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Sample records for affect biogeochemical processes

  1. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity in any hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water-column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting data set was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  2. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life, and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and, potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial populations and their metabolic properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial population, and their metabolic properties. Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time, their Biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self-sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a diel (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen. sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  4. Climate change effects on watershed hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Projected changes in climate are widely expected to alter watershed processes. However, the extent of these changes is difficult to predict because complex interactions among affected hydrological and biogeochemical processes will likely play out over many decades and spatial sc...

  5. Biogeochemical processes underpin ecosystem services

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elemental cycling is critical to the function of ecosystems and delivery of key ecosystem services because many of these elements are essential nutrients or detrimental toxicants that directly affect the health of organisms and ecosystems. A team of authors from North Carolina State University and ...

  6. Diel biogeochemical processes in terrestrial waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compiled and Edited by Nimick, David A.; Gammons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Many biogeochemical processes in rivers and lakes respond to the solar photocycle and produce persistent patterns of measureable phenomena that exhibit a day-night, or 24-h, cycle. Despite a large body of recent literature, the mechanisms responsible for these diel fluctuations are widely debated, with a growing consensus that combinations of physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved. These processes include streamflow variation, photosynthesis and respiration, plant assimilation, and reactions involving photochemistry, adsorption and desorption, and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Diel changes in streamflow and water properties such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentration have been widely recognized, and recently, diel studies have focused more widely by considering other constituents such as dissolved and particulate trace metals, metalloids, rare earth elements, mercury, organic matter, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and nutrients. The details of many diel processes are being studied using stable isotopes, which also can exhibit diel cycles in response to microbial metabolism, photosynthesis and respiration, or changes in phase, speciation, or redox state. In addition, secondary effects that diel cycles might have, for example, on biota or in the hyporheic zone are beginning to be considered. This special issue is composed primarily of papers presented at the topical session "Diurnal Biogeochemical Processes in Rivers, Lakes, and Shallow Groundwater" held at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in October 2009 in Portland, Oregon. This session was organized because many of the growing number of diel studies have addressed just a small part of the full range of diel cycling phenomena found in rivers and lakes. This limited focus is understandable because (1) fundamental aspects of many diel processes are poorly understood and require detailed study, (2) the interests and expertise of individual

  7. An approach to quantify sources, seasonal change, and biogeochemical processes affecting metal loading in streams: Facilitating decisions for remediation of mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.; Walton-Day, K.

    2010-01-01

    Historical mining has left complex problems in catchments throughout the world. Land managers are faced with making cost-effective plans to remediate mine influences. Remediation plans are facilitated by spatial mass-loading profiles that indicate the locations of metal mass-loading, seasonal changes, and the extent of biogeochemical processes. Field-scale experiments during both low- and high-flow conditions and time-series data over diel cycles illustrate how this can be accomplished. A low-flow experiment provided spatially detailed loading profiles to indicate where loading occurred. For example, SO42 - was principally derived from sources upstream from the study reach, but three principal locations also were important for SO42 - loading within the reach. During high-flow conditions, Lagrangian sampling provided data to interpret seasonal changes and indicated locations where snowmelt runoff flushed metals to the stream. Comparison of metal concentrations between the low- and high-flow experiments indicated substantial increases in metal loading at high flow, but little change in metal concentrations, showing that toxicity at the most downstream sampling site was not substantially greater during snowmelt runoff. During high-flow conditions, a detailed temporal sampling at fixed sites indicated that Zn concentration more than doubled during the diel cycle. Monitoring programs must account for diel variation to provide meaningful results. Mass-loading studies during different flow conditions and detailed time-series over diel cycles provide useful scientific support for stream management decisions.

  8. Global Biology Research Program: Biogeochemical Processes in Wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of a workshop examining potential NASA contributions to research on wetland processes as they relate to global biogeochemical cycles are summarized. A wetlands data base utilizing remotely sensed inventories, studies of wetland/atmosphere exchange processes, and the extrapolation of local measurements to global biogeochemical cycling processes were identified as possible areas for NASA support.

  9. Biogeochemical Process Comparison of the Five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Peters, N. E.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Blum, A. E.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Larsen, M. C.; Mast, M. A.; Stallard, R. F.; Troester, J. W.; Walker, J. F.; Webb, R. M.; White, A. F.

    2001-12-01

    Input - output budgets (in wet deposition and streamwater) have been constructed for water and major solutes at the five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites for the period 1992-97 (Peters et al., 2000). In this poster we interpret the net chemical fluxes to identify the controlling biogeochemical processes, as influenced by the strong physical and biological contrasts (climate, geology, physiography, and vegetation types) in the five diverse environments. The five sites are: Allequash Creek, Wisconsin (low-relief humid continental forest); Andrews Creek, Colorado (cold alpine, taiga/tundra, and subalpine boreal forest); Icacos River, Puerto Rico (lower montane, wet tropical forest); Panola Mountain, Georgia (humid subtropical piedmont forest); and Sleepers River, Vermont (humid northern hardwood forest). Base cations and Si produced by chemical weathering displayed a net export at each site. The magnitude and stoichiometry of export reflects mineralogy, climate (temperature and rainfall), and water residence time in the subsurface. The lowest and highest mass export generally was for Andrews Creek and Icacos River, respectively, consistent with their extreme mean annual temperatures (0/degC in Colorado to 21/degC in Puerto Rico) and the limited residence time of meltwater at Andrews Creek. Calcite in bedrock at the three coldest watersheds caused somewhat higher relative export of Ca, especially at Sleepers River where calcite weathering is a dominant control on stream chemistry. In contrast, the high Mg content of the volcaniclastic rocks at Icacos River and glacial deposits at Allequash Creek caused disproportionately high Mg export relative to the other sites. Relatively high Na export at Panola Mountain and K export at Sleepers River are probably caused by plagioclase and biotite weathering, respectively. SO4 is retained at the two warmest sites, Panola Mountain and Icacos River. SO4 adsorption is known to limit SO4- export in highly

  10. A General Simulator for Reaction-Based Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Yeh, George

    2006-02-01

    As more complex biogeochemical situations are being investigated (e.g., evolving reactivity, passivation of reactive surfaces, dissolution of sorbates), there is a growing need for biogeochemical simulators to flexibly and facilely address new reaction forms and rate laws. This paper presents an approach that accommodates this need to efficiently simulate general biogeochemical processes, while insulating the user from additional code development. The approach allows for the automatic extraction of fundamental reaction stoichiometry and thermodynamics from a standard chemistry database, and the symbolic entry of arbitrarily complex user-specified reaction forms, rate laws, and equilibria. The user-specified equilibrium and kinetic reactions (i.e., reactions not defined in the format of the standardized database) are interpreted by the Maple symbolic mathematical software package. FORTRAN 90 code is then generated by Maple for (1) the analytical Jacobian matrix (if preferred over the numerical Jacobian matrix) used in the Newton-Raphson solution procedure, and (2) the residual functions for user-specified equilibrium expressions and rate laws. Matrix diagonalization eliminates the need to conceptualize the system of reactions as a tableau, while identifying a minimum rank set of basis species with enhanced numerical convergence properties. The newly generated code, which is designed to operate in the BIOGEOCHEM biogeochemical simulator, is then compiled and linked into the BIOGEOCHEM executable. With these features, users can avoid recoding the simulator to accept new equilibrium expressions or kinetic rate laws, while still taking full advantage of the stoichiometry and thermodynamics provided by an existing chemical database. Thus, the approach introduces efficiencies in the specification of biogeochemical reaction networks and eliminates opportunities for mistakes in preparing input files and coding errors. Test problems are used to demonstrate the features of

  11. A Reactive Transport Simulator for Biogeochemical Processes in Subsurface System

    2003-04-01

    BIOGEOCHEM is a Fortran code that mumerically simulates the coupled processes of solute transport, microbial population dynamics, microbial metabolism, and geochemical reactions. The potential applications of the code include, but not limited to, (a) sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for assessing the impact of microbial activity on subsurface geochemical systems; (b) extraction of biogeochemical parameter values from field observations or laboratory measurements, (c) helping to design and optimize laboratory biogeochemical experiments, and (d) data integration. Methodmore » of Solution: A finite difference method and a Newton-Raphson technique are used to solve a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations and algebraic equations. Practical Application: Environmental analysis, bioremediation performance assessments of radioactive or non-radioactive wase disposal, and academic research.« less

  12. Implementing high-latitude biogeochemical processes into Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Kleinen, Thomas; Cresto-Aleina, Fabio; Kloster, Silvia; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Projections of future climate changes suggest that air temperatures in the Arctic could rise to the levels unprecedented in the last million years. Sensitivity of carbon storages on land and shelves to climate change of that scale is highly uncertain. Earth System models (ESMs), consisting of atmosphere, ocean, land, and cryosphere components are the main tools to understand interactions between carbon cycle and climate. However, ESM representation of ecological and biogeochemical processes in the Arctic is extremely simplistic. For example, all ESMs agree that tree cover in the future warming scenarios will move northwards to the Arctic coast, but they ignore interactions between vegetation, permafrost, and disturbances such as fires, which are critical for vegetation dynamics in this region. Improving modeling of interactions between model components and their evaluation against growing observational evidence is a promising research area. The first attempts to account for the permafrost carbon dynamics in the ESM framework suggest that CO2 and CH4 emissions from high-latitude regions in the 21st century are relatively small, but they become much more significant afterwards due to committed climate changes. Therefore, extension of ESM simulations beyond 2100 is essential to estimate a proper scale of frozen carbon pool response to human-induced climate change. Additionally, inclusion of sub-sea permafrost component into ESMs is an active research area that brings together terrestrial and marine biogeochemical communities, as well as geologists analyzing climate proxies on glacial timescales. Another challenging aspect of biogeochemical interactions in Arctic is an extreme land surface heterogeneity. A mixture of wetlands, lakes, and vegetation-covered surfaces on fine local scale is not properly reflected in the model structure. A promising approach of dealing with scaling gaps in modeling high-latitude biogeochemical processes in ESMs will be presented.

  13. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  14. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ricart, A. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Mateo, M. A.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Masque, P.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3 to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3 to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stores were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). Also, sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3 to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8 and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypotheses that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g. meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g. recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g. hydrodynamic energy and sediment accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  15. Silicon biogeochemical processes in a large river (Cauvery, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameswari Rajasekaran, Mangalaa; Arnaud, Dapoigny; Jean, Riotte; Sarma Vedula, V. S. S.; Nittala, S. Sarma; Sankaran, Subramanian; Gundiga Puttojirao, Gurumurthy; Keshava, Balakrishna; Cardinal, Damien

    2016-04-01

    Silicon (Si), one of the key nutrients for diatom growth in ocean, is principally released during silicate weathering on continents and then exported by rivers. Phytoplankton composition is determined by the availability of Si relative to other nutrients, mainly N and P, which fluxes in estuarine and coastal systems are affected by eutrophication due to land use and industrialization. In order to understand the biogeochemical cycle of Si and its supply to the coastal ocean, we studied a tropical monsoonal river from Southern India (Cauvery) and compare it with other large and small rivers. Cauvery is the 7th largest river in India with a basin covering 85626 sq.km. The major part of the basin (˜66%) is covered by agriculture and inhabited by more than 30 million inhabitants. There are 96 dams built across the basin. As a consequence, 80% of the historical discharge is diverted, mainly for irrigation (Meunier et al. 2015). This makes the Cauvery River a good example of current anthropogenic pressure on silicon biogeochemical cycle. We measured amorphous silica contents (ASi) and isotopic composition of dissolved silicon (δ30Si-DSi) in the Cauvery estuary, including freshwater end-member and groundwater as well as along a 670 km transect along the river course. Other Indian rivers and estuaries have also been measured, including some less impacted by anthropogenic pressure. The average Cauvery δ30Si signature just upstream the estuary is 2.21±0.15 ‰ (n=3) which is almost 1‰ heavier than the groundwater isotopic composition (1.38±0.03). The δ30Si-DSi of Cauvery water is also almost 1‰ heavier than the world river supply to the ocean estimated so far and 0.4‰ heavier than other large Indian rivers like Ganges (Frings et al 2015) and Krishna. On the other hand, the smaller watersheds (Ponnaiyar, Vellar, and Penna) adjacent to Cauvery also display heavy δ30Si-DSi. Unlike the effect of silicate weathering, the heavy isotopic compositions in the river

  16. Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition Effects on Forest Biogeochemical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chronic atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur have widely ranging biogeochemical consequences in terrestrial ecosystems. Both N and S deposition can affect plant growth, decomposition, and nitrous oxide production, with sometimes synergistic and sometimes contradictory responses; yet their separate effects are rarely isolated and their interactive biogeochemical impacts are often overlooked. For example, S deposition and consequent acidification and mortality may negate stimulation of plant growth induced by N deposition; decomposition can be slowed by both N and S deposition, though through different mechanisms; and N2O production may be stimulated directly by N and indirectly by S amendments. Recent advances in conceptual models and whole-ecosystem experiments provide novel means for disentangling the impacts of N and S in terrestrial ecosystems. Results from a new whole-ecosystem N x S- addition experiment will be presented in detail, examining differential response of tree and soil carbon storage to N and S additions. These results combine with observations from a broad array of long-term N addition studies, atmospheric deposition gradients, stable isotope tracer studies, and model analyses to inform the magnitude, controls, and stability of ecosystem C storage in response to N and S addition.

  17. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Hubbard, Susan S; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in terrestrial system processes, including the turnover of natural organic carbon, such as leaf litter and woody debris that accumulate in soils and subsurface sediments. What has emerged from a series of recent DNA sequencing-based studies is recognition of the enormous variety of little known and previously unknown microorganisms that mediate recycling of these vast stores of buried carbon in subsoil compartments of the terrestrial system. More importantly, the genome resolution achieved in these studies has enabled association of specific members of these microbial communities with carbon compound transformations and other linked biogeochemical processes-such as the nitrogen cycle-that can impact the quality of groundwater, surface water, and atmospheric trace gas concentrations. The emerging view also emphasizes the importance of organism interactions through exchange of metabolic byproducts (e.g., within the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles) and via symbioses since many novel organisms exhibit restricted metabolic capabilities and an associated extremely small cell size. New, genome-resolved information reshapes our view of subsurface microbial communities and provides critical new inputs for advanced reactive transport models. These inputs are needed for accurate prediction of feedbacks in watershed biogeochemical functioning and their influence on the climate via the fluxes of greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O. PMID:27156744

  18. Vesicomyid Clams Alter Biogeochemical Processes at Pacific Methane Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2007-12-01

    There exists a close relationship between fluid flow, biogeochemistry, and biota in seep sediments. Upwelling of methane and sulfide-rich fluids supports abundant macrofauna species harboring thiotrophic or methanotrophic symbionts. Variations in fluid flow, thus supply of methane and sulfide, are considered key factors controlling benthic communities. Vesicomyid clams harbor thiotrophic symbionts in their gills, which are supplied with oxygen from the surrounding water and hydrogen sulfide from the sediment. The clams are capable of extending their foot into the sediment to tap sulfide sources in deeper layers, consequently affecting water-sediment solute exchange. Because seep fluids are generally depleted in sulfate compared to seawater, this bioturbation activity may enhance the supply of sulfate to otherwise sulfate-limited sediments, thus boosting microbial activity of sulfate reduction (SR) coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The goal of this study was to investigate the activity of three species of vesicomyid clams ( Calyptogena pacifica, C. kilmeri, C. gigas) from three methane seep habitats (Eel River Basin, Hydrate Ridge, Monterey Bay Canyon) and to evaluate its effect on biogeochemical processes. Sediment cores and clams were collected using the submersible Alvin or the ROV Jason, during three cruises with the R/V Atlantis in July and October 2006 and July 2007 (AT 15-7, AT 15-11, and AT 15-20). We performed high-resolution measurements of geochemical gradients in intact sediment cores using microsensors (O2, H2S, pH, redox potential). The cores were then sliced (1 cm intervals) for detailed chemical and microbiological analyses. Parallel cores were used to determine microbial activity (AOM, SR) with radioactive tracers. For detailed laboratory investigations, clams were kept in narrow aquaria (15 cm x 20 cm x 5 cm) in the ship's cold room. The front of the aquaria was perforated with holes at 1 cm resolution. These silicone-filled holes

  19. Deriving forest fire ignition risk with biogeochemical process modelling☆

    PubMed Central

    Eastaugh, C.S.; Hasenauer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate impacts the growth of trees and also affects disturbance regimes such as wildfire frequency. The European Alps have warmed considerably over the past half-century, but incomplete records make it difficult to definitively link alpine wildfire to climate change. Complicating this is the influence of forest composition and fuel loading on fire ignition risk, which is not considered by purely meteorological risk indices. Biogeochemical forest growth models track several variables that may be used as proxies for fire ignition risk. This study assesses the usefulness of the ecophysiological model BIOME-BGC's ‘soil water’ and ‘labile litter carbon’ variables in predicting fire ignition. A brief application case examines historic fire occurrence trends over pre-defined regions of Austria from 1960 to 2008. Results show that summer fire ignition risk is largely a function of low soil moisture, while winter fire ignitions are linked to the mass of volatile litter and atmospheric dryness. PMID:26109905

  20. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-10-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  1. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  2. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  3. Biogeochemical factors affecting the presence of 210Po in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Stillings, L.L.; Cutler, N.; Salonen, L.; Outola, I.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of natural 210Po enrichment at levels exceeding 500 mBq/L in numerous domestic wells in northern Nevada, USA, led to a geochemical investigation of the processes responsible for its mobilization. 210Po activities in 63 domestic and public-supply wells ranged from below 1 mBq/L to 6590 ± 590 mBq/L, among the highest reported levels in the USA. There is little spatial or depth variability in 210Pb activity in study-area sediments and mobilization of a few percent of the 210Po in the sediments would account for all of the 210Po in water. Stable-isotope measurements indicate SO4 reduction has occurred in all 210Po contaminated wells. Sulfide species are not accumulating in the groundwater in much of Lahontan Valley, probably because of S cycling involving microbial SO4 reduction, abiotic oxidation of H2S to S0 by Mn(IV), followed by microbial disproportionation of S0 to H2S and SO4. The high pH, Ca depletion, MnCO3 saturation, and presence of S0 in Lahontan Valley groundwater may be consequences of the anaerobic S cycling. Consistent with data from naturally-enriched wells in Florida, 210Po activities begin to decrease when aqueous sulfide species begin to accumulate. This may be due to formation and precipitation of PoS, however, Eh–pH diagrams suggest PoS would not be stable in study-area groundwater. An alternative explanation for the study area is that H2S accumulation begins when anaerobic S cycling stops because Mn oxides are depleted and their reduction is no longer releasing 210Po. Common features of 210Po-enriched groundwater were identified by comparing the radiological and geochemical data from Nevada with data from naturally-enriched wells in Finland, and Florida and Maryland in the USA. Values of pH ranged from 9 in Nevada wells, indicating that pH is not critical in determining whether 210Po is present. Where U is present in the sediments, the data suggest 210Po levels may be elevated in aquifers with (1) SO4-reducing waters with low H2S

  4. Impacts of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Process Synchrony Transcend Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Kokelj, S.; McCluskie, M.; Hedstrom, N.

    2015-12-01

    In portions of the circumpolar north, there are documented cases of increases in annual inorganic nitrogen loading. Confounding the explanation of this phenomenon is a lack of accompanying annual trends in streamflow, precipitation or atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Evidence from Canada's subarctic suggests this dichotomy could be due to three key non-linearities in the predominant biogeochemical and hydrological processes. Because snowfall changes to rainfall near the zero degree air temperature isotherm, there has been an increase in late autumn rainfall across the region due to earlier passage of precipitation generating cold fronts. Runoff generation in cold regions is often a storage threshold-mediated process, and the enhanced rainfall results in more common exceedance of these thresholds and higher winter streamflow. Finally, net mineralization rates in regional lakes peak in winter following the onset of ice cover. Subtle increases in monthly rainfall at specific times of the year can permit hydro-chemical process synchrony within watersheds that enhances annual inorganic nitrogen loading, implying that the impacts of process synchrony transcend scale. The presence of shifts in nitrogen export suggests that sustained regular process synchrony can modify system states. Sound understanding of system processes and interactions across scales will be needed to properly predict impacts and make sound decisions when managing watersheds and competing resource demands.

  5. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  6. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: Mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, F.; Harvey, J. W.; Marion, A.; Packman, A. I.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.; Wörman, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed.

  7. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohne, T.; Rinklebe, J.; Langer, U.; Du Laing, G.; Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

    2012-01-01

    An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg Hg kg-1 and >30 mg Hg kg-1). The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately -350 mV at pH 5) to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5). Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) such as Desulfobacter species (10Me16:0, cy17:0, 10Me18:0, cy19:0) or Desulfovibrio species (18:2ω6,9), which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt) concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to Hgt ratio (ln(DOC/Hgt) ratio) (R2 = 0.39, p<0.0001, n= 63) whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p<0.05; n = 63). In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas EH and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe3+/Fe2+ and Cl- seem to play subordinate roles in Hg mobilization and methylation under our experimental conditions.

  8. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohne, T.; Rinklebe, J.; Langer, U.; Du Laing, G.; Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

    2011-09-01

    An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg kg-1 Hg and >30 mg kg-1 Hg). The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately -350 mV at pH 5) to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5). Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) such as Desulfobacter species (10me16:0, cy17:0, 10me18:0, cy19:0) or Desulfovibrio species (18:2ω6,9), which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt) concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to Hgt ratio (lnDOC/lnHgt ratio) (R2 = 0.39, p < 0.0001, n = 63) whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p < 0.05; n = 63). In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas E,H and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe,3+/Fe2+ and Cl- seem to play subordinate roles in Hg mobilization and methylation under our experimental conditions.

  9. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  10. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  11. Biotic Interactions in Microbial Communities as Modulators of Biogeochemical Processes: Methanotrophy as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Adrian; Angel, Roey; Veraart, Annelies J.; Daebeler, Anne; Jia, Zhongjun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial interaction is an integral component of microbial ecology studies, yet the role, extent, and relevance of microbial interaction in community functioning remains unclear, particularly in the context of global biogeochemical cycles. While many studies have shed light on the physico-chemical cues affecting specific processes, (micro)biotic controls and interactions potentially steering microbial communities leading to altered functioning are less known. Yet, recent accumulating evidence suggests that the concerted actions of a community can be significantly different from the combined effects of individual microorganisms, giving rise to emergent properties. Here, we exemplify the importance of microbial interaction for ecosystem processes by analysis of a reasonably well-understood microbial guild, namely, aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). We reviewed the literature which provided compelling evidence for the relevance of microbial interaction in modulating methane oxidation. Support for microbial associations within methane-fed communities is sought by a re-analysis of literature data derived from stable isotope probing studies of various complex environmental settings. Putative positive interactions between active MOB and other microbes were assessed by a correlation network-based analysis with datasets covering diverse environments where closely interacting members of a consortium can potentially alter the methane oxidation activity. Although, methanotrophy is used as a model system, the fundamentals of our postulations may be applicable to other microbial guilds mediating other biogeochemical processes. PMID:27602021

  12. Spatio-temporal evolution of biogeochemical processes at a landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of fate and transport of contaminants are strongly dependent on spatio-temporal variability of soil hydraulic and geochemical properties. This study focuses on time-series signatures of hydrological and geochemical properties at different locations within the Norman landfill site. Norman Landfill is a closed municipal landfill site with prevalent organic contamination. Monthly data at the site include specific conductance, δ18O, δ2H, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and anions (chloride, sulfate, nitrate) from 1998-2006. Column scale data on chemical concentrations, redox gradients, and flow parameters are also available on daily and hydrological event (infiltration, drainage, etc.) scales. Since high-resolution datasets of contaminant concentrations are usually unavailable, Wavelet and Fourier analyses were used to infer the dominance of different biogeochemical processes at different spatio-temporal scales and to extract linkages between transport and reaction processes. Results indicate that time variability controls the progression of reactions affecting biodegradation of contaminants. Wavelet analysis suggests that iron-sulfide reduction reactions had high seasonal variability at the site, while fermentation processes dominated at the annual time scale. Findings also suggest the dominance of small spatial features such as layered interfaces and clay lenses in driving biogeochemical reactions at both column and landfill scales. A conceptual model that caters to increased understanding and remediating structurally heterogeneous variably-saturated media is developed from the study.

  13. Biotic Interactions in Microbial Communities as Modulators of Biogeochemical Processes: Methanotrophy as a Model System.

    PubMed

    Ho, Adrian; Angel, Roey; Veraart, Annelies J; Daebeler, Anne; Jia, Zhongjun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2016-01-01

    Microbial interaction is an integral component of microbial ecology studies, yet the role, extent, and relevance of microbial interaction in community functioning remains unclear, particularly in the context of global biogeochemical cycles. While many studies have shed light on the physico-chemical cues affecting specific processes, (micro)biotic controls and interactions potentially steering microbial communities leading to altered functioning are less known. Yet, recent accumulating evidence suggests that the concerted actions of a community can be significantly different from the combined effects of individual microorganisms, giving rise to emergent properties. Here, we exemplify the importance of microbial interaction for ecosystem processes by analysis of a reasonably well-understood microbial guild, namely, aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). We reviewed the literature which provided compelling evidence for the relevance of microbial interaction in modulating methane oxidation. Support for microbial associations within methane-fed communities is sought by a re-analysis of literature data derived from stable isotope probing studies of various complex environmental settings. Putative positive interactions between active MOB and other microbes were assessed by a correlation network-based analysis with datasets covering diverse environments where closely interacting members of a consortium can potentially alter the methane oxidation activity. Although, methanotrophy is used as a model system, the fundamentals of our postulations may be applicable to other microbial guilds mediating other biogeochemical processes. PMID:27602021

  14. CALIBRATION OF SUBSURFACE BATCH AND REACTIVE-TRANSPORT MODELS INVOLVING COMPLEX BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the calibration of subsurface batch and reactive-transport models involving complex biogeochemical processes was systematically evaluated. Two hypothetical nitrate biodegradation scenarios were developed and simulated in numerical experiments to evaluate the perfor...

  15. Affective processing requires awareness.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Hyönä, Jukka; Koivisto, Mika; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Studies using backward masked emotional stimuli suggest that affective processing may occur outside visual awareness and imply primacy of affective over semantic processing, yet these experiments have not strictly controlled for the participants' awareness of the stimuli. Here we directly compared the primacy of affective versus semantic categorization of biologically relevant stimuli in 5 experiments (n = 178) using explicit (semantic and affective discrimination; Experiments 1-3) and implicit (semantic and affective priming; Experiments 4-5) measures. The same stimuli were used in semantic and affective tasks. Visual awareness was manipulated by varying exposure duration of the masked stimuli, and subjective level of stimulus awareness was measured after each trial using a 4-point perceptual awareness scale. When participants reported no awareness of the stimuli, semantic and affective categorization were at chance level and priming scores did not differ from zero. When participants were even partially aware of the stimuli, (a) both semantic and affective categorization could be performed above chance level with equal accuracy, (b) semantic categorization was faster than affective categorization, and (c) both semantic and affective priming were observed. Affective categorization speed was linearly dependent on semantic categorization speed, suggesting dependence of affective processing on semantic recognition. Manipulations of affective and semantic categorization tasks revealed a hierarchy of categorization operations beginning with basic-level semantic categorization and ending with superordinate level affective categorization. We conclude that both implicit and explicit affective and semantic categorization is dependent on visual awareness, and that affective recognition follows semantic categorization. PMID:25559654

  16. Effect of Vertical Flow Exchange on Biogeochemical Processes in Hyporheic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.; Shin, D.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes in hyporheic zones are of great interest because they make the hyporheic zones highly productive and complex environments. When contaminants or polluted water pass through hyporheic zones, in particular, biogeochemical processes play an important role in removing contaminants or attenuating contamination under certain conditions. The study site, a reach of Munsan stream (Paju-si, South Korea), exhibits severe contamination of surface water by nitrate released from Water Treatment Plant (WTP) nearby. The objectives of this study are to investigate the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes at the riparian area of the site which may contribute to natural attenuation of surface water driven nitrate, and analyze the effect of vertical (hyporheic) flow exchange on the biogeochemical processes in the area. To examine hydraulic mixing or dilution processes, vertical hydraulic gradients were measured at several depth levels using minipiezometers, and then soil temperatures were measured by using i-buttons installed inside the minipiezometers. The microbial analyses by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-cloning methods were also done in order to identify the denitrification process in soil samples. In addition, correlation between vertical flow exchange, temperature data, and denitrifying bacteria activity was also investigated so as to examine the effects on one another. The results showed that there were significant effects of vertical flow exchange and hyporheic soil temperature on the biogeochemical processes of the site. This study found strong support for the idea that the biogeochemical function of hyporheic zone is a predictable outcome of the interaction between microbial activity and flow exchange.

  17. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced ~ 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short

  18. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-07-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced roughly 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short

  19. The interaction between biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes and their feedback on permafrost soil carbon stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElMasri, B.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Our current understanding of the full suite of processes and their responses to recent warming in terrestrial high-latitudes are far from complete. While continued research on development of more detailed Earth system models (ESMs) is essential to understand the interactions and feedbacks between vegetation, soils and climate change in the Northern high latitudes (NHL), one of the major challenges is the treatment of the biophysical and biogeochemical processes and feedback in the ESM and their impact on soil organic carbon. We used a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), which coupled carbon-nitrogen biogeochemical and energy and hydrology biogeophysical processes, to investigate the effects of feedbacks between the biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes on the model estimated soil organic carbon (SOC) for the NHL permafrost region. We not only focused on recent improvement in the ISAM biogeophysical processes that are deemed important for the high latitude soils/snow; such as deep soil column, modulation of soil thermal and hydrological properties, wind compaction of snow, and depth hoar formation; on permafrost SOC, but also biogeochemical processes; such as dynamic phenology and root distribution, litter carbon decomposition rates and nitrogen amount remaining; on soil biogeochemistry. We selected multiple sites representative of different high latitude biomes to calibrate and evaluate the model. We then carried out several ISAM model simulations to study the effects of feedbacks between biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes on SOC. Our model analysis shows that including the biogeophysical processes alone could increase modeled Northern high-latitude permafrost carbon by about 30% compared to measurements. Accounting for the biogeochmical processes further improve the NHL soil carbon. This study demonstrates that improvements in biogeophysical or biogeochemical processes alone does not help to improve the modeled SOC

  20. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of

  1. Biogeochemical Processes Controlling Microbial Reductive Precipitation of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, James K.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2004-03-17

    This project is focused on elucidating the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentrations, chemical speciation, and distribution of the redox sensitive contaminants uranium (U) and technetium (Tc) between the aqueous and solid phases. The research is designed to provide new insights into the under-explored areas of competing geochemical and microbiological oxidation-reduction reactions that govern the fate and transport of redox sensitive contaminants and to generate fundamental scientific understanding of the identity and stoichiometry of competing microbial reduction and geochemical oxidation reactions. These goals and objectives are met through a series of hypothesis-driven tasks that focus on (1) the use of well-characterized microorganisms and synthetic and natural mineral oxidants, (2) advanced spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to monitor redox transformations of U and Tc, and (3) the use of flow-through experiments to more closely approximate groundwater environments. The results are providing an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the redox dynamics of radionuclides in subsurface environments. For purposes of this poster, the results are divided into three sections: (1) influence of Ca on U(VI) bioreduction; (2) localization of biogenic UO{sub 2} and TcO{sub 2}; and (3) reactivity of Mn(III/IV) oxides.

  2. The Interactions between Biogeophysical and Biogeochemical Processes and their Feedbacks on Permafrost Soil Carbon Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; El Masri, B.; Barman, R.; Shu, S.; Song, Y.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major challenges in more detailed Earth system models (ESMs) is the treatment of the biophysical and biogeochemical processes and feedbacks and their impact on soil organic carbon in the Northern high latitudes (NHL). We use a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) to investigate the effects of feedbacks between the biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes on the model estimated soil organic carbon (SOC) for the NHL permafrost region. We not only focus on recent model improvements in the biogeophysical processes that are deemed important for the high latitude soils/snow; such as deep soil column, modulation of soil thermal and hydrological properties, wind compaction of snow, and depth hoar formation; on permafrost SOC; but also biogeochemical processes; such as dynamic phenology and root distribution, litter carbon decomposition rates and nitrogen amount remaining; on soil biogeochemistry. We select multiple sites to evaluate the model. We then carried out several model simulations to study the effects of feedbacks between biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes on SOC. Our model analysis shows that including the biogeophysical processes alone could increase modeled NHL permafrost carbon by about 30% compared to measurements. Accounting for the biogeochmical processes further improve the NHL soil carbon.

  3. Isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural biodegradation processes in open cast pit mining landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Christina; Knöller, Kay; Koschorreck, Matthias; Ussath, Maria; Hoth, Nils

    2014-05-01

    laboratory experiments, we tested reactive materials that may speed up the process of bacterial sulfate reduction. In in-situ experiments, we quantified nitrification rates. Based on the results, we are able to suggest promising technical measures that enhance natural attenuation processes at mine dump site and in mining lakes. The natural water cycle in lignite mining landscapes is heavily impacted by human activities. Basically, nature is capable of cleaning itself to a certain extent after mining activities stopped. However, it is our responsibility to support biogeochemical processes to make them more efficient and more sustainable. Isotopic monitoring proved to be an excellent tool for assessing the relevance and performance of different re-cultivation measures for a positive long-term development of the water quality in large-scale aquatic systems affected by the impact of lignite mining.

  4. A Virtual Soil System to Study Macroscopic Manifestation of Pore-Scale Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fang, Y.; Shang, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mechanistic soil biogeochemical processes occur at the pore-scale that fundamentally control the moisture and CO2 fluxes at the soil and atmosphere interface. This presentation will present an on-going research to investigate pore-scale moisture migration and biogeochemical processes of organic carbon degradation, and their macroscopic manifestation in soils. Soil cores collected from Rattlesnake Mountain in southeastern Washington, USA, where a field experiment was conducted to investigate dynamic response of soil biogeochemistry to changing climate conditions, were used as an example for this study. The cores were examined using computerized x-ray tomography (XCT) to determine soil pore structures. The XCT imaging, together with various measurements of soil properties such as porosity, moisture content, organic carbon, biochemistry, etc are used to establish a virtual soil core with a high spatial resolution (~20um). The virtual soil system is then used to simulate soil moisture migration and organic carbon degradation, to identify important physical and biogeochemical factors controlling macroscopic moisture and CO2 fluxes in response to changing climate conditions, and to develop and evaluate pragmatic biogeochemical process models for larger scale applications. Core-scale measurements of CO2 flux and moisture change are used for development and validation of the process models.

  5. Switchgrass influences soil biogeochemical processes in dryland region of the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass and other perennial grasses have been promoted as biomass crops for production of renewable fuels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biomass removal on soil biogeochemical processes. A three year field study consisting of three levels of net primary productivity (...

  6. Do antibiotics have environmental side-effects? Impact of synthetic antibiotics on biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Roose-Amsaleg, Céline; Laverman, Anniet M

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic use in the early 1900 vastly improved human health but at the same time started an arms race of antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in ubiquitous trace concentrations of many antibiotics in most environments. Little is known about the impact of these antibiotics on microbial processes or "non-target" organisms. This mini-review summarizes our knowledge of the effect of synthetically produced antibiotics on microorganisms involved in biogeochemical cycling. We found only 31 articles that dealt with the effects of antibiotics on such processes in soil, sediment, or freshwater. We compare the processes, antibiotics, concentration range, source, environment, and experimental approach of these studies. Examining the effects of antibiotics on biogeochemical processes should involve environmentally relevant concentrations (instead of therapeutic), chronic exposure (versus acute), and monitoring of the administered antibiotics. Furthermore, the lack of standardized tests hinders generalizations regarding the effects of antibiotics on biogeochemical processes. We investigated the effects of antibiotics on biogeochemical N cycling, specifically nitrification, denitrification, and anammox. We found that environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoroquinolones and sulfonamides could partially inhibit denitrification. So far, the only documented effects of antibiotic inhibitions were at therapeutic doses on anammox activities. The most studied and inhibited was nitrification (25-100 %) mainly at therapeutic doses and rarely environmentally relevant. We recommend that firm conclusions regarding inhibition of antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations remain difficult due to the lack of studies testing low concentrations at chronic exposure. There is thus a need to test the effects of these environmental concentrations on biogeochemical processes to further establish the possible effects on ecosystem functioning. PMID

  7. MOPS-1.0: towards a model for the regulation of the global oceanic nitrogen budget by marine biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriest, I.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-09-01

    Global models of the oceanic nitrogen cycle are subject to many uncertainties regarding the representation of the relevant biogeochemical processes and of the feedbacks between nitrogen sources and sinks that determine space- and timescales on which the global nitrogen budget is regulated. We investigate these aspects using a global model of ocean biogeochemistry that explicitly considers phosphorus and nitrogen, including pelagic denitrification and nitrogen fixation as sink and source terms of fixed nitrogen, respectively. The model explores different parameterizations of organic matter sinking speed, oxidant affinity of oxic and suboxic remineralization, and regulation of nitrogen fixation by temperature and different stoichiometric ratios. Examination of the initial transient behavior of different model setups initialized from observed biogeochemical tracer distributions reveal changes in simulated nitrogen inventories and fluxes particularly during the first centuries. Millennial timescales have to be resolved in order to bring all biogeochemical and physical processes into a dynamically consistent steady state. Analysis of global properties suggests that not only particularly particle sinking speed but also the parameterization of denitrification determine the extent of oxygen minimum zones, global nitrogen fluxes, and hence the oceanic nitrogen inventory. However, the ways and directions in which different parameterizations of particle sinking, nitrogen fixation, and denitrification affect the global diagnostics are different suggesting that these may, in principle, be constrained independently from each other. Analysis of the model misfit with respect to observed biogeochemical tracer distributions and fluxes suggests a particle flux profile close to the one suggested by Martin et al. (1987). Simulated pelagic denitrification best agrees with the lower values between 59 and 84 Tg N yr-1 recently estimated by other authors.

  8. Lacustrine wetland in an agricultural catchment: nitrogen removal and related biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrini, R.; Arese, C.; Delconte, C.

    2007-09-01

    The role of specific catchment areas, such as the soil-river or lake interfaces, in removing or buffering the flux of N from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems is globally recognized but the extreme variability of microbiological and hydrological processes make it difficult to predict the extent to which different wetlands function as buffer systems. In this paper we evaluate the degree to which biogeochemical processes in a lacustrine wetland are responsible for the nitrate removal from ground waters feeding Candia Lake (Northern Italy). A transect of 18 piezometers was installed perpendicular to the shoreline, in a sub-unit formed by 80 m of poplar plantation, close to a crop field and 30 m of reed swamp. The chemical analysis revealed a drastic NO3-N ground water depletion from the crop field to the lake, with concentrations decreasing from 15-18 mg N/l to the detection limit within the reeds. Patterns of Cl, SO4, O2, NO2-N, HCO3 and DOC suggest that the metabolic activity of bacterial communities, based on the differential use of electron donors and acceptors in redox reactions is the key function of this system. The significant inverse relationship found between NO3-N and HCO3 is a valuable indicator of the denitrification activity. The pluviometric regime, the temperature, the organic carbon availability and the hydrogeomorphic properties are the main environmental factors affecting the N transformations in the studied lacustrine ecosystem.

  9. Lacustrine wetland in an agricultural catchment: nitrogen removal and related biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrini, R.; Arese, C.; Delconte, C.

    2008-03-01

    The role of specific catchment areas, such as the soil-river or lake interfaces, in removing or buffering the flux of N from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems is globally recognized but the extreme variability of microbiological and hydrological processes make it difficult to predict the extent to which different wetlands function as buffer systems. In this paper we evaluate the degree to which biogeochemical processes in a lacustrine wetland are responsible for the nitrate removal from ground waters feeding Candia Lake (Northern Italy). A transect of 18 piezometers was installed perpendicular to the shoreline, in a sub-unit formed by 80 m of poplar plantation, close to a crop field and 30 m of reed swamp. The chemical analysis revealed a drastic NO3--N ground water depletion from the crop field to the lake, with concentrations decreasing from 15-18 mg N/l to the detection limit within the reeds. Patterns of Cl-, SO42-, O2, NO2--N, HCO3- and DOC suggest that the metabolic activity of bacterial communities, based on the differential use of electron donors and acceptors in redox reactions is the key function of this system. The significant inverse relationship found between NO3--N and HCO3- is a valuable indicator of the denitrification activity. The pluviometric regime, the temperature, the organic carbon availability and the hydrogeomorphic properties are the main environmental factors affecting the N transformations in the studied lacustrine ecosystem.

  10. Dynamic interactions of ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes in water-stressed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Manzoni, S.; Ravi, S.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Water is the essential reactant, catalyst, or medium for many biogeochemical reactions and flows. The coupling between hydrological and biogeochemical processes is particularly evident in drylands, but also in areas with strong seasonal precipitation patterns or in mesic systems during droughts. Moreover, this coupling is apparent at all levels in the ecosystems - from soil microbial cells to whole plants to landscapes. A holistic approach is essential to fully understand function and processes in water-limited ecosystems and to predict their responses to environmental change. We examine some of the mechanisms responsible for microbial and vegetation responses to moisture inputs in water-limited ecosystems through a synthesis of existing literature and we also summarize the modeling advances in addressing these interactions. This paper focuses on three opportunities to advance coupled hydrological and biogeochemical research: (1) improved quantitative understanding of mechanisms linking hydrological and biogeochemical variations in drylands, (2) experimental and theoretical approaches that describe linkages between hydrology and biogeochemistry (particularly across scales), and (3) the use of these tools and insights to address critical dryland issues of societal relevance.

  11. The effect of tidal forcing on biogeochemical processes in intertidal salt marsh sediments

    PubMed Central

    Taillefert, Martial; Neuhuber, Stephanie; Bristow, Gwendolyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Early diagenetic processes involved in natural organic matter (NOM) oxidation in marine sediments have been for the most part characterized after collecting sediment cores and extracting porewaters. These techniques have proven useful for deep-sea sediments where biogeochemical processes are limited to aerobic respiration, denitrification, and manganese reduction and span over several centimeters. In coastal marine sediments, however, the concentration of NOM is so high that the spatial resolution needed to characterize these processes cannot be achieved with conventional sampling techniques. In addition, coastal sediments are influenced by tidal forcing that likely affects the processes involved in carbon oxidation. Results In this study, we used in situ voltammetry to determine the role of tidal forcing on early diagenetic processes in intertidal salt marsh sediments. We compare ex situ measurements collected seasonally, in situ profiling measurements, and in situ time series collected at several depths in the sediment during tidal cycles at two distinct stations, a small perennial creek and a mud flat. Our results indicate that the tides coupled to the salt marsh topography drastically influence the distribution of redox geochemical species and may be responsible for local differences noted year-round in the same sediments. Monitoring wells deployed to observe the effects of the tides on the vertical component of porewater transport reveal that creek sediments, because of their confinements, are exposed to much higher hydrostatic pressure gradients than mud flats. Conclusion Our study indicates that iron reduction can be sustained in intertidal creek sediments by a combination of physical forcing and chemical oxidation, while intertidal mud flat sediments are mainly subject to sulfate reduction. These processes likely allow microbial iron reduction to be an important terminal electron accepting process in intertidal coastal sediments. PMID:17567893

  12. Modeling biogeochemical processes of phosphorus for global food supply.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marion; Frossard, Emmanuel; Scholz, Roland W

    2011-08-01

    Harvests of crops, their trade and consumption, soil erosion, fertilization and recycling of organic waste generate fluxes of phosphorus in and out of the soil that continuously change the worldwide spatial distribution of total phosphorus in arable soils. Furthermore, due to variability in the properties of the virgin soils and the different histories of agricultural practices, on a planetary scale, the distribution of total soil phosphorus is very heterogeneous. There are two key relationships that determine how this distribution and its change over time affect crop yields. One is the relationship between total soil phosphorus and bioavailable soil phosphorus and the second is the relationship between bioavailable soil phosphorus and yields. Both of these depend on environmental variables such as soil properties and climate. We propose a model in which these relationships are described probabilistically and integrated with the dynamic feedbacks of P cycling in the human ecosystem. The model we propose is a first step towards evaluating the large-scale effects of different nutrient management scenarios. One application of particular interest is to evaluate the vulnerability of different regions to an increased scarcity in P mineral fertilizers. Another is to evaluate different regions' deficiency in total soil phosphorus compared with the level at which they could sustain their maximum potential yield without external mineral inputs of phosphorus but solely by recycling organic matter to close the nutrient cycle. PMID:21463882

  13. Reservoir and contaminated sediments impacts in high-Andean environments: Morphodynamic interactions with biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Contreras, M. T.; Müllendorff, D. A.; Pasten, P.; Pizarro, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and biogeochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long-term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta river, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. Research has been supported by Fondecyt grant 1130940 and CONICYT/FONDAP Grant 15110017

  14. A continuous time random walk approach to model biogeochemical processes in rivers and hyporheic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Drummond, J. D.; Packman, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Exchange of solutes and particles between river channels and the subsurface is critical for biogeochemical processes in rivers. Subsurface water moves slowly, delaying downstream transport and providing ample time for reactions to proceed. We present a stochastic modeling framework for the transport of reactive solutes in rivers based on continuous time random walk theory. This model includes solute transport, storage, and reactions in both the channel and the bed. Hyporheic residence times can take any distribution. The model produces realistic breakthrough curves for conservative and reactive solutes. Reactive solutes breakthrough curves exhibit characteristic late time truncation. We have also extended the model for river networks and use it to assess how the interaction of exchange rates, residence time distributions and reaction rates affect export at the watershed scale. We show that extended travel times reduce total export, but in proportions that vary with reaction kinetics relative to transport rates. When reactions are fast relative to transport rates, exchange between the surface and subsurface tend to control removal whereas for slow reactions, residence time distributions become more important.

  15. Dimensionless Numbers For Morphological, Thermal And Biogeochemical Controls Of Hyporheic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Alberto; Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    Transport of solutes and heat within the hyporheic zone are interface processes that gained growing attention in the last decade, when several modelling strategies have been proposed, mainly at the local or reach scale. We propose to upscale local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and network scales by means of a Lagrangian modelling framework, which allows to consider the impact of the flow structure on the processes modelled. This analysis shows that geochemical processes can be parametrized through two new Damköhler numbers, DaO, and DaT. DaO = ?up,50-?lim is defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time, ?up,50 and the time of consuming dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration, ?lim, below which reductive reactions are activated. It quantifies the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone and could be a metric for upscaling local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and river-network scale processes. In addition, ?up,50 is the time scale of hyporheic advection; while ?lim is the representative time scale of biogeochemical reactions and indicates the distance along the streamline, measured as the time needed to travel that distance, that a particle of water travels before the dissolved oxygen concentration declines to [DO]lim, the value at which denitrification is activated. We show that DaO is representative of the redox status and indicates whether the hyporheic zone is a source or a sink of nitrate. Values of DaO larger than 1 indicate prevailing anaerobic conditions, whereas values smaller than 1 prevailing aerobic conditions. Similarly, DaT quantifies the importance of the temperature daily oscillations of the stream water on the hyporheic environment. It is defined as the ratio between ?up,50, and the time limit at which the ratio between the amplitude of the temperature oscillation within the hyporheic zone (evaluated along the streamline) and in the stream water is smaller than e-1. We show that

  16. Biogeochemical processes driving mercury cycling in estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that has been enriched in the environment through human activities, particularly in the coastal zone. Bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in marine fishposes health risks for fish-consuming populations and is a worldwide health concern. A broader understanding of major environmental processes controlling Hg cycling and MeHg production and bioaccumulation in estuaries is therefore needed. Recent fieldwork and modeling show diverse sources of MeHg production in estuaries. We present geochemical modeling results for Hg and MeHg acrossmultiple estuaries with contrasting physical, chemical and biological characteristics. We report new measurements of water column and sediment mercury speciation and methylation data from the subarctic (Lake Melville, Labrador Canada) and temperate latitudes (Long Island Sound, Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay). We find that benthic sediment is a relatively small source of MeHg to the water column in all systems. Water column methylation drives MeHg levels in Lake Melville, whereas in more impacted shallow systems such as Chesapeake Bay and Long Island Sound, external inputs and sediment resuspension are more dominant. All systems are a net source of MeHg to the ocean through tidal exchange. In light of these inter-system differences, we will evaluate timescales of coastal ecosystem responses to changes in Hg loading that can help predict potential responses to future perturbations.

  17. Hybrid Numerical Methods for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Redden, George D.; Meakin, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Many subsurface flow and transport problems of importance today involve coupled non-linear flow, transport, and reaction in media exhibiting complex heterogeneity. In particular, problems involving biological mediation of reactions fall into this class of problems. Recent experimental research has revealed important details about the physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms involved in these processes at a variety of scales ranging from molecular to laboratory scales. However, it has not been practical or possible to translate detailed knowledge at small scales into reliable predictions of field-scale phenomena important for environmental management applications. A large assortment of numerical simulation tools have been developed, each with its own characteristic scale including molecular (e.g., molecular dynamics), microbial (e.g., cellular automata or particle individual-based models), pore (e.g., lattice-Boltzmann, pore network models, and discrete particle methods such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics) and continuum scales (e.g., traditional partial differential equations solved by finite difference or finite element methods). While many problems can be effectively addressed by one of these models at a single scale, some problems may require explicit integration of models across multiple scales. We are developing a hybrid multi-scale subsurface reactive transport modeling framework that integrates models with diverse representations of physics, chemistry and biology at different scales (sub-pore, pore and continuum). The modeling framework is being designed to take advantage of advanced computational technologies including parallel code components using the Common Component Architecture, parallel solvers, gridding, data and workflow management, and visualization. This paper describes the specific methods/codes being used at each scale, techniques used to directly and adaptively couple across model scales, and preliminary results of application to a

  18. Evidence of biogeochemical processes in iron duricrust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levett, Alan; Gagen, Emma; Shuster, Jeremiah; Rintoul, Llew; Tobin, Mark; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Bambery, Keith; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Southam, Gordon

    2016-11-01

    Canga is a moderately hard iron-rich duricrust primarily composed of goethite as a result of the weathering of banded iron formations. Canga duricrusts lack a well-developed soil profile and consequently form an innate association with rupestrian plants that may become ferruginised, contributing to canga possessing macroscopic biological features. Examination of polished canga using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) revealed the biological textures associated with canga extended to the sub-millimetre scale in petrographic sections and polished blocks. Laminae that formed by abiotic processes and regions where goethite cements were formed in association with microorganisms were observed in canga. Biological cycling of iron within canga has resulted in two distinct forms of microbial fossilisation: permineralisation of multispecies biofilms and mineralisation of cell envelopes. Goethite permineralised biofilms frequently formed around goethite-rich kaolinite grains in close proximity to goethite bands and were composed of micrometre-scale rod-shaped, cocci and filamentous microfossils. In contrast, the cell envelopes immobilised by authigenic iron oxides were primarily of rod-shaped microorganisms, were not permineralised and occurred in pore spaces within canga. Complete mineralisation of intact rod-shaped casts and the absence of permineralisation suggested mineralised cell envelopes may represent fossilised iron-oxidising bacteria in the canga ecosystem. Replication of these iron-oxidising bacteria appeared to infill the porous regions within canga. Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy demonstrated that organic biomarkers were poorly preserved with only weak bands indicative of aliphatic methylene (CH2) associated with permineralised microbial biofilms. High resolution imaging of microbial fossils in canga that had been etched with oxalic acid supported the poor preservation of organic biomarkers within canga

  19. Connections between physical, optical and biogeochemical processes in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Chai, Fei

    2014-03-01

    A new biogeochemical model has been developed and coupled to a three-dimensional physical model in the Pacific Ocean. With the explicitly represented dissolved organic pools, this new model is able to link key biogeochemical processes with optical processes. Model validation against satellite and in situ data indicates the model is robust in reproducing general biogeochemical and optical features. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has been suggested to play an important role in regulating underwater light field. With the coupled model, physical and biological regulations of CDOM in the euphotic zone are analyzed. Model results indicate seasonal variability of CDOM is mostly determined by biological processes, while the importance of physical regulation manifests in the annual mean terms. Without CDOM attenuating light, modeled depth-integrated primary production is about 10% higher than the control run when averaged over the entire basin, while this discrepancy is highly variable in space with magnitudes reaching higher than 100% in some locations. With CDOM dynamics integrated in physical-biological interactions, a new mechanism by which physical processes affect biological processes is suggested, namely, physical transport of CDOM changes water optical properties, which can further modify underwater light field and subsequently affect the distribution of phytoplankton chlorophyll. This mechanism tends to occur in the entire Pacific basin but with strong spatial variability, implying the importance of including optical processes in the coupled physical-biogeochemical model. If ammonium uptake is sufficient to permit utilization of DOM, that is, UB∗⩾-U{U}/{U}-{(1-r_b)}/{RB}, then bacteria uptake of DOM has the form of FB=(1-r_b){U}/{RB}, bacteria respiration, SB=r_b×U, remineralization by bacteria, EB=UC{UN}/{UC}-{(1-r_b)}/{RB}. If EB > 0, then UB = 0; otherwise, UB = -EB. If there is insufficient ammonium, that is, UB∗<-U{U}/{U}-{(1-r_b)}/{RB}, then

  20. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    precipitation in the mixolimnion and metalimnion, but the absence of calcareous sediments at depth suggests dissolution and recycling during winter months. Dissolved carbon concentrations [dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)] increased with depth, reaching ∼0.04 mol/L at the metalimnion-monimolimnion boundary. DIC concentrations were seasonally variable in the mixolimnion and metalimnion, and were influenced by calcium carbonate precipitation. DOC concentrations mimicked those of conservative salts (e.g., Na+-Cl-) in the mixolimnion and metalimnion, but decreased in the monimolimnion where mass loss by anaerobic microbial processes is implied. Biogenic reduced solutes originating in monimolimnion (H2S and CH4) were biologically oxidized in the metalimnion as they were not observed in more shallow lake waters. Multi-year solute inventory calculations indicated that Hot Lake is a stable, albeit seasonally and annually dynamic feature, with inorganic solutes cycled between lake waters and sediments depending on annual recharge, temperature, and lake water dilution state. With its extreme geochemical and thermal regime, Hot Lake functions as analog of early earth and extraterrestrial life environments.

  1. High resolution modelling of the biogeochemical processes in the eutrophic Loire River (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaudo, Camille; Moatar, Florentina; Curie, Florence; Gassama, Nathalie; Billen, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    A biogeochemical model was developed, coupling a physically based water temperature model (T-NET) with a semi-mechanistic biogeochemical model (RIVE, used in ProSe and Riverstrahler models) in order to assess at a fine temporal and spatial resolution the biogeochemical processes in the eutrophic Middle Loire hydrosystem (≈10 000 km², 3361 river segments). The code itself allows parallelized computing, which decreased greatly the calculation time (5 hours for simulating 3 years hourly). We conducted a daily survey during the period 2012-2014 at 2 sampling stations located in the Middle Loire of nutrients, chlorophyll pigments, phytoplankton and physic-chemical variables. This database was used as both input data (upstream Loire boundary) and validation data of the model (basin outlet). Diffuse and non-point sources were assessed based on a land cover analysis and WWTP datasets. The results appeared very sensible to the coefficients governing the dynamic of suspended solids and of phosphorus (sorption/desorption processes) within the model and some parameters needed to be estimated numerically. Both the Lagrangian point of view and fluxes budgets at the seasonal and event-based scale evidenced the biogeochemical functioning of the Loire River. Low discharge levels set up favorable physical conditions for phytoplankton growth (long water travel time, limited water depth, suspended particles sedimentation). Conversely, higher discharge levels highly limited the phytoplankton biomass (dilution of the colony, washing-out, limited travel time, remobilization of suspended sediments increasing turbidity), and most biogeochemical species were basically transferred downstream. When hydrological conditions remained favorable for phytoplankton development, P-availability was the critical factor. However, the model evidenced that most of the P in summer was recycled within the water body: on one hand it was assimilated by the algae biomass, and on the other hand it was

  2. Biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes: quantifying the functional role of vernal pools in ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, K. A.; Rancatti, R.; Calhoun, A.; Hunter, M.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots are characterized as small areas within a landscape matrix that show comparably high chemical reaction rates relative to surrounding areas. For small, natural features to generate biogeochemical hotspots within a landscape, their contribution to nutrient dynamics must be significant relative to nutrient demand of the surrounding landscape. In northeastern forests in the US, vernal pools are abundant, small features that typically fill in spring with snow melt and precipitation and dry by the end of the summer. Ephemeral flooding alters soil moisture and the depth of the oxic/anoxic boundary in the soil, which may affect leaf-litter decomposition rates and nutrient dynamics including denitrification. Additionally, pool-breeding organisms may influence nutrient dynamics via consumer-driven nutrient remineralization. We studied the effects of vernal pools on rates of leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification in forested habitats in Maine. Our results indicate leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification rates in submerged habitats of vernal pools were greater than in upland forest habitat. Our data also suggest pool-breeding organisms, such as wood frogs, may play an important role in nutrient dynamics within vernal pools. Together, the results suggest vernal pools may function as biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes.

  3. Potential effects of climate change and variability on watershed biogeochemical processes and water quality in Northeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hyung; Duan, Lei; Kim, Bomchul; Mitchell, Myron J; Shibata, Hideaki

    2010-02-01

    An overview is provided of the potential effects of climate change on the watershed biogeochemical processes and surface water quality in mountainous watersheds of Northeast (NE) Asia that provide drinking water supplies for large populations. We address major 'local' issues with the case studies conducted at three watersheds along a latitudinal gradient going from northern Japan through the central Korean Peninsula and ending in southern China. Winter snow regimes and ground snowpack dynamics play a crucial role in many ecological and biogeochemical processes in the mountainous watersheds across northern Japan. A warmer winter with less snowfall, as has been projected for northern Japan, will alter the accumulation and melting of snowpacks and affect hydro-biogeochemical processes linking soil processes to surface water quality. Soils on steep hillslopes and rich in base cations have been shown to have distinct patterns in buffering acidic inputs during snowmelt. Alteration of soil microbial processes in response to more frequent freeze-thaw cycles under thinner snowpacks may increase nutrient leaching to stream waters. The amount and intensity of summer monsoon rainfalls have been increasing in Korea over recent decades. More frequent extreme rainfall events have resulted in large watershed export of sediments and nutrients from agricultural lands on steep hillslopes converted from forests. Surface water siltation caused by terrestrial export of sediments from these steep hillslopes is emerging as a new challenge for water quality management due to detrimental effects on water quality. Climatic predictions in upcoming decades for southern China include lower precipitation with large year-to-year variations. The results from a four-year intensive study at a forested watershed in Chongquing province showed that acidity and the concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in soil and surface waters were generally lower in the years with lower precipitation, suggesting year

  4. Significant differences in biogeochemical processes between a glaciated and a permafrost dominated catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindshaw, Ruth; Heaton, Tim; Boyd, Eric; Lang, Susan; Tipper, Ed

    2014-05-01

    It is increasingly recognised that microbially mediated processes have a significant impact on chemical fluxes from glaciated catchments. One important reaction is the oxidation of pyrite since the production of sulphuric acid facilitates the dissolution of minerals without the need for acidity generated by dissolved atmospheric CO2. Thus weathering processes can still continue even when isolated from the atmosphere, as is thought to occur under large ice masses. However, as a glacier melts, it is expected that the microbial community will change with knock-on effects on the stream water chemistry. Understanding the difference in solute generation processes between glaciated and un-glaciated terrain is key to understanding how glacial-interglacial cycles affect atmospheric CO2 consumption by chemical weathering. In order to investigate whether biogeochemical processes differ between glaciated and un-glaciated terrain we collected stream water samples from two small catchments (each approximately 3 km2) in Svalbard. One catchment is glaciated and the other catchment is un-glaciated but is affected by permafrost and a seasonal snow-pack. The two catchments are situated next to each other with identical bedrock (shale with minor siltstone and sandstone). The proximity of the catchments to each other ensures that meteorological variables such as temperature and precipitation are very similar. Sampling was conducted early in the melt-season when there was still significant snow-cover and in mid-summer when most of the seasonal snow-pack had melted. The water samples were analysed for δ34S-SO4, δ18O-SO4, δ18O-H2O, δ13C-DIC and δ13C-DOC, together with major anions and cations. Despite the nominally identical lithology, there were significant differences in the stream water chemistry between the two catchments. For example, sulphate was the dominant anion in the un-glaciated catchment whereas bicarbonate was the dominant anion in the glaciated catchment. Pyrite

  5. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north–central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42- reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3-–N less than 0.016 mg L-1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L-1 progressively enriched in δ15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy δ15N and δ18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  6. Characterization of eco-hydraulic habitats for examining biogeochemical processes in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, L. E.; O'Connor, B. L.; Harvey, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Spatial variability in biogeochemical reaction rates in streams is often attributed to sediment characteristics such as particle size, organic material content, and biota attached to or embedded within the sediments. Also important in controlling biogeochemical reaction rates are hydraulic conditions, which influence mass transfer of reactants from the stream to the bed, as well as hyporheic exchange within near-surface sediments. This combination of physical and ecological variables has the potential to create habitats that are unique not only in sediment texture but also in their biogeochemical processes and metabolism rates. In this study, we examine the two-dimensional (2D) variability of these habitats in an agricultural river in central Iowa. The streambed substratum was assessed using a grid-based survey identifying dominant particle size classes, as well as aerial coverage of green algae, benthic organic material, and coarse woody debris. Hydraulic conditions were quantified using a calibrated 2D model, and hyporheic exchange was assessed using a scaling relationship based on sediment and hydraulic characteristics. Point-metabolism rates were inferred from measured sediment dissolved oxygen profiles using an effective diffusion model and compared to traditional whole-stream measurements of metabolism. The 185 m study reach had contrasting geomorphologic and hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream portions of an otherwise relatively straight run of a meandering river. The upstream portion contained a large central gravel bar (50 m in length) flanked by riffle-run segments and the downstream portion contained a deeper, fairly uniform channel cross-section. While relatively high flow velocities and gravel sediments were characteristic of the study river, the upstream island bar separated channels that differed with sandy gravels on one side and cobbley gravels on the other. Additionally, green algae was almost exclusively found in riffle

  7. EFFECT OF NUTRIENT LOADING ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES IN A NEW ENGLAND HIGH SALT MARSH, SPARTINA PATNES, (AITON MUHL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marshes represent an important transitional zone between uplands and estuaries and can assimilate nutrient inputs from uplands. We examined the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization on biogeochemical and microbial processes during the summer growing sea...

  8. Biogeochemical processes on tree islands in the greater everglades: Initiating a new paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, P.R.; Sklar, Fred H.; Coronado, C.A.; Troxler, T.G.; Krupa, S.L.; Sullivan, P.L.; Ewe, S.; Price, R.M.; Newman, S.; Orem, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientists' understanding of the role of tree islands in the Everglades has evolved from a plant community of minor biogeochemical importance to a plant community recognized as the driving force for localized phosphorus accumulation within the landscape. Results from this review suggest that tree transpiration, nutrient infiltration from the soil surface, and groundwater flow create a soil zone of confluence where nutrients and salts accumulate under the head of a tree island during dry periods. Results also suggest accumulated salts and nutrients are flushed downstream by regional water flows during wet periods. That trees modulate their environment to create biogeochemical hot spots and strong nutrient gradients is a significant ecological paradigm shift in the understanding of the biogeochemical processes in the Everglades. In terms of island sustainability, this new paradigm suggests the need for distinct dry-wet cycles as well as a hydrologic regime that supports tree survival. Restoration of historic tree islands needs further investigation but the creation of functional tree islands is promising. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quideau, S. A.; Swallow, M. J. B.; Prescott, C. E.; Grayston, S. J.; Oh, S.-W.

    2013-08-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities) in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems, covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of Northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  10. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quideau, S. A.; Swallow, M. J. B.; Prescott, C. E.; Grayston, S. J.; Oh, S.-W.

    2013-04-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities) in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability, and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  11. Soil property control of biogeochemical processes beneath two subtropical stormwater infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Wanielista, Martin P; Chang, Ni-Bin; Harris, Willie G; Xuan, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Substantially different biogeochemical processes affecting nitrogen fate and transport were observed beneath two stormwater infiltration basins in north-central Florida. Differences are related to soil textural properties that deeply link hydroclimatic conditions with soil moisture variations in a humid, subtropical climate. During 2008, shallow groundwater beneath the basin with predominantly clayey soils (median, 41% silt+clay) exhibited decreases in dissolved oxygen from 3.8 to 0.1 mg L and decreases in nitrate nitrogen (NO-N) from 2.7 mg L to <0.016 mg L, followed by manganese and iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, beneath the basin with predominantly sandy soils (median, 2% silt+clay), aerobic conditions persisted from 2007 through 2009 (dissolved oxygen, 5.0-7.8 mg L), resulting in NO-N of 1.3 to 3.3 mg L in shallow groundwater. Enrichment of δN and δO of NO combined with water chemistry data indicates denitrification beneath the clayey basin and relatively conservative NO transport beneath the sandy basin. Soil-extractable NO-N was significantly lower and the copper-containing nitrite reductase gene density was significantly higher beneath the clayey basin. Differences in moisture retention capacity between fine- and coarse-textured soils resulted in median volumetric gas-phase contents of 0.04 beneath the clayey basin and 0.19 beneath the sandy basin, inhibiting surface/subsurface oxygen exchange beneath the clayey basin. Results can inform development of soil amendments to maintain elevated moisture content in shallow soils of stormwater infiltration basins, which can be incorporated in improved best management practices to mitigate NO impacts. PMID:22370419

  12. Soil property control of biogeochemical processes beneath two subtropical stormwater infiltration basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Harris, Willie G.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Substantially different biogeochemical processes affecting nitrogen fate and transport were observed beneath two stormwater infiltration basins in north-central Florida. Differences are related to soil textural properties that deeply link hydroclimatic conditions with soil moisture variations in a humid, subtropical climate. During 2008, shallow groundwater beneath the basin with predominantly clayey soils (median, 41% silt+clay) exhibited decreases in dissolved oxygen from 3.8 to 0.1 mg L-1 and decreases in nitrate nitrogen (NO3-–N) from 2.7 mg L-1 to -1, followed by manganese and iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, beneath the basin with predominantly sandy soils (median, 2% silt+clay), aerobic conditions persisted from 2007 through 2009 (dissolved oxygen, 5.0–7.8 mg L-1), resulting in NO3-–N of 1.3 to 3.3 mg L-1 in shallow groundwater. Enrichment of d15N and d18O of NO3- combined with water chemistry data indicates denitrification beneath the clayey basin and relatively conservative NO3- transport beneath the sandy basin. Soil-extractable NO3-–N was significantly lower and the copper-containing nitrite reductase gene density was significantly higher beneath the clayey basin. Differences in moisture retention capacity between fine- and coarse-textured soils resulted in median volumetric gas-phase contents of 0.04 beneath the clayey basin and 0.19 beneath the sandy basin, inhibiting surface/subsurface oxygen exchange beneath the clayey basin. Results can inform development of soil amendments to maintain elevated moisture content in shallow soils of stormwater infiltration basins, which can be incorporated in improved best management practices to mitigate NO3- impacts.

  13. Approaches for Investigating Hydraulic and Biogeochemical Gradients at Multiple Scales in Critical Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    Transport and transformations of chemical species in soils and other near-surface terrestrial environments of Earth's critical zone reflect complex interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes. Hydraulic and biogeochemical gradients driving transport and reactions occur over multiple scales in the subsurface. Thus, bulk measurements that average across hydraulic, chemical, and/or microbiological gradients limit identification of basic processes. Over the decades, a variety of tools and experimental methods have been developed with capabilities to resolve very steep environmental gradients. Although most of these methods are laboratory-based, they can provide insights into critical zone processes, especially when field-relevant conditions are reasonably replicated. In this presentation, examples of some novel experimental methods are reviewed, suitable for characterizing properties and processes at scales ranging from meters down to about 10 nm. The larger scale experimental approaches address dynamic processes in soil profiles. Intermediate scale experimental approaches are compatible with investigating biogeochemical dynamics within soil aggregates. Still finer scale techniques permit examination of heterogeneity within individual soil particles and micro-aggregates.

  14. Trees actively and directly influence biogeochemical processes in boreal forested watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Trees actively and directly influence biogeochemical processes in boreal forested watersheds Peter Högberg, Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden It is increasingly realized that trees are directly influencing soil processes, and thereby significantly also biogeochemical processes at the scale of watersheds. For example, it is now well established that recent photosynthesis supports on average around 50% of the soil respiratory activity. It takes only a few days from tree canopy photosynthesis to the use of that C by plant roots and soil microbes. Importantly, not only does this represent a significant and rapid return flux of CO2 back to the atmosphere, but it also relates to a range of important biogeochemical processes. These occur not only in the soil, but also in streams and lakes, e.g., in nutrient-poor boreal forests areas labile C compounds produced by tree roots and their associated microorganisms constitute an important C source for lake biota. Furthermore, the tree belowground C allocation is under strong physiological control and responds to the supply of nutrients, especially to the supply of nitrogen. When this is low, as in most boreal forests, the belowground C allocation to roots and mycorrhizal fungi is large. This explains the very large N retention capacity of these forests. However, after large additions of N, this belowground C flux is reduced and consequently also the N retention capacity of mycorrhizal fungi. When this occurs, bacteria, organisms with a much lower C/N ratio, become dominant; but as these are C-limited, their capacity to sequester N is much lower than that of fungi. As a consequence, the N cycle opens up, and N is lost through leaching of nitrate and denitrification. However, if the N-load is removed, the trees start to allocate more C belowground to their mycorrhizal fungi again, and this important N-trap is restored. Thus, there are many examples of how trees actively and directly (with short

  15. Technical note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, Tim; Bach, Lennart T.; Czerny, Jan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial and temporal decoupling between particle formation in the surface ocean and particle collection in sediment traps at depth often handicaps reconciliation of production and sedimentation even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms are restricted to the surface ocean, but have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to studying how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples for biogeochemical analysis. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently separated from bulk seawater by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride, and we discuss the advantages and efficiencies of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranged from fine to coarse silt (2-63 µm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements, and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight into various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate the processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  16. Coupled Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Governing Arsenic Mobility Within Sediments of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Polizzotto, M. L.; Ying, S. C.; Benner, S. G.; Sampson, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    Weathering of As-bearing rocks in the Himalayas has resulted in the transport of sediments down major river systems such as the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Red, Irrawaddy, and Mekong. Groundwater in these river basins commonly has As concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended drinking water limit (10 μg L-1) by more than an order of magnitude. Coupling of hydrology and biogeochemical processes underlies the elevated concentrations of As in these aquifers, necessitating studies that allow their deconvolution. Furthermore, to fully elucidate the biogeochemical mechanisms of sedimentary As release, the thermodynamic favorability of controlling biogeochemical reactions must be considered. We therefore used a combination of spectroscopic and wet chemical measurements to resolve the dominant processes controlling As release and transport in surficial soils/sediments within an As-afflicted field area of the Mekong delta. Based on these measurements, we assess the thermodynamic potential for As, Fe, and S reduction to transpire--major processes influencing As release and mobility. Our results illustrate that clay (0-12m deep) underlying oxbow and wetland environments are subjected to continuously reducing conditions due to ample carbon input and saturated conditions. Ensuing reductive mobilization of As from As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxides results in its migration to the underlying sandy aquifer (>12 m deep). Reactive transport modeling using PHREEQC and MIN3P, constrained with chemical and hydrologic field measurements, provides a calibrated illustration of As release and transport occurring within the clays underlying organic-rich, permanently inundated locations. These areas provide sufficient As to the aqueous phase for widespread contamination of the aquifer, and release is predicted to occur for several thousand years prior to depletion of As from the solid phase.

  17. Technical Note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, T.; Bach, L. T.; Czerny, J.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-11-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial decoupling between particle formation and collection often handicaps reconciliation of these two processes even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to study how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently concentrated by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride and we discuss the advantages of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranges from fine to coarse silt (2-63 μm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight on various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  18. Can spectroscopic analysis improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes in agricultural streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Ann Louise

    2015-04-01

    In agricultural catchments diffuse fluxes of nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from arable land and livestock are responsible for pollution of receiving waters and their eutrophication. Organic matter (OM) can play an important role in mediating a range of biogeochemical processes controlling diffuse pollution in streams and at their interface with surrounding land in the riparian and hyporheic zones. Thus, a holistic and simultaneous monitoring of N, P and OM fractions can help to improve our understanding of biogeochemical functioning of agricultural streams. In this study we build on intensive in situ monitoring of diffuse pollution in a small agricultural groundwater-fed stream in NW England carried out since 2009. The in situ monitoring unit captures high-frequency (15 minutes to hourly) responses of water quality parameters including total phosphorus, total reactive phosphorus and nitrate-nitrogen to changing flow conditions. For two consecutive hydrological years we have carried out additional spectroscopic water analyses to characterise organic matter components and their interactions with nutrient fractions. Automated and grab water samples have been analysed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance and excitation-emission (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, a tryptophan sensor was trialled to capture in situ fluorescence dynamics. Our paper evaluates patterns in nutrient and OM responses to baseflow and storm flow conditions and provides an assessment of storage-related changes of automated samples and temperature and turbidity effects on in situ tryptophan measurements. The paper shows the value of spectroscopic measurements to understand biogeochemical and hydrological nutrient dynamics and quantifies analytical uncertainty associated with both laboratory-based and in situ spectroscopic measurements.

  19. Biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation and release of acid metalliferous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-ting; Li, Jin-tian; Chen, Lin-xing; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Huang, Li-nan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Bi-bo; Liao, Bin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2014-05-20

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals (principally pyrite) is responsible for the majority of acid metalliferous drainage from mine sites, which represents a significant environmental problem worldwide. Understanding the complex biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation is critical not only for solving this problem but also for understanding the industrial bioleaching of sulfide minerals. To this end, we conducted a simulated experiment of natural pyrite oxidative dissolution. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community revealed a distinct succession across three stages. At the early stage, a newly proposed genus, Tumebacillus (which can use sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as the sole electron donors), dominated the microbial community. At the midstage, Alicyclobacillus (the fifth most abundant genus at the early stage) became the most dominant genus, whereas Tumebacillus was still ranked as the second most abundant. At the final stage, the microbial community was dominated by Ferroplasma (the tenth most abundant genus at the early stage). Our geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicated that exchangeable heavy metals increased as the oxidation progressed and that some secondary sulfate minerals (including jarosite and magnesiocopiapite) were formed at the final stage of the oxidation sequence. Additionally, we propose a comprehensive model of biogeochemical processes governing the oxidation of sulfide minerals. PMID:24730689

  20. Characterizing biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone using flume experiments and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Reeder, W. J.; Farrell, T. B.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    The hyporheic zones of streams are hotspots of biogeochemical cycling, where reactants from surface water and groundwater are continually brought into contact with microbial populations on the surfaces of stream sediments and reaction products are removed by hyporheic flow and degassing. Using large flume experiments we have documented the complex redox dynamics associated with dune-scale hyporheic flow. Observations, coupled with reactive transport modeling, provide insight into how flow dictates spatio-temporal distribution of redox reactions and the associated consumption and production of reactants and products. Dune hyporheic flow was experimentally produced by maintaining control over flow rates, slopes, sediment grain size, bedform geomorphology, and organic carbon content. An extensive in-situ monitoring array combined with sampling events over time elucidated redox-sensitive processes including constraints on the spatial distribution and magnitude of aerobic respiration, organic carbon consumption, sulfide deposition, and denitrification. Reactive transport modeling reveals further insight into the influence of system geometry and reaction rate. As an example application of the model, the relationship between residence times and reaction rates may be used to generate Damköhler numbers that are related to biogeochemical processes, such as the potential of streambed morphology and nitrate loading to influence production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide via incomplete denitrification.

  1. Tracing biogeochemical and microbial variability over a complete oil sand mining and recultivation process.

    PubMed

    Noah, Mareike; Lappé, Michael; Schneider, Beate; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilkes, Heinz; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2014-11-15

    Recultivation of disturbed oil sand mining areas is an issue of increasing importance. Nevertheless only little is known about the fate of organic matter, cell abundances and microbial community structures during oil sand processing, tailings management and initial soil development on reclamation sites. Thus the focus of this work is on biogeochemical changes of mined oil sands through the entire process chain until its use as substratum for newly developing soils on reclamation sites. Therefore, oil sand, mature fine tailings (MFTs) from tailings ponds and drying cells and tailings sand covered with peat-mineral mix (PMM) as part of land reclamation were analyzed. The sample set was selected to address the question whether changes in the above-mentioned biogeochemical parameters can be related to oil sand processing or biological processes and how these changes influence microbial activities and soil development. GC-MS analyses of oil-derived biomarkers reveal that these compounds remain unaffected by oil sand processing and biological activity. In contrast, changes in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and pattern can be observed along the process chain. Especially naphthalenes, phenanthrenes and chrysenes are altered or absent on reclamation sites. Furthermore, root-bearing horizons on reclamation sites exhibit cell abundances at least ten times higher (10(8) to 10(9) cells g(-1)) than in oil sand and MFT samples (10(7) cells g(-1)) and show a higher diversity in their microbial community structure. Nitrate in the pore water and roots derived from the PMM seem to be the most important stimulants for microbial growth. The combined data show that the observed compositional changes are mostly related to biological activity and the addition of exogenous organic components (PMM), whereas oil extraction, tailings dewatering and compaction do not have significant influences on the evaluated compounds. Microbial community composition remains relatively

  2. Advances in Coupling of Kinetics and Molecular Scale Tools to Shed Light on Soil Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-02

    Biogeochemical processes in soils such as sorption, precipitation, and redox play critical roles in the cycling and fate of nutrients, metal(loid)s and organic chemicals in soil and water environments. Advanced analytical tools enable soil scientists to track these processes in real-time and at the molecular scale. Our review focuses on recent research that has employed state-of-the-art molecular scale spectroscopy, coupled with kinetics, to elucidate the mechanisms of nutrient and metal(loid) reactivity and speciation in soils. We found that by coupling kinetics with advanced molecular and nano-scale tools major advances have been made in elucidating important soil chemical processes including sorption, precipitation, dissolution, and redox of metal(loids) and nutrients. Such advances will aid in better predicting the fate and mobility of nutrients and contaminants in soils and water and enhance environmental and agricultural sustainability.

  3. Molecular organic tracers of biogeochemical processes in a saline meromictic lake (Ace Lake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, S.; Rijpstra, W. I. C.; Kok, M.; Hopmans, E. C.; Summons, R. E.; Volkman, J. K.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-05-01

    The chemical structures, distribution and stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in a sediment core taken in meromictic Ace Lake (Antarctica) were analyzed to trace past biogeochemical cycling. Biomarkers from methanogenic archaea, methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria were unambiguously assigned using organic geochemical understanding and by reference to what is known about the lake's present-day ecosystem. For instance, saturated and unsaturated 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane, archaeol and sn2-hydroxyarchaeol were derived from methanogenic archaea. Carotenoid analysis revealed chlorobactene and isorenieratene derived from the green-colored and brown-colored strains of the green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae); isotopic analyses showed that they were 13C-enriched. Phytenes appear to be derived from photoautotrophs that use the Calvin-Benson cycle, while phytane has a different source, possibly within the archaea. The most 13C-depleted compounds (ca. -55‰) identified were 4-methyl-5α-cholest-8(14)-en-3β-ol, identified using an authentic standard, and co-occurring 4-methylsteradienes: these originate from the aerobic methanotrophic bacterium Methylosphaera hansonii. Lipids of photoautotrophic origin, steranes and alkenones, are relatively depleted (ca. -28 to -36‰) whilst archaeal biomarkers are relatively enriched in 13C (ca. -17 to -25‰). The structural and carbon isotope details of sedimentary lipids thus revealed aspects of in situ biogeochemical processes such as methane generation and oxidation and phototrophic sulfide oxidation.

  4. Biogeochemical Processes Contributing to Nickel Dynamics Within a Mine Tailings Impacted Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, L.; Warren, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Nickel mining in the Sudbury area in Ontario, Canada has been pursued since the late 1920's by Falconbridge and INCO. Large tailings deposits have therefore been generated and require remediation. At the Onaping mine site, Moose Lake is used as the treatment pond for tailings. The drainage released has had a profound effect on Moose Lake's geochemistry, rendering it highly acidic (pH below 3.5), metal impacted, and chemically stratified. These conditions removed higher trophic levels, thus making microbial processes dominant. Since Moose Lake discharges into the Onaping River system, waters from its upper basin need to be treated. Presently, chemical treatment is performed, however this procedure is not useful for long-term remediation. Rather, an effective remediation strategy for Moose Lake requires an understanding of metal transport through, and cycling within, its water column and particularly of the role that microbial processes play in influencing metal fate. Since the prevailing geochemical conditions and processes occurring within this lake are not well characterized, our aims are to: determine metal concentrations through the water column; identify potential solid phases retaining metals; and to identify biogeochemical processes controlling the dynamics of their partitioning. Initial samples were collected from June - Sept. 2001 for water column metals (particulate (above 0.45 um), colloidal (0.2-0.45 um) and dissolved (lower than 0.2um), iron (Fe3+ and Fe2+) sulfate and sulfide, microbial community structure and physico-chemical parameters (pH, temperature, O2, redox, conductivity). Results indicate that the water column is chemically stratified at a depth of 3.5 m (25 m max. depth). Water column pH is less than 3.5 and shows low to anoxic conditions below the chemocline. Metal analyses indicate high dissolved nickel concentrations (700 uM). A depth related decrease of Ni levels was observed near the sediment-water interface, probably due to solid

  5. Positive affect and psychobiological processes

    PubMed Central

    Dockray, Samantha; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Positive affect has been associated with favourable health outcomes, and it is likely that several biological processes mediate the effects of positive mood on physical health. There is converging evidence that positive affect activates the neuroendocrine, autonomic and immune systems in distinct and functionally meaningful ways. Cortisol, both total output and the awakening response, has consistently been shown to be lower among individuals with higher levels of positive affect. The beneficial effects of positive mood on cardiovascular function, including heart rate and blood pressure, and the immune system have also been described. The influence of positive affect on these psychobiological processes are independent of negative affect, suggesting that positive affect may have characteristic biological correlates. The duration and conceptualisation of positive affect may be important considerations in understanding how different biological systems are activated in association with positive affect. The association of positive affect and psychobiological processes has been established, and these biological correlates may be partly responsible for the protective effects of positive affect on health outcomes. PMID:20097225

  6. Multi-scale Characterization and Prediction of Coupled Subsurface Biogeochemical-Hydrological Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Banfield, Jill; Long, Phil; Slater, Lee; Pride, Steve; Jinsong Chen

    2006-06-01

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations.

  7. Compound-specific isotopic analyses: a novel tool for reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Freeman, K. H.; Popp, B. N.; Hoham, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Patterns of isotopic fractionation in biogeochemical processes are reviewed and it is suggested that isotopic fractionations will be small when substrates are large. If so, isotopic compositions of biomarkers will reflect those of their biosynthetic precursors. This prediction is tested by consideration of results of analyses of geoporphyrins and geolipids from the Greenhorn Formation (Cretaceous, Western Interior Seaway of North America) and the Messel Shale (Eocene, lacustrine, southern Germany). It is shown (i) that isotopic compositions of porphyrins that are related to a common source, but which have been altered structurally, cluster tightly and (ii) that isotopic differences between geolipids and porphyrins related to a common source are equal to those observed in modern biosynthetic products. Both of these observations are consistent with preservation of biologically controlled isotopic compositions during diagenesis. Isotopic compositions of individual compounds can thus be interpreted in terms of biogeochemical processes in ancient depositional environments. In the Cretaceous samples, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes are covariant with those of total organic carbon, while delta values for pristane and phytane are covariant with those of porphyrins. In this unit representing an open marine environment, the preserved acyclic polyisoprenoids apparently derive mainly from primary material, while the extractable, n-alkanes derive mainly from lower levels of the food chain. In the Messel Shale, isotopic compositions of individual biomarkers range from -20.9 to -73.4% vs PDB. Isotopic compositions of specific compounds can be interpreted in terms of origin from methylotrophic, chemautotrophic, and chemolithotrophic microorganisms as well as from primary producers that lived in the water column and sediments of this ancient lake.

  8. Compound-specific isotopic analyses: a novel tool for reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J M; Freeman, K H; Popp, B N; Hoham, C H

    1990-01-01

    Patterns of isotopic fractionation in biogeochemical processes are reviewed and it is suggested that isotopic fractionations will be small when substrates are large. If so, isotopic compositions of biomarkers will reflect those of their biosynthetic precursors. This prediction is tested by consideration of results of analyses of geoporphyrins and geolipids from the Greenhorn Formation (Cretaceous, Western Interior Seaway of North America) and the Messel Shale (Eocene, lacustrine, southern Germany). It is shown (i) that isotopic compositions of porphyrins that are related to a common source, but which have been altered structurally, cluster tightly and (ii) that isotopic differences between geolipids and porphyrins related to a common source are equal to those observed in modern biosynthetic products. Both of these observations are consistent with preservation of biologically controlled isotopic compositions during diagenesis. Isotopic compositions of individual compounds can thus be interpreted in terms of biogeochemical processes in ancient depositional environments. In the Cretaceous samples, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes are covariant with those of total organic carbon, while delta values for pristane and phytane are covariant with those of porphyrins. In this unit representing an open marine environment, the preserved acyclic polyisoprenoids apparently derive mainly from primary material, while the extractable, n-alkanes derive mainly from lower levels of the food chain. In the Messel Shale, isotopic compositions of individual biomarkers range from -20.9 to -73.4% vs PDB. Isotopic compositions of specific compounds can be interpreted in terms of origin from methylotrophic, chemautotrophic, and chemolithotrophic microorganisms as well as from primary producers that lived in the water column and sediments of this ancient lake. PMID:11540919

  9. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  10. Evaluation of Boundless Biogeochemical Cycle through Development of Process-Based Eco-Hydrological and Biogeochemical Cycle Model to Incorporate Terrestrial-Aquatic Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water might act as important transport pathway for continental biogeochemical cycle although its contribution has remained uncertain yet due to a paucity of data (Battin et al. 2009). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-regional-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic-geomorphic-ecological processes. Because NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and expands from previous 1- or 2-D or steady state, the model can simulate the lateral transport pronounced at steeper-slope or riparian/floodplain with surface-groundwater connectivity. River discharge and groundwater level simulated by NICE agreed reasonably with those in previous researches (Niu et al., 2007; Fan et al., 2013) and extended to clarify lateral subsurface also has important role on global hydrologic cycle (Nakayama, 2011b; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013b) though the resolution was coarser. NICE was further developed to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The missing role of carbon cycle simulated by NICE, for example, CO2 evasion from inland water (global total flux was estimated as about 1.0 PgC/yr), was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical relation using previous pCO2 data (Aufdenkampe et al., 2011; Laruelle et al., 2013). The model would play important role in identification of greenhouse gas balance of the biosphere and spatio-temporal hot spots, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al. 2007; Frei et al. 2012).

  11. Reactive transport modelling of biogeochemical processes and carbon isotope geochemistry inside a landfill leachate plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, Boris M.; Griffioen, Jasper; Röling, Wilfred F. M.; van Verseveld, Henk W.

    2004-06-01

    The biogeochemical processes governing leachate attenuation inside a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, the Netherlands) were revealed and quantified using the 1D reactive transport model PHREEQC-2. Biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was simulated assuming first-order oxidation of two DOC fractions with different reactivity, and was coupled to reductive dissolution of iron oxide. The following secondary geochemical processes were required in the model to match observations: kinetic precipitation of calcite and siderite, cation exchange, proton buffering and degassing. Rate constants for DOC oxidation and carbonate mineral precipitation were determined, and other model parameters were optimized using the nonlinear optimization program PEST by means of matching hydrochemical observations closely (pH, DIC, DOC, Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH 4, Fe(II), SO 4, Cl, CH 4, saturation index of calcite and siderite). The modelling demonstrated the relevance and impact of various secondary geochemical processes on leachate plume evolution. Concomitant precipitation of siderite masked the act of iron reduction. Cation exchange resulted in release of Fe(II) from the pristine anaerobic aquifer to the leachate. Degassing, triggered by elevated CO 2 pressures caused by carbonate precipitation and proton buffering at the front of the plume, explained the observed downstream decrease in methane concentration. Simulation of the carbon isotope geochemistry independently supported the proposed reaction network.

  12. Reactive transport modelling of biogeochemical processes and carbon isotope geochemistry inside a landfill leachate plume.

    PubMed

    van Breukelen, Boris M; Griffioen, Jasper; Röling, Wilfred F M; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2004-06-01

    The biogeochemical processes governing leachate attenuation inside a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, the Netherlands) were revealed and quantified using the 1D reactive transport model PHREEQC-2. Biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was simulated assuming first-order oxidation of two DOC fractions with different reactivity, and was coupled to reductive dissolution of iron oxide. The following secondary geochemical processes were required in the model to match observations: kinetic precipitation of calcite and siderite, cation exchange, proton buffering and degassing. Rate constants for DOC oxidation and carbonate mineral precipitation were determined, and other model parameters were optimized using the nonlinear optimization program PEST by means of matching hydrochemical observations closely (pH, DIC, DOC, Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4, Fe(II), SO4, Cl, CH4, saturation index of calcite and siderite). The modelling demonstrated the relevance and impact of various secondary geochemical processes on leachate plume evolution. Concomitant precipitation of siderite masked the act of iron reduction. Cation exchange resulted in release of Fe(II) from the pristine anaerobic aquifer to the leachate. Degassing, triggered by elevated CO2 pressures caused by carbonate precipitation and proton buffering at the front of the plume, explained the observed downstream decrease in methane concentration. Simulation of the carbon isotope geochemistry independently supported the proposed reaction network. PMID:15134877

  13. Perirheic mixing and biogeochemical processing in flow-through and backwater floodplain wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. Nathan; Scott, Durelle T.; Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2014-09-01

    Inundation hydrology and associated processes control biogeochemical processing in floodplains. To better understand how hydrologic connectivity, residence time, and intrafloodplain mixing vary in floodplain wetlands, we examined how water quality of two contrasting areas in the floodplain of the Atchafalaya River—a flow-through and a backwater wetland—responded to an annual flood pulse. Large, synoptic sampling campaigns occurred in both wetlands during the rising limb, peak, and falling limb of the hydrograph. Using a combination of conservative and reactive tracers, we inferred three dominant processes that occurred over the course of the flood pulse: flushing (rising limb), advective transport (peak), and organic matter accumulation (falling limb). Biogeochemistry of the two wetlands was similar during the peak while the river overflowed into both. However, during the rising and falling limbs, flow in the backwater wetland experienced much greater residence time. This led to the accumulation of dissolved organic matter and dissolved phosphorus. There were also elevated ratios of dissolved organic carbon to nitrate in the backwater wetland, suggesting nitrogen removal was limited by nitrate transported into the floodplain there. Collectively, our results suggest inclusion of a temporal component into the perirheic concept more fully describes inundation hydrology and biogeochemistry in large river floodplain. This article was corrected on 6 OCT 2014. See the end of the full text for details

  14. Variability of atmospheric greenhouse gases as a biogeochemical processing signal at regional scale in a karstic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borràs, Sílvia; Vazquez, Eusebi; Morguí, Josep-Anton; Àgueda, Alba; Batet, Oscar; Cañas, Lídia; Curcoll, Roger; Grossi, Claudia; Nofuentes, Manel; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The South-eastern area of the Iberian Peninsula is an area where climatic conditions reach extreme climatic conditions during the year, and is also heavily affected by the ENSO and NAO. The Natural Park of Cazorla, Segura de la Sierra and Las Villas is located in this region, and it is the largest protected natural area in Spain (209920 Ha). This area is characterized by important climatic and hydrologic contrasts: although the mean annual precipitation is 770 nm, the karstic soils are the main cause for water scarcity during the summer months, while on the other hand it is in this area where the two main rivers of Southern Spain, the Segura and the Guadalquivir, are born. The protected area comprises many forested landscapes, karstic areas and reservoirs like Tranco de Beas. The temperatures during summer are high, with over 40°C heatwaves occurring each year. But during the winter months, the land surface can be covered by snow for periods of time up until 30 days. The ENSO and NAO influences cause also an important inter annual climatic variability in this area. Under the ENSO, autumnal periods are more humid while the following spring is drier. In this area vegetal Mediterranean communities are dominant. But there are also a high number of endemic species and derelict species typical of temperate climate. Therefore it is a protected area with high specific diversity. Additionally, there is an important agricultural activity in the fringe areas of the Natural Park, mainly for olive production, while inside the Park this activity is focused on mountain wheat production. Therefore the diverse vegetal communities and landscapes can easily be under extreme climatic pressures, affecting in turn the biogeochemical processes at the regional scale. The constant, high-frequency monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHG) (CO2 and CH4) integrates the biogeochemical signal of changes in this area related to the carbon cycle at the regional scale, capturing the high diversity of

  15. The effect of gold mining and processing on biogeochemical cycles in Muteh area, Isfahan province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, B.; Moore, F.

    2009-04-01

    The environmental impacts of gold mining and processing on geochemical and biogeochemical cycles in Muteh region located northwest of Esfahan province and northeast of Golpaygan city is investigated. For this purpose systematic sampling was carried out in, rock, soil, water, and sediment environments along with plant, livestocks and human hair samples. Mineralogical and Petrological studies show that ore mineral such as pyrite and arsenopyrite along with fluorine-bearing minerals like tremolite, actinolite, biotite and muscovite occur in green schist, amphibolite and lucogranitic rocks in the area. The hydrochemistry of the analysed water samples indicate that As and F display the highest concentrations among the analysed elements. Indeed arsenic has the highest concentration in both topsoil and subsoil samples when compared with other potentially toxic elements. Anthropogenic activity also have it s greatest effect on increasing arsenic concentration among the analysed samples. The concentration of the majority of the analysed elements in the shoots and leaves of two local plants of the region i.e Artemesia and Penagum is higher than their concentration in the roots. Generally speaking, Artemesia has a greater tendency for bioaccumulating heavy metals. The results of cyanide analysis in soil samples show that cyanide concentration in the soils near the newly built tailing dam is much higher than that in the vicinity of the old tailing dam. The high concentration of fluorine in the drinking water of the Muteh village is the main reason of the observed dental fluorosis symptoms seen in the inhabitants. One of the two drinking water wells which is located near the metamorphic complex and supplies part of the tap water in the village, probably has the greatest impact in this regard. A decreasing trend in fluorine concentration is illustrated with increasing distance from the metamorphic complex. Measurements of As concentration in human hair specimens indicate that As

  16. A flexible numerical component to simulate surface runoff transport and biogeochemical processes through dense vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Carpena, R.; Perez-Ovilla, O.

    2012-12-01

    Methods to estimate surface runoff pollutant removal using dense vegetation buffers (i.e. vegetative filter strips) usually consider a limited number of factors (i.e. filter length, slope) and are in general based on empirical relationships. When an empirical approach is used, the application of the model is limited to those conditions of the data used for the regression equations. The objective of this work is to provide a flexible numerical mechanistic tool to simulate dynamics of a wide range of surface runoff pollutants through dense vegetation and their physical, chemical and biological interactions based on equations defined by the user as part of the model inputs. A flexible water quality model based on the Reaction Simulation Engine (RSE) modeling component is coupled to a transport module based on the traditional Bubnov -Galerkin finite element method to solve the advection-dispersion-reaction equation using the alternating split-operator technique. This coupled transport-reaction model is linked to the VFSMOD-W (http://abe.ufl.edu/carpena/vfsmod) program to mechanistically simulate mobile and stabile pollutants through dense vegetation based on user-defined conceptual models (differential equations written in XML language as input files). The key factors to consider in the creation of a conceptual model are the components in the buffer (i.e. vegetation, soil, sediments) and how the pollutant interacts with them. The biogeochemical reaction component was tested successfully with laboratory and field scale experiments. One of the major advantages when using this tool is that the pollutant transport and removal thought dense vegetation is related to physical and biogeochemical process occurring within the filter. This mechanistic approach increases the range of use of the model to a wide range of pollutants and conditions without modification of the core model. The strength of the model relies on the mechanistic approach used for simulating the removal of

  17. Bio-mineralization and potential biogeochemical processes in bauxite deposits: genetic and ore quality significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskou, Magdalini; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The Parnassos-Ghiona bauxite deposit in Greece of karst type is the 11th largest bauxite producer in the world. The mineralogical, major and trace-element contents and δ18O, δ12C, δ34S isotopic compositions of bauxite ores from this deposit and associated limestone provide valuable evidence for their origin and biogeochemical processes resulting in the beneficiation of low grade bauxite ores. The organic matter as thin coal layers, overlying the bauxite deposits, within limestone itself (negative δ12C isotopic values) and the negative δ34S values in sulfides within bauxite ores point to the existence of the appropriate circumstances for Fe bio-leaching and bio-mineralization. Furthermore, a consortium of microorganisms of varying morphological forms (filament-like and spherical to lenticular at an average size of 2 μm), either as fossils or presently living and producing enzymes, is a powerful factor to catalyze the redox reactions, expedite the rates of metal extraction and provide alternative pathways for metal leaching processes resulting in the beneficiation of bauxite ore.

  18. Biogeochemical processes in the ocean and at the ocean-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliot, A.

    2006-12-01

    The ocean can be considered as a chemical reactor, whose energy sources are the various matter inputs originating from the continent and the ocean. Among various elements, carbon plays a key role as it is involved in both inorganic form as CO{2} and organic forms such as compounds synthesized through photosynthesis. Thus, the ocean is presently an active actor in climate change and ocean-atmosphere exchange processes. This review will present some insights into: 1) schematic representations of the carbon cycle, with emphasis on CO{2} exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere and to the organic parts of this cycle, 2) concepts relative to the biological pump of CO{2}, with a detailed view on photosynthesis, 3) concepts leading to the existence of oceanic provinces and associated productivity for open sea and coastal areas, 4) addressing the question: what is the net efficiency of the biological pump of CO{2 }in terms of exportation of organic carbon and sequestration in sediments and 5) specific aspects on biogeochemical processes occurring at the boundary between the ocean and the atmosphere.

  19. Biogeochemical processes and nutrient cycling within an artificial reef off Southern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Falcão, M; Santos, M N; Vicente, M; Monteiro, C C

    2007-06-01

    This study (2002/2004) examines the effect of artificial reef (AR) structures off the southern coast of Portugal on biogeochemical process and nutrient cycling. Organic and inorganic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorophyll a were determined monthly in sediment cores and settled particles for a two-year period. Ammonium, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, total organic nitrogen and phosphorus, chlorophyll a and phaeopigments were also determined monthly in water samples within AR and control sites. Results of the two-year study showed that: (i) there was a significant exponential fit between organic carbon and chlorophyll a (r2=0.91; p<0.01) in reef sediment suggesting an increase of benthic productivity; (ii) organic carbon and nitrogen content in settled particles within AR environment was about four times higher two years after reef deployment; (iii) nutrients and chlorophyll a in the water column were higher at AR than control site. Two years after AR deployment, dissolved organic and inorganic compounds in near bottom water were 30-60% higher, emphasizing benthic remineralization processes at AR's organically rich sediment. Marked chemical changes in the ecosystem were observed during the two-year study period, reinforcing the importance of these structures for sandy coastal areas rehabilitation through trophic chain pull-out. PMID:17239434

  20. The influence of biogeochemical processes on the pH dynamics in the seasonally hypoxic saline Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, Mathilde; Slomp, Caroline; Meysman, Filip; Borges, Alberto; Middelburg, Jack

    2013-04-01

    Coastal areas experience more pronounced short-term fluctuations in pH than the open ocean due to higher rates of biogeochemical processes such as primary production, respiration and nitrification. These processes and changes therein can mask or amplify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. Coastal acidification can be enhanced when eutrophication-induced hypoxia develops. This is because the carbon dioxide produced during respiration leads to a decrease in the buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water. Saline Lake Grevelingen (SW Netherlands) has limited water exchange with the North Sea and experiences seasonal bottom water hypoxia, which differs in severity interannually. Hence this lake provides an ideal site to study how coastal acidification is affected by seasonal hypoxia. We examined the annual cycle of the carbonate system in Lake Grevelingen in 2012 and how biogeochemical processes in the water column impact it. Monthly measurements of all carbonate system parameters (DIC, pH, fCO2 and TA), suspended matter, oxygen and nutrients were accompanied by measurements of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations. Primary production was also estimated every season using 14C-incubations and monthly via 13C-labeling of phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA). Finally, incubations to estimate nitrification and NH4 uptake using 15N-enriched ammonium were carried out seasonally. Preliminary results show that the hypoxic period was rather short in 2012. During stratification and hypoxia, pH varied by up to 0.75 units between the oxic surface water and the hypoxic bottom water. Consistency calculations of the carbonate system reveal that pH is best computed using DIC and TA and that there is no significant difference between TA measured on filtered (0.45 μm) and unfiltered samples. Primary production rates were highest in summer and range up to 800 mmol C/m2/d. Nitrification rates varied between 73

  1. Factors Affecting the Tutoring Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Hope J.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes factors internal to the tutor and tutee (i.e., cognition, metacognition, and affect) and external to them (e.g., teacher/tutor background knowledge, educational environment, content to be learned, socioeconomic status, family background, and cultural forces) that influence the tutoring process. Suggests a theoretical framework for…

  2. Determination of dominant biogeochemical processes in a contaminated aquifer-wetland system using multivariate statistical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baez-Cazull, S. E.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the processes governing aqueous biogeochemistry in a wetland hydrologically linked to an underlying contaminated aquifer is challenging due to the complex exchange between the systems and their distinct responses to changes in precipitation, recharge, and biological activities. To evaluate temporal and spatial processes in the wetland-aquifer system, water samples were collected using cm-scale multichambered passive diffusion samplers (peepers) to span the wetland-aquifer interface over a period of 3 yr. Samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, methane, and a suite of organic acids resulting in a large dataset of over 8000 points, which was evaluated using multivariate statistics. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen with the purpose of exploring the sources of variation in the dataset to expose related variables and provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that control the water chemistry of the system. Factor scores computed from PCA were mapped by date and depth. Patterns observed suggest that (i) fermentation is the process controlling the greatest variability in the dataset and it peaks in May; (ii) iron and sulfate reduction were the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes in the system and were associated with fermentation but had more complex seasonal variability than fermentation; (iii) methanogenesis was also important and associated with bacterial utilization of minerals as a source of electron acceptors (e.g., barite BaSO4); and (iv) seasonal hydrological patterns (wet and dry periods) control the availability of electron acceptors through the reoxidation of reduced iron-sulfur species enhancing iron and sulfate reduction. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  3. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  4. Seasonal Variation in Floodplain Biogeochemical Processing in a Restored Headwater Stream.

    PubMed

    Jones, C Nathan; Scott, Durelle T; Guth, Christopher; Hester, Erich T; Hession, W Cully

    2015-11-17

    Stream and river restoration activities have recently begun to emphasize the enhancement of biogeochemical processing within river networks through the restoration of river-floodplain connectivity. It is generally accepted that this practice removes pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus because the increased contact time of nutrient-rich floodwaters with reactive floodplain sediments. Our study examines this assumption in the floodplain of a recently restored, low-order stream through five seasonal experiments. During each experiment, a floodplain slough was artificially inundated for 3 h. Both the net flux of dissolved nutrients and nitrogen uptake rate were measured during each experiment. The slough was typically a source of dissolved phosphorus and dissolved organic matter, a sink of NO3(-), and variable source/sink of ammonium. NO3(-) uptake rates were relatively high when compared to riverine uptake, especially during the spring and summer experiments. However, when scaled up to the entire 1 km restoration reach with a simple inundation model, less than 0.5-1.5% of the annual NO3(-) load would be removed because of the short duration of river-floodplain connectivity. These results suggest that restoring river-floodplain connectivity is not necessarily an appropriate best management practice for nutrient removal in low-order streams with legacy soil nutrients from past agricultural landuse. PMID:26463837

  5. Biogeochemical processes and the diversity of Nhecolândia lakes, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Teodoro I R; Calijuri, Maria do Carmo; Falco, Patrícia B; Casali, Simone P; Kupriyanova, Elena; Paranhos Filho, Antonio C; Sigolo, Joel B; Bertolo, Reginaldo A

    2011-06-01

    The Pantanal of Nhecolândia, the world's largest and most diversified field of tropical lakes, comprises approximately 10,000 lakes, which cover an area of 24,000 km(2) and vary greatly in salinity, pH, alkalinity, colour, physiography and biological activity. The hyposaline lakes have variable pHs, low alkalinity, macrophytes and low phytoplankton densities. The saline lakes have pHs above 9 or 10, high alkalinity, a high density of phytoplankton and sand beaches. The cause of the diversity of these lakes has been an open question, which we have addressed in our research. Here we propose a hybrid process, both geochemical and biological, as the main cause, including (1) a climate with an important water deficit and poverty in Ca(2+) in both superficial and phreatic waters; and (2) an elevation of pH during cyanobacteria blooms. These two aspects destabilise the general tendency of Earth's surface waters towards a neutral pH. This imbalance results in an increase in the pH and dissolution of previously precipitated amorphous silica and quartzose sand. During extreme droughts, amorphous silica precipitates in the inter-granular spaces of the lake bottom sediment, increasing the isolation of the lake from the phreatic level. This paper discusses this biogeochemical problem in the light of physicochemical, chemical, altimetric and phytoplankton data. PMID:21670869

  6. Linking Food Webs and Biogeochemical Processes in Wetlands: Insights From Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stricker, C. A.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Rye, R. O.

    2005-05-01

    To better understand the transfer of nutrients into prairie wetland food webs we have investigated the cycling of S (via S isotope systematics and geochemistry) in a prairie wetland landscape by characterizing sources (ground water, interstitial water, surface water) and processes in a small catchment comprised of four wetlands in eastern South Dakota. We focused on S to derive process information that is not generally available from carbon isotopes alone. The wetlands chosen for study spanned a considerable range in SO4 concentration (0.1-13.6 mM), which corresponded with landscape position. Ground water δ34SSO4 values remained relatively constant (mean = -13.2 per mil) through time. However, δ34SSO4 values of wetland surface waters ranged from -2.9 to -30.0 per mil (CDT) and were negatively correlated with SO4 concentrations (p<0.05). The isotopic variability of surface water SO4 resulted from mixing with re-oxidized sulfides associated with recently flushed wetland soils. The δ34S signatures of wetland primary (Gastropoda: Stagnicola elodes) and secondary (Odonata: Anax sp.) consumers were significantly related to surface water δ34SSO4 values (p<0.05) suggesting that food web components were responding to changes in the isotopic composition of the S source. Both primary and secondary consumer δ34S signatures differed between wetlands (ANOVA, p<0.05). These data illustrate the complexity of S cycling in prairie wetlands and the influence of wetland hydrologic and biogeochemical processes on prairie wetland food webs. Additionally, this work has demonstrated that sulfur isotopes can provide unique source and process information that cannot be derived from traditional carbon and nitrogen isotope studies.

  7. Understanding system disturbance and ecosystem services in restored saltmarshes: Integrating physical and biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; Harvey, G. L.

    2012-06-01

    Coastal saltmarsh ecosystems occupy only a small percentage of Earth's land surface, yet contribute a wide range of ecosystem services that have significant global economic and societal value. These environments currently face significant challenges associated with climate change, sea level rise, development and water quality deterioration and are consequently the focus of a range of management schemes. Increasingly, soft engineering techniques such as managed realignment (MR) are being employed to restore and recreate these environments, driven primarily by the need for habitat (re)creation and sustainable coastal flood defence. Such restoration schemes also have the potential to provide additional ecosystem services including climate regulation and waste processing. However, these sites have frequently been physically impacted by their previous land use and there is a lack of understanding of how this 'disturbance' impacts the delivery of ecosystem services or of the complex linkages between ecological, physical and biogeochemical processes in restored systems. Through the exploration of current data this paper determines that hydrological, geomorphological and hydrodynamic functioning of restored sites may be significantly impaired with respects to natural 'undisturbed' systems and that links between morphology, sediment structure, hydrology and solute transfer are poorly understood. This has consequences for the delivery of seeds, the provision of abiotic conditions suitable for plant growth, the development of microhabitats and the cycling of nutrients/contaminants and may impact the delivery of ecosystem services including biodiversity, climate regulation and waste processing. This calls for a change in our approach to research in these environments with a need for integrated, interdisciplinary studies over a range of spatial and temporal scales incorporating both intensive and extensive research design.

  8. Parameter Sensitivity and Laboratory Benchmarking of a Biogeochemical Process Model for Enhanced Anaerobic Dechlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J. I.; Mao, X.; Barry, D. A.; Robinson, C.; Brovelli, A.; Harkness, M.; Fisher, A.; Mack, E. E.; Payne, J. A.; Dworatzek, S.; Roberts, J.

    2008-12-01

    A detailed model to simulate trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorination in anaerobic groundwater systems has been developed and implemented through PHAST, a robust and flexible geochemical modeling platform. The approach is comprehensive but retains flexibility such that models of varying complexity can be used to simulate TCE biodegradation in the vicinity of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The complete model considers a full suite of biological (e.g., dechlorination, fermentation, sulfate and iron reduction, electron donor competition, toxic inhibition, pH inhibition), physical (e.g., flow and mass transfer) and geochemical processes (e.g., pH modulation, gas formation, mineral interactions). Example simulations with the model demonstrated that the feedback between biological, physical, and geochemical processes is critical. Successful simulation of a thirty-two-month column experiment with site soil, complex groundwater chemistry, and exhibiting both anaerobic dechlorination and endogenous respiration, provided confidence in the modeling approach. A comprehensive suite of batch simulations was then conducted to estimate the sensitivity of predicted TCE degradation to the 36 model input parameters. A local sensitivity analysis was first employed to rank the importance of parameters, revealing that 5 parameters consistently dominated model predictions across a range of performance metrics. A global sensitivity analysis was then performed to evaluate the influence of a variety of full parameter data sets available in the literature. The modeling study was performed as part of the SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project, a public/private consortium whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The modelling conducted has provided valuable insight into the complex interactions between processes in the evolving biogeochemical systems

  9. Cumulative Significance of Hyporheic Exchange and Biogeochemical Processing in River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical reactions in rivers that decrease excessive loads of nutrients, metals, organic compounds, etc. are enhanced by hydrologic interactions with microbially and geochemically active sediments of the hyporheic zone. The significance of reactions in individual hyporheic flow paths has been shown to be controlled by the contact time between river water and sediment and the intrinsic reaction rate in the sediment. However, little is known about how the cumulative effects of hyporheic processing in large river basins. We used the river network model NEXSS (Gomez-Velez and Harvey, submitted) to simulate hyporheic exchange through synthetic river networks based on the best available models of network topology, hydraulic geometry and scaling of geomorphic features, grain size, hydraulic conductivity, and intrinsic reaction rates of nutrients and metals in river sediment. The dimensionless reaction significance factor, RSF (Harvey et al., 2013) was used to quantify the cumulative removal fraction of a reactive solute by hyporheic processing. SF scales reaction progress in a single pass through the hyporheic zone with the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone for a specified distance. Reaction progress is optimal where the intrinsic reaction timescale in sediment matches the residence time of hyporheic flow and is less efficient in longer residence time hyporheic flow as a result of the decreasing proportion of river flow that is processed by longer residence time hyporheic flow paths. In contrast, higher fluxes through short residence time hyporheic flow paths may be inefficient because of the repeated surface-subsurface exchanges required to complete the reaction. Using NEXSS we found that reaction efficiency may be high in both small streams and large rivers, although for different reasons. In small streams reaction progress generally is dominated by faster pathways of vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms. Slower exchange

  10. The value of automated high-frequency nutrient monitoring in inference of biogeochemical processes, temporal variability and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Louise

    2013-04-01

    Stream water quality signals integrate catchment-scale processes responsible for delivery and biogeochemical transformation of the key biotic macronutrients (N, C, P). This spatial and temporal integration is particularly pronounced in the groundwater-dominated streams, as in-stream nutrient dynamics are mediated by the processes occurring within riparian and hyporheic ecotones. In this paper we show long-term high-frequency in-stream macronutrient dynamics from a small agricultural catchment located in the North West England. Hourly in-situ measurements of total and reactive phosphorus (Systea, IT), nitrate (Hach Lange, DE) and physical water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH; WaterWatch, UK) were carried out on the lowland, gaining reach of the River Leith. High-frequency data show complex non-linear nutrient concentration-discharge relationships. The dominance of hysteresis effects suggests the presence of a temporally varying apportionment of allochthonous and autochthonous nutrient sources. Varying direction, magnitude and dynamics of the hysteretic responses between storm events is driven by the variation in the contributing source areas and shows the importance of the coupling of catchment-scale, in-stream, riparian and hyporheic biogeochemical cycles. The synergistic effect of physical (temperature-driven, the hyporheic exchange controlled by diffusion) and biogeochemical drivers (stream and hyporheic metabolism) on in-stream nutrient concentrations manifests itself in observed diurnal patterns. As inferred from the high-frequency nutrient monitoring, the diurnal dynamics are of the greatest importance under baseflow conditions. Understanding the role and relative importance of these processes can be difficult due to spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the key mechanisms involved. This study shows the importance of in-situ, fine temporal resolution, automated monitoring approaches in providing evidence

  11. Assessment of the GHG reduction potential from energy crops using a combined LCA and biogeochemical process models: a review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed. PMID:25045736

  12. Assessment of the GHG Reduction Potential from Energy Crops Using a Combined LCA and Biogeochemical Process Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed. PMID:25045736

  13. A Unified Multi-scale Model for Cross-Scale Evaluation and Integration of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, X.; Bailey, V. L.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hinkle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical representations of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in soil, plant, aquatic, and atmospheric systems vary with scale. Process-rich models are typically used to describe hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the pore and small scales, while empirical, correlation approaches are often used at the watershed and regional scales. A major challenge for multi-scale modeling is that water flow, biogeochemical processes, and reactive transport are described using different physical laws and/or expressions at the different scales. For example, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations at the pore-scale in soils, by the Darcy law in soil columns and aquifer, and by the Navier-Stokes equations again in open water bodies (ponds, lake, river) and atmosphere surface layer. This research explores whether the physical laws at the different scales and in different physical domains can be unified to form a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) to systematically investigate the cross-scale, cross-domain behavior of fundamental processes at different scales. This presentation will discuss our research on the concept, mathematical equations, and numerical execution of the UMSM. Three-dimensional, multi-scale hydrological processes at the Disney Wilderness Preservation (DWP) site, Florida will be used as an example for demonstrating the application of the UMSM. In this research, the UMSM was used to simulate hydrological processes in rooting zones at the pore and small scales including water migration in soils under saturated and unsaturated conditions, root-induced hydrological redistribution, and role of rooting zone biogeochemical properties (e.g., root exudates and microbial mucilage) on water storage and wetting/draining. The small scale simulation results were used to estimate effective water retention properties in soil columns that were superimposed on the bulk soil water retention properties at the DWP site. The UMSM parameterized from smaller

  14. Identifying biogeochemical processes beneath stormwater infiltration ponds in support of a new best management practice for groundwater protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2011-01-01

     When applying a stormwater infiltration pond best management practice (BMP) for protecting the quality of underlying groundwater, a common constituent of concern is nitrate. Two stormwater infiltration ponds, the SO and HT ponds, in central Florida, USA, were monitored. A temporal succession of biogeochemical processes was identified beneath the SO pond, including oxygen reduction, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, aerobic conditions persisted beneath the HT pond, resulting in nitrate leaching into groundwater. Biogeochemical differences likely are related to soil textural and hydraulic properties that control surface/subsurface oxygen exchange. A new infiltration BMP was developed and a full-scale application was implemented for the HT pond. Preliminary results indicate reductions in nitrate concentration exceeding 50% in soil water and shallow groundwater beneath the HT pond.

  15. Affective Processes and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma Deitch; Feshbach, Seymour

    1987-01-01

    Data indicate that for girls, affective dispositional factors (empathy, depressive affectivity, aggression, and self-concept) are intimately linked to cognitive development and academic achievement. (PCB)

  16. Using Bathymodiolus tissue stable isotope signatures to infer biogeochemical process at hydrocarbon seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Kiel, S.; Qiu, J.; Yang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Peng, Y.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the tissue of two bathymodiolin mussel species with different chemotrophic symbionts (methanotrophs in B. platifrons and sulfide-oxidizers in B. aduloides) to gain insights into the biogeochemical processes at an active site in 1120 m depth on the Formosa Ridge, called Site F. Because mussels with methanotrophic symbionts acquire the isotope signature of the used methane, the average δ13C values of B. platifrons (-70.3‰; n=36) indicates a biogenic methane source at Site F, consistent with the measured carbon isotope signature of methane (-61.1‰ to -58.7‰) sampled 1.5 m above the mussel beds. The only small offset between the δ13C signatures of the ascending methane and the authigenic carbonate at site F (as low as -55.3‰) suggests only minor mixing of the pore water with marine bicarbonate, which in turn may be used as an indicator for advective rather than diffusive seepage at this site. B. aduloides has much higher average δ13C values of -34.4‰ (n=9), indicating inorganic carbon (DIC) dissolved in epibenthic bottom water as its main carbon source. The DIC was apparently marine bicarbonate with a small contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from locally oxidized methane. The δ34S values of the two mussel species indicate that they used two different sulfur sources. B. platifrons (average δ34S = +6.4±2.6‰; n=36) used seawater sulfate mixed with isotopically light re-oxidized sulfide from the sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), while the sulfur source of B. aduloides (δ34S = -8.0±3.1‰; n=9) was AOM-derived sulfide used by its symbionts. δ15N values differed between the mussels, with B. platifrons having a wider range of on average slightly lower values (mean = +0.5±0.7‰, n=36) than B. aduloides (mean = +1.1±0.0‰). These values are significantly lower than δ15N values of South China Sea deep-sea sediments (+5‰ to +6‰), indicating that the organic nitrogen

  17. Three-dimensional approach using two coupled models for description of hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesca, Ina; Kraft, Philipp; Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological and biogeochemical transport through changing landscapes has been well described during the past years in literature. However, the uncertainties of combined water quality and water quantity models are still challenging, both due to a lack in process understanding as well to spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environmental conditions driving the processes. In order to reduce the uncertainty in water quality and runoff predictions at the catchment scale, a variety of different model approaches from empirical-conceptual to fully physical and process based models have been developed. In this study we present a new modelling approach for the investigation of hydrological processes and nutrient cycles, with a focus on nitrogen in a small catchment from Hessen, Germany. A hydrological model based on the model toolbox Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF) has been coupled with the process based biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC. States, fluxes and parameters are exchanged between the models at high temporal and spatial resolution using the Python scripting language in order to obtain a 3-dimensional model application. The transport of water and nutrients through the catchment is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes, a kinematic wave approach for surface runoff and a Penman-Monteith based calculation of evapotranspiration. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by Landscape-DNDC, including plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification and associated nitrous oxide emissions. The interactions and module connectivity between the two coupled models, as well as the model application on a 3.7 km² catchment with the runoff results and nitrogen quantification will be presented in this study.

  18. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Berthrong, Sean T; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Pineiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH{sub 4}{sup +} in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils.

  19. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands.

    PubMed

    Berthrong, Sean T; Schadt, Christopher W; Piñeiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-10-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH(4)(+) in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils. PMID:19700539

  20. Urban pollution of sediments: Impact on the physiology and burrowing activity of tubificid worms and consequences on biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Pigneret, M; Mermillod-Blondin, F; Volatier, L; Romestaing, C; Maire, E; Adrien, J; Guillard, L; Roussel, D; Hervant, F

    2016-10-15

    In urban areas, infiltration basins are designed to manage stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of associated pollutants. The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of these structures is highly organic and multicontaminated (mainly heavy metals and hydrocarbons). Only few aquatic species are able to maintain permanent populations in such an extreme environment, including the oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. Nevertheless, the impact of urban pollutants on these organisms and the resulting influence on infiltration basin functioning remain poorly studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine how polluted sediments could impact the survival, the physiology and the bioturbation activity of L. hoffmeisteri and thereby modify biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface. To this end, we conducted laboratory incubations of worms, in polluted sediments from infiltration basins or slightly polluted sediments from a stream. Analyses were performed to evaluate physiological state and burrowing activity (X-ray micro-tomography) of worms and their influences on biogeochemical processes (nutrient fluxes, CO2 and CH4 degassing rates) during 30-day long experiments. Our results showed that worms exhibited physiological responses to cope with high pollution levels, including a strong ability to withstand the oxidative stress linked to contamination with heavy metals. We also showed that the presence of urban pollutants significantly increased the burrowing activity of L. hoffmeisteri, demonstrating the sensitivity and the relevance of such a behavioural response as biomarker of sediment toxicity. In addition, we showed that X-ray micro-tomography was an adequate technique for accurate and non-invasive three-dimensional investigations of biogenic structures formed by bioturbators. The presence of worms induced stimulations of nutrient fluxes and organic matter recycling (between +100% and 200% of CO2 degassing rate

  1. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Le Vu, B.; Cambon, G.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2013-06-01

    The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O) occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS) taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (northern Benguela) using the high-resolution hydrodynamic ROMS model. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate, and chlorophyll a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g, NH4+ and NO2- oxidation, NO3- reduction, and anammox) as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking, and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss, and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the explicit parameterization of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is necessary to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with the OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen concentrations are driven by

  2. Spatial patterns in soil biogeochemical process rates along a Louisiana wetland salinity gradient in the Barataria Bay estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. J.; Rich, M. W.; Sullivan, H. L.; Bledsoe, R.; Dawson, M.; Donnelly, B.; Marton, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Louisiana has the highest rates of coastal wetland loss in the United States. In addition to being lost, Louisiana wetlands experience numerous other environmental stressors including changes in salinity regime (both increases from salt water intrusion and decreases from the creation of river diversions) and climate change induced changes in vegetation (e.g. the northward expansion of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) into salt marshes). In this study, we examined how these changes might influence biogeochemical process rates important in regulating carbon balance and the cycling, retention, and removal of nutrients in Louisiana wetlands. Specifically, we measured net soil greenhouse gas fluxes and collected cores for the determination of rates of greenhouse gas production, denitrification potential, nitrification potential, iron reduction, and phosphorus sorption from surface (0-5cm) and subsurface (10-15cm) depths for three plots in each of 4 sites along the salinity gradient: a freshwater marsh site, a brackish (7 ppt) marsh site, a salt marsh (17 ppt), and a Avicennia germinans stand (17 ppt; adjacent to salt marsh site) in the Barataria Bay estuarine system. Most biogeochemical processes displayed similar spatial patterns with salt marsh rates being lower than rates in freshwater and/or brackish marsh sites and not having significantly different rates than in Avicennia germinans stands. Rates in surface soils were generally higher than in subsurface soils. These patterns were generally consistent with spatial patterns in soil properties with soil water content, organic matter quantity and quality, and extractable nutrients generally being higher in freshwater and brackish marsh sites than salt marsh and Avicennia germinans sites, especially in surface soils. These spatial patterns suggest that the ability of coastal wetlands to retain and remove nutrients might change significantly in response to future climate changes in the region and that these

  3. Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Farrington, J W

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food web transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a significant source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly. PMID:1904812

  4. Rn as a geochemical tool for estimating residence times in the hyporheic zone and its application to biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, Benjamin; Dörner, Sebastian; Ebertshäuser, Marlene Esther; Glaser, Barbara; Klug, Maria; Pittroff, Marco; Pieruschka, Ines; Waldemer, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    The hyporheic zone is at the interface between groundwater and surface water systems. It is also often a geochemical and redox boundary between typically reduced groundwater and oxic surface water. It experiences dynamic physical and chemical conditions as both groundwater fluxes and surface water levels vary in time and space. This can be particularly important for processes such as biogeochemical processing of nutrients and carbon. There has recently been an increasing focus on coupling residence times of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. While geochemical profiles can be readily measured using established geochemical sampling techniques (e.g. peepers), quantifying surface water residence times and flow paths within the hyporheic zone is more elusive. The nobel gas radon offers a method for quantification of surface water residence times in the hyporheic zone. Radon activities are typically low in surface waters due to degassing to the atmosphere and decay. However once the surface water flows into the hyporheic zone radon accumulates along the flow path due to emanation from the sediments. Using simple analytical equations the water residence time can be calculated based on the difference between measured 222Rn activities and 222Rn activities at secular equilibrium, with a maximum limit of about 20 days (depending on measurement precision). Rn is particularly suited to residence time measurements in the hyporheic zone since it does not require addition of tracers to the stream nor does it require complex simulations and assumptions (such as 1D vertical flow) as for temperature measurements. As part of the biogeochemistry course at the University of Bayreuth, we have investigated the coupling of redox processes and water residence times in the hyporheic zone using 222Rn as a tracer for residence time. Of particular interest were nitrate and sulfate reduction and methane and CO2 production. Measurements were made in a sandy section

  5. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Boyer, E.W.; David, M.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Tobias, C.R.; Tonitto, C.; Wollheim, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  6. Changing Seasonality in the Arctic and its Influences on Biogeochemical Processing in Tundra River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, W. B.; Gooseff, M. N.; Wollheim, W. M.; Herstand, M. R.; Treat, C. C.; Whittinghill, K. A.; Wlostowski, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the primary expressions of climate change in the arctic is a change in "seasonality"; i.e., changes in the timing, duration, and characteristics of the traditional arctic seasons. These changes are most likely to affect temperature and precipitation patterns but will have relatively little effect on the annual light regime. Temperature, precipitation, and light are crucial drivers in any ecosystem and so the potential that the relationships between these three master environmental variables will change in the future has important consequences. Our research addresses how river networks process critical nutrients (C, N, and P) delivered from land as they are transported to coastal zones. We are currently focusing on land-water interactions in headwater streams. As in any ecosystem, temperature strongly influences microbial processing in soils and thus net mineralization of organic nutrients. Nutrients made available by microbial processing in the soil will be used by vegetation as long as the vegetation actively grows. However, active growth by vegetation is highly dependent on the annual light regime, which is not changing substantially. Thus, as arctic seasonality changes there is a growing asynchrony developing between production of nutrients by soil microbes and the demand for nutrients by vegetation, with greater production of nutrients by temperature-dependent microbes than demand by light-dependent vegetation. It is reasonable to expect that the "excess" nutrients produced in this way will migrate to streams and we hypothesize that this seasonal subsidy may strongly influence the structure and function of arctic stream ecosystems. Previous stream research in the arctic largely ignored the spring and fall tail seasons. Preliminary findings indicate that the seasonal asynchrony has profound influences on nutrient concentrations and autotrophic biomass in arctic streams. We expect this to have important influences on key processes such as primary

  7. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrations in an urban estuary.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G; Burgess, Robert M; Coull, Brent; Shine, James P

    2016-05-01

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limited, due to underexplored techniques for measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. In this work, we performed statistical analyses on a large dataset containing repeated measurements of free ion concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd, the most commonly measured metals in seawater, at five inshore locations in Boston Harbor, previously collected using an in-situ equilibrium-based multi-metal free ion sampler, the 'Gellyfish'. We examined correlations among these five metals by season, and evaluated effects of 10 biogeochemical variables on free ion concentrations over time and location through multivariate regressions. We also explored potential clustering among the five metals through a principal component analysis. We found significant correlations among metals, with varying patterns over season. Our regression results suggest that instead of dissolved metals, pH, salinity, temperature and rainfall were the most significant determinants of free metal ion concentrations. For example, a one-unit decrease in pH was associated with a 2.2 (Cd) to 99 (Cu) times increase in free ion concentrations. This work is among the first to reveal key contributors to spatiotemporal variations in free ion concentrations, and demonstrated the usefulness of the Gellyfish sampler in routine sampling of free ions within metal mixtures and in generating data for statistical analyses. PMID:26901477

  8. Autonomous Studies of Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Processes- Lessons from NAB08 and Prospects for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Craig; D'Asaro, Eric; Perry, Mary Jane

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by the increasing application of autonomous sensors to physical, biological and biogeochemical investigations at the submesoscale, we examine techniques developed during the 2008 North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NAB08), review successes, failures, and lessons learned, and offer perspectives on how these approaches might evolve in response to near-term shifts in scientific goals and technological advances. NAB08 exploited the persistence of autonomous platforms coupled with the extensive capabilities of a ship-based sampling program to investigate the patch-scale physics, biogeochemistry and community dynamics of a spring phytoplankton bloom. Autonomous platforms (Seagliders following a heavily-instrumented Lagrangian float) collected measurements in a quasi-Lagrangian frame, beginning before bloom initiation and extending well past its demise. This system of autonomous instruments resolved variability at the patch scale while also providing the persistence needed to follow bloom evolution. Biological and biogeochemical measurements were conducted from R/V Knorr during the bloom. An aggressive protocol for sensor calibration and proxy building bridged the ship-based and autonomous efforts, leveraging the intensive but sparse ship-based measurements onto the much more numerous autonomous observations. The combination of sampling in the patch-following frame, persistent, autonomous surveys and focused, aggressive calibration and proxy building produced robust, quantitative estimates of physical and biogeochemical processes. For example, budgets of nitrate, dissolved oxygen and particulate organic carbon (POC) following the patch were used to estimate net community production (NCP) and apparent POC export. Net community production was 805 mmol C?m-2 during the main bloom, with apparent POC export of 564 mmol C?m-2 and 282 mmol C?m-2 lost due to net respiration (70%) and apparent export (30%) on the day following bloom termination. Thus, POC export of roughly

  9. Ozone and Nitrogen Deposition as Modifiers of Biogeochemical Fluxes and Processes in California Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The combined effects of ozone and N deposition results in major perturbations of C and N cycling in forests of southern and central California. Increased shoot:root ratios of the major trees species, N-stimulation of aboveground growth, and premature foliar abscission result in greater aboveground C and N pools. Fire suppression exacerbates these perturbations and provides the opportunity for chronic N deposition to further increase the stand densification problem. Long-term litter decomposition rates are retarded by N enrichment which contributes further to litter accumulation in the forest floor. Stage 3 of N saturation in California mixed conifer forests occurs as chronic N deposition, in conjunction with co-occurring ozone effects, decreases fine root biomass, interferes with stomatal control, and increases the susceptibility of ponderosa pine trees to drought stress and bark beetle attack, leading to increased stand mortality. Hot moments of N transfers from canopy to the forest floor occur during precipitation events that follow long dry periods, but particularly during fog events. During initial soil wet up, pulses of NO and N2O emissions from the forest floor occur. Streamwater losses of nitrate are highest following storms preceded by dry periods, but also during peak runoff, typically in February and March. However, major losses of accumulated N occur during and after fire events. However, ecosystem N budgets, biogeochemical modeling studies and experimental burns in N-saturated chaparral catchments in southern California demonstrate that symptoms of N excess are not easily reversed by N release in and following fire. Even with decreased N deposition, momentum for elevated N losses from California forests would likely continue, driven by actively nitrifying soils and increased N content of litter and soil organic matter. Initial studies show that during peak runoff, as much as 20-40% of runoff nitrate in some catchments is throughput of unassimilated

  10. Biogeochemical and hydrologic processes controlling mercury cycling in Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftz, D.; Kenney, T.; Angeroth, C.; Waddell, B.; Darnall, N.; Perschon, C.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL), in the Western United States, is a terminal lake with a highly variable surface area that can exceed 5,100 km2. The open water and adjacent wetlands of the GSL ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere, as well as a brine shrimp industry with annual revenues exceeding 70 million dollars. Despite the ecologic and economic significance of GSL, little is known about the biogeochemical cycling of mercury (Hg) and no water-quality standards currently exist for this system. Whole water samples collected since 2000 were determined to contain elevated concentrations of total Hg (100 ng/L) and methyl Hg (33 ng/L). The elevated levels of methyl Hg are likely the result of high rates of SO4 reduction and associated Hg methylation in persistently anoxic areas of the lake at depths greater than 6.5 m below the water surface. Hydroacoustic equipment deployed in this anoxic layer indicates a "conveyor belt" flow system that can distribute methyl Hg in a predominantly southerly direction throughout the southern half of GSL (fig. 1, URL: http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs- AUG06.pdf). Periodic and sustained wind events on GSL may result in transport of the methyl Hg-rich anoxic water and bottom sediments into the oxic and biologically active regions. Sediment traps positioned above the anoxic brine interface have captured up to 6 mm of bottom sediment during cumulative wind-driven resuspension events (fig. 2, URL:http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs-AUG06.pdf). Vertical velocity data collected with hydroacoustic equipment indicates upward flow > 1.5 cm/sec during transient wind events (fig. 3, URL:http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs-AUG06.pdf). Transport of methyl Hg into the oxic regions of GSL is supported by biota samples. The median Hg concentration (wet weight) in brine shrimp increased seasonally from the spring to fall time period and is likely a

  11. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-02-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L-1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate show

  12. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L−1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate

  13. Are Changes in Biogeochemical or Hydrologic Processes Responsible for Increasing DOC Concentrations in Headwater Streams of Northeastern North America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Murdoch, P. S.

    2005-12-01

    The recent recognition of widespread and significant upward trends in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface waters of northeastern North America and Europe has stimulated research to understand the cause of these trends. Several factors have been offered to explain these DOC trends including climate warming, chronic atmospheric nitrogen deposition, decreasing atmospheric sulfur deposition, and increasing surface water pH. Changes in these factors have acted to either increase the solubility of DOC or increase the rates of biogeochemical processes that generate labile carbon in the soil. Additionally, it is well known that rain events and snowmelt increase DOC concentrations in many surface waters through flushing along shallow flow paths where most labile carbon is stored. Changes in hydrologic flushing rates have generally not been explored as a possible explanation of these widely reported upward trends in DOC concentrations. Biscuit Brook, a 9.9 km2 catchment in the Catskill Mountains of New York has shown a significant increasing trend in DOC concentrations since 1992, consistent with other streams in this region. Stream chemistry has been monitored at Biscuit Brook on a weekly basis supplemented with event samples since 1983, providing a detailed data set with which to examine the causes of changes in DOC concentrations. Here, we examine the relative roles of climate warming, decreasing sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, and changes in the frequency and size of hydrologic events on the long-term temporal pattern (1992 to 2004) of DOC concentrations in Biscuit Brook. DOC concentrations increased significantly in weekly samples collected primarily during low flow conditions. No similar trend was apparent in the high flow samples. Mean annual SO42- plus NO3- concentrations showed a strong inverse relation (r2 = 0.91, p < 0.01) to DOC concentrations, but these concentrations were not related to stream pH nor to air temperature

  14. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    PubMed

    Dubinina, G A; Sorokina, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation. PMID:25423717

  15. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation. PMID:25507440

  16. Non-conservative behaviors of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in a turbid estuary: Roles of multiple biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liyang; Guo, Weidong; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Guizhi

    2013-11-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) may show notable non-conservative behaviors in many estuaries due to a variety of biogeochemical processes. The partition between CDOM and chromophoric particulate organic matter (CPOM) was examined in the Jiulong Estuary (China) using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, which was also compared with microbial and photochemical degradations. The absorption coefficient of water-soluble CPOM (aCPOM(280)) at ambient Milli-Q water pH (6.1) ranged from 0.11 to 7.94 m-1 in the estuary and was equivalent to 5-101% of CDOM absorption coefficient. The aCPOM(280) correlated significantly with the concentration of suspended particulate matter and was highest in the bottom water of turbidity maximum zone. Absorption spectral slope (S275-295) and slope ratio (SR) correlated positively with salinity for both CPOM and CDOM, suggesting decreases in the average molecular weight with increasing salinity. The adsorption of CDOM to re-suspended sediments (at 500 mg L-1) within 2 h was equivalent to 4-26% of the initial aCDOM(280). The adsorption of CDOM to particles was less selective with respect to various CDOM constituents, while the microbial degradation resulted decreases in S275-295 and SR of CDOM and preferential removal of protein-like components. The partition between CPOM and CDOM represented a rapid and important process for the non-conservative behavior of CDOM in turbid estuaries.

  17. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    ¨hler number seemed to overestimate the actual transition as indicated by multiple secondary electron acceptors, illustrating the gradient nature of anaerobic transition. Temporal flux variability in low-flux morphologies generated a much greater range in hyporheic redox conditions compared to high-flux zones, and chemical responses to changing flux rates were consistent with those predicted from the empirical relationship between redox condition and residence time. The Raz tracer revealed that hyporheic flow paths have strong net aerobic respiration, particularly at higher residence time, but this reactive exchange did not affect the net stream signal at the reach scale.

  18. U(VI) reduction at the nano, meso and meter scale: concomitant transition from simpler to more complex biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Hochella, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Reduction of aqueous hexavalent U(VI) to the sparingly soluble nanoparticulate mineral uraninite [UO2] represents a promising strategy for the in situ immobilization of uranium in contaminated subsurface sediments and groundwater. Studies related to uranium reduction have been extensively carried out at various scales ranging from nano to meso to the meter scale with varying degrees of success. While nanoscale processes involving simple two-electron transfer reactions such as enzymatic microbial U(VI) reduction results in biogenic UO2 formation, mesoscale processes involving minerals and U(VI) are a step up in complexity and have shown varying results ranging from partial uranium reduction to the formation of mixed U(IV)/U(V) species. Although nano- and meso-scale biogeochemical processes have been helpful in predicting the contaminant dynamics at the meter scale, their occurrence is not necessarily apparent in soils and aquifers given the enormous volume of contaminated groundwater to be remediated, among other factors. The formation and long-term stability of biologically reduced uranium at the meter scale is also determined in addition by the complex interplay of aqueous geochemistry, hydrology, soil and sediment mineralogy and microbial community dynamics. For instance, indigenous subsurface microbes often encounter multiple electron acceptors in heterogeneous environments during biostimulation and can catalyze the formation of various reactive biogenic minerals. In such cases, abiotic interactions between U(VI) and reactive biogenic minerals is potentially important because the success of a remediation strategy is contingent upon the speciation of reduced uranium. This presentation will give an overview of uranium reduction ranging from simple nanoscale biological processes to increasingly complex meso and meter scale processes involving abiotic interactions between aqueous uranium and nano-biogenic minerals and the effect of mineralogy and aqueous

  19. Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Benner, Shawn G.; Ying, Samantha C.; Ung, Mengieng; Ouch, Kagna; Samreth, Sopheap; Suy, Bunseang; Phan, Kongkea; Sampson, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2008-11-01

    Arsenic is contaminating the groundwater of Holocene aquifers throughout South and Southeast Asia. To examine the biogeochemical and hydrological processes influencing dissolved concentrations and transport of As within soils/sediments in the Mekong River delta, a ~50 km₂ field site was established near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where aqueous As concentrations are dangerously high and where groundwater retrieval for irrigation is minimal. Dissolved As concentrations vary spatially, ranging up to 1300 µg/L in aquifer groundwater and up to 600 µg/L in surficial clay pore water. Groundwaters with high As concentrations are reducing with negligible dissolved O₂ and high concentrations of Fe(II), NH⁺₄ , and dissolved organic C. Within near-surface environments, these conditions are most pronounced in sediments underlying permanent wetlands, often found within oxbow channels near the Mekong River. There, labile C, co-deposited with As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxides under reducing conditions, drives the reductive mobilization (inclusive of Fe and As reduction) of As. Here, conditions are described under which As is mobilized from these sediments, and near-surface As release is linked to aquifer contamination over long time periods (100s to 1000s of years). Site biogeochemistry is coupled with extensive hydrologic measurements, and, accordingly, a comprehensive interpretation of spatial As release and transport within a calibrated hydraulic flow-field is provided of an As-contaminated aquifer that is representative of those found throughout South and Southeast Asia.

  20. The Effect of Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes on Nitrogen in Stream Water Originating From Coal-Bed Methane Supply Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2003-12-01

    Water obtained from coal-bed methane (CBM) wells typically contains a variety of reduced chemical constituents, including methane, metal ions, particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and ammonium. In many locales in Wyoming and Montana, CBM water is disposed via discharge to stream channels and reservoirs. Though it is likely that biogeochemical and hydrologic processes will result in major changes in the chemical composition of these waters with subsequent downstream transport, few studies have actually examined these water quality changes or their ecological impacts. A field study was conducted in the Powder River Basin, WY to document changes in solute composition within stream channels below discharge points of CBM water. Particular emphasis was placed on nitrogen and nitrogen cycling processes. Concentration ranges in discharge water were: DOC, 200-350 μ M; alkalinity, 40-50 meq/L; specific conductance, 3.3-4.0 mS/cm; ammonium, 350-400 μ M; and pH, 7.2-7.3. Ammonium concentrations decreased with transport distance via nitrification, with subsequent increases in nitrite and nitrate. Within a single discharge channel, nitrite concentrations increased with travel distance, peaking at >100 μ M at 100-200 m, but also exhibited a strong diel pattern that was inversely related to incident light. Nitrite production/consumption processes differed significantly within in-stream incubation chambers, depending upon location relative to the CBM discharge point and time of day. In the main channel, subject to several CBM discharge points, diel nitrite concentrations were more constant at a fixed station, but did increase with distance downstream. Main channel total inorganic nitrogen remained relatively constant ( ˜400 μ M N) with distance (>5 km), suggesting little net nitrogen removal. The results of this study suggest that CBM discharge can serve as a significant source of dissolved nitrogen to western watersheds, with oxidative processes resulting in nitrate and

  1. Development of advanced process-based model towards evaluation of boundless biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial-aquatic continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2014-05-01

    Recent research shows inland water may play some role in continental biogeochemical cycling though its contribution has remained uncertain due to a paucity of data (Battin et al. 2009). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local, regional and global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes. In this study, NICE was extended to evaluate global hydrologic cycle by using various global datasets. The simulated result agreed reasonably with that in the previous research (Fan et al., 2013) and extended to clarify further eco-hydrological process in global scale. Then, NICE was further developed to incorporate the biogeochemical cycle including the reaction between inorganic and organic carbons (DOC, POC, DIC, pCO2, etc.) in the biosphere (terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems including surface water and groundwater). The model simulated the carbon cycle, for example, CO2 evasion from inland water in global scale, which is relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical relation using the previous pCO2 data (Aufdenkampe et al., 2011; Global River Chemistry Database, 2013). This simulation system would play important role in identification of full greenhouse gas balance of the biosphere and spatio-temporal hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycle (Cole et al. 2007; Frei et al. 2012). References; Aufdenkampe, A.K., et al., Front. Ecol. Environ., doi:10.1890/100014, 2011. Battin, T.J., et al., Nat. Geosci., 2, 598-600, 2009. Cole, J.J. et al., Ecosystems, doi:10.1007/s10021-006-9013-8, 2007. Fan, Y. et al

  2. Potential for real-time understanding of coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in stream ecosystems: Future integration of telemetered data with process models for glacial meltwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Diane M.; Cozzetto, Karen; Cullis, James D. S.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Jaros, Christopher; Koch, Joshua C.; Lyons, W. Berry; Neupauer, Roseanna; Wlostowski, Adam

    2015-08-01

    While continuous monitoring of streamflow and temperature has been common for some time, there is great potential to expand continuous monitoring to include water quality parameters such as nutrients, turbidity, oxygen, and dissolved organic material. In many systems, distinguishing between watershed and stream ecosystem controls can be challenging. The usefulness of such monitoring can be enhanced by the application of quantitative models to interpret observed patterns in real time. Examples are discussed primarily from the glacial meltwater streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Although the Dry Valley landscape is barren of plants, many streams harbor thriving cyanobacterial mats. Whereas a daily cycle of streamflow is controlled by the surface energy balance on the glaciers and the temporal pattern of solar exposure, the daily signal for biogeochemical processes controlling water quality is generated along the stream. These features result in an excellent outdoor laboratory for investigating fundamental ecosystem process and the development and validation of process-based models. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological Research project, we have conducted field experiments and developed coupled biogeochemical transport models for the role of hyporheic exchange in controlling weathering reactions, microbial nitrogen cycling, and stream temperature regulation. We have adapted modeling approaches from sediment transport to understand mobilization of stream biomass with increasing flows. These models help to elucidate the role of in-stream processes in systems where watershed processes also contribute to observed patterns, and may serve as a test case for applying real-time stream ecosystem models.

  3. Affective processing in bilingual speakers: disembodied cognition?

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    A recent study by Keysar, Hayakawa, and An (2012) suggests that "thinking in a foreign language" may reduce decision biases because a foreign language provides a greater emotional distance than a native tongue. The possibility of such "disembodied" cognition is of great interest for theories of affect and cognition and for many other areas of psychological theory and practice, from clinical and forensic psychology to marketing, but first this claim needs to be properly evaluated. The purpose of this review is to examine the findings of clinical, introspective, cognitive, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging studies of affective processing in bilingual speakers in order to identify converging patterns of results, to evaluate the claim about "disembodied cognition," and to outline directions for future inquiry. The findings to date reveal two interrelated processing effects. First-language (L1) advantage refers to increased automaticity of affective processing in the L1 and heightened electrodermal reactivity to L1 emotion-laden words. Second-language (L2) advantage refers to decreased automaticity of affective processing in the L2, which reduces interference effects and lowers electrodermal reactivity to negative emotional stimuli. The differences in L1 and L2 affective processing suggest that in some bilingual speakers, in particular late bilinguals and foreign language users, respective languages may be differentially embodied, with the later learned language processed semantically but not affectively. This difference accounts for the reduction of framing biases in L2 processing in the study by Keysar et al. (2012). The follow-up discussion identifies the limits of the findings to date in terms of participant populations, levels of processing, and types of stimuli, puts forth alternative explanations of the documented effects, and articulates predictions to be tested in future research. PMID:23163422

  4. New HYDRUS Modules for Simulating Preferential Flow, Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport, and Various Biogeochemical Processes in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, J.; Sejna, M.; Jacques, D.; Langergraber, G.; Bradford, S. A.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    2012-04-01

    We have dramatically expanded the capabilities of the HYDRUS (2D/3D) software package by developing new modules to account for processes not available in the standard HYDRUS version. These new modules include the DualPerm, C-Hitch, HP2/3, Wetland, and Unsatchem modules. The dual-permeability modeling approach of Gerke and van Genuchten [1993] simulating preferential flow and transport is implemented into the DualPerm module. Colloid transport and colloid-facilitated solute transport, the latter often observed for many contaminants, such as heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and explosives [Šimůnek et al., 2006] are implemented into the C-Hitch module. HP2 and HP3 are the two and three-dimensional alternatives of the HP1 module, currently available with HYDRUS-1D [Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005], that couple HYDRUS flow and transport routines with the generic geochemical model PHREEQC of Parkhurst and Appelo [1999]. The Wetland module includes two alternative approaches (CW2D of Langergraber and Šimůnek [2005] and CWM1 of Langergraber et al. [2009]) for modeling aerobic, anaerobic, and anoxic biogeochemical processes in natural and constructed wetlands. Finally, the Unsatchem module simulates the transport and reactions of major ions in a soil profile. Brief descriptions and an application of each module will be presented. Except for HP3, all modules simulate flow and transport processes in two-dimensional transport domains. All modules are fully supported by the HYDRUS graphical user interface. Further development of these modules, as well as of several other new modules (such as Overland), is still envisioned. Continued feedback from the research community is encouraged.

  5. Isotopic order, biogeochemical processes, and earth history - Goldschmidt lecture, Davos, Switzerland, August 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The impetus to interpret carbon isotopic signals comes from an understanding of isotopic fractionations imposed by living organisms. That understanding rests in turn on studies of enzymatic isotope effects, on fruitful concepts of isotopic order, and on studies of the distribution of 13C both between and within biosynthetic products. In sum, these studies have shown that the isotopic compositions of biological products are governed by reaction kinetics and by pathways of carbon flow. Isotopic compositions of individual compounds can indicate specific processes or environments. Examples include biomarkers which record the isotopic compositions of primary products in aquatic communities, which indicate that certain bacteria have used methane as a carbon source, and which show that some portions of marine photic zones have been anaerobic. In such studies, the combination of structural and isotopic lines of evidence reveals relationships between compounds and leads to process-related thinking. These are large steps. Reconstruction of the sources and histories of molecular fossils redeems much of the early promise of organic geochemistry by resolving and clarifying paleoenviron-mental signals. In turn, contemplation of this new information is driving geochemists to study microbial ecology and evolution, oceanography, and sedimentology.

  6. Distinguishing biogeochemical processes influencing phosphorus dynamics in oxidizing and desiccating mud deposits from a freshwater wetland system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Wassen, Martin J.; Griffioen, Jasper

    2015-04-01

    Focus and aim: Currently, lake Markermeer (680 km2) provides poor environmental conditions for the development of flora and fauna due to a thick fluffy layer that prevails at the lake's bed. To improve the conditions in the lake, large wetlands will be built from this fluffy layer, possibly mixed with sand or with the underlying Southern Sea deposit. The aim of this study is to distinguish biogeochemical processes influencing phosphorus dynamics in porewater during oxidation and desiccation of mud deposits from this lake. We focus on three important aspects that potentially influence these processes: granulometry, sediment type and modification by plants. Material and methods: A greenhouse experiment was conducted with three types of sediment that potentially will function as building material for the islands: fluffy mud (FM), sandy mud (SM) and Southern Sea deposit (SSD). Reed (Phragmites australis) was planted in half of the pots to distinguish influence by plants. For six months, the porewater-, soil- and plant quality was monitored to determine important biogeochemical processes. Variables measured from the porewater include: Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, PO43- and SO42- (IC); Ca, Fe, K, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr (ICP-OES); as well as Fe2+, pH, alkalinity and EC. A phosphorus fractionation was carried out on the sediment to determine the phosphorus pools and the major elements of the sediments were determined following an aqua regia destruction using ICP-OES. Plant tissue was analysed for N, P, K and C content as well as the above- and belowground biomass. Results and discussion: It was found that sulfate production was the most important process influencing phosphorus availability in these soils. Due to oxidation processes in the mud, sulfate (SO42-) concentrations rose drastically in porewater from 100 ppm at the beginning of the experiment to well over 2000 ppm at the end of the experiment. This effect was strongest in SSD soils, likely due to higher presence of pyrite that gets

  7. Treatment of oil and grease in produced water by a pilot-scale constructed wetland system using biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Michael J; Castle, James W; Rodgers, John H; Huddleston, George M

    2014-05-01

    Constructed wetland treatment systems (CWTSs) can effectively remove many constituents that limit beneficial use of oilfield produced water. The objectives of this investigation were: (1) to assess the effect of mass loadings of oil and grease (O & G) on treatment performance in pilot-scale subsurface flow and free water surface CWTS series having sequential reducing and oxidizing cells, and (2) to evaluate effects on treatment performance of adding a pilot-scale oil-water separator. Increase in O & G mass loading from 5 to 20 mg min(-1) caused decreases in both dissolved oxygen concentration and sediment redox potential, which affected treatment performance. Biogeochemical pathways for removal of O & G, iron, and manganese operate under oxidizing conditions, and removal rate coefficients for these constituents decreased (0.905-0.514 d(-1) for O & G, 0.773-0.452 d(-1) for iron, and 0.970-0.518 d(-1) for manganese) because greater mass loading of O & G promoted reducing conditions. With increased mass loading, removal rate coefficients for nickel and zinc increased from 0.074 to 0.565 d(-1) and from 0.196 to 1.08 d(-1), respectively. Although the sequential reducing and oxidizing cells in the CWTS were very effective in treating the targeted constituents, an oil-water separator was added prior to wetland cells to enhance O & G removal at high inflow concentration (100 mg L(-1)). The oil-water separator removed approximately 50% of the O & G, and removal extents and efficiencies approximated those observed at 50 mg L(-1) inflow concentration during treatment without an oil-water separator. PMID:24321330

  8. Biogeochemical Processes in Late Archean Marine Biosphere Revealed by Isotopic and Molecular Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freeman, K. H.; Summons, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    The presence of shallow-marine oxygen oases and associated aerobic ecosystems in an otherwise anoxic and anaerobic world has been proposed by researchers to explain the anomalous 40 permil spread in organic-carbon isotope values during the late Archean. To test this hypothesis, we studied isotopic, molecular, and lithologic records of 2.7-2.5 Ga rocks of different depositional facies from the Hamersley Province, Western Australia. Kerogen carbon-isotopic compositions indicate that extreme 13C-depletion (more than -45 permil) was associated with shallow-marine-carbonate environments at 2.72 Ga and with deepwater environments thereafter. Moreover, kerogen-carbon-isotope values associated with carbonate environments became enriched by more than 10 permil over 100-150 Ma. These observations suggest that microbial processes responsible for extreme 13C-depletion became less significant in shallow carbonate environments, but remained important in deeper settings. Molecular biomarker ratios determined for associated bitumens: 1) strongly correlate to kerogen carbon-isotope values and other biomarker ratios, and, 2) show relationships with depositional facies and dolomite abundance giving credence to a syngenetic relationship with host rocks. The biomarker data confirm aerobic methanotrophs in the Late Archean biosphere, but not in strong association with extreme 13C-depletion. Biomarker patterns reflect a greater association of aerobic respiration and oxygenic photosynthesis in shallow carbonate environments compared to deeper settings. Collectively, the data record dramatic changes in carbon cycling associated with environmental partitioning of microbial processes and ecosystems over 100-150 Ma. Most likely, this represents increased bioavailability of strong electron acceptors with the expansion of oxidant-rich oases prior to rise in atmospheric oxygen.

  9. The Precambrian Biogeochemical Carbon Isotopic Record: Contributions of Thermal Versus Biological Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Superplumes offer a new approach for understanding global C cycles. Isotopes help to discern the impacts of geological, environmental and biological processes ujpun the evolution of these cycles. For example, C-13/C-12 values of coeval sedimentary organics and carbonates give global estimates of the fraction of C buried as organics (Forg), which today lies near 0.2. Before Oxygenic photosynthesis arose, our biosphere obtained reducing power for biosynthesis solely from thermal volatiles and rock alteration. Thus Forg was dominated by the mantle redox state, which has remained remarkably constant for greater than Gy. Recent data confirm that the long-term change in Forg had been small, indicating that the mantle redox buffer remains important even today. Oxygenic photosynthesis enabled life to obtain additional reducing power by splitting the water molecule. Accordingly, biological organic production rose above the level constrained by the mantle-derived flux of reduced species. For example, today, chemoautotrophs harvesting energy from hydrothermal emanations can synthesize at most between 0.2 x 10(exp 12) and 2x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1 of organic C globally. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated at 9000 x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1. Occasionally photosynthetic productivity did contribute to dramatically -elevated Forg values (to 0.4 or more) as evidenced by very high carbonate C-13/C-12. The interplay between biological, tectonic and other environmental factors is illustrated by the mid-Archean to mid-Proterozoic isotopic record. The relatively constant C-13/C-12 values of Archean carbonates support the view that photosynthetically-driven Forg increases were not yet possible. In contrast, major excursions in C-13/C-12, and thus also in Forg, during the early Proterozoic confirmed the global importance of oxygenic photosynthesis by that time. Remarkably, the superplume event at 1.9 Ga did not trigger another major Forg increase, despite the

  10. Inorganic Carbon Cycling and Biogeochemical Processes in an Arctic Inland Sea (Hudson Bay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Miller, Lisa; Granskog, Mats; Papakyriakou, Tim; Pengelly, Leah

    2016-04-01

    The distributions of CO2 system parameters in Hudson Bay, which not only receives nearly one third of Canada's river discharge, but is also subject to annual cycles of sea-ice formation and melt, indicate that the timing and magnitude of freshwater inputs play an important role in carbon biogeochemistry and ocean acidification in this unique Arctic ecosystem. This study uses basin-wide measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), as well as stable isotope tracers (δ18OH2O and δ13CDIC), to provide a detailed assessment of carbon cycling processes throughout the bay. Surface distributions of carbonate parameters reveal the particular importance of freshwater inputs in the southern portion of the bay. Riverine TA end-members vary significantly both regionally and with small changes in near-surface depths, highlighting the importance of careful surface water sampling in highly stratified waters. In an along-shore transect, large increases in subsurface DIC are accompanied by equivalent decreases in δ13CDIC with no discernable change in TA, indicating a respiratory DIC production on the order of 100 μmol/kg during deep water circulation around the bay. Based on TA data we surmise that the deep waters in the Hudson Bay are of Pacific origin.

  11. Microbial Analysis of Australian Dry Lake Cores; Analogs For Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. V.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomson, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Gilmore in Western Australia is an acidic ephemeral lake that is analogous to Martian geochemical processes represented by interbedded phyllosilicates and sulfates. These areas demonstrate remnants of a global-scale change on Mars during the late Noachian era from a neutral to alkaline pH to relatively lower pH in the Hesperian era that continues to persist today. The geochemistry of these areas could possibly be caused by small-scale changes such as microbial metabolism. Two approaches were used to determine the presence of microbes in the Australian dry lake cores: DNA analysis and lipid analysis. Detecting DNA or lipids in the cores will provide evidence of living or deceased organisms since they provide distinct markers for life. Basic DNA analysis consists of extraction, amplification through PCR, plasmid cloning, and DNA sequencing. Once the sequence of unknown DNA is known, an online program, BLAST, will be used to identify the microbes for further analysis. The lipid analysis approach consists of phospholipid fatty acid analysis that is done by Microbial ID, which will provide direct identification any microbes from the presence of lipids. Identified microbes are then compared to mineralogy results from the x-ray diffraction of the core samples to determine if the types of metabolic reactions are consistent with the variation in composition in these analog deposits. If so, it provides intriguing implications for the presence of life in similar Martian deposits.

  12. [Biogeochemical processes of the major ions and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Guijiang River].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Kui; Tao, Zhen; Gao, Quan-Zhou; Mao, Hai-Ruo; Jiang, Guang-Hui; Jiao, Shu-Lin; Zheng, Xiong-Bo; Zhang, Qian-Zhu; Ma, Zan-Wen

    2014-06-01

    Within the drainage basin, information about natural processes and human activities can be recorded in the chemical composition of riverine water. The analysis of the Guijiang River, the first level tributary of the Xijiang River, demonstrated that the chemical composition of water in the Guijiang River was mainly influenced by the chemical weathering of carbonate rocks within the drainage basin, in which CO2 was the main erosion medium, and that the weathering of carbonate rock by H2SO4 had a remarkable impact on the water chemical composition in the Guijiang River. Precipitation, human activities, the weathering of carbonate rocks and silicate rocks accounted for 2.7%, 6.3%, 72.8% and 18.2% of the total dissolved load, respectively. The stable isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (delta13C(DIC)) indicated that DIC in the Guijiang River had been assimilated by the phytoplankton in photosynthesis. The primary production of phytoplankton contributed to 22.3%-30.9% of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the Guijiang River, which implies that phytoplankton can transform DIC into POC by photosynthesis, and parts of POC will sink into the bottom of the river in transit, which leads into the formation of burial organic carbon. PMID:25158483

  13. Impact of hydrotalcite deposition on biogeochemical processes in a shallow tropical bay.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Daniel M; McKinnon, A David

    2011-03-01

    The biogeochemistry of a tropical shoal bay (Melville Bay, Australia) impacted by the effluent release, precipitation, and deposition of hydrotalcite from an alumina refinery was studied in both wet and dry seasons. Within the deposition zone, sulfate reduction dominated benthic carbon cycling accounting for ≈100% of total microbial activity, with rates greater than those measured in most other marine sediments. These rapid rates of anoxic metabolism resulted in high rates of sulfide and ammonium production and low C:S ratios, implying significant preservation of S in stable sulfide minerals. Rates of total microbial activity were significantly less in control sediments of equivalent grain size, where sulfate reduction accounted for ≈50% of total benthic metabolism. Rates of planktonic carbon cycling overlying the deposition zone were also greater than those measured in the control areas of southern Melville Bay. At the sediment surface, productive algal and cyanobacterial mats helped stabilize the sediment surface and oxidize sulfide to sulfate to maintain a fully oxygenated water-column overlying the impacted zone. The mats utilized a significant fraction of dissolved inorganic N and P released from the sea bed; some nutrients escaped to the water-column such that benthic regeneration of NH₄+ and PO₄³⁻ accounted for 100% and 42% of phytoplankton requirements for N and P, respectively. These percentages are high compared to other tropical coastal environments and indicate that benthic nutrient recycling may be a significant factor driving water-column production overlying the deposition zone. With regard to remediation, it is recommended that the sea bed not be disturbed as attempts at removal may result in further environmental problems and would require specific assessment of the proposed removal process. PMID:21176952

  14. Benthic Communities as Indicators of Geological and Biogeochemical Processes in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.; Dhir, S.; Chummar, J.; Dantzler, M. M.; Aller, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    Benthic communities inhabiting Gulf of Papua deposits play important roles in determining remineralization and material cycling processes at the seafloor. Faunal abundances, size-frequency distributions, functional groups, and vertical distributions reflect a spectrum of diagenetic depositional environments produced by variations in local sediment transport dynamics and coastal morphology. Thus faunal properties provide a basis for comparison of factors influencing sediment - overlying water interactions, elemental cycling, and material storage. During mid NW monsoon periods (Jan-Feb), macrofaunal densities at Gulf stations are generally low (260 to 1270 m{-2 }), large macroinfauna are absent in the upper ˜25 cm, and small (< 0.5 mm) surface deposit-feeding polychaetes and tubiculous amphipods dominate, reflecting a frequently destabilized seabed and high sedimentation / erosion rates. Although significant numbers of macrofauna have generally been found to be absent over large areas due to frequent physical disturbance, sedimentary structures demonstrate that many regions of the GoP deltaic complex are periodically extensively bioturbated by relatively large and deep-burrowing infauna. Additionally, faunal samples from February 2003 have significantly increased numbers of opportunistic polychaete and crustacean species relative to 1999 and 2000, indicating that there are periods of faunal colonization and community expansion. These changes may correlate with decreased riverine sediment input associated with El Niño conditions. While the macrofaunal community is relatively depauperate and apparently subject to inhibition by inhospitable physical conditions, the microbial community is highly active, diverse, and abundant throughout the upper ˜1m. The dominance of bacteria and microfauna rather than macrofauna in wet tropical environments like the GoP, contrasts with many reactive continental shelf mud deposits in temperate regions.

  15. Impact of depositional and biogeochemical processes on small scale variations in nodule abundance in the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, K.; Mogollón, J. M.; Picard, A.; Rühlemann, C.; Kuhn, T.; Nöthen, K.; Kasten, S.

    2014-09-01

    Manganese nodules of the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) in the NE Pacific Ocean are highly enriched in Ni, Cu, Co, Mo and rare-earth elements, and thus may be the subject of future mining operations. Elucidating the depositional and biogeochemical processes that contribute to nodule formation, as well as the respective redox environment, in both water column and sediment, supports our ability to locate future nodule deposits and to evaluate the potential ecological and environmental effects of future deep-sea mining. For these purposes we studied the local hydrodynamics and pore-water geochemistry with respect to the nodule coverage at four sites in the eastern CCFZ. Furthermore, we carried out selective leaching experiments at these sites in order to assess the potential mobility of Mn in the solid phase, and compared them with the spatial variations in sedimentation rates. We found that the oxygen penetration depth is 180-300 cm at all four sites, while reduction of Mn and NO3- is only significant below the oxygen penetration depth at sites with small or no nodules on the sediment surface. At the site without nodules, potential microbial respiration rates, determined by incubation experiments using 14C-labeled acetate, are slightly higher than at sites with nodules. Leaching experiments showed that surface sediments covered with big or medium-sized nodules are enriched in mobilizable Mn. Our deep oxygen measurements and pore-water data suggest that hydrogenetic and oxic-diagenetic processes control the present-day nodule growth at these sites, since free manganese from deeper sediments is unable to reach the sediment surface. We propose that the observed strong lateral contrasts in nodule size and abundance are sensitive to sedimentation rates, which in turn, are controlled by small-scale variations in seafloor topography and bottom-water current intensity.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF INTRINSIC BIOREMEDIATION OF A COAL-TAR AFFECTED AQUIFER USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL MASS BALANCE APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expedited site characterization and groundwater monitoring using direct-push technology and conventional monitoring wells were conducted at a former manufactured gas plant site. Biogeochemical data and heterotrophic plate counts support the presence of microbially mediated remedi...

  17. New insights into biogeochemical processing gained from sub-daily river monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, S. J.; Wade, A. J.; Skeffington, R. A.; Bowes, M.; Palmer-Felgate, E.; Loewenthal, M.; Jarvie, H.; Neal, C.; Reynolds, B.; Gozzard, E.; Newman, J.

    2012-12-01

    This talk will focus on the insights obtained from sub-daily hydrochemical monitoring for a sustained time periods (> 1 year), at multiple sites within a catchment and across different catchment types. Sub-daily instream hydrochemical dynamics were investigated, using non-stationary time-series analysis techniques, for two catchments representative of upland and lowland UK. The River Hafren at Plynlimon, mid-Wales drains an upland catchment where half the land cover is unmanaged moorland and the other half is first generation plantation forestry. The Hafren was monitored at two sites on a 7-hourly basis, between March 2007 and January 2009, using a Xian automatic sampler. The River Enborne, Berkshire, southeast England, is a rural lowland catchment, impacted by agricultural runoff, and septic tank and sewage treatment works discharges. The Enborne was monitored on an hourly basis between November 2009 and February 2012, using in situ field deployable analytical equipment to measure: Total Reactive Phosphorus (TRP: Systea Micromac C), Nitrate (Hach-Lange Nitratax), pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and water temperature (YSI 6600 Multi-parameter sonde). The results reveal complex diurnal patterns which exhibit seasonal changes in phase and amplitude, and are influenced by both flow conditions and nutrient sources. The comparison of the upland and lowland nitrate time series highlights how the different nitrogen sources within each system results in marked differences in the seasonal and diurnal dynamics, with a seasonal maximum in winter and a single peak diurnal cycle in the upland system, compared to a summer maximum and a two peak diurnal cycle in the lowland system. The analysis of TRP and nitrate concentrations in the Enborne catchment, in combination with flow, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and water temperature, allowed the main processes controlling the observed sub-daily nutrient dynamics to be investigated. The different monitoring approaches adopted

  18. Effect of bottom water oxygenation on oxygen consumption and benthic biogeochemical processes at the Crimean Shelf (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Janssen, F.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Holtappels, M.; Struck, U.; Jessen, G.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxia occurs where oxygen concentrations fall below a physiological threshold of many animals, usually defined as <63 µmol L-1. Oxygen depletion can be caused by anthropogenic influences, such as global warming and eutrophication, but as well occurs naturally due to restricted water exchange in combination with high nutrient loads (e.g. upwelling). Bottom-water oxygen availability not only influences the composition of faunal communities, but is also one of the main factors controlling sediment-water exchange fluxes and organic carbon degradation in the sediment, usually shifting processes towards anaerobic mineralization pathways mediated by microorganisms. The Black Sea is one of the world's largest meromictic marine basins with an anoxic water column below 180m. The outer shelf edge, where anoxic waters meet the seafloor, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the response of benthic ecosystems to hypoxia, including benthic biogeochemical processes. During the MSM 15/1 expedition with the German research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN, the NW area of the Black Sea (Crimean Shelf) was studied. The study was set up to investigate the influence of bottom water oxygenation on, (1) the respective share of fauna-mediated oxygen uptake, microbial respiration, or re-oxidation of reduced compounds formed in the deeper sediments for the total oxygen flux and (2) on the efficiency of benthic biogeochemical cycles. During our study, oxygen consumption and pathways of organic carbon degradation were estimated from benthic chamber incubations, oxygen microprofiles measured in situ, and pore water and solid phase profiles measured on retrieved cores under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic water column conditions. Benthic oxygen fluxes measured in Crimean Shelf sediments in this study were comparable to fluxes from previous in situ and laboratory measurements at similar oxygen concentrations (total fluxes -8 to -12 mmol m-2 d-1; diffusive fluxes: -2 to -5 mmol m-2 d-1) with oxygen

  19. Biogeochemical Processes and Microbial Characteristics Across Groundwater-Surface Water Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntzen, E. V.; McKinley, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    The flux of contaminants from ground water to surface water is spatially and temporally dynamic and a function of the variability of the hydrogeology, geochemistry, and biology within the boundary between groundwater and surface waters (i.e., the hyporheic zone). Currently, there lacks a basic understanding of processes within this interaction zone, and consequently, it is not possible to accurately predict the transport and fate of contaminants to sensitive surface water biota. A study was conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to develop and evaluate methods for collecting samples from ground water - surface water mixing zones and to characterize microbiological, geochemical, and hydraulic gradients between the Columbia River and the adjacent unconfined aquifer. During 2002 we sampled the hyporheic zone using passive multilevel samplers (MLS) deployed in riverbed piezometers to determine fine-scale geochemical variations. MLS units were deployed at four locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, one near an area where contaminant chromate is known to enter the river and the other three near areas where salmon spawn. MLS units were used to collect ambient water samples in 10 cm intervals to depths ranging from 114 cm to 123 cm below the riverbed. MLS results reflected ambient water conditions integrated over an approximately 10 hour period prior to removal (equilibration time between the MLS and ambient hyporheic water was approximately 10 hours). MLS units were recovered following periods of relatively high and low diurnal fluctuation of river stage. The period of maximum stage occurred at a river discharge of 192,000 ft3/s (median river discharge over 10 hours prior to removal = 192,000 ft3/s); the minimum at 52,000 ft3/s (median river discharge over 10 hours prior to removal = 52,000 ft3/s). The median vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) was larger at all sites during minimum discharge, with values 1

  20. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (α2β2γ2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass

  1. Biogeochemical Processes Related to Metal Removal and Toxicity Reduction in the H-02 Constructed Wetland, Savannah River Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, E. A.; Mills, G. L.; Harmon, M.; Samarkin, V.

    2011-12-01

    The H-02 wetland system was designed to treat building process water and storm water runoff from multiple sources associated with the Tritium Facility at the DOE-Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The wetland construction included the addition of gypsum (calcium sulfate) to foster a sulfate-reducing bacterial population. Conceptually, the wetland functions as follows: ? Cu and Zn initially bind to both dissolved and particulate organic detritus within the wetland. ? A portion of this organic matter is subsequently deposited into the surface sediments within the wetland. ? The fraction of Cu and Zn that is discharged in the wetland effluent is organically complexed, less bioavailable, and consequently, less toxic. ? The Cu and Zn deposited in the surface sediments are eventually sequestered into insoluble sulfide minerals in the wetland. Development of the H-02 system has been closely monitored; sampling began in August 2007, shortly after its construction. This monitoring has included the measurement of water quality parameters, Cu and Zn concentrations in surface water and sediments, as well as, characterization of the prokaryotic (e.g., bacterial) component of wetland biogeochemical processes. Since the beginning of the study, the mean influent Cu concentration was 31.5±12.1 ppb and the mean effluent concentration was 11.9±7.3 ppb, corresponding to an average Cu removal of 64%. Zn concentrations were more variable, averaging 39.2±13.8 ppb in the influent and 25.7±21.3 ppb in the effluent. Average Zn removal was 52%. The wetland also ameliorated high pH values associated with influent water to values similar to those measured at reference sites. Seasonal variations in DOC concentration corresponded to seasonal variations in Cu and Zn removal efficiency. The concentration of Cu and Zn in the surface layer of the sediments has increased over the lifetime of the wetland and, like removal efficiency, demonstrated seasonal variation. Within its first year, the H-02

  2. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  3. Synchronous DOM and dissolved phosphorus release in riparian soil waters: linking water table fluctuations and biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruau, G.; Dupas, R.; Humbert, G.; GU, S.; Jeanneau, L.; Fovet, O.; Denis, M.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Jaffrezic, A.; Faucheux, M.; Gilliet, N.; Hamon, Y.; Petitjean, P.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones are often viewed as hot spots controlling N, C, P and Fe cycling and export in catchments. Groundwater and surface water flowpaths converge in these zones, and encounter the most reactive, organic-rich, uppermost soil horizons, while being at the same time zones in which soil moisture conditions temporarily fluctuate due to changes in water table depth, which can trigger biogeochemical processes. One well documented example is the process of denitrification which can remove N from riparian groundwater due to the anaerobic reduction of nitrate by soil organic matter. However, the role of riparian zones on the cycling of other nutrients such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and dissolved P (DP) is much less well documented. In this study, we evaluated this role by using time series of DOM and DP concentrations obtained on the Kervidy-Naizin catchment, a temperate agricultural headwater catchment controlled by shallow groundwater. Over 2 years, groundwater DOM and DP were monitored fortnightly both in the riparian zones and at the bottom of hillslope domains. Two periods of synchronous DOM and DP release were evidenced, the first corresponding to the rise of the water table after the dry summer period, the second being concomitant of the installation of reducing conditions. The reductive dissolution of soil Fe oxyhydroxides initiated by the prolonged soil water saturation caused the second peak, a process which was, however, strongly temporarily and spatially variable at the catchment scale, being dependent on i) the local topographic slope and ii) the annual rainfall amount and frequency. As regard the first peak, it was due either to the flushing by the water table of DOM and DP accumulated during the summer period, or to the release of microbial DOM and DP due to microbial biomass killing by osmotic shock. This study argues for the existence of coupled and complex DOM and DP release processes in the riparian zones of shallow groundwater dominated

  4. Carbon Characteristics and Biogeochemical Processes of Uranium Accumulating Organic Matter Rich Sediments in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boye, K.; Noel, V.; Tfaily, M. M.; Dam, W. L.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium plume persistence in groundwater aquifers is a problem on several former ore processing sites on floodplains in the upper Colorado River Basin. Earlier observations by our group and others at the Old Rifle Site, CO, have noted that U concentrations are highest in organic rich, fine-grained, and, therefore, diffusion limited sediment material. Due to the constantly evolving depositional environments of floodplains, surficial organic matter may become buried at various stages of decomposition, through sudden events such as overbank flooding and through the slower progression of river meandering. This creates a discontinuous subsurface distribution of organic-rich sediments, which are hotspots for microbial activity and thereby central to the subsurface cycling of contaminants (e.g. U) and biologically relevant elements (e.g. C, N, P, Fe). However, the organic matter itself is poorly characterized. Consequently, little is known about its relevance in driving biogeochemical processes that control U fate and transport in the subsurface. In an investigation of soil/sediment cores from five former uranium ore processing sites on floodplains distributed across the Upper Colorado River Basin we confirmed consistent co-enrichment of U with organic-rich layers in all profiles. However, using C K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with Fourier-Transformed Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Mass-Spectroscopy (FT-ICR-MS) on bulk sediments and density-separated organic matter fractions, we did not detect any chemical difference in the organic rich sediments compared to the surrounding coarser-grained aquifer material within the same profile, even though there were differences in organic matter composition between the 5 sites. This suggests that U retention and reduction to U(IV) is independent of C chemical composition on the bulk scale. Instead it appears to be the abundance of organic matter in combination with a limited O2 supply in the fine-grained material that

  5. Age, Marital Processes, and Depressed Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookwala, Jamila; Jacobs, Jamie

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We examined age-cohort differences in the interrelationships among marital processes and depressed affect. Design and Methods: We used data from individuals in first marriages that participated in the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH). The NSFH interviewed one adult per household of a nationally representative sample.…

  6. Cognitive and Affective Processes Underlying Career Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muja, Naser; Appelbaum, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aligning social identity and career identity has become increasingly complex due to growth in the pursuit of meaningful careers that offer very long-term personal satisfaction and stability. This paper aims to explore the complex cognitive and affective thought process involved in the conscious planning of voluntary career change.…

  7. Subsurface processes affecting cold season streamflow generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount and timing of snowmelt-generated streamflow greatly affects the management of water resources in the western USA and Canada. Subsurface processes that deliver water to streams during snowmelt are somewhat different from those that occur during rainfall. In this study we document some of ...

  8. Controlled Freeze-thaw Experiments to Study Biogeochemical Process and its Effects on Greenhouse Gas Release in Arctic Soil Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Tas, N.; Bill, M.; Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas release associated with permafrost thawing is one of the largest uncertainties in future climate prediction. Improvement of such prediction relies on a better representation of the interactions between hydrological, geochemical and microbial processes in the Arctic ecosystem that occur over a wide range of space and time scales and under dynamic freeze-thaw conditions. As part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments in the Arctic (NGEE-Arctic), we conducted controlled laboratory freeze-thaw experiments to study greenhouse gas release in vertical permafrost soil columns with vertically heterogeneous hydrological, geochemical and microbial properties. The studies were performed using soil cores collected from the NGEE Barrow, AK site. Two cores collected next to each other with very similar soil structures were used for the experiment. One of the cores was destructively sampled for baseline characterization, and the second core was used for the freeze-thaw experiments. The core extends from the ground surface into the permafrost with roughly 40 cm of active layer. The column was instrumented with various sensors and sampling devices, including thermocouples, geophysical (electrical) sensors, and sampling ports for solids and fluids. The headspace of the soil column was purged with CO2 free air and the gas samples were collected periodically for greenhouse gas analysis. Our initial tests simulated seasonal temperature variation from ~ -10°C to +10°C at the ground surface. Our results demonstrated that temperature and geophysical data provided real time information on the freeze thaw dynamics of the column and the surface greenhouse gas fluxes correlated with the freeze thaw stages and associated hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the vertical soil column. For example, surface fluxes data revealed an early burst of GHG concentrations during the initial thawing of the surface ice rich layer of the soil, indicating the presence of trapped

  9. Use of Zn isotopes as a probe of anthropogenic contamination and biogeochemical processes in the Seine River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Gaillardet, J.; Louvat, P.; Birck, J.

    2009-05-01

    a whole river basin, showing Zn isotopes a powerful probe to trace contamination sources and biogeochemical processes in hydrologic systems.

  10. Effects of biogeochemical processes on magnesium isotope variations in a forested catchment in the Vosges Mountains (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolou-Bi, Emile B.; Vigier, Nathalie; Poszwa, Anne; Boudot, Jean-Pierre; Dambrine, Etienne

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the potential of Mg isotopes as tracers of biogeochemical processes in a small-forested catchment located on sandstones extremely poor in Mg-bearing minerals. The average δ26Mg is -0.63 ± 0.12‰ and 0 ± 0.14‰ for local rainwater and bedrock, respectively. From the C horizon to the upper eluvial (E) horizon, soil δ26Mg (from 0.0 ± 0.14‰ to 0.25 ± 0.14‰) is close to the bedrock value, while more than 70% of Mg is lost, suggesting a small isotopic shift during illite dissolution. The surface soil horizon (Ah) δ26Mg is close to plant δ26Mg, and especially to the grass δ26Mg value (-0.49‰). The bulk δ26Mg of trees and grass (-0.32‰ and -0.41‰, respectively) are higher than the average δ26Mg values of the soil exchangeable fraction (-0.92‰ to -0.42‰), and of rainwater (-0.65‰). Within plants, roots are enriched in heavy isotopes, whereas light isotopes are preferentially translocated and stored in the above ground parts. In Norway spruce, the older needles, forming the annual litterfall, are isotopically lighter and strongly depleted in Mg compared to more recent needles. Soil solution δ26Mg shifts seasonally, from low values, lower than rainwater and close to litterfall during a high rainfall period in spring, to higher values, close to soil δ26Mg in dryer periods of winter or summer. At the watershed scale, streamwater δ26Mg varies between -0.85 ± 0.14‰ and -0.08 ± 0.14‰ and δ26Mg values decrease linearly with discharge. The high streamwater δ26Mg at low flow, close to bedrock δ26Mg, most likely reflects dissolution processes in the deep saprolite in relation to the very long water residence time. Conversely, we suggest that low stream level δ26Mg values are at least partly related to the contribution of surface flows from wet areas. Using a simple mass and isotopic balance approach, we compute that mineral dissolution rates in the soil (0.35 kg Mg ha-1 year-1) presently compensate for Mg losses from

  11. Microphysical Processes Affecting the Pinatubo Volcanic Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Houben, Howard; Young, Richard; Turco, Richard; Zhao, Jingxia

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider microphysical processes which affect the formation of sulfate particles and their size distribution in a dispersing cloud. A model for the dispersion of the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic cloud is described. We then consider a single point in the dispersing cloud and study the effects of nucleation, condensation and coagulation on the time evolution of the particle size distribution at that point.

  12. [Affect processing in psychosomatic patients. I].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, S

    1984-01-01

    The present article reports the results of an empirical investigation concerned with specific characteristics of psychosomatic patients. Subjects suffering from ulcus duodeni or from colitis ulcerosa designated as psychosomatic patients. Controls were chosen from among neurotic patients and from among patients with only somatic illness. Against the background of the criticism with regard to the scientific approaches so far, our own approach was conceived as an experiment. Film episodes of two contrating (friendly versus unfriendly) interactions between physician and patient were offered to the test subjects as triggering situations. The contents of these film segments were organized in a manner calculated to produce an affective embarrassment in the psychosomatic patients. The reactions of the test subjects were inventoried on two levels. One of the levels of investigation was geared to cognitive processes by the application of Hofstätter's list of polarities (1955, 1973). In this case the psychosomatic patients distinguished themselves from the two control groups in that they misinterpreted the differences in the affective contents of both film sequences. On the other level of investigation subconscious processes were recorded by the application of Gottschalk's analysis of verbal contents. In this context all three groups in the investigation reacted in a similar manner to friendly connotations in the behaviour of the physician, namely with hidden aggressions. The results infer an affective resonance of the investigated psychosomatic patients on a subconscious level which, however, does not become evident on the conscious cognitive level. PMID:6485587

  13. Biogeochemical processing of nutrients in groundwater-fed stream during baseflow conditions - the value of fluorescence spectroscopy and automated high-frequency nutrient monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Louise

    2014-05-01

    Recent research in groundwater-dominated streams indicates that organic matter plays an important role in nutrient transformations at the surface-groundwater interface known as the hyporheic zone. Mixing of water and nutrient fluxes in the hyporheic zone controls in-stream nutrients availability, dynamics and export to downstream reaches. In particular, benthic sediments can form adsorptive sinks for organic matter and reactive nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) that sustain a variety of hyporheic processes e.g. denitrification, microbial uptake. Thus, hyporheic metabolism can have an important effect on both quantity (concentration) and quality (labile vs. refractory character) of organic matter. Here high-frequency nutrient monitoring combined with spectroscopic analysis was used to provide insights into biogeochemical processing of a small, agricultural stream in the NE England subject to diffuse nutrient pollution. Biogeochemical data were collected hourly for a week at baseflow conditions when in-stream-hyporheic nutrient dynamics have the greatest impact on stream health. In-stream nutrients (total phosphorus, reactive phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen) and water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential) were measured in situ hourly by an automated bank-side laboratory. Concurrent hourly autosamples were retrieved daily and analysed for nutrients and fine sediments including spectroscopic analyses of dissolved organic matter - excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectroscopy. Our results show that organic matter can potentially be utilised as a natural, environmental tracer of the biogeochemical processes occurring at the surface-groundwater interface in streams. High-frequency spectroscopic characterisation of in-stream organic matter can provide useful quantitative and qualitative information on fluxes of reactive nutrients in

  14. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  15. Will a changed element composition of rainfall - due to climate change - affect the biogeochemical cycle of montane forest soils in Southern Ecuador?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullaert, H.; Peña, J. L.; González, E.; Valarezo, C.; Wilcke, W.

    2009-04-01

    Increasing biomass burning, fertilization and industrialization in tropical areas will generally lead to a greater N deposition in the Tropics including the northern Andean forests in the coming decades. In previous work, we detected extra Ca deposition from the atmosphere in the northern Andes originating from Sahara dust during a pronounced la Niña event. Therefore, the possible shortening of the El Niño Southern Oscillation might result in more frequent Ca input into the northern Andean forests. We quantify biogeochemical processes in a tropical montane forest in southern Ecuador at 2000 m a.s.l. in response to N and Ca additions to simulate elevated N and Ca deposition from the atmosphere. Four replicate experimental plots under native forest were fertilized with either 50 kg N or 10 kg Ca ha-1 y-1 with urea (46%) and CaCl2.2H2O, respectively, distributed between two dates per year and the effects were compared with non-fertilized control plots. We collected litter percolate with zero-tension lysimeters, soil solution with suction cups at 0.15 and 0.30 m, rainfall and throughfall. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of total N, nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and Ca. Two months after the first fertilization, nitrogen addition mainly stimulates microbial activity where in a priming effect ammonium is transferred to nitrate and soil organic matter is mineralised, resulting in increased DON concentrations. This stimulation would also release other nutrients than N which in turn enhance tree growth. Total nitrogen concentration in litter leachate increased slightly after N fertilization from 1.75 mg/l to 1.8 mg/l, which represents about 1.5% of the total applied N. In contrast, the low Ca concentrations in litter leachate doubled from 0.10 mg/l to 0.20 mg/l after Ca addition, which on yearly basis would represent about 15% of the total applied Ca. From these preliminary results we conclude that (i) both added N and Ca are net retained in

  16. Quantifying the dynamic coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in stream ecosystems: examples from streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Lyons, W. B.; Gooseff, M. N.; Koch, J. C.; Neupauer, R.; Cozzetto, K.; Bencala, K.; Cullis, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    While continuous monitoring of stream flow and stream temperature has been a widely used resource for some time, currently there is great potential to expand continuous monitoring to include important water quality parameters such as nutrients and dissolved organic material. In many systems distinguishing between watershed and stream ecosystem controls can be challenging, and the usefulness of such monitoring can be enhanced by application of quantitative models to interpret observed patterns. The glacial meltwater streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, are surrounded by large expanses of patterned ground devoid of plants. In contrast, many streams have thriving cyanobacterial mats that are freeze-dried through the winter and begin photosynthesis with the onset of flow. Thus, the daily signal in terms of biogeochemical processes controlling water quality is generated within the stream. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long Term Ecological Research project, we have conducted field experiments and developed coupled biogeochemical transport models for the role of hyporheic exchange in controlling weathering of major ions, microbial cycling of nitrogen species, and streams temperature regulation. We have also adapted modelling approaches from sediment transport to understand mobilization of stream biomass with increasing flows. These models are relevant to understanding the role of in-stream processes in diverse stream systems where watershed processes also contribute to observed patterns.

  17. Simulating temporal variations of nitrogen losses in river networks with a dynamic transport model unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Alexander, Richard; Bohlke, John; Boyer, Elizabeth; Harvey, Judson; Seitzinger, Sybil; Tobias, Craig; Tonitto, Christina; Wollheim, Wilfred

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  18. Up-scaling of process-based eco-hydrology model to global scale for identification of hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent research shows inland water may play some role in continental biogeochemical cycling though its contribution has remained uncertain due to a paucity of data (Battin et al. 2009). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which includes surface-groundwater interactions and down-scaling process from regional to local simulation with finer resolution, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes in east Asia. In this study, NICE was further extended to implement map factor and non-uniform grid through up-scaling process of coordinate transformation from rectangular to longitude-latitude system applicable to global scale. This improved model was applied to several basins in Eurasia to evaluate the impact of coordinate transformation on eco-hydrological changes. Simulated eco-hydrological process after up-scaling corresponded reasonably to that in the original there after evaluating the effect of different latitude. Then, the model was expanded to evaluate global hydrologic cycle by using various global datasets. The simulated result agreed reasonably with that in the previous research (Fan et al., 2013) and extended to clarify further eco-hydrological process in global scale. This simulation system would play important role in identification of spatio-temporal hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycle along terrestrial-aquatic continuum for global environmental change (Cole et al. 2007; Battin et al. 2009; Frei et al. 2012).

  19. Microphysical processes affecting stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Kiang, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Physical processes which affect stratospheric aerosol particles include nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Quantitative studies of these mechanisms to determine if they can account for some of the observed properties of the aerosol are carried out. It is shown that the altitude range in which nucleation of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets can take place corresponds to that region of the stratosphere where the aerosol is generally found. Since heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mechanism, the stratospheric solution droplets are mainly formed on particles which have been mixed up from the troposphere or injected into the stratosphere by volcanoes or meteorites. Particle growth by heteromolecular condensation can account for the observed increase in mixing ratio of large particles in the stratosphere. Coagulation is important in reducing the number of particles smaller than 0.05 micron radius. Growth by condensation, applied to the mixed nature of the particles, shows that available information is consistent with ammonium sulfate being formed by liquid phase chemical reactions in the aerosol particles. The upper altitude limit of the aerosol layer is probably due to the evaporation of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, while the lower limit is due to mixing across the tropopause.

  20. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The elements carbon (C) and sulfur (S) interact with each other across a network of elemental reservoirs that are interconnected by an array of physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed the biogeochemical C and S cycles. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. The element S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. This presentation describes the modern biogeochemical C and S cycles. Measurements are described whereby stable isotopes can help to infer the nature and quantitative significance of biological and geological processes involved in the C and S cycles. This lecture also summarizes the geological and climatologic aspects of the ancient C and S cycles, as well as the planetary and extraterrestrial processes that influenced their evolution over millions to billions of years.

  1. Geophysical Measurements for Real-time Monitoring of Biogeochemical Processes for Improvement of Soil Engineering Properties and Subsurface Environmental Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of biogeochemical processes, from inorganic mineral precipitation, to bio-film formation, to bio-gas generation, are being investigated as alternative methods to improve soil engineering properties and subsurface environmental conditions. Every process applied in a geotechnical or geoenvironmental application requires the ability to monitor the progression of treatment non-destructively and in real-time. Geophysical methods have been shown effective to monitor temporally and map spatially soil improvement. Results from seismic velocity (compression and shear wave) and resistivity measurements obtained on 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D experiments at scales ranging from bench-top to field scale will be presented. Shear wave velocity will be demonstrated to be most effective in monitoring microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in sands while compression wave velocity will be used to monitor desaturation through bio-gas formation. Finally, the implications of these results for real-time monitoring during field-scale applications will be discussed.

  2. Assessment of intrinsic bioremediation of a coal-tar-affected aquifer using two-dimensional reactive transport and biogeochemical mass balance approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.W.; Ong, S.K.; Stenback, G.A.; Golchin, J.; Kjartanson, B.H.

    2007-01-15

    Expedited site characterization and groundwater monitoring using direct-push technology and conventional monitoring wells were conducted at a former manufactured gas plant site. Biogeochemical data and heterotrophic plate counts support the presence of microbially mediated remediation. By superimposing solutions of a two-dimensional reactive transport analytical model, first-order degradation rate coefficients (day{sup -1}) of various compounds for the dissolved-phase plume were estimated (i.e., benzene (0.0084), naphthalene (0.0058), and acenaphthene (0.0011)). The total mass transformed by aerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, and sulfate reduction around the free-phase coal-tar dense-nonaqueous-phase-liquid region and in the plume was estimated to be approximately 4.5 kg/y using a biogeochemical mass-balance approach. The total mass transformed using the degradation rate coefficients was estimated to be approximately 3.6 kg/y. Results showed that a simple two-dimensional analytical model and a biochemical mass balance with geochemical data from expedited site characterization can be useful for rapid estimation of mass-transformation rates.

  3. The biogeochemical footprint of agricultural soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, Gerard; Van Oost, Kristof; Wang, Zhengang

    2015-04-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles are a key component of the functioning of the Earth System: these cycles are all, to a varying extent, disturbed by human activities which not only has dramatic consequences for the global climate but also for the acidity of the world's oceans. It is only relatively recently that the role of lateral fluxes related to surface water movement and soil erosion and deposition (and the way those fluxes are modified by human action) is explicitly considered by the scientific community. In this paper we present an overview of our present-day understanding of the role of agricultural soil erosion in the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and silica. We discuss the major processes through which erosion affects these global cycles and pay particular attention to the knowledge gaps that prevent us from accurately assessing the impact of soil erosion on global biogeochemical cycling at different temporal scales. Furthering our understanding (and better constraining our estimates) will require progress both in terms of model development and process understanding. Research needs can be most clearly identified with respect to soil organic carbon: (i) at present, large-scale soil erosion (and deposition) models are poorly constrained so that the amount of carbon mobilised by erosion (and its fate) cannot be accurately estimated and (ii) the fate of soil organic carbon buried by deposition or delivered to river network is poorly understood. Uncertainties for N, P and Si are larger than those for C as we have less information on the amount of these elements stored in agricultural soils and/or do not fully understand how these elements cycle through the soil/plant system. Agricultural soil erosion does not affect soil functioning through its effect on biogeochemical cycling. Erosion directly affects soil hydrological functioning and is likely to affect weathering processes and soil production. Addressing all these issues requires the

  4. A new post-processing tool for the source-related element tracing in biogeochemical models: A case study for the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große, Fabian; Kreus, Markus; Pätsch, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The mitigation of eutrophication and its concomitants, like harmful algal blooms or deoxygenation of bottom waters, is one of the major aspects of the ecological management of coastal marine ecosystems. In the past, biogeochemical models helped to significantly improve the understanding of the interaction of the physical and biological processes behind eutrophication. Nevertheless, the quantification of the influence of source-related nutrient inputs to eutrophication in a specific region remains an important issue, since it is as crucial for an efficient management as it is difficult to obtain. About a decade ago, a method applicable to biogeochemical models had been developed allowing for the tracing of elements from different sources, e.g. phosphorus and/or nitrogen from two different rivers, throughout the whole process chain of the applied model. This tracing method - often referred to as 'trans-boundary nutrient transport' (TBNT) - provides additional information about the contributions from different sources to the overall amount ('bulk') of an element in each part of the model domain. This information constitutes the basis for the quantification, evaluation and optimisation of nutrient reduction targets for the tributaries of a marine ecosystem. In the meantime, the TBNT method has been applied to a variety of different biogeochemical models, e.g. to quantify the influence of nutrient loads from different rivers or atmospheric deposition on phytoplankton blooms or to determine the source-related composition of total nitrogen in different parts of an ecosystem. However, for all of these applications the method was directly implemented into the considered model, and thus was model-dependent and required an individual solution to deal with the model specifics like grid structure, programming language etc. For the application of the TBNT method to the ECOHAM model (ECOlogical model HAMburg), we further developed the approach by creating a post-processing

  5. Reappraisal of soil C storage processes. The controversy on structural diversity of humic substances as biogeochemical driver for soil C fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, Gonzalo; Gonzalez-Vila, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Perez, Jose Antonio; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    The functional relationships between the macromolecular structure of the humic substances (HS) and a series of biogeochemical processes related with the C sequestration performance in soils have been recently questioned. In this communication we collect recent data from a wide array of different ecosystems where the C storage in soils has been studied and explained as a possible cause-to-effect relationship or has been found significantly correlated (multivariate statistical models) with a series of structural characteristics of humic materials. The study of humic materials has methodological analytical limitations that are derived from its complex, chaotic and not completely understood structure, that reflects its manifold precursors as well as the local impact of environmental/depositional factors. In this work we attempt to design an exploratory, multiomic approach based on the information provided by the molecular characterization of the soil organic matter (SOM). Massive data harvesting was carried out of statistical variables, to infer biogeochemical proxies (spectroscopic, chromatographic, mass spectrometric quantitative descriptors). The experimental data were acquired from advanced instrumental methodologies, viz, analytical pyrolysis, compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA), derivative infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, solid-state C-13 and N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) data after direct injection (thermoevaporation), previous pyrolysis, or ion averaging of specific m/z ranges from classical GC/MS chromatograms. In the transversal exploratory analysis of the multianalytical information, the data were coded for on-line processing in a stage in which there is no need for interpretation, in molecular or structural terms, of the quantitative data consisting of e.g., peak intensities, signal areas, chromatographic (GC) total abundances, etc. A series of forecasting chemometric approaches (aiming to express SOM

  6. Seasonal baseline of nutrients and stable isotopes in a saline lake of Argentina: biogeochemical processes and river runoff effects.

    PubMed

    Kopprio, Germán A; Kattner, Gerhard; Freije, R Hugo; de Paggi, Susana José; Lara, Rubén J

    2014-05-01

    The seasonal variability of inorganic and organic nutrients and stable isotopes and their relations with plankton and environmental conditions were monitored in Lake Chasicó. Principal component analysis evidenced the strong influence of the river runoff on several biogeochemical variables. Silicate concentrations were controlled by diatom biomass and river discharge. Higher values of nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) indicated agricultural uses in the river basin. Elevated pH values (∼ 9) inhibiting nitrification in the lake explained partially the dominance of ammonium: ∼ 83 % of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). The low DIN/SRP ratio inferred nitrogen limitation, although the hypotheses of iron and CO2 limitation are relevant in alkaline lakes. Particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were mainly of autochthonous origin. The main allochthonous input was imported by the river as POM owning to the arid conditions. Dissolved organic carbon was likely top-down regulated by the bacterioplankton grazer Brachionus plicatilis. The δ(13)C signature was a good indicator of primary production and its values were influenced probably by CO2 limitation. The δ(15)N did not evidence nitrogen fixation and suggested the effects of anthropogenic activities. The preservation of a good water quality in the lake is crucial for resource management. PMID:24415133

  7. Modeling biogeochemical processes in subterranean estuaries: Effect of flow dynamics and redox conditions on submarine groundwater discharge of nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiteri, Claudette; Slomp, Caroline P.; Tuncay, Kagan; Meile, Christof

    2008-02-01

    A two-dimensional density-dependent reactive transport model, which couples groundwater flow and biogeochemical reactions, is used to investigate the fate of nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, and PO4) in idealized subterranean estuaries representing four end-members of oxic/anoxic aquifer and seawater redox conditions. Results from the simplified model representations show that the prevalent flow characteristics and redox conditions in the freshwater-seawater mixing zone determine the extent of nutrient removal and the input of nitrogen and phosphorus to coastal waters. At low to moderate groundwater velocities, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification can lead to a reversal in the depth of freshwater NO3- and NH4+-PO4 plumes, compared to their original positions at the landward source. Model results suggest that autotrophic denitrification pathways with Fe2+ or FeS2 may provide an important, often overlooked link between nitrogen and phosphorus biogeochemistry through the precipitation of iron oxides and subsequent binding of phosphorus. Simulations also highlight that deviations of nutrient data from conservative mixing curves do not necessarily indicate nutrient removal.

  8. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07

    Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer – a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  9. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  10. Biogeochemical Processes leading to release of As and Mn in the groundwaters of Murshidabad District of West Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, K. H.; Datta, S.; Vega, M.; Berube, M.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of both manganese (Mn) and arsenic (As) have been observed in the groundwaters of Murshidabad, in eastern India. Mn, a postulated neurotoxin is known to cause neuromuscular problems, inhibition of neurological development particularly in children. The health impacts from higher bioavailable proportions of As is well known in being a Class I carcinogen. The discovery of this additional contaminant in the already As afflicted regions of SE Asia poses serious implications for millions of inhabitants. The current study aims to address three objectives in understanding biogeochemical cycling of Mn and As in groundwaters: i) the occurrence and overall distribution (lateral and temporal) of groundwater Mn and As; ii) characterization of the dissolved organic matter and microbial content and the resultant effects that are imposed on dissolved As and Mn; and iii) the relationship between Mn, As, and various other inorganic constituents and their impact on the subsequent release of Mn, on top of As. A three year time series of chemical data for the dissolved constituents from six villages in Murshidabad will be presented. Hariharpara, Beldanga, Naoda villages contain reducing groundwaters (mean Mn: 0.93mg/L); Nabagram, Kandi, Khidirpore demonstrate oxidizing aquifers (Mn: 0.74mg/L). Eighty-three percent of the wells surveyed contain Mn levels that exceed the recommended WHO limit of 0.4 mg/L. Dissolved As within the same locations show a range from <10μg/L to ~4000 μg/L. DOC values demonstrate a positive correlation with Mn in reducing and a negative correlation in oxidizing environments. The reducing aquifers are also high in As and DOC, indicating that the microbially mediated reductive dissolution of As-sorbed onto Fe-Mn mineral phases is probable. Fluorescence analyses of dissolved OM, solidphase modeling of Mn speciation are being combined in this study for more insight into the mechanisms of Mn release and its relation if any to As release.

  11. Linking the Modern and Recent Record of Cabo Frio Upwelling with Local Climate and Biogeochemical Processes in Hypersaline Coastal Lagoons, Região dos Lagos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Nascimento, G. S.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Belem, A. L.; Carreira, R.; Eglinton, T. I.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    A unique marine and lagoonal system along the coast east of Rio de Janeiro is being investigated to understand the impact of climatic variability on the South Atlantic carbon cycle and biomineralisation processes involved in carbonate precipitation in the hypersaline coastal lagoons. The region is dominated by a semi-arid microclimate attributed to the local coastal upwelling phenomenon near Cabo Frio. The intensity of the upwelling affects the hydrology of the annual water and biogeochemical cycles in the lagoons, as well as biogeochemical signals of environmental change recorded in both onshore and offshore sediments. Preliminary results of δ18O and δD values of water samples collected monthly in Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho from 2011 to 2014 show lower values for waters corresponding to the wet season, reflecting increased input of meteoric water. The higher values for waters collected during the dry season reflect the greater amount of evaporation with increased seasonal aridity. Radiocarbon dating of Holocene marine and lagoonal cores indicates that Mg-carbonate precipitation in the lagoons is associated with high evaporation. Modern field observations for the last 3 years suggest that the amount of carbonate precipitation is correlated with evaporitic conditions associated with the upwelling phenomenon. A calibration study of hydrogen isotopic fractionation in the modern lagoons is underway to define a relationship between δDlipid of suspended particles and δDwater of associated water. This isotopic relationship will be applied to material obtained in cores from the lagoons. Offshore cores will be studied using well-tested paleotemperature proxies to evaluate the intensity of the upwelling during the Holocene. In summary, linking the coastal upwelling with the lagoonal hydrology has the potential to furnish important insights about the relationship between the local climate and paleoceanographic circulation associated with the regional carbon cycle.

  12. Flexible control in processing affective and non-affective material predicts individual differences in trait resilience.

    PubMed

    Genet, Jessica J; Siemer, Matthias

    2011-02-01

    Trait resilience is a stable personality characteristic that involves the self-reported ability to flexibly adapt to emotional events and situations. The present study examined cognitive processes that may explain individual differences in trait resilience. Participants completed self-report measures of trait resilience, cognitive flexibility and working memory capacity tasks, and a novel affective task-switching paradigm that assesses the ability to flexibly switch between processing the affective versus non-affective qualities of affective stimuli (i.e., flexible affective processing). As hypothesised, cognitive flexibility and flexible affective processing were unique predictors of trait resilience. Working memory capacity was not predictive of trait resilience, indicating that trait resilience is tied to specific cognitive processes rather than overall better cognitive functioning. Cognitive flexibility and flexible affective processing were not associated with other trait measures, suggesting that these flexibility processes are unique to trait resilience. This study was among the first to investigate the cognitive abilities underlying trait resilience. PMID:21432680

  13. Do unconscious processes affect educational institutions?

    PubMed

    Hinshelwood, R D

    2009-10-01

    In this article I discuss the way that aspects of school and teaching have unconscious roots. Where anxiety about the process, for teachers and children, is high then there is the risk that unconscious defensive processes may occur resulting in institutionalized phenomena. These take the form of cultural attitudes and common practices which may not necessarily enhance the work and in some cases may actively interfere. PMID:19759069

  14. Sound Affects the Speed of Visual Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keetels, Mirjam; Vroomen, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of a task-irrelevant sound on visual processing. Participants were presented with revolving clocks at or around central fixation and reported the hand position of a target clock at the time an exogenous cue (1 clock turning red) or an endogenous cue (a line pointing toward 1 of the clocks) was presented. A…

  15. Dilution, Not Load, Affects Distractor Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Daryl E.; Muroi, Miya; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2011-01-01

    Lavie and Tsal (1994) proposed that spare attentional capacity is allocated involuntarily to the processing of irrelevant stimuli, thereby enabling interference. Under this view, when task demands increase, spare capacity should decrease and distractor interference should decrease. In support, Lavie and Cox (1997) found that increasing perceptual…

  16. Oceanographic and biogeochemical insights from diatom genomes.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Chris; Vardi, Assaf; Allen, Andrew E

    2010-01-01

    Diatoms are the most successful group of eukaryotic phytoplankton in the modern ocean and have risen to dominance relatively quickly over the last 100 million years. Recently completed whole genome sequences from two species of diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have revealed a wealth of information about the evolutionary origins and metabolic adaptations that have led to their ecological success. A major finding is that they have incorporated genes both from their endosymbiotic ancestors and by horizontal gene transfer from marine bacteria. This unique melting pot of genes encodes novel capacities for metabolic management, for example, allowing the integration of a urea cycle into a photosynthetic cell. In this review we show how genome-enabled approaches are being leveraged to explore major phenomena of oceanographic and biogeochemical relevance, such as nutrient assimilation and life histories in diatoms. We also discuss how diatoms may be affected by climate change-induced alterations in ocean processes. PMID:21141668

  17. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  18. Effect of sulfidogenesis cycling on the biogeochemical process in arsenic-enriched aquifers in the Lanyang Plain of Taiwan: Evidence from a sulfur isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Pei-Ling; Liao, Chung-Min

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the biogeochemical interactions between arsenic (As) and sulfur (S) in groundwater to understand the natural and anthropogenic influences of S redox processes on As mobilization in the Lanyang Plain, Taiwan. Cl- and the sulfate isotopic composition (δ34S[SO4]) were selected as conservative tracers. River water and saline seawater were considered as end members in the binary mixing model. Thirty-two groundwater samples were divided into four types of groundwater (I, pyrite-oxidation; II, iron- and sulfate-reducing; III, sulfate-reducing; and IV, anthropogenic and others). The binary mixing model coupled with discriminant analysis was applied to yield a classification with 97% correctness, indicating that the DO/ORP values and δ34S[SO4] and Fe2+ concentrations are effective redox-sensitive indicators. Type I groundwater is mostly located in a mountainous recharge area where pyrite oxidation is the major geochemical process. A high 18O enrichment factor (ε[SO4-H2O]) and high 34S enrichment factor (ε34S[FeS2-SO4]) indicate that disproportionation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction are both involved in Type II and Type III groundwater. The process of bacterial sulfate reduction may coprecipitate and sequester As, a mechanism that is unlikely to occur in Type II groundwater. The presence of high As and Fe2+ concentrations and enriched δ34S[SO4] in Type II groundwater suggest that biogeochemical reactions occurred under anaerobic conditions. The reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe oxyhydroxides together with microbial disproportionation of sulfur explains the substantial correlations among the high As concentration and enriched δ34S[SO4] and Fe2+ concentrations in the iron- and sulfate-reducing zone (Type II). The As concentration in Type III groundwater (sulfate-reducing) is lower than that in Type II groundwater because of bacterial sulfate reduction and coprecipitation with As. Furthermore, the dissolution of sulfate minerals is not the

  19. Biogeochemical factors affecting the distribution, speciation, and transport of Hg species in the Deûle and Lys Rivers (Northern France).

    PubMed

    Daye, Mirna; Kadlecova, Milada; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-02-01

    The Deûle River is a highly polluted River by heavy metals caused by the historical discharges of ore minerals from the former ore smelter "Metaleurop." The potential mercury (Hg) pollution in the Deûle River implicates the importance of Hg distribution study in the river. As well as to configure the different biogeochemical factors that control the distribution and the potential transport of Hg to distant places. Four different sites were studied as follows: D-A (Deûle River, a site located upstream the river), D-B (Deûle River, a site located near a Zn, Pb, Cu, and Ni smelter that closed in 2003), L-C (Lys River, a site located upstream the confluence of the Deûle River with Lys River), and L-D (downstream the rivers confluence). Different Hg analyses were performed including total mercury in sediment (HgTS), methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment, total mercury in pore water (HgTPW), total mercury in surface water (HgTD), and total suspended particulate Hg in water (HgTP). HgTS decreases downstream from the Deûle River sites with a mean value of 11 ± 0.34 mg/kg to Lys River site (L-D) with a mean value of 0.53 ± 0.02 mg/kg at the confluence. The unaffected side of the Lys River, localized before the confluence (L-C), is characterized by low HgTS of an average value of 0.042 ± 0.003 mg/kg and high % MeHg reaching 4.2 %. Whereas, the highly contaminated Deûle sites are designated by low % MeHg with an average value of 0.053 %. Low pristine environments like that found in L-C site with more favorable biogeochemical conditions of lower concentrations of HgTS, sulfides, and Corg host more active biotic methylation than that of the highly polluted Deûle sites with high concentrations of HgTS and sulfides concentrations. Methylation in D-B (the closet site to Metaleurop smelter) is an old and recent methylation activity that has contributed to MeHg accumulation in the sediments as opposed to the exclusive recent events of methylation in Lys sites. Me

  20. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  1. Quantification of terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the conterminous United States combining a process-based biogeochemical model and MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite remote sensing provides continuous temporal and spatial information of terrestrial ecosystems. Using these remote sensing data and eddy flux measurements and biogeochemical models, such as the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), should provide a more adequate quantification of carbon dynami...

  2. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  3. New Insights into Fluvial Carbon Responses to Future Forest Management and Climate Change Obtained from Multi-Scale Modelling of Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oni, S. K.; Tiwari, T.; Futter, M. N.; Agren, A.; Teutschbein, C.; Ledesma, J.; Schelker, J.; Laudon, H.

    2014-12-01

    The boreal ecozone covers 2x107 km2 of the northern circumpolar region and includes 29% of the world's forests. The boreal consists of mosaic of forest/wetland landscape elements and stores about 500 Gt3 carbon (C) with a delicate sink-source C balance. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the main form of C exported from boreal landscapes and is fundamental to global C cycling. This northern ecosystem is vulnerable to global climate change, and increasing demands for forest products threaten its surface water resources. So far, there have been no attempts to assess the combined impacts of climate change and forest management on the future DOC fluxes from boreal surface waters. While differences in model assumptions may have negligible effects on present day simulations, these differences could be amplified when projecting the future climate and land use change conditions. Here we use an ensemble of regional climate models and multi-scale models of biogeochemical processes to gain insights into uncertainties associated with climate change and forest management on C and runoff dynamics in boreal landscape. While there are significant uncertainties associated with model projections, our results show that climate change will be the main driver of long term DOC dynamics in meso- to large boreal catchments in the future. However, forestry intensifies hydrological processes and can lead to large DOC fluxes at the headwater scales.

  4. Studies of dynamical processes affecting global climate

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.; Cooper, D.; Eichinger, W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective was, by a combined theoretical and observational approach, to develop improved models of dynamic processes in the oceans and atmosphere and to incorporate them into large climate codes, chiefly in four main areas: numerical physics, chemistry, water vapor, and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Main areas of investigation included studies of: cloud parameterizations for global climate codes, Lidar and the planetary boundary layer, chemistry, climate variability using coupled ocean-atmospheric models, and numerical physical methods. This project employed a unique approach that included participation of a number of University of California faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students who collaborated with Los Alamos research staff on specific tasks, thus greatly enhancing the research output. Overall accomplishments during the sensing of the atmospheric planetary were: (1) first two- and three-dimensional remote sensing of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer using Lidars, (2) modeling of 20-year cycle in both pressure and sea surface temperatures in North Pacific, (3) modeling of low frequency internal variability, (4) addition of aerosols to stratosphere to simulate Pinatubo effect on ozone, (5) development of fast, comprehensive chemistry in the troposphere for urban pollution studies, (6) new prognostic cloud parameterization in global atmospheric code remedied problems with North Pacific atmospheric circulation and excessive equatorial precipitation, (7) development of a unique aerosol analysis technique, the aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), which allows real-time analysis of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, and (8) numerical physics applying Approximate Inertial Manifolds to ocean circulation. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Mechanisms of Physical-Biological-Biogeochemical Interaction at the Oceanic Mesoscale.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscale phenomena are ubiquitous and highly energetic features of ocean circulation. Their influence on biological and biogeochemical processes varies widely, stemming not only from advective transport but also from the generation of variations in the environment that affect biological and chemical rates. The ephemeral nature of mesoscale features in the ocean makes it difficult to elucidate the attendant mechanisms of physical-biological-biogeochemical interaction, necessitating the use of multidisciplinary approaches involving in situ observations, remote sensing, and modeling. All three aspects are woven through this review in an attempt to synthesize current understanding of the topic, with particular emphasis on novel developments in recent years. PMID:26359818

  6. Mechanisms of Physical-Biological-Biogeochemical Interaction at the Oceanic Mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillicuddy, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscale phenomena are ubiquitous and highly energetic features of ocean circulation. Their influence on biological and biogeochemical processes varies widely, stemming not only from advective transport but also from the generation of variations in the environment that affect biological and chemical rates. The ephemeral nature of mesoscale features in the ocean makes it difficult to elucidate the attendant mechanisms of physical-biological-biogeochemical interaction, necessitating the use of multidisciplinary approaches involving in situ observations, remote sensing, and modeling. All three aspects are woven through this review in an attempt to synthesize current understanding of the topic, with particular emphasis on novel developments in recent years.

  7. Searching for Biogeochemical Cycles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The search for life on Mars clearly benefits from a rigorous, yet broad, definition of life that compels us to consider all possible lines of evidence for a martian biosphere. Recent studies in microbial ecology illustrate that the classic definition of life should be expanded beyond the traditional definition of a living cell. The traditional defining characteristics of life are threefold. First, life is capable of metabolism, that is, it performs chemical reactions that utilize energy and also synthesize its cellular constituents. Second, life is capable of self-replication. Third, life can evolve in order to adapt to environmental changes. An expanded, ecological definition of life also recognizes that life is a community of organisms that must interact with their nonliving environment through processes called biogeochemical cycles. This regenerative processing maintains, in an aqueous conditions, a dependable supply of nutrients and energy for growth. In turn, life can significantly affect those processes that control the exchange of materials between the atmosphere, ocean, and upper crust. Because metabolic processes interact directly with the environment, they can alter their surroundings and thus leave behind evidence of life. For example, organic matter is produced from single-carbon-atom precursors for the biosynthesis of cellular constituents. This leads to a reservoir of reduced carbon in sediments that, in turn, can affect the oxidation state of the atmosphere. The harvesting of chemical energy for metabolism often employs oxidation-reduction reactions that can alter the chemistry and oxidation state of the redox-sensitive elements carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and manganese. Have there ever been biogeochemical cycles on Mars? Certain key planetary processes can offer clues. Active volcanism provides reduced chemical species that biota can use for organic synthesis. Volcanic carbon dioxide and methane can serve as greenhouse gases. Thus the

  8. Coupling between pore water fluxes, structural heterogeneity, and biogeochemical processes controls contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M.; Fetters, K.; Jarrett, B.; Yuen, J.; Cadoux, C.; EI-Natour, M.; Packman, A. I.; Gaillard, J.; Burton, G.

    2012-12-01

    Sediments can serve as both sinks and sources of contaminants in aquatic systems. Contaminants are typically not sequestered permanently in sediments, and instead release slowly to the water column, posing an ongoing threat to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Many processes, including hydrodynamic transport, sediment diagenesis, and bioturbation regulate the behavior and effects of contaminants in sediments. While many of these processes have been studied individually, it is extremely important to understand how they interact to control the form, flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. We used well-defined experimental mesocosms to investigate the effects of hydrodynamic and biological processes on the redistribution of metals between sediments, pore water and overlying water, associated changes in metals speciation, and resulting bioavailability and toxicity to benthic organisms. Metals speciation was evaluated in deposited and resuspended particles using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We also used time-lapse photography and oxygen optode imaging to evaluate how bioturbation and bioirrigation control sediment structure, sediment mixing process, and oxygen delivery to sediments. In the extremely fine sediments used here, local contaminant fluxes are mainly dominated by diffusion, but episodic bioturbation and resuspension cause extreme variability in contaminant flux and increases oxidation of reduced sediments. Metals contamination substantially reduced bioturbation by indwelling organisms. Sediment resuspension decreased survival and increased tissue burden of epi-benthic organisms. Bioturbation mixed sediments as deep as several centimeters, while associated bioirrigation through worm burrows delivered oxygen over an order of magnitude deeper than local diffusion. These results show that it is important to understand how local transport processes, sediment chemistry, and biological activity interact to control rates and patterns of metals speciation and

  9. Measurements of spectral optical properties and their relation to biogeochemical variables and processes in Crater Lake, Crater Lake National Park, OR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boss, E.S.; Collier, R.; Larson, G.; Fennel, K.; Pegau, W.S.

    2007-01-01

    Spectral inherent optical properties (IOPs) have been measured at Crater Lake, OR, an extremely clear sub-alpine lake. Indeed Pure water IOPs are major contributors to the total IOPs, and thus to the color of the lake. Variations in the spatial distribution of IOPs were observed in June and September 2001, and reflect biogeochemical processes in the lake. Absorption by colored dissolved organic material increases with depth and between June and September in the upper 300 m. This pattern is consistent with a net release of dissolved organic materials from primary and secondary production through the summer and its photo-oxidation near the surface. Waters fed by a tributary near the lake's rim exhibited low levels of absorption by dissolved organic materials. Scattering is mostly dominated by organic particulate material, though inorganic material is found to enter the lake from the rim following a rain storm. Several similarities to oceanic oligotrophic regions are observed: (a) The Beam attenuation correlates well with particulate organic material (POM) and the relationship is similar to that observed in the open ocean. (b) The specific absorption of colored dissolved organic material has a value similar to that of open ocean humic material. (c) The distribution of chlorophyll with depth does not follow the distribution of particulate organic material due to photo-acclimation resulting in a subsurface pigment maximum located about 50 m below the POM maximum. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. Mapping pan-Arctic CH4 emissions using an adjoint method by integrating process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models and atmospheric CH4 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding CH4 emissions from wetlands and lakes are critical for the estimation of Arctic carbon balance under fast warming climatic conditions. To date, our knowledge about these two CH4 sources is almost solely built on the upscaling of discontinuous measurements in limited areas to the whole region. Many studies indicated that, the controls of CH4 emissions from wetlands and lakes including soil moisture, lake morphology and substrate content and quality are notoriously heterogeneous, thus the accuracy of those simple estimates could be questionable. Here we apply a high spatial resolution atmospheric inverse model (nested-grid GEOS-Chem Adjoint) over the Arctic by integrating SCIAMACHY and NOAA/ESRL CH4 measurements to constrain the CH4 emissions estimated with process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models. Our modeling experiments using different wetland CH4 emission schemes and satellite and surface measurements show that the total amount of CH4 emitted from the Arctic wetlands is well constrained, but the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions is sensitive to priors. For CH4 emissions from lakes, our high-resolution inversion shows that the models overestimate CH4 emissions in Alaskan costal lowlands and East Siberian lowlands. Our study also indicates that the precision and coverage of measurements need to be improved to achieve more accurate high-resolution estimates.

  11. Improving predictions of large scale soil carbon dynamics: Integration of fine-scale hydrological and biogeochemical processes, scaling, and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Dwivedi, D.; Ghimire, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; Pau, G. S. H.; Randerson, J. T.; Shen, C.; Tang, J.; Zhu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical model representations of decadal- to centennial-scale soil-carbon dynamics are a dominant cause of uncertainty in climate change predictions. Recent attempts by some Earth System Model (ESM) teams to integrate previously unrepresented soil processes (e.g., explicit microbial processes, abiotic interactions with mineral surfaces, vertical transport), poor performance of many ESM land models against large-scale and experimental manipulation observations, and complexities associated with spatial heterogeneity highlight the nascent nature of our community's ability to accurately predict future soil carbon dynamics. I will present recent work from our group to develop a modeling framework to integrate pore-, column-, watershed-, and global-scale soil process representations into an ESM (ACME), and apply the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) package for evaluation. At the column scale and across a wide range of sites, observed depth-resolved carbon stocks and their 14C derived turnover times can be explained by a model with explicit representation of two microbial populations, a simple representation of mineralogy, and vertical transport. Integrating soil and plant dynamics requires a 'process-scaling' approach, since all aspects of the multi-nutrient system cannot be explicitly resolved at ESM scales. I will show that one approach, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, improves predictions of forest nitrogen and phosphorus experimental manipulations and leads to very different global soil carbon predictions. Translating model representations from the site- to ESM-scale requires a spatial scaling approach that either explicitly resolves the relevant processes, or more practically, accounts for fine-resolution dynamics at coarser scales. To that end, I will present recent watershed-scale modeling work that applies reduced order model methods to accurately scale fine-resolution soil carbon dynamics to coarse-resolution simulations. Finally, we

  12. Biogeochemical cycling and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Research is underway at the NASA Ames Research Center that is concerned with aspects of the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. An interdisciplinary research group is attempting to correlate nitrogen transformations, processes, and productivity with variables that can be remotely sensed. Recent NASA and other publications concerning biogeochemical cycling at global scales identify attributes of vegetation that could be related or explain the spatial variation in biologically functional variables. These functional variables include net primary productivity, annual nitrogen mineralization, and possibly the emission rate of nitrous oxide from soils.

  13. Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, Jack C; Begoli, Edmon; Jose, Ajith; Griffin, Christopher

    2011-02-01

    Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

  14. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of belowground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature and specification, and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. Our research is divided into two major components, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Presently, we are near completion of phase one.

  15. An integrated water system model considering hydrological and biogeochemical processes at basin scale: model construction and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Shao, Q. X.; Ye, A. Z.; Xing, H. T.

    2014-08-01

    Integrated water system modeling is a reasonable approach to provide scientific understanding and possible solutions to tackle the severe water crisis faced over the world and to promote the implementation of integrated river basin management. Such a modeling practice becomes more feasible nowadays due to better computing facilities and available data sources. In this study, the process-oriented water system model (HEXM) is developed by integrating multiple water related processes including hydrology, biogeochemistry, environment and ecology, as well as the interference of human activities. The model was tested in the Shaying River Catchment, the largest, highly regulated and heavily polluted tributary of Huai River Basin in China. The results show that: HEXM is well integrated with good performance on the key water related components in the complex catchments. The simulated daily runoff series at all the regulated and less-regulated stations matches observations, especially for the high and low flow events. The average values of correlation coefficient and coefficient of efficiency are 0.81 and 0.63, respectively. The dynamics of observed daily ammonia-nitrogen (NH4N) concentration, as an important index to assess water environmental quality in China, are well captured with average correlation coefficient of 0.66. Furthermore, the spatial patterns of nonpoint source pollutant load and grain yield are also simulated properly, and the outputs have good agreements with the statistics at city scale. Our model shows clear superior performance in both calibration and validation in comparison with the widely used SWAT model. This model is expected to give a strong reference for water system modeling in complex basins, and provide the scientific foundation for the implementation of integrated river basin management all over the world as well as the technical guide for the reasonable regulation of dams and sluices and environmental improvement in river basins.

  16. Effects of physical and biogeochemical processes on aquatic ecosystems at the groundwater-surface water interface: An evaluation of a sulfate-impacted wild rice stream in Minnesota (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, G. H. C.; Yourd, A. R.; Myrbo, A.; Johnson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Significant uncertainty and variability in physical and biogeochemical processes at the groundwater-surface water interface complicate how surface water chemistry affects aquatic ecosystems. Questions surrounding a unique 10 mg/L sulfate standard for wild rice (Zizania sp.) waters in Minnesota are driving research to clarify conditions controlling the geochemistry of shallow sediment porewater in stream- and lake-beds. This issue raises the need and opportunity to carry out in-depth, process-based analysis into how water fluxes and coupled C, S, and Fe redox cycles interact to impact aquatic plants. Our study builds on a recent state-wide field campaign that showed that accumulation of porewater sulfide from sulfate reduction impairs wild rice, an annual grass that grows in shallow lakes and streams in the Great Lakes region of North America. Negative porewater sulfide correlations with organic C and Fe quantities also indicated that lower redox rates and greater mineral precipitation attenuate sulfide. Here, we focus on a stream in northern Minnesota that receives high sulfate loading from iron mining activity yet maintains wild rice stands. In addition to organic C and Fe effects, we evaluate the degree to which streambed hydrology, and in particular groundwater contributions, accounts for the active biogeochemistry. We collect field measurements, spanning the surrounding groundwater system to the stream, to constrain a reactive-transport model. Observations from seepage meters, temperature probes, and monitoring wells delineate upward flow that may lessen surface water impacts below the stream. Geochemical analyses of groundwater, porewater, and surface water samples and of sediment extractions reveal distinctions among the different domains and stream banks, which appear to jointly control conditions in the streambed. A model based on field conditions can be used to evaluate the relative the importance and the spatiotemporal scales of diverse flux and

  17. Implicit Processing of Visual Emotions Is Affected by Sound-Induced Affective States and Individual Affective Traits

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bertolino, Alessandro; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize emotions contained in facial expressions are affected by both affective traits and states and varies widely between individuals. While affective traits are stable in time, affective states can be regulated more rapidly by environmental stimuli, such as music, that indirectly modulate the brain state. Here, we tested whether a relaxing or irritating sound environment affects implicit processing of facial expressions. Moreover, we investigated whether and how individual traits of anxiety and emotional control interact with this process. 32 healthy subjects performed an implicit emotion processing task (presented to subjects as a gender discrimination task) while the sound environment was defined either by a) a therapeutic music sequence (MusiCure), b) a noise sequence or c) silence. Individual changes in mood were sampled before and after the task by a computerized questionnaire. Additionally, emotional control and trait anxiety were assessed in a separate session by paper and pencil questionnaires. Results showed a better mood after the MusiCure condition compared with the other experimental conditions and faster responses to happy faces during MusiCure compared with angry faces during Noise. Moreover, individuals with higher trait anxiety were faster in performing the implicit emotion processing task during MusiCure compared with Silence. These findings suggest that sound-induced affective states are associated with differential responses to angry and happy emotional faces at an implicit stage of processing, and that a relaxing sound environment facilitates the implicit emotional processing in anxious individuals. PMID:25072162

  18. Implicit processing of visual emotions is affected by sound-induced affective states and individual affective traits.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bertolino, Alessandro; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize emotions contained in facial expressions are affected by both affective traits and states and varies widely between individuals. While affective traits are stable in time, affective states can be regulated more rapidly by environmental stimuli, such as music, that indirectly modulate the brain state. Here, we tested whether a relaxing or irritating sound environment affects implicit processing of facial expressions. Moreover, we investigated whether and how individual traits of anxiety and emotional control interact with this process. 32 healthy subjects performed an implicit emotion processing task (presented to subjects as a gender discrimination task) while the sound environment was defined either by a) a therapeutic music sequence (MusiCure), b) a noise sequence or c) silence. Individual changes in mood were sampled before and after the task by a computerized questionnaire. Additionally, emotional control and trait anxiety were assessed in a separate session by paper and pencil questionnaires. Results showed a better mood after the MusiCure condition compared with the other experimental conditions and faster responses to happy faces during MusiCure compared with angry faces during Noise. Moreover, individuals with higher trait anxiety were faster in performing the implicit emotion processing task during MusiCure compared with Silence. These findings suggest that sound-induced affective states are associated with differential responses to angry and happy emotional faces at an implicit stage of processing, and that a relaxing sound environment facilitates the implicit emotional processing in anxious individuals. PMID:25072162

  19. Estimating impacts of lichens and bryophytes on global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Weber, Bettina; Elbert, Wolfgang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Lichens and bryophytes may significantly affect global biogeochemical cycles by fixation of nitrogen and biotic enhancement of surface weathering rates. Most of the studies suggesting these effects, however, are either conceptual or rely on upscaling of regional estimates to obtain global numbers. Here we use a different method, based on estimates of net carbon uptake, to quantify the impacts of lichens and bryophytes on biogeochemical cycles at the global scale. We focus on three processes, namely, nitrogen fixation, phosphorus uptake, and chemical weathering. Our estimates have the form of potential rates, which means that we quantify the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus needed by the organisms to build up biomass, also accounting for resorption and leaching of nutrients. Subsequently, we use potential phosphorus uptake on bare ground to estimate chemical weathering by the organisms, assuming that they release weathering agents to obtain phosphorus. The predicted requirement for nitrogen ranges from 3.5 to 34 Tgyr-1 and for phosphorus it ranges from 0.46 to 4.6 Tgyr-1. Estimates of chemical weathering are between 0.058 and 1.1 km3 yr-1 of rock. These values seem to have a realistic order of magnitude, and they support the notion that lichens and bryophytes have the potential to play an important role for biogeochemical cycles.

  20. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  1. Integrated water system simulation by considering hydrological and biogeochemical processes: model development, with parameter sensitivity and autocalibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Shao, Q. X.; Ye, A. Z.; Xing, H. T.; Xia, J.

    2016-02-01

    Integrated water system modeling is a feasible approach to understanding severe water crises in the world and promoting the implementation of integrated river basin management. In this study, a classic hydrological model (the time variant gain model: TVGM) was extended to an integrated water system model by coupling multiple water-related processes in hydrology, biogeochemistry, water quality, and ecology, and considering the interference of human activities. A parameter analysis tool, which included sensitivity analysis, autocalibration and model performance evaluation, was developed to improve modeling efficiency. To demonstrate the model performances, the Shaying River catchment, which is the largest highly regulated and heavily polluted tributary of the Huai River basin in China, was selected as the case study area. The model performances were evaluated on the key water-related components including runoff, water quality, diffuse pollution load (or nonpoint sources) and crop yield. Results showed that our proposed model simulated most components reasonably well. The simulated daily runoff at most regulated and less-regulated stations matched well with the observations. The average correlation coefficient and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency were 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. Both the simulated low and high flows at most stations were improved when the dam regulation was considered. The daily ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) concentration was also well captured with the average correlation coefficient of 0.67. Furthermore, the diffuse source load of NH4-N and the corn yield were reasonably simulated at the administrative region scale. This integrated water system model is expected to improve the simulation performances with extension to more model functionalities, and to provide a scientific basis for the implementation in integrated river basin managements.

  2. Genome-Enabled Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes Predicts Metabolic Dependencies that Connect the Relative Fitness of Microbial Functional Guilds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Steefel, C. I.; Banfield, J. F.; Beller, H. R.; Anantharaman, K.; Ligocki, T. J.; Trebotich, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pore-scale processes mediated by microorganisms underlie a range of critical ecosystem services, regulating carbon stability, nutrient flux, and the purification of water. Advances in cultivation-independent approaches now provide us with the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations from which functional roles may be assigned. With this capability to reveal microbial metabolic potential, the next step is to put these microbes back where they belong to interact with their natural environment, i.e. the pore scale. At this scale, microorganisms communicate, cooperate and compete across their fitness landscapes with communities emerging that feedback on the physical and chemical properties of their environment, ultimately altering the fitness landscape and selecting for new microbial communities with new properties and so on. We have developed a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled functional guilds that are parameterized with unique combinations of traits that govern fitness under dynamic conditions. Using a reactive transport framework, we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor-acceptor reactions to predict energy available for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production. From metagenomics, we directly estimate some trait values related to growth and identify the linkage of key traits associated with respiration and fermentation, macromolecule depolymerizing enzymes, and other key functions such as nitrogen fixation. Our simulations were carried out to explore abiotic controls on community emergence such as seasonally fluctuating water table regimes across floodplain organic matter hotspots. Simulations and metagenomic/metatranscriptomic observations highlighted the many dependencies connecting the relative fitness of functional guilds and the importance of chemolithoautotrophic lifestyles. Using an X-Ray microCT-derived soil microaggregate physical model combined

  3. Biogeochemical and hydrological processes controlling the transport and fate of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in soil and ground water, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian G.

    1993-01-01

    Widespread contamination of ground water in central Florida by 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) has resulted because of its heavy usage as a soil fumigant during a 20-year period, its relatively high aqueous solubility, and the low sorption capacity of the highly permeable sandy soils lacking organic matter. Two models were used to improve understanding of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control the transport and fate of EDB in soil and ground water. First, a mass-balance model was developed to estimate the max-imum concentration of EDB in ground water resulting from known application rates of EDB. Key processes that were quantified in the model included volatilization, diffusion of EDB vapor in soils, partitioning between aqueous and gaseous phases, sorption of EDB vapor on organic carbon and soil particles, chemical and biological degradation reactions, and nonreversible binding of EDB to soils. Model calculations using an EDB half-life of 0.65 year closely reproduced the maximum observed concentrations in ground water, 37 and 0.22 micrograms per liter, at downgradient sites in two study areas in central Florida. Maximum concentrations of EDB in ground water also were estimated in a second model that incorporated an analytical solution to the three-dimensional advection-dispersion equation for instantaneous point sources of EDB entering the flow systems in the two study areas. The model used an EDB half-life of 0.65 year (obtained from the mass-balance calculations), mean ground-water flow velocities of 0.6 to 1 meter per day, coefficients of longitudinal hydro-dynamic dispersion of 0.6 to 1.0 square meter per day, and coefficients of transverse hydrodynamic dispersion of 0.1 square meter per day. Peak concentrations of EDB in ground water calculated from the analytical model agreed closely with observed peak concentrations measured from 1983 through 1987.

  4. Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Processes as Controls on the Quantity and Chemical Quality of Dissolved Organic Carbon Across Multiple Spatial Scales in the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.

    2012-12-01

    Longitudinal patterns in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads and chemical quality were described in the Colorado River from the headwaters in the Rocky Mountains to the United States-Mexico border from 1994-2011. Watershed- and reach-scale climate, land use, river discharge and hydrologic modification conditions that contribute to patterns in DOC were also identified. Principal components analysis (PCA) identified site-specific precipitation and reach-scale discharge as being correlated with sites in the upper basin, where there were increases in DOC load from the upstream to downstream direction. In the lower basin, where DOC load decreased from upstream to downstream, sites were correlated with site-specific temperature and reach-scale population, urban land use, and hydrologic modification. In the reaches containing Lakes Powell and Mead, the two largest reservoirs in the United States, DOC quantity decreased, terrestrially-derived aromatic DOC was degraded and/or autochthonous less aromatic DOC was produced. Taken together these results suggest that longitudinal patterns in the relatively unregulated upper basin are influenced by watershed inputs of water and DOC; whereas DOC patterns in the lower basin are reflective of a balance between watershed contribution of water and DOC to the river, and loss of water and DOC due to hydrologic modification and/or biogeochemical processes. These findings suggest that alteration of constituent fluxes in rivers that are highly regulated may overshadow watershed processes that would control fluxes in comparable unregulated rivers. Further, these results provide a foundation for detailed assessments of factors controlling the transport and chemical quality of DOC in the Colorado River.

  5. DayCent-Chem Simulations of Ecological and Biogeochemical Processes of Eight Mountain Ecosystems in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Melannie D.; Baron, Jill S.; Clow, David W.; Creed, Irena F.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Ewing, Holly A.; Haines, Bruce D.; Knoepp, Jennifer; Lajtha, Kate; Ojima, Dennis S.; Parton, William J.; Renfro, Jim; Robinson, R. Bruce; Van Miegroet, Helga; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Williams, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    deposition as a result of dry and fog inputs. The uncertainties related to weathering reactions, deposition, soil cation exchange capacity, and groundwater contributions influenced how well the simulated acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH estimates compared to observed values. Daily discharge was well represented by the model for most sites. The chapters of this report describe the parameterization for each site and summarize model results for ecosystem variables, stream discharge, and stream chemistry. This intersite comparison exercise provided insight about important and possibly not well understood processes.

  6. Unintentionality of affective attention across visual processing stages

    PubMed Central

    Uusberg, Andero; Uibo, Helen; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Tamm, Maria; Raidvee, Aire; Allik, Jüri

    2013-01-01

    Affective attention involves bottom-up perceptual selection that prioritizes motivationally significant stimuli. To clarify the extent to which this process is automatic, we investigated the dependence of affective attention on the intention to process emotional meaning. Affective attention was manipulated by presenting affective images with variable arousal and intentionality by requiring participants to make affective and non-affective evaluations. Polytomous rather than binary decisions were required from the participants in order to elicit relatively deep emotional processing. The temporal dynamics of prioritized processing were assessed using early posterior negativity (EPN, 175–300 ms) as well as P3-like (P3, 300–500 ms) and slow wave (SW, 500–1500 ms) portions of the late positive potential. All analyzed components were differentially sensitive to stimulus categories suggesting that they indeed reflect distinct stages of motivational significance encoding. The intention to perceive emotional meaning had no effect on EPN, an additive effect on P3, and an interactive effect on SW. We concluded that affective attention went from completely unintentional during the EPN to partially unintentional during P3 and SW where top-down signals, respectively, complemented and modulated bottom-up differences in stimulus prioritization. The findings were interpreted in light of two-stage models of visual perception by associating the EPN with large-capacity initial relevance detection and the P3 as well as SW with capacity-limited consolidation and elaboration of affective stimuli. PMID:24421772

  7. Coupled effects of biogeochemical and hydrological processes on C, N, and P export during extreme rainfall events in a purple soil watershed in southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhu, Bo; Yu, Guirui; Chen, Weiliang; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Tao; Miao, Chiyuan

    2014-04-01

    As global warming and extreme weather events increase and intensify across the globe, it becomes ever more urgent to study and understand the effects of extreme rainfall events on carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) export from terrestrial to riverine ecosystems. There is still much to learn regarding C, N, and P non-point source discharge that results from extremely heavy rainfall as well as their effects on downstream ecosystems. This study aimed to shed light on C, N, and P biogeochemical and hydrological coupling processes. Long-term and short-term water composition monitoring research was carried out within a purple soil watershed in China's Sichuan Province. This study captured both base flow from long-term observations and dynamic runoff under extreme rainfall events that took place during the 2012 rainy season. Dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) was the largest percentage of total nitrogen (TN) in storm runoff. DTN exceeded particulate nitrogen (PN), which itself exceeded dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Under site conditions, particulate phosphorus (PP) formed the largest constituent of total phosphorus (TP) followed by dissolved total phosphorus (DTP) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP). Furthermore, results showed that C, N, and P loads increased sharply in response to heavy rainfall. Although P abundance in purple soils is limited, it was nevertheless shown that C:N:P ratios measured during rainstorms corresponded much more closely to the Redfield ratio than to ratios measured in base flows. This adds to the evidence that suggests that increased storm runoff will increase eutrophication likelihood in ecosystems further downstream.

  8. Cretaceous-Palaeogene experiments in Biogeochemical Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penman, D. E.; Henehan, M. J.; Hull, P. M.; Planavsky, N.; Schmidt, D. N.; Rae, J. W. B.; Thomas, E.; Huber, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Human activity is altering biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. While ultimately anthropogenic forcings may be brought under control, it is still unclear whether tipping points may exist beyond which human-induced changes to biogeochemical cycles become irreversible. We use the Late Cretaceous and the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary interval as an informative case study. Over this interval, two carbon cycle perturbations (gradual flood basalt volcanism and abrupt bolide impact) occurred within a short time window, allowing us to investigate the resilience of biogeochemical cycles to different pressures applied to the same initial boundary conditions on very different time scales. We demonstrate that relatively gradual emission of CO2 from the Deccan large igneous province was efficiently mitigated within the limits of existing biogeochemical processes. However, the rapid extinction of pelagic calcifying organisms at the K-Pg boundary due to the Chicxulub bolide impact had more profound effects, and caused lasting (> 1 million years) changes to biogeochemical cycles. By combining sedimentological observations with boron isotope-based pH reconstructions over these events, we document two potentially useful partial analogues for best and worst case scenarios for anthropogenic global change. We suggest that if current ocean acidification results in the mass extinction of marine pelagic calcifiers, we may cause profound changes to the Earth system that will persist for 100,000s to millions of years.

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  10. Investigating the interactions between biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes in the northern high latitudes using a land surface model; feedbacks and climatic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, R.; Jain, A.; Liang, M.; McGuire, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of carbon fluxes in the permafrost region is likely to have tremendous impacts for the future global climate. Recently, several ecosystem and land surface models have demonstrated improved permafrost modeling capabilities by incorporating deep soil layers, organic soils, and parameterizing the effects of wind compaction and depth hoar formations, which influence high latitude soil biogeophysics. However, no global study has yet incorporated the combined effects of these biogeophysical improvements. Additionally, the primary focus has been on modeling biogeophysical fluxes rather than on how biogeochemical processes and feedbacks are impacted. In this study, we evaluate how biogeochemistry (carbon and nitrogen dynamics) responds to improved biogeophysics in the high latitudes. We employ a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), to model the fluxes of water, energy and carbon, as well as the change in active layer depths during the historical period. The ISAM represents fully prognostic carbon and nitrogen cycles, coupled with biogeophysics schemes adapted selectively from other land surface models such as the Community Land Model (CLM3.5) and the Common Land Model (CoLM). The soil decomposition module in the ISAM was calibrated with field experiment data, which includes representation of nitrogen mineralization processes. Additionally, biogeophysical improvements such as the inclusion of deep soils, organic soils, wind compaction and depth hoar formation effects, which are critical for high-latitude soil thermal dynamics, have been incorporated into the model. The performance of the model is evaluated using observations for active layer depths and carbon fluxes, together with recent estimates for total soil carbon amount in the permafrost region. This is one of the first studies to explore the combined effects of improvements in biogeophysics, coupled with a detailed model of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, for the entire

  11. Biogeochemical processes at the fringe of a landfill leachate pollution plume: potential for dissolved organic carbon, Fe(II), Mn(II), NH4, and CH4 oxidation.

    PubMed

    van Breukelen, Boris M; Griffioen, Jasper

    2004-09-01

    Various redox reactions may occur at the fringe of a landfill leachate plume, involving oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CH4, Fe(II), Mn(II), and NH4 from leachate and reduction of O2, NO3 and SO4 from pristine groundwater. Knowledge on the relevance of these processes is essential for the simulation and evaluation of natural attenuation (NA) of pollution plumes. The occurrence of such biogeochemical processes was investigated at the top fringe of a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, the Netherlands). Hydrochemical depth profiles of the top fringe were captured via installation of a series of multi-level samplers at 18, 39 and 58 m downstream from the landfill. Ten-centimeter vertical resolution was necessary to study NA within a fringe as thin as 0.5 m. Bromide appeared an equally well-conservative tracer as chloride to calculate dilution of landfill leachate, and its ratio to chloride was high compared to other possible sources of salt in groundwater. The plume fringe rose steadily from a depth of around 5 m towards the surface with a few meters in the period 1998-2003. The plume uplift may be caused by enhanced exfiltration to a brook downstream from the landfill, due to increased precipitation over this period and an artificial lowering of the water level of the brook. This rise invoked cation exchange including proton buffering, and triggered degassing of methane. The hydrochemical depth profile was simulated in a 1D vertical reactive transport model using PHREEQC-2. Optimization using the nonlinear optimization program PEST brought forward that solid organic carbon and not clay minerals controlled retardation of cations. Cation exchange resulted in spatial separation of Fe(II), Mn(II) and NH4 fronts from the fringe, and thereby prevented possible oxidation of these secondary redox species. Degradation of DOC may happen in the fringe zone. Re-dissolution of methane escaped from the plume and subsequent oxidation is an explanation for absence of

  12. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, I M; Böhlke, J K; Masoner, J; Breit, G N; Lorah, M M; Tuttle, M L W; Jaeschke, J B

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework. PMID:21314684

  13. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  14. Are you in the mood? Therapist affect and psychotherapy process.

    PubMed

    Chui, Harold; Hill, Clara E; Kline, Kathryn; Kuo, Patty; Mohr, Jonathan J

    2016-07-01

    Studies on therapist factors have mostly focused on therapist traits rather than states such as affect. Research related to therapist affect has often looked at therapist baseline well-being or therapist reactions, but not both. Fifteen therapists and 51 clients rated pre- and postsession affect, as well as postsession working alliance and session quality, for 1,172 sessions of individual psychotherapy at a community clinic. Therapists' affect became more positive when clients were initially positive and when clients became more positive over the session, and became more negative when clients were initially negative and when clients became more negative over the session. Furthermore, when therapists were initially positive in affect and when therapists became more positive over the session, clients rated the session quality to be high. Conversely, when therapists were initially negative in affect and when therapists became more negative over the session, clients rated the session quality and working alliance low. On open-ended questions, therapists reported mood shifts in 67% of sessions (63% positive, 50% negative). Positive affect change was attributed to collaborating with the client, perceiving the client to be engaged, or being a good therapist. Negative affect change was attributed to having a difficult client, perceiving the client to be in distress, or being a poor therapist. Thus, therapist state affect at presession and change in affect across a session may independently contribute to the process and outcome of therapy sessions. The examination of within-therapist variables over the course of therapy may further our understanding of therapist factors. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27177026

  15. fMRI Scanner Noise Interaction with Affective Neural Processes

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Stavros; Gray, Marcus; Critchley, Hugo; Koelsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was the investigation of interaction effects between functional MRI scanner noise and affective neural processes. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced musical pieces, expressing three different emotions (fear, neutral, joy). Participants (N=34, 19 female) were split into two groups, one subjected to continuous scanning and another subjected to sparse temporal scanning that features decreased scanner noise. Tests for interaction effects between scanning group (sparse/quieter vs continuous/noisier) and emotion (fear, neutral, joy) were performed. Results revealed interactions between the affective expression of stimuli and scanning group localized in bilateral auditory cortex, insula and visual cortex (calcarine sulcus). Post-hoc comparisons revealed that during sparse scanning, but not during continuous scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for fear, as well as stronger for fear than for neutral in bilateral auditory cortex. During continuous scanning, but not during sparse scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for neutral in the left auditory cortex and for joy than for fear in the calcarine sulcus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show a statistical interaction effect between scanner noise and affective processes and extends evidence suggesting scanner noise to be an important factor in functional MRI research that can affect and distort affective brain processes. PMID:24260420

  16. Affective picture processing: An integrative review of ERP findings

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jonas K.; Nordin, Steven; Sequeira, Henrique; Polich, John

    2008-01-01

    The review summarizes and integrates findings from 40 years of event-related potential (ERP) studies using pictures that differ in valence (unpleasant-to-pleasant) and arousal (low-to-high) and that are used to elicit emotional processing. Affective stimulus factors primarily modulate ERP component amplitude, with little change in peak latency observed. Arousal effects are consistently obtained, and generally occur at longer latencies. Valence effects are inconsistently reported at several latency ranges, including very early components. Some affective ERP modulations vary with recording methodology, stimulus factors, as well as task-relevance and emotional state. Affective ERPs have been linked theoretically to attention orientation for unpleasant pictures at earlier components (< 300 ms). Enhanced stimulus processing has been associated with memory encoding for arousing pictures of assumed intrinsic motivational relevance, with task-induced differences contributing to emotional reactivity at later components (> 300 ms). Theoretical issues, stimulus factors, task demands, and individual differences are discussed. PMID:18164800

  17. PROCESSES AFFECTING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document focuses solely on the process affecting migration of fluids from a leaking tank and their effects on monitoring methodologies. Based upon the reviews presented, soil heterogeneities and the potential for multiphase flow will lead to high monitoring uncertainties if l...

  18. Developing Worksheet Based on Science Process Skills: Factors Affecting Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsli, Fethiye; Sahin, Cigdem

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a worksheet about the factors affecting solubility, which could be useful for the prospective science teachers (PST) to remind and regain their science process skills (SPS). The pilot study of the WS was carried out with 32 first grade PST during the 2007-2008 academic year in the education department at…

  19. Necker's smile: Immediate affective consequences of early perceptual processes.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Erle, Thorsten M; Reber, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    Current theories assume that perception and affect are separate realms of the mind. In contrast, we argue that affect is a genuine online-component of perception instantaneously mirroring the success of different perceptual stages. Consequently, we predicted that the success (failure) of even very early and cognitively encapsulated basic visual processing steps would trigger immediate positive (negative) affective responses. To test this assumption, simple visual stimuli that either allowed or obstructed early visual processing stages without participants being aware of this were presented briefly. Across 5 experiments, we found more positive affective responses to stimuli that allowed rather than obstructed Gestalt completion at certain early visual stages (Experiments 1-3; briefest presentation 100 ms with post-mask), and visual disambiguation in possible vs. impossible Necker cubes (Experiments 4 and 5; briefest presentation 100 ms with post-mask). This effect was observed both on verbal preference ratings (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and as facial muscle responses occurring within 2-4 s after stimulus onset (zygomaticus activity; Experiments 3 and 7). For instance, in participants unaware of spatial possibility we found affective discrimination between possible and impossible Necker cubes (the famous Freemish Crate) for 100 ms presentation timings, although a conscious discrimination took more than 2000 ms (Experiment 4). PMID:25855534

  20. Humans Process Dog and Human Facial Affect in Similar Ways

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Annett; Seow, Cui Shan; Penney, Trevor B.

    2013-01-01

    Humans share aspects of their facial affect with other species such as dogs. Here we asked whether untrained human observers with and without dog experience are sensitive to these aspects and recognize dog affect with better-than-chance accuracy. Additionally, we explored similarities in the way observers process dog and human expressions. The stimulus material comprised naturalistic facial expressions of pet dogs and human infants obtained through positive (i.e., play) and negative (i.e., social isolation) provocation. Affect recognition was assessed explicitly in a rating task using full face images and images cropped to reveal the eye region only. Additionally, affect recognition was assessed implicitly in a lexical decision task using full faces as primes and emotional words and pseudowords as targets. We found that untrained human observers rated full face dog expressions from the positive and negative condition more accurately than would be expected by chance. Although dog experience was unnecessary for this effect, it significantly facilitated performance. Additionally, we observed a range of similarities between human and dog face processing. First, the facial expressions of both species facilitated lexical decisions to affectively congruous target words suggesting that their processing was equally automatic. Second, both dog and human negative expressions were recognized from both full and cropped faces. Third, female observers were more sensitive to affective information than were male observers and this difference was comparable for dog and human expressions. Together, these results extend existing work on cross-species similarities in facial emotions and provide evidence that these similarities are naturally exploited when humans interact with dogs. PMID:24023954

  1. Affective recognition memory processing and event-related brain potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Erik J.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition memory was examined for visual affective stimuli using behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) measures. Images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) that varied systematically in arousal level (low, high) and valence direction (unpleasant, pleasant) were first viewed passively. Then, during a response phase, the original images were intermixed with an equal number of new images and presented, and participants were instructed to press a button to indicate whether each stimulus picture was previously viewed (target) or new (foil). Participants were more sensitive to unpleasant- than to pleasant-valence stimuli and were biased to respond to high-arousal unpleasant stimuli as targets, whether the stimuli were previously viewed or new. Response times (RTs) to target stimuli were systematically affected by valence, whereas RTs to foil stimuli were influenced by arousal level. ERP component amplitudes were generally larger for high than for low arousal levels. The P300 (late positive component) amplitude was largest for high-arousal unpleasant target images. These and other amplitude effects suggest that high-arousal unpleasant stimuli engage a privileged memory-processing route during stimulus processing. Theoretical relationships between affective and memory processes are discussed. PMID:21384231

  2. [Effects of global climate change on the ecological characteristics and biogeochemical significance of marine viruses--A review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunlan; Cai, Lanlan; Zhang, Rui

    2015-09-01

    As the most abundance biological agents in the oceans, viruses can influence the physiological and ecological characteristics of host cells through viral infections and lysis, and affect the nutrient and energy cycles of the marine food chain. Thus, they are the major players in the ocean biogeochemical processes. The problems caused by global climate changes, such as sea-surface warming, acidification, nutrients availability, and deoxygenation, have the potential effects on marine viruses and subsequently their ecological and biogeochemical function in the ocean. Here, we reviewed the potential impacts of global climate change on the ecological characteristics (e. g. abundance, distribution, life cycle and the host-virus interactions) and biogeochemical significance (e. g. carbon cycling) of marine viruses. We proposed that marine viruses should not be ignored in the global climate change study. PMID:26762022

  3. Biogeochemical evolution of sulfide ore mine tailings profiles under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mining represents a principal form of earth surface disturbance in the anthropocene. Weathering reactions that ensue following tailings deposition are strongly affected by climatic forcing and tailings composition, and these also affect the weathering-induced transformations of the associated mineral assemblages and metal(loid) contaminants. The presence or absence of plants and associated microbiota can have a profound influence on these weathering trajectories. We employed field, laboratory and modeling approaches to resolve the impact of (bio)geochemical weathering reactions on the transformation of mine tailings parent materials into soil over the time following mining cessation. Using controlled experiments, we have evaluated the impacts of plants and associated rhizosphere microbiota on these reactions, hydrologic fluxes, and the molecular speciation of mining derived contaminants. Plant establishment is shown to alter site ecohydrology and biogeochemical weathering processes leading to distinctly different weathering products and patterns.

  4. Investigating the Impact of a Burrowing Shrimp on Biogeochemical Processes and Microbial Communities in a Shallow Lagoon, Catalina Harbor, California, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Ziebis, W.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between the activity of macrofauna organisms and the biogeochemistry and microbiology of marine sediments is crucial in evaluating marine ecosystem functioning and nutrient cycling. Burrows built by different organisms often vary in architecture, size, and permanence, making it difficult to extrapolate from one organism to another and from one location to another, the impact that bioturbation or bioirrigation has on the local biogeochemical processes. The overall goal of this study is to combine interdisciplinary approaches to assess the impact of the ghost shrimp Callianassa californiensis, on the biogeochemistry of a shallow lagoon located in Catalina Harbor, California, USA. Field investigations were performed in the lagoon along a transect from the shoreline out to 10 m. The area is bioturbated by Callianassa californiensis with a linear increase in burrows with distance from the shore (R2 = 0.9481). Highest numbers were found at the 10 m distance with approximately 866 burrows m-2. Oxygen penetration depths were determined using Clark-type amperometric microsensors. These measurements were accompanied by detailed analyses of sediment and pore water parameters (porosity, TOC, H2S, NH4+, NO3-, Fe (II)/Fe (III)) by taking sediment cores at 2 m intervals along the transect and slicing these cores in a vertical resolution of 1 cm. Microbial abundances with sediment depth and along the transect were determined by direct counts (AODC) and microbial diversity patterns were analyzed using the molecular finger printing method ARISA (Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis). In addition to the field studies, we examined the effects of the shrimp burrows in more detail by using narrow aquaria (40 cm x 15 cm x 5 cm). Each aquarium was filled with sediment collected from the study site, populated by one or two shrimps, and placed in a flowing seawater system. The front walls of the aquaria were perforated with holes in a 1 cm grid that were

  5. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shiller, A.M.; Gieskes, J.M.

    1980-05-20

    Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.

  6. Hydro-biogeochemical Controls on Geophysical Signatures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical techniques such as seismic, magnetic and electrical techniques have historically played a major role in oil exploration. Their main use has been for delineation basin geometry, structures and hydrocarbon traps and for understanding the subsurface stratigraphy. Their use for investigating microbial processes has only recently been recognized over the last decade resulting in the development of biogeophysics as a frontier research area which bridges the fields of environmental microbiology, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology. Recent biogeophysical studies have demonstrated the potential of geophysical technologies to (1) probe the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in subsurface geologic media, (2) investigate the interactions between microorganisms and subsurface geologic media, (3) assess biogeochemical transformations, biomineralization, and biogeochemical reaction rates, and (4) investigate the alteration of physical properties of subsurface geologic media induced by microorganisms. The unique properties of geophysical datasets (e.g. non-invasive data acquisition, spatially continuous properties retrieved) make them attractive for probing microbial processes affecting fate and transport of contaminants. This presentation will provide an updated understanding of major controls on geophysical signatures by highlighting some of the important advancements in biogeophysical studies at hydrocarbon contaminated environments. Important challenges that provide an opportunity for further research in this new field will also be examined.

  7. Neural Correlates of Affect Processing and Aggression in Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Payer, Doris E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; London, Edythe D.

    2012-01-01

    Context Methamphetamine abuse is associated with high rates of aggression, but few studies have addressed the contributing neurobiological factors. Objective To quantify aggression, investigate function of the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and assess relationships between brain function and behavior in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Design In a case-control study, aggression and brain activation were compared between methamphetamine-dependent and control participants. Setting Participants were recruited from the general community to an academic research center. Participants Thirty-nine methamphetamine-dependent volunteers (16 women) who were abstinent for 7 to 10 days and 37 drug-free control volunteers (18 women) participated in the study; subsets completed self-report and behavioral measures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 25 methamphetamine-dependent and 23 control participants. Main outcome measures We measured self-reported and perpetrated aggression, and self-reported alexithymia. Brain activation was assessed using fMRI during visual processing of facial affect (affect matching), and symbolic processing (affect labeling), the latter representing an incidental form of emotion regulation. Results Methamphetamine-dependent participants self-reported more aggression and alexithymia than control participants and escalated perpetrated aggression more following provocation. Alexithymia scores correlated with measures of aggression. During affect matching, fMRI showed no differences between groups in amygdala activation, but found lower activation in methamphetamine-dependent than control participants in bilateral ventral inferior frontal gyrus. During affect labeling, participants recruited dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and exhibited decreased amygdala activity, consistent with successful emotion regulation; there was no group difference in this effect. The magnitude of decrease in amygdala activity during affect labeling

  8. Application of ultrasound processed images in space: assessing diffuse affectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Poch, A.; Bru, C.; Nicolau, C.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffuse affectations in the liver using texture image processing techniques. Ultrasound diagnose equipments are the election of choice to be used in space environments as they are free from hazardous effects on health. However, due to the need for highly trained radiologists to assess the images, this imaging method is mainly applied on focal lesions rather than on non-focal ones. We have conducted a clinical study on 72 patients with different degrees of chronic hepatopaties and a group of control of 18 individuals. All subjects' clinical reports and results of biopsies were compared to the degree of affectation calculated by our computer system , thus validating the method. Full statistical results are given in the present paper showing a good correlation (r=0.61) between pathologist's report and analysis of the heterogenicity of the processed images from the liver. This computer system to analyze diffuse affectations may be used in-situ or via telemedicine to the ground.

  9. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeaneDeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSpozaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  10. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeanedeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSouzaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  11. Biogeochemical processes in an urban, restored wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007-2009; methods and data for plant, sediment and water parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Kieu, Le H.; Kakouros, Evangelos; Erikson, Li H.; Ward, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    The restoration of 18 acres of historic tidal marsh at Crissy Field has had great success in terms of public outreach and visibility, but less success in terms of revegetated marsh sustainability. Native cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) has experienced dieback and has failed to recolonize following extended flooding events during unintended periodic closures of its inlet channel, which inhibits daily tidal flushing. We examined the biogeochemical impacts of these impoundment events on plant physiology and on sulfur and mercury chemistry to help the National Park Service land managers determine the relative influence of these inlet closures on marsh function. In this comparative study, we examined key pools of sulfur, mercury, and carbon compounds both during and between closure events. Further, we estimated the net hydrodynamic flux of methylmercury and total mercury to and from the marsh during a 24-hour diurnal cycle. This report documents the methods used and the data generated during the study.

  12. Olfactory modulation of affective touch processing - A neurophysiological investigation.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Drechsler, Edda; Hamilton, Paul; Hummel, Thomas; Olausson, Håkan

    2016-07-15

    Touch can be highly emotional, and depending on the environment, it can be perceived as pleasant and comforting or disgusting and dangerous. Here, we studied the impact of context on the processing of tactile stimuli using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. This was achieved by embedding tactile stimulation in a variable olfactory environment. Twenty people were scanned with BOLD fMRI while receiving the following stimulus blocks: Slow stroking Touch, Civette odor (feces like), Rose odor, Touch+Civette, and Touch+Rose. Ratings of pleasantness and intensity of tactile stimuli and ratings of disgust and intensity of olfactory stimuli were collected. The impact of the olfactory context on the processing of touch was studied using covariance analyses. Coupling between olfactory processing and somatosensory processing areas was assessed with psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI). A subjectively disgusting olfactory environment significantly reduced the perceived pleasantness of touch. The touch fMRI activation in the secondary somatosensory cortex, operculum 1 (OP1), was positively correlated with the disgust towards the odors. Decreased pleasantness of touch was related to decreased posterior insula activity. PPI analysis revealed a significant interaction between the OP1, posterior insula, and regions processing the disgust of odors (orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala). We conclude that the disgust evaluation of the olfactory environment moderates neural reactivity in somatosensory regions by upregulation of the OP1 and downregulation of the posterior insula. This adaptive regulation of affective touch processing may facilitate adaptive reaction to a potentially harmful stimulus. PMID:27138206

  13. Basin-wide modification of dynamical and biogeochemical processes by the positive phase of the Indian Ocean dipole during the SeaWiFS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggert, Jerry D.; Vialard, Jérôme; Behrenfeld, Michael J.

    Characterizing how the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) modifies typical basin-wide dynamical variability has been vigorously pursued over the past decade. Along with this dynamic response, a clear biological impact has been revealed in the ocean color data acquired by remote sensing platforms such as Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS). The signature feature illustrating IOD alteration of typical spatiotemporal chlorophyll variability is the phytoplankton bloom that first appears in September along the eastern boundary of the IO in tropical waters that are normally highly oligotrophic. Positive chlorophyll anomalies (CLa) are also apparent in the southeastern Bay of Bengal, while negative anomalies are observed over much of the Arabian Sea. Moreover, in situ measurements obtained by the R/V Suroit as part of the Cirene cruise during the 2006/2007 IOD reveal anomalous subsurface biochemical distributions in the southern tropical IO that are not reflected in SeaWiFS data. Despite the clear basin-wide influence of IOD events on biological variability, the accompanying influence on biogeochemical cycling that must occur has received little attention. Here, the dynamical signatures apparent in remote sensing fields for the two positive-phase IODs of the SeaWiFS era are used to illuminate how these events are similar or distinct. A corresponding comparison of IOD-engendered surface CLa is performed, with the dynamical fields providing the framework for interpreting the mechanisms underlying the biological response. Then, results from a newly developed net primary production algorithm are presented that provide the first characterization of how biogeochemical fluxes throughout the IO are altered by IOD occurrence

  14. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C D; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitation/dissolution reactions control the transformation and mobility of chromium. The reduction of CrVI to CrIII can occur in the presence of ferrous iron in solution or in mineral phases, reduced sulfur compounds, or soil organic matter. At neutral to alkaline pH, the CrIII precipitates as amorphous hydroxides or forms complexes with organic matter. CrIII is oxidized by manganese dioxide, a common mineral found in many soils. Solid-phase precipitates of hexavalent chromium such as barium chromate can serve either as sources or sinks for CrVI. Adsorption of CrVI in soils increases with decreasing chromium concentration, making it more difficult to remove the chromium as the concentration decreases during pump-and-treat remediation. Knowledge of these chemical and physical processes is important in developing and selecting effective, cost-efficient remediation designs for chromium-contaminated sites. PMID:1935849

  15. Agricultural management affects evolutionary processes in a migratory songbird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perlut, N.G.; Freeman-Gallant, C. R.; Strong, A.M.; Donovan, T.M.; Kilpatrick, C.W.; Zalik, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Hay harvests have detrimental ecological effects on breeding songbirds, as harvesting results in nest failure. Importantly, whether harvesting also affects evolutionary processes is not known. We explored how hay harvest affected social and genetic mating patterns, and thus, the overall opportunity for sexual selection and evolutionary processes for a ground-nesting songbird, the Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis). On an unharvested field, 55% of females were in polygynous associations, and social polygyny was associated with greater rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP). In this treatment, synchrony explained variation in EPP rates, as broods by more synchronous females had more EPP than broods by asynchronous females. In contrast, on a harvested field, simultaneous nest failure caused by haying dramatically decreased the overall incidence of EPP by increasing the occurrence of social monogamy and, apparently, the ability of polygynous males to maintain paternity in their own nests. Despite increased social and genetic monogamy, these haying-mediated changes in mating systems resulted in greater than twofold increase in the opportunity for sexual selection. This effect arose, in part, from a 30% increase in the variance associated with within-pair fertilization success, relative to the unharvested field. This effect was caused by a notable increase (+110%) in variance associated with the quality of social mates following simultaneous nest failure. Because up to 40% of regional habitat is harvested by early June, these data may demonstrate a strong population-level effect on mating systems, sexual selection, and consequently, evolutionary processes. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  16. Pitch accent type affects the N400 during referential processing.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Petra B; Baumann, Stefan

    2010-06-23

    Discourse processing depends on semantic memory as well as maintaining and updating of a mental model. Using event-related potentials, we investigated how a referent's information status (new, accessible, given) is processed in combination with three different prosodic realizations (an appropriate accent and two inappropriate accents). The data reveal a biphasic N400-late positivity pattern, indicating that prosodic information affects an early discourse linking stage, during which prominence information reflecting a referent's accessibility is computed (N400), and a later discourse updating stage, during which conflicts between prosodic information and a referent's actual information status are detected (late positivity). Crucially, the data show that the N400 is not only sensitive to lexico-semantic relations but also to discourse accessibility induced by prosodic cues. PMID:20489672

  17. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation zone from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Jones, E.; White, D.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analyzed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence. Whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and colored dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  18. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Jones, Emlyn M.; White, Dana

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analysed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence, whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and coloured dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  19. Development of brain mechanisms for processing affective touch

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Gordon, Ilanit; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Olausson, Håkan; Kaiser, Martha D.

    2014-01-01

    Affective tactile stimulation plays a key role in the maturation of neural circuits, but the development of brain mechanisms processing touch is poorly understood. We therefore used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain responses to soft brush stroking of both glabrous (palm) and hairy (forearm) skin in healthy children (5–13 years), adolescents (14–17 years), and adults (25–35 years). Adult-defined regions-of-interests in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), insular cortex and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) were significantly and similarly activated in all age groups. Whole-brain analyses revealed that responses in the ipsilateral SII were positively correlated with age in both genders, and that responses in bilateral regions near the pSTS correlated significantly and strongly with age in females but not in males. These results suggest that brain mechanisms associated with both sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational aspects of touch are largely established in school-aged children, and that there is a general continuing maturation of SII and a female-specific increase in pSTS sensitivity with age. Our work establishes a groundwork for future comparative studies of tactile processing in developmental disorders characterized by disrupted social perception such as autism. PMID:24550800

  20. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Major hydrogeochemical processes in an acid mine drainage affected estuary.

    PubMed

    Asta, Maria P; Calleja, Maria Ll; Pérez-López, Rafael; Auqué, Luis F

    2015-02-15

    This study provides geochemical data with the aim of identifying and quantifying the main processes occurring in an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) affected estuary. With that purpose, water samples of the Huelva estuary were collected during a tidal half-cycle and ion-ion plots and geochemical modeling were performed to obtain a general conceptual model. Modeling results indicated that the main processes responsible for the hydrochemical evolution of the waters are: (i) the mixing of acid fluvial water with alkaline ocean water; (ii) precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxysulfates (schwertmannite) and hydroxides (ferrihydrite); (iii) precipitation of Al hydroxysulfates (jurbanite) and hydroxides (amorphous Al(OH)3); (iv) dissolution of calcite; and (v) dissolution of gypsum. All these processes, thermodynamically feasible in the light of their calculated saturation states, were quantified by mass-balance calculations and validated by reaction-path calculations. In addition, sorption processes were deduced by the non-conservative behavior of some elements (e.g., Cu and Zn). PMID:25530015

  2. Determination of processes affecting groundwater quality in the coastal aquifer beneath Puri city, India: a multivariate statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, P K; Vijay, R; Pujari, P R; Sundaray, S K; Mohanty, B P

    2011-01-01

    Variability of groundwater quality parameters is linked to various processes such as weathering, organic matter degradation, aerobic respiration, iron reduction, mineral dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange and mixing of salt water with fresh water. Multivariate statistical analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were applied to the standardized data set of eleven groundwater quality parameters (i.e. pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Fe3+, alkalinity, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-), TDS) collected during the post-monsoon and the summer seasons in order to elicit hydrologic and biogeochemical processes affecting water quality in the unconfined aquifer beneath Puri city in eastern India. The application of PCA resulted in four factors explaining 73% variance in post-monsoon and 81% variance in summer. The HCA using Ward's method and squared Euclidean distance measure classified the parameters into four clusters based on their similarities. PCA and HCA allowed interpretation of processes. During both post-monsoon and summer seasons, anthropogenic pollution and organic matter degradation/Fe(III) reduction were found dominant due to contribution from on-site sanitation in septic tanks and soak pits in the city. Cation exchange and mineral precipitation were possible causes for increase in Na+ and decrease in Ca2+ concentration in summer. Fresh water recharge during monsoon and Sea water intrusion in summer are attributed as significant hydrologic processes to variations of the groundwater quality at the study site. PMID:22097065

  3. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. The "Musical Emotional Bursts": a validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle; Belin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear) and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analog of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV)-a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 s) improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]), or a clarinet (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]). The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, non-linguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli [30 stimuli × 4 (3 emotions + neutral) × 2 instruments] by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task); 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80) was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0%) and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each) MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems. PMID:23964255

  5. Biogeochemical weathering under ice: Size matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Skidmore, M.; Hodson, A. J.; Priscu, J.; Lyons, W. B.; Sharp, M.; Wynn, P.; Jackson, M.

    2010-09-01

    The basal regions of continental ice sheets are gaps in our current understanding of the Earth's biosphere and biogeochemical cycles. We draw on existing and new chemical data sets for subglacial meltwaters to provide the first comprehensive assessment of sub-ice sheet biogeochemical weathering. We show that size of the ice mass is a critical control on the balance of chemical weathering processes and that microbial activity is ubiquitous in driving dissolution. Carbonate dissolution fueled by sulfide oxidation and microbial CO2 dominate beneath small valley glaciers. Prolonged meltwater residence times and greater isolation characteristic of ice sheets lead to the development of anoxia and enhanced silicate dissolution due to calcite saturation. We show that sub-ice sheet environments are highly geochemically reactive and should be considered in regional and global solute budgets. For example, calculated solute fluxes from Antarctica (72-130 t yr-1) are the same order of magnitude as those from some of the world's largest rivers and rates of chemical weathering (10-17 t km-2 yr-1) are high for the annual specific discharge (2.3-4.1 × 10-3 m). Our model of chemical weathering dynamics provides important information on subglacial biodiversity and global biogeochemical cycles and may be used to design strategies for the first sampling of Antarctic Subglacial Lakes and other sub-ice sheet environments for the next decade.

  6. Evaluation of Geochemical Processes Affecting Uranium Sequestration and Longevity of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C. C.; Webb, S.; Bargar, J.; Naftz, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    Development of effective remediation techniques for protecting existing drinking water supplies and for mitigating existing contamination problems requires evaluating both the contaminant sequestration processes and the secondary reactions affecting the long term stability of contaminant attenuation. Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provide a means for passive remediation of dissolved groundwater contaminants and may be an effective strategy for remediation of uranium (U) groundwater contamination provided that long term stability of the sequestered U can be achieved for the geochemical conditions of the aquifer expected subsequent to remediation. Understanding the chemical reaction mechanisms resulting in U uptake and PRB performance are critical to evaluating the potential for release of sequestered U and for improved design of remediation devices. We are using synchrotron X-ray techniques to investigate U sequestration reaction mechanisms and biogeochemical processes in PRB materials recovered from a 9-year field demonstration of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and bone char apatite PRBs in a U contaminated aquifer near Fry Canyon, Utah. X-ray microprobe mapping of iron phases shows that extensive secondary precipitation of mackinawite, siderite and aragonite in the ZVI PRB has resulted from ZVI corrosion coupled with microbial sulfate reduction. Bulk U-EXAFS measurements and micron-scale U-oxidation state mapping indicates that U removal occurs largely by reduction and precipitation of a UO2-like U(IV) phase on the ZVI surfaces, and that the sequestered U is often buried by the secondary Fe precipitates. These findings are significant to the efficacy of ZVI PRBs for remediation of U and other contaminants in that the ongoing secondary phase precipitation cements grains and fills internal porosity resulting in the observed decreased PRB permeability and limits subsequent U removal, but likely limits oxidative remobilization of U. In the bone char apatite PRB, elevated

  7. Hepatitis C virus mutation affects proteasomal epitope processing

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Ulrike; Liermann, Heike; Racanelli, Vito; Halenius, Anne; Wiese, Manfred; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ruppert, Thomas; Rispeter, Kay; Henklein, Peter; Sijts, Alice; Hengel, Hartmut; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The high incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence raises the question of how HCV interferes with host immune responses. Studying a single-source HCV outbreak, we identified an HCV mutation that impaired correct carboxyterminal cleavage of an immunodominant HLA-A2–restricted CD8 cell epitope that is frequently recognized by recovered patients. The mutation, a conservative HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) tyrosine to phenylalanine substitution, was absent in 54 clones of the infectious source, but present in 15/21 (71%) HLA-A2–positive and in 11/24 (46%) HLA-A2–negative patients with chronic hepatitis C. In order to analyze whether the mutation affected the processing of the HLA-A2–restricted CD8 cell epitope, mutant and wild-type NS3 polypeptides were digested in vitro with 20S constitutive proteasomes and with immunoproteasomes. The presence of the mutation resulted in impaired carboxyterminal cleavage of the epitope. In order to analyze whether impaired epitope processing affected T cell priming in vivo, HLA-A2–transgenic mice were infected with vaccinia viruses encoding either wild-type or mutant HCV NS3. The mutant induced fewer epitope-specific, IFN-γ;–producing and fewer tetramer+ cells than the wild type. These data demonstrate how a conservative mutation in the flanking region of an HCV epitope impairs the induction of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells and reveal a mechanism that may contribute to viral sequence evolution in infected patients. PMID:15254592

  8. Processes Controlling Temporal Changes in Agriculturally-Affected Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, K. R.; Belitz, K.; Jurgens, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    The National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey includes assessment of groundwater-quality changes with time. To better understand changes at a national scale, NAWQA has implemented smaller scale flow-path studies to evaluate the processes affecting these changes. Flow path studies are designed to sample groundwater of different ages. Wells are sampled for a suite of constituents, including tracers of groundwater age. In the 1990s, a 4.6 km transect of monitoring wells was installed near Fresno in the southern Central Valley of California. The region is dominated by intensive agriculture. The wells were sampled in 1994-95, 2003, and 2013 to provide data on changes in water quality and groundwater age. In 2013, the flow path was extended to a regional scale (30 km) by using existing production wells. Preliminary interpretation of the local-scale flow path indicates that nitrate concentrations in the upper 25 m of the aquifer are higher than the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water and variably increase or decrease with time. At intermediate depths (25-40 m), nitrate concentrations are lower and show small to moderate increases. The legacy pesticide 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) is degrading at a half-life of about 4-6 years. DBCP is present above the MCL at intermediate depths even though it is has been banned from use for more than 30 years. Both nitrate and DBCP appear to be moving vertically downward through the aquifer. Whereas uranium concentrations are generally below the MCL in the local-scale flow path, concentrations increase along the regional transect, with concentrations nearly an order of magnitude above the MCL in some wells. Further evaluation of processes affecting these constituents (such as source, redox, and mobilization factors) will provide important insight that can be applied to other regions and will assist local water managers.

  9. The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD): A TOPMODEL application developed within the Modular Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.; Wolock, D. M.; Linard, J. I.; Wieczorek, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    Process-based flow and transport simulation models can help increase understanding of how hydrologic flow paths affect biogeochemical mixing and reactions in watersheds. This presentation describes the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD), a new model designed to simulate water and chemical transport in both pristine and agricultural watersheds. WEBMOD simulates streamflow using TOPMODEL algorithms and also simulates irrigation, canopy interception, snowpack, and tile-drain flow; these are important processes for successful multi-year simulations of agricultural watersheds. In addition, the hydrologic components of the model are linked to the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) geochemical model PHREEQC such that solute chemistry for the hillslopes and streams also are computed. Model development, execution, and calibration take place within the USGS Modular Modeling System. WEBMOD is being validated at ten research watersheds. Five of these watersheds are nearly pristine and comprise the USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) Program field sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. The remaining five watersheds contain intensely cultivated fields being studied by USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program: Merced River, California; Granger Drain, Washington; Maple Creek, Nebraska; Sugar Creek, Indiana; and Morgan Creek, Delaware. Model calibration improved understanding of observed variations in soil moisture, solute concentrations, and stream discharge at the five WEBB watersheds and is now being set up to simulate the processes at the five agricultural watersheds that are now ending their first year of data collection.

  10. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of below ground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature, and speciation and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. The research is divided into two major parts, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Variant factors affecting sulfide flux include the wetlands' tidal range, seasonal salinity, and other hydrological conditions, grass species and plant growth, soil composition, and microbial activity.

  11. Terrestrial ecosystems and the global biogeochemical silica cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel J.

    2002-12-01

    Most research on the global Si cycle has focused nearly exclusively on weathering or the oceanic Si cycle and has not explored the complexity of the terrestrial biogeochemical cycle. The global biogeochemical Si cycle is of great interest because of its impact on global CO2 concentrations through the combined processes of weathering of silicate minerals and transfer of CO2 from the atmosphere to the lithosphere. A sizable pool of Si is contained as accumulations of amorphous silica, or biogenic silica (BSi), in living tissues of growing plants, known as phytoliths, and, after decomposition of organic material, as remains in the soil. The annual fixation of phytolith silica ranges from 60-200 Tmol yr-1 and rivals that fixed in the oceanic biogeochemical cycle (240 Tmol yr-1). Internal recycling of the phytolith pool is intense with riverine fluxes of dissolved silicate to the oceans buffered by the terrestrial biogeochemical Si cycle, challenging the ability of weathering models to predict rates of weathering and consequently, changes in global climate. Consideration must be given to the influence of the terrestrial BSi pool on variations in the global biogeochemical Si cycle over geologic time and the influence man has had on modifying both the terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr-1, with wetland methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr-1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 were in the range of 14.6-30.4 Tg yr-1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr-1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr-1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.

  13. How processing digital elevation models can affect simulated water budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Lowery, M.A.; Campbell, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    For regional models, the shallow water table surface is often used as a source/sink boundary condition, as model grid scale precludes simulation of the water table aquifer. This approach is appropriate when the water table surface is relatively stationary. Since water table surface maps are not readily available, the elevation of the water table used in model cells is estimated via a two-step process. First, a regression equation is developed using existing land and water table elevations from wells in the area. This equation is then used to predict the water table surface for each model cell using land surface elevation available from digital elevation models (DEM). Two methods of processing DEM for estimating the land surface for each cell are commonly used (value nearest the cell centroid or mean value in the cell). This article demonstrates how these two methods of DEM processing can affect the simulated water budget. For the example presented, approximately 20% more total flow through the aquifer system is simulated if the centroid value rather than the mean value is used. This is due to the one-third greater average ground water gradients associated with the centroid value than the mean value. The results will vary depending on the particular model area topography and cell size. The use of the mean DEM value in each model cell will result in a more conservative water budget and is more appropriate because the model cell water table value should be representative of the entire cell area, not the centroid of the model cell.

  14. Integrating the Affective Domain into the Instructional Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Robert G.

    This study begins with a definition of the affective domain and its importance to learning, outlining its impact both in achieving affective behaviors and in facilitating cognitive and psychomotor objectives. The study then develops a model of instructional design that incorporates the affective domain as an integral component. The model combines…

  15. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  16. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tatia M C; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    2013-03-01

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to compare the affective processing in 12 people with mild Alzheimer's disease and 12 matched controls. The main finding was that the clinical participants showed reduced activations in regions associated with the motor simulation system (the ventral premotor cortex) and in regions associated with emotional simulation-empathy (the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum). This regional decline in blood oxygen level-dependent signals appeared to be lateralized in the left hemisphere and was not related to any structural degeneration in the clinical participants. Furthermore, the regions that showed changes in neural activity differed for the 3 emotional facial expressions studied. Findings of our study indicate that neural changes in regions associated with the motor and emotional simulation systems might play an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22840336

  17. Brain Potentials During Affective Picture Processing in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hajcak, Greg; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2008-01-01

    In adults, emotional (e.g., both unpleasant and pleasant) compared to neutral pictures elicit an increase in the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP); modulation of these ERP components are thought to reflect the facilitated processing of, and increased attention to, motivationally salient stimuli. To determine whether the EPN and LPP are sensitive to emotional content in children, high-density EEG was recorded from 18 children who were 5 to 8 years of age (mean age = 77 months, SD = 11 months) while they viewed developmentally appropriate pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Self-reported ratings of valence and arousal were also obtained. An EPN was not evident following emotional compared to neutral pictures; however, a positivity maximal at occipital-parietal recording sites was increased from 500 to 1,000 ms following pleasant pictures and from 500 to 1,500 ms following unpleasant pictures. Comparisons between the EPN and LPP observed in children and adults, and implications for developmental studies of emotion, are discussed. PMID:19103249

  18. Breathing and affective picture processing across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Patrick; Filippou, Dimitra; Pais, Bruno; von Gunten, Armin; Danuser, Brigitta

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated differences between healthy younger, middle-aged, and older adults in their respiratory responses to pictures of different valence and arousal. Expiratory time shortened and end-tidal PCO2 decreased with increasing arousal in all age groups; yet, compared to younger adults, older adults' overall change from baseline was smaller for expiratory time and larger for end-tidal PCO2. Contrary to their younger counterparts, older adults' inspiratory time did not shorten with increasing arousal. Inspiratory duty cycle did not covary with affective ratings for younger adults, increased with unpleasantness for middle-aged adults, and increased with arousal for older adults. Thoracic breathing increased with increasing unpleasantness only among older adults. Age had no effects on mean inspiratory flow and minute ventilation, which both augmented as arousal increased. We discuss how age effects on respiratory response magnitude and pattern may depend on age-associated biological changes or reflect age-related differences in emotional processing. PMID:27417701

  19. Emotional Language Processing: How Mood Affects Integration Processes during Discourse Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egidi, Giovanna; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2012-01-01

    This research tests whether mood affects semantic processing during discourse comprehension by facilitating integration of information congruent with moods' valence. Participants in happy, sad, or neutral moods listened to stories with positive or negative endings during EEG recording. N400 peak amplitudes showed mood congruence for happy and sad…

  20. Quantification of Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics in the Conterminous United States Combining a Process-Based Biogeochemical Model and MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Cook, David R.; Coulter, Richard L.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Scott, Russell L.; Munger, J. W.; Bible, Ken

    2011-09-21

    Satellite remote sensing provides continuous temporal and spatial information of terrestrial 24 ecosystems. Using these remote sensing data and eddy flux measurements and biogeochemical 25 models, such as the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), should provide a more adequate 26 quantification of carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use Moderate Resolution 27 Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Land Surface Water Index 28 (LSWI) and carbon flux data of AmeriFlux to conduct such a study. We first modify the gross primary 29 production (GPP) modeling in TEM by incorporating EVI and LSWI to account for the effects of the 30 changes of canopy photosynthetic capacity, phenology and water stress. Second, we parameterize and 31 verify the new version of TEM with eddy flux data. We then apply the model to the conterminous 32 United States over the period 2000-2005 at a 0.05o ×0.05o spatial resolution. We find that the new 33 version of TEM generally captured the expected temporal and spatial patterns of regional carbon 34 dynamics. We estimate that regional GPP is between 7.02 and 7.78 Pg C yr-1 and net primary 35 production (NPP) ranges from 3.81 to 4.38 Pg C yr-1 and net ecosystem production (NEP) varies 36 within 0.08-0.73 Pg C yr-1 over the period 2000-2005 for the conterminous United States. The 37 uncertainty due to parameterization is 0.34, 0.65 and 0.18 Pg C yr-1 for the regional estimates of GPP, 38 NPP and NEP, respectively. The effects of extreme climate and disturbances such as severe drought in 39 2002 and destructive Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were captured by the model. Our study provides a 40 new independent and more adequate measure of carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, 41 which will benefit studies of carbon-climate feedback and facilitate policy-making of carbon 42 management and climate.

  1. Effects of soil data and simulation unit resolution on quantifying changes of soil organic carbon at regional scale with a biogeochemical process model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liming; Yu, Dongsheng; Shi, Xuezheng; Xu, Shengxiang; Xing, Shihe; Zhao, Yongcong

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models were often applied to regions with high heterogeneity, but limited spatially differentiated soil information and simulation unit resolution. This study, carried out in the Tai-Lake region of China, defined the uncertainty derived from application of the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) biogeochemical model in an area with heterogeneous soil properties and different simulation units. Three different resolution soil attribute databases, a polygonal capture of mapping units at 1:50,000 (P5), a county-based database of 1:50,000 (C5) and county-based database of 1:14,000,000 (C14), were used as inputs for regional DNDC simulation. The P5 and C5 databases were combined with the 1:50,000 digital soil map, which is the most detailed soil database for the Tai-Lake region. The C14 database was combined with 1:14,000,000 digital soil map, which is a coarse database and is often used for modeling at a national or regional scale in China. The soil polygons of P5 database and county boundaries of C5 and C14 databases were used as basic simulation units. Results project that from 1982 to 2000, total SOC change in the top layer (0-30 cm) of the 2.3 M ha of paddy soil in the Tai-Lake region was +1.48 Tg C, -3.99 Tg C and -15.38 Tg C based on P5, C5 and C14 databases, respectively. With the total SOC change as modeled with P5 inputs as the baseline, which is the advantages of using detailed, polygon-based soil dataset, the relative deviation of C5 and C14 were 368% and 1126%, respectively. The comparison illustrates that DNDC simulation is strongly influenced by choice of fundamental geographic resolution as well as input soil attribute detail. The results also indicate that improving the framework of DNDC is essential in creating accurate models of the soil carbon cycle. PMID:24523922

  2. Using Halogens (Cl, Br, F, I) and Stable Isotopes of Water (δ18O, δ2H) to Trace Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes in Prairie Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Z. F.; Lu, Z.; Mills, C. T.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Mushet, D.; Siegel, D. I.; Fiorentino, A. J., II; Gade, M.; Spradlin, J.

    2014-12-01

    Prairie pothole wetlands are ubiquitous features of the Great Plains of North America, and important habitat for amphibians and migratory birds. The salinity of proximal wetlands varies highly due to groundwater-glacial till interactions, which influence wetland biota and associated ecosystem functions. Here we use halogens and stable isotopes of water to fingerprint hydrological and biogeochemical controls on salt cycling in a prairie wetland complex. We surveyed surface, well, and pore waters from a groundwater recharge wetland (T8) and more saline closed (P1) and open (P8) basin discharge wetlands in the Cottonwood Lake Study Area (ND) in August/October 2013 and May 2014. Halogen concentrations varied over a broad range throughout the study area (Cl = 2.2 to 170 mg/L, Br = 13 to 2000 μg/L, F = < 30 (MDL) to 740 μg/L, I = 1 to 538 μg/L). The Cl/Br molar ratios were higher (171 to 574) at the recharge wetland, indicating meteoric sources, and had a tighter and lower range (33 to 320) at the down-gradient sites. The Cl/I molar ratios of waters throughout the site had a wide range (32 to 26,000). Lowest values occurred at the upgradient shore of P1 (32 to 43) due to low Cl concentrations and the center of P1 (196 to 213) where pore water of weathered till underlying 1.2 m of organic-rich sediment and silty clay soil is enriched in I to ~500 µg/L. Stable isotopes of water showed that evaporation-enriched pond water (δ18O = -9.5 to -2.71 ‰) mixes with shallow groundwater in the top 0.6 m of fringing wetland soils and 1.2 m of the substrate in the center of P1. Our results suggest endogenous sources for Br and I within the prairie landscape that may be controlled by biological mechanisms or weathering of shale from glacial till.

  3. Effects of Soil Data and Simulation Unit Resolution on Quantifying Changes of Soil Organic Carbon at Regional Scale with a Biogeochemical Process Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Yu, Dongsheng; Shi, Xuezheng; Xu, Shengxiang; Xing, Shihe; Zhao, Yongcong

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models were often applied to regions with high heterogeneity, but limited spatially differentiated soil information and simulation unit resolution. This study, carried out in the Tai-Lake region of China, defined the uncertainty derived from application of the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) biogeochemical model in an area with heterogeneous soil properties and different simulation units. Three different resolution soil attribute databases, a polygonal capture of mapping units at 1∶50,000 (P5), a county-based database of 1∶50,000 (C5) and county-based database of 1∶14,000,000 (C14), were used as inputs for regional DNDC simulation. The P5 and C5 databases were combined with the 1∶50,000 digital soil map, which is the most detailed soil database for the Tai-Lake region. The C14 database was combined with 1∶14,000,000 digital soil map, which is a coarse database and is often used for modeling at a national or regional scale in China. The soil polygons of P5 database and county boundaries of C5 and C14 databases were used as basic simulation units. Results project that from 1982 to 2000, total SOC change in the top layer (0–30 cm) of the 2.3 M ha of paddy soil in the Tai-Lake region was +1.48 Tg C, −3.99 Tg C and −15.38 Tg C based on P5, C5 and C14 databases, respectively. With the total SOC change as modeled with P5 inputs as the baseline, which is the advantages of using detailed, polygon-based soil dataset, the relative deviation of C5 and C14 were 368% and 1126%, respectively. The comparison illustrates that DNDC simulation is strongly influenced by choice of fundamental geographic resolution as well as input soil attribute detail. The results also indicate that improving the framework of DNDC is essential in creating accurate models of the soil carbon cycle. PMID:24523922

  4. Quantification of terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the conterminous United States combining a process-based biogeochemical model and MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai; Cook, D.; Coulter, Richard L.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Scott, Russell L.; Munger, J. W.; Bible, Ken

    2011-08-31

    Satellite remote sensing provides continuous temporal and spatial information of terrestrial ecosystems. Using these remote sensing data and eddy flux measurements and biogeochemical models, such as the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), should provide a more adequate quantification of carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Land Surface Water Index (LSWI) and carbon flux data of AmeriFlux to conduct such a study. We first modify the gross primary production (GPP) modeling in TEM by incorporating EVI and LSWI to account for the effects of the changes of canopy photosynthetic capacity, phenology and water stress. Second, we parameterize and verify the new version of TEM with eddy flux data. We then apply the model to the conterminous United States over the period 2000-2005 at a 0.05-0.05 spatial resolution. We find that the new version of TEM made improvement over the previous version and generally captured the expected temporal and spatial patterns of regional carbon dynamics. We estimate that regional GPP is between 7.02 and 7.78 PgC yr{sup -1} and net primary production (NPP) ranges from 3.81 to 4.38 Pg Cyr{sup -1} and net ecosystem production (NEP) varies within 0.08- 0.73 PgC yr{sup -1} over the period 2000-2005 for the conterminous United States. The uncertainty due to parameterization is 0.34, 0.65 and 0.18 PgC yr{sup -1} for the regional estimates of GPP, NPP and NEP, respectively. The effects of extreme climate and disturbances such as severe drought in 2002 and destructive Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were captured by the model. Our study provides a new independent and more adequate measure of carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, which will benefit studies of carbon-climate feedback and facilitate policy-making of carbon management and climate.

  5. EFFECTS OF INCREASED SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS)). n terrestrial ecosystems,...

  6. Processes Affecting Nitrogen Speciation in a Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Musgrove, M.; Wong, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Like many karst aquifers, the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, in central Texas, is in an area undergoing rapid growth in population, and there is concern as to how increased amounts of wastewater might affect groundwater quality. We measured concentrations and estimated loads of nitrogen (N) species in recharge to and discharge from the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, central Texas, to evaluate processes affecting the transport and fate of N species in groundwater. Water samples were collected during 17 months (November 2008-March 2010) from five streams that contribute about 85% of recharge to the aquifer segment and from Barton Springs, the principal point of discharge from the segment. The sampling period spanned a range of climatic conditions from exceptional drought to above-normal rainfall. Samples were analyzed for N species (organic N + ammonia, ammonia, nitrate + nitrite, nitrite); loads of organic N and nitrate were estimated with LOADEST, a regression-based model that uses a time series of streamflow and measured constituent concentrations to estimate constituent loads. Concentrations of organic nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were higher and concentrations of nitrate were lower in surface water than in spring discharge, consistent with conversion of organic nitrogen to nitrate and associated consumption of dissolved oxygen in the aquifer. During the period of the study, the estimated load of organic N in recharge from streams (average daily load [adl] of 39 kg/d) was about 10 times that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 9.4 kg/d), whereas the estimated load of nitrate in recharge from streams (adl of 123 kg/d) was slightly less than that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 148 kg/d). The total average N load in recharge from streams and discharge from Barton Springs was not significantly different (adl of 162 and 157 kg/d, respectively), indicating that surface-water recharge can account for all of the N in Barton Springs

  7. Carbon sources and biogeochemical processes in Monticchio maar lakes, Mt Vulture volcano (southern Italy): New geochemical constrains of active degassing of mantle derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Grassa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Since the catastrophic releases of carbon dioxide from the African volcanic lakes Nyos and Monoun in the 1980s, the scientific community draw attention towards all those crater lakes able to accumulate massive amount of CO2, which could be catastrophically released following overturn of their deep waters. This implies a quantification of the gas accumulation rate into the lakes and the knowledge of recharge processes and their evolution in time. In fact the gaseous recharge in a lake occurs at alarming rates, when an active degassing of hazardous nature volatiles occurs into the lakes and the structure and dynamic of the lake permit the accumulation of gases into the water. The Monticchio lakes, LPM and LGM, occupies two maar craters formed during the last volcanic activity of Mt. Vulture occurred ˜ 140 000 years ago. LPM is a permanently stratified lake, with a thick deep volume of stagnant water and a shallower layer affected by seasonal overturn. On the contrary LGM is a monomittic lake with a complete overturn of the water during winter time. The major dissolved volatiles are methane and CO2. Dissolved helium is in trace amounts and its isotopic signature ranges between 6.1 and 5.3 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric 3He/4He isotopic ratio). These values are within the range of those measured in the olivine fluid inclusions (both of mantle xenoliths and dispersed in the pyroclastics) of LPM maar ejecta. During three years of investigations we observed that dissolved methane in the deep waters of LGM drastically decreases in wintertime as consequence of the complete overturn of the water. The isotopic signature of methane in the deepest portions of LGM (both sediment and water) is quite stable with time and highlights a biogenic origin, being produced both by acetate fermentation and by CO2-reduction in variable proportions. In contrast, a higher contribution of methane produced via CO2 reduction characterizes sediments at shallower depths. At LPM, there is a great

  8. Biogeochemical dynamics in zero-valent iron columns: Implications for permeable reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Phelps, T.J.; Liang, L.; Palumbo, A.V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Dickey, M.J.; Roh, Y.; Kinsall, B.L.

    1999-07-01

    The impact of microbiological and geochemical processes has been a major concern for the long-term performance of permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}). To evaluate potential biogeochemical impacts, laboratory studies were performed over a 5-month period using columns containing a diverse microbial community. The conditions chosen for these experiments were designed to simulate high concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate containing groundwater regimes. Groundwater chemistry was found to significantly affect corrosion rates of Fe{sup 0} filings and resulted in the formation of a suite of mineral precipitates. HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions in SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}-containing water were particularly corrosive to Fe{sup 0}, resulting in the formation of ferrous carbonate and enhanced H{sub 2} gas generation that stimulated the growth of microbial populations and increased SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} reduction. Major mineral precipitates identified included lepidocrocite, akaganeite, mackinawite, magnetite/maghemite, goethite, siderite, and amorphous ferrous sulfide. Sulfide was formed as a result of microbial reduction of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} that became significant after about 2 months of column operations. This study demonstrates that biogeochemical influences on the performance and reaction of Fe{sup 0} may be minimal in the short term, necessitating longer-term operations to observe the effects of biogeochemical reactions on the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers. Although major failures of in-ground treatment barriers have not been problematic to date, the accumulation of iron oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and sulfides from biogeochemical processes could reduce the reactivity and permeability of Fe{sup 0} beds, thereby decreasing treatment efficiency.

  9. Addiction Motivation Reformulated: An Affective Processing Model of Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Timothy B.; Piper, Megan E.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Majeskie, Matthew R.; Fiore, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This article offers a reformulation of the negative reinforcement model of drug addiction and proposes that the escape and avoidance of negative affect is the prepotent motive for addictive drug use. The authors posit that negative affect is the motivational core of the withdrawal syndrome and argue that, through repeated cycles of drug use and…

  10. Sources and Processes Affecting Particulate Matter Pollution over North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Shao, J.; Lu, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, S.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Severe fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution over North China has received broad attention worldwide in recent years. Better understanding the sources and processes controlling pollution over this region is of great importance with urgent implications for air quality policy. We will present a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint model at 0.25° × 0.3125° horizontal resolution, and apply it to analyze the factors affecting PM2.5 concentrations over North China. Hourly surface observations of PM2.5 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from the China National Environmental Monitoring Center (CNEMC) can be assimilated into the model to evaluate and constrain aerosol (primary and precursors) emissions. Application of the data assimilation system to the APEC period (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit; 5-11 November 2014) shows that 46% of the PM2.5 pollution reduction during APEC ("The APEC Blue") can be attributed to meteorology conditions and the rest 54% to emission reductions due to strict emission controls. Ammonia emissions are shown to significantly contribute to PM2.5 over North China in the fall. By converting sulfuric acid and nitric acid to longer-lived ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate aerosols, ammonia plays an important role in promoting their regional transport influences. We will also discuss the pathways and mechanisms of external long-range transport influences to the PM2.5 pollution over North China.

  11. Morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges in river restoration - the Thur River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J.; Linde, N.; Perona, P.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; Hollender, J.; Cirpka, O. A.; Schneider, P.; Vogt, T.; Radny, D.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2014-06-01

    River restoration can enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity, but the underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals, and adverse effects are prevented. In particular, we need to comprehend how hydromorphological variability quantitatively relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity as well as ground- and surface water quality in restored river corridors. This involves (i) physical processes and structural properties, determining erosion and sedimentation, as well as solute and heat transport behavior in surface water and within the subsurface; (ii) biogeochemical processes and characteristics, including the turnover of nutrients and natural water constituents; and (iii) ecological processes and indicators related to biodiversity and ecological functioning. All these aspects are interlinked, requiring an interdisciplinary investigation approach. Here, we present an overview of the recently completed RECORD (REstored CORridor Dynamics) project in which we combined physical, chemical, and biological observations with modeling at a restored river corridor of the perialpine Thur River in Switzerland. Our results show that river restoration, beyond inducing morphologic changes that reshape the river bed and banks, triggered complex spatial patterns of bank infiltration, and affected habitat type, biotic communities and biogeochemical processes. We adopted an interdisciplinary approach of monitoring the continuing changes due to restoration measures to address the following questions: How stable is the morphological variability established by restoration? Does morphological variability guarantee an improvement in biodiversity? How does morphological variability affect biogeochemical transformations in the river corridor? What are some potential adverse effects of river restoration? How is river restoration influenced by catchment-scale hydraulics

  12. Biogeochemical processes involving dissolved CO2 and CH4 at Albano, Averno, and Monticchio meromictic volcanic lakes (Central-Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Fiebig, Jens; Nocentini, Matteo; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Rouwet, Dmitri; Bicocchi, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    measured δ13CTDIC values are not consistent, indicating that CO2 and the main carbon-bearing ion species (HCO3 -) are not in isotopic equilibrium, likely due to the fast kinetics of biochemical processes involving both CO2 and CH4. This study demonstrates that the vertical patterns of the CO2/CH4 ratio and of δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-CH4 are to be regarded as promising tools to detect perturbations, related to different causes, such as changes in the CO2 input from sublacustrine springs, that may affect aerobic and anaerobic layers of meromictic volcanic lakes.

  13. A framework to assess biogeochemical response to ecosystem disturbance using nutrient partitioning ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranabetter, J. Marty; McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Enders, Sara K.; Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Higuera, Philip E.; Morris, Jesse L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Barnes, Rebecca; Buma, Brian; Gavin, Daniel G.; Gerhart, Laci M.; Gillson, Lindsey; Hietz, Peter; Mack, Michelle C.; McNeil, Brenden; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that the ratio of soil and plant nutrient stocks in mature ecosystems represents a characteristic site property. Focusing on nitrogen (N), we hypothesize that this partitioning ratio (soil N: plant N) will undergo a predictable trajectory after disturbance. We investigate the nature of this partitioning ratio with three approaches: (1) nutrient stock data from forested ecosystems in North America, (2) a process-based ecosystem model, and (3) conceptual shifts in site nutrient availability with altered disturbance frequency. Partitioning ratios could be applied to a variety of ecosystems and successional states, allowing for improved temporal scaling of disturbance events. The generally short-term empirical evidence for recovery trajectories of nutrient stocks and partitioning ratios suggests two areas for future research. First, we need to recognize and quantify how disturbance effects can be accreting or depleting, depending on whether their net effect is to increase or decrease ecosystem nutrient stocks. Second, we need to test how altered disturbance frequencies from the present state may be constructive or destructive in their effects on biogeochemical cycling and nutrient availability. Long-term studies, with repeated sampling of soils and vegetation, will be essential in further developing this framework of biogeochemical response to disturbance.

  14. Factors Influencing Phosphorous Cycling in Biogeochemical 'Hot Spots'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Regan, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the phosphorus (P) cycle has led to subsequent soil and water quality issues. For example, P build up in soils due to historic fertilizer application may become biologically available and exacerbate eutrophication and anoxia in nearby water bodies. In the humid Northeastern United States, storm runoff transports P and also stimulates biogeochemical processes, these locations are termed biogeochemical 'hot spots'. Many studies have looked at nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesize the periodic wetting and drying of biogeochemical hot spots promotes a combination of abiotic and biotic processes that influence the mobility of P. To test this hypothesis, we took monthly soil samples (5 cm deep) from May to October in forest, pasture, and cropped land near Ithaca, NY. In-situ measurements taken with each sample included volumetric soil moisture and soil temperature. We also analyzed samples for 'runoff generated' phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate (from 0.01 M CaCl2 extraction), Fe(II), percent organic matter, pH, as well as oxalate extractable and total P, Al, and Fe. We used linear mixed effects models to test how runoff generated phosphate concentrations vary with soil moisture and whether other environmental factors strengthen/weaken this relationship. The knowledge gained from this study will improve our understanding of P cycling in biogeochemical hot spots and can be used to improve the effectiveness of agricultural management practices in the Northeastern United States.

  15. Biogeochemical modeling at mass extinction boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Caldeira, K. G.

    1991-01-01

    The causes of major mass extinctions is a subject of considerable interest to those concerned with the history and evolution of life on earth. The primary objectives of the proposed plan of research are: (1) to develop quantitative time-dependent biogeochemical cycle models, coupled with an ocean atmosphere in order to improve the understanding of global scale physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the distribution of elements important for life at times of mass extinctions; and (2) to develop a comprehensive data base of the best available geochemical, isotopic, and other relevant geologic data from sections across mass extinction boundaries. These data will be used to constrain and test the biogeochemical model. These modeling experiments should prove useful in: (1) determining the possible cause(s) of the environmental changes seen at bio-event boundaries; (2) identifying and quantifying little-known feedbacks among the oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere; and (3) providing additional insights into the possible responses of the earth system to perturbations of various timescales. One of the best known mass extinction events marks the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary (66 Myr ago). Data from the K/T boundary are used here to constrain a newly developed time-dependent biogeochemical cycle model that is designed to study transient behavior of the earth system. Model results predict significant fluctuations in ocean alkalinity, atmospheric CO2, and global temperatures caused by extinction of calcareous plankton and reduction in the sedimentation rates of pelagic carbonates and organic carbon. Oxygen-isotome and other paleoclimatic data from K/T time provide some evidence that such climatic fluctuations may have occurred, but stabilizing feedbacks may have acted to reduce the ocean alkalinity and carbon dioxide fluctuations.

  16. Ecosystem biogeochemical function and services in an urbanizing desert region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, N. B.; Cook, E. M.; Earl, S.; Hale, R. L.; Hall, S. J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Iwaniec, D.; Larson, E. K.; McHale, M.; Sponseller, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem services derive from underlying ecosystem processes but are distinguished by their benefits to society. Among ecosystem services, those associated with biogeochemical cycling and regulation of water, air, and soil quality are relatively unrecognized by the public, although concentrations of some materials are regulated by local, state and national laws. The disconnection between their importance and the degree to which these services are acknowledged means that biogeochemical ecosystem services have seldom been considered in urban planning and design. Drawing from research at multiple scales in the central Arizona region that includes over twenty cities and towns comprising metropolitan Phoenix, we illustrate the relationships between ecosystem functions and services in three areas. First, at household to whole-city scales, we show that the overriding influence of water and material inputs mediated by humans is changing biogeochemical patterns in soil and vegetation. Second, we show how human modification of aquatic ecosystems for water delivery, stormwater management, and wastewater removal give rise to important trade-offs among these services. And finally, we illustrate the limited capacity of surrounding unproductive desert ecosystems to assimilate the air pollutants generated by this region of >4 million inhabitants. We argue that urban planning and design that take into account the ecosystem functions underlying biogeochemical ecosystem services will be most effective in management of potential pollution problems associated with all of these cases. This paper thus highlights biogeochemical research conducted at the central Arizona-Phoenix LTER within a framework of ecosystem services.

  17. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Determinants of Performance: A Process Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Peter W.; Stephan, Walter G.

    Literature from organizational and social psychology has suggested that three types of factors influence performance, i.e., cognitive, affective and behavioral. A model was developed to test a set of propositions concerning the relationship between the three kinds of factors, and included attributions, expectancies, general emotional responses to…

  18. Processing of Affective Speech Prosody Is Impaired in Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpilahti, Pirjo; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kuusikko, Sanna; Suominen, Kalervo; Rytky, Seppo; Pauls, David L.; Moilanen, Irma

    2007-01-01

    Many people with the diagnosis of Asperger syndrome (AS) show poorly developed skills in understanding emotional messages. The present study addressed discrimination of speech prosody in children with AS at neurophysiological level. Detection of affective prosody was investigated in one-word utterances as indexed by the N1 and the mismatch…

  19. A GIS-based Framework for Examining the Effects of Water-Driven Erosion on Soil Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abban, B. K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion has long been identified as one of the key mechanisms affecting biogeochemical processes in the soil, through the transport and delivery of carbon and nutrients adsorbed to soil particles in the soil active layer. However, most biogeochemical models treat soil erosion contributions simplistically and lack the capacity to accurately account for the mechanisms that control soil erosion and deposition on the landscape. This stems from the fact that the majority of the biogeochemical models have traditionally been employed on landscapes where lateral and downslope fluxes due to soil erosion have been less significant compared to other vertical fluxes and processes occurring at a fixed location on the landscape. In intensely managed landscapes, however, this may not be the case since land management practices such as tillage and exposed land cover can lead to copious amounts of erosion on the landscape. Therefore, to better understand the role of soil erosion on soil biogeochemical cycling in IMLs, we present a framework for simulating the spatiotemporal effects of soil erosion and deposition on soil biogeochemical cycling. We focus specifically on tillage- and runoff-induced erosion since these are prevalent in IMLs. The framework employs a geospatial approach that loosely couples a GIS-based upland water erosion model, GeoWEPP, with a soil biogeochemistry model, Century, to predict downslope and lateral fluxes of soil erosion and the resultant impacts on soil biogeochemical cycling. The use of a geospatial approach allows us to better capture the effects of topography, soil type, land use/land cover, and climate on soil erosion fluxes as well as soil biogeochemical cycling. The spatiotemporal resolution of the framework makes it particularly beneficial for identifying hotspots in fields and hot moments at scales ranging from daily to annual time scales. We employ the framework to study the monthly redistribution of soil organic carbon over the course of a

  20. Genotypic variation in tomatoes affecting processing and antioxidant attributes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammed Wasim; Ayala-Zavala, J F; Dhua, R S

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes are widely consumed either raw or after processing and can provide a significant proportion of the total antioxidants in the diet associated with beneficial health properties. Over the last two or three decades an increasing interest for processing and antioxidant attributes in tomatoes has arisen. The screening of processing attributes of tomatoes is subject of a large number of articles; however, special interest has been addressed to the biochemical composition. The postharvest and industrial processing of tomato in tomato-based products includes several steps. Processing and antioxidant characteristics of the raw fruit are important considering the processing steps and final product. To respond to consumer and industrial complaints, breeders should know the range of genetic variability available in tomato resources, including local genotypes, for improving the mentioned attributes. Characterization and conservation of traditional and modern varieties is a major goal for their preservation and utilization. The bioactive contents have an impact on the processed destines so their stability must be contemplated while selecting the tomato fruits for processing. The endeavor of this review was to examine comprehensively the variation in processing and antioxidant attributes among tomatoes. Role of tomato peel in terms of bioactive contents and information on high pigment (hp) tomato mutants are also touched to some extent. Probably, patterns of variation identified/discussed in this paper would give impetus for planning breeding strategies to develop and improve the new processing cultivars with good antioxidant status. PMID:24279355

  1. How Word Frequency Affects Morphological Processing in Monolinguals and Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Laine, Matti

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated processing of morphologically complex words in three different frequency ranges in monolingual Finnish speakers and Finnish-Swedish bilinguals. By employing a visual lexical decision task, we found a differential pattern of results in monolinguals vs. bilinguals. Monolingual Finns seemed to process low frequency and…

  2. Factors Affecting Location Decisions of Food Processing Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turhan, Sule; Canan Ozbag, Basak; Cetin, Bahattin

    The main aim of this study is to examine the determinants of location choices for food processing plants using the results of 59 personal surveys. The 61.3% of the food processing plants that were interviewed are small scale plants, 9.1% are large scale plants and 29.6% are medium scale plants. Sixteen of the firms process vegetables, 12 process poultry, 12 process dairy and 9 process seafood products. Business climate factors are divided into six categories (market, infrastructure, raw material, labor, personal and environmental) and 17 specific location factors are considered. The survey responses are analyzed by types of raw materials processed and by plant size. 43.7, 55.3 and 42.2% of the respondents cited categories of Market, Raw Material and Infrastructure respectively as important, while 44.3, 50.7 and 74.4% of the respondents cited, labor, personal and environmental regulation categories of as not important. Thus survey findings indicate that plant location choices are mainly driven by market, raw material and infra structural factors. Environmental factors such as environmental regulations and permissions are relatively insignificant.

  3. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria. PMID:26325197

  4. Process Formulations And Curing Conditions That Affect Saltstone Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Pickenheim, B. R.; Daniel, W. E.

    2012-09-28

    The first objective of this study was to analyze saltstone fresh properties to determine the feasibility of reducing the formulation water to premix (w/p) ratio while varying the amount of extra water and admixtures used during processing at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The second part of this study was to provide information for understanding the impact of curing conditions (cure temperature, relative humidity (RH)) and processing formulation on the performance properties of cured saltstone.

  5. Psychometric Characteristics of the EEAA (Scale of Affective Strategies in the Learning Process)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villardón-Gallego, Lourdes; Yániz, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Affective strategies for coping with affective states linked to the learning process may be oriented toward controlling emotions or toward controlling motivation. Both types affect performance, directly and indirectly. The objective of this research was to design an instrument for measuring the affective strategies used by university…

  6. Insights into High-Resolution Physico-Biogeochemical Processes in Nearshore Environments of Lake Erie Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehm, C. L.; Vermette, S.; Perrelli, M.; Bauer, K.; Jerla, B.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this project is to gain a better understanding of the physico-chemical-biological dynamics in nearshore areas of Lake Erie as a function of environmental and climate change. Nearshore processes in the Great Lakes are complex and drive many efforts in remediating areas of concern (AoCs). Long term studies of the processes and the dynamics of these environments are necessary to determine the success of management strategies and the application of policies. A network of monitoring buoys can provide an insight into long term temporal changes in the system, however, the spatial resolution is rather coarse. As part of a nearshore buoy observations study on the long-term impacts of climate and environmental change on Lake Erie the deployment of an automated underwater vehicle (AUV) compliments and augments the data obtained by the buoys by providing direct high spatial resolution observations. The high resolution data will be used to improve parameter estimates of water circulation and water quality parameters for models (FVCOM) that often cannot accurately predict nearshore surface and subsurface dynamics. An AUV equipped with water quality instrumentation as well as an acoustic doppler current profiler and side scan sonar was deployed in a gridded pattern at multiple locations along the shoreline of Lake Erie throughout the summer of 2012. The data presented here describe and capture at, high spatial resolution, the nearshore-offshore characteristics and inter-relationships of lake bottom morphology, water quality and current patterns and provide an insight into the complex processes and dynamics of these regions. These data will provide a better understanding of nearshore lake processes that can be used to improve current model parameters and inform both science at large and management strategies.

  7. Temporal factors affecting somatosensory–auditory interactions in speech processing

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takayuki; Gracco, Vincent L.; Ostry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Speech perception is known to rely on both auditory and visual information. However, sound-specific somatosensory input has been shown also to influence speech perceptual processing (Ito et al., 2009). In the present study, we addressed further the relationship between somatosensory information and speech perceptual processing by addressing the hypothesis that the temporal relationship between orofacial movement and sound processing contributes to somatosensory–auditory interaction in speech perception. We examined the changes in event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to multisensory synchronous (simultaneous) and asynchronous (90 ms lag and lead) somatosensory and auditory stimulation compared to individual unisensory auditory and somatosensory stimulation alone. We used a robotic device to apply facial skin somatosensory deformations that were similar in timing and duration to those experienced in speech production. Following synchronous multisensory stimulation the amplitude of the ERP was reliably different from the two unisensory potentials. More importantly, the magnitude of the ERP difference varied as a function of the relative timing of the somatosensory–auditory stimulation. Event-related activity change due to stimulus timing was seen between 160 and 220 ms following somatosensory onset, mostly around the parietal area. The results demonstrate a dynamic modulation of somatosensory–auditory convergence and suggest the contribution of somatosensory information for speech processing process is dependent on the specific temporal order of sensory inputs in speech production. PMID:25452733

  8. Coupled Biogeochemical Processes Governing the Stability of Bacteriogenic Uraninite and Release of U(VI) in Heterogeneous Media: Molecular to Meter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    In-situ reductive biotransformation of subsurface U(VI) to U(IV) (as ?UO2?) has been proposed as a bioremediation method to immobilize uranium at contaminated DOE sites. The chemical stability of bacteriogenic ?UO2? is the seminal issue governing its success as an in-situ waste form in the subsurface. The structure and properties of chemically synthesized UO2+x have been investigated in great detail. It has been found to exhibit complex structural disorder, with nonstoichiometry being common, hence the designation ?UO2+x?, where 0 < x < 0.25. Little is known about the structures and properties of the important bacteriogenic analogs, which are believed to occur as nanoparticles in the environment. Chemically synthesized UO2+x exhibits an open fluorite structure and is known to accommodate significant doping of divalent cations. The extent to which bacteriogenic UO2+x incorporates common ground water cations (e.g., Ca2+) has not been investigated, and little is known about nonstoichiometry and structure defects in the bacteriogenic material. Particle size, nonstoichiometry, and doping may significantly alter the reactivity, and hence stability, of bacteriogenic UO2+x in the subsurface. The presence of associated sulfide minerals, and solid phase oxidants such as bacteriogenic Mn oxides may also affect the longevity of bacteriogenic UO2 in the subsurface.

  9. Centrifugal inhibitory processes affecting neurones in the cat cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Comis, S. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the lateral part of the olivary S-segment in the cat inhibited neurones in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. A smaller number of neurones located in the ventral division of the cochlear nucleus were excited. 2. It is suggested that inhibition in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus may be mediated directly by fibres making synaptic connexions on the cochlear nucleus neurones, or indirectly by inhibitory fibres acting at the cochlea. 3. The direct inhibitory process at the cochlear nucleus is unaffected by strychnine, whereas the inhibitory process at the cochlea is abolished by strychnine. 4. A cochlear nucleus neurone can be influenced simultaneously by excitatory and inhibitory processes. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5499823

  10. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water

  11. Distal Prosodic Context Affects Word Segmentation and Lexical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, Laura C.; McAuley, J. Devin

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the role of distal (i.e., nonlocal) prosody in word segmentation and lexical processing. In Experiment 1, prosodic characteristics of the initial five syllables of eight-syllable sequences were manipulated; the final portions of these sequences were lexically ambiguous (e.g., "note bookworm", "notebook worm"). Distal…

  12. Does Welfare Affect Family Processes and Adolescent Adjustment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated parenting behavior, parent/adolescent relationship, and adolescent attitudes and behaviors in three family types. Results showed minimal support for the hypothesis that welfare is negatively related to family processes and adolescent attitudes and behavior, although mothers receiving welfare reported fewer effective parent-management…

  13. Stimulus Characteristics Affect Humor Processing in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS…

  14. Can Process Portfolios Affect Students' Writing Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaidou, Iolie

    2012-01-01

    Can process portfolios that support students in goal setting, reflection, self-evaluation and feedback have a positive impact on students' writing self-efficacy? This article presents the findings of a yearlong study conducted in three 4th grade elementary classes in Cyprus where paper-based and web-based portfolios were implemented to help…

  15. Feedstock and Processes Affect Environmental Properties of Biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar, a byproduct of the pyrolysis process of biomass-to-energy conversion, can be used as a soil amendment to improve soil health, providing beneficial use for biochar. The quality of the biochar as soil amendment and its environmental impact are likely to depend on feedstock source and processi...

  16. Social Process Variables Affecting Reading Performance in Delayed Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorton, Mary; Kukuk, Cristopher

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between fourteen social process variables (relating to perinatal events, early language patterns, parental/home environment, and child behavior patterns) and the reading performance of retarded readers. The subjects were 180 children, aged seven through fifteen, randomly selected from among…

  17. Understanding groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone biogeochemical processes in a Chalk catchment using fluorescence properties of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, D. J.; Gooddy, D. C.; Allen, D.; Old, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction in Chalk catchments is complicated by the degree of geological heterogeneity. At this study site, in southern United Kingdom, alluvial deposits in the riparian zone can be considered as a patchwork of varying grades and types with an equally varied lateral connectivity. Some display good connection with the river system and others good connection with the groundwater system and, by definition, poorer connectivity with the surface water. By coupling tangential flow fractionation (TFF) with fluorescence analysis we were able to characterize the organic matter in the river and hyporheic zone. There is a significant proportion of particulate and colloidal fluorescent organic matter (FOM) within the river system and at depth within the gravels beneath the river channel. At depth in the hyporheic zone, the surface water inputs are dampened by mixing with deeper groundwater FOM. The shallow (0-0.5 m below river bed) hyporheic zone is highly dynamic as a result of changing surface water inputs from upstream processes. Labile C in the form of protein-like FOM appears to be attenuated preferentially compared to fulvic-like fluorescence in the hyporheic zone compared to the adjacent gravel and sand deposits. These preliminary findings have important implications for understanding nutrient and trace element mobility and attenuation within the groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone of permeable Chalk catchments. Fluorescence analysis of dissolved organic matter has been shown to be a useful environmental tracer that can be used in conjunction with other methods to understand GW-SW processes within a permeable Chalk catchment.

  18. Critical processes affecting Cryptosporidium oocyst survival in the environment.

    PubMed

    King, B J; Monis, P T

    2007-03-01

    Cryptosporidium are parasitic protozoans that cause gastrointestinal disease and represent a significant risk to public health. Cryptosporidium oocysts are prevalent in surface waters as a result of human, livestock and native animal faecal contamination. The resistance of oocysts to the concentrations of chlorine and monochloramine used to disinfect potable water increases the risk of waterborne transmission via drinking water. In addition to being resistant to commonly used disinfectants, it is thought that oocysts can persist in the environment and be readily mobilized by precipitation events. This paper will review the critical processes involved in the inactivation or removal of oocysts in the terrestrial and aquatic environments and consider how these processes will respond in the context of climate change. PMID:17096874

  19. Does welfare affect family processes and adolescent adjustment?

    PubMed

    Kalil, A; Eccles, J S

    1998-12-01

    Recent welfare reform legislation requires increased parental work effort and imposes time limits on the receipt of federal assistance. These changes were based in part on assumptions that parental welfare receipt may be negatively related to family processes and children's attitudes and behaviors. Currently, researchers know little about the effects of welfare by itself relative to the effects of related variables such as family demographic characteristics, economic strain, and neighborhood factors on processes among families with adolescent children. This study investigates parenting behaviors, parent-adolescent relationships, and adolescent attitudes and behaviors in three family types. Families of adolescents ages 11-15 who received income from Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in the previous 12 months are compared with poor families who have not received AFDC in the last year and with families who are neither poor nor welfare dependent. We found minimal support for the hypothesis that welfare is negatively related to family processes and adolescent attitudes and behaviors, although mothers receiving welfare report fewer effective parent management practices than their poor non-welfare counterparts. Implications of the findings for current social policy debates are discussed. PMID:9914641

  20. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro. PMID:16041055

  1. Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Lee X; Slevin, John T; Kryscio, Richard J; Martin, Catherine A; Andersen, Anders H; Smith, Charles D; Schmitt, Frederick A

    2013-11-30

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease and is associated with cognitive impairment. Dopaminergic medications are effective in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease; however, little is known regarding the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on cognitive function in depressed Parkinson patients. This study examines the neuropsychological effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy in Parkinsonian depression. We compared cognitive function in depressed and non-depressed Parkinson patients at two time-points: following overnight withdrawal and after the usual morning regimen of dopaminergic medications. A total of 28 non-demented, right-handed patients with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated. Ten of these patients were depressed according to DSM IV criteria. Results revealed a statistically significant interaction between depression and medication status on three measures of verbal memory and a facial affect naming task. In all cases, depressed Parkinson's patients performed significantly more poorly while on dopaminergic medication than while off. The opposite pattern emerged for the non-depressed Parkinson's group. The administration of dopaminergic medication to depressed Parkinson patients may carry unintended risks. PMID:23838419

  2. Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression

    PubMed Central

    Blonder, Lee X.; Slevin, John T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Martin, Catherine A.; Andersen, Anders H.; Smith, Charles D.; Schmitt, Frederick A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson’s disease and is associated with cognitive impairment. Dopaminergic medications are effective in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease; however, little is known regarding the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on cognitive function in depressed Parkinson patients. This study examines the neuropsychological effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy in Parkinsonian depression. We compared cognitive function in depressed and non-depressed Parkinson patients at two time-points: following overnight withdrawal and after the usual morning regimen of dopaminergic medications. A total of 28 non-demented, right-handed patients with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson’s disease participated. Ten of these patients were depressed according to DSM IV criteria. Results revealed a statistically significant interaction between depression and medication status on three measures of verbal memory and a facial affect naming task. In all cases, depressed Parkinson’s patients performed significantly more poorly while on dopaminergic medication than while off. The opposite pattern emerged for the non-depressed Parkinson’s group. The administration of dopaminergic medication to depressed Parkinson patients may carry unintended risks. PMID:23838419

  3. Understanding processes affecting mineral deposits in humid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, Robert R., II; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent interdisciplinary studies by the U.S. Geological Survey have resulted in substantial progress toward understanding the influence that climate and hydrology have on the geochemical signatures of mineral deposits and the resulting mine wastes in the eastern United States. Specific areas of focus include the release, transport, and fate of acid, metals, and associated elements from inactive mines in temperate coastal areas and of metals from unmined mineral deposits in tropical to subtropical areas; the influence of climate, geology, and hydrology on remediation options for abandoned mines; and the application of radiogenic isotopes to uniquely apportion source contributions that distinguish natural from mining sources and extent of metal transport. The environmental effects of abandoned mines and unmined mineral deposits result from a complex interaction of a variety of chemical and physical factors. These include the geology of the mineral deposit, the hydrologic setting of the mineral deposit and associated mine wastes, the chemistry of waters interacting with the deposit and associated waste material, the engineering of a mine as it relates to the reactivity of mine wastes, and climate, which affects such factors as temperature and the amounts of precipitation and evapotranspiration; these factors, in turn, influence the environmental behavior of mineral deposits. The role of climate is becoming increasingly important in environmental investigations of mineral deposits because of the growing concerns about climate change.

  4. Effect of Biogeochemical Redox Processes on the Fate and Transport of As and U at an Abandoned Uranium Mine Site: an X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Stone, James J.; Borch, Thomas

    2014-01-28

    Although As can occur in U ore at concentrations up to 10 wt-%, the fate and transport of both U and As at U mine tailings have not been previously investigated at a watershed scale. The major objective of this study was to determine primary chemical and physical processes contributing to transport of both U and As to a down gradient watershed at an abandoned U mine site in South Dakota. Uranium is primarily transported by erosion at the site, based on decreasing concentrations in sediment with distance from the tailings. equential extractions and U X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) fitting indicate that U is immobilised in a near-source sedimentation pond both by prevention of sediment transport and by reduction of UVI to UIV. In contrast to U, subsequent release of As to the watershed takes place from the pond partially due to reductive dissolution of Fe oxy(hydr)oxides. However, As is immobilised by adsorption to clays and Fe oxy(hydr)oxides in oxic zones and by formation of As–sulfide mineral phases in anoxic zones down gradient, indicated by sequential extractions and As XANES fitting. This study indicates that As should be considered during restoration of uranium mine sites in order to prevent transport.

  5. Final Project Report - Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloriethylene Co-Metabolism: Co-Metabolic Enzyme Activity Probes and Modeling Co-Metabolism and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert C; Orr, Brennon R; Lee, M Hope; Delwiche, Mark

    2010-02-26

    Trichloroethene (TCE) (also known as trichloroethylene) is a common contaminant in groundwater. TCE is regulated in drinking water at a concentration of 5 µg/L, and a small mass of TCE has the potential to contaminant large volumes of water. The physical and chemical characteristics of TCE allow it to migrate quickly in most subsurface environments, and thus large plumes of contaminated groundwater can form from a single release. The migration and persistence of TCE in groundwater can be limited by biodegradation. TCE can be biodegraded via different processes under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Anaerobic biodegradation is widely recognized, but aerobic degradation is less well recognized. Under aerobic conditions, TCE can be oxidized to non hazardous conditions via cometabolic pathways. This study applied enzyme activity probes to demonstrate that cometabolic degradation of TCE occurs in aerobic groundwater at several locations, used laboratory microcosm studies to determine aerobic degradation rates, and extrapolated lab-measured rates to in situ rates based on concentrations of microorganisms with active enzymes involved in cometabolic TCE degradation. Microcosms were constructed using basalt chips that were inoculated with microorganisms to groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory Test Area North TCE plume by filling a set of Flow-Through In Situ Reactors (FTISRs) with chips and placing the FTISRs into the open interval of a well for several months. A parametric study was performed to evaluate predicted degradation rates and concentration trends using a competitive inhibition kinetic model, which accounts for competition for enzyme active sites by both a growth substrate and a cometabolic substrate. The competitive inhibition kinetic expression was programmed for use in the RT3D reactive transport package. Simulations of TCE plume evolution using both competitive inhibition kinetics and first order decay were performed.

  6. Nitrogen and carbon flow from rock to water: Regulation through soil biogeochemical processes, Mokelumne River watershed, California, and Grand Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Smith, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    Soil denitrification is an ecologically important nitrogen removal mechanism that releases to the atmosphere the greenhouse gas N2O, an intermediate product from the reduction of NO3- to N 2. In this study we evaluate the relationship between soil carbon and denitrification potential in watersheds with bedrock acting as a nonpoint source of nitrogen, testing the hypothesis that nitrate leaching to stream water is in part regulated by denitrification. Two sites, one in a Mediterranean climate and the other in an arid climate, were investigated to understand the interplay between carbon and denitrification potential. Both sites included carbonaceous bedrock with relatively high nitrogen concentrations (> 1,000 mg N kg-1) and had low background nitrogen concentrations in surface and groundwater. There was a net accumulation of carbon and nitrogen in soil relative to the corresponding bedrock, with the exception of carbonaceous shale from the arid site. There the concentration of carbon in the soil (15,620 mg C kg-1) was less than the shale parent (22,460 mg C kg-1), consistent with the bedrock being a source of soil carbon. Rates of denitrification potential (0.5-83 ??g N kg-1 hr-1) derived from laboratory incubations appeared to be related to the ratio of dissolved organic carbon and nitrate extracted from soils. These data indicate that microbial processes such as denitrification can help maintain background nitrogen concentrations to tens of ??M N in relatively undisturbed ecosystems when nitrogen inputs from weathering bedrock are accompanied by sufficient organic carbon concentrations to promote microbial nitrogen transformations.

  7. From neurons to epidemics: How trophic coherence affects spreading processes.

    PubMed

    Klaise, Janis; Johnson, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Trophic coherence, a measure of the extent to which the nodes of a directed network are organised in levels, has recently been shown to be closely related to many structural and dynamical aspects of complex systems, including graph eigenspectra, the prevalence or absence of feedback cycles, and linear stability. Furthermore, non-trivial trophic structures have been observed in networks of neurons, species, genes, metabolites, cellular signalling, concatenated words, P2P users, and world trade. Here, we consider two simple yet apparently quite different dynamical models-one a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model adapted to include complex contagion and the other an Amari-Hopfield neural network-and show that in both cases the related spreading processes are modulated in similar ways by the trophic coherence of the underlying networks. To do this, we propose a network assembly model which can generate structures with tunable trophic coherence, limiting in either perfectly stratified networks or random graphs. We find that trophic coherence can exert a qualitative change in spreading behaviour, determining whether a pulse of activity will percolate through the entire network or remain confined to a subset of nodes, and whether such activity will quickly die out or endure indefinitely. These results could be important for our understanding of phenomena such as epidemics, rumours, shocks to ecosystems, neuronal avalanches, and many other spreading processes. PMID:27368799

  8. Suprasegmental information affects processing of talking faces at birth.

    PubMed

    Guellai, Bahia; Mersad, Karima; Streri, Arlette

    2015-02-01

    From birth, newborns show a preference for faces talking a native language compared to silent faces. The present study addresses two questions that remained unanswered by previous research: (a) Does the familiarity with the language play a role in this process and (b) Are all the linguistic and paralinguistic cues necessary in this case? Experiment 1 extended newborns' preference for native speakers to non-native ones. Given that fetuses and newborns are sensitive to the prosodic characteristics of speech, Experiments 2 and 3 presented faces talking native and nonnative languages with the speech stream being low-pass filtered. Results showed that newborns preferred looking at a person who talked to them even when only the prosodic cues were provided for both languages. Nonetheless, a familiarity preference for the previously talking face is observed in the "normal speech" condition (i.e., Experiment 1) and a novelty preference in the "filtered speech" condition (Experiments 2 and 3). This asymmetry reveals that newborns process these two types of stimuli differently and that they may already be sensitive to a mismatch between the articulatory movements of the face and the corresponding speech sounds. PMID:25531944

  9. From neurons to epidemics: How trophic coherence affects spreading processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaise, Janis; Johnson, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Trophic coherence, a measure of the extent to which the nodes of a directed network are organised in levels, has recently been shown to be closely related to many structural and dynamical aspects of complex systems, including graph eigenspectra, the prevalence or absence of feedback cycles, and linear stability. Furthermore, non-trivial trophic structures have been observed in networks of neurons, species, genes, metabolites, cellular signalling, concatenated words, P2P users, and world trade. Here, we consider two simple yet apparently quite different dynamical models—one a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model adapted to include complex contagion and the other an Amari-Hopfield neural network—and show that in both cases the related spreading processes are modulated in similar ways by the trophic coherence of the underlying networks. To do this, we propose a network assembly model which can generate structures with tunable trophic coherence, limiting in either perfectly stratified networks or random graphs. We find that trophic coherence can exert a qualitative change in spreading behaviour, determining whether a pulse of activity will percolate through the entire network or remain confined to a subset of nodes, and whether such activity will quickly die out or endure indefinitely. These results could be important for our understanding of phenomena such as epidemics, rumours, shocks to ecosystems, neuronal avalanches, and many other spreading processes.

  10. Does Signal Degradation Affect Top-Down Processing of Speech?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anita; Pals, Carina; de Blecourt, Charlotte M; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Başkent, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Speech perception is formed based on both the acoustic signal and listeners' knowledge of the world and semantic context. Access to semantic information can facilitate interpretation of degraded speech, such as speech in background noise or the speech signal transmitted via cochlear implants (CIs). This paper focuses on the latter, and investigates the time course of understanding words, and how sentential context reduces listeners' dependency on the acoustic signal for natural and degraded speech via an acoustic CI simulation.In an eye-tracking experiment we combined recordings of listeners' gaze fixations with pupillometry, to capture effects of semantic information on both the time course and effort of speech processing. Normal-hearing listeners were presented with sentences with or without a semantically constraining verb (e.g., crawl) preceding the target (baby), and their ocular responses were recorded to four pictures, including the target, a phonological (bay) competitor and a semantic (worm) and an unrelated distractor.The results show that in natural speech, listeners' gazes reflect their uptake of acoustic information, and integration of preceding semantic context. Degradation of the signal leads to a later disambiguation of phonologically similar words, and to a delay in integration of semantic information. Complementary to this, the pupil dilation data show that early semantic integration reduces the effort in disambiguating phonologically similar words. Processing degraded speech comes with increased effort due to the impoverished nature of the signal. Delayed integration of semantic information further constrains listeners' ability to compensate for inaudible signals. PMID:27080670

  11. Global Change: A Biogeochemical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M.

    1983-01-01

    A research program that is designed to enhance our understanding of the Earth as the support system for life is described. The program change, both natural and anthropogenic, that might affect the habitability of the planet on a time scale roughly equal to that of a human life is studied. On this time scale the atmosphere, biosphere, and upper ocean are treated as a single coupled system. The need for understanding the processes affecting the distribution of essential nutrients--carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulfur, and water--within this coupled system is examined. The importance of subtle interactions among chemical, biological, and physical effects is emphasized. The specific objectives are to define the present state of the planetary life-support system; to ellucidate the underlying physical, chemical, and biological controls; and to provide the body of knowledge required to assess changes that might impact the future habitability of the Earth.

  12. Selenium source identification and biogeochemical processes controlling selenium in surface water and biota, Kendrick Reclamation Project, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; See, R.B.; Ramirez, P.

    1993-01-01

    The major tributaries draining the Kendrick Reclamation Project (KRP) account for an average of 52% of the total Se load measured in the North Platte River downstream from Casper, Wyoming. The Casper Creek drainage basin contributed the largest Se load of the five tributary sites to the North Platte River. The 4-d average Se concentration in water samples from one site in the part of the North Platte River that receives irrigation return flows exceeded the 5 ??g/l U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's aquatic life criterion five time during a 50-d monitoring period in 1989. In agreement with the water-quality data, muscle and liver tissue rom rainbow trout collected from the same part of the North Platte River had Se concentrations exceeding levels known to cause reproductive failure and chronic Se poisoning. On the basis of Se: Cl, 18O/16O and D/H ratios in water from Goose and Rasmus Lee Lakes (closed-basin systems), the large Se concentrations in those lakes were derived by natural evaporation of irrigation water without leaching of soluble forms of Se from soil or rocks. Water samples from Thirtythree Mile Reservoir and Illco Pond (flow-through systems) showed considerable enrichment in Se over evaporative concentration, presumably due to leaching and desorption of Se from soil and rock. The Se: Cl ratios of irrigation drain water collected from the KRP indicate that leaching and desorption of soluble forms of Se from soils and rocks are the dominant processes in drain water. Results of a Wilcoxon matched-pairs test for 43 paired drain-water samples collected during June and August 1988, indicated there is a statistically larger concentration of Se (0.01 significance level) during the June sampling period. The larger concentrations of Se and other chemical constitutents during the early part of the irrigation season probably were due to dissolution of seleniferous salts that have accumulated in soils within the KRP since the last irrigation season. The large

  13. Silicification of Thermophilic Biofilms: Do Aquificales Affect the Mineralisation Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, K.; Lalonde, S.; Aguiar, P.; Reysenbach, A.

    2003-12-01

    In geothermal environments, biomineralisation is an inevitable consequence of microbes growing in solute-rich waters. The process of silicification is of particular interest due to (1) apparent discrepancies between natural and laboratory silicification rates and (2) siliceous microfossils currently serve as the earliest physical evidence for life on Earth. Although mesophilic microbe-silica interactions have been studied in great detail, there is a paucity of information on the role that thermophiles play in the silicification process, i.e., does their metabolism in any way facilitate silicification and do their cellular remains fossilise? To help resolve some of these uncertainties, a thermophilic, biofilm-forming member of the Aquificales order, Sulfurihydrogenobium azorense, was grown in the presence of various concentrations of silica, ranging from undersaturated to those extremely supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica. Since the chemolithoautotrophic Aquificales use of a wide range and combination of electron donors and acceptors, the bacteria cultured were grown in the presence of H2 with O2, S and Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptors. This study focused on the rates of pH-induced silica polymerisation during a 48 hour interval, when the soluble silica phase was at its most reactive stage, and when the greatest amount of silica immobilisation was likely to occur. S. azorense was found to have no detectable effect on the polymerisation rate of silica under any condition tested, nor did it cause silica to precipitate in undersaturated conditions. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that although silica did indeed precipitate from solution, there was no obvious association between solid-phase silica and the cells walls. This suggests that under high silica levels there is such a strong chemical driving force for silica polymerisation, homogeneous nucleation, and ultimately silica precipitation that there is no obvious need for

  14. Quantitative evolution of volcanic surfaces affected by erosional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahitte, Pierre; Boillot-Airaksinen, Kim; Germa, Aurélie; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Variations through time of erosion dynamics, a key point to investigate correlation between climates and landform evolution, still remains poorly documented. One of the main issue in this type of study is the difficulty in determining for how long the erosion has operated. For this purpose, volcanic contexts are particularly suitable for defining the temporal dynamics governing erosion since the age of volcanic activity also constrains the age of emplacement of the surface today eroded, and thus the erosion duration. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of river profiles offers the opportunity to discriminate, among the wide variety of geological phenomena influencing erosion, their respective influence. Quantification of erosion processes and constrain of their signature on reliefs can be addressed by a morphometric approach of river profiles in volcanic environment through the analysis of digital topography (DEM). Break in slope zones, the so-called knickpoints, are usually related to a retreat of the point between the relict channel, upstream, and the adjusted channel, downstream. They are induced by either a lithological contrast, a change in the base level, uplift or eustatism, or a rejuvenation of the age of the volcanic surface. The stream long-profile and its watershed is also investigated by their concavity and hypsometric indexes to determine for how long the complexity and its heterogeneity along the valley incision remain visible. The present study focusses on the erosion of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles, Reunion Island and Lombok Island (Indonesia). All located in tropical environments, these volcanoes offer a wide diversity of age (30 - 0 Ma) and lithology for investigating the respective influence of geological processes that have induced a large variety of shapes and volcanic history that we try to correlate to geometry of river profiles.

  15. Arsenic in New Jersey Coastal Plain streams, sediments, and shallow groundwater: effects from different geologic sources and anthropogenic inputs on biogeochemical and physical mobilization processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Julia L.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Mumford, Adam C.; Benzel, William M.; Szabo, Zoltan; Shourds, Jennifer L.; Young, Lily Y.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) concentrations in New Jersey Coastal Plain streams generally exceed the State Surface Water Quality Standard (0.017 micrograms per liter (µg/L)), but concentrations seldom exceed 1 µg/L in filtered stream-water samples, regardless of geologic contributions or anthropogenic inputs. Nevertheless, As concentrations in unfiltered stream water indicate substantial variation because of particle inputs from soils and sediments with differing As contents, and because of discharges from groundwater of widely varying chemistry. In the Inner Coastal Plain, streams draining to lower reaches of the Delaware River traverse As-rich glauconitic sediments of marine origin in which As contents typically are about 20 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) or greater. In some of these sedimentary units, As concentrations exceed the New Jersey drinking-water maximum contaminant level (5 µg/L) in shallow groundwater that discharges to streams. Microbes, fueled by organic carbon beneath the streambed, reduce iron (Fe) and As, releasing As and Fe into solution in the shallow groundwater from geologic materials that likely include (in addition to glauconite) other phyllosilicates, apatite, and siderite. When the groundwater discharges to the stream, the dissolved Fe and As are oxidized, the Fe precipitates as a hydroxide, and the As sorbs or co-precipitates with the Fe. Because of the oxidation/precipitation process, dissolved As concentrations measured in filtered stream waters of the Inner Coastal Plain are about 1 µg/L, but the total As concentrations (and loads) are greater, substantially amplified by As-bearing suspended sediment in stormflows. In the Outer Coastal Plain, streams draining to the Atlantic Ocean traverse quartz-rich sediments of mainly deltaic origin where the As content generally is low ( With a history of agriculture in the New Jersey Coastal Plain, anthropogenic inputs of As, such as residues from former pesticide applications in soils, can amplify any

  16. Early Social Experience Affects the Development of Eye Gaze Processing.

    PubMed

    Senju, Atsushi; Vernetti, Angélina; Ganea, Natasa; Hudry, Kristelle; Tucker, Leslie; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H

    2015-12-01

    Eye gaze is a key channel of non-verbal communication in humans. Eye contact with others is present from birth, and eye gaze processing is crucial for social learning and adult-infant communication. However, little is known about the effect of selectively different experience of eye contact and gaze communication on early social and communicative development. To directly address this question, we assessed 14 sighted infants of blind parents (SIBPs) longitudinally at 6-10 and 12-16 months. Face scanning and gaze following were assessed using eye tracking. In addition, naturalistic observations were made when the infants were interacting with their blind parent and with an unfamiliar sighted adult. Established measures of emergent autistic-like behaviors and standardized tests of cognitive, motor, and linguistic development were also collected. These data were then compared with those obtained from a group of infants of sighted parents. Despite showing typical social skills development overall, infants of blind parents allocated less attention to adult eye movements and gaze direction, an effect that increased between 6-10 and 12-16 months of age. The results suggest that infants adjust their use of adults' eye gaze depending on gaze communication experience from early in life. The results highlight that human functional brain development shows selective experience-dependent plasticity adaptive to the individual's specific social environment. PMID:26752077

  17. Early Social Experience Affects the Development of Eye Gaze Processing

    PubMed Central

    Senju, Atsushi; Vernetti, Angélina; Ganea, Natasa; Hudry, Kristelle; Tucker, Leslie; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eye gaze is a key channel of non-verbal communication in humans [1, 2, 3]. Eye contact with others is present from birth [4], and eye gaze processing is crucial for social learning and adult-infant communication [5, 6, 7]. However, little is known about the effect of selectively different experience of eye contact and gaze communication on early social and communicative development. To directly address this question, we assessed 14 sighted infants of blind parents (SIBPs) longitudinally at 6–10 and 12–16 months. Face scanning [8] and gaze following [7, 9] were assessed using eye tracking. In addition, naturalistic observations were made when the infants were interacting with their blind parent and with an unfamiliar sighted adult. Established measures of emergent autistic-like behaviors [10] and standardized tests of cognitive, motor, and linguistic development [11] were also collected. These data were then compared with those obtained from a group of infants of sighted parents. Despite showing typical social skills development overall, infants of blind parents allocated less attention to adult eye movements and gaze direction, an effect that increased between 6–10 and 12–16 months of age. The results suggest that infants adjust their use of adults’ eye gaze depending on gaze communication experience from early in life. The results highlight that human functional brain development shows selective experience-dependent plasticity adaptive to the individual’s specific social environment. PMID:26752077

  18. Ecosystem Consequences of Forest Fragmentation in the Pacific Northwest: Biogeochemical Edge Effects within Old-Growth Forest Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, T. D.; Swanson, A.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Griffiths, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    Our research includes quantifying the long term impact of clear-cut edges on biogeochemical processes affecting carbon and nitrogen retention within fragmented old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forests in the Pacific Northwest. In addition to quantifying the magnitude and depth of influence of edge effects on soil processes, this research seeks broader application to conservation biology, using a mechanistic approach. Along 360-m gradients spanning clear-cut to forest at nine sites, long-term monitoring of edge effects integrates microclimate, above-ground structure, litter fall, decomposition, and soil nitrogen dynamics. Abrupt changes in height and structure at edges induce increased microclimatic variability in adjacent forest, which, in turn, alters rates of nitrogen and carbon cycling in soils. Field and laboratory assays reveal increases in litter decomposition and nitrogen availability in near edge (0-30 m from edge) forest, and higher rates of litter fall and soil organic matter storage within far edge (30-120 m from edge) forest, relative to interior forest (more than 120 m from edge). Abiotic structural effects, by modulating microclimatic variability, change the complex biotic interactions involved in biogeochemical cycling in forest soils within 120 m of edges. Due to such interactions, organic-matter and nitrogen pool sizes in soil and vegetation, and net ecosystem production, vary in a nonlinear, but predictable, manner with distance into forest from edge. Mixed-effects statistical models most precisely quantify depth of influence for over 100 microclimatic, structural, and biogeochemical variables.

  19. Overview of the 1988 GCE/CASE/WATOX Studies of biogeochemical cycles in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszenny, Alexander A. P.; Galloway, James N.; Artz, Richard S.; Boatman, Joseph F.

    1990-06-01

    The 1988 Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX) was a multifaceted research program designed to study atmospheric and oceanic processes affecting the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and trace metals in the North Atlantic Ocean region. Field work included (1) a 49-day research cruise aboard NOAA ship Mt. Mitchell (Global Change Expedition) from Norfolk, Virginia, to Bermuda, Iceland, the Azores, and Barbados, (2) eight flights of the NOAA King Air research aircraft, four off the Virginia Capes and four near Bermuda (CASE/WATOX), and (3) a research cruise aboard the yacht Fleurtie near Bermuda (WATOX). Objectives of GCE/CASE/WATOX were (1) to examine processes controlling the mesoscale distributions of productivity, chlorophyll, and phytoplankton growth rates in Atlantic surface waters, (2) to identify factors controlling the distribution of ozone in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer, and (3) to estimate the contributions of sources on surrounding continents to the biogeochemical cycles of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals over the North Atlantic region during the boreal summer season. The individual papers in this and the next two issues of Global Biogeochemical Cycles provide details on the results and analyses of the individual measurement efforts. This paper provides a brief overview of GCE/CASE/WATOX.

  20. A Coupled Land Surface-Subsurface Biogeochemical Model for Aqueous and Gaseous Nitrogen Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.; Pan, L.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.; Miller, N.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to nitrate (NOB3PB-P) water pollution and atmospheric pollution of nitrous oxide (NB2BO), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NHB3B). Characterizing the amount and species of N losses is therefore essential in developing a strategy to estimate and mitigate N leaching and emission to the atmosphere. Indeed, transformations of nitrogen depend strongly on water content, soil temperature, and nitrogen concentration. Land surface processes therefore have to be taken into account to properly characterize N biogeochemical cycling. However, most current nitrogen biogeochemical models take the land surface as the upper boundary by lumping the complex processes above the surface as known boundary conditions. In this study, an extant subsurface mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was coupled with the community land model (CLM). The resulting coupled model extends the modeling capability of TOUGHREACT-N to include the important energy, momentum, and moisture dynamics provided by CLM. The coupled model showed a significant impact of land-surface diurnal forcing on soil temperature and moisture and on nitrogen fluxes. We also discuss field applications of the model and discuss how temporal dynamics of nitrogen fluxes are affected by land surface processes.

  1. The Role and Impact of Affect in the Process of Resistance to Persuasion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael; Szabo, Erin Alison; Anderson, Jason; Morrill, Joshua; Zubric, Jessica; Wan, Hua-Hsin

    2001-01-01

    Deals with the role and impact of affect in the process of resistance among undergraduate students. Notes that initial results indicated that the cognitive, affective-anger, and affective-happiness inoculation treatments all conferred resistance to persuasive attacks. Indicates that greater receiver involvement was positively associated with…

  2. Incorporating nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria in the global biogeochemical model HAMOCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Hanna; Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation by marine diazotrophs plays a fundamental role in the oceanic nitrogen and carbon cycle as it provides a major source of 'new' nitrogen to the euphotic zone that supports biological carbon export and sequestration. Since most global biogeochemical models include nitrogen fixation only diagnostically, they are not able to capture its spatial pattern sufficiently. Here we present the incorporation of an explicit, dynamic representation of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and the corresponding nitrogen fixation in the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC (Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model), which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth system model (MPI-ESM). The parameterization of the diazotrophic growth is thereby based on available knowledge about the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., which is considered as the most significant pelagic nitrogen fixer. Evaluation against observations shows that the model successfully reproduces the main spatial distribution of cyanobacteria and nitrogen fixation, covering large parts of the tropical and subtropical oceans. Besides the role of cyanobacteria in marine biogeochemical cycles, their capacity to form extensive surface blooms induces a number of bio-physical feedback mechanisms in the Earth system. The processes driving these interactions, which are related to the alteration of heat absorption, surface albedo and momentum input by wind, are incorporated in the biogeochemical and physical model of the MPI-ESM in order to investigate their impacts on a global scale. First preliminary results will be shown.

  3. Effects of Privately Owned Land Management Practices on Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getson, J. M.; Hutyra, L.; Short, A. G.; Templer, P. H.; Kittredge, D.

    2014-12-01

    An increasing fraction of the global population lives in urban settings. Understanding how the human-natural system couple and decouple biogeochemical cycles across urbanization gradients is crucial for human health and environmental sustainability. Natural processes of nutrient deposition, export, uptake, and internal cycling can be disrupted by human activities. Residential landscape management (e.g. composting, leaf litter collection, fertilizer application) interrupts these natural biogeochemical cycles; therefore, it is key to characterize these practices and their impacts. This study looks at private land management practices along a rural to urban gradient in Boston, Massachusetts. We used a mail survey instrument coupled with biogeochemical measurements and remote sensing derived estimates of aboveground biomass to estimate biogeochemical modifications associated with residential landscape management practices. We find parcel size influences management behavior, management practices differ for leaf litter and lawn clippings, and fertilizer application is unrelated to parcel size or degree of urban-ness. These management practices result in nutrient redistribution that differs with residential characteristics.

  4. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF SOIL BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of kinetic studies to soil chemistry is useful to determine reaction mechanisms and fate of nutrients and environmental contaminants. How deeply one wishes to query the mechanism depends on the detail sought. Reactions that involve chemical species in more than on...

  5. Understanding Biogeochemical Transformations Of Trace Elements In Multi Metal-Rich Geomaterials Under Stimulated Redox Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural and anthropogenic influences on hydrological conditions can induce periodic or long-term reduced conditions in geologic materials. Such conditions can cause significant impacts on biogeochemical processes of trace elements in subsurface or near surface environments. The...

  6. 43 CFR 2.4 - Does where you send your request affect its processing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Does where you send your request affect its processing? 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior FREEDOM... request affect its processing? (a) A request to a particular bureau component (for example, a...

  7. 43 CFR 2.4 - Does where you send your request affect its processing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Does where you send your request affect its processing? 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior FREEDOM... request affect its processing? (a) A request to a particular bureau component (for example, a...

  8. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Woodson, C Brock; Litvin, Steven Y

    2015-02-10

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy-sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom-up vs. top-down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  9. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, C. Brock; Litvin, Steven Y.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy–sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom–up vs. top–down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  10. 76 FR 30509 - Court Orders and Legal Processes Affecting Thrift Savings Plan Accounts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Part 1653 Court Orders and Legal Processes Affecting Thrift Savings Plan Accounts AGENCY: Federal... finalize the process by which TSP accounts may be garnished efficiently--consistent with law and regulation... is trying to process more than 7,000 child support orders. If the Agency processes these orders...

  11. The biogeochemical reactivity of suspended particulate matter at nested sites in the Dee basin, NE Scotland.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J J C; Adhikari, Y R; Soulsby, C; Stutter, M I

    2012-09-15

    Variation in the organic matter content associated with suspended particulate matter (SPM) is an often overlooked component of carbon cycling within freshwater riverine systems. The potential biogeochemical reactivity of particulate organic carbon (POC) that affect its interactions and fate, i.e. respired and lost to the atmosphere along river continua or ultimately exported to estuarine and oceanic pools was assessed. Eleven contrasting sites draining nested catchments (5-1837 km(2)) in the River Dee basin, NE Scotland were sampled during summer 2008 to evaluate spatio-temporal variations in quantity and quality (biogeochemical reactivity) of SPM during relatively low flow conditions. Mean SPM concentrations increased from 0.21 to 1.22 mg L(-1) between the uppermost and lowest mainstem sites. Individually, POC concentrations ranged from 0.08 to 0.55 mg L(-1) and accounted for ca. 3-15% of total aqueous organic carbon transported. The POC content was partitioned into autotrophic (2.78-73.0 mg C g(-1) SPM) and detrital (119-388 mg C g(-1) SPM) biomass carbon content. The particulate respired CO(2)-C as a % of the total carbon associated with SPM, measured by MicroResp™ over 18 h, varied in recalcitrance from 0.49% at peat-dominated sites to 3.20% at the lowermost mainstem site. Significant (p<0.05) relationships were observed between SPM biogeochemical reactivity measures (% respired CO(2)-C; chlorophyll α; bioavailable-phosphorus) and arable and improved grassland area, associated with increasing biological productivity downstream. Compositional characteristics and in-stream processing of SPM appear to be related to contributory land use pressures, that influence SPM characteristics and biogeochemistry (C:N:P stoichiometry) of its surrounding aqueous environment. As moorland influences declined, nutrient inputs from arable and improved grasslands increasingly affected the biogeochemical content and reactivity of both dissolved and particulate matter. This

  12. Marine viruses and their biogeochemical and ecological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Jed A.

    1999-06-01

    Viruses are the most common biological agents in the sea, typically numbering ten billion per litre. They probably infect all organisms, can undergo rapid decay and replenishment, and influence many biogeochemical and ecological processes, including nutrient cycling, system respiration, particle size-distributions and sinking rates, bacterial and algal biodiversity and species distributions, algal bloom control, dimethyl sulphide formation and genetic transfer. Newly developed fluorescence and molecular techniques leave the field poised to make significant advances towards evaluating and quantifying such effects.

  13. Study of individual and group affective processes in the crew of a simulated mission to Mars: Positive affectivity as a valuable indicator of changes in the crew affectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Lačev, Alek; Šolcová, Iva

    2014-07-01

    The success of a long-duration space mission depends on various technical demands as well as on the psychological (cognitive, affective, and motivational) adaptation of crewmembers and the quality of interactions within the crew. We examined the ways crewmembers of a 520-day simulated spaceflight to Mars (held in the Institute for Biomedical Problems, in Moscow) experienced and regulated their moods and emotions. Results show that crewmembers experienced predominantly positive emotions throughout their 520-day isolation and the changes in mood of the crewmembers were asynchronous and balanced. The study suggests that during the simulation, crewmembers experienced and regulated their emotions differently than they usually do in their everyday life. In isolation, crewmembers preferred to suppress and neutralize their negative emotions and express overtly only emotions with positive valence. Although the affective processes were almost invariable throughout the simulation, two periods of time when the level of positive emotions declined were identified. Regarding the findings, the paper suggests that changes in positive affectivity could be a more valuable indicator of human experience in demanding but professional environments than changes in negative affectivity. Finally, the paper discusses the phenomenology of emotions during a real space mission.

  14. A generic reaction-based biogeochemical simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Yeh, Gour T.; C.T. Miller, M.W. Farthing, W.G. Gray, and G.F. Pinder

    2004-06-17

    This paper presents a generic biogeochemical simulator, BIOGEOCHEM. The simulator can read a thermodynamic database based on the EQ3/EQ6 database. It can also read user-specified equilibrium and kinetic reactions (reactions not defined in the format of that in EQ3/EQ6 database) symbolically. BIOGEOCHEM is developed with a general paradigm. It overcomes the requirement in most available reaction-based models that reactions and rate laws be specified in a limited number of canonical forms. The simulator interprets the reactions, and rate laws of virtually any type for input to the MAPLE symbolic mathematical software package. MAPLE then generates Fortran code for the analytical Jacobian matrix used in the Newton-Raphson technique, which are compiled and linked into the BIOGEOCHEM executable. With this feature, the users are exempted from recoding the simulator to accept new equilibrium expressions or kinetic rate laws. Two examples are used to demonstrate the new features of the simulator.

  15. 10 years of BAWLing into affective and aesthetic processes in reading: what are the echoes?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Arthur M.; Võ, Melissa L.-H.; Briesemeister, Benny B.; Conrad, Markus; Hofmann, Markus J.; Kuchinke, Lars; Lüdtke, Jana; Braun, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Reading is not only “cold” information processing, but involves affective and aesthetic processes that go far beyond what current models of word recognition, sentence processing, or text comprehension can explain. To investigate such “hot” reading processes, standardized instruments that quantify both psycholinguistic and emotional variables at the sublexical, lexical, inter-, and supralexical levels (e.g., phonological iconicity, word valence, arousal-span, or passage suspense) are necessary. One such instrument, the Berlin Affective Word List (BAWL) has been used in over 50 published studies demonstrating effects of lexical emotional variables on all relevant processing levels (experiential, behavioral, neuronal). In this paper, we first present new data from several BAWL studies. Together, these studies examine various views on affective effects in reading arising from dimensional (e.g., valence) and discrete emotion features (e.g., happiness), or embodied cognition features like smelling. Second, we extend our investigation of the complex issue of affective word processing to words characterized by a mixture of affects. These words entail positive and negative valence, and/or features making them beautiful or ugly. Finally, we discuss tentative neurocognitive models of affective word processing in the light of the present results, raising new issues for future studies. PMID:26089808

  16. 10 years of BAWLing into affective and aesthetic processes in reading: what are the echoes?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Arthur M; Võ, Melissa L-H; Briesemeister, Benny B; Conrad, Markus; Hofmann, Markus J; Kuchinke, Lars; Lüdtke, Jana; Braun, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Reading is not only "cold" information processing, but involves affective and aesthetic processes that go far beyond what current models of word recognition, sentence processing, or text comprehension can explain. To investigate such "hot" reading processes, standardized instruments that quantify both psycholinguistic and emotional variables at the sublexical, lexical, inter-, and supralexical levels (e.g., phonological iconicity, word valence, arousal-span, or passage suspense) are necessary. One such instrument, the Berlin Affective Word List (BAWL) has been used in over 50 published studies demonstrating effects of lexical emotional variables on all relevant processing levels (experiential, behavioral, neuronal). In this paper, we first present new data from several BAWL studies. Together, these studies examine various views on affective effects in reading arising from dimensional (e.g., valence) and discrete emotion features (e.g., happiness), or embodied cognition features like smelling. Second, we extend our investigation of the complex issue of affective word processing to words characterized by a mixture of affects. These words entail positive and negative valence, and/or features making them beautiful or ugly. Finally, we discuss tentative neurocognitive models of affective word processing in the light of the present results, raising new issues for future studies. PMID:26089808

  17. Modeling the biogeochemical seasonal cycle in the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Romero, E.; Vichi, M.; Castro, M.; Macías, J.; Macías, D.; García, C. M.; Bruno, M.

    2014-11-01

    A physical-biological coupled model was used to estimate the effect of the physical processes at the Strait of Gibraltar over the biogeochemical features of the Atlantic Inflow (AI) towards the Mediterranean Sea. This work was focused on the seasonal variation of the biogeochemical patterns in the AI and the role of the Strait; including primary production and phytoplankton features. As the physical model is 1D (horizontal) and two-layer, different integration methods for the primary production in the Biogeochemical Fluxes Model (BFM) have been evaluated. An approach based on the integration of a production-irradiance function was the chosen method. Using this Plankton Functional Type model (BFM), a simplified phytoplankton seasonal cycle in the AI was simulated. Main results included a principal bloom in spring dominated by nanoflagellates, whereas minimum biomass (mostly picophytoplankton) was simulated during summer. Physical processes occurring in the Strait could trigger primary production and raise phytoplankton biomass (during spring and autumn), mainly due to two combined effects. First, in the Strait a strong interfacial mixing (causing nutrient supply to the upper layer) is produced, and, second, a shoaling of the surface Atlantic layer occurs eastward. Our results show that these phenomena caused an integrated production of 105 g C m- 2 year- 1 in the eastern side of the Strait, and would also modify the proportion of the different phytoplankton groups. Nanoflagellates were favored during spring/autumn while picophytoplankton is more abundant in summer. Finally, AI could represent a relevant source of nutrients and biomass to Alboran Sea, fertilizing the upper layer of this area with 4.95 megatons nitrate year- 1 (79.83 gigamol year- 1) and 0.44 megatons C year- 1. A main advantage of this coupled model is the capability of solving relevant high-resolution processes as the tidal forcing without expensive computing requirements, allowing to assess the

  18. A coupled biogeochemical-Dynamic Energy Budget model as a tool for managing fish production ponds.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Dalila; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Caetano, Miguel; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Duarte, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    The sustainability of semi-intensive aquaculture relies on management practices that simultaneously improve production efficiency and minimize the environmental impacts of this activity. The purpose of the present work was to develop a mathematical model that reproduced the dynamics of a semi-intensive fish earth pond, to simulate different management scenarios for optimizing fish production. The modeling approach consisted of coupling a biogeochemical model that simulated the dynamics of the elements that are more likely to affect fish production and cause undesirable environmental impacts (nitrogen, phosphorus and oxygen) to a fish growth model based on the Dynamic Energy Budget approach. The biogeochemical sub-model successfully simulated most water column and sediment variables. A good model fit was also found between predicted and observed white seabream (Diplodus sargus) growth data over a production cycle. In order to optimize fish production, different management scenarios were analysed with the model (e.g. increase stocking densities, decrease/increase water exchange rates, decrease/increase feeding rates, decrease phosphorus content in fish feeds, increase food assimilation efficiency and decrease pellets sinking velocity) to test their effects on the pond environment as well as on fish yields and effluent nutrient discharges. Scenarios were quantitatively evaluated and compared using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) methodology. The best management options that allow the maximization of fish production while maintaining a good pond environment and minimum impacts on the adjacent coastal system were to double standard stocking densities and to improve food assimilation efficiency. PMID:23872182

  19. Characterizing marine particles and their impact on biogeochemical cycles in the GEOTRACES program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert F.; Hayes, Christopher T.

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements and their isotopes (TEIs) are of priority interest in several subdisciplines of oceanography. For example, the vital role of trace element micronutrients in regulating the growth of marine organisms, which, in turn, may influence the structure and composition of marine ecosystems, is now well established (Morel and Price, 2003; Twining and Baines, 2013). Natural distributions of some TEIs have been severely impacted by anthropogenic emissions, leading to substantial perturbations of natural ocean inventories. Pb and Hg, for example, (Lamborg et al., 2002; Schaule and Patterson, 1981), may represent a significant threat to human food supply. Furthermore, much of our knowledge of past variability in the ocean environment, including the ocean's role in climate change, has been developed using TEI proxies archived in marine substrates such as sediments, corals and microfossils. Research in each of these areas relies on a comprehensive knowledge of the distributions of TEIs in the ocean, and on the sensitivity of these distributions to changing environmental conditions. With numerous processes affecting the regional supply and removal of TEIs in the ocean, a comprehensive understanding of the marine biogeochemical cycles of TEIs can be attained only by a global, coordinated, international effort. GEOTRACES, an international program designed to study the marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes (Anderson et al., 2014; Henderson et al., 2007), aims to achieve these goals.

  20. The microbial engines that drive Earth's biogeochemical cycles.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Paul G; Fenchel, Tom; Delong, Edward F

    2008-05-23

    Virtually all nonequilibrium electron transfers on Earth are driven by a set of nanobiological machines composed largely of multimeric protein complexes associated with a small number of prosthetic groups. These machines evolved exclusively in microbes early in our planet's history yet, despite their antiquity, are highly conserved. Hence, although there is enormous genetic diversity in nature, there remains a relatively stable set of core genes coding for the major redox reactions essential for life and biogeochemical cycles. These genes created and coevolved with biogeochemical cycles and were passed from microbe to microbe primarily by horizontal gene transfer. A major challenge in the coming decades is to understand how these machines evolved, how they work, and the processes that control their activity on both molecular and planetary scales. PMID:18497287

  1. Positive Affect and Processes of Recovery among Treatment-Seeking Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Adam W.; Woods, William J.; Siever, Michael D.; Discepola, Michael V.; Dilwort, Samantha E.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Miller, Nicole; Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie

    2015-01-01

    Background Revised Stress and Coping Theory proposes that positive affect serves adaptive functions, independent of negative affect. However, scant research has examined whether, how, and under what circumstances positive affect is associated with decreased substance use. Methods Eighty-eight methamphetamine-using men who have sex with men (MSM) completed the baseline assessment for substance abuse treatment outcome study which included measures of positive and negative affect, cognitive-behavioral change processes (i.e., approach-oriented coping, self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers, and abstinence-related action tendencies), abstinence-specific social support, and self-reported substance use. Participants also provided a urine sample for toxicology screening. Results After controlling for demographic characteristics and negative affect, higher positive affect was independently associated with greater approach-oriented coping, abstinence-related action tendencies, and abstinence-specific social support. Positive affect was also independently associated with greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers, but only at lower levels of negative affect. Through these cognitive-behavioral and social pathways, positive affect was indirectly associated with lower frequency of stimulant use in the past 30 days, lower odds of reporting stimulant use two or more days in a row, and lower odds of providing a urine sample that was reactive for stimulant metabolites. On the other hand, negative affect was not indirectly associated with any measure of stimulant use. Conclusions Clinical research is needed to examine the pathways whereby positive affect may predict better substance abuse treatment outcomes. PMID:23684632

  2. Are Developmental Processes Affected by Immigration? Family Processes, Internalizing Behaviors, and Externalizing Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T.; Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth; Huang, Li

    2006-01-01

    The current study compared levels of family processes, internalizing behaviors, and externalizing behaviors as well as developmental processes, namely the associations among family processes and measures of internalizing or externalizing behaviors, in native Swiss, 2nd and 1st generation immigrant adolescents (N=3,540). Findings provided evidence…

  3. Plant Nitrogen Uptake in Terrestrial Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti Donati, A.; Cox, P.; Smith, M. J.; Purves, D.; Sitch, S.; Jones, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations than originally expected. This study compares the differences in the predictions of alternative models of plant N uptake found in different terrestrial biogeochemical models with the predictions from a new N-uptake model developed under the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) framework. We implement a methodology for the construction, parameterization and evaluation of N uptake models to fully decompose all the N uptake component processes in terms of their parameter uncertainty and the accuracy of their predictions with respect to different empirical data sets. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the European Commission FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 Marie Curie Action: "Greencycles II: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 Marie Curie Action: "Networks for Initial Training"

  4. The Impact of Affect on Out-Group Judgments Depends on Dominant Information-Processing Styles: Evidence From Incidental and Integral Affect Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Linda M; Lair, Elicia C; Rovenpor, Daniel R

    2016-04-01

    Two studies tested the affect-as-cognitive-feedback model, in which positive and negative affective states are not uniquely associated with particular processing styles, but rather serve as feedback about currently accessible processing styles. The studies extend existing work by investigating (a) both incidental and integral affect, (b) out-group judgments, and (c) downstream consequences. We manipulated processing styles and either incidental (Study 1) or integral (Study 2) affect and measured perceptions of out-group homogeneity. Positive (relative to negative) affect increased out-group homogeneity judgments when global processing was primed, but under local priming, the effect reversed (Studies 1 and 2). A similar interactive effect emerged on attributions, which had downstream consequences for behavioral intentions (Study 2). These results demonstrate that both incidental and integral affect do not directly produce specific processing styles, but rather influence thinking by providing feedback about currently accessible processing styles. PMID:26984013

  5. Thinking Back about a Positive Event: The Impact of Processing Style on Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, Sabine; Holmes, Emily A.; Palmieri, Rosa; Bellelli, Guglielmo; Raes, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The manner in which individuals recall an autobiographical positive life event has affective consequences. Two studies addressed the processing styles during positive memory recall in a non-clinical sample. Participants retrieved a positive memory, which was self-generated (Study 1, n = 70) or experimenter-chosen (i.e., academic achievement, Study 2, n = 159), followed by the induction of one of three processing styles (between-subjects): in Study 1, a “concrete/imagery” vs. “abstract/verbal” processing style was compared. In Study 2, a “concrete/imagery,” “abstract/verbal,” and “comparative/verbal” processing style were compared. The processing of a personal memory in a concrete/imagery-based way led to a larger increase in positive affect compared to abstract/verbal processing in Study 1, as well as compared to comparative/verbal thinking in Study 2. Results of Study 2 further suggest that it is making unfavorable verbal comparisons that may hinder affective benefits to positive memories (rather than general abstract/verbal processing per se). The comparative/verbal thinking style failed to lead to improvements in positive affect, and with increasing levels of depressive symptoms it had a more negative impact on change in positive affect. We found no evidence that participant’s tendency to have dampening thoughts in response to positive affect in daily life contributed to the affective impact of positive memory recall. The results support the potential for current trainings in boosting positive memories and mental imagery, and underline the search for parameters that determine at times deleterious outcomes of abstract/verbal memory processing in the face of positive information. PMID:25806003

  6. Thinking Back about a Positive Event: The Impact of Processing Style on Positive Affect.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Sabine; Holmes, Emily A; Palmieri, Rosa; Bellelli, Guglielmo; Raes, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The manner in which individuals recall an autobiographical positive life event has affective consequences. Two studies addressed the processing styles during positive memory recall in a non-clinical sample. Participants retrieved a positive memory, which was self-generated (Study 1, n = 70) or experimenter-chosen (i.e., academic achievement, Study 2, n = 159), followed by the induction of one of three processing styles (between-subjects): in Study 1, a "concrete/imagery" vs. "abstract/verbal" processing style was compared. In Study 2, a "concrete/imagery," "abstract/verbal," and "comparative/verbal" processing style were compared. The processing of a personal memory in a concrete/imagery-based way led to a larger increase in positive affect compared to abstract/verbal processing in Study 1, as well as compared to comparative/verbal thinking in Study 2. Results of Study 2 further suggest that it is making unfavorable verbal comparisons that may hinder affective benefits to positive memories (rather than general abstract/verbal processing per se). The comparative/verbal thinking style failed to lead to improvements in positive affect, and with increasing levels of depressive symptoms it had a more negative impact on change in positive affect. We found no evidence that participant's tendency to have dampening thoughts in response to positive affect in daily life contributed to the affective impact of positive memory recall. The results support the potential for current trainings in boosting positive memories and mental imagery, and underline the search for parameters that determine at times deleterious outcomes of abstract/verbal memory processing in the face of positive information. PMID:25806003

  7. The “Musical Emotional Bursts”: a validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle; Belin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear) and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analog of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV)—a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 s) improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]), or a clarinet (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]). The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, non-linguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli [30 stimuli × 4 (3 emotions + neutral) × 2 instruments] by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task); 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80) was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0%) and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each) MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems. PMID:23964255

  8. Simulation of land-atmosphere gaseous exchange using a coupled land surface-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W. J.; Perez, T. J.; Pan, L.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to develop and evaluate biogeochemical models that on the one hand represent vegetation and soil dynamics and on the other hand provide energy and water fluxes in a temporal resolution suitable for biogeochemical processes. In this study, we present a consistent coupling between a common land surface model (CLM3.0) and a recently developed biogeochemical model (TOUGHREACT-N). The model TOUGHREACT-N (TR-N) is one of the few process-based models that simulate green house gases fluxes by using an implicit scheme to solve the diffusion equations governing soil heat and water fluxes. By coupling with CLM3.0, we have significantly improved TR-N by including realistic representations of surface water, energy, and momentum exchanges, through the use of improved formulations for soil evaporation, plant transpiration, vegetation growth, and plant nitrogen uptake embedded in CLM3.0. The coupled CLMTR-N model is a first step for a full coupling of land surface and biogeochemical processes. The model is evaluated with measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, and N2O and N2 gaseous emission data from fallow, corn, and forest sites in Venezuela. The results demonstrate that the CLMTR-N model simulates realistic diurnal variation of soil temperature, soil water content, and N gaseous fluxes. For example, mean differences between predicted and observed midday near-surface soil water content were 8, 11, and 4 % in July, August, and September. The sensitivity of the biogeochemical processes and resulting N emissions to variation in environmental drivers is high, which indicates the need to calculate biogeochemical processes in, at least, two hourly time steps using dynamically updated (rather than daily averaged) soil environmental conditions. The development in CLMTR-N of such a complex representation of processes will allow us to characterize relevant processes and simplifications appropriate for regional to global-scale coupled biogeochemical and

  9. Responsiveness and Affective Processes in the Interactive Construction of Understanding in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kay; Perry, Bob; Conroy, John; Howe, Peter; Geoghegan, Noel

    1998-01-01

    Reports on important learning processes that emerged during adult mathematics classes that used a teaching approach compatible with a social constructivist theory of knowing. Concludes that affective processes precipitated students' responsiveness, modifying the immediate learning context which influenced student thinking, creating a snowball…

  10. Ecological and Dynamical Study of the Creative Process and Affects of Scientific Students Working in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peilloux, Aurélien; Botella, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Although creativity has drawn the attention of researchers during the past century, collaborative processes have barely been investigated. In this article, the collective dimension of a creative process is investigated, based on a dynamic and ecological approach that includes an affective component. "Dynamic" means that the creative…

  11. How Does Tele-Mental Health Affect Group Therapy Process? Secondary Analysis of a Noninferiority Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Carolyn J.; Morland, Leslie A.; Macdonald, Alexandra; Frueh, B. Christopher; Grubbs, Kathleen M.; Rosen, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Video teleconferencing (VTC) is used for mental health treatment delivery to geographically remote, underserved populations. However, few studies have examined how VTC affects individual or group psychotherapy processes. This study compares process variables such as therapeutic alliance and attrition among participants receiving anger…

  12. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur on Early Earth (and on Mars?)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    The physical and chemical interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere can be examined for elements such as carbon (C) and sulfur (S) that have played central roles for both life and the environment. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. These multiple roles of C and S interact across a network of elemental reservoirs interconnected by physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed biogeochemical C and S cycles.

  13. The Mechanism of Valence-Space Metaphors: ERP Evidence for Affective Word Processing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiushu; Wang, Ruiming; Chang, Song

    2014-01-01

    Embodied cognition contends that the representation and processing of concepts involve perceptual, somatosensory, motoric, and other physical re-experiencing information. In this view, affective concepts are also grounded in physical information. For instance, people often say “feeling down” or “cheer up” in daily life. These phrases use spatial information to understand affective concepts. This process is referred to as valence-space metaphor. Valence-space metaphors refer to the employment of spatial information (lower/higher space) to elaborate affective concepts (negative/positive concepts). Previous studies have demonstrated that processing affective words affects performance on a spatial detection task. However, the mechanism(s) behind this effect remain unclear. In the current study, we hypothesized that processing affective words might produce spatial information. Consequently, spatial information would affect the following spatial cue detection/discrimination task. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to remember an affective word. Then, they completed a spatial cue detection task while event-related potentials were recorded. The results indicated that the top cues induced enhanced amplitude of P200 component while participants kept positive words relative to negative words in mind. On the contrary, the bottom cues induced enhanced P200 amplitudes while participants kept negative words relative to positive words in mind. In Experiment 2, we conducted a behavioral experiment that employed a similar paradigm to Experiment 1, but used arrows instead of dots to test the attentional nature of the valence-space metaphor. We found a similar facilitation effect as found in Experiment 1. Positive words facilitated the discrimination of upper arrows, whereas negative words facilitated the discrimination of lower arrows. In summary, affective words might activate spatial information and cause participants to allocate their attention to corresponding

  14. Multi-scale interactions affecting transport, storage, and processing of solutes and sediments in stream corridors (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Packman, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water and groundwater flow interact with the channel geomorphology and sediments in ways that determine how material is transported, stored, and transformed in stream corridors. Solute and sediment transport affect important ecological processes such as carbon and nutrient dynamics and stream metabolism, processes that are fundamental to stream health and function. Many individual mechanisms of transport and storage of solute and sediment have been studied, including surface water exchange between the main channel and side pools, hyporheic flow through shallow and deep subsurface flow paths, and sediment transport during both baseflow and floods. A significant challenge arises from non-linear and scale-dependent transport resulting from natural, fractal fluvial topography and associated broad, multi-scale hydrologic interactions. Connections between processes and linkages across scales are not well understood, imposing significant limitations on system predictability. The whole-stream tracer experimental approach is popular because of the spatial averaging of heterogeneous processes; however the tracer results, implemented alone and analyzed using typical models, cannot usually predict transport beyond the very specific conditions of the experiment. Furthermore, the results of whole stream tracer experiments tend to be biased due to unavoidable limitations associated with sampling frequency, measurement sensitivity, and experiment duration. We recommend that whole-stream tracer additions be augmented with hydraulic and topographic measurements and also with additional tracer measurements made directly in storage zones. We present examples of measurements that encompass interactions across spatial and temporal scales and models that are transferable to a wide range of flow and geomorphic conditions. These results show how the competitive effects between the different forces driving hyporheic flow, operating at different spatial scales, creates a situation

  15. Biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems of the Caatinga Biome.

    PubMed

    Menezes, R S C; Sampaio, E V S B; Giongo, V; Pérez-Marin, A M

    2012-08-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of C, N, P and water, the impacts of land use in the stocks and flows of these elements and how they can affect the structure and functioning of Caatinga were reviewed. About half of this biome is still covered by native secondary vegetation. Soils are deficient in nutrients, especially N and P. Average concentrations of total soil P and C in the top layer (0-20 cm) are 196 mg kg(-1) and 9.3 g kg(-1), corresponding to C stocks around 23 Mg ha(-1). Aboveground biomass of native vegetation varies from 30 to 50 Mg ha(-1), and average root biomass from 3 to 12 Mg ha(-1). Average annual productivities and biomass accumulation in different land use systems vary from 1 to 7 Mg ha(-1) year(-1). Biological atmospheric N2 fixation is estimated to vary from 3 to 11 kg N ha(-1) year-1 and 21 to 26 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) in mature and secondary Caatinga, respectively. The main processes responsible for nutrient and water losses are fire, soil erosion, runoff and harvest of crops and animal products. Projected climate changes in the future point to higher temperatures and rainfall decreases. In face of the high intrinsic variability, actions to increase sustainability should improve resilience and stability of the ecosystems. Land use systems based on perennial species, as opposed to annual species, may be more stable and resilient, thus more adequate to face future potential increases in climate variability. Long-term studies to investigate the potential of the native biodiversity or adapted exotic species to design sustainable land use systems should be encouraged. PMID:23011295

  16. Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective Theory of Mind in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Catherine L; Fontaine, Nathalie M G; Bird, Geoffrey; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Brito, Stephane A De; McCrory, Eamon J P; Viding, Essi

    2012-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to attribute thoughts, intentions and beliefs to others. This involves component processes, including cognitive perspective taking (cognitive ToM) and understanding emotions (affective ToM). This study assessed the distinction and overlap of neural processes involved in these respective components, and also investigated their development between adolescence and adulthood. While data suggest that ToM develops between adolescence and adulthood, these populations have not been compared on cognitive and affective ToM domains. Using fMRI with 15 adolescent (aged 11-16 years) and 15 adult (aged 24-40 years) males, we assessed neural responses during cartoon vignettes requiring cognitive ToM, affective ToM or physical causality comprehension (control). An additional aim was to explore relationships between fMRI data and self-reported empathy. Both cognitive and affective ToM conditions were associated with neural responses in the classic ToM network across both groups, although only affective ToM recruited medial/ventromedial PFC (mPFC/vmPFC). Adolescents additionally activated vmPFC more than did adults during affective ToM. The specificity of the mPFC/vmPFC response during affective ToM supports evidence from lesion studies suggesting that vmPFC may integrate affective information during ToM. Furthermore, the differential neural response in vmPFC between adult and adolescent groups indicates developmental changes in affective ToM processing. PMID:21467048

  17. Extreme sensory processing patterns and their relation with clinical conditions among individuals with major affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Engel-Yeger, Batya; Muzio, Caterina; Rinosi, Giorgio; Solano, Paola; Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Pompili, Maurizio; Amore, Mario; Serafini, Gianluca

    2016-02-28

    Previous studies highlighted the involvement of sensory perception in emotional processes. However, the role of extreme sensory processing patterns expressed in hyper- or hyposensitivity was not thoroughly considered. The present study, in real life conditions, examined the unique sensory processing patterns of individuals with major affective disorders and their relationship with psychiatric symptomatology. The sample consisted of 105 participants with major affective conditions ranging in age from 20 to 84 years (mean=56.7±14.6). All participants completed the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS-A), the second version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP). Sensory sensitivity/avoiding hypersensitivity patterns and low registration (a hyposensitivity pattern) were prevalent among our sample as compared to normative data. About seventy percent of the sample showed lower seeking tendency. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that depression and anxious/cyclothymic affective temperaments were predicted by sensory sensory/avoiding. Anxious and irritable affective temperaments were predicted by low registration. Hyperthymic affective temperament and lower severity of depression were predicted by sensation seeking. Hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity may be "trait" markers of individuals with major affective disorders. Interventions should refer to the individual unique sensory profiles and their behavioral and functional impact in the context of real life. PMID:26738981

  18. Towards understanding how surface life can affect interior geological processes: a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, J. G.; Gans, F.; Kleidon, A.

    2011-06-01

    Life has significantly altered the Earth's atmosphere, oceans and crust. To what extent has it also affected interior geological processes? To address this question, three models of geological processes are formulated: mantle convection, continental crust uplift and erosion and oceanic crust recycling. These processes are characterised as non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems. Their states of disequilibrium are maintained by the power generated from the dissipation of energy from the interior of the Earth. Altering the thickness of continental crust via weathering and erosion affects the upper mantle temperature which leads to changes in rates of oceanic crust recycling and consequently rates of outgassing of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Estimates for the power generated by various elements in the Earth system are shown. This includes, inter alia, surface life generation of 264 TW of power, much greater than those of geological processes such as mantle convection at 12 TW. This high power results from life's ability to harvest energy directly from the sun. Life need only utilise a small fraction of the generated free chemical energy for geochemical transformations at the surface, such as affecting rates of weathering and erosion of continental rocks, in order to affect interior, geological processes. Consequently when assessing the effects of life on Earth, and potentially any planet with a significant biosphere, dynamical models may be required that better capture the coupled nature of biologically-mediated surface and interior processes.

  19. Biogeochemical interactions affecting hepatic trace element levels in aquatic birds

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, G.

    1996-07-01

    Knowledge of elemental interactions is important to the toxicological assessment of wildlife in the geochemical environment. This study determines the concentrations of Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Li, Mg, Mn, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Ag, V, and Zn in aquatic bird liver, fish liver, whole bivalves, insects, and waters in several aquatic ecosystems in northern California. There is evidence of strong in vivo and environmental interactions, including the observation of manganese as a possible cofactor or indicator in selenium bioaccumulation. The nearest neighbor selenium correlation in aquatic bird liver tissue that results from this work is Cd-Mn-Se-Hg-As. The correlation of liver selenium to manganese in vivo and the result that the majority of the variance in liver selenium concentration is contained in the manganese term of the regression model relating Se to Cd, Mn, and Hg is new knowledge in the study of aquatic birds. A linear relationship between liver selenium and environmental manganese (water and sediment) is found in the data, suggesting a water chemistry compartmentalization or activation of toxicants. Alternatively, the hepatic concentrations of selenium, manganese, and iron suggest induction of enzymes in response to oxidative stress.

  20. Modelling Marine Biological and Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetaert, Karline; van Oevelen, Dick

    2011-09-01

    In the environmental sciences, mathematic models are commonly applied to analyze ecological and biogeochemical data. The technique where a model is used to interpret available measurements such as to retrieve unmeasured information on the system being observed is called "inverse modelling". In this paper we will discuss and give examples of two modeling techniques used to analyse ecological and biogeochemical data. On the one hand are mechanistic mathematical models that are written as a set of non-linear differential equations. On the other hand are so-called linear inverse models (LIMs) that consist of a set of linear equations that need to be solved for the unknowns.

  1. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Wilfred M; Venterea, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles as they relate to North America-wide budgeting and future projection of biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Understanding the current magnitude and providing guidance on the future trajectories of atmospheric concentrations of these gases requires investigation of their (i) biogeochemical origins, (ii) response to climate feedbacks and other environmental factors, and (iii) susceptibility to management practices. This special issue provides a group of articles that present the current state of continental scale sources and sinks of biogenic GHGs and the potential to better manage them in the future.

  2. Parameterization of biogeochemical sediment-water fluxes using in-situ measurements and a steady-state diagenetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Arnaud; Fennel, Katja; Wilson, Robin; Lehrter, John; Devereux, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Sediment biogeochemical processes are important drivers of water column biogeochemistry in coastal areas. For example, sediment oxygen consumption can be an important driver of bottom water oxygen depletion in hypoxic systems, and sediment-water nutrient fluxes support primary productivity in the overlying water column. Yet, biogeochemical sediment-water fluxes are often parameterized crudely and only poorly constrained in coupled physical-biogeochemical models. Here, we present a method for parameterizing biogeochemical sediment-water fluxes realistically and efficiently, using in-situ measurements and a steady state diagenetic model. We apply this method to the Louisiana Shelf where high primary production induced by excess nutrient loads from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system promotes the development of hypoxic bottom waters in summer. The implementation of the parameterizations in a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model of the northern Gulf of Mexico results in realistic sediment-water fluxes that enable a sediment-water column feedback at low bottom oxygen concentrations.

  3. MODELING COUPLED HYDROLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES: LONG-TERM URANIUM TRANSPORT FOLLOWING PHOSPHOROUS-FERTILIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminants in the vadose zone are affected by the physical processes of water flow, heat movement and multicomponent transport, as well as generally by a range of interacting biogeochemical processes. Coupling these various processes within one integrated numerical simulator provides a process-ba...

  4. Interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2007-03-01

    This report assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are often linked to concurrent exposure to UV-A radiation (315-400 nm), which is influenced by global climate change. These interactions involving UV radiation (the combination of UV-B and UV-A) are central to the prediction and evaluation of future Earth environmental conditions. There is increasing evidence that elevated UV-B radiation has significant effects on the terrestrial biosphere with implications for the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and other elements. The cycling of carbon and inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen can be affected by UV-B-mediated changes in communities of soil organisms, probably due to the effects of UV-B radiation on plant root exudation and/or the chemistry of dead plant material falling to the soil. In arid environments direct photodegradation can play a major role in the decay of plant litter, and UV-B radiation is responsible for a significant part of this photodegradation. UV-B radiation strongly influences aquatic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and metals cycling that affect a wide range of life processes. UV-B radiation changes the biological availability of dissolved organic matter to microorganisms, and accelerates its transformation into dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrogen, including carbon dioxide and ammonium. The coloured part of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies, but CDOM is also photodegraded by solar UV radiation. Changes in CDOM influence the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies with major consequences for aquatic biogeochemical processes. Changes in aquatic primary productivity and decomposition due to climate-related changes in circulation and nutrient supply occur concurrently with

  5. Overview of processes affecting contaminant release from confined disposal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.; McCutcheon, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Confined disposal facilities (CDFs) are widely used for the disposal of dredged material from Corps of Engineers maintenance dredging projects along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and waterways and harbors in the Great Lakes. CDFs are a less common disposal alternative along the Pacific coast and inland river systems. When contaminated dredged material is placed in the CDF, there is a potential for contaminant mobilization and release from the CDF by a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. This report provides an overview of the processes affecting mobilization and release of contaminants from CDFs and the potential applicability of multimedia models for prediction of contaminant release. Processes affecting release from in-water CDFs are emphasized, although many of the processes discussed are applicable to nearshore and upland CDFs. Processes affecting contaminant release are complex, involving a variety of chemicals and operational and design considerations. Many of the important processes are reasonably well known. Laboratory column settling and elutriate techniques have been developed to estimate solids and contaminant concentration in water directly released during hydraulic disposal operations. Predictive techniques for other processes are not as available.

  6. The sound of emotions-Towards a unifying neural network perspective of affective sound processing.

    PubMed

    Frühholz, Sascha; Trost, Wiebke; Kotz, Sonja A

    2016-09-01

    Affective sounds are an integral part of the natural and social environment that shape and influence behavior across a multitude of species. In human primates, these affective sounds span a repertoire of environmental and human sounds when we vocalize or produce music. In terms of neural processing, cortical and subcortical brain areas constitute a distributed network that supports our listening experience to these affective sounds. Taking an exhaustive cross-domain view, we accordingly suggest a common neural network that facilitates the decoding of the emotional meaning from a wide source of sounds rather than a traditional view that postulates distinct neural systems for specific affective sound types. This new integrative neural network view unifies the decoding of affective valence in sounds, and ascribes differential as well as complementary functional roles to specific nodes within a common neural network. It also highlights the importance of an extended brain network beyond the central limbic and auditory brain systems engaged in the processing of affective sounds. PMID:27189782

  7. Investigating the initial stages of soil formation in glacier forefields using the new biogeochemical model: SHIMMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, James; Anesio, Alexandre; Arndt, Sandra; Sabacka, Marie; Barker, Gary; Benning, Liane; Blacker, Joshua; Singarayer, Joy; Tranter, Martyn; Yallop, Marian

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets in Polar and alpine regions are retreating in response to recent climate warming, exposing terrestrial ecosystems that have been locked under the ice for thousands of years. Exposed soils exhibit successional characteristics that can be characterised using a chronosequence approach. Decades of empirical research in glacier forefields has shown that soils are quickly colonised by microbes which drive biogeochemical cycling of elements and affect soil properties including nutrient concentrations, carbon fluxes and soil stability (Bradley et al, 2014). The characterisation of these soils is important for our understanding of the cycling of organic matter under extreme environmental and nutrient limiting conditions, and their potential contribution to global biogeochemical cycles. This is particularly important as these new areas will become more geographically expansive with continued ice retreat. SHIMMER (Soil biogeocHemIcal Model of Microbial Ecosystem Response) (Bradley et al, 2015) is a new mathematical model that simulates biogeochemical and microbial dynamics in glacier forefields. The model captures, explores and predicts the growth of different microbial groups (classified by function), and the associated cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus along a chronosequence. SHIMMER improves typical soil model formulations by including explicit representation of microbial dynamics, and those processes which are shown to be important for glacier forefields. For example, we categorise microbial groups by function to represent the diversity of soil microbial communities, and include the different metabolic needs and physiological pathways of microbial organisms commonly found in glacier forefields (e.g. microbes derived from underneath the glacier, typical soil bacteria, and microbes that can fix atmospheric nitrogen and assimilate soil nitrogen). Here, we present data from a study where we integrated modelling using SHIMMER with empirical

  8. How orthographic transparency affects morphological processing in young readers with and without reading disability.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Miguel; García, Laura; Burani, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates how orthographic modifications to the stems of complex words affect morphological processing in proficient young Spanish readers and children with reading deficits. In a definition task all children, irrespective of their reading skill, were worse at defining derived words that had an orthographic alteration of the base stem than words with no orthographic alteration. In a go/no-go lexical decision task, an interaction between base frequency and orthographic alteration was found: base frequency affected derived words with no orthographic alteration more than words with alterations, irrespective of reading skill. Overall, results show that all children benefit from a high frequency base, skilled children outperform children with reading deficits and morphological processing is affected by orthographic alterations similarly in proficient and impaired readers. PMID:25899060

  9. Abnormal, affect-specific modulatory effects on early auditory processing in schizophrenia: magnetoencephalographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Junghöfer, Markus; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Küppers, Kerstin; Ohrmann, Patricia; Pedersen, Anya

    2015-02-01

    Abnormalities in the perception and identification of emotions have frequently been reported in schizophrenia. Hemodynamic neuroimaging studies found functional abnormalities in cortical and subcortical brain circuits that are involved in normal affective processing, but the temporal dynamics of abnormal emotion processing in schizophrenia remain largely elusive. To investigate this issue, we recorded early auditory evoked field components by means of whole-head magnetoencephalography that were in response to emotion-associated tones in seventeen patients with schizophrenia and in seventeen healthy, matched controls. Forty-two click-like tones (conditioned stimuli; CS) acquired differential emotional meaning through an affective associative learning procedure by pairing each CS three times with either pleasant, unpleasant or neutral auditory scenes. As expected, differential affect-specific modulation in patients vs. controls was evident, starting at the auditory N1m onset latency of approximately 70ms, extending to 230ms. While controls showed the expected enhanced processing of emotion associated CS, patients revealed an inverted pattern with reduced processing of arousal, when compared to neutral stimuli, in the right prefrontal cortex. The present finding suggests impairments in the prioritization of emotionally salient vs. non-salient stimuli in patients with schizophrenia. Dysfunction in higher cognitive processes and behavior in schizophrenia may therefore reflect dysfunction in fundamental, early emotion processing stages. PMID:25497223

  10. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and their roles in determining current continental-scale budgets and future trends in biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) for North America. Understanding the current magnitude and forecasting future trajectories of atmospheric GHG concent...

  11. Social Information Processing in Children: Specific Relations to Anxiety, Depression, and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Bell, Debora J.; Allwood, Maureen A.; Swenson, Lance P.; Early, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    Two studies examined shared and unique relations of social information processing (SIP) to youth's anxious and depressive symptoms. Whether SIP added unique variance over and above trait affect in predicting internalizing symptoms was also examined. In Study 1, 215 youth (ages 8-13) completed symptom measures of anxiety and depression and a…

  12. Interaction between Task Oriented and Affective Information Processing in Cognitive Robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haazebroek, Pascal; van Dantzig, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard

    There is an increasing interest in endowing robots with emotions. Robot control however is still often very task oriented. We present a cognitive architecture that allows the combination of and interaction between task representations and affective information processing. Our model is validated by comparing simulation results with empirical data from experimental psychology.

  13. Automatic Processing of Emotional Faces in High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders: An Affective Priming Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamio, Yoko; Wolf, Julie; Fein, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study examined automatic processing of emotional faces in individuals with high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (HFPDD) using an affective priming paradigm. Sixteen participants (HFPDD and matched controls) were presented with happy faces, fearful faces or objects in both subliminal and supraliminal exposure conditions, followed…

  14. Facial Affect Processing and Depression Susceptibility: Cognitive Biases and Cognitive Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistricky, Steven L.; Ingram, Rick E.; Atchley, Ruth Ann

    2011-01-01

    Facial affect processing is essential to social development and functioning and is particularly relevant to models of depression. Although cognitive and interpersonal theories have long described different pathways to depression, cognitive-interpersonal and evolutionary social risk models of depression focus on the interrelation of interpersonal…

  15. Approaching the Affective Factors of Information Seeking: The Viewpoint of the Information Search Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savolainen, Reijo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The article contributes to the conceptual studies of affective factors in information seeking by examining Kuhlthau's information search process model. Method: This random-digit dial telephone survey of 253 people (75% female) living in a rural, medically under-serviced area of Ontario, Canada, follows-up a previous interview study…

  16. Processes affecting the transport of nitrogen in groundwater and factors related to slope position

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate (NO3-) pollution of water resources has been a major problem for years, causing contaminated water supplies, harmful effects on human health, and widespread eutrophication of fresh water resources. The main objectives of this study were to: 1) understand the processes affecting NO3- transpor...

  17. Factors Affecting Christian Parents' School Choice Decision Processes: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Tami G.; Swezey, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies factors affecting the decision processes for school choice by Christian parents. Grounded theory design incorporated interview transcripts, field notes, and a reflective journal to analyze themes. Comparative analysis, including open, axial, and selective coding, was used to reduce the coded statements to five code families:…

  18. Atypical Sensory Processing in Adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Non-Affected Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De la Marche, Wouter; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse

    2012-01-01

    Atypical sensory processing is common in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Specific profiles have been proposed in different age groups, but no study has focused specifically on adolescents. Identifying traits of ASD that are shared by individuals with ASD and their non-affected family members can shed light on the genetic underpinnings of ASD.…

  19. Transactional Distance among Open University Students: How Does it Affect the Learning Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassandrinou, Amanda; Angelaki, Christina; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the presence of transactional distance among students, the factors affecting it, as well as the way it influences the learning process of students in a blended distance learning setting in Greece. The present study involved 12 postgraduate students of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). A qualitative research was conducted,…

  20. Biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. Part 1: Introduction to the effects of upwelling along the west coast of North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is examined as it relates to the cycling of chemical species in coastal waters along the west coast of North America. The temporal and spatial features of upwelling phenomena in the Eastern boundary regions of the North Pacific Ocean are presented and discussed in terms of upwelling episodes. Climate conditions affecting upwelling include: thermal effects, wind-induced shear stress which moves surface layers, and the curl of the wind stress vector which is thought to affect the extent and nature of upwelling and the formation of offshore convergent downwelling fronts. These effects and the interaction of sunlight and upwelled nutrients which result in a biological bloom in surface waters is modeled analytically. The roles of biological and chemical species, including the effects of predation, are discussed in that context, and relevant remote sensing and in situ observations are presented. Climatological, oceanographic, biological, physical, chemical events, and processes that pertain to biogeochemical cycling are presented and described by a set of partial differential equations. Simple preliminary results are obtained and are compared with data. Thus a fairly general framework has been laid where the many facets of biogeochemical cycling in coastal upwelled waters can be examined in their relationship to one another, and to the whole, to whatever level of detail or approximation is warranted or desired.

  1. Quantifying the Variability of CH4 Emissions from Pan-Arctic Lakes with Lake Biogeochemical and Landscape Evolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in the arctic and subarctic show that CH4 emissions from pan-arctic lakes are playing much more significant roles in the regional carbon cycling than previously estimated. Permafrost thawing due to pronounced warming at northern high latitudes affects lake morphology, changing its CH4 emissions. Thermokarst can enlarge the extent of artic lakes, exposing stable ancient carbon buried in the permafrost zone for degradation and changing a previously known carbon sink to a large carbon source. In some areas, the thawing of subarctic discontinuous and isolated permafrost can diminish thermokarst lakes. To date, few models have considered these important hydrological and biogeochemical processes to provide adequate estimation of CH4 emissions from these lakes. To fill this gap, we have developed a process-based climate-sensitive lake biogeochemical model and a landscape evolution model, which have been applied to quantify the state and variability of CH4 emissions from this freshwater system. Site-level experiments show the models are capable to capture the spatial and temporal variability of CH4 emissions from lakes across Siberia and Alaska. With the lake biogeochemical model solely, we estimate that the magnitude of CH4 emissions from lakes is 13.2 Tg yr-1 in the north of 60 ºN at present, which is on the same order of CH4 emissions from northern high-latitude wetlands. The maximum increment is 11.8 Tg CH4 yr-1 by the end of the 21st century when the worst warming scenario is assumed. We expect the landscape evolution model will improve the existing estimates.

  2. Prepare for scare-Impact of threat predictability on affective visual processing in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Klahn, Anna Luisa; Klinkenberg, Isabelle A G; Notzon, Swantje; Arolt, Volker; Pantev, Christo; Zwanzger, Peter; Junghöfer, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The visual processing of emotional faces is influenced by individual's level of stress and anxiety. Valence unspecific affective processing is expected to be influenced by predictability of threat. Using a design of phasic fear (predictable threat), sustained anxiety (unpredictable threat) and safety (no threat), we investigated the magnetoencephalographic correlates and temporal dynamics of emotional face processing in a sample of phobic patients. Compared to non-anxious controls, phobic individuals revealed decreased parietal emotional attention processes during affective processing at mid-latency and late processing stages. While control subjects showed increasing parietal processing of the facial stimuli in line with decreasing threat predictability, phobic subjects revealed the opposite pattern. Decreasing threat predictability also led to increasing neural activity in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at mid-latency stages. Additionally, unpredictability of threat lead to higher subjective discomfort compared to predictability of threat and no threat safety condition. Our findings indicate that visual processing of emotional information is influenced by both stress induction and pathologic anxiety. PMID:27036648

  3. Affective Assessment of a Computer User through the Processing of the Pupil Diameter Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Barreto, Armando; Adjouadi, Malek

    This study proposes to achieve the affective assessment of a computer user through the processing of the pupil diameter (PD) signal. An adaptive interference canceller (AIC) system using the H∞ time-varying (HITV) adaptive algorithm was developed to minimize the impact of the PLR (pupil size changes caused by light intensity variations) on the measured pupil diameter signal. The modified pupil diameter (MPD) signal, obtained from the AIC, was expected to reflect primarily the pupillary affective responses (PAR) of the subject. Additional manipulations of the AIC output resulted in a Processed MPD (PMPD) signal, from which a classification feature, “PMPDmean”, was extracted. This feature was used to train and test a support vector machine (SVM), for the identification of “stress” states in the subject, achieving an accuracy rate of 77.78%. The advantages of affective recognition through the PD signal were verified by comparatively investigating the classification of “stress” and “relaxation” states through features derived from the simultaneously recorded galvanic skin response (GSR) and blood volume pulse (BVP) signals, with and without the PD feature. Encouraging results in affective assessment based on pupil diameter monitoring were obtained in spite of intermittent illumination increases purposely introduced during the experiments. Therefore, these results confirmed the possibility of using PD monitoring to evaluate the evolving affective states of a computer user.

  4. Affective ERP Processing in a Visual Oddball Task: Arousal, Valence, and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Rozenkrants, Bella; Polich, John

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess affective event-related brain potentials (ERPs) using visual pictures that were highly distinct on arousal level/valence category ratings and a response task. Methods Images from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) were selected to obtain distinct affective arousal (low, high) and valence (negative, positive) rating levels. The pictures were used as target stimuli in an oddball paradigm, with a visual pattern as the standard stimulus. Participants were instructed to press a button whenever a picture occurred and to ignore the standard. Task performance and response time did not differ across conditions. Results High-arousal compared to low-arousal stimuli produced larger amplitudes for the N2, P3, early slow wave, and late slow wave components. Valence amplitude effects were weak overall and originated primarily from the later waveform components and interactions with electrode position. Gender differences were negligible. Conclusion The findings suggest that arousal level is the primary determinant of affective oddball processing, and valence minimally influences ERP amplitude. Significance Affective processing engages selective attentional mechanisms that are primarily sensitive to the arousal properties of emotional stimuli. The application and nature of task demands are important considerations for interpreting these effects. PMID:18783987

  5. Facial affect processing deficits in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of antipsychotic treatment effects

    PubMed Central

    Kempton, Matthew J; Mehta, Mitul A

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition, including emotion processing, is a recognised deficit observed in patients with schizophrenia. It is one cognitive domain which has been emphasised as requiring further investigation, with the efficacy of antipsychotic treatment on this deficit remaining unclear. Nine studies met our criteria for entry into a meta-analysis of the effects of medication on facial affect processing, including data from 1162 patients and six antipsychotics. Overall we found a small, positive effect (Hedge’s g = 0.13, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.21, p = 0.002). In a subgroup analysis this was statistically significant for atypical, but not typical, antipsychotics. It should be noted that the pooled sample size of the typical subgroup was significantly lower than the atypical. Meta-regression analyses revealed that age, gender and changes in symptom severity were not moderating factors. For the small, positive effect on facial affect processing, the clinical significance is questionable in terms of treating deficits in emotion identification in schizophrenia. We show that antipsychotic medications are poor at improving facial affect processing compared to reducing symptoms. This highlights the need for further investigation into the neuropharmacological mechanisms associated with accurate emotion processing, to inform treatment options for these deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:25492885

  6. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  7. Small pores in soils: Is the physico-chemical environment accurately reflected in biogeochemical models ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Riedel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Free water is a prerequesite to chemical reactions and biological activity in earth's upper crust essential to life. The void volume between the solid compounds provides space for water, air, and organisms that thrive on the consumption of minerals and organic matter thereby regulating soil carbon turnover. However, not all water in the pore space in soils and sediments is in its liquid state. This is a result of the adhesive forces which reduce the water activity in small pores and charged mineral surfaces. This water has a lower tendency to react chemically in solution as this additional binding energy lowers its activity. In this work, we estimated the amount of soil pore water that is thermodynamically different from a simple aqueous solution. The quantity of soil pore water with properties different to liquid water was found to systematically increase with increasing clay content. The significance of this is that the grain size and surface area apparently affects the thermodynamic state of water. This implies that current methods to determine the amount of water content, traditionally determined from bulk density or gravimetric water content after drying at 105°C overestimates the amount of free water in a soil especially at higher clay content. Our findings have consequences for biogeochemical processes in soils, e.g. nutrients may be contained in water which is not free which could enhance preservation. From water activity measurements on a set of various soils with 0 to 100 wt-% clay, we can show that 5 to 130 mg H2O per g of soil can generally be considered as unsuitable for microbial respiration. These results may therefore provide a unifying explanation for the grain size dependency of organic matter preservation in sedimentary environments and call for a revised view on the biogeochemical environment in soils and sediments. This could allow a different type of process oriented modelling.

  8. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Andy L.; Dayvault, Richard D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01

    in higher concentrations of TEAP reaction products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions with localized effects of the fine lithofacies having the largest impact on U(VI) surface complexation. The ability to model the comprehensive biogeochemical reaction network, and spatially and temporally variable processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium behavior during engineered bioremediation in the naturally complex Rifle IFRC subsurface system required a subsurface simulator that could use the large memory and computational performance of a massively parallel computer. In this case, the eSTOMP simulator, operating on 128 processor cores for 12 h, was used to simulate the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior.

  9. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  10. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  11. Parallel effects of processing fluency and positive affect on familiarity-based recognition decisions for faces

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Devin; Fiacconi, Chris M.; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    According to attribution models of familiarity assessment, people can use a heuristic in recognition-memory decisions, in which they attribute the subjective ease of processing of a memory probe to a prior encounter with the stimulus in question. Research in social cognition suggests that experienced positive affect may be the proximal cue that signals fluency in various experimental contexts. In the present study, we compared the effects of positive affect and fluency on recognition-memory judgments for faces with neutral emotional expression. We predicted that if positive affect is indeed the critical cue that signals processing fluency at retrieval, then its manipulation should produce effects that closely mirror those produced by manipulations of processing fluency. In two experiments, we employed a masked-priming procedure in combination with a Remember-Know (RK) paradigm that aimed to separate familiarity- from recollection-based memory decisions. In addition, participants performed a prime-discrimination task that allowed us to take inter-individual differences in prime awareness into account. We found highly similar effects of our priming manipulations of processing fluency and of positive affect. In both cases, the critical effect was specific to familiarity-based recognition responses. Moreover, in both experiments it was reflected in a shift toward a more liberal response bias, rather than in changed discrimination. Finally, in both experiments, the effect was found to be related to prime awareness; it was present only in participants who reported a lack of such awareness on the prime-discrimination task. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that points not only to a role of fluency, but also of positive affect in familiarity assessment. As such they are consistent with the idea that fluency itself may be hedonically marked. PMID:24795678

  12. Searching for Judy: How small mysteries affect narrative processes and memory

    PubMed Central

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how author’s narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers’ narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that one type of small mystery—a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story—affects readers’ moment-by-moment processing. For that project, participants read stories that introduced characters by proper name alone (e.g., Judy) or with information connecting the character to the rest of the story (e.g., our principal Judy). In an on-line recognition probe task, responses to the character’s name three lines after his or her introduction were faster when the character had not been introduced with connecting information, suggesting that the character remained accessible awaiting resolution. In the four experiments in this paper, we extended our theoretical analysis of small mysteries. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found evidence that trait information (e.g., daredevil Judy) is not sufficient to connect a character to a text. In Experiments 3 and 4, we provide evidence that the moment-by-moment processing effects of such small mysteries also affect readers’ memory for the stories. We interpret the results in terms of Kintsch’s Construction-Integration model (1988) of discourse processing. PMID:20438273

  13. Searching for Judy: how small mysteries affect narrative processes and memory.

    PubMed

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how authors' narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers' narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that 1 type of small mystery-a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story-affects readers' moment-by-moment processing. For that project, participants read stories that introduced characters by proper name alone (e.g., "Judy") or with information connecting the character to the rest of the story (e.g., "our principal Judy"). In an online recognition probe task, responses to the character's name 3 lines after his or her introduction were faster when the character had not been introduced with connecting information, suggesting that the character remained accessible awaiting resolution. In the 4 experiments in this article, we extend our theoretical analysis of small mysteries. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found evidence that trait information (e.g., "daredevil Judy") is not sufficient to connect a character to a text. In Experiments 3 and 4, we found evidence that the moment-by-moment processing effects of such small mysteries also affect readers' memory for the stories. We interpret the results in terms of Kintsch's (1988) construction-integration model of discourse processing. PMID:20438273

  14. Threat processing in generalized social phobia: an investigation of interpretation biases in ambiguous facial affect.

    PubMed

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-06-30

    Facial affect is one of the most important information sources during the course of social interactions, but it is susceptible to distortion due to the complex and dynamic nature. Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit alterations in the processing of social information, such as an attentional and interpretative bias toward threatening information. This may be one of the key factors contributing to the development and maintenance of anxious psychopathology. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a threat-related interpretation bias is evident for ambiguous facial stimuli in a population of individuals with a generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (gSAD) as compared to healthy controls. Participants judged ambiguous happy/fearful, angry/fearful and angry/happy blends varying in intensity and rated the predominant affective expression. The results obtained in this study do not indicate that gSAD is associated with a biased interpretation of ambiguous facial affect. PMID:24656896

  15. Oceanic biogeochemical controls on global dynamics of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Jordi; Lohmann, Rainer; Ockenden, Wendy A; Méjanelle, Laurence; Eisenreich, Steven J; Jones, Kevin C

    2002-10-15

    Understanding and quantifying the global dynamics and sinks of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is important to assess their environmental impact and fate. Air-surface exchange processes, where temperature plays a central role in controlling volatilization and deposition, are of key importance in controlling global POP dynamics. The present study is an assessment of the role of oceanic biogeochemical processes, notably phytoplankton uptake and vertical fluxes of particles, on the global dynamics of POPs. Field measurements of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and furans (PCDFs) are combined with remote sensing estimations of oceanic temperature, wind speed, and chlorophyll, to model the interactions between air-water exchange, phytoplankton uptake, and export of organic matter and POPs out of the mixed surface ocean layer. Deposition is enhanced in the mid-high latitudes and is driven by sinking marine particulate matter, rather than by a cold condensation effect. However, the relative contribution of the biological pump is a function of the physical-chemical properties of POPs. It is concluded that oceanic biogeochemical processes play a critical role in controlling the global dynamics and the ultimate sink of POPs. PMID:12387392

  16. Development of assimilative biogeochemical ocean models for operational and research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, Pierre

    The Green-Mercator project (2007-2009, http://mercator-vert.ipsl.jussieu.fr/) aims at implementing the marine biogeochemical model PISCES at global scale into the MERCATOR operational monitoring and forecasting system. Besides the development of the model system itself, this project relies on two major research activities to improve biogeochemical simulations: (1) the refinement of process resolution to investigate the impact of the transition between eddy permitting to eddy resolving on biogeochemical simulations at global scale, and (2) the assimilation of physical and biogeochemical data (such as ocean color) into the model. The project also includes research activities to demonstrate the potential of an operational biogeochemical model for regional downscaling and extension towards marine resources. In this talk, we will focus on developments achieved in the framework of the E.U. MERSEA project (2004-2008) to assimilate satellite and in situ data into coupled models. Experiments using the SEEK filter in a North Atlantic prototype at 1/4° resolution illustrate the feasability of the approach. The results show that traditional methods such as the Kalman filter may lead to physical inconsistencies originating from the gaussian nature of the KF analysis scheme. A new scheme based on truncated gaussian pdfs is therefore developed (TGF) to integrate inequality constraints during the assimilation process. This new scheme represents a major step toward the assimilation of a variety of satellite data, such as sea-ice thickness and ocean colour data, into coupled models.

  17. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  18. Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Austin, Amy T; Yahdjian, Laura; Stark, John M; Belnap, Jayne; Porporato, Amilcare; Norton, Urszula; Ravetta, Damián A; Schaeffer, Sean M

    2004-10-01

    The episodic nature of water availability in arid and semiarid ecosystems has significant consequences on belowground carbon and nutrient cycling. Pulsed water events directly control belowground processes through soil wet-dry cycles. Rapid soil microbial response to incident moisture availability often results in almost instantaneous C and N mineralization, followed by shifts in C/N of microbially available substrate, and an offset in the balance between nutrient immobilization and mineralization. Nitrogen inputs from biological soil crusts are also highly sensitive to pulsed rain events, and nitrogen losses, particularly gaseous losses due to denitrification and nitrate leaching, are tightly linked to pulses of water availability. The magnitude of the effect of water pulses on carbon and nutrient pools, however, depends on the distribution of resource availability and soil organisms, both of which are strongly affected by the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation cover, topographic position and soil texture. The 'inverse texture hypothesis' for net primary production in water-limited ecosystems suggests that coarse-textured soils have higher NPP than fine-textured soils in very arid zones due to reduced evaporative losses, while NPP is greater in fine-textured soils in higher rainfall ecosystems due to increased water-holding capacity. With respect to belowground processes, fine-textured soils tend to have higher water-holding capacity and labile C and N pools than coarse-textured soils, and often show a much greater flush of N mineralization. The result of the interaction of texture and pulsed rainfall events suggests a corollary hypothesis for nutrient turnover in arid and semiarid ecosystems with a linear increase of N mineralization in coarse-textured soils, but a saturating response for fine-textured soils due to the importance of soil C and N pools. Seasonal distribution of water pulses can lead to the accumulation of mineral N in the dry season

  19. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    PubMed

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided. PMID:22562463

  20. Elevated Preattentive Affective Processing in Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder: A Preliminary fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.; Hooley, Jill M.; Dahlgren, Mary K.; Gönenc, Atilla; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.; Gruber, Staci A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emotion dysregulation is central to the clinical conceptualization of borderline personality disorder (BPD), with individuals often displaying instability in mood and intense feelings of negative affect. Although existing data suggest important neural and behavioral differences in the emotion processing of individuals with BPD, studies thus far have only explored reactions to overt emotional information. Therefore, it is unclear if BPD-related emotional hypersensitivity extends to stimuli presented below the level of conscious awareness (preattentively). Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure neural responses to happy, angry, fearful, and neutral faces presented preattentively, using a backward masked affect paradigm. Given their tendency toward emotional hyperreactivity and altered amygdala and frontal activation, we hypothesized that individuals with BPD would demonstrate a distinct pattern of fMRI responses relative to those without BPD during the viewing of masked affective versus neutral faces in specific regions of interests (ROIs). Results: Results indicated that individuals with BPD demonstrated increases in frontal, cingulate, and amygdalar activation represented by number of voxels activated and demonstrated a different pattern of activity within the ROIs relative to those without BPD while viewing masked affective versus neutral faces. Conclusion: These findings suggest that in addition to the previously documented heightened responses to overt displays of emotion, individuals with BPD also demonstrate differential responses to positive and negative emotions, early in the processing stream, even before conscious awareness. PMID:26696932

  1. Positive Affect Processing and Joint Attention in Infants at High Risk for Autism: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Key, Alexandra P; Ibanez, Lisa V; Henderson, Heather A; Warren, Zachary; Messinger, Daniel S; Stone, Wendy L

    2015-12-01

    Few behavioral indices of risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are present before 12 months, and potential biomarkers remain largely unexamined. This prospective study of infant siblings of children with ASD (n = 16) and low-risk comparison infants (n = 15) examined group differences in event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing processing of facial positive affect (N290/P400, Nc) at 9 months and their relation to joint attention at 15 months. Group differences were most pronounced for subtle facial expressions, in that the low-risk group exhibited relatively longer processing (P400 latency) and greater attention resource allocation (Nc amplitude). Exploratory analyses found associations between ERP responses and later joint attention, suggesting that attention to positive affect cues may support the development of other social competencies. PMID:25056131

  2. Advancing the Assessment of Personality Pathology With the Cognitive-Affective Processing System.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Nelson, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    The Cognitive-Affective Processing System (CAPS) is a dynamic and expansive model of personality proposed by Mischel and Shoda (1995) that incorporates dispositional and processing frameworks by considering the interaction of the individual and the situation, and the patterns of variation that result. These patterns of cognition, affect, and behavior are generally defined through the use of if … then statements, and provide a rich understanding of the individual across varying levels of assessment. In this article, we describe the CAPS model and articulate ways in which it can be applied to conceptualizing and assessing personality pathology. We suggest that the CAPS model is an ideal framework that integrates a number of current theories of personality pathology, and simultaneously overcomes a number of limits that have been empirically identified in the past. PMID:26214351

  3. Integrative Processing of Touch and Affect in Social Perception: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J H; Salone, Anatolia; Martinotti, Giovanni; Carlucci, Leonardo; Mantini, Dante; Perrucci, Mauro G; Saggino, Aristide; Romani, Gian Luca; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Northoff, Georg; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Social perception commonly employs multiple sources of information. The present study aimed at investigating the integrative processing of affective social signals. Task-related and task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 26 healthy adult participants during a social perception task concerning dynamic visual stimuli simultaneously depicting facial expressions of emotion and tactile sensations that could be either congruent or incongruent. Confounding effects due to affective valence, inhibitory top-down influences, cross-modal integration, and conflict processing were minimized. The results showed that the perception of congruent, compared to incongruent stimuli, elicited enhanced neural activity in a set of brain regions including left amygdala, bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and left superior parietal cortex. These congruency effects did not differ as a function of emotion or sensation. A complementary task-related functional interaction analysis preliminarily suggested that amygdala activity depended on previous processing stages in fusiform gyrus and PCC. The findings provide support for the integrative processing of social information about others' feelings from manifold bodily sources (sensory-affective information) in amygdala and PCC. Given that the congruent stimuli were also judged as being more self-related and more familiar in terms of personal experience in an independent sample of participants, we speculate that such integrative processing might be mediated by the linking of external stimuli with self-experience. Finally, the prediction of task-related responses in amygdala by intrinsic functional connectivity between amygdala and PCC during a task-free state implies a neuro-functional basis for an individual predisposition for the integrative processing of social stimulus content. PMID:27242474

  4. Integrative Processing of Touch and Affect in Social Perception: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H.; Salone, Anatolia; Martinotti, Giovanni; Carlucci, Leonardo; Mantini, Dante; Perrucci, Mauro G.; Saggino, Aristide; Romani, Gian Luca; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Northoff, Georg; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Social perception commonly employs multiple sources of information. The present study aimed at investigating the integrative processing of affective social signals. Task-related and task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 26 healthy adult participants during a social perception task concerning dynamic visual stimuli simultaneously depicting facial expressions of emotion and tactile sensations that could be either congruent or incongruent. Confounding effects due to affective valence, inhibitory top–down influences, cross-modal integration, and conflict processing were minimized. The results showed that the perception of congruent, compared to incongruent stimuli, elicited enhanced neural activity in a set of brain regions including left amygdala, bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and left superior parietal cortex. These congruency effects did not differ as a function of emotion or sensation. A complementary task-related functional interaction analysis preliminarily suggested that amygdala activity depended on previous processing stages in fusiform gyrus and PCC. The findings provide support for the integrative processing of social information about others’ feelings from manifold bodily sources (sensory-affective information) in amygdala and PCC. Given that the congruent stimuli were also judged as being more self-related and more familiar in terms of personal experience in an independent sample of participants, we speculate that such integrative processing might be mediated by the linking of external stimuli with self-experience. Finally, the prediction of task-related responses in amygdala by intrinsic functional connectivity between amygdala and PCC during a task-free state implies a neuro-functional basis for an individual predisposition for the integrative processing of social stimulus content. PMID:27242474

  5. The ANK3 gene and facial affect processing: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wan; Zhang, Qiumei; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Zhifang; Chen, Xiongying; Gu, Huang; Zhai, Jinguo; Chen, Min; Du, Boqi; Deng, Xiaoxiang; Ji, Feng; Wang, Chuanyue; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Li, Dawei; Wu, Hongjie; Dong, Qi; Luo, Yuejia; Li, Jun; Chen, Chuansheng

    2016-09-01

    ANK3 is one of the most promising candidate genes for bipolar disorder (BD). A polymorphism (rs10994336) within the ANK3 gene has been associated with BD in at least three genome-wide association studies of BD [McGuffin et al., 2003; Kieseppä, 2004; Edvardsen et al., 2008]. Because facial affect processing is disrupted in patients with BD, the current study aimed to explore whether the BD risk alleles are associated with the N170, an early event-related potential (ERP) component related to facial affect processing. We collected data from two independent samples of healthy individuals (Ns = 83 and 82, respectively) to test the association between rs10994336 and an early event-related potential (ERP) component (N170) that is sensitive to facial affect processing. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance in both samples consistently revealed significant main effects of rs10994336 genotype (Sample I: F (1, 72) = 7.24, P = 0.009; Sample II: F (1, 69) = 11.81, P = 0.001), but no significant interaction of genotype × electrodes (Ps > 0.05) or genotype × emotional conditions (Ps > 0.05). These results suggested that rs10994336 was linked to early ERP component reflecting facial structural encoding during facial affect processing. These results shed new light on the brain mechanism of this risk SNP and associated disorders such as BD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177275

  6. Intrinsic colony conditions affect the provisioning and oviposition process in the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Morais, M M; Nascimento, F S; Bego, L R

    2009-01-01

    The cell provisioning and oviposition process (POP) is a unique characteristic of stingless bees (Meliponini), in which coordinated interactions between workers and queen regulate the filling of brood cells with larval resources and subsequent egg laying. Environmental conditions seem to regulate reproduction in stingless bees; however, little is known about how the amount of food affects quantitative sequences of the process. We examined intrinsic variables by comparing three colonies in distinct conditions (strong, intermediate and weak state). We predicted that some of these variables are correlated with temporal events of POP in Melipona scutellaris colonies. The results demonstrated that the strong colony had shorter periods of POP. PMID:19554772

  7. Using Bayesian Nonparametric Hidden Semi-Markov Models to Disentangle Affect Processes during Marital Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, William A.; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Sequential affect dynamics generated during the interaction of intimate dyads, such as married couples, are associated with a cascade of effects—some good and some bad—on each partner, close family members, and other social contacts. Although the effects are well documented, the probabilistic structures associated with micro-social processes connected to the varied outcomes remain enigmatic. Using extant data we developed a method of classifying and subsequently generating couple dynamics using a Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Hidden semi-Markov Model (HDP-HSMM). Our findings indicate that several key aspects of existing models of marital interaction are inadequate: affect state emissions and their durations, along with the expected variability differences between distressed and nondistressed couples are present but highly nuanced; and most surprisingly, heterogeneity among highly satisfied couples necessitate that they be divided into subgroups. We review how this unsupervised learning technique generates plausible dyadic sequences that are sensitive to relationship quality and provide a natural mechanism for computational models of behavioral and affective micro-social processes. PMID:27187319

  8. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  9. Attentional and affective processing of sexual stimuli in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Marieke; van Leeuwen, Matthijs; Janssen, Erick; Newhouse, Sarah K; Heiman, Julia R; Laan, Ellen

    2012-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most common sexual problem in women. From an incentive motivation perspective, HSDD may be the result of a weak association between sexual stimuli and rewarding experiences. As a consequence, these stimuli may either lose or fail to acquire a positive meaning, resulting in a limited number of incentives that have the capacity to elicit a sexual response. According to current information processing models of sexual arousal, sexual stimuli automatically activate meanings and if these are not predominantly positive, processes relevant to the activation of sexual arousal and desire may be interrupted. Premenopausal U.S. and Dutch women with acquired HSDD (n = 42) and a control group of sexually functional women (n = 42) completed a single target Implicit Association Task and a Picture Association Task assessing automatic affective associations with sexual stimuli and a dot detection task measuring attentional capture by sexual stimuli. Results showed that women with acquired HSDD displayed less positive (but not more negative) automatic associations with sexual stimuli than sexually functional women. The same pattern was found for self-reported affective sex-related associations. Participants were slower to detect targets in the dot detection task that replaced sexual images, irrespective of sexual function status. As such, the findings point to the relevance of affective processing of sexual stimuli in women with HSDD, and imply that the treatment of HSDD might benefit from a stronger emphasis on the strengthening of the association between sexual stimuli and positive meaning and sexual reward. PMID:21892693

  10. Using Bayesian Nonparametric Hidden Semi-Markov Models to Disentangle Affect Processes during Marital Interaction.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William A; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Sequential affect dynamics generated during the interaction of intimate dyads, such as married couples, are associated with a cascade of effects-some good and some bad-on each partner, close family members, and other social contacts. Although the effects are well documented, the probabilistic structures associated with micro-social processes connected to the varied outcomes remain enigmatic. Using extant data we developed a method of classifying and subsequently generating couple dynamics using a Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Hidden semi-Markov Model (HDP-HSMM). Our findings indicate that several key aspects of existing models of marital interaction are inadequate: affect state emissions and their durations, along with the expected variability differences between distressed and nondistressed couples are present but highly nuanced; and most surprisingly, heterogeneity among highly satisfied couples necessitate that they be divided into subgroups. We review how this unsupervised learning technique generates plausible dyadic sequences that are sensitive to relationship quality and provide a natural mechanism for computational models of behavioral and affective micro-social processes. PMID:27187319

  11. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces. Our results

  12. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale laboratory microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces

  13. Biogeochemical effects and remote sensing characteristics of gold deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yueliang; Xu, Ruisong

    1998-08-01

    In vegetation district, as a result of that the plant absorb Au and associated elements of locks and soils, the contents of Au and associated elements, pigment, water, surface temperature, and cells structure in leaves occur variations, even the plant cause abnormality of biogeochemical effect, thus it appear abnormality in the spectral information of TM image. This paper takes the Hetai gold deposit in Guangdong as researh target. The results proved that Au content of leaves in the gold deposit is as high as the background value, Au content in chlorophyll of leaves is 2 - 8 times higher than that, the contents of the chlorophyll a and b as well as the carotenoid are also higher than those of the control area, the water content and surface temperature of leaves are lower than the background value, the cells structure in leaves are deformed and broken, the spectral reflectance of the leave is 5% - 30% higher than that in the reference areas, the spectral wave shape is more shifted toward the short wavelength. According to these feature and difference, the remote sensing image processing technologies are utilized to extract the abnormal feature of biogeochemical effect, and enclose the remote sensing abnormal areas of mineral; Gold exploration was thus conducted in the surrounding areas of the Hetai bold deposits in Guangdong and two remote sensing abnormal areas of gold mineralization were rapidly evaluated in this way. The research proved that the remote sensing technology is a rapid, accurate and economical method of extracting abnormal information about the biogeochemical effect in vegetation and applying it to the mineral exploration practice, and this constitutes a new way in exploring hidden ore deposits in vegetation regions.

  14. TMS affects moral judgment, showing the role of DLPFC and TPJ in cognitive and emotional processing

    PubMed Central

    Jeurissen, Danique; Sack, Alexander T.; Roebroeck, Alard; Russ, Brian E.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making involves a complex interplay of emotional responses and reasoning processes. In this study, we use TMS to explore the neurobiological substrates of moral decisions in humans. To examining the effects of TMS on the outcome of a moral-decision, we compare the decision outcome of moral-personal and moral-impersonal dilemmas to each other and examine the differential effects of applying TMS over the right DLPFC or right TPJ. In this comparison, we find that the TMS-induced disruption of the DLPFC during the decision process, affects the outcome of the moral-personal judgment, while TMS-induced disruption of TPJ affects only moral-impersonal conditions. In other words, we find a double-dissociation between DLPFC and TPJ in the outcome of a moral decision. Furthermore, we find that TMS-induced disruption of the DLPFC during non-moral, moral-impersonal, and moral-personal decisions lead to lower ratings of regret about the decision. Our results are in line with the dual-process theory and suggest a role for both the emotional response and cognitive reasoning process in moral judgment. Both the emotional and cognitive processes were shown to be involved in the decision outcome. PMID:24592204

  15. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  16. Seasonal Variations of Biogeochemical Characteristics in Predominantly Anaerobic Groundwater From a Riverine Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, D.; Ha, K.; Kim, K.; Ko, K.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated for groundwater from six multi-level wells (up to 30 m deep) in a riverine alluvial aquifer with intense agricultural activities of rice, barley and vegetable cultivation during two sampling campaigns in rainy summer (July) and dry spring (March) season to identify seasonal variation in biogeochemical processes in the aquifer. The alluvial aquifer is located in flooldplains of Mangyeong River, western part of South Korea near the city of Jeonju. pH, concentrations of Na, Cl, Ca, F have little difference between the two sampling periods. Electrical conductivity (EC) and concentrations of HCO3, Mg, SO4 slightly increased as a whole from rainy season to dry season. Dissolved concentrations of major ions in river water increased by more than three fold during the seasons. These feature indicates that the groundwater system is relatively stable and less affected by the river in hydrogeochemical aspects. Dissolve oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than 1 mg/L for most of the wells whereas two wells turned to aerobic conditions in dry season which can be attributed to removal of stagnant water in the paddy fields. NO3 concentrations decreased significantly in dry season at most well points near the paddy fields. This indicates that denitrification is dominant over nitrate supply by infiltrating water from the land surface which is likely to be significantly decreased after harvesting of rice during the dry season. However, NO3 increased in upper zones (<10 m) in two wells near the barley and vegetable fields, which suggest continued nitrate supply from the crop fields to the upper part of the aquifer during the season. Fe concentrations have relatively small variations in most of wells for two sampling periods. However, from rainy season to dry season, Fe concentrations significantly increased more than two fold in two wells whereas NO3 concentration decreased below detection limit from 2 to 8 mg/L. The increase of Fe

  17. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  18. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  19. Isotopes and Isoscapes: Tools for Testing Hydrological and Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.

    2014-12-01

    In the 21st century, the importance of high quality water resources cannot be overstated. New approaches are needed to pinpoint sources and ages of multiple contaminants, and to better understand critical hydrologic systems. Stable isotopic compositions of materials often show strong spatial and temporal distributions related to combinations of sources and processes. Isoscapes (spatial and/or temporal maps) of riverine and atmospheric data are increasingly being found to be effective means for assessing the effects of different land uses and biogeochemical processes on water resources. Hence, isotopes and isoscapes are a potentially powerful component of monitoring and assessment programs that are aimed at quantifying and mitigating alterations to environments from human activities (anthropogenic disturbances). Locations exhibiting unusually high rates of biogeochemical cycling or elevated pollution levels usually have distinctive isotopic compositions that are suggestive or diagnostic of specific reactions and pollution sources. Isotopes can be more effective at identifying hot spots and hot moments than concentrations alone because isotopic ratios may change even when concentrations do not. Hence, isotopes provide valuable additions to standard chemical and hydrological mass balance methods. This presentation will examine how the field of isotope hydrology has evolved over my 40+ year career as an isotope geochemist, highlight several exciting recent research thrusts, and share some thoughts on future research directions.

  20. Converting copepod vital rates into units appropriate for biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangoulis, C.; Carlotti, F.; Eisenhauer, L.; Zervoudaki, S.

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of units is one of the difficulties of model parameterisation. Conversion errors may result not only from incorrect choices of conversion factors, but also from incorrect choices of the value itself. In biogeochemical models, mesozooplankton, is the highest trophic level of the food web, and it is very often reduced to a single variable generally considered as a representation of the copepod community, the dominant taxa in mesozooplankton. If this simplifies the information to be obtained for the stock, a correct parameterisation of the processes related to the copepod community is already a tricky task due to the wide range of copepod species, sizes, stages and behaviour. The goal of this paper is to improve the communication between experimentalists and modellers by giving indications for the conversion of copepod vital rates from experimental to biogeochemical model units. This includes the choice of values, conversion factors, terminology distinction and the scale transfer. To begin with, we briefly address the common problem of the conversion of a rate per individual to a rate per mass. Then, we focus on unit conversion problems for each specific rate and give recommendations. Finally, we discuss the problem of scale transfer between the level of organisation at which the rate value is measured at characteristic time and space-scales versus the level of representation of the corresponding process in the model, with its different characteristic time and space-scales .

  1. Hyporheic transport and biogeochemical reactions in pool-riffle systems under varying ambient groundwater flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool-riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O2 and NO3 concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O2 and NO3. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream-groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems.

  2. Early neural activation during facial affect processing in adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder☆

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Rachel C.; Pang, Elizabeth W.; Cassel, Daniel; Brian, Jessica A.; Smith, Mary Lou; Taylor, Margot J.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired social interaction is one of the hallmarks of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Emotional faces are arguably the most critical visual social stimuli and the ability to perceive, recognize, and interpret emotions is central to social interaction and communication, and subsequently healthy social development. However, our understanding of the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying emotional face processing in adolescents with ASD is limited. We recruited 48 adolescents, 24 with high functioning ASD and 24 typically developing controls. Participants completed an implicit emotional face processing task in the MEG. We examined spatiotemporal differences in neural activation between the groups during implicit angry and happy face processing. While there were no differences in response latencies between groups across emotions, adolescents with ASD had lower accuracy on the implicit emotional face processing task when the trials included angry faces. MEG data showed atypical neural activity in adolescents with ASD during angry and happy face processing, which included atypical activity in the insula, anterior and posterior cingulate and temporal and orbitofrontal regions. Our findings demonstrate differences in neural activity during happy and angry face processing between adolescents with and without ASD. These differences in activation in social cognitive regions may index the difficulties in face processing and in comprehension of social reward and punishment in the ASD group. Thus, our results suggest that atypical neural activation contributes to impaired affect processing, and thus social cognition, in adolescents with ASD. PMID:25610782

  3. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas. PMID:25469984

  4. The Biogeochemical Role of Baleen Whales and Krill in Southern Ocean Nutrient Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R.; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas. PMID:25469984

  5. Molecular biogeochemical provinces in the Atlantic Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Bracher, A.; Cooper, W.; Frka, S.; Gašparović, B.; Gonsior, M.; Hertkorn, N.; Jaffe, R.; Jenkins, A.; Kuss, J.; Lara, R. J.; Lucio, M.; McCallister, S. L.; Neogi, S. B.; Pohl, C.; Roettgers, R.; Rohardt, G.; Schmitt, B. B.; Stuart, A.; Theis, A.; Ying, W.; Witt, M.; Xie, Z.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, Z. Y.; Kattner, G.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most important aspects to understand marine organic carbon fluxes is to resolve the molecular mechanisms which convert fresh, labile biomolecules into semi-labile and refractory dissolved and particulate organic compounds in the ocean. In this interdisciplinary project, which was performed on a cruise with RV Polarstern, we carried out a detailed molecular characterisation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on a North-South transect in the Atlantic surface ocean in order to relate the data to different biological, climatic, oceanographic, and meteorological regimes as well as to terrestrial input from riverine and atmospheric sources. Our goal was to achieve a high resolution data set for the biogeochemical characterisation of the sources and reactivity of DOM. We applied ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), nutrient, trace element, amino acid, and lipid analyses and other biogeochemical measurements for 220 samples from the upper water column (0-200m) and eight deep profiles. Various spectroscopic techniques were applied continuously in a constant sample water flow supplied by a fish system and the moon pool. Radiocarbon dating enabled assessing DOC residence time. Bacterial abundance and production provided a metabolic context for the DOM characterization work and pCO2 concentrations. Combining molecular organic techniques and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) established an important link between organic and inorganic biogeochemical studies. Multivariate statistics, primarily based on FT-ICR-MS data for 220 samples, allowed identifying geographical clusters which matched ecological provinces proposed previously by Longhurst (2007). Our study demonstrated that marine DOM carries molecular information reflecting the “history” of ocean water masses. This information can be used to define molecular biogeochemical provinces and to improve our understanding of element fluxes in

  6. Study of major factors to affect photoresist profile on developable bottom anti-reflective coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hyo Jung; Ju, Dong Kyu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jaehyun

    2011-04-01

    As critical dimensions continue to shrink in lithography, new materials will be needed to meet the new demands imposed by this shrinkage. Recently, there are needs for novel materials with various substrates and immersing process, including double patterning process, a high resolution implant process, and so on. Among such materials, Developable Bottom Anti-reflective Coating material (DBARC) is a good candidate for high resolution implant application as well as double patterning. DBARC should have reflectivity control function as an ordinary BARC, as well as an appropriate solubility in TMAH-based conventional developer after exposure and bake process. The most distinguished advantage of DBARC is to skip BARC etch process that is required in normal BARC process. In spite of this advantage, the photoresist profile on DBARC could be influenced by components and process conditions of DBARC. Several groups have tried to solve this issue to implement DBARC to new process. We have studied material-related factors affecting photoresist profiles, such as a polymer, photo-acid generators (PAGs), and additives. And we explored the effect of process condition for photoresist and DBARC. In case of polymer, we studied the effect of dissolution rate in developer and crosslinking functionality. For PAGs and additives, the effect of acid diffusivity and cross-linking degree according to their bulkiness were examined. We also evaluated coated film stability in a photoresist solvent after BARC bake process and compared lithographic performance of various DBARC formulations. In addition, the effect of photoresist profile with bake condition of photoresist and DBARC were investigated. In this paper, we will demonstrate the most influential factors of DBARC to photoresist profile and suggest the optimum formulation and process condition for DBARC application.

  7. Application of a solar UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to oil sands process-affected water remediation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Li, Chao; Belosevic, Miodrag; Bolton, James R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2014-08-19

    The solar UV/chlorine process has emerged as a novel advanced oxidation process for industrial and municipal wastewaters. Currently, its practical application to oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) remediation has been studied to treat fresh OSPW retained in large tailings ponds, which can cause significant adverse environmental impacts on ground and surface waters in Northern Alberta, Canada. Degradation of naphthenic acids (NAs) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW was investigated. In a laboratory-scale UV/chlorine treatment, the NAs degradation was clearly structure-dependent and hydroxyl radical-based. In terms of the NAs degradation rate, the raw OSPW (pH ∼ 8.3) rates were higher than those at an alkaline condition (pH = 10). Under actual sunlight, direct solar photolysis partially degraded fluorophore organic compounds, as indicated by the qualitative synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) of the OSPW, but did not impact NAs degradation. The solar/chlorine process effectively removed NAs (75-84% removal) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW in the presence of 200 or 300 mg L(-1) OCl(-). The acute toxicity of OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was reduced after the solar/chlorine treatment. However, the OSPW toxicity toward goldfish primary kidney macrophages after solar/chlorine treatment showed no obvious toxicity reduction versus that of untreated OSPW, which warrants further study for process optimization. PMID:25051215

  8. The power of emotional valence-from cognitive to affective processes in reading.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Ulrike; Bohrn, Isabel C; Lubrich, Oliver; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of stories requires the reader to imagine the cognitive and affective states of the characters. The content of many stories is unpleasant, as they often deal with conflict, disturbance or crisis. Nevertheless, unpleasant stories can be liked and enjoyed. In this fMRI study, we used a parametric approach to examine (1) the capacity of increasing negative valence of story contents to activate the mentalizing network (cognitive and affective theory of mind, ToM), and (2) the neural substrate of liking negatively valenced narratives. A set of 80 short narratives was compiled, ranging from neutral to negative emotional valence. For each story mean rating values on valence and liking were obtained from a group of 32 participants in a prestudy, and later included as parametric regressors in the fMRI analysis. Another group of 24 participants passively read the narratives in a three Tesla MRI scanner. Results revealed a stronger engagement of affective ToM-related brain areas with increasingly negative story valence. Stories that were unpleasant, but simultaneously liked, engaged the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which might reflect the moral exploration of the story content. Further analysis showed that the more the mPFC becomes engaged during the reading of negatively valenced stories, the more coactivation can be observed in other brain areas related to the neural processing of affective ToM and empathy. PMID:22754519

  9. The power of emotional valence—from cognitive to affective processes in reading

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Ulrike; Bohrn, Isabel C.; Lubrich, Oliver; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of stories requires the reader to imagine the cognitive and affective states of the characters. The content of many stories is unpleasant, as they often deal with conflict, disturbance or crisis. Nevertheless, unpleasant stories can be liked and enjoyed. In this fMRI study, we used a parametric approach to examine (1) the capacity of increasing negative valence of story contents to activate the mentalizing network (cognitive and affective theory of mind, ToM), and (2) the neural substrate of liking negatively valenced narratives. A set of 80 short narratives was compiled, ranging from neutral to negative emotional valence. For each story mean rating values on valence and liking were obtained from a group of 32 participants in a prestudy, and later included as parametric regressors in the fMRI analysis. Another group of 24 participants passively read the narratives in a three Tesla MRI scanner. Results revealed a stronger engagement of affective ToM-related brain areas with increasingly negative story valence. Stories that were unpleasant, but simultaneously liked, engaged the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which might reflect the moral exploration of the story content. Further analysis showed that the more the mPFC becomes engaged during the reading of negatively valenced stories, the more coactivation can be observed in other brain areas related to the neural processing of affective ToM and empathy. PMID:22754519

  10. Positive affect and health-related neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, and inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Wardle, Jane; Marmot, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Negative affective states such as depression are associated with premature mortality and increased risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and disability. It has been suggested that positive affective states are protective, but the pathways through which such effects might be mediated are poorly understood. Here we show that positive affect in middle-aged men and women is associated with reduced neuroendocrine, inflammatory, and cardiovascular activity. Positive affect was assessed by aggregating momentary experience samples of happiness over a working day and was inversely related to cortisol output over the day, independently of age, gender, socioeconomic position, body mass, and smoking. Similar patterns were observed on a leisure day. Happiness was also inversely related to heart rate assessed by using ambulatory monitoring methods over the day. Participants underwent mental stress testing in the laboratory, where plasma fibrinogen stress responses were smaller in happier individuals. These effects were independent of psychological distress, supporting the notion that positive well-being is directly related to health-relevant biological processes. PMID:15840727

  11. The mental health of children affected by armed conflict: Protective processes and pathways to resilience

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Khan, Kashif Tanveer

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of resilience in the context of children affected by armed conflict. Resilience has been frequently viewed as a unique quality of certain ‘invulnerable’ children. In contrast, this paper argues that a number of protective processes contribute to resilient mental health outcomes in children when considered through the lens of the child's social ecology. While available research has made important contributions to understanding risk factors for negative mental health consequences of war-related violence and loss, the focus on trauma alone has resulted in inadequate attention to factors associated with resilient mental health outcomes. This paper presents key studies in the literature that address the interplay between risk and protective processes in the mental health of war-affected children from an ecological, developmental perspective. It suggests that further research on war-affected children should pay particular attention to coping and meaning making at the individual level; the role of attachment relationships, caregiver health, resources and connection in the family, and social support available in peer and extended social networks. Cultural and community influences such as attitudes towards mental health and healing as well as the meaning given to the experience of war itself are also important aspects of the larger social ecology. PMID:18569183

  12. Application of ultrasound processed images in space: Quanitative assessment of diffuse affectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Poch, A.; Bru, C.; Nicolau, C.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffuse affectations in the liver using texture image processing techniques. Ultrasound diagnose equipments are the election of choice to be used in space environments as they are free from hazardous effects on health. However, due to the need for highly trained radiologists to assess the images, this imaging method is mainly applied on focal lesions rather than on non-focal ones. We have conducted a clinical study on 72 patients with different degrees of chronic hepatopaties and a group of control of 18 individuals. All subjects' clinical reports and results of biopsies were compared to the degree of affectation calculated by our computer system , thus validating the method. Full statistical results are given in the present paper showing a good correlation (r=0.61) between pathologist's report and analysis of the heterogenicity of the processed images from the liver. This computer system to analyze diffuse affectations may be used in-situ or via telemedicine to the ground.

  13. The mental health of children affected by armed conflict: protective processes and pathways to resilience.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Khan, Kashif Tanveer

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the concept of resilience in the context of children affected by armed conflict. Resilience has been frequently viewed as a unique quality of certain 'invulnerable' children. In contrast, this paper argues that a number of protective processes contribute to resilient mental health outcomes in children when considered through the lens of the child's social ecology. While available research has made important contributions to understanding risk factors for negative mental health consequences of war-related violence and loss, the focus on trauma alone has resulted in inadequate attention to factors associated with resilient mental health outcomes. This paper presents key studies in the literature that address the interplay between risk and protective processes in the mental health of war-affected children from an ecological, developmental perspective. It suggests that further research on war-affected children should pay particular attention to coping and meaning making at the individual level; the role of attachment relationships, caregiver health, resources and connection in the family, and social support available in peer and extended social networks. Cultural and community influences such as attitudes towards mental health and healing as well as the meaning given to the experience of war itself are also important aspects of the larger social ecology. PMID:18569183