km depth, and a reverse pattern below. Both azimuthal and radial anisotropies show a stratification of anisotropy at depth, corresponding to different physical processes. These results suggest that the Afar hotspot has a different and

  16. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  17. A directional nucleation-zipping mechanism for triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Patrizia; Arimondo, Paola B; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Garestier, Thérèse; Hélène, Claude; Sun, Jian-Sheng

    2002-12-15

    A detailed kinetic study of triple helix formation was performed by surface plasmon resonance. Three systems were investigated involving 15mer pyrimidine oligonucleotides as third strands. Rate constants and activation energies were validated by comparison with thermodynamic values calculated from UV-melting analysis. Replacement of a T.A base pair by a C.G pair at either the 5' or the 3' end of the target sequence allowed us to assess mismatch effects and to delineate the mechanism of triple helix formation. Our data show that the association rate constant is governed by the sequence of base triplets on the 5' side of the triplex (referred to as the 5' side of the target oligopurine strand) and provides evidence that the reaction pathway for triple helix formation in the pyrimidine motif proceeds from the 5' end to the 3' end of the triplex according to the nucleation-zipping model. It seems that this is a general feature for all triple helices formation, probably due to the right-handedness of the DNA double helix that provides a stronger base stacking at the 5' than at the 3' duplex-triplex junction. Understanding the mechanism of triple helix formation is not only of fundamental interest, but may also help in designing better triple helix-forming oligonucleotides for gene targeting and control of gene expression.

  18. Triple Point Topological Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ziming; Winkler, Georg W.; Wu, QuanSheng; Li, Ju; Soluyanov, Alexey A.

    2016-07-01

    Topologically protected fermionic quasiparticles appear in metals, where band degeneracies occur at the Fermi level, dictated by the band structure topology. While in some metals these quasiparticles are direct analogues of elementary fermionic particles of the relativistic quantum field theory, other metals can have symmetries that give rise to quasiparticles, fundamentally different from those known in high-energy physics. Here, we report on a new type of topological quasiparticles—triple point fermions—realized in metals with symmorphic crystal structure, which host crossings of three bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level protected by point group symmetries. We find two topologically different types of triple point fermions, both distinct from any other topological quasiparticles reported to date. We provide examples of existing materials that host triple point fermions of both types and discuss a variety of physical phenomena associated with these quasiparticles, such as the occurrence of topological surface Fermi arcs, transport anomalies, and topological Lifshitz transitions.

  19. The Afar region as an analogue of mature oceanic ridges: a model for slow spreading centres?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, Sarah; Pik, Raphaël; Burnard, Peter; France, Lyderic; Whaler, Kathryn

    2014-05-01

    The Afar depression (Ethiopia) is organised along magmatic rift segments which morphologically resemble oceanic ridges. The segmentation in individual magmatic rift segments results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed in mature oceanic ridges. Therefore the Afar region represents an ideal natural and subaerial analogue laboratory to study the evolution of rift/ridge morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences.We focussed on the Dabbahu rift segment which experienced in 2005 a well-documented rifting event. This tectono-volcanic crisis provided invaluable information via the direct observation of a sequence of dyke intrusions. However, over timescales of 1 to 100 kyrs - a key period over which the main morphology of a rift/ridge segment is acquired - chronological constraints are very scarce. In order to address the lack of data on these timescales, a multidisciplinary study of the Dabbahu rift has combined surface exposure dating (3He and 36Cl) of lavas and fault scarp with major & trace element compositions and field/remote sensing mapping. Over three field campaigns, we investigated the Northern and central parts of the rift, from its western shoulders to the axial valley, allowing the long-term interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes to be deciphered (Medynski et al., 2013; Medynski et al. 2014a,b submitted). Based on this subaerial example of an active magmatic rift segment, we propose a model for the acquisition of slow spreading oceanic ridge morphology, where topography building is tightly tied to magma budget and location. Over a period of ~100 ka, magmatic accretion is maintained by successive intrusions of dikes that spread from the various magma chambers distributed along the rift, and which also provoke a local topographic response. The main topographic development is not continuous, but rather is linked to the degree of differentiation of these reservoirs. Our data show that magma chambers

  20. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  1. A kinematic model for Afar Depression lithospheric thinning and its implications for hominid evolution: an exercise in plate-tectonic paleoanthropology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T.; Often, M.; Wheeler, W. H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a detailed Nubia-Arabia-Somalia (NU-AR-SOM) kinematic reconstruction based on magnetic sea floor isochrons in the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea and piercing points along the Red Sea margins. The reconstruction is combined with digital topographic and depth-to-Moho data to constrain in 4D the Late Oligocene to present-day evolution of the Afar supra-Moho crust. Opposite end-member models for crustal evolution are described. We conclude that less than 20% of the present-day Afar supra-Moho crust was constructed by magmatic processes such as diking and underplating. The reconstructions indicate that the greater percentage of crustal thinning (extension) occurred before 6.2 Ma. We model the thinning of the effective elastic lithosphere that accompanied extension, and show that the regional-scale topographic development of the Afar depression was virtually complete by Mid Pliocene time. The plate-tectonic model has paleoanthropological implications. Prior to 6.2 Ma the proximal positions of NU-SOM, AR, and the Danakil block suggest subaerial conditions prevailed between Yemen and Ethiopia. Uninhibited Africa-Eurasia faunal exchange through Afar and Arabia (corroborated by isotopic and paleontologic data) was tectonically permissible until the time of the earliest hominids. Continued stretching caused the Afar land bridge(s) to disappear during Early to Mid Pliocene time. Primitive hominid populations living within the Afar Depression became isolated from AR sometime before ~3.2 Ma. With the plateau becoming less habitable due to long-term Late Neogene cooling, hominids that remained in the Afar Depression were required to adapt to a smaller range that was effectively bounded by the already well-developed NU-SOM escarpments and the newly opened Straits of Bab el Mandeb. The combination of high quality habitat,topographic confinement, and a gradual (tectonic) reduction in range, exacerbated by potentially severe fluctuations in local climate (well documented by land

  2. Nearly Isosceles Pythagorean Triples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryden, Robert

    1983-01-01

    The nature of an investigation into numbers termed Nearly Isosceles Pythagorean Triples (NIPTs) is detailed. The exploration, even though it is stated to have no practical value, is defended as helping pupils see the beauty of patterns in mathematics. Two questions regarding the pattern of generating NIPTs are noted. (MP)

  3. September 2005 mega-dike emplacement in the Manda-Harraro nascent oceanic rift (Afar depression)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayele, Atalay; Keir, Derek; Ebinger, Cynthia; Wright, Tim J.; Stuart, Graham W.; Buck, W. Roger; Jacques, Eric; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Sholan, Jamal

    2009-10-01

    Local and regional seismic data constrain the space-time history of deformation and likely magma sources for the September 2005 diking episode in the Manda-Harraro rift zone of the Afar depression. The results distinguish three centers from which subhorizontal dike propagation progressed: two distinct sources around the Dabbahu-Gab'ho Volcanic Complex (DVC) and the third at the Ado'Ale Volcanic Complex (AVC). The temporal development of seismicity shows that the majority of the dike volume is fed from beneath AVC and migrated laterally with an average rate of 15-30 cm/sec. This dike emplacement at a divergent plate boundary is unusual due to the rapid intrusion of a large volume of magma and the large amount of seismic moment release. We interpret this volcano-tectonic crisis as a complex interaction of multiple magma plumbing sources and lithosphere at a plate boundary under extension. Such repeated episodes will eventually shape the incipient oceanic rift morphology.

  4. Geoscience Methods Lead to Paleo-anthropological Discoveries in Afar Rift, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WoldeGabriel, Giday; Renne, Paul R.; Hart, William K.; Ambrose, Stanley; Asfaw, Berhane; White, Tim D.

    2004-07-01

    With few exceptions, most of the hominid evolutionary record in Africa is closely associated with the East African Rift System. The exceptions are the South African and Chadian hominids collected from the southern and west-central parts of the continent, respectively. The Middle Awash region stands alone as the most prolific paleoanthropological area ever discovered (Figure 1). Its paleontological record has yielded over 13,000 vertebrate fossils, including several hominid taxa, ranging in age from 5.8 Ma to the present. The uniqueness of the Middle Awash hominid sites lies in their occurrence within long, > 6 Ma volcanic and sedimentary stratigraphic records. The Middle Awash region has yielded the longest hominid record yet available. The region is characterized by distinct geologic features related to a volcanic and tectonic transition zone between the continental Main Ethiopian and the proto-oceanic Afar Rifts. The rift floor is wider-200 km-than other parts of the East African Rift (Figure 1). Moreover, its Quaternary axial rift zone is wide and asymetrically located close to the western margin. The fossil assemblages and the lithostratigraphic records suggest that volcanic and tectonic activities within the broad rift floor and the adjacent rift margins were intense and episodic during the late Neogene rift evolution.

  5. Magmatism on rift flanks: insights from Ambient-Noise Phase-velocity in Afar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Ren, Yong; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Keir, Derek; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. Michael; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continent in the presence of magma, strain is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting, and progressively migrate in space and time towards axial magma intrusion. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase-velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems, but also both upper and lower crust beneath rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occurs at the surface. The results show that magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process, and may persist through to early seafloor spreading. Since ongoing flank magmatism during breakup impacts the thermal evolution of the lithosphere, it has implications for the subsidence history of the rift.

  6. Mapping Distribution and Forecasting Invasion of Prosopis juliflora in Ethiopia's Afar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. M.; Wakie, T.; Luizza, M.; Evangelista, P.

    2014-12-01

    Invasion of non-native species is among the most critical threats to natural ecosystems and economies world-wide. Mesquite (which includes some 45 species) is an invasive deciduous tree which is known to have an array of negative impacts on ecosystems and rural livelihoods in arid and semi-arid regions around the world, dominating millions of hectares of land in Asia, Africa, Australia and the Americas. In Ethiopia, Prosopis juliflora (the only reported mesquite) is the most pervasive plant invader, threatening local livelihoods and the country's unique biodiversity. Due to its rapid spread and persistence, P. juliflora has been ranked as one of the leading threats to traditional land use, exceeded only by drought and conflict. This project utilized NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) data and species distribution modeling to map current infestations of P. juliflora in the Afar region of northeastern Ethiopia, and forecast its suitable habitat across the entire country. This project provided a time and cost-effective strategy for conducting risk assessments of invasive mesquite and subsequent monitoring and mitigation efforts by land managers and local communities.

  7. Chronostratigraphy of the Miocene-Pliocene Sagantole Formation, Middle Awash Valley, Afar rift, Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, P.R. |; WoldeGabriel, G.; Heiken, G.; Hart, W.K.; White, T.D.

    1999-06-01

    The Sagantole Formation comprises more than 200 m of lacustrine, alluvial, and volcaniclastic sediments, plus compositionally bimodal tephras and basaltic lavas, exposed in a domelike horst named the Central Awash Complex in the southwestern Afar rift of Ethiopia. The Sagantole Formation is widely known for abundant vertebrate faunas, including the 4.4 Ma primitive hominid Ardipithecus ramidus. New lithostratigraphic data are used to subdivide the Sagantole Formation into the Kuseralee, Gawto, Haradaso, Aramis, Beidareem, Adgantole, and Belohdelie Members, in ascending order. The members are defined on the basis of lithologic differences and laterally continuous bounding tephras. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating of 12 intercalated volcanic units firmly establishes the age of the Sagantole Formation to be 5.6 to 3.9 Ma, significantly older than previous proposals based on erroneous correlations. Magnetostratigraphic data reveal eight paleomagnetic polarity zones, which can be correlated unambiguously with the Thvera, Sidufjall, Nunivak, and Cochiti Subchrons of the Gilbert Chron. Thus, by reference to the geomagnetic polarity time scale, seven additional chronological datums can be placed in the Sagantole Formation. With a total of 19 such datums, the age resolution anywhere in the Sagantole Formation is better than {+-}100 k.y., making this the best-dated Miocene-Pliocene succession in Africa.

  8. Dielectric effect on electric fields in the vicinity of the metal-vacuum-dielectric junction.

    PubMed

    Chung, M S; Mayer, A; Miskovsky, N M; Weiss, B L; Cutler, P H

    2013-09-01

    The dielectric effect was theoretically investigated in order to describe the electric field in the vicinity of a junction of a metal, dielectric, and vacuum. The assumption of two-dimensional symmetry of the junction leads to a simple analytic form and to a systematic numerical calculation for the field. The electric field obtained for the triple junction was found to be enhanced or reduced according to a certain criterion determined by the contact angles and dielectric constant. Further numerical calculations of the dielectric effect show that an electric field can experience a larger enhancement or reduction for a quadruple junction than that achieved for the triple junction. It was also found that even though it changes slowly in comparison with the shape effect, the dielectric effect was noticeably large over the entire range of the shape change.

  9. The Quaternary volcanic rocks of the northern Afar Depression (northern Ethiopia): Perspectives on petrology, geochemistry, and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, Miruts; Koeberl, Christian; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    The northern Afar Depression is one of the most volcano-tectonically active parts of the East African Rift system, a place where oceanic rifting may be beginning to form an incipient oceanic crust. In its center, over an area that is ∼80 km long and ∼50 km wide, there are seven major NNW-SSE-aligned shield volcanoes/volcanic edifices surrounded by compositionally distinct fissure-fed basalts. The Quaternary lavas in this area range from transitional to tholeiitic basalts, with significant across-axis variation both in mineralogy and chemistry. The variation in the contents of the major elements (TiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3), incompatible trace elements (Nd, Hf, Th, Ta), and the contents and ratios of the rare earth elements (REE) (e.g., (La/Yb)n = 5.3-8.9) indicate some variation in the petrogenetic processes responsible for the formation of these basalts. However, the variation in isotopic compositions of the mafic lavas is minimal (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7036-0.7041, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51286-0.51289), which suggests only one source for all the Danakil Depression basalts. These basalts have isotope and incompatible trace element ratios that overlap with those of the Oligocene High-Ti2 flood basalts from the Ethiopian Plateau, interpreted as being derived from the last phase/tail of the Afar mantle plume source. Moreover, the Ce/Pb, Ba/U ratios indicate that the involvement of continental crust in the petrogenesis of the basaltic rocks is minimal; instead, both depth and degree of melting of the source reservoir underneath the northern Afar Depression played a major role for the production of incompatible element-enriched basalts (e.g., AleBagu Shield basalts) and the incompatible element-depleted tholeiitic basalts (e.g., Erta'Ale and Alu Shield basalts).

  10. Determinants of Desire for Children among HIV-Positive Women in the Afar Region, Ethiopia: Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The desire for a child in Ethiopian society is normal. Among HIV positive women, due to the risk of MTCT, it is imperative to understand factors influencing women’s desire for children. This study aimed at assessing factors associated with desire for children among HIV-positive women in two selected hospitals of Afar Regional State, Ethiopia. Methods A facility based case-control study was conducted among 157 cases (with a desire) and 157 controls of HIV positive individuals registered in the selected health facilities. The participants were selected by random sampling technique. Data were collected using face-to-face interview and was analyzed using logistic regression. Result Factors found to be independently associated with desire for children were age categories of 20–24 years (OR = 6.22, 1.29–10.87) and 25–29 years (OR = 14.6, 3.05–21.60), being married (OR = 5.51, 2.19–13.54), Afar ethnicity (OR 6.93, 1.19–12.14), having HIV-positive children (OR 0.23, 0.09–0.63), duration on ART more than one year (3.51, 1.68–9.05), CD4 count greater than 350 (OR 4.83, 1.51–7.27) and discussion of reproductive health issues with health providers (OR 0.31, 0.12–0.51). Conclusion Women who were young, married, Afar, those who received ART more than one year, and had CD4 count >350 were more likely to have a desire for children. Recommendation Health care workers at ART clinic should openly discuss about the reproductive options for the women living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:26930467

  11. "Coming from afar" and "temporarily becoming the patient without knowing it": two necessary analytic conditions according to Ferenczi's later thought.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Franco

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the author discusses two points regarding Ferenczi's views of psychoanalysis. The first concerns the fact that analysts, like their patients, "come from afar" (a concept of Borgogno, 2011). The second, closely linked to the first, has to do with Ferenczi's belief that psychoanalytical knowledge is not intellectual but visceral, seeing that if analysts are to truly understand their patients they must first "take on" their suffering in such a way as to "become the patient." The author follows Ferenczi's progression along these two points through his whole oeuvre, from his first psychoanalytical writings to the Clinical Diary (1932a) of the last year of his life.

  12. Magmatic cycles pace tectonic and morphological expression of rifting (Afar depression, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Dumont, S.; Grandin, R.; Williams, A.; Blard, P.-H.; Schimmelpfennig, I.; Vye-Brown, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Benedetti, L.; Yirgu, G.

    2016-07-01

    The existence of narrow axial volcanic zones of mid-oceanic ridges testifies of the underlying concentration of both melt distribution and tectonic strain. As a result of repeated diking and faulting, axial volcanic zones therefore represent a spectacular topographic expression of plate divergence. However, the submarine location of oceanic ridges makes it difficult to constrain the interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes in time and space. In this study, we use the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) magmatic rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia) to provide quantitative constraints on the response of tectonic processes to variations in magma supply at divergent plate boundaries. The DMH magmatic rift segment is considered an analogue of an oceanic ridge, exhibiting a fault pattern, extension rate and topographic relief comparable to intermediate- to slow-spreading ridges. Here, we focus on the northern and central parts of DMH rift, where we present quantitative slip rates for the past 40 kyr for major and minor normal fault scarps in the vicinity of a recent (September 2005) dike intrusion. The data obtained show that the axial valley topography has been created by enhanced slip rates that occurred during periods of limited volcanism, suggestive of reduced magmatic activity, probably in association with changes in strain distribution in the crust. Our results indicate that the development of the axial valley topography has been regulated by the lifetimes of the magma reservoirs and their spatial distribution along the segment, and thus to the magmatic cycles of replenishment/differentiation (<100 kyr). Our findings are also consistent with magma-induced deformation in magma-rich rift segments. The record of two tectonic events of metric vertical amplitude on the fault that accommodated the most part of surface displacement during the 2005 dike intrusion suggests that the latter type of intrusion occurs roughly every 10 kyr in the northern part of the DMH segment.

  13. Magma-maintained rift segmentation at continental rupture in the 2005 Afar dyking episode.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tim J; Ebinger, Cindy; Biggs, Juliet; Ayele, Atalay; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Keir, Derek; Stork, Anna

    2006-07-20

    Seafloor spreading centres show a regular along-axis segmentation thought to be produced by a segmented magma supply in the passively upwelling mantle. On the other hand, continental rifts are segmented by large offset normal faults, and many lack magmatism. It is unclear how, when and where the ubiquitous segmented melt zones are emplaced during the continental rupture process. Between 14 September and 4 October 2005, 163 earthquakes (magnitudes greater than 3.9) and a volcanic eruption occurred within the approximately 60-km-long Dabbahu magmatic segment of the Afar rift, a nascent seafloor spreading centre in stretched continental lithosphere. Here we present a three-dimensional deformation field for the Dabbahu rifting episode derived from satellite radar data, which shows that the entire segment ruptured, making it the largest to have occurred on land in the era of satellite geodesy. Simple elastic modelling shows that the magmatic segment opened by up to 8 m, yet seismic rupture can account for only 8 per cent of the observed deformation. Magma was injected along a dyke between depths of 2 and 9 km, corresponding to a total intrusion volume of approximately 2.5 km3. Much of the magma appears to have originated from shallow chambers beneath Dabbahu and Gabho volcanoes at the northern end of the segment, where an explosive fissural eruption occurred on 26 September 2005. Although comparable in magnitude to the ten year (1975-84) Krafla events in Iceland, seismic data suggest that most of the Dabbahu dyke intrusion occurred in less than a week. Thus, magma intrusion via dyking, rather than segmented normal faulting, maintains and probably initiated the along-axis segmentation along this sector of the Nubia-Arabia plate boundary. PMID:16855588

  14. Phylogeny of early Australopithecus: new fossil evidence from the Woranso-Mille (central Afar, Ethiopia).

    PubMed

    Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2010-10-27

    The earliest evidence of Australopithecus goes back to ca 4.2 Ma with the first recorded appearance of Australopithecus 'anamensis' at Kanapoi, Kenya. Australopithecus afarensis is well documented between 3.6 and 3.0 Ma mainly from deposits at Laetoli (Tanzania) and Hadar (Ethiopia). The phylogenetic relationship of these two 'species' is hypothesized as ancestor-descendant. However, the lack of fossil evidence from the time between 3.6 and 3.9 Ma has been one of its weakest points. Recent fieldwork in the Woranso-Mille study area in the Afar region of Ethiopia has yielded fossil hominids dated between 3.6 and 3.8 Ma. These new fossils play a significant role in testing the proposed relationship between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. The Woranso-Mille hominids (3.6-3.8 Ma) show a mosaic of primitive, predominantly Au. anamensis-like, and some derived (Au. afarensis-like) dentognathic features. Furthermore, they show that, as currently known, there are no discrete and functionally significant anatomical differences between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. Based on the currently available evidence, it appears that there is no compelling evidence to falsify the hypothesis of 'chronospecies pair' or ancestor-descendant relationship between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. Most importantly, however, the temporally and morphologically intermediate Woranso-Mille hominids indicate that the species names Au. afarensis and Au. anamensis do not refer to two real species, but rather to earlier and later representatives of a single phyletically evolving lineage. However, if retaining these two names is necessary for communication purposes, the Woranso-Mille hominids are best referred to as Au. anamensis based on new dentognathic evidence.

  15. InSAR observations of post-rifting deformation around the Dabbahu rift segment, Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamling, Ian J.; Wright, Tim J.; Calais, Eric; Lewi, Elias; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Increased displacement rates have been observed following manylarge earthquakes and magmatic events. Although an order of magnitude smaller than the displacements associated with the main event, the post-seismic or post-rifting deformation may continue for years to decades after the initial earthquake or dyke intrusion. Due to the rare occurrence of subaerial rifting events, there are very few observations to constrain models of post-rifting deformation. In 2005 September, a 60-km-long dyke was intruded along the Dabbahu segment of the Nubia-Arabia Plate boundary (Afar, Ethiopia), marking the beginning of an ongoing rifting episode. Continued activity has been monitored using satellite radar interferometry and data from global positioning system instruments deployed around the rift in response to the initial intrusion. Using multiple satellite passes, we are able to separate the rift perpendicular and vertical displacement fields around the Dabbahu segment. Rift perpendicular and vertical rates of up to 180 and 240 mm yr-1, respectively. Here, we show that models of viscoelastic relaxation alone are insufficient to reproduce the observed deformation field and that a large portion of the observed signal is related to the movement of magma within the rift segment. Our models suggest upper mantle viscosities of 1018-19 Pa s overlain by an elastic crust of between 15 and 30 km. To fit the observations, inflation and deflation of magma chambers in the centre of the rift and to the south east of the rift axis is required at rates of ˜0.13 and -0.08 km3 yr-1.

  16. Geodetic measurements and numerical models of the Afar rifting sequence 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, T.; Feigl, K.; Calais, E.; Hamling, I. J.; Wright, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Rifting episodes are characterized by magma migration and dike intrusions that perturb the stress field within the surrounding lithosphere, inducing viscous flow in the lower crust and upper mantle that leads to observable, transient surface deformation. The Manda Hararo-Dabbahu rifting episode that occurred in the Afar depression between 2005 and 2010 is the first such episode to unfold fully in the era of satellite geodesy, thus providing a unique opportunity to probe the rheology of lithosphere at a divergent plate boundary. GPS and SAR measurements over the region since 2005 show accelerated surface deformation rates during post-diking intervals [Wright et al., Nature Geosci., 2012]. Using these observations in combination with a numerical model, we estimate model parameters that best explain the deformation signal. Our model accounts for three distinct processes: (i) secular plate spreading between Nubian and Arabian plates, (ii) time dependent post-rifting viscoelastic relaxation following the 14 dike intrusions that occurred between 2005 and 2010, including the 60 km long mega dike intrusion of September 2005, and (iii) magma accumulation within crustal reservoirs that feed the dikes. To model the time dependent deformation field, we use the open-source unstructured finite element code, Defmod [Ali, 2011, http://defmod.googlecode.com/]. Using a gradient-based iterative scheme [Ali and Feigl, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 2012], we optimize the fit between observed and modeled deformation to estimate parameters in the model, including the locking depth of the rift zone, geometry and depth of magma reservoirs and rheological properties of lower crust and upper mantle, along with their formal uncertainties.

  17. Magma-maintained rift segmentation at continental rupture in the 2005 Afar dyking episode.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tim J; Ebinger, Cindy; Biggs, Juliet; Ayele, Atalay; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Keir, Derek; Stork, Anna

    2006-07-20

    Seafloor spreading centres show a regular along-axis segmentation thought to be produced by a segmented magma supply in the passively upwelling mantle. On the other hand, continental rifts are segmented by large offset normal faults, and many lack magmatism. It is unclear how, when and where the ubiquitous segmented melt zones are emplaced during the continental rupture process. Between 14 September and 4 October 2005, 163 earthquakes (magnitudes greater than 3.9) and a volcanic eruption occurred within the approximately 60-km-long Dabbahu magmatic segment of the Afar rift, a nascent seafloor spreading centre in stretched continental lithosphere. Here we present a three-dimensional deformation field for the Dabbahu rifting episode derived from satellite radar data, which shows that the entire segment ruptured, making it the largest to have occurred on land in the era of satellite geodesy. Simple elastic modelling shows that the magmatic segment opened by up to 8 m, yet seismic rupture can account for only 8 per cent of the observed deformation. Magma was injected along a dyke between depths of 2 and 9 km, corresponding to a total intrusion volume of approximately 2.5 km3. Much of the magma appears to have originated from shallow chambers beneath Dabbahu and Gabho volcanoes at the northern end of the segment, where an explosive fissural eruption occurred on 26 September 2005. Although comparable in magnitude to the ten year (1975-84) Krafla events in Iceland, seismic data suggest that most of the Dabbahu dyke intrusion occurred in less than a week. Thus, magma intrusion via dyking, rather than segmented normal faulting, maintains and probably initiated the along-axis segmentation along this sector of the Nubia-Arabia plate boundary.

  18. Prevalence of Schistosoma haematobium Infection among School-Age Children in Afar Area, Northeastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Degarege, Abraham; Mekonnen, Zeleke; Levecke, Bruno; Legesse, Mengistu; Negash, Yohannes; Vercruysse, Jozef; Erko, Berhanu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma haematobium infection was determined among school-age children living in the Middle and Lower Awash Valley, Afar Regional State of Ethiopia. Between February and May 2014, urine samples were collected from 885 school-age children (5-16 years of age) from the Middle (n = 632; 4 villages) and Lower (n = 253; 3 villages) Awash Valley. All samples were processed using urine filtration to detect and quantify S. haematobium eggs. In addition, a subset of the urine samples was tested for hematuria using a urine dipstick (n = 556). The overall prevalence was 20.8% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 18.1%, 23.5%), based on urine filtration but the prevalence considerably varied across villages both in the Middle (from 12.5% to 37.0%) and Lower Awash Valley (from 0 to 5.3%). The overall mean urine egg count (UEC) among the infected children was 4.0 eggs/10 ml of urine (95% CI = 2.43, 5.52). The infection intensity varied from 0.4 eggs/10 ml of urine to 7.7 eggs/10 ml of urine in the Middle Awash Valley, and from 0 to 1.1 eggs/10 ml of urine in Lower Awash Valley. Age and sex were not associated with S. haematobium infection based on the multivariable logistic regression model. The prevalence of hematuria was 56.3% (95% CI = 52.2%, 60.4%) among a subset of the study participants (556) examined using the urine dipstick. The prevalence of hematuria also varies with villages from 8.3% to 93.2%. In conclusion, the prevalence of S. haematobium infection in the Middle Awash Valley was high and it varies across villages. Hence, children living in the present study villages of the Middle Awash Valley need to be treated with praziquantel to reduce morbidity and disrupt transmission. PMID:26252615

  19. Phylogeny of early Australopithecus: new fossil evidence from the Woranso-Mille (central Afar, Ethiopia)

    PubMed Central

    Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2010-01-01

    The earliest evidence of Australopithecus goes back to ca 4.2 Ma with the first recorded appearance of Australopithecus ‘anamensis’ at Kanapoi, Kenya. Australopithecus afarensis is well documented between 3.6 and 3.0 Ma mainly from deposits at Laetoli (Tanzania) and Hadar (Ethiopia). The phylogenetic relationship of these two ‘species’ is hypothesized as ancestor–descendant. However, the lack of fossil evidence from the time between 3.6 and 3.9 Ma has been one of its weakest points. Recent fieldwork in the Woranso-Mille study area in the Afar region of Ethiopia has yielded fossil hominids dated between 3.6 and 3.8 Ma. These new fossils play a significant role in testing the proposed relationship between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. The Woranso-Mille hominids (3.6–3.8 Ma) show a mosaic of primitive, predominantly Au. anamensis-like, and some derived (Au. afarensis-like) dentognathic features. Furthermore, they show that, as currently known, there are no discrete and functionally significant anatomical differences between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. Based on the currently available evidence, it appears that there is no compelling evidence to falsify the hypothesis of ‘chronospecies pair’ or ancestor–descendant relationship between Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis. Most importantly, however, the temporally and morphologically intermediate Woranso-Mille hominids indicate that the species names Au. afarensis and Au. anamensis do not refer to two real species, but rather to earlier and later representatives of a single phyletically evolving lineage. However, if retaining these two names is necessary for communication purposes, the Woranso-Mille hominids are best referred to as Au. anamensis based on new dentognathic evidence. PMID:20855306

  20. 10.4% Efficient triple organic solar cells containing near infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerheim, Rico; Körner, Christian; Oesen, Benjamin; Leo, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serially stacked subcells with spectrally different absorber materials. For the triple junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor materials DCV5T-Me for the green region and Tol2-benz-bodipy or Ph2-benz-bodipy as near infrared absorbers. The broader spectral response allows an efficiency increase from a pure DCV5T-Me triple cell to a triple junction containing a Ph2-benz-bodipy subcell, reaching 10.4%. As often observed for organic photovoltaics, the efficiency is further increased at low light intensities to 11%, which allows improved energy harvesting under real outdoor conditions and better performance indoor.

  1. Fluid inclusion and stable isotopes studies of epithermal gold-bearing veins in the SE Afar Rift (Djibouti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, N.; Boiron, M. C.; Grassineau, N.; Fouquet, Y.; Le Gall, B.; Mohamed, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Afar rift results from the interaction of a number of actively-propagating tectono-magmatic axes. Recent field investigations in the SE Afar rift have emphasized the importance of hydrothermal system in rift-related volcanic complexes. Mineralization occur as gold-silver bearing veins and are associated with felsic volcanism. Late carbonate veins barren of sulfides and gold are common. The morphologies and textures of quartz show crustiform colloform banding, massive and breccias. Microthermometric measurements were made on quartz-hosted two phases (liquid + vapor) inclusions; mean homogenization temperature range from 150°C to 340°C and ice-melting temperatures range from -0.2° to 1.6°C indicating that inclusion solutions are dilute and contain 0.35 to 2.7 equivalent wt. % NaCl. Furthermore, δ18O and δ13C values from calcite range from 3.7 to 26.6 ‰ and -7.5 to 0.3‰, respectively. The presence of platy calcite and adularia indicate that boiling condition existed. This study shows that precious-metal deposition mainly occurred from hydrothermal fluids at 200°C at around 300 and 450 m below the present-day surface in a typical low-sulphidation epithermal environment.

  2. Mapping current and potential distribution of non-native Prosopis juliflora in the Afar region of Ethiopia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wakie, Tewodros; Evangelista, Paul H.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Laituri, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    We used correlative models with species occurrence points, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices, and topo-climatic predictors to map the current distribution and potential habitat of invasive Prosopis juliflora in Afar, Ethiopia. Time-series of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Indices (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) with 250 m2 spatial resolution were selected as remote sensing predictors for mapping distributions, while WorldClim bioclimatic products and generated topographic variables from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission product (SRTM) were used to predict potential infestations. We ran Maxent models using non-correlated variables and the 143 species-occurrence points. Maxent generated probability surfaces were converted into binary maps using the 10-percentile logistic threshold values. Performances of models were evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results indicate that the extent of P. juliflora invasion is approximately 3,605 km2 in the Afar region (AUC = 0.94), while the potential habitat for future infestations is 5,024 km2 (AUC = 0.95). Our analyses demonstrate that time-series of MODIS vegetation indices and species occurrence points can be used with Maxent modeling software to map the current distribution of P. juliflora, while topo-climatic variables are good predictors of potential habitat in Ethiopia. Our results can quantify current and future infestations, and inform management and policy decisions for containing P. juliflora. Our methods can also be replicated for managing invasive species in other East African countries.

  3. Theoretical performance of multi-junction solar cells combining III-V and Si materials.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Ian; O'Mahony, Donagh; Corbett, Brian; Morrison, Alan P

    2012-09-10

    A route to improving the overall efficiency of multi-junction solar cells employing conventional III-V and Si photovoltaic junctions is presented here. A simulation model was developed to consider the performance of several multi-junction solar cell structures in various multi-terminal configurations. For series connected, 2-terminal triple-junction solar cells, incorporating an AlGaAs top junction, a GaAs middle junction and either a Si or InGaAs bottom junction, it was found that the configuration with a Si bottom junction yielded a marginally higher one sun efficiency of 41.5% versus 41.3% for an InGaAs bottom junction. A significant efficiency gain of 1.8% over the two-terminal device can be achieved by providing an additional terminal to the Si bottom junction in a 3-junction mechanically stacked configuration. It is shown that the optimum performance can be achieved by employing a four-junction series-connected mechanically stacked device incorporating a Si subcell between top AlGaAs/GaAs and bottom In0.53Ga0.47As cells.

  4. Mapping of lithologic and structural units using multispectral imagery. [Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent areas (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of Yemen and Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronberg, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 MSS imagery covering the Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent regions (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of Yemen and Saudi Arabi) was applied to the mapping of lithologic and structural units of the test area at a scale 1:1,000,000. Results of the geological evaluation of the ERTS-1 imagery of the Afar have proven the usefullness of this type of satellite data for regional geological mapping. Evaluation of the ERTS images also resulted in new aspects of the structural setting and tectonic development of the Afar-Triangle, where three large rift systems, the oceanic rifts of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden and the continental East African rift system, seem to meet each other. Surface structures mapped by ERTS do not indicate that the oceanic rift of the Gulf of Aden (Sheba Ridge) continues into the area of continental crust west of the Gulf of Tadjura. ERTS data show that the Wonji fault belt of the African rift system does not enter or cut through the central Afar. The Aysha-Horst is not a Horst but an autochthonous spur of the Somali Plateau.

  5. Free electron gas primary thermometer: The bipolar junction transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.

    2013-11-04

    The temperature of a bipolar transistor is extracted probing its carrier energy distribution through its collector current, obtained under appropriate polarization conditions, following a rigorous mathematical method. The obtained temperature is independent of the transistor physical properties as current gain, structure (Homo-junction or hetero-junction), and geometrical parameters, resulting to be a primary thermometer. This proposition has been tested using off the shelf silicon transistors at thermal equilibrium with water at its triple point, the transistor temperature values obtained involve an uncertainty of a few milli-Kelvin. This proposition has been successfully tested in the temperature range of 77–450 K.

  6. Magmatic cycles pace tectonic and morphological expression of rifting (Afar depression, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, Sarah; Pik, Raphael; Burnard, Peter; Blard, Pierre-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Dyking and faulting at mid-oceanic ridges are concentrated in narrow axial volcanic zones due to focussing of both melt distribution and tectonic strain along the plate boundary. Due to the predominantly submarine location of oceanic ridges, the interplay between these processes remain poorly constrained in time and space. In this study, we use the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) magmatic rift segment (MRS) (Afar, Ethiopia) to answers the long debated chicken-egg question about magmatic and tectonic processes in extensive context: which on comes first, and how those two processes interplay to finally form oceanic ridges? The DMH MRS is an oceanic ridge analogue and here we present quantitative slip rates on major and minor normal fault scarps for the past 40 kyr in the vicinity of a recent (September 2005) dike intrusion. Our data show that the long-term-vertical slip rates of faults that ruptured in 2005 are too low to explain the present rift topography and that the 2005 strain distribution is not the main stress accommodating mechanism in the DMH segment. Instead, we show that the axial valley topography is created by enhanced slip rates which occur only when the amount of magma available in magma reservoirs is limited, thus preventing dykes from reaching the surface. Our results suggest that development of the axial valley topography is regulated by the magma reservoir lifetime and, thus, to the magmatic cycles of replenishment/differentiation (< 100 ky). This implies that in the DMH rift system (with a magma supply typical of an intermediate spreading centre), significant topography of the axial rift valley is transient, and is expressed only when magma available in the reservoirs decreases. The absence of tilting on the rift margins over the last 200 kyr also suggests that amagmatic accommodation of extension is not required over this time period. Extension instead is accommodated by dykes injected laterally from multiple ephemeral reservoirs located along the DMH

  7. Petrological and geochemical data of volcanic rocks from the southern Afar Depression, Ethiopia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Ch.; Faupl, P.; Richter, W.; Seidler, H.

    2003-04-01

    The geological and petrological investigations (FWF Project P15196) in the southern Afar Depression of Ethiopia support an international palaeoanthropological research-team (PAR) under the leadership of Horst Seidler. Mount Galila is the conspicuous centre of the research area [N 9° 44.101', E 40° 27.368'], situated about 20 km E of the NNE-SSW striking, recently active Hertale Graben, which represents a northernmost segment of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER). Stratigraphically, the fossiliferous lacustrine and fluvial deposits, as well as the intercalated volcanic layers of the Galila area, belong to the "Upper Stratoid Series" (5-1.4 Ma) and will be named the Mount Galila Formation. They are similar to the Awash Group, from which very famous early hominid fossils have been described. In the Mount Galila Fm., 7 main volcanic horizons serve as marker beds comprising basalts, ignimbrites, tuffs and tuffaceous sands. The basalt horizons in the research area represent basaltic lava flows each consisting of one single flow unit c. 5 meters thick with maximum 5 cooling units. A first set of geochemical data from XRF spectrometry comprising main and trace element analysis shows characteristics for the volcanic marker beds as following: The basalts are clearly tholeiitic in the main elements (FeO/MgO/Alk) and show typical trace element distributions (e.g. Zr/Y-Zr; Ti/100-Yx3-Zr) as Within Plate Tholeiit Basalts. All basalt samples contain access 40Ar which can be explained by specific erruption mechanisms that leads to analytical problems for 40Ar/39Ar dating. In the TAS diagram after LeMaitre 1984 the ignimbrites vary at high alkali levels (7-9%) from trachytic to dacitic and rhyolitic composition, whereas at low alkali contents (<7%) they plot into the andesitic field. Compared to the basalts, the geochemistry of the ignimbrites is much more inhomogenous. Tuffs and tuffaceous sands are relevant as marker beds especially for the palaeoanthropological excavations in the

  8. Capturing magma intrusion and faulting processes during continental rupture: seismicity of the Dabbahu (Afar) rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Calais, E.; Wright, T. J.; Belachew, M.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Campbell, E.; Buck, W. R.

    2008-09-01

    Continental rupture models emphasize the role of faults in extensional strain accommodation; extension by dyke intrusion is commonly overlooked. A major rifting episode that began in 2005 September in the Afar depression of Ethiopia provides an opportunity to examine strain accommodation in a zone of incipient plate rupture. Earthquakes recorded on a temporary seismic array (2005 October to 2006 April), direct observation of fault patterns and geodetic data document ongoing strain and continued dyke intrusion along the ~60-km long Dabbahu rift segment defined in earlier remote sensing studies. Epicentral locations lie along a ~3 km wide, ~50 km long swath that curves into the SE flank of Dabbahu volcano; a second strand continues to the north toward Gab'ho volcano. Considering the ~8 m of opening in the September crisis, we interpret the depth distribution of microseismicity as the dyke intrusion zone; the dykes rise from ~10 km to the near-surface along the ~60-km long length of the tectono-magmatic segment. Focal mechanisms indicate slip along NNW-striking normal faults, perpendicular to the Arabia-Nubia plate opening vector. The seismicity, InSAR, continuous GPS and structural patterns all suggest that magma injection from lower or subcrustal magma reservoirs continued at least 3 months after the main episode. Persistent earthquake swarms at two sites on Dabbahu volcano coincide with areas of deformation identified in the InSAR data: (1) an elliptical, northwestward-dipping zone of seismicity and subsidence interpreted as a magma conduit, and (2) a more diffuse, 8-km radius zone of shallow seismicity (<2 km) above a shadow zone, interpreted as a magma chamber between 2.5 and 6 km subsurface. InSAR and continuous GPS data show uplift above a shallow source in zone (2) and uplift above the largely aseismic Gab'ho volcano. The patterns of seismicity provide a 3-D perspective of magma feeding systems maintaining the along-axis segmentation of this incipient seafloor

  9. Teaching Triple Science: GCSE Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) has contracted with the Learning and Skills Network to support awareness and take-up of Triple Science GCSEs through the Triple Science Support Programme. This publication provides an introduction to teaching and learning approaches for the extension topics within GCSE Chemistry. It…

  10. Density of Primitive Pythagorean Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killen, Duncan A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the properties of a Primitive Pythagorean Triple (PPT), a computer program was written to generate, print, and count all PPTs greater than or equal to I[subscript x], where I[subscript x] is an arbitrarily chosen integer. The Density of Primitive Pythagorean Triples may be defined as the ratio of the number of PPTs whose hypotenuse is…

  11. Teaching Triple Science: GCSE Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) has contracted with the Learning and Skills Network to support awareness and take-up of Triple Science GCSEs through the Triple Science Support Programme. This publication provides an introduction to teaching and learning approaches for the extension topics within GCSE Biology. It highlights…

  12. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  13. Receiver function imaging of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and melt beneath the Afar Rift in comparison to other systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Heating, melting, and stretching destroy continents at volcanic rifts. Mantle plumes are often invoked to thermally weaken the continental lithosphere and accommodate rifting through the influx of magma. However the relative effects of mechanical stretching vs. melt infiltration and weakening are not well quantified during the evolution of rifting. S-to-p (Sp) imaging beneath the Afar Rift provides additional constraints. We use two methodologies to investigate structure and locate robust features: 1) binning by conversion point and then simultaneous deconvolution in the frequency domain, and 2) extended multitaper followed by migration and stacking. We image a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~75 km beneath the flank of the Afar Rift vs. its complete absence beneath the rift. Instead, a strong velocity increase with depth at ~75 km depth is imaged. Beneath the rift axis waveform modeling suggests the lack of a mantle lithosphere with a velocity increase at ~75 km depth. Geodynamic models that include high melt retention and suppress thermal convection easily match the required velocity-depth profile, the velocity increase arising from a drop in melt percentage at the onset of decompression melting. Whereas, models with conservative melt retention that include thermal buoyancy effects cannot reproduce the strong velocity increase. The shallow depth of the onset of melting is consistent with a mantle potential temperature = 1350 - 1400°C, i.e., typical for adiabatic decompression melting. Trace element signatures and geochemical modeling have been used to argue for a thick lithosphere beneath the rift and slightly higher mantle potential temperatures ~1450°C, although overall, given modeling assumptions, the results are not in disagreement. Therefore, although a plume initially destroyed the mantle lithosphere, its influence directly beneath Afar today is not strong. Volcanism continues via adiabatic decompression melting assisted by strong melt buoyancy

  14. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  15. Triple flames and flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadwell, James E.

    1994-01-01

    It is now well established that when turbulent jet flames are lifted, combustion begins, i.e., the flame is stabilized, at an axial station where the fuel and air are partially premixed. One might expect, therefore, that the beginning of the combustion zone would be a triple flame. Such flames have been described; however, other experiments provide data that are difficult to reconcile with the presence of triple flames. In particular, laser images of CH and OH, marking combustion zones, do not exhibit shapes typical of triple flames, and, more significantly, the lifted flame appears to have a propagation speed that is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar flame speed. The speed of triple flames studied thus far exceeds the laminar value by a factor less than two. The objective of the present task is the resolution of the apparent conflict between the experiments and the triple flame characteristics, and the clarification of the mechanisms controlling flame stability. Being investigated are the resolution achieved in the experiments, the flow field in the neighborhood of the stabilization point, propagation speeds of triple flames, laboratory flame unsteadiness, and the importance of flame ignition limits in the calculation of triple flames that resemble lifted flames.

  16. The mantle transition zone beneath the Afar Depression and adjacent regions: implications for mantle plumes and hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Afar Depression and its adjacent areas are underlain by an upper mantle marked by some of the world's largest negative velocity anomalies, which are frequently attributed to the thermal influences of a lower-mantle plume. In spite of numerous studies, however, the existence of a plume beneath the area remains enigmatic, partially due to inadequate quantities of broad-band seismic data and the limited vertical resolution at the mantle transition zone (MTZ) depth of the techniques employed by previous investigations. In this study, we use an unprecedented quantity (over 14 500) of P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) recorded by 139 stations from 12 networks to image the 410 and 660 km discontinuities and map the spatial variation of the thickness of the MTZ. Non-linear stacking of the RFs under a 1-D velocity model shows robust P-to-S conversions from both discontinuities, and their apparent depths indicate the presence of an upper-mantle low-velocity zone beneath the entire study area. The Afar Depression and the northern Main Ethiopian Rift are characterized by an apparent 40-60 km depression of both MTZ discontinuities and a normal MTZ thickness. The simplest and most probable interpretation of these observations is that the apparent depressions are solely caused by velocity perturbations in the upper mantle and not by deeper processes causing temperature or hydration anomalies within the MTZ. Thickening of the MTZ on the order of 15 km beneath the southern Arabian Plate, southern Red Sea and western Gulf of Aden, which comprise the southward extension of the Afro-Arabian Dome, could reflect long-term hydration of the MTZ. A 20 km thinning of the MTZ beneath the western Ethiopian Plateau is observed and interpreted as evidence for a possible mantle plume stem originating from the lower mantle.

  17. Afar plume, Anatolia escape and Aegean rollback are features of the Arabia-Middle East convection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Faccenna, C.; Jolivet, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Arabia-Anatolia-Aegean (AAA) system represents a key site within the Tethyan domain where continental break-up, collision, and escape tectonics are linked together. This offers an opportunity to study the forces that drive and deform the continental lithosphere within a convecting mantle. We perform global mantle circulation computations to test the role of slab pull and mantle upwellings as driving forces for the kinematics of the AAA system, evaluating different boundary conditions and mantle density distributions as inferred from seismic tomography or slab models. Model result are compared with geodesy, residual topography and shear wave splitting. The AAA velocity field with respect to Eurasia shows an anti-clockwise toroidal pattern, with increasing velocities toward the Aegean trench. The best match to these crustal motions can be obtained by combining the effect of slab pull exerted in the Aegean with a mantle upwelling underneath Afar and, more generally, with the large-scale flow associated with a whole-mantle, Tethyan convection cell. Neogene volcanism for AAA is not confined to extensional or subduction settings but also found within plate interiors, such as in Syria-Jordan-Israel and in the collisional belt. In addition, morphological feature show large uplifting domains far from plate boundary. Such intraplate tectonics may all be associated with northward plume transport and the establishment of the Tethyan convection cell upon slab segmentation. Our model reconciles Afar plume volcanism, the collision on the Bitlis, and the rapid increase of Aegean trench rollback in a single coherent frame of large scale mantle convection, initiated during the last ~40 Ma.

  18. Examining the Causes of Low-frequency Hybrid Earthquakes During Dike Intrusions in the Afar Rift, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, G.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2005 and 2012, there were 14 large dike intrusions into the Dabbahu rift segment in the Afar rift, Ethiopia. Swarms of earthquakes with local magnitudes between 1.45Afar hybrids are largely a result of path effects based on high attenuation (Q ~ 200) and azimuthal dependence of spectral content. However, large (~3m) surface displacements on short faults indicate that unusual source processes, such as slow rupture times, may also be a factor in these hybrid events. The aims of this study are to distinguish between path and source effects, to characterize the source processes of these events, and to explore the relation between hybrid and normal tectonic events in the region - are the differences in the source or only in the path? For closely located earthquakes, an Empirical Green's Function approach is a great method to isolate the source-time function. Spectral analysis of the source-time function can be used to provide insights into the rupture time, stress drop, and scaling relations of the earthquakes. These results will be used to further refine earthquake classifications and determine if there are any defining characteristics of the classes that associate them with specific faulting processes, such as surface

  19. Mapping Current and Potential Distribution of Non-Native Prosopis juliflora in the Afar Region of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wakie, Tewodros T.; Evangelista, Paul H.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Laituri, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    We used correlative models with species occurrence points, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices, and topo-climatic predictors to map the current distribution and potential habitat of invasive Prosopis juliflora in Afar, Ethiopia. Time-series of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Indices (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) with 250 m2 spatial resolution were selected as remote sensing predictors for mapping distributions, while WorldClim bioclimatic products and generated topographic variables from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission product (SRTM) were used to predict potential infestations. We ran Maxent models using non-correlated variables and the 143 species- occurrence points. Maxent generated probability surfaces were converted into binary maps using the 10-percentile logistic threshold values. Performances of models were evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results indicate that the extent of P. juliflora invasion is approximately 3,605 km2 in the Afar region (AUC  = 0.94), while the potential habitat for future infestations is 5,024 km2 (AUC  = 0.95). Our analyses demonstrate that time-series of MODIS vegetation indices and species occurrence points can be used with Maxent modeling software to map the current distribution of P. juliflora, while topo-climatic variables are good predictors of potential habitat in Ethiopia. Our results can quantify current and future infestations, and inform management and policy decisions for containing P. juliflora. Our methods can also be replicated for managing invasive species in other East African countries. PMID:25393396

  20. Mapping current and potential distribution of non-native Prosopis juliflora in the Afar region of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wakie, Tewodros T; Evangelista, Paul H; Jarnevich, Catherine S; Laituri, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    We used correlative models with species occurrence points, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices, and topo-climatic predictors to map the current distribution and potential habitat of invasive Prosopis juliflora in Afar, Ethiopia. Time-series of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Indices (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) with 250 m2 spatial resolution were selected as remote sensing predictors for mapping distributions, while WorldClim bioclimatic products and generated topographic variables from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission product (SRTM) were used to predict potential infestations. We ran Maxent models using non-correlated variables and the 143 species- occurrence points. Maxent generated probability surfaces were converted into binary maps using the 10-percentile logistic threshold values. Performances of models were evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results indicate that the extent of P. juliflora invasion is approximately 3,605 km2 in the Afar region (AUC  = 0.94), while the potential habitat for future infestations is 5,024 km2 (AUC  = 0.95). Our analyses demonstrate that time-series of MODIS vegetation indices and species occurrence points can be used with Maxent modeling software to map the current distribution of P. juliflora, while topo-climatic variables are good predictors of potential habitat in Ethiopia. Our results can quantify current and future infestations, and inform management and policy decisions for containing P. juliflora. Our methods can also be replicated for managing invasive species in other East African countries. PMID:25393396

  1. Mapping current and potential distribution of non-native Prosopis juliflora in the Afar region of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wakie, Tewodros T; Evangelista, Paul H; Jarnevich, Catherine S; Laituri, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    We used correlative models with species occurrence points, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices, and topo-climatic predictors to map the current distribution and potential habitat of invasive Prosopis juliflora in Afar, Ethiopia. Time-series of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Indices (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) with 250 m2 spatial resolution were selected as remote sensing predictors for mapping distributions, while WorldClim bioclimatic products and generated topographic variables from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission product (SRTM) were used to predict potential infestations. We ran Maxent models using non-correlated variables and the 143 species- occurrence points. Maxent generated probability surfaces were converted into binary maps using the 10-percentile logistic threshold values. Performances of models were evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results indicate that the extent of P. juliflora invasion is approximately 3,605 km2 in the Afar region (AUC  = 0.94), while the potential habitat for future infestations is 5,024 km2 (AUC  = 0.95). Our analyses demonstrate that time-series of MODIS vegetation indices and species occurrence points can be used with Maxent modeling software to map the current distribution of P. juliflora, while topo-climatic variables are good predictors of potential habitat in Ethiopia. Our results can quantify current and future infestations, and inform management and policy decisions for containing P. juliflora. Our methods can also be replicated for managing invasive species in other East African countries.

  2. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting beneath the Red Sea rift and adjacent regions, Afar Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cory A.; Almadani, Sattam; Gao, Stephen S.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Cherie, Solomon; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Thurmond, Allison K.; Liu, Kelly H.

    2014-03-01

    The Afar Depression is an ideal locale for the investigation of crustal processes involved in the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. To provide relatively high resolution images of the crust beneath the Red Sea rift (RSR) represented by the Tendaho graben in the Afar Depression, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Stacking of about 2300 receiver functions from the 18 and several nearby stations along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22±4 km, ranging from ~17 km near the RSR axis to 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios decrease from 2.40 in the southwest to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to obtain an overall highly reduced average crustal Vp of ~5.1 km/s. The melt percentage is about 10% beneath the RSR while the overlap zone contains minor quantities of partial melt. The observed high Vp/Vs values beneath most of the study area indicate widespread partial melting beneath the southwest half of the profile, probably as a result of gradual eastward migration of the RSR axis. Our results also suggest that the current extensional strain in the lower crust beneath the region is diffuse, while the strain field in the upper crust is localized along narrow volcanic segments. These disparate styles of deformation imply a high degree of decoupling between the upper and lower crust.

  3. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  4. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  5. [Activities of Dept. of Geological Sciences, Colorado University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Using remotely sensed data and GPS observations we completed a study of neotectonic processes responsible for landscape changes in an area of active extensional deformation and volcanism. The findings from this study describe the extensional processes operating in the region of the Afar triple junction and the northern Ethiopian rift.

  6. The Axum-Adwa basalt-trachyte complex: a late magmatic activity at the periphery of the Afar plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, C.; Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Siena, F.

    2013-08-01

    The Axum-Adwa igneous complex consists of a basalt-trachyte (syenite) suite emplaced at the northern periphery of the Ethiopian plateau, after the paroxysmal eruption of the Oligocene (ca 30 Ma) continental flood basalts (CFB), which is related to the Afar plume activity. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages, carried out for the first time on felsic and basaltic rocks, constrain the magmatic age of the greater part of the complex around Axum to 19-15 Ma, whereas trachytic lavas from volcanic centres NE of Adwa are dated ca 27 Ma. The felsic compositions straddle the critical SiO2-saturation boundary, ranging from normative quartz trachyte lavas east of Adwa to normative (and modal) nepheline syenite subvolcanic domes (the obelisks stones of ancient axumites) around Axum. Petrogenetic modelling based on rock chemical data and phase equilibria calculations by PELE (Boudreau 1999) shows that low-pressure fractional crystallization processes, starting from mildly alkaline- and alkaline basalts comparable to those present in the complex, could generate SiO2-saturated trachytes and SiO2-undersaturated syenites, respectively, which correspond to residual liquid fractions of 17 and 10 %. The observed differentiation processes are consistent with the development of rifting events and formation of shallow magma chambers plausibly located between displaced (tilted) crustal blocks that favoured trapping of basaltic parental magmas and their fractionation to felsic differentiates. In syenitic domes, late- to post-magmatic processes are sometimes evidenced by secondary mineral associations (e.g. Bete Giorgis dome) which overprint the magmatic parageneses, and mainly induce additional nepheline and sodic pyroxene neo-crystallization. These metasomatic reactions were promoted by the circulation of Na-Cl-rich deuteric fluids (600-400 °C), as indicated by mineral and bulk rock chemical budgets as well as by δ18O analyses on mineral separates. The occurrence of this magmatism post-dating the

  7. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  8. The Drosophila Claudin Kune-kune is required for septate junction organization and tracheal tube size control.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin S; Furuse, Mikio; Beitel, Greg J

    2010-07-01

    The vertebrate tight junction is a critical claudin-based cell-cell junction that functions to prevent free paracellular diffusion between epithelial cells. In Drosophila, this barrier is provided by the septate junction, which, despite being ultrastructurally distinct from the vertebrate tight junction, also contains the claudin-family proteins Megatrachea and Sinuous. Here we identify a third Drosophila claudin, Kune-kune, that localizes to septate junctions and is required for junction organization and paracellular barrier function, but not for apical-basal polarity. In the tracheal system, septate junctions have a barrier-independent function that promotes lumenal secretion of Vermiform and Serpentine, extracellular matrix modifier proteins that are required to restrict tube length. As with Sinuous and Megatrachea, loss of Kune-kune prevents this secretion and results in overly elongated tubes. Embryos lacking all three characterized claudins have tracheal phenotypes similar to any single mutant, indicating that these claudins act in the same pathway controlling tracheal tube length. However, we find that there are distinct requirements for these claudins in epithelial septate junction formation. Megatrachea is predominantly required for correct localization of septate junction components, while Sinuous is predominantly required for maintaining normal levels of septate junction proteins. Kune-kune is required for both localization and levels. Double- and triple-mutant combinations of Sinuous and Megatrachea with Kune-kune resemble the Kune-kune single mutant, suggesting that Kune-kune has a more central role in septate junction formation than either Sinuous or Megatrachea.

  9. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  10. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  11. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-06-30

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  12. Seismicity during lateral dike propagation: Insights from new data in the recent Manda Hararo-Dabbahu rifting episode (Afar, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, R.; Jacques, E.; Nercessian, A.; Ayele, A.; Doubre, C.; Socquet, A.; Keir, D.; Kassim, M.; Lemarchand, A.; King, G. C. P.

    2011-04-01

    Seismicity released during lateral dike intrusions in the Manda Hararo-Dabbahu Rift (Afar, Ethiopia) provides indirect insight into the distribution and evolution of tensile stress along this magma-assisted divergent plate boundary. In this paper, 5 dike intrusions among the 14 that form the 2005-present rifting episode are analyzed with local and regional seismic data. During dike intrusions, seismicity migrates over distances of 10-15 km at velocities of 0.5-3.0 km/h away from a single reservoir in the center of the rift segment, confirming the analogy with a slow spreading mid-ocean ridge segment. Comparison with geodetic data shows that the reservoir is located 7 km down rift from the topographic summit of the axial depression. Dikes emplaced toward the north are observed to migrate faster and to be more voluminous than those migrating southward, suggesting an asymmetry of tension in the brittle-elastic lithosphere. Seismicity during dike injections is concentrated near the propagating crack front. In contrast, faults and fissures in the subsurface appear to slip or open aseismically coeval with the intrusions. The seismic energy released during dike intrusions in the Manda Hararo Rift appears to be primarily modulated by the local magnitude of differential tensile stress and marginally by the rate of stress change induced by the intrusion. The low level of seismic energy accompanying dike intrusions, despite their significant volumes, is likely an indicator of an overall low level of tension in the lithosphere of this nascent plate boundary.

  13. Solution Patterns Predicting Pythagorean Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezenweani, Ugwunna Louis

    2013-01-01

    Pythagoras Theorem is an old mathematical treatise that has traversed the school curricula from secondary to tertiary levels. The patterns it produced are quite interesting that many researchers have tried to generate a kind of predictive approach to identifying triples. Two attempts, namely Diophantine equation and Brahmagupta trapezium presented…

  14. Triple products of Eisenstein series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Anil

    In this thesis, we construct a Massey triple product on the Deligne cohomology of the modular curve with coefficients in symmetric powers of the standard representation of the modular group. This result is obtained by constructing a Massey triple product on the extension groups in the category of admissible variations of mixed Hodge structure over the modular curve, which induces the desired construction on Deligne cohomology. The result extends Brown's construction of the cup product on Deligne cohomology to a higher cohomological product. Massey triple products on Deligne cohomology have been previously investigated by Deninger, who considered Deligne cohomology with trivial real coefficients. By working over the reals, Deninger was able to compute cohomology exclusively with differential forms. In this work, Deligne cohomology is studied over the rationals, which introduces an obstruction to applying Deninger's results. The obstruction arises from the fact that the integration map from the de Rham complex to the Eilenberg-MacLane complex of the modular group is not an algebra homomorphism. We compute the correction terms of the integration map as regularized iterated integrals of Eisenstein series, and show that these integrals arise in the cup product and Massey triple product on Deligne cohomology.

  15. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Günter; Schmalhorst, Jan; Thomas, Andre; Hütten, Andreas; Yuasa, Shinji

    In magnetoelectronic devices large opportunities are opened by the spin dependent tunneling resistance, where a strong dependence of the tunneling current on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the electrodes is found. Within a short time, the amplitude of the resistance change of the junctions increased dramatically. We will cover Al-O and MgO based junctions and present highly spin-polarized electrode materials such as Heusler alloys. Furthermore, we will give a short overview on applications such as read heads in hard disk drives, storage cells in MRAMs, field programmable logic circuits and biochips. Finally, we will discuss the currently growing field of current induced magnetization switching.

  16. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  17. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  18. Fast three-material modeling with triple arch projection for electronic cleansing in CTC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunna; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Se Hyung; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast three-material modeling for electronic cleansing (EC) in computed tomographic colonography. Using a triple arch projection, our three-material modeling provides a very quick estimate of the three-material fractions to remove ridge-shaped artifacts at the T-junctions where air, soft-tissue (ST), and tagged residues (TRs) meet simultaneously. In our approach, colonic components including air, TR, the layer between air and TR, the layer between ST and TR (L(ST/TR)), and the T-junction are first segmented. Subsequently, the material fraction of ST for each voxel in L(ST/TR) and the T-junction is determined. Two-material fractions of the voxels in L(ST/TR) are derived based on a two-material transition model. On the other hand, three-material fractions of the voxels in the T-junction are estimated based on our fast three-material modeling with triple arch projection. Finally, the CT density value of each voxel is updated based on our fold-preserving reconstruction model. Experimental results using ten clinical datasets demonstrate that the proposed three-material modeling successfully removed the T-junction artifacts and clearly reconstructed the whole colon surface while preserving the submerged folds well. Furthermore, compared with the previous three-material transition model, the proposed three-material modeling resulted in about a five-fold increase in speed with the better preservation of submerged folds and the similar level of cleansing quality in T-junction regions.

  19. Integrating local pastoral knowledge, participatory mapping, and species distribution modeling for risk assessment of invasive rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora) in Ethiopia’s Afar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luizza, Matthew; Wakie, Tewodros; Evangelista, Paul; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2016-01-01

    The threats posed by invasive plants span ecosystems and economies worldwide. Local knowledge of biological invasions has proven beneficial for invasive species research, but to date no work has integrated this knowledge with species distribution modeling for invasion risk assessments. In this study, we integrated pastoral knowledge with Maxent modeling to assess the suitable habitat and potential impacts of invasive Cryptostegia grandiflora Robx. Ex R.Br. (rubber vine) in Ethiopia’s Afar region. We conducted focus groups with seven villages across the Amibara and Awash-Fentale districts. Pastoral knowledge revealed the growing threat of rubber vine, which to date has received limited attention in Ethiopia, and whose presence in Afar was previously unknown to our team. Rubber vine occurrence points were collected in the field with pastoralists and processed in Maxent with MODIS-derived vegetation indices, topographic data, and anthropogenic variables. We tested model fit using a jackknife procedure and validated the final model with an independent occurrence data set collected through participatory mapping activities with pastoralists. A Multivariate Environmental Similarity Surface analysis revealed areas with novel environmental conditions for future targeted surveys. Model performance was evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and showed good fit across the jackknife models (average AUC = 0.80) and the final model (test AUC = 0.96). Our results reveal the growing threat rubber vine poses to Afar, with suitable habitat extending downstream of its current known location in the middle Awash River basin. Local pastoral knowledge provided important context for its rapid expansion due to acute changes in seasonality and habitat alteration, in addition to threats posed to numerous endemic tree species that provide critical provisioning ecosystem services. This work demonstrates the utility of integrating local ecological

  20. Replacing cottonseed meal with ground Prosopis juliflora pods; effect on intake, weight gain and carcass parameters of Afar sheep fed pasture hay basal diet.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Mohammed; Animut, Getachew

    2014-08-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine the supplementary feeding value of ground Prosopis juliflora pod (Pjp) and cottonseed meal (CSM) and their mixtures on feed intake, body weight gain and carcass parameters of Afar sheep fed a basal diet of pasture hay. Twenty-five yearling fat-tailed Afar rams with mean initial live weight 17.24 ± 1.76 kg (mean ± SD) were used in a randomized complete block design. Animals were blocked on their initial body weight. The experiment was conducted for 12 weeks and carcass evaluation followed. Treatments were hay alone ad libitum (T 1) or with 300 g CSM (T 2), 300 g Pjp (T 5), 2:1 ratio (T 3) and 1:2 ratio of CSM : Pjp (T 4). The CP contents of the hay, CSM and Pjp were 10.5, 44.5 and 16.7 %, respectively. Hay DM intake was higher (P < 0.05) for non-supplemented and total DM intake was lower in non-supplemented. Average daily weight gain (ADG) was lower (P < 0.05) for T 1 compared to all supplemented treatments except T 5. Hot carcass weight and rib-eye muscle area also followed the same trend like that of ADG. Compared with feeding hay alone, supplementing with CSM or a mixture of CSM and Pjp appeared to be a better feeding strategy, biologically, for yearling Afar rams.

  1. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Smith, L.M.; Tong, X.E.

    1995-03-28

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis. 4 figures.

  2. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Renfeng; Smith, Lloyd M.; Tong, Xinchun E.

    1995-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis.

  3. Transient collagen triple helix binding to a key metalloproteinase in invasion and development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingchu; Marcink, Thomas C; Sanganna Gari, Raghavendar Reddy; Marsh, Brendan P; King, Gavin M; Stawikowska, Roma; Fields, Gregg B; Van Doren, Steven R

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal development and invasion by tumor cells depends on proteolysis of collagen by the pericellular metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Its hemopexin-like (HPX) domain binds to collagen substrates to facilitate their digestion. Spin labeling and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection have revealed how the HPX domain docks to collagen I-derived triple helix. Mutations impairing triple-helical peptidase activity corroborate the interface. Saturation transfer difference NMR suggests rotational averaging around the longitudinal axis of the triple-helical peptide. Part of the interface emerges as unique and potentially targetable for selective inhibition. The triple helix crosses the junction of blades I and II at a 45° angle to the symmetry axis of the HPX domain, placing the scissile Gly∼Ile bond near the HPX domain and shifted ∼25 Å from MMP-1 complexes. This raises the question of the MT1-MMP catalytic domain folding over the triple helix during catalysis, a possibility accommodated by the flexibility between domains suggested by atomic force microscopy images.

  4. Highly efficient organic multi-junction solar cells with a thiophene based donor material

    SciTech Connect

    Meerheim, Rico Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-11

    The efficiency of organic solar cells can be increased by serial stacked subcells even upon using the same absorber material. For the multi-junction devices presented here, we use the small molecule donor material DCV5T-Me. The subcell currents were matched by optical transfer matrix simulation, allowing an efficiency increase from 8.3% for a single junction up to 9.7% for a triple junction cell. The external quantum efficiency of the subcells, measured under appropriate light bias illumination, is spectrally shifted due to the microcavity of the complete stack, resulting in a broadband response and an increased cell current. The increase of the power conversion efficiency upon device stacking is even stronger for large area cells due to higher influence of the resistance of the indium tin oxide anode, emphasizing the advantage of multi-junction devices for large-area applications.

  5. Une nouvelle faune du Pléistocène moyen de la région de Busidima Telalak en Afar, Éthiopie.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemseged, Zeresenay; Geraads, Denis

    2000-10-01

    We report on a diverse fauna from the Busidima-Telalak region of the Afar in Ethiopia. The fossiliferous sediments are characterized by riverbank deposits. During our first field season thirty-one mammalian species were encountered. Fossils are nicely preserved and abundant. Bovids, carnivores, monkeys, and large rodents are the most common taxa. The fauna points to a Middle Pleistocene age (0.2 to 0.8 Ma). Our preliminary palaeoenvironmental reconstruction indicates that our fossil assemblage is derived from a rather wet and closed environment. This condition is unique as sites of this time period were reported to be more open and dry.

  6. The geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-He isotopic characterization of the mantle source of Rungwe Volcanic Province: comparison with the Afar mantle domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Hilton, D. R.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Wang, R.

    2012-12-01

    The ultimate source of heat and magmatism associated with continental rifting in the East African Rift System (EARS) is generally viewed to be the African Superplume, but there is continuing debate on the surface expression of this large anomalous feature, which originates in the lower mantle. Previous studies have demonstrated an insignificant role for crustal contamination thereby identifying a single mantle plume signature in Quaternary basalts from the Main Ethiopian Rift in the northern EARS. This is designated to be the Afar plume and is characterized by, e.g., 3He/4He >15 RA, 206Pb/204Pb = 19.5 and 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7035 [Rooney et al., J. Pet. 53, 2012]. In contrast, the signature of plume(s) in the southern EARS is less constrained. Rogers et al. [EPSL 176, 2000] proposed a plume in the sub-lithospheric Kenyan mantle with characteristically lower 43Nd/144Nd than the Afar plume whereas Furman [JAES 48, 2007] advocated a high μ [HIMU] plume based primarily on the high 206Pb/204Pb ratios of lavas in all areas within and south of the Turkana Depression: both models assume a 3He/4He lower than the Afar plume. Here we report the trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition of basaltic lavas from the Rungwe Volcanic Province (RVP) in the southern extreme of the Western Rift previously identified as a high 3He/4He locality (~15 RA; [Hilton et al., GRL 38, 2011]). Trace element analyses are within the previously reported range of lava compositions that include a relatively large lithospheric component. More importantly, we identify correlations among incompatible trace element and isotopic ratios (e.g., 3He/4He vs 206Pb/204Pb, Rb/Sr, Nb/Ta; 87Sr/86Sr vs 208Pb/204Pb). Our new results suggest the presence of a distinct, high 3He/4He mantle source beneath RVP that is more radiogenic (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb up to ~19.8; 87Sr/86Sr up to 0.7055) than the Afar mantle plume. There is also very little or no HIMU signature in RPV basalts based on their high Sr and low Nd isotopic

  7. Magma storage depths beneath an active rift volcano in Afar (Dabbahu), constrained by melt inclusion analyses, seismicity and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L.; Blundy, J.; Wright, T. J.; Yirgu, G.; Afar Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Dabbahu volcano is located at the northern end of the active Manda Hararo rift segment in western Afar, Ethiopia. In 2005 a major rifting episode began in the segment, which has been modelled as basalt dyke injections (1). Seismic activity, inflation and deflation have been recorded at the volcano. The aim of this research is to provide an insight into the history and evolution of a silicic magmatic centre in the rift, and to contribute to the wider aims of the NERC Afar Consortium to track the creation, migration, evolution and emplacement of magma from the asthenosphere to the crust. The volatile contents of rare melt inclusions trapped within phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, clinopyroxene and olivine from Dabbahu have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The host lavas are mildly peralkaline obsidians, which, based on field evidence and preliminary results from 40Ar-39Ar dating, represent the youngest samples on the volcano (<4 ka). Whilst the obsidian and pumice groundmass glasses are largely degassed, the H2O contents of the analysed inclusions are up to 5.8 wt%. CO2 contents are generally low; <462 ppm in the alkali feldspar-hosted inclusions, but higher values (up to 1457 ppm) have been found in the clinopyroxene-hosted inclusions. The pressure (and depth) of pre-eruptive magma storage beneath Dabbahu has been constrained using H2O and CO2 data, which suggest shallow magma storage at depths of ~1 - 5 km below the surface. These depths are consistent with observations from recorded seismicity and InSAR at Dabbahu. Seismicity has been recorded from deformation caused by deflation of the magma chamber following the 2005 dyke emplacement event (Oct 2005 - Apr 2006)(2) and InSAR has monitored deflation and subsequent steady inflation after this event. We show that melt inclusions accurately record a stable, shallow magma chamber as corroborated by remote sensing and geophysical observations at Dabbahu volcano. 1 Ayele et al. 2009 ‘September 2005

  8. Tephrostratigraphy of the Waki-Mille area of the Woranso-Mille paleoanthropological research project, Afar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Beverly Z; Angelini, Joshua; Deino, Alan; Alene, Mulugeta; Fournelle, John H; Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2016-04-01

    Tephra geochemistry and (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology are reported for the Waki-Mille area in the northwestern part of the Woranso-Mille paleoanthropological project area in the west central Afar region of Ethiopia. Previous studies documented dentognathic fossils that are morphologically intermediate between Australopithecus anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis and some that are attributed to Australopithecus afarensis. Additional dentognathic remains from the study area were assigned to the newly identified species Australopithecus deyiremeda. These fossil hominin taxa were recovered from volcanic and sedimentary strata containing tuffs ranging in age from more than 3.77 million years ago (Ma) to less than 3.469 Ma. One of the tuffs was correlated based on geochemistry, feldspar mineralogy, and age to the Lokochot Tuff of the Omo-Turkana Basin of southern Ethiopia and Kenya. Variations in major and minor element abundances in volcanic glass demarcate ten geochemically distinct tuffs and tuff sequences, including three that are geochemically similar to widespread regional tuffs, specifically the Lomogol, Lokochot, and β- Tulu Bor/Sidi Hakoma tuffs. A new (40)Ar/(39)Ar age for the Waki Tuff, which is geochemically similar to the Lomogol Tuff, is 3.664 ± 0.016 Ma. Other tuffs in the Waki-Mille area are geochemically dissimilar to regional tuffs documented to date. Identification of tuffs based on character, stratigraphic position, and geochemistry refines local stratigraphic correlations and delineates the geographic distributions of precisely dated fossiliferous levels within the Waki-Mille area. PMID:27086054

  9. Camelus dromedarius brucellosis and its public health associated risks in the Afar National Regional State in northeastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A cross-sectional study was carried out in four districts of the Afar region in Ethiopia to determine the prevalence of brucellosis in camels, and to identify risky practices that would facilitate the transmission of zoonoses to humans. This study involved testing 461 camels and interviewing 120 livestock owners. The modified Rose Bengal plate test (mRBPT) and complement fixation test (CFT) were used as screening and confirmatory tests, respectively. SPSS 16 was used to analyze the overall prevalence and potential risk factors for seropositivity, using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results In the camel herds tested, 5.4% had antibodies against Brucella species, and the district level seroprevalence ranged from 11.7% to 15.5% in camels. The logistic regression model for camels in a herd size > 20 animals (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.16-6.62) and greater than four years of age (OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 1.45-16.82) showed a higher risk of infection when compared to small herds and those ≤ 4 years old. The questionnaire survey revealed that most respondents did not know about the transmission of zoonotic diseases, and that their practices could potentially facilitate the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. Conclusions The results of this study revealed that camel brucellosis is prevalent in the study areas. Therefore, there is a need for implementing control measures and increasing public awareness in the prevention methods of brucellosis. PMID:24344729

  10. Geological summary of the Busidima Formation (Plio-Pleistocene) at the Hadar paleoanthropological site, Afar Depression, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Campisano, Christopher J

    2012-03-01

    The Hadar paleoanthropological site in Ethiopia preserves a record of hominin evolution spanning from approximately 3.45 Ma to 0.8 Ma. An angular unconformity just above the ca. 2.95 Ma BKT-2 complex divides the sediments into the Hadar Formation (ca. 3.8-2.9Ma) and the Busidima Formation (ca. 2.7-0.15 Ma). The unconformity is likely a response to a major tectonic reorganization in the Afar Depression, and activation of the As Duma fault near the Ethiopian Escarpment (west of Hadar) created a half-graben in which the Busidima Formation was deposited. The pattern and character of sedimentation in the region changed dramatically above the unconformity, as cut-and-fill channel conglomerates and silt-dominated paleosols that comprise the Busidima Formation stand in sharp contrast to the underlying deposits of the Hadar Formation. Conglomerate deposition has been related to both the perennial, axial paleo-Awash and ephemeral, escarpment-draining tributaries. Overbank silts have yielded fossils attributed to early Homo and Oldowan stone tools. Numerous tuffaceous deposits exist within the Busidima Formation, but they are often spatially limited, fine-grained, and reworked. Recent work on the tephrostratigraphic framework of the Busidima Formation at Hadar has identified at least 12 distinct vitric tephras and established the first geochemical-based correlations between Hadar and the neighboring project areas of Gona and Dikika. Compared to Gona and Dikika, where Busidima Formation sediments are exposed over large areas, the highly discontinuous sediments at Hadar comprise less than 40 m in composite section and are exposed over an area of <20 km(2), providing only snapshots into the 2.7-0.15 Ma window. The stratigraphic record at Hadar confirms the complex depositional history of the Busidima Formation, and also provides important details on regional stratigraphic correlations and the pattern of deposition and erosion in the lower Awash Valley reflective of its tectonic

  11. Arginine conjugates of metallo-supramolecular cylinders prescribe helicity and enhance DNA junction binding and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Cardo, Lucia; Sadovnikova, Victoria; Phongtongpasuk, Siriporn; Hodges, Nikolas J; Hannon, Michael J

    2011-06-21

    The conjugation of arginine residues at the ends of a metallo-supramolecular triple-helical cylinder enables absolute control over the helicity of the cylinder core, and boosts the DNA junction recognition by the complexes and their activity against a cancer cell line.

  12. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  13. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  14. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:17303718

  15. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  16. Energy Efficient Triple IG Automation EEE (Triple-E)

    SciTech Connect

    McGlinchy, Timothy B

    2013-02-28

    GED Integrated Solutions collaborated with US window and door manufactures to investigate, design and verify technical and cost feasibility for producing high performance, high volume, low material and labor cost window, utilizing a modified window design containing a triple insulating glass unit (IGU). This window design approach when combined with a high volume IGU manufacturing system, can produce R5 rated windows for an approximate additional consumer cost of only $4 per square foot when compared to conventional Low-E argon dual pane IG windows, resulting in a verify practical, reliable and affordable high performance window for public use.

  17. Discontinuous current-phase relations in small one-dimensional Josephson junction arrays.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jens; Le Hur, Karyn

    2008-08-29

    We study the Josephson effect in small one-dimensional (1D) Josephson junction arrays. For weak Josephson tunneling, topologically different regions in the charge-stability diagram generate distinct current-phase (I-phi) relationships. We present results for a three-junction system in the vicinity of charge-degeneracy lines and triple points. We explain the generalization to larger arrays, show that discontinuities of the I-phi relation at phase pi persist and that, at maximum degeneracy, the problem can be mapped to a tight-binding model providing analytical results for arbitrary system size.

  18. Feed intake, digestibility, body weight and carcass parameters of Afar rams fed tef (Eragrostis tef) straw supplemented with graded levels of concentrate mix.

    PubMed

    Hagos, Tesfay; Melaku, Solomon

    2009-04-01

    The experiment was conducted at Alamata Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia using 20 Afar rams with an initial body weight (BW) of 18.2 +/- 1.76 (mean +/- SD) kg. The objectives were to study the effect of supplementation with concentrate mix consisting of wheat bran (WB), noug seed cake (NSC) and sesame seed cake (SSC) at the ratio of 2:1:1 on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively on feed intake, digestibility, BW gain and carcass parameters of Afar rams fed tef (Eragrostis tef) straw basal diet. The experiment was arranged with four treatments and five replications in a randomized complete block design. The treatments included feeding sole tef straw (T1, control), and daily supplementation with the concentrate mix offered at 150 (T2, low), 250 (T3, medium) and 350 (T4, high) g DM per head. Total DM intake, crude protein (CP) digestibility, daily BW gain (P < 0.001), DM and organic matter (OM) digestibility, and carcass parameters (P < 0.05) were higher in the supplemented than in the control treatment. Intake of tef straw reduced as the level of supplementation increased, whereas the contrary was true for CP intake. Performance in carcass parameters was better for the medium compared to the low level of concentrate mix supplementation. Moreover, the medium level of supplementation did not substitute tef straw intake. Therefore, it is concluded that the medium level of concentrate mix supplement maintained the utilization of the roughage feed and resulted in better carcass parameters.

  19. Witnessing the birth of a new ocean? The first 6 years of the Dabbahu rifting episode, and other activity in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T.; Ayele, A.; Barnie, T.; Belachew, M.; Calais, E.; Field, L.; Hamling, I.; Hammond, J.; Keir, D.

    2012-04-01

    Intense earthquake activity and a small rhyolitic eruption in September 2005 heralded the onset of an unprecedented period of geological activity in the Afar Depression. The seismic activity accompanied dyke intrusion in the upper 10 km of crust along 60 km of the Dabbahu (northern Manda-Hararo) Magmatic Segment (DMS) of the Nubia-Arabia plate boundary, a nascent seafloor spreading centre. InSAR observations of the resulting deformation showed that the initial dyke was up to 8 m thick, with a total volume of 2-2.5 km3. Urgency funding from the UK Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) enabled us to deploy a local array of seismometers in October 2005, continuous GPS instruments in January 2006, and to acquire a dense time series of satellite radar images. The medium-term viability of these instruments was secured with major follow-on funding from NSF and NERC; these projects supported the collection and analysis of additional unique data sets, including data from a broader array of seismic and GPS instruments, magneto-telluric transects of the rift, airborne LiDAR, petrological sampling and micro-gravity work. The combination of these data has allowed us to quantify the processes associated with crustal growth at divergent plate boundaries for the first time. Here, we present a broad overview of geological activity in the Afar depression in the hyperactive 21st century. Activity in the DMS began after September 2000, when Gabho volcano at the north of the segment began uplifting, as its magma chamber, ~3 km below the surface, was replenished. It is likely that the inflation at Gabho ultimately triggered the onset of the Dabbahu rifting episode. The rifting episode began with intense seismicity at the northern end of the DMS, before jumping to the Ado Ale Volcanic Complex at the segment centre. This initial dyking was fed from shallow (~3 km) chambers at Gabho and Dabbahu as well as a deeper (~10 km) source at Ado Ale

  20. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  1. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  2. Tight junctions and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Norimasa; Murata, Masaki; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tobioka, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Chiba, Hideki

    2003-09-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical end of the lateral membrane surface. They have two functions, the barrier (or gate) function and the fence function. The barrier function of tight junctions regulates the passage of ions, water, and various macromolecules, even of cancer cells, through paracellular spaces. The barrier function is thus relevant to edema, jaundice, diarrhea, and blood-borne metastasis. On the other hand, the fence function maintains cell polarity. In other words, tight junctions work as a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell biology, in terms of loss of cell polarity. Of the proteins comprising tight junctions, integral membrane proteins occludin, claudins, and JAMs have been recently discovered. Of these molecules, claudins are exclusively responsible for the formation of tight-junction strands and are connected with the actin cytoskeleton mediated by ZO-1. Thus, both functions of tight junctions are dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton as well as ATP. Mutations in the claudin14 and the claudin16 genes result in hereditary deafness and hereditary hypomagnesemia, respectively. Some pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight-junction function, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases is summarized.

  3. Dynamics of Dike Intrusions and Three-Dimensional Velocity Structure beneath an Incipient Seafloor Spreading Center in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yihun, Manahloh Belachew

    A rifting episode started in September 2005 with an intrusion of a 60 km-long mega-dike along the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) rift segment in Afar, Ethiopia. Between 2005 and 2009 thirteen smaller volume dikes intruded different portions of the rift segment. Out of the 13 dikes, 9 were recorded on a temporary network of 44 three-component broadband stations. The dynamics of the dike intrusions are studied using the detailed analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of dike-induced earthquakes and their source mechanisms. In addition, a 3D model of seismic velocity structure is determined using local earthquake travel time tomography algorithm. The dike-induced migration patterns of the earthquakes show the dikes were fed from a ˜5 km-radius zone at the middle of the DMH segment, and traveled northward and southward along the rift axis. The dikes that propagated north of the mid-segment have higher propagation rates and short migration duration relative to the dikes that propagated south. Faulting and graben formation above the dikes occurs hours after the passage of the dike tip, coincident with the onset of low-frequency earthquakes, and accounts for the large percentage of seismic energy release during an intrusion. The large deficit between total seismic and geodetic moment estimates, and the similarity between total seismic slip and geodetic slip estimates on normal faults above the dikes indicates that dike inflation and most of plate boundary deformation occurs largely aseismically. Local earthquake travel time tomography reveals low velocity zones at depths >13 km beneath the Dabbahu volcanic complex, and a broad zone of low velocity beneath the mid-segment. These regions are interpreted to be the magma source zones at different stages of the rifting cycle along the DMH rift segment. However, the lack of migrating seismicity originating from the Dabbahu volcano suggest that only the magma source zone beneath the Ado'Ale Volcanic Complex is actively

  4. Magma plumbing systems deduced from comparison of multiple dike intrusions in an incipientseafloor spreading segment in Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Cote, D. M.; Keir, D.; Rowland, J. V.; Hammond, J. O.; Ayele, A.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanic crust is accreted through the emplacement of dikes at spreading ridges, but the role of dike intrusion in plate boundary deformation during continental rupture remains poorly understood. Since September 2005 the ~70 km-long Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift segment in Afar, Ethiopia has experienced 14 large volume dike intrusions, including 3 fissural eruptions and a small volume silicic eruption. We present comparisons of 9 dike intrusions recorded by two temporary seismic networks between 2006 and 2009, set within the context of new 3D crustal velocity models of the region. All of the migrating swarms of earthquakes which are interpreted as caused by the dike intrusions and graben formation above the dike started from an ~5 km-radius and > 6 km-deep zone at the middle of the rift segment. The earthquake swarms migrated either to the south or north along the rift. Small magnitude earthquakes associated with the margins of the propagating dike tips are followed by the largest magnitude, mostly low-frequency earthquakes (< 2 Hz) interpreted as slow-slip and/or graben formation above the dike. The seismic moment distributions show > 80% of energy is released during the propagation phase of the dikes with minimal seismic energy release after the dikes ceased to propagate. Thus, for most of the dikes, faulting and graben formation above the dikes occurs hours after the passage of the crack tip, and while the dike continues to lengthen. The dikes that propagated to the north had faster average velocities (0.4 - 0.6m/s) compared to the ones that propagated to the south (0.15 - 0.3 m/s). The propagation velocities of each of the dikes follow a decaying exponential, suggesting pressure drops in the dike feeder zone limit dike volume/length. The small changes in intervals between dike intrusions, and the lack of a decrease in dike length with time both suggest that the magma chamber was regularly recharged over the 4-year period since the onset of the rifting episode in

  5. Low geomagnetic field intensity in the Matuyama Chron: palaeomagnetic study of a lava sequence from Afar depression, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hyeon-Seon; Kidane, Tesfaye; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Otofuji, Yo-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Palaeointensity variation is investigated for an inferred time period spanning from 2.34 to 1.96 Ma. Twenty-nine consecutive lava flows are sampled along cliffs 350 m high generated by normal faulting on the Dobi section of Afar depression, Ethiopia. Magnetostratigraphy and K-Ar measurements indicate a lava sequence of R-N-R-N geomagnetic field polarities in ascending order; the lower normal polarity is identified as the Réunion Subchron. Reliability of palaeomagnetic data is ascertained through careful thermal demagnetization and by the reversal test. The Tsunakawa-Shaw method yielded 70 successful palaeointensity results from 24 lava flows and gave 11 acceptable mean palaeointensities. Reliability in palaeointensity data is ascertained by the similar values obtained by the IZZI-Thellier method and thus 11 reliable mean values are obtained from our combined results. After the older reverse polarity with the field intensity of 19.6 ± 7.8 μT, an extremely low palaeointensity period with an average of 6.4 μT is shown to occur prior to the Réunion Subchron. During the Réunion Subchron, the dipole field strength is shown to have returned to an average of 19.5 μT, followed by second extreme low of 3.6 μT and rejuvenation with 17.1 ± 5.3 μT in the younger reverse polarity. This `W-shape' palaeointensity variation is characterized by occurrences of two extremely weak fields lower than 8 μT prior to and during the Réunion Subchron and a relatively weak time-averaged field of approximately 15 μT. This feature is also found in sedimentary cores from the Ontong Java Plateau and the north Atlantic, indicative of a possibly global geomagnetic field phenomenon rather than a local effect on Ethiopia. Furthermore, we estimate a weak virtual axial dipole moment of 3.66 (±1.85) × 1022 Am2 during early stage of the Matuyama Chron (inferred time period of 2.34-1.96 Ma).

  6. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  7. Cementoenamel junction: An insight.

    PubMed

    Vandana, Kharidi Laxman; Haneet, Ryana Kour

    2014-09-01

    The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition. PMID:25425813

  8. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Kharidi Laxman; Haneet, Ryana Kour

    2014-01-01

    The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition. PMID:25425813

  9. Guided search for triple conjunctions.

    PubMed

    Nordfang, Maria; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2014-08-01

    A key tenet of feature integration theory and of related theories such as guided search (GS) is that the binding of basic features requires attention. This would seem to predict that conjunctions of features of objects that have not been attended should not influence search. However, Found (1998) reported that an irrelevant feature (size) improved the efficiency of search for a Color × Orientation conjunction if it was correlated with the other two features across the display, as compared to the case in which size was not correlated with color and orientation features. We examined this issue with somewhat different stimuli. We used triple conjunctions of color, orientation, and shape (e.g., search for a red, vertical, oval-shaped item). This allowed us to manipulate the number of features that each distractor shared with the target (sharing) and it allowed us to vary the total number of distractor types (and, thus, the number of groups of identical items: grouping). We found that these triple conjunction searches were generally very efficient--producing very shallow Reaction Time × Set Size slopes, consistent with strong guidance by basic features. Nevertheless, both of the variables, sharing and grouping, modulated performance. These influences were not predicted by previous accounts of GS; however, both can be accommodated in a GS framework. Alternatively, it is possible, though not necessary, to see these effects as evidence for "preattentive binding" of conjunctions. PMID:25005070

  10. Theoretical efficiency limit for a two-terminal multi-junction "step-cell" using detailed balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hadi, Sabina; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-02-01

    Here we present detailed balance efficiency limit for a novel two-terminal dual and triple junction "step-cell" under AM 1.5G and AM 0 incident spectrums. The step-cell is a multi-junction (MJ) solar cell in which part of the top cell is removed, exposing some of the bottom cell area to unfiltered incident light, thus increasing bottom cell's photogenerated current. Optical generation of the bottom cell is modeled in two parts: step part, limited by the bottom cell bandgap, and conventional part, additionally limited by the top cell absorption. Our results show that conventionally designed MJ cell with optimized bandgap combination of 1.64 eV/0.96 eV for dual junction and 1.91 eV/1.37 eV/0.93 eV for triple junction has the highest theoretical efficiency limit. However, the step-cell design provides significant efficiency improvement for cells with non-optimum bandgap values. For example, for 1.41 eV ( ˜GaAs)/Si dual junction under AM 1.5G, efficiency limit increases from ˜21% in a conventional design to 38.7% for optimized step-cell. Similar benefits are observed for three-junction step-cell and for AM 0 spectrum studied here. Step-cell relaxes bandgap requirements for efficient MJ solar cells, providing an opportunity for a wider selection of materials and cost reduction.

  11. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  12. 49 CFR 380.205 - LCV Triples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SPECIAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS LCV Driver-Training Program § 380.205 LCV Triples. (a) To qualify for the training necessary to... training, have: (1) A valid Class A CDL with a double/triple trailer endorsement; (2) Experience...

  13. 49 CFR 380.205 - LCV Triples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SPECIAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS LCV Driver-Training Program § 380.205 LCV Triples. (a) To qualify for the training necessary to... training, have: (1) A valid Class A CDL with a double/triple trailer endorsement; (2) Experience...

  14. A pseudoneoplastic finding of deep endometriosis: laparoscopic triple segmental bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Cosma, Stefano; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Benedetto, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    Bowel endometriosis affects 3-37% of patients with endometriosis, involving more frequently the rectum and the rectosigmoid junction. Severe endometriosis with bowel involvement is often refractory to standard medical therapy. For these reasons, surgery for bowel treatment is frequently needed. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with deep endometriosis of the pelvis, triple segmental bowel involvement (recto-sigma, ileum-cecum, transverse colon) and massive endometriotic ascites with secondary Glisson's capsule inflammation, refractory to medical therapy. A laparoscopic triple segmental bowel resection and complete fertility sparing excision of pelvic endometriotic lesions was performed. At 48 months of follow-up, the woman was asymptomatic, with no evidence of recurrence of disease or ascites. Laparoscopic segmental bowel resection, including multiple section, is feasible in selected symptomatic patients with consequent improved quality of life, morbidity rates similar to those achieved by laparotomy and with a less detrimental effect on fertility.

  15. Formation of triple-helical structures by the 3'-end sequences of MALAT1 and MENβ noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Valenstein, Max L; Yario, Therese A; Tycowski, Kazimierz T; Steitz, Joan A

    2012-11-20

    Stability of the long noncoding-polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is conferred by an expression and nuclear retention element (ENE). The ENE protects PAN RNA from a rapid deadenylation-dependent decay pathway via formation of a triple helix between the U-rich internal loop of the ENE and the 3'-poly(A) tail. Because viruses borrow molecular mechanisms from their hosts, we searched highly abundant human long-noncoding RNAs and identified putative ENE-like structures in metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) and multiple endocrine neoplasia-β (MENβ) RNAs. Unlike the PAN ENE, the U-rich internal loops of both predicted cellular ENEs are interrupted by G and C nucleotides and reside upstream of genomically encoded A-rich tracts. We confirmed the ability of MALAT1 and MENβ sequences containing the predicted ENE and A-rich tract to increase the levels of an intronless β-globin reporter RNA. UV thermal denaturation profiles at different pH values support formation of a triple-helical structure composed of multiple U•A-U base triples and a single C•G-C base triple. Additional analyses of the MALAT1 ENE revealed that robust stabilization activity requires an intact triple helix, strong stems at the duplex-triplex junctions, a G-C base pair flanking the triplex to mediate potential A-minor interactions, and the 3'-terminal A of the A-rich tract to form a blunt-ended triplex lacking unpaired nucleotides at the duplex-triplex junction. These examples of triple-helical, ENE-like structures in cellular noncoding RNAs, are unique.

  16. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  17. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  18. Performance evaluation of multi-junction solar cells by spatially resolved electroluminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lijing; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Shanshan; Cao, Yiyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Kang, Junyong

    2015-02-01

    An electroluminescence microscopy combined with a spectroscopy was developed to visually analyze multi-junction solar cells. Triple-junction solar cells with different conversion efficiencies were characterized by using this system. The results showed that the mechanical damages and material defects in solar cells can be clearly distinguished, indicating a high-resolution imaging. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements demonstrated that different types of defects or damages impacted cell performance in various degrees and the electric leakage mostly degraded the EQE. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between electroluminescence intensity and short-circuit current density J SC. The results indicated that the gray value of the electroluminescence image corresponding to the intensity was almost proportional to J SC. This technology provides a potential way to evaluate the current matching status of multi-junction solar cells.

  19. Performance evaluation of multi-junction solar cells by spatially resolved electroluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lijing; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Shanshan; Cao, Yiyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Kang, Junyong

    2015-01-01

    An electroluminescence microscopy combined with a spectroscopy was developed to visually analyze multi-junction solar cells. Triple-junction solar cells with different conversion efficiencies were characterized by using this system. The results showed that the mechanical damages and material defects in solar cells can be clearly distinguished, indicating a high-resolution imaging. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements demonstrated that different types of defects or damages impacted cell performance in various degrees and the electric leakage mostly degraded the EQE. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between electroluminescence intensity and short-circuit current density J SC. The results indicated that the gray value of the electroluminescence image corresponding to the intensity was almost proportional to J SC. This technology provides a potential way to evaluate the current matching status of multi-junction solar cells.

  20. Triple flame structure and diffusion flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Vervisch, L.; Poinsot, T.; Linan, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1994-01-01

    The stabilization of diffusion flames is studied using asymptotic techniques and numerical tools. The configuration studied corresponds to parallel streams of cold oxidizer and fuel initially separated by a splitter plate. It is shown that stabilization of a diffusion flame may only occur in this situation by two processes. First, the flame may be stabilized behind the flame holder in the wake of the splitter plate. For this case, numerical simulations confirm scalings previously predicted by asymptotic analysis. Second, the flame may be lifted. In this case a triple flame is found at longer distances downstream of the flame holder. The structure and propagation speed of this flame are studied by using an actively controlled numerical technique in which the triple flame is tracked in its own reference frame. It is then possible to investigate the triple flame structure and velocity. It is shown, as suggested from asymptotic analysis, that heat release may induce displacement speeds of the triple flame larger than the laminar flame speed corresponding to the stoichiometric conditions prevailing in the mixture approaching the triple flame. In addition to studying the characteristics of triple flames in a uniform flow, their resistance to turbulence is investigated by subjecting triple flames to different vortical configurations.

  1. A quantitative geomorphological approach to constraining the volcanic and tectonic evolution of the active Dabbahu rift segment, Afar, Ethiopia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, Sarah; Pik, Raphaël; Burnard, Peter; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Blard, Pierre-Henri; France, Lydéric; Dumont, Stéphanie; Grandin, Raphaël; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Benedetti, Lucilla; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2013-04-01

    In the Afar depression (Ethiopia), extension is organised along rift segments that morphologically resemble oceanic rifts. Segmentation results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed during the well-documented 2005 rifting event on the Dabbahu rift segment. This tectono-volcanic crisis was observed in detail via remote sensing techniques, providing invaluable information on the present-day tectonic - magmatic interplay during a sequence of dyke intrusions. However, lack of data remains on timescales of 1 to 100 kyr, the period over which the main morphology of the rift is acquired. The Dabbahu rift segment represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of rift morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences. We use cosmogenic nuclides (3He and 36Cl) to determine the ages of young (<100 kyr) lava flows and to date the initiation and movement of fault scarps, which cut the lavas. Where possible, we analysed vertical profiles along fault scarps, in an attempt to distinguish individual tectonic events that offset the scarp, estimate their amplitudes and date the recurrence intervals. These geochronological constraints, combined with major & trace element compositions, field mapping and digital mapping (Landsat, ASTER and SPOT imagery), provide valuable insights on the magmatic and tectonic history of the segment. The results show that over the last 100 ka, the northern part of the Dabbahu segment was supplied by at least two different magma reservoirs, which can be identified from their distinctive chemistries. The main reservoir is located beneath Dabbahu volcano at the northern tip of the rift segment, and has been supplied with magma for at least 72 ka. The second reservoir is located further south on the rift axis and corresponds to the current mid-segment magma chamber, which was responsible for the 2005 rifting episode. Two magmatic cycles linked to the Dabbahu magma chamber were recorded, lasting 20-30 kyr

  2. Quantification of gap junction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ek-Vitorín, Jose F; Burt, Janis M

    2005-12-01

    Gap junctions, which are essential for functional coordination and homeostasis within tissues, permit the direct intercellular exchange of small molecules. The abundance and diversity of this exchange depends on the number and selectivity of the comprising channels and on the transjunctional gradient for and chemical character of the permeant molecules. Limited knowledge of functionally significant permeants and poor detectability of those few that are known have made it difficult to define channel selectivity. Presented herein is a multifaceted approach to the quantification of gap junction selectivity that includes determination of the rate constant for intercellular diffusion of a fluorescent probe (k2-DYE) and junctional conductance (gj) for each junction studied, such that the selective permeability (k2-DYE/gj) for dyes with differing chemical characteristics or junctions with differing connexin (Cx) compositions (or treatment conditions) can be compared. In addition, selective permeability can be correlated using single-channel conductance when this parameter is also measured. Our measurement strategy is capable of detecting 1) rate constants and selective permeabilities that differ across three orders of magnitude and 2) acute changes in that rate constant. Using this strategy, we have shown that 1) the selective permeability of Cx43 junctions to a small cationic dye varied across two orders of magnitude, consistent with the hypothesis that the various channel configurations adopted by Cx43 display different selective permeabilities; and 2) the selective permeability of Cx37 vs. Cx43 junctions was consistently and significantly lower. PMID:16093281

  3. Influence of the Afar plume on the deep structure of Aden and Red Sea margins - Insight from teleseismic tomography in western Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Basuyau, Clémence; Leroy, Sylvie; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Keir, Derek; Stuart, Graham; Rolandone, Frédérique; Ganad, Ismail Al; Khanbari, Khaled

    2013-04-01

    Continental rupture processes under mantle plume influence are still poorly known although extensively studied. The Afar plume has been largely investigated in Ethiopia to study early stages of continental break-up. Here we imaged the lithospheric structure of western continental Yemen to evaluate the role of the Afar plume on the evolution of the continental margin and its extent towards the East. A part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory) permitted the deployment of twenty-three broadband stations in Yemen (from 2009 to 2010). Using a classical teleseismic tomography (Aki et al., 1974) on these stations together with a permanent GFZ station, we image the relative velocity variations of P-waves in the crust and lithosphere down to 300 km depth, with a maximum lateral resolution of about ~20 km. The model thus obtained shows (1) a dramatic and localized thinning of the crust in the vicinity of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden (2) the presence of magmatic underplating related to seaward dipping reflectors under those two volcanic margins (3) two granitic syn-rift intrusions on the border of the great escarpment (4) a low velocity anomaly in which with evidence of partial melting, just below thick Oligocene trapps series and other volcanic events (from 15 Ma to present). This low velocity anomaly could correspond to an abnormally hot mantle and could be responsible for dynamic topography and recent magmatism in western Yemen. (5) Finally, we infer the presence of hot material under the Southwestern corner of Yemen that could be related to Miocene volcanism in Jabal an Nar.

  4. Generic along-strike segmentation of Afar normal faults, East Africa: Implications on fault growth and stress heterogeneity on seismogenic fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Caulet, C.; Barros, L.; Perrin, C.; Cappa, F.; Gaudemer, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural faults are segmented along their length can provide useful insights into fault growth processes, stress distribution on fault planes, and earthquake dynamics. We use cumulative displacement profiles to analyze the two largest scales of segmentation of ˜900 normal faults in Afar, East Africa. We build upon a prior study by Manighetti et al. (2009) and develop a new signal processing method aimed at recovering the number, position, displacement, and length of both the major (i.e., longest) and the subordinate, secondary segments within the faults. Regardless of their length, age, geographic location, total displacement, and slip rate, 90% of the faults contain two to five major segments, whereas more than 70% of these major segments are divided into two to four secondary segments. In each hierarchical rank of fault segmentation, most segments have a similar proportional length, whereas the number of segments slightly decreases with fault structural maturity. The along-strike segmentation of the Afar faults is thus generic at its two largest scales. We summarize published fault segment data on 42 normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults worldwide, and find a similar number (two to five) of major and secondary segments across the population. We suggest a fault growth scenario that might account for the generic large-scale segmentation of faults. The observation of a generic segmentation suggests that seismogenic fault planes are punctuated with a deterministic number of large stress concentrations, which are likely to control the initiation, arrest and hence extent and magnitude of earthquake ruptures.

  5. InGaP/GaAs Inverted Dual Junction Solar Cells For CPV Applications Using Metal-Backed Epitaxial Lift-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauhuis, Gerard J.; Mulder, Peter; Haverkamp, Erik J.; Schermer, John J.; Nash, Lee J.; Fulgoni, Dominic J. F.; Ballard, Ian M.; Duggan, Geoffrey

    2010-10-01

    The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique has been combined with inverted III-V PV cell epitaxial growth with the aim of employing thin film PV cells in HCPV systems. In a stepwise approach to the realization of an inverted triple junction on a MELO platform we have first grown a GaAs single junction PV cell to establish the basic layer release process and cell processing steps followed by the growth, fabrication and test of an inverted InGaP/GaAs dual junction structure.

  6. InGaP/GaAs Inverted Dual Junction Solar Cells For CPV Applications Using Metal-Backed Epitaxial Lift-Off

    SciTech Connect

    Bauhuis, Gerard J.; Mulder, Peter; Haverkamp, Erik J.; Schermer, John J.; Nash, Lee J.; Fulgoni, Dominic J. F.; Ballard, Ian M.; Duggan, Geoffrey

    2010-10-14

    The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique has been combined with inverted III-V PV cell epitaxial growth with the aim of employing thin film PV cells in HCPV systems. In a stepwise approach to the realization of an inverted triple junction on a MELO platform we have first grown a GaAs single junction PV cell to establish the basic layer release process and cell processing steps followed by the growth, fabrication and test of an inverted InGaP/GaAs dual junction structure.

  7. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices. PMID:27277330

  8. Pyrimidine motif triple helix in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA pseudoknot is essential for function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cash, Darian D; Cohen-Zontag, Osnat; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Shefer, Kinneret; Brown, Yogev; Ulyanov, Nikolai B; Tzfati, Yehuda; Feigon, Juli

    2013-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of linear chromosomes. The specialized telomerase reverse transcriptase requires a multidomain RNA (telomerase RNA, TER), which includes an integral RNA template and functionally important template-adjacent pseudoknot. The structure of the human TER pseudoknot revealed that the loops interact with the stems to form a triple helix shown to be important for activity in vitro. A similar triple helix has been predicted to form in diverse fungi TER pseudoknots. The solution NMR structure of the Kluyveromyces lactis pseudoknot, presented here, reveals that it contains a long pyrimidine motif triple helix with unexpected features that include three individual bulge nucleotides and a C(+)•G-C triple adjacent to a stem 2-loop 2 junction. Despite significant differences in sequence and base triples, the 3D shape of the human and K. lactis TER pseudoknots are remarkably similar. Analysis of the effects of nucleotide substitutions on cell growth and telomere lengths provides evidence that this conserved structure forms in endogenously assembled telomerase and is essential for telomerase function in vivo.

  9. Metastability in the evolution of triple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynova, A. I.; Orlov, V. V.; Rubinov, A. V.

    2003-10-01

    The dynamical evolution of 15000 equal-mass triple systems with zero initial velocities (the free-fall three-body problem) is considered. The equations of motion are numerically integrated using regularization of binary and triple encounters. We find 170 triple systems which reach a state where the motions take place within a limited region of phase space during a long time. These regions are concentrated in the zones of regular motions in the vicinities of stable periodic orbits: the von Schubart orbit in the rectilinear problem, the Broucke orbit in the isosceles problem, and the `Eight' orbit. The classification of such metastable orbits is suggested. A change of the types is found during the dynamical evolution of some metastable systems. The triple system leaves the metastable regime after some time, and its evolution is finished by the escape of one body.

  10. Coloring RDF Triples to Capture Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flouris, Giorgos; Fundulaki, Irini; Pediaditis, Panagiotis; Theoharis, Yannis; Christophides, Vassilis

    Recently, the W3C Linking Open Data effort has boosted the publication and inter-linkage of large amounts of RDF datasets on the Semantic Web. Various ontologies and knowledge bases with millions of RDF triples from Wikipedia and other sources, mostly in e-science, have been created and are publicly available. Recording provenance information of RDF triples aggregated from different heterogeneous sources is crucial in order to effectively support trust mechanisms, digital rights and privacy policies. Managing provenance becomes even more important when we consider not only explicitly stated but also implicit triples (through RDFS inference rules) in conjunction with declarative languages for querying and updating RDF graphs. In this paper we rely on colored RDF triples represented as quadruples to capture and manipulate explicit provenance information.

  11. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  13. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  14. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  15. Stability junction at a common mutation site in the collagenous domain of the mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Angela; Li, Yingjie; Doss-Pepe, Ellen; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2005-02-15

    Missense mutations in the collagen triple-helix that replace one of the required Gly residues in the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n)() repeating sequence have been implicated in various disorders. Although most hereditary collagen disorders are rare, a common occurrence of a Gly replacement mutation is found in the collagenous domain of mannose binding lectin (MBL). A Gly --> Asp mutation at position 54 in MBL is found at a frequency as high as 30% in certain populations and leads to increased susceptibility to infections. The structural and energetic consequences of this mutation are investigated by comparing a triple-helical peptide containing the N-terminal Gly-X-Y units of MBL with the homologous peptide containing the Gly to Asp replacement. The mutation leads to a loss of triple-helix content but only a small decrease in the stability of the triple-helix (DeltaT(m) approximately 2 degrees C) and no change in the calorimetric enthalpy. NMR studies on specifically labeled residues indicate the portion of the peptide C-terminal to residue 54 is in a highly ordered triple-helix in both peptides, while residues N-terminal to the mutation site have a weak triple-helical signal in the parent peptide and are completely disordered in the mutant peptide. These results suggest that the N-terminal triplet residues are contributing little to the stability of this peptide, a hypothesis confirmed by the stability and enthalpy of shorter peptides containing only the region C-terminal to the mutation site. The Gly to Asp replacement at position 54 in MBL occurs at the boundary of a highly stable triple-helix region and a very unstable sequence. The junctional position of this mutation minimizes its destabilizing effect, in contrast with the significant destabilization seen for Gly replacements in peptides modeling collagen diseases.

  16. Arthroscopic Subtalar, Double, and Triple Fusion.

    PubMed

    Walter, Richard; Parsons, Stephen; Winson, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Arthroscopic approaches to subtalar, double, and triple arthrodesis allow relative preservation of the soft tissue envelope compared with traditional open approaches. The surgical technique involving the use of a 4.5-mm 30° arthroscope via sinus tarsi portals is described. All 3 joints of the triple joint can be prepared for fusion with motorized burrs. Rigid fixation is achieved with cannulated screws. High union rates and low complication rates have been reported. PMID:27524712

  17. Tunable φ Josephson junction ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menditto, R.; Sickinger, H.; Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Goldobin, E.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the operation of a deterministic Josephson ratchet with tunable asymmetry. The ratchet is based on a φ Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic barrier operating in the underdamped regime. The system is probed also under the action of an additional dc current, which acts as a counterforce trying to stop the ratchet. Under these conditions the ratchet works against the counterforce, thus producing a nonzero output power. Finally, we estimate the efficiency of the φ Josephson junction ratchet.

  18. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  19. The von Neumann Triple Point Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Richard; Tesdall, Allen M.

    We describe the problem of weak shock reflection off a wedge and discuss the triple point paradox that arises. When the shock is sufficiently weak and the wedge is thin, Mach reflection appears to be observed but is impossible according to what von Neumann originally showed in 1943. We summarize some recent numerical results for weak shock reflection problems for the unsteady transonic small disturbance equations, the nonlinear wave system, and the Euler equations. Rather than finding a standard but mathematically inadmissible Mach reflection with a shock triple point, the solutions contain a complex structure: there is a sequence of triple points and supersonic patches in a tiny region behind the leading triple point, with an expansion fan originating at each triple point. The sequence of patches may be infinite, and we refer to this structure as Guderley Mach reflection. The presence of the expansion fans at the triple points resolves the paradox. We describe some recent experimental evidence which is consistent with these numerical findings.

  20. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  1. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  2. Impact of the third-strand orientation on the thermodynamic stability of the four-way DNA junction.

    PubMed

    Makube, N; Klump, H H

    2001-09-01

    The physical properties of a triple-helical DNA four-way junction J(T2T4) have been characterized by means of UV spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). J(T2T4) is another four-way junction that was designed in addition to J(T1T3) (N. Makube and H. H. Klump (2000) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 377, 31-42) to study the effects of third strands on the stability of the four-way junction with triple-helical arms. The pH titration curves illustrate the sequential folding of single strands to double-helical four-way junctions and finally the binding of third strands to their respective W-C duplexes. CD measurements confirm triplex formation under appropriate pH and ionic strength conditions. The CD spectra also suggest different melting patterns for the triple-helical arms of J(T2T4). The melting temperature as a function of pH or ionic strength characterizes the effect of the third strands on the structural stability. Increased sodium concentration and low pH conditions enhances and stabilizes the overall structure of the junction. The results also indicate that all triplexes in J(T2T4) are formed in the absence of salt and at low pH; however, the junction may, under these conditions, assume a conformation different from the one assumed in the presence of salt. Through the deconvolution of DSC data, the calorimetric enthalpies associated with melting of arms of the junctions were determined. The loops are designed to have the same enthalpic effect on the different arms. The stabilizing effect of the loops is more pronounced when those loops are shifted from arms 1 and 3 in J(T1T3) to arms 2 and 4 in J(T2T4) without changing any of the sequences. Overall, J(T2T4) is slightly more stable than J(T1T3). The differences can be attributed to sequence effects rather than structural effects. All the results illustrate that binding of the third strand in either of the two orientations 5'5'3' (J(T2T4)) or 5'3'3' (J(T1T3)) stabilizes the underlying

  3. Comparative Analysis Of Radiation Degradation Of Triple-Junction Solar Cells Using Two Different Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Chanteperdrix, G.; Evans, H.; Heynderickx, D.; DeDonder, E.; Guillaume, L.; Theroude, C.; Baur, C.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation degradation of solar cells has historically been analysed on the basis of 'relative damage coefficients' using the EQFLUX code developed by NASA/JPL. In recent years, efforts have been made to improve the possibilities for this kind analysis using methods which are more closely similar to the analysis performed on other components. In this paper, we discuss the status of the available tools in the context of the user requirements and expectations.

  4. Tectonic uplift of a middle Wisconsin marine platform near the Mendocino triple junction California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Lajoie, K.R.; Sorg, D.H.; Morrison, S.D.; Wolfe, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    An uplifted wave-cut marine platform eroded across bedrock of the Franciscan Complex at Point Delgada, northern California, is overlain by 0.5 to 5 m of wave-worked pea gravel, which is in turn directly overlain by fluvial gravel and silt deposited as alluvial fans. Fossil wood debris from this horizon yields a 14C date of 44 800 yr. We tentatively correlate this terrace with the middle Wisconsin high sea-level stand at -37m, and if so, the tectonic uplift since middle Wisconsin time has been 44m, and the average rate of uplift has been at least 1.0m/1000 yr. -from Author

  5. Pulling the rug out from under California: seismic images of the Mendocino Triple Junction region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 and 1994 a network of large-aperture seismic profiles was collected to image the crustal and upper-mantle structure beneath northern California and the adjacent continental margin. The data include approximately 650 km of onshore seismic refraction/reflection data, 2000 km of off-shore multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data, and simultaneous onshore and offshore recording of the MCS airgun source to yield large-aperture data. Scientists from more than 12 institutions were involved in data acquisition.

  6. Progress in the Development of Metamorphic Multi-Junction III-V Space-Solar Cells at Essential Research Incorporated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinharoy, Samar; Patton, Martin O.; Valko, Thomas M., Sr.; Weizer, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have shown that highest efficiency III-V multi-junction solar cells require alloy structures that cannot be grown on a lattice-matched substrate. Ever since the first demonstration of high efficiency metamorphic single junction 1.1 eV and 1.2 eV InGaAs solar cells by Essential Research Incorporated (ERI), interest has grown in the development of multi-junction cells of this type using graded buffer layer technology. ERI is currently developing a dual-junction 1.6 eV InGaP/1.1 eV InGaAs tandem cell (projected practical air-mass zero (AM0), one-sun efficiency of 28%, and 100-sun efficiency of 37.5%) under a Ballistic Missile Defense Command (BMDO) SBIR Phase II program. A second ongoing research effort at ERI involves the development of a 2.1 eV AlGaInP/1.6 eV InGaAsP/1.2 eV InGaAs triple-junction concentrator tandem cell (projected practical AM0 efficiency of 36.5% under 100 suns) under a SBIR Phase II program funded by the Air Force. We are in the process of optimizing the dual-junction cell performance. In case of the triple-junction cell, we have developed the bottom and the middle cell, and are in the process of developing the layer structures needed for the top cell. A progress report is presented in this paper.

  7. Josephson junctions in SPICE3

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on SPICE3 which is the most recent version of the venerable circuit simulator SPICE from the University of California, Berkeley. Unlike its predecessors, SPICE3 is written in the C programming language, and is designed for interactive use under a modern multitasking operating system. SPICE3, being an interactive program, offers the user great control and flexibility in performing simulations, and provides a powerful graphics capability for viewing simulation results. A C-shell like control syntax is supported, as well as such features as plotting while simulating, parameter alteration during simulation, and simulation data controlled breakpoints. Unfortunately, the Berkeley distribution of SPICE3 lacks support for Josephson junctions. As a consequence, the author has developed a customize version of SPICE3b.1 which incorporates a Josephson junction model. The model supports control current modulation, as well as a fifth order polynomial description of the quasiparticle current suitable for NbN junctions.

  8. Structure and morphology of a triple point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekiri, H.; Emanuel, G.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive analytical/numerical treatment of triple points is based on over 5 × 103 parametric solutions. The approach is applicable to triple points in steady or unsteady, three-dimensional flow with a variable freestream. The analysis is for a perfect gas with three different ratios of specific heat values and an upstream Mach number that ranges from an onset value to 10. The structure and morphology of the solution manifold is extensively discussed. This includes solution type, solution overlap, double, triple, and split solutions, shock wave and slipstream angular orientations, the strength of the shocks, etc. Both the reflected and Mach stem shocks can be normal shocks. The occurrence, conditions, and parametric results for these normal shocks are provided.

  9. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  10. The triple point of sulfur hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, P. M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A cryogenic fixed point cell has been filled with high purity (99.999%) sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and measured in an adiabatic closed-cycle cryostat system. Temperature measurements of the SF6 melting curve were performed using a capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometer (CSPRT) calibrated over the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) subrange from the triple point of equilibrium hydrogen to the triple point of water. The measured temperatures were corrected by 0.37 mK for the effects of thermometer self-heating, and the liquidus-point temperature estimated by extrapolation to melted fraction F  =  1 of a simple linear regression versus melted fraction F in the range F  =  0.53 to 0.84. Based on this measurement, the temperature of the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride is shown to be 223.555 23(49) K (k  =  1) on the ITS-90. This value is in excellent agreement with the best prior measurements reported in the literature, but with considerably smaller uncertainty. An analysis of the detailed uncertainty budget of this measurement suggests that if the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride were to be included as a defining fixed point of the next revision of the International Temperature Scale, it could do so with a total realization uncertainty of approximately 0.43 mK, slightly larger than the realization uncertainties of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90. Since the combined standard uncertainty of this SF6 triple point temperature determination is dominated by chemical impurity effects, further research exploring gas purification techniques and the influence of specific impurity species on the SF6 triple point temperature may bring the realization uncertainty of SF6 as a fixed point material into the range of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90.

  11. Triple arthrodesis for adult acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Alan R; Dix, Brian T; Richardson, Phillip E; Mendicino, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The primary goal of triple arthrodesis for stage III and IV adult acquired flatfoot is to obtain a well-aligned plantigrade foot that will support the ankle in optimal alignment. Ancillary procedures including posterior muscle group lengthening, medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy, medial column stabilization, peroneus brevis tenotomy, or transfer and harvest of regional bone graft are often necessary to achieve adequate realignment. Image intensification is helpful in confirming optimal realignment before fixation. Results of triple arthrodesis are enhanced with adequate preparation of joint surfaces, bone graft/orthobiologics, 2-point fixation of all 3 tritarsal joints, and a vertical heel position.

  12. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  13. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  14. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  15. (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating, paleomagnetism, and tephrochemistry of Pliocene strata of the hominid-bearing Woranso-Mille area, west-central Afar Rift, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; Scott, Gary R; Saylor, Beverly; Alene, Mulugeta; Angelini, Joshua D; Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2010-02-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of tuffs and mafic lavas, tephra geochemistry, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy have been used to establish the chronostratigraphy of the Pliocene hominid-bearing fossiliferous succession at Woranso-Mille, a paleontological study area in the western part of the central Afar region of Ethiopia. The succession in the northwestern part of the study area ranges in (40)Ar/(39)Ar age from 3.82-3.570 Ma, encompassed by paleomagnetic subchron C2Ar (4.187-3.596 Ma). One of the major tuff units, locally named the Kilaytoli tuff, is correlative on the basis of age and geochemistry to the Lokochot Tuff of the Turkana Basin. A hominid partial skeleton (KSD-VP-1) was found in strata whose precise stratigraphic position and age is still under investigation, but is believed to correspond to the later part of this interval. Woranso-Mille fills a significant gap in the fossil record of northeastern Africa at the time of the lower to middle Pliocene transition, when many extant species lineages of African fauna were established.

  16. Evaluating methods used for fission track dating of tephras: examples from the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, and the Denali fault zone, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, A. E.; Warfel, T. S.; Phillips, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fission track geochronology has been successfully used to date volcanic glasses and tephras in several studies, a variety of approaches have been used (see Westgate et al., 2013), and no consensus for a standardized methodology has emerged. As a result, this technique is rarely employed, despite having the potential to date tephras and glasses that cannot be dated by other methods, such as K-Ar dating. We have been evaluating the various approaches used to address the technical issues in fission track dating of tephras, by applying them to standards of known ages, including Moldavite tektite, and Huckleberry and Bishop Tuffs. Some of these issues include track etching and counting protocol, and corrections for the effects of track fading at low temperatures. Track etching is generally done in 24% HF for 75 or more seconds, but the time necessary for optimal etching appears to vary according to sample composition and grain size. To correct for track fading, we are using the diameter correction technique of Sandhu and Westgate (1995). We have obtained tephra samples from two regions, the Afar Depression in Ethiopia, an area with significant early hominid fossils, and the Denali fault zone in Alaska, an area with a complicated tectonic evolution. For both of these regions, we have samples that have been dated by other methods for calibration purposes, and we will explore the application of a Zeta correction to the technique. This underutilized technique can provide powerful constraints on studies of timing in diverse geologic environments.

  17. (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating, paleomagnetism, and tephrochemistry of Pliocene strata of the hominid-bearing Woranso-Mille area, west-central Afar Rift, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; Scott, Gary R; Saylor, Beverly; Alene, Mulugeta; Angelini, Joshua D; Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2010-02-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of tuffs and mafic lavas, tephra geochemistry, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy have been used to establish the chronostratigraphy of the Pliocene hominid-bearing fossiliferous succession at Woranso-Mille, a paleontological study area in the western part of the central Afar region of Ethiopia. The succession in the northwestern part of the study area ranges in (40)Ar/(39)Ar age from 3.82-3.570 Ma, encompassed by paleomagnetic subchron C2Ar (4.187-3.596 Ma). One of the major tuff units, locally named the Kilaytoli tuff, is correlative on the basis of age and geochemistry to the Lokochot Tuff of the Turkana Basin. A hominid partial skeleton (KSD-VP-1) was found in strata whose precise stratigraphic position and age is still under investigation, but is believed to correspond to the later part of this interval. Woranso-Mille fills a significant gap in the fossil record of northeastern Africa at the time of the lower to middle Pliocene transition, when many extant species lineages of African fauna were established. PMID:20034653

  18. 12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all triple windows on first and second floors. Note single swing jib door - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  19. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  20. Sequence-specific photoinduced c-fos gene damage mediated by triple stranded-forming oligonucleotide conjugated to psoralen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, En-Hua; Wang, Ju-jun; Ma, Wenjian; Qin, Jingfen

    1999-09-01

    A psoralen-oligonucleotide conjugate was designed to photoinduce a cross-link at a specific sequence of c-fos oncogene. Psoralen was attached to its C-3 position of a 20-base mer oligonucleotide, which binds to a synthetic 49 bp duplex containing the c-fos gene polypurine site, where it forms a triple stranded DNA. Upon near-UV-irradiation, the two strand of DNA are crosslinked at the TpA step present at the triple-duplex junction. Results show that the yield of the photoinduce cross- linking reaction is quite high. We treated HeLa cells with above 2-mer oligonucleotide conjugated to psoralen. The expression of c-fos oncogene was significant reduced, no significant effect on the level of c-myc mRNA. These data indicate that such psoralen- oligonucleotide conjugates could be used to selectively control gene expression or to induce sequence-specific damages.

  1. Fixed Point Problems for Linear Transformations on Pythagorean Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, M.-Q.; Tong, J.-C.; Braza, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, an attempt is made to find all linear transformations that map a standard Pythagorean triple (a Pythagorean triple [x y z][superscript T] with y being even) into a standard Pythagorean triple, which have [3 4 5][superscript T] as their fixed point. All such transformations form a monoid S* under matrix product. It is found that S*…

  2. SIN tunnel junction as a temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, D.; Kuzmin, Leonid S.; Willander, Magnus

    1999-04-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of a superconductor-normal metal tunnel junction (SIN) is very sensitive to the temperature of the normal metal. Therefore SIN junction can be used as a thermometer which can be conveniently integrated into more complicated devices, for example bolometers. We estimate the effect of different types of noise on the sensitivity of such a thermometer. Shot noise of the tunnel junction, amplifier noise and the noise related to the fluctuations of the heat flow through the junction are considered. The performance of the bolometer with SIN junction as a temperature sensor is also discussed.

  3. Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Gingrich, Eric C.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2015-03-01

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic materials are of interest for both scientific and technological purposes. In principle, either the amplitude of the critical current or superconducting phase shift across the junction can be controlled by the relative magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers in the junction. Our approach concentrates on phase control utilizing two junctions in a SQUID geometry. We will report on efforts to control the phase of junctions carrying either spin-singlet or spin-triplet supercurrent for cryogenic memory applications. Supported by Northorp Grumman Corporation and by IARPA under SPAWAR Contract N66001-12-C-2017.

  4. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weides, M.; Tillmann, K.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2006-05-01

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al2O3/Ni60Cu40/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al2O3 tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with jc spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  5. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  6. Modulation of adrenal gap junction expression.

    PubMed

    Murray, S A; Shah, U S

    1998-01-01

    To increase our knowledge of the role of peptide hormone stimulation in gap junction protein expression and adrenal cortical cell function, primary rat adrenal cortical cells were treated with adrenocorticotropin, and gap junction proteins were measured. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were used to detect and characterize gap junction type and distribution. The gap junction protein, connexin 43 (alpha 1), was detected. Analysis of six connexin protein types did not reveal gap junction species other than alpha 1. Cells of the inner adrenal cortical zones, zonae fasciculata and reticularis, were demonstrated to have the highest number of gap junctions per cell in the adrenal gland. Adrenal cell cultures enriched for the two inner cortical adrenal zones were established and demonstrated also to express alpha 1 gap junction protein. Adrenocorticotropin (40 mUnits/ml) and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (1 mM) treatments increased alpha 1 gap junction protein levels and decreased cell proliferation rates in the cell cultures. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gap junction expression can be regulated by adrenocorticotropin acting through the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate. It can be suggested that gap junction expression in the adrenal gland may be under hormonal influence, and that gap junctions serve as passage for movement of molecules involved in control of cell proliferation. PMID:9694574

  7. Single-molecule conductance of functionalized oligoynes: length dependence and junction evolution.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Gulcur, Murat; Manrique, David Zsolt; Pope, Thomas; Hong, Wenjing; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Huang, Cancan; Batsanov, Andrei S; Bryce, Martin R; Lambert, Colin; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2013-08-21

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the length dependence and anchor group dependence of the electrical conductance of a series of oligoyne molecular wires in single-molecule junctions with gold contacts. Experimentally, we focus on the synthesis and properties of diaryloligoynes with n = 1, 2, and 4 triple bonds and the anchor dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene (BT). For comparison, we also explored the aurophilic anchor group cyano (CN), amino (NH2), thiol (SH), and 4-pyridyl (PY). Scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STM-BJ) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) techniques are employed to investigate single-molecule conductance characteristics. The BT moiety is superior as compared to traditional anchoring groups investigated so far. BT-terminated oligoynes display a 100% probability of junction formation and possess conductance values which are the highest of the oligoynes studied and, moreover, are higher than other conjugated molecular wires of similar length. Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations are reported for oligoynes with n = 1-4 triple bonds. Complete conductance traces and conductance distributions are computed for each family of molecules. The sliding of the anchor groups leads to oscillations in both the electrical conductance and the binding energies of the studied molecular wires. In agreement with experimental results, BT-terminated oligoynes are predicted to have a high electrical conductance. The experimental attenuation constants βH range between 1.7 nm(-1) (CN) and 3.2 nm(-1) (SH) and show the following trend: βH(CN) < βH(NH2) < βH(BT) < βH(PY) ≈ βH(SH). DFT-based calculations yield lower values, which range between 0.4 nm(-1) (CN) and 2.2 nm(-1) (PY).

  8. Functional dissection of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Holliday junction resolvase Ydc2: in vivo role in mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sigala, Barbara; Tsaneva, Irina R

    2003-07-01

    The crystal structure of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Holliday junction resolvase Ydc2 revealed significant structural homology with the Escherichia coli resolvase RuvC but Ydc2 contains a small triple helical bundle that has no equivalent in RuvC. Two of the alpha-helices that form this bundle show homology to a putative DNA-binding motif known as SAP. To investigate the biochemical function of the triple-helix domain, truncated Ydc2 mutants were expressed in E. coli and in fission yeast. Although the truncated proteins retained all amino-acid residues that map to the structural core of RuvC including the catalytic site, deletion of the SAP motif alone or the whole triple-helix domain of Ydc2 resulted in the complete loss of resolvase activity and impaired significantly the binding of Ydc2 to synthetic junctions in vitro. These results are in full agreement with our proposal for a DNA-binding role of the triple-helix motif [Ceschini et al. (2001) EMBO J. 20, 6601-6611]. The biological effect of Ydc2 on mtDNA in yeast was probed using wild-type and several Ydc2 mutants expressed in Deltaydc2 S. pombe. The truncated mutants were shown to localize exclusively to yeast mitochondria ruling out a possible role of the helical bundle in mitochondrial targeting. Cells that lacked Ydc2 showed a significant depletion of mtDNA content. Plasmids expressing full-length Ydc2 but not the truncated or catalytically inactive Ydc2 mutants could rescue the mtDNA 'phenotype'. These results provide evidence that the Holliday junction resolvase activity of Ydc2 is required for mtDNA transmission and affects mtDNA content in S. pombe.

  9. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  10. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  11. Gauging triple stores with actual biological data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Semantic Web technologies have been developed to overcome the limitations of the current Web and conventional data integration solutions. The Semantic Web is expected to link all the data present on the Internet instead of linking just documents. One of the foundations of the Semantic Web technologies is the knowledge representation language Resource Description Framework (RDF). Knowledge expressed in RDF is typically stored in so-called triple stores (also known as RDF stores), from which it can be retrieved with SPARQL, a language designed for querying RDF-based models. The Semantic Web technologies should allow federated queries over multiple triple stores. In this paper we compare the efficiency of a set of biologically relevant queries as applied to a number of different triple store implementations. Results Previously we developed a library of queries to guide the use of our knowledge base Cell Cycle Ontology implemented as a triple store. We have now compared the performance of these queries on five non-commercial triple stores: OpenLink Virtuoso (Open-Source Edition), Jena SDB, Jena TDB, SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. We examined three performance aspects: the data uploading time, the query execution time and the scalability. The queries we had chosen addressed diverse ontological or biological questions, and we found that individual store performance was quite query-specific. We identified three groups of queries displaying similar behaviour across the different stores: 1) relatively short response time queries, 2) moderate response time queries and 3) relatively long response time queries. SwiftOWLIM proved to be a winner in the first group, 4Store in the second one and Virtuoso in the third one. Conclusions Our analysis showed that some queries behaved idiosyncratically, in a triple store specific manner, mainly with SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. Virtuoso, as expected, displayed a very balanced performance - its load time and its response time for all the

  12. Double Planet Meets Triple Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    atmosphere, a large campaign involving more than twenty scientists and engineers from the Paris Observatory and associated institutions [1] was organized to observe the July 20, 2002, event involving an occultation of a star of visual magnitude 11 (i.e., about 100 times fainter than what can be perceived with then unaided eye), referred to as "P126" in McDonald and Elliot's catalogue. In May 2002, preparatory observations showed that star to be double, with the brighter component of the system ( "P126 A" ) being likely to be occulted by Pluto, as seen from South America. However, because of the duplicity, the predictions of exactly where the shadow of Pluto would sweep the ground were uncertain by about 0.1 arcsec in the sky, corresponding to more than 2000 km on the ground. The NACO images ESO PR Photo 21b/02 ESO PR Photo 21b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 47k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 208k] ESO PR Photo 21c/02 ESO PR Photo 21c/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 467 pix - 53k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 933 pix - 232k] Caption : PR Photo 21b/02 shows one of the images obtained with the NAOS-CONICA (NACO) adaptive optics (AO) camera mounted on the ESO VLT 8.2-m YEPUN telescope at the Paranal Observatory in connection with a stellar occultation by Pluto on July 20, 2002. The star was found to be triple - the three components (A, B and C), as well as Pluto and its moon, Charon, are indicated in PR Photo 21c/02 for easy orientation. The images are based on data available from the NACO data webpage. See the text for details. In the end, the close approach (an "appulse" in astronomical terminology) of Pluto and P126 A was indeed observed from various sites in South America, with several mobile telescopes and also including major facilities at the ESO La Silla and Paranal Observatories. In particular, unique and very sharp images were obtained with the NAOS-CONICA (NACO) adaptive optics (AO) camera mounted on the ESO VLT 8.2-m YEPUN telescope . One of the NACO images is shown in PR

  13. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  14. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  15. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  16. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  17. Controls on magmatic cycles and development of rift topography of the Manda Hararo segment (Afar, Ethiopia): Insights from cosmogenic 3He investigation of landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Williams, A.; Vye-Brown, C.; Ferguson, D.; Blard, P.-H.; France, L.; Yirgu, G.; Seid, J. I.; Ayalew, D.; Calvert, A.

    2013-04-01

    Crustal extension at mature continental rifts and oceanic ridges occurs by a combination of normal faulting and magma injection, which interact to create rift morphology. Quantifying the relative roles of faulting and melt intrusion in accommodating extension at magmatic rifts remains difficult and requires studies at sufficient spatial and temporal scales to resolve the interaction between these processes. In this study we provide new chronological constraints based on cosmogenic exposure dating for the ˜100 kyr topographic evolution of a young and active magmatic rift segment in Afar, Ethiopia. We combine structural investigations, field mapping, geochemical analysis and cosmogenic 3He exposure dating of lava surfaces in order to investigate the interplay between volcanic activity and fault growth in the northern part of the axial depression, where the rift segment intersects a large stratovolcano. Our results allow us to determine the roles of the various magma reservoirs feeding this rift system and their interactions during accretion over the past 100 kyr. New age data for key lava units allow several magmatic cycles to be distinguished. Each cycle lasts 20-40 ka resulting in periods of high and low magma supply rate. The variations in magma supply rate at the segment extremity strongly affect the development of the rift depression, with the availability of melt controlling the morphological impact of faulting. Melts from different magma reservoirs feeding the segment are chemically distinct and geochemical analysis of lavas from the rift floor allows their respective contributions to maintaining magmatic accretion to be estimated. We propose that melts from the magma reservoir at the northern end of the segment contribute around one-third of the length of this portion of the segment, whereas the mid-segment reservoir is responsible for the remaining two-thirds of the segment accretion.

  18. Triple orbital metastases from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tun, Kagan; Bulut, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma, when metastatic, typically involves bone and produces both osteoblastic and osteolytic changes. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our department because of unilateral progressive proptosis and visual blurriness for 3 months. The patient had a history of prostate adenocarcinoma diagnosis 5 years ago. We report a case of orbital involvement presented that intraorbital mass (including periocular structures), temporal bone and temporal muscle from prostate cancer. The mass was removed with total excision. Despite the frequency of bone metastasis in prostatic carcinoma, triple orbital metastases are extremely rare. The best of our knowledge, prostate adenocarcinoma and its triple (temporal bone, temporal muscle and intraorbital mass) orbital metastases have not been published previously. Metastatic orbital tumor secondary to prostate cancer should be considered in patients who have varying degrees of eye symptoms. PMID:27591068

  19. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G; Kiselev, Andrey A; Fong, Bryan H; Holabird, Kevin S; Hazard, Thomas M; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E; Ross, Richard S; Gyure, Mark F; Hunter, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  20. Development of a triple beam irradiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, S.; Miwa, Y.; Yamaki, D.; Katano, Y.; Nakazawa, T.; Noda, K.

    1998-10-01

    A triple beam ion irradiation facility has been developed to study the synergistic effects of displacement damage, helium and hydrogen atoms on microstructural changes of materials under irradiation environments simulating a fusion reactor. The system consists of a vacuum chamber and three beamlines, which are connected with each electrostatic accelerator. Samples can be irradiated in the wide temperature range from liquid nitrogen to 1273 K in the chamber by replacing two kinds of sample stages alternatively. An austenitic stainless steel was simultaneously irradiated with triple beam of nickel, helium and hydrogen ions at 573-673 K using this facility and TEM observations were carried out from a cross sectional view normal to the incident surface. It was shown that the number density of dislocation loops decreased in the region where hydrogen and helium were deposited in comparison with ones in the region where only displacement damage was induced to a similar damage level.

  1. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G.; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Fong, Bryan H.; Holabird, Kevin S.; Hazard, Thomas M.; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W.; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E.; Ross, Richard S.; Gyure, Mark F.; Hunter, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  2. [Principles of reorientation in triple arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Döderlein, L

    2006-04-01

    Triple arthrodesis can be used for a three-dimensional correction of all types of hindfoot deformities. Prerequisites are a functional integrity of the ankle joint and an adequate bone stock. The procedure blocks the cardanic mechanism of the hindfoot and therefore reduces the shock-absorbing and mobile-adaptive functions of the foot. This results in increased stresses with the risk of long-term degenerative changes. In addition to triple arthrodesis, procedures to the forefoot are often necessary. Especially in neurogenic deformities, muscle lengthening and balancing procedures may be needed. In the evaluation of the results, different etiologies (e.g. posttraumatic, degenerative, neurogenic, congenital) and different deformities (varus, valgus, cavovarus, equinus) should not be mixed up. The results in congenital and neurogenic deformities in the literature are inferior to those of degenerative and posttraumatic origin. A standardization of indications, techniques, and evaluation criteria is still needed in order to exactly estimate the value of this procedure for different pathologies.

  3. Lignin-Based Triple Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Sivasankarapillai, Gopakumar; Li, Hui; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-09-14

    Lignin-based triple shape memory polymers comprised of both permanent covalent cross-links and physical cross-links have been synthesized. A mixing phase with poly(ester-amine) and poly(ester-amide) network having two distinct glass transitions was hot mixed with more structurally homogenized methanol soluble lignin fraction by one-pot, two-step method. Triple shape properties arise from the combined effect of the glass transition of polyester copolymers and lignin and the dissociation of self-complementary hydrogen bonding and cross-link density. The percentage of recovery in each stage was investigated and it was proved that the first recovery is related with lignin-poly(ester-amine) rich network and the second recovery stage is related with lignin-poly(ester-amide) rich network. The thermal and mechanical properties of the lignin-copolymer networks were also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  4. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.; Pravec, P.; Taylor, P.; Carry, B.; Jacobson, S.

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main-belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main-belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (≲20 km) binaries form by rotational fission and establishes that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect powers the spin-up process. A unifying paradigm based on rotational fission and post-fission dynamics can explain the formation of small binaries, triples, and pairs. Large (>~20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  5. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, S. T. M.; Trees, B. R.

    2001-10-01

    There is considerable scientific and technological interest in the time-dependent behavior of arrays of non-identical Josephson junctions, whose voltages oscillate with individual bare frequencies that can be made, through interactions, to renormalize their frequencies to a common value. We have studied the degree of synchronization of a subset of overdamped junctions in a ladder geometry, in which the voltages across the ``rung'' junctions of the ladder oscillate with the same, renormalized frequency and a fixed phase difference. We measure the degree of synchronization of the junctions with an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of the nearest-neighbor junction coupling strength. We also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction (RSJ) equations could be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of the junction coupling strength and also demonstrated that the relationship between the array size N and the critical coupling strength for all junctions to oscillate with the same frequency scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  6. Chaos induced by coupling between Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Azemtsa-Donfack, H.; Botha, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    It is found that, in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions in layered high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation, the chaotic features are triggered by interjunction coupling, i.e., the coupling between different junctions in the stack. While the radiation is well known to produce chaotic effects in the single junction, the effect of interjunction coupling is fundamentally different and it can lead to the onset of chaos via a different route to that of the single junction. A precise numerical study of the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions, as described by the CCJJ+DC model, is performed. We demonstrate the charging of superconducting layers, in a bias current interval corresponding to a Shapiro step subharmonic, due to the creation of a longitudinal plasma wave along the stack of junctions. With increase in radiation amplitude chaotic behavior sets in. The chaotic features of the coupled Josephson junctions are analyzed by calculations of the Lyapunov exponents. We compare results for a stack of junctions to the case of a single junction and prove that the observed chaos is induced by the coupling between the junctions. The use of Shapiro step subharmonics may allow longitudinal plasma waves to be excited at low radiation power.

  7. Triple plasmon resonance of bimetal nanoshell

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam; Arghavani Nia, Borhan

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, light absorption spectra properties of a bimetal multilayer nanoshell based on quasi-static approach are investigated. Comparing with silver-dielectric-silver and silver-dielectric-gold nanoshells, gold-dielectric-silver nanoshells have three intense and separated plasmon peaks which are more suitable for multiplex biosensing. Calculations show that relatively small thickness of outer silver shell and large dielectric constant of middle dielectric layer of gold-dielectric-silver nanoshell are suitable to obtain the triple plasmon resonance.

  8. Device Maintains Water At The Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. W.; Burkett, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Inexpensive device maintains water at 0.01 degree C for 10 weeks or longer. New device consists of four basic assemblies; small, commercial chest freezer containing insulated water tank; insulated copper cell holder; "ice switch" for cycling freezer compressor and externally-mounted air pump for circulation. Access hole in freezer lid allows triple point measurements without opening lid. Modified freezer used to calibrate standard platinum resistance thermomenters.

  9. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  10. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  11. DNA three-way junction with a dinuclear iron(II) supramolecular helicate at the center: a NMR structural study.

    PubMed

    Cerasino, Leonardo; Hannon, Michael J; Sletten, Einar

    2007-08-01

    A tetracationic supramolecular helicate, [Fe2L3]4+ (L = C25H20N4), with a triple-helical architecture is found to induce the formation of a three-way junction (3WJ) of deoxyribonucleotides with the helicate located in the center of the junction. NMR spectroscopic studies of the interaction between the M enantiomer of the helicate and two different oligonucleotides, [5'-d(TATGGTACCATA)]2 and [5'-d(CGTACG)]2, show that, in each case, the 2-fold symmetry of the helicate is lifted, while the 3-fold symmetry around the helicate axis is retained. The 1:3 helicate/DNA stoichiometry estimated from 1D NMR spectra supports a molecular model of a three-way junction composed of three strands. Three separate double-helical arms of the three-way junction are chemically identical giving rise to one set of proton resonances. The NOE contacts between the helicate and DNA unambiguously show that the helicate is fitted into the center of the three-way junction experiencing a hydrophobic 3-fold symmetric environment. Close stacking interactions between the ligand phenyl groups and the nucleotide bases are demonstrated through unusually large downfield shifts (1-2 ppm) of the phenyl protons. The unprecedented 3WJ arrangement observed in solution has also been found to exist in the crystal structure of the helicate adduct of [d(CGTACG)2] (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 1227).

  12. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  13. Multiterminal Coulomb-Majorana junction.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Egger, Reinhold

    2013-05-10

    We study multiple helical nanowires in proximity to a common mesoscopic superconducting island, where Majorana fermion bound states are formed. We show that a weak finite charging energy of the center island may dramatically affect the low-energy behavior of the system. While for strong charging interactions, the junction decouples the connecting wires, interactions lower than a nonuniversal threshold may trigger the flow towards an exotic Kondo fixed point. In either case, the ideally Andreev reflecting fixed point characteristic for infinite capacitance (grounded) devices gets destabilized by interactions.

  14. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  15. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  16. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  17. Triple-energy contrast enhanced digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puong, Sylvie; Milioni de Carvalho, Pablo; Muller, Serge

    2010-04-01

    With the injection of iodine, Contrast Enhanced Digital Mammography (CEDM) provides functional information about breast tumour angiogenesis that can potentially help in cancer diagnosis. In order to generate iodine images in which the gray level is proportional to the iodine thickness, temporal and dual-energy approaches have already been considered. The dual-energy method offers the advantage of less patient motion artifacts and better comfort during the exam. However, this approach requires knowledge of the breast thickness at each pixel. Generally, as compression is applied, the breast thickness at each pixel is taken as the compression thickness. Nevertheless, in the breast border region, this assumption is not correct anymore and this causes inaccuracies in the iodine image. Triple-Energy CEDM could overcome these limitations by providing supplemental information in the form of a third image acquired with a different spectrum than the other two. This precludes the need of a priori knowledge of the breast thickness. Moreover, with Triple-Energy CEDM, breast thickness and glandularity maps could potentially be derived. In this study, we first focused on the method to recombine the three images in order to generate the iodine image, analyzing the performance of either quadratic, cubic or conic recombination functions. Then, we studied the optimal acquisition spectra in order to maximize the iodine SDNR in the recombined image for a given target total glandular dose. The concept of Triple-Energy CEDM was validated on simulated textured images and poly-energetic images acquired with a conventional X-ray mammography tube.

  18. Nanostructure of wetting triple line in a Ag-Cu-Ti/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} reactive system

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, M.; Iwamoto, C.; Tanaka, S.I.

    1999-01-15

    Nanometer scale structures around wetting triple lines were studied in a Ag-Cu-Ti/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} reactive system. Changes in the contact angle and radius of the molten metal on the substrate as a function of time were also measured in the system as macroscopic wetting behaviors. The macroscopic wetting behaviors showed two wetting stages and double layered reaction products consisting of upper Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and lower TiN layers were observed in both first and second stages. The reaction product always lay in front of the triple line defined as a triple junction of Ag-Cu-Ti alloy/Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/atmosphere. At the front of the reaction product, a dominant phase changed from TiN in the first stage to Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} in the second stage. It is considered that the structural change is one of the reasons why the macroscopic wetting behavior changed, and that the structural change was caused by a decrease of Ti activity as the reactive wetting progressed.

  19. Determination of the Latent Heats and Triple Point of Perfluorocyclobutane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, A. G.; Strachan, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes the use of Perfluorocyclobutane in physical chemistry courses to conduct experiments on latent heat, triple point temperatures and pressures, boiling points, and entropy of vaporization. (SL)

  20. Gleason's Theorem for Rectangular JBW-Triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. Martin; Rüttimann, Gottfried T.

    A JBW*-triple B is said to be rectangular if there exists a W*-algebra A and a pair (p,q) of centrally equivalent elements of the complete orthomodular lattice of projections in A such that B is isomorphic to the JBW*-triple pAq. Any weak*-closed injective operator space provides an example of a rectangular JBW*-triple. The principal order ideal of the complete *-lattice of centrally equivalent pairs of projections in a W*-algebra A, generated by (p,q), forms a complete lattice that is order isomorphic to the complete lattice of weak*-closed inner ideals in B and to the complete lattice of structural projections on B. Although not itself, in general, orthomodular, possesses a complementation that allows for definitions of orthogonality, centre, and central orthogonality to be given. A less familiar notion in lattice theory, that is well-known in the theory of Jordan algebras and Jordan triple systems, is that of rigid collinearity of a pair (e2,f2) and (e2,f2) of elements of . This is defined and characterized in terms of properties of . A W*-algebra A is sometimes thought of as providing a model for a statistical physical system. In this case B, or, equivalently, pAq, may be thought of as providing a model for a fixed sub-system of that represented by A. Therefore, may be considered to represent the set consisting of a particular kind of sub-system of that represented by pAq. Central orthogonality and rigid collinearity of pairs of elements of may be regarded as representing two different types of disjointness, the former, classical disjointness, and the latter, decoherence, of the two sub-systems. It is therefore natural to consider bounded measures m on that are additive on centrally orthogonal and rigidly collinear pairs of elements. Using results of J.D.M. Wright, it is shown that, provided that neither of the two hereditary sub-W*-algebras pAp and qAq of A has a weak*-closed ideal of Type I2, such measures are precisely those that are the restrictions of

  1. Binaries and triples among asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Scheirich, Peter; Kušnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2015-08-01

    Despite major achievements obtained during the past two decades, our knowledge of the population and properties of small binary and multiple asteroid systems is still far from advanced. There is a numerous indirect evidence for that most small asteroid systems were formed by rotational fission of cohesionless parent asteroids that were spun up to the critical frequency presumably by YORP, but details of the process are lacking. Furthermore, as we proceed with observations of more and more binary and paired asteroids, we reveal new facts that substantially refine and sometimes change our understanding of the asteroid systems. One significant new finding we have recently obtained is that primaries of many asteroid pairs are actually binary or triple systems. The first such case found is (3749) Balam (Vokrouhlický, ApJL 706, L37, 2009). We have found 9 more binary systems among asteroid pairs within our ongoing NEOSource photometric project since October 2012. They are (6369) 1983 UC, (8306) Shoko, (9783) Tensho-kan, (10123) Fideoja, (21436) Chaoyichi, (43008) 1999 UD31, (44620) 1999 RS43, (46829) 1998 OS14 and (80218) 1999 VO123. We will review their characteristics. These paired binaries as we call them are mostly similar to binaries in the general ("background") population (of unpaired asteroids), but there are a few trends. The paired binaries tend to have larger secondaries with D_2/D_1 = 0.3 to 0.5 and they also tend to be wider systems with 8 of the 10 having orbital periods between 30 and 81 hours, than average among binaries in the general population. There may be also a larger fraction of triples; (3749) Balam is a confirmed triple, having a larger close and a smaller distant satellite, and (8306) Shoko and (10123) Fideoja are suspect triples as they show additional rotational lightcurve components with periods of 61 and 38.8 h that differ from the orbital period of 36.2 and 56.5 h, respectively. The unbound secondaries tend to be of the same size or

  2. Large geodetic time series constraining the spatial distribution and the time evolution of the velocity field at the western tip of the Aden Ridge in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, C.; Deprez, A.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.; Ulrich, P.; Ibrahim Ahmed, S.; de Chabalier, J. B.; Ahmadine Omar, A.; Vigny, C.; Ruegg, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of the last GPS campaign conducted over the Djiboutian part of Eastern Afar. A large and dense geodetic network has been measured regularly since the 90's, and allows an accurate determination of the velocity field associated with the western tip of the Arabia-Somalia divergent plate boundary. Within the Tadjoura Gulf, the Aden ridge consists of a series of 3 en échelon, submerged spreading segments, except for the Asal segment, which is partly above water. The repetition of 6 to 7 measurements together with 6 permanent continuous GNSS stations allow an opportunity to study the spatial distribution of the active extension in relation to these 3 segments, but also to study time variations of the displacements, which are greatly expected to be transitory because of the occurrence of dyking events, small to intermediate seismic events, and volcanic activity. The divergent motion of the two margins of the Gulf occurs at ~15 mm/yr, which is consistent with the long-term estimates of the Arabia-Somalia motion. Across the Asal segment, this value confirms that the effect of the dyking event in 1978 has ended. The velocity gradients show that the deformation is distributed from the southern to the northern rift shoulder. As revealed by the InSAR data however, the along-axis variations of the deformation pattern, i.e. clear superficial active faults in the SE part of the rift and deep opening in the NW part, suggests the remaining influence of the previous dyke intrusions within the segment inner floor. The time series show that the velocity field was more heterogeneous before 2003, when the micro-seismic activity was significant, particularly around the volcanic center. The striking feature of the time evolution of the velocity field consists in the transition from an extension mainly localized across the Asal segment before 2003 to an extension more distributed, implying the influence of the southern Quaternary structures forming the Gaggade and

  3. Source mechanisms of dike-induced earthquakes in the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo rift segment in Afar, Ethiopia: implications for faulting above dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belachew, Manahloh; Ebinger, C.; Coté, D.

    2013-03-01

    The process of dike emplacement changes the stress field in the intruded region, causing swarms of migrating earthquakes. We determine source mechanisms of the largest earthquakes (ML ≥ 3.5) induced by the emplacement of two large volume dikes along an incipient seafloor spreading segment in Afar, Ethiopia to determine their space-time relations. Given the possibility of complex source mechanisms during dike emplacement, we solved for four different source models: double couple (DC), DC + isotropic (DC + ISO), deviatoric (DVMT), and full moment tensor (FMT). The solutions obtained using the different models indicate that the earthquakes have non-double couple components. The best double-couple mechanisms, which are mainly normal faulting with small strike-slip components, have slip planes nearly perpendicular to the geodetically determined plate opening direction. Most of these earthquakes are low-frequency earthquakes with peak frequencies ≤2 Hz, and they occurred during the propagation phase of the dikes. The space-time distribution of the source mechanisms with respect to the migrating patterns of seismicity during dike emplacement, the shallow source depths estimated, the lack of mechanisms with ˜90º rotated P-axes from the regional maximum compressive stress and the non-double couple nature of the mechanisms indicate that the largest magnitude earthquakes are generated mainly by normal faulting above the dikes probably with some component of tensile opening under the influence of dike-related fluids. These observations suggest that normal faulting above dikes is the main process of seismic energy release during dike intrusions. Assuming that faults above dikes follow length-displacement relations found for tectonic earthquakes, total seismic slips of 0.8 m and 1.3 m are estimated for the November 2007 and October 2008 dikes, respectively. Similarity of the total slip estimates from the largest earthquakes and from elastic dislocation model estimates of

  4. Stability of rift axis magma reservoirs: Spatial and temporal evolution of magma supply in the Dabbahu rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia) over the past 30 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye-Brown, C.; France, L.; Schimmelpfennig, I.; Whaler, K.; Johnson, N.; Benedetti, L.; Ayelew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling the volcanic history of the Dabbahu/Manda Hararo rift segment in the Afar depression (Ethiopia) using a combination of cosmogenic (36Cl and 3He) surface exposure dating of basaltic lava-flows, field observations, geological mapping and geochemistry, we show in this paper that magmatic activity in this rift segment alternates between two distinct magma chambers. Recent activity in the Dabbahu rift (notably the 2005-2010 dyking crises) has been fed by a seismically well-identified magma reservoir within the rift axis, and we show here that this magma body has been active over the last 30 kyr. However, in addition to this axial magma reservoir, we highlight in this paper the importance of a second, distinct magma reservoir, located 15 km west of the current axis, which has been the principal focus of magma accumulation from 15 ka to the subrecent. Magma supply to the axial reservoir substantially decreased between 20 ka and the present day, while the flank reservoir appears to have been regularly supplied with magma since 15 ka ago, resulting in less variably differentiated lavas. The trace element characteristics of magmas from both reservoirs were generated by variable degrees of partial melting of a single homogeneous mantle source, but their respective magmas evolved separately in distinct crustal plumbing systems. Magmatism in the Dabbahu/Manda Hararo rift segment is not focussed within the current axial depression but instead is spread out over at least 15 km on the western flank. This is consistent with magneto-telluric observations which show that two magma bodies are present below the segment, with the main accumulation of magma currently located below the western flank, precisely where the most voluminous recent (<15 ka) flank volcanism is observed at the surface. Applying these observations to slow spreading mid-ocean ridges indicates that magma bodies likely have a lifetime of a least 20 ka, and that the continuity of magmatic activity is

  5. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  6. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  7. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  8. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DIFFERENTIATION OF TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER.

    PubMed

    Lesar, Miroslav; Stanec, Mladen; Lesar, Nikola; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir; Zore, Zvonimir; Banović, Marija; Brozović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    Based on immunohistochemical staining for the basal markers cytokeratin 5/6 (CK 5/6), cytokeratin 14 (CK 14) and P-cadherin, triple negative tumors (TNT) are divided into two groups: 1) basal-like (BL) positive for one or all three markers; and 2) non basal-like (NBL) negative for all three markers. Even though the different origin of the cells of these two types of tumors implies different biological properties, they had been treated as one entity until recently. This paper analyzes TNT collected from 150 patients and distributed into two groups according to the results of immunohistochemical analysis, i.e. BL 116 (77.3%) and NBL 34 (22.67%). In this study, CK 5/6, CK 14 and P-cadherin were used as markers for identifying BL tumors. The immunohistochemical reaction was positive for CK 5/6 in 37%, for CK 14 in 50.86% and for P-cadherin in 68.34% of cases. The subclassification of triple negative breast cancer using the basal markers CK 5/6, CK 14 and P-cadherin has enabled identification of BL and NBL breast cancers in a proportion that is in line with the only accurate analysis of TNT gene expression. Using the mentioned combination of markers in daily practice is easy to perform and economically affordable. PMID:27333711

  9. Mergers and obliquities in stellar triples

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-10-01

    Many close stellar binaries are accompanied by a faraway star. The 'eccentric Kozai-Lidov' (EKL) mechanism can cause dramatic inclination and eccentricity fluctuations, resulting in tidal tightening of inner binaries of triple stars. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations, including the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, and tides, and we determine the semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and spin-orbit angle distributions of the final configurations. We find that the efficiency of forming tight binaries (≲ 16 days) when taking the EKL mechanism into account is ∼21%, and about 4% of all simulated systems ended up in a merger event. These merger events can lead to the formation of blue stragglers. Furthermore, we find that the spin-orbit angle distribution of the inner binaries carries a signature of the initial setup of the system; thus, observations can be used to disentangle close binaries' birth configuration. The resulting inner and outer final orbits' period distributions and their estimated fraction suggest that secular dynamics may be a significant channel for the formation of close binaries in triples and even blue stragglers.

  10. Triple galaxies and a hidden mass problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Lebedev, V. S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors consider a homogeneous sample of 84 triple systems of galaxies with components brighter than m = 15.7, located in the northern sky and satisfying an isolation criterion with respect to neighboring galaxies in projection. The distributions of basic dynamical parameters for triplets have median values as follows: radial velocity dispersion 133 km/s, mean harmonic radius 63 kpc, absolute magnitude of galaxies M sub B equals -20.38, crossing time tau = 0.04 H(sup minus 1). For different ways of estimation the median mass-to-luminosity ratio is (20 - 30). A comparison of the last value with the ones for single and binary galaxies shows the presence of a virial mass excess for triplets by a factor 4. The mass-to-luminosity ratio is practically uncorrelated with linear size of triplets or with morphological types of their components. We note that a significant part of the virial excess may be explained by the presence of nonisolated triple configurations in the sample, which are produced by debris of more populous groups of galaxies.

  11. Triple Oxygen Isotopes: Fundamental Relationships and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2016-06-01

    The element oxygen has three stable isotopes: 16O, 17O, and 18O. For a defined process, a change in 18O/16O scales with the corresponding change in 17O/16O, or the fractionation factors 18α and 17α have a relationship of θ = ln17α/ln18α, in which the triple oxygen isotope exponent θ is relatively fixed but does vary with reaction path, temperature, and species involved. When the small variation is of interest, the distinction of three concepts—θ, S (a slope through data points in δ17O-δ18O space), and C (an arbitrary referencing number for the degree of 17O deviation)—becomes important. Triple oxygen isotope variations can be measured by modern instruments and thus offer an additional line of information on the underlying reaction processes and conditions. Analytical methods and Earth science applications have recently been developed for air oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, silicates, oxides, sulfates, carbonates, and phosphates.

  12. Triple Oxygen Isotopes: Fundamental Relationships and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2016-06-01

    The element oxygen has three stable isotopes: 16O, 17O, and 18O. For a defined process, a change in 18O/16O scales with the corresponding change in 17O/16O, or the fractionation factors 18α and 17α have a relationship of θ = ln17α/ln18α, in which the triple oxygen isotope exponent θ is relatively fixed but does vary with reaction path, temperature, and species involved. When the small variation is of interest, the distinction of three concepts—θ, S (a slope through data points in δ17O–δ18O space), and C (an arbitrary referencing number for the degree of 17O deviation)—becomes important. Triple oxygen isotope variations can be measured by modern instruments and thus offer an additional line of information on the underlying reaction processes and conditions. Analytical methods and Earth science applications have recently been developed for air oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, silicates, oxides, sulfates, carbonates, and phosphates.

  13. Triple-activated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    The current shortage of portland cement in the world will require the use of Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) to fill demands in many industrialized countries. Therefore, an extensive series of triple-activated slag experiments have been undertaken to optimize an economical combination of mechanical properties for alkali-activated slags. Na{sub 2}OSiO{sub 2} (N Grade), Ca(OH){sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} have been added as activators in 5 to 10, 0 to 5 and 0 to 5 weight percentages of water and slag in a mix with a water:cement ratio of 1:1. Silica Fume and Sika 10 superplasticizer have been added as 1 and 10 weight percent of slag. Set times, initial hardening times and compressive strengths at percentages of the mix to identify more refined formulations. Finally, the resulting aggregate to develop a triple-activated slag formulation with the ultimate objective of contributing toward satisfying the world shortage of high performance concrete.

  14. Kappa Fornaci, A Triple Radio Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Bright and nearby (22 pc) solar-type dwarf κ For (HIP 11072) is a triple system. The close pair of M-type dwarfs Ba,Bb with a tentative period of 3.7 days moves around the main component A on a 26 yr orbit. The mass of the "dark companion" Ba+Bb is comparable to the mass of A, causing large motion of the photo-center. The combined spectro-interferometric orbit of AB is derived, and the relative photometry of the components A and B is given. A weak signature of Ba and Bb is detected in the high-resolution spectra by cross-correlation and by variable emission in the Balmer hydrogen lines. The activity of the M dwarfs, manifested by a previously detected radio flare, is likely maintained by synchronization with their tight orbit. We discuss the frequency of similar hidden triple systems, methods of their detection, and the implications for multiple-star statistics. Based on observations obtained with CHIRON spectrometer at the 1.5 m CTIO telescope operated by SMARTS (NOAO program 2012B-0075), at the SOAR telescope, and at the Gemini Observatory (program GS-2012B-Q-71, PI: M. Hartung).

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  16. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lage, Eduardo Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae; Udías, Jose M.; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  17. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  18. BROWN DWARF BINARIES FROM DISINTEGRATING TRIPLE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo E-mail: Seppo.Mikkola@utu.fi

    2015-04-15

    Binaries in which both components are brown dwarfs (BDs) are being discovered at an increasing rate, and their properties may hold clues to their origin. We have carried out 200,000 N-body simulations of three identical stellar embryos with masses drawn from a Chabrier IMF and embedded in a molecular core. The bodies are initially non-hierarchical and undergo chaotic motions within the cloud core, while accreting using Bondi–Hoyle accretion. The coupling of dynamics and accretion often leads to one or two dominant bodies controlling the center of the cloud core, while banishing the other(s) to the lower-density outskirts, leading to stunted growth. Eventually each system transforms either to a bound hierarchical configuration or breaks apart into separate single and binary components. The orbital motion is followed for 100 Myr. In order to illustrate 200,000 end-states of such dynamical evolution with accretion, we introduce the “triple diagnostic diagram,” which plots two dimensionless numbers against each other, representing the binary mass ratio and the mass ratio of the third body to the total system mass. Numerous freefloating BD binaries are formed in these simulations, and statistical properties are derived. The separation distribution function is in good correspondence with observations, showing a steep rise at close separations, peaking around 13 AU and declining more gently, reaching zero at separations greater than 200 AU. Unresolved BD triple systems may appear as wider BD binaries. Mass ratios are strongly peaked toward unity, as observed, but this is partially due to the initial assumptions. Eccentricities gradually increase toward higher values, due to the lack of viscous interactions in the simulations, which would both shrink the orbits and decrease their eccentricities. Most newborn triple systems are unstable and while there are 9209 ejected BD binaries at 1 Myr, corresponding to about 4% of the 200,000 simulations, this number has grown to

  19. Brown Dwarf Binaries from Disintegrating Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2015-04-01

    Binaries in which both components are brown dwarfs (BDs) are being discovered at an increasing rate, and their properties may hold clues to their origin. We have carried out 200,000 N-body simulations of three identical stellar embryos with masses drawn from a Chabrier IMF and embedded in a molecular core. The bodies are initially non-hierarchical and undergo chaotic motions within the cloud core, while accreting using Bondi-Hoyle accretion. The coupling of dynamics and accretion often leads to one or two dominant bodies controlling the center of the cloud core, while banishing the other(s) to the lower-density outskirts, leading to stunted growth. Eventually each system transforms either to a bound hierarchical configuration or breaks apart into separate single and binary components. The orbital motion is followed for 100 Myr. In order to illustrate 200,000 end-states of such dynamical evolution with accretion, we introduce the “triple diagnostic diagram,” which plots two dimensionless numbers against each other, representing the binary mass ratio and the mass ratio of the third body to the total system mass. Numerous freefloating BD binaries are formed in these simulations, and statistical properties are derived. The separation distribution function is in good correspondence with observations, showing a steep rise at close separations, peaking around 13 AU and declining more gently, reaching zero at separations greater than 200 AU. Unresolved BD triple systems may appear as wider BD binaries. Mass ratios are strongly peaked toward unity, as observed, but this is partially due to the initial assumptions. Eccentricities gradually increase toward higher values, due to the lack of viscous interactions in the simulations, which would both shrink the orbits and decrease their eccentricities. Most newborn triple systems are unstable and while there are 9209 ejected BD binaries at 1 Myr, corresponding to about 4% of the 200,000 simulations, this number has grown to

  20. Exploring multiple binding sites of an indoloquinoline in triple-helical DNA: a paradigm for DNA triplex-selective intercalators.

    PubMed

    Dickerhoff, Jonathan; Riechert-Krause, Fanny; Seifert, Jenny; Weisz, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Employing NMR spectroscopic methods preferred binding sites of a triplex-selective indoloquinoline drug were examined with three DNA triplex targets. To directly derive and evaluate number and type of the different sites of interaction, studies were performed on short triple-helical constructs specifically labeled with 3-(15)N thymidine probes. The detection and assignment of several coexisting species was enabled through the observation of slow exchange on the chemical shift timescale between complexes and free triplex. In general, the 5'-triplex-duplex junction constitutes the most favorable intercalation site, in particular when flanked by a TAT base triad. NMR data also revealed two different orientations for the intercalating indoloquinoline drug. Binding affinity significantly decreases with a C(+)GC triad bordering the junction but junction binding is still preferred over intercalation between TAT base triads within the triplex stem. In addition to the intercalation between two uncharged TAT triplets, intercalation between a TAT and a 3'-terminal C(+)GC triplet was also observed, indicating a non-protonated third strand cytosine at the triplex end position.

  1. Optical coupling from InGaAs subcell to InGaP subcell in InGaP/InGaAs/Ge multi-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, G W; Lin, J Y; Jian, H T; Shen, J L; Wang, S C; Chou, C L; Chou, W C; Wu, C H; Chiu, C H; Kuo, H C

    2013-01-14

    Spatially-resolved electroluminescence (EL) images in the triple-junction InGaP/InGaAs/Ge solar cell have been investigated to demonstrate the subcell coupling effect. Upon irradiating the infrared light with an energy below bandgap of the active layer in the top subcell, but above that in the middle subcell, the EL of the top subcell quenches. By analysis of EL intensity as a function of irradiation level, it is found that the coupled p-n junction structure and the photovoltaic effect are responsible for the observed EL quenching. With optical coupling and photoswitching effects in the multi-junction diode, a concept of infrared image sensors is proposed.

  2. 22. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW, SOUTHEAST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. Typical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW, SOUTHEAST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. Typical for all triple windows on first and second floors. Single swing jib door under center sash opening out. Door thickness measures from flush with exterior siding to 3/4' inside bottom sash. See also Photo 12. SC-291-12. - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  3. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  4. Spin waves in triple-q structures: Application to USb

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.; Bak, P.

    1981-06-01

    The spin-wave spectrum in a system with triple-q magnetic structure is calculated. The spin waves differ distinctly from those in the corresponding single-q structure, but agree with the excitations observed by Lander and Stirling in uranium antimonide (USb). Their experiments thus directly verify that the spins in USb are ordered in the triple-q structure.

  5. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  6. Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model: Setting the Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  7. Government and Governance of Regional Triple Helix Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danson, Mike; Todeva, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual paper contributes to the discussion of the role of regional government and regional Triple Helix constellations driving economic development and growth within regional boundaries. The impact of regionalism and subsidiarity on regional Triple Helix constellations, and the questions of governmentality, governance and institutional…

  8. Coordinate transformation in the model of long Josephson junctions: geometrically equivalent Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerdzhieva, E. G.; Boyadzhiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2005-10-01

    The transition from the model of a long Josephson junction of variable width to the model of a junction with a coordinate-dependent Josephson current amplitude is effected through a coordinate transformation. This establishes the correspondence between the classes of Josephson junctions of variable width and quasi-one-dimensional junctions with a variable thickness of the barrier layer. It is shown that for a junction of exponentially varying width the barrier layer of the equivalent quasi-one-dimensional junction has a distributed resistive inhomogeneity that acts as an attractor for magnetic flux vortices. The curve of the critical current versus magnetic field for a Josephson junction with a resistive microinhomogeneity is constructed with the aid of a numerical simulation, and a comparison is made with the critical curve of a junction of exponentially varying width. The possibility of replacing a distributed inhomogeneity in a Josephson junction by a local inhomogeneity at the end of the junction is thereby demonstrated; this can have certain advantages from a technological point of view.

  9. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  10. Downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leithe, Edward; Sirnes, Solveig; Omori, Yasufumi; Rivedal, Edgar

    2006-12-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains enriched in channels that allow direct exchange of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junction channels are composed of a family of transmembrane proteins called connexin. Connexins play important roles in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cancer cells usually have downregulated levels of gap junctions, and several lines of evidence suggest that loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is an important step in carcinogenesis. In support of this hypothesis are studies showing that reexpression of connexins in cancer cells causes normalization of cell growth control and reduced tumor growth. To gain a more detailed understanding of the role of connexins as tumor suppressors, a clearer picture of the mechanisms involved in loss of gap junctions in cancer cells is needed. Furthermore, defining the mechanisms involved in downregulation of connexins in carcinogenesis will be an important step toward utilizing the potential of connexins as targets in cancer prevention and therapy. Various mechanisms are involved in the loss of gap junctions in cancer cells, ranging from loss of connexin gene transcription to aberrant trafficking of connexin proteins. This review will discuss our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in the downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells. PMID:17425504

  11. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  12. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  13. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  14. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  15. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  16. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Koshelets, V. P.; Dmitriev, P.

    2010-02-01

    The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements on a number of delta-biased samples having different electrical and geometrical parameters.

  17. Grand Junction Resource Area, Resource Management Plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for the 2.0-million-acre Grand Junction Planning Area, located in west-central Colorado. Under the preferred alternative, existing withdrawals from mineral location on 124,442 acres would continue and an additional 154,067 acres would be withdrawn. Approximately 14,100 acres would be identified as unsuitable for further coal leasing. Approximately 624,701 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing without stipulations; 685,603 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing with stipulations; and 149,087 acres would be closed to oil and gas leasing. Air quality enhancement, soil stabilization, and watershed protection would be emphasized. Habitats of major wildlife species and of threatened and endangered plants and animals would be actively managed, but no new livestock management actions would be implemented. The wild horse herd would be allowed to expand from 65 to 120 animals. Paleontological sites and 11,685 archaeological sites would be protected. Approximately 1319 acres of commercial forest land would be identified as suitable for management, and 2800 cords of fuel wood would be offered for sale annually. The three existing developed recreation sites would be maintained, and the Mud Springs site would be expanded to accommodate more group use.

  18. Mathematical modelling of triple arterial stenoses.

    PubMed

    Ang, K C; Mazumdar, J

    1995-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of triple stenoses (ie. three stenoses in series) in a reasonably large artery. The model developed is axi-symmetric and blood is assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation. These equations are solved using the Finite Element Method and the FIDAP computational fluid dynamics (C.F.D.) package. Various combinations of differing degrees of stenosis in the triplet are considered. Pressure drop profiles and streamline plots of the solutions to these models show that the effects of milder stenoses are diminished in the presence of more severe ones. Also, a pressure recovery is observed whenever a mild stenosis follows a more severe stenosis in multiply stenosed arteries.

  19. [Triple fracture of the shoulder suspensory complex].

    PubMed

    Tamimi Mariño, I; Martin Rodríguez, I; Mora Villadeamigo, J

    2013-01-01

    The superior suspensory complex of the shoulder (SSCS) is a ring shaped structure composed of bones and soft tissues that play a fundamental role in the stability of the shoulder joint. Isolated injuries of the SSCS are relatively common, but injuries that affect 3 components are extremely unusual. We present a triple injury of the SSCS in a 26 year old patient with a Neer type ii clavicular fracture, a Kuhn type iii acromion fracture and an Ogawa type i coracoid fracture. An open reduction and stabilization of the clavicle was performed with 2 Kirschner nails. The acromial fracture was synthesized with 2 cannulated screws, and the coracoid fracture was treated conservatively. After 24 months of follow up the patient had an excellent functional outcome according to the Constat-Murley shoulder score and QuickDASH scoring system, and all the fractures healed correctly.

  20. Triple flames in microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to examine in detail the influence of the triple flame structure on the flame spread problem. It is with an eye to the practical implications that this fundamental research project must be carried out. The microgravity configuration is preferable because buoyancy-induced stratification and vorticity generation are suppressed. A more convincing case can be made for comparing our predictions, which are zero-g, and any projected experiments. Our research into the basic aspects will employ two models. In one, flows of fuel and oxidizer from the lower wall are not considered. In the other, a convective flow is allowed. The non-flow model allows us to develop combined analytical and numerical solution methods that may be used in the more complicated convective-flow model.

  1. Roles, Stacks, Histories: A Triple for Hoare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgström, Johannes; Gordon, Andrew D.; Pucella, Riccardo

    Behavioural type and effect systems regulate properties such as adherence to object and communication protocols, dynamic security policies, avoidance of race conditions, and many others. Typically, each system is based on some specific syntax of constraints, and is checked with an ad hoc solver. Instead, weadvocate types refined with first-order logic formulas as a basis for behavioural type systems, and general purpose automated theorem provers as an effective means of checking programs. To illustrate this approach, we define a triple of security-related type systems: for role-based access control, for stack inspection, and for history-based access control. The three are all instances of a refined state monad. Our semantics allows a precise comparison of the similarities and differences of these mechanisms. In our examples, the benefit of behavioural type-checking is to rule out the possibility of unexpected security exceptions, a common problem with code-based access control.

  2. HD 207651: A composite spectrum triple system

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.

    2015-02-01

    From numerous radial velocities obtained at KPNO and Fairborn Observatory, we have determined the orbital elements of the composite spectrum triple system HD 207651. This system consists of a broad-lined A8 V star and an unseen M dwarf companion in a 1.470739 days orbit. Variations of the center-of-mass velocity of this short-period system and velocity variations of a narrow-lined F7: V star have an orbital period of 724.1 days or 1.98 yr and an eccentricity of 0.39. The revised Hipparcos parallax, corresponding to a distance of 255 pc, appears to be too small to yield consistent properties. Instead, we adopt a distance of 150 pc.

  3. The triple system KR Comae Berenices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Uhlář, R.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present the detailed analysis of triple system KR Com with different observational techniques - photometry, interferometry, and period variation. Methods: The use of BVR photometry of the close-contact binary KR Com, which is the primary component of a triple system, helps us to better describe the properties of the components. The interferometric data obtained during the last 30 years sufficiently determine the visual orbit, but the use of minima timings of KR Com for the study of period variation together with the visual orbit is a novel approach in this system. Results: Basic physical parameters resulting from the light curve analysis agree well with the previous results from spectroscopy. The temperatures for the primary and secondary component resulted in 5549 and 6072 K, respectively, and the amount of the third light in all filters is about 1/3 of the total luminosity. The distant third component revolves around the common barycenter on 11 yr orbit with a very high eccentricity (0.934) and this movement is also detectable via the period variation, which is clearly visible in the O-C diagram of times of minima observations. The use of minima times for the combined analysis helps us to independently determine the distance to the system (64.02 ± 9.42 pc) and also to confirm the orientation of the orbit in space. Conclusions: New minima observations and also spectroscopy would be very profitable, especially during the next periastron passage in the year 2017. Photometric tables are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/519/A78

  4. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin; Kjølbye, Anne-Louise; Hennan, James K; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2007-03-01

    Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes. In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs and by interfering with the gating of gap junctional channels.

  5. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  6. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  7. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  8. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the Afar depression (Ethiopia), extension is already organised along rift segments which morphologically resemble oceanic rifts. Segmentation here results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed during the well documented 2005 event on the Dabbahu rift segment. During this tectono-volcanic crisis, a megadyke was injected, followed by 12 subsequent dike intrusions, sometimes associated with fissure flow eruptions. Despite the accurate surveying of the magmatic and tectonic interplay during this event via remote sensing techniques, there is a lack of data on timescales of 1 to 100 kyr, the period over which the main morphology of a rift is acquired. The Dabbahu rift segment represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of rift morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences. It is possible to constrain the timing of fault growth relative to the infilling of the rift axial depression by lava flows, and to assess the influence of the different magma bodies involved in lava production along the rift-segment. We use cosmogenic nuclides (3He) to determine the ages of young (<100 kyr) lava flows and to date the initiation and movement of fault scarps which cut the lavas. Combined with major & trace element compositions, field mapping and digital cartography (Landsat, ASTER and SPOT imagery), the rift geomorphology can be linked to the magmatic and tectonic history defined by surface exposure dating. The results show that over the last 100 ka the Northern part of the Dabbahu segment was supplied by two different magma reservoirs which can be identified based on their distinctive chemistries. The main reservoir is located beneath Dabbahu volcano, and has been supplied with magma for at least 72 ka. This magmatic centre supplies magma to most of the northern third of the rift segment. The second reservoir is located further south, on the axis, close to the current mid-segment magma chamber, which was responsible for

  9. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  10. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  11. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  12. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  13. Random telegraph signals in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jan; González, Maria Teresa; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2014-11-26

    We investigate conductance fluctuations in molecular junctions using a mechanically controllable break junction setup in a liquid environment. In contrast to conventional break junction measurements, time-dependent conductance signals were recorded while reducing the gap size between the two contact electrodes. Only small amplitude fluctuations of the conductance are observed when measuring in pure solvent. Conductance traces recorded in solutions containing alkanedithiols show significantly larger fluctuations which can take the form of random telegraph signals. Such signals emerge in a limited conductance range, which corresponds well to the known molecular conductance of the compounds investigated. These large-amplitude fluctuations are attributed to the formation and thermally driven breaking of bonds between a molecule and a metal electrode and provide a still poorly explored source of information on the dynamics of molecular junctions formation. The lifetimes of the high and low conductance states are found to vary between 0.1 ms and 0.1 s. PMID:25352489

  14. The Inherent Properties of DNA Four-way Junctions: Comparing the Crystal Structures of Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Eichman, Brandt F.; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Aymamí, Joan; Coll, Miquel; Ho, Pui Shing

    2015-01-01

    Holliday junctions are four-stranded DNA complexes that are formed during recombination and related DNA repair events. Much work has focused on the overall structure and properties of four-way junctions in solution, but we are just now beginning to understand these complexes at the atomic level. The crystal structures of two all-DNA Holliday junctions have been determined recently from the sequences d(CCGGGACCGG) and d(CCGGTACCGG). A detailed comparison of the two structures helps to distinguish distortions of the DNA conformation that are inherent to the cross-overs of the junctions in this crystal system from those that are consequences of the mismatched dG·dA base-pair in the d(CCGGGACCGG) structure. This analysis shows that the junction itself perturbs the sequence-dependent conformational features of the B-DNA duplexes and the associated patterns of hydration in the major and minor grooves only minimally. This supports the idea that a DNA four-way junction can be assembled at relatively low energetic cost. Both structures show a concerted rotation of the adjacent duplex arms relative to B-DNA, and this is discussed in terms of the conserved interactions between the duplexes at the junctions and further down the helical arms. The interactions distant from the strand cross-overs of the junction appear to be significant in defining its macroscopic properties, including the angle relating the stacked duplexes across the junction. PMID:12126623

  15. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  16. Two junction effects in dc SQUID phase qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. K.; Kwon, H.; Przybysz, A. J.; Budoyo, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2011-03-01

    The dc SQUID phase qubit was designed to allow one isolation junction to filter bias current noise from a second junction operating as a single junction phase qubit. As junctions shrink to minimize dielectric loss, the Josephson inductances of each junction approach the coupling loop inductance and this single junction picture appears inadequate. We consider a two-junction model of the dc SQUID phase qubit, where the qubit now corresponds to one of the normal oscillatory modes of the full SQUID. We discuss applications of this model to sweet spots in various control parameters and unusual behavior in the tunneling state measurement. Funded by DOD, CNAM and JQI.

  17. Bond resistances in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna

    2006-03-01

    The description of molecular contacts is one of the hardest problems in modeling molecular junctions. In common approaches macroscopic leads ensure a finite potential drop and hence a driving force for the current. Recently, a different strategy is emerging where a steady-state DC current is forced in the molecule, by making resort to Lagrange multipliers, or by drawing a magnetic flux through the molecule. The strategy is promising, but two main problems remain to be solved: (1) the calculation of the potential drop needed to sustain the current, and (2) the definition of the potential profile along the molecule. Here the Joule law is used to evaluate the potential drop from the electrical power spent on the molecule, and continuity constraints for steady-state DC current are implemented to get information on the potential profile. Borrowing powerful concepts from the field of molecular spectroscopy, emphasis is put on the molecule, while clamping information about contacts in the molecular relaxation matrix. The molecule is described in a real-space approach, leading to a suggestive analogy between the molecule and an electrical circuit where resistances are associated with chemical bonds.

  18. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  19. Photovoltaic device having an extended PN junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Aiello, Robert Vincent (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A photovoltaic device having essentially only a body of semiconductor material having a first region of one conductivity type in contact with a second region of the opposite conductivity type, forming a portion of the device PN junction therebetween. A plurality of pocket regions of the same conductivity type as the first region extend into the second region thereby further defining a portion of the PN junction in the second region.

  20. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.