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Sample records for affect cancer cell

  1. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment. PMID:26498911

  2. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3' UTR - core protein genes - envelope protein genes - RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene - 5' UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5' end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a given gene

  3. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  4. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  5. Transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affects cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar Ali, Muhammad; Younis, Shady; Wallerman, Ola; Gupta, Rajesh; Andersson, Leif; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ZBED6 (zinc finger, BED-type containing 6) is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation, and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate in RKO cells but reduced growth in HCT116 cells. This striking difference was reflected in the transcriptome analyses, which revealed enrichment of cell-cycle–related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines, but the direction of change often differed between the cell lines. ChIP sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes up-regulated in ZBED6-knockout clones, consistent with the view that ZBED6 modulates gene expression primarily by repressing transcription. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets, and their down-regulation by ZBED6 was validated experimentally. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-β, EGF receptor, or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. The results of this study show that the effect of ZBED6 on tumor development depends on the genetic background and the transcriptional state of its target genes. PMID:26056301

  6. Mechanistic adaptability of cancer cells strongly affects anti-migratory drug efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Lim, Chwee Teck; Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis involves the dissemination of cancer cells from the primary tumour site and is responsible for the majority of solid tumour-related mortality. Screening of anti-metastasis drugs often includes functional assays that examine cancer cell invasion inside a three-dimensional hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we built a mechanically tuneable collagen hydrogel model to recapitulate cancer spreading into heterogeneous tumour stroma and monitored the three-dimensional invasion of highly malignant breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. Migration assays were carried out in the presence and the absence of drugs affecting four typical molecular mechanisms involved in cell migration, as well as under five ECMs with different biophysical properties. Strikingly, the effects of the drugs were observed to vary strongly with matrix mechanics and microarchitecture, despite the little dependence of the inherent cancer cell migration on the ECM condition. Specifically, cytoskeletal contractility-targeting drugs reduced migration speed in sparse gels, whereas migration in dense gels was retarded effectively by inhibiting proteolysis. The results corroborate the ability of cancer cells to switch their multiple invasion mechanisms depending on ECM condition, thus suggesting the importance of factoring in the biophysical properties of the ECM in anti-metastasis drug screenings. PMID:25100319

  7. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  8. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  9. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27028823

  10. Inhibition of the mevalonate pathway affects epigenetic regulation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karlic, Heidrun; Thaler, Roman; Gerner, Christopher; Grunt, Thomas; Proestling, Katharina; Haider, Florian; Varga, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway provides metabolites for post-translational modifications such as farnesylation, which are critical for the activity of RAS downstream signaling. Subsequently occurring regulatory processes can induce an aberrant stimulation of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) as well as changes in histone deacetylases (HDACs) and microRNAs in many cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway are increasingly recognized as anticancer drugs. Extensive evidence indicates an intense cross-talk between signaling pathways, which affect growth, differentiation, and apoptosis either directly or indirectly via epigenetic mechanisms. Herein, we show data obtained by novel transcriptomic and corresponding methylomic or proteomic analyses from cell lines treated with pharmacologic doses of respective inhibitors (i.e., simvastatin, ibandronate). Metabolic pathways and their epigenetic consequences appear to be affected by a changed concentration of NADPH. Moreover, since the mevalonate metabolism is part of a signaling network, including vitamin D metabolism or fatty acid synthesis, the epigenetic activity of associated pathways is also presented. This emphasizes the far-reaching epigenetic impact of metabolic therapies on cancer cells and provides some explanation for clinical observations, which indicate the anticancer activity of statins and bisphosphonates. PMID:25978957

  11. Hyaluronic acid hydrogel stiffness and oxygen tension affect cancer cell fate and endothelial sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-I; Abaci, Hasan E.; Krupsi, Yoni; Weng, Lien-Chun; Burdick, Jason A.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture models may recapitulate aspects of the tumorigenic microenvironment in vivo, enabling the study of cancer progression in vitro. Both hypoxia and matrix stiffness are known to regulate tumor growth. Using a modular culture system employing an acrylated hyaluronic acid (AHA) hydrogel, three hydrogel matrices with distinctive degrees of viscoelasticity — soft (78±16 Pa), medium (309± 57 Pa), and stiff (596± 73 Pa) — were generated using the same concentration of adhesion ligands. Oxygen levels within the hydrogel in atmospheric (21 %), hypoxic (5 %), and severely hypoxic (1 %) conditions were assessed with a mathematical model. HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, encapsulated within the AHA hydrogels in high densities, generated nonuniform oxygen distributions, while lower cell densities resulted in more uniform oxygen distributions in the atmospheric and hypoxic environments. When we examined how varying viscoelasticity in atmospheric and hypoxic environments affects cell cycles and the expression of BNIP3 and BNIP3L (autophagy and apoptosis genes), and GLUT-1 (a glucose transport gene), we observed that HT1080 cells in 3D hydrogel adapted better to hypoxic conditions than those in a Petri dish, with no obvious correlation to matrix viscoelasticity, by recovering rapidly from possible autophagy/apoptotic events and alternating metabolism mechanisms. Further, we examined how HT1080 cells cultured in varying viscoelasticity and oxygen tension conditions affected endothelial sprouting and invasion. We observed that increased matrix stiffness reduced endothelial sprouting and invasion in atmospheric conditions; however, we observed increased endothelial sprouting and invasion under hypoxia at all levels of matrix stiffness with the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoeitin-1 (ANG-1). Overall, HT1080 cells encapsulated in the AHA hydrogels under hypoxic stress recovered better from apoptosis and

  12. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  13. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  14. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:26530987

  15. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans May Promote or Inhibit Cancer Progression by Interacting with Integrins and Affecting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Mariana A.; Teixeira, Felipe C. O. B.; Fontes, Miguel; Arêas, Ana Lúcia; Leal, Marcelo G.; Pavão, Mauro S. G.; Stelling, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic disease is one of the main consequences of tumor progression, being responsible for most cancer-related deaths worldwide. This review intends to present and discuss data on the relationship between integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in health and cancer progression. Integrins are a family of cell surface transmembrane receptors, responsible for cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. Integrins' main functions include cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are cell surface molecules that play important roles as cell receptors, cofactors, and overall direct or indirect contributors to cell organization. Both molecules can act in conjunction to modulate cell behavior and affect malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the different contexts in which various integrins, such as α5, αV, β1, and β3, interact with HSPGs species, such as syndecans and perlecans, affecting tissue homeostasis. PMID:26558271

  16. The inhibition of aromatase alters the mechanical and rheological properties of non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines affecting cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, E; Siatis, K E; Metsiou, D; Kritikou, I; Papachristou, D J; Kalofonou, M; Koutras, A; Athanassiou, G; Kalofonos, H P

    2015-02-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are key aspects of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). During migration, cells undergo mechanical alterations. The mechanical phenotype of breast cancer cells is correlated with aromatase gene expression. We have previously shown that targeting aromatase is a promising strategy for NSCLC. The aim of this study was to examine morphological and mechanical changes of NSCLC cells, upon treatment with aromatase inhibitor and correlate their ability to migrate and invade. In vitro experiments were performed using H23 and A549 NSCLC cell lines and exemestane was used for aromatase inhibition. We demonstrated that exemestane reduced H23 cell migration and invasion and caused changes in cell morphology including increased vacuolar structures and greater pleomorphism. In addition, exemestane changed the distribution of α-tubulin in H23 and A549 cells in a way that might destabilize microtubules polymerization. These effects were associated with increased cell viscosity and decreased elastic shear modulus. Although exemestane caused similar effects in A549 cells regarding viscosity and elastic shear modulus, it did not affect A549 cell migration and caused an increase in invasion. The increased invasion was in line with vimentin perinuclear localization. Our data show that the treatment of NSCLC cells with an aromatase inhibitor not only affects cell migration and invasion but also alters the mechanical properties of the cells. It suggests that the different origin of cancer cells is associated with different morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior. PMID:25450981

  17. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates. PMID:23393330

  18. Sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to acetaminophen reveals biological pathways that affect patient survival

    PubMed Central

    BUSH, STEPHEN H.; TOLLIN, SHARON; MARCHION, DOUGLAS C.; XIONG, YIN; ABBASI, FOROUGH; RAMIREZ, INGRID J.; ZGHEIB, NADIM BOU; BOAC, BERNADETTE; JUDSON, PATRICIA L.; CHON, HYE SOOK; WENHAM, ROBERT M.; APTE, SACHIN M.; CUBITT, CHRISTOPHER L.; BERGLUND, ANDERS E.; HAVRILESKY, LAURA J.; LANCASTER, JOHNATHAN M.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological data support the potential activity of acetaminophen against ovarian cancer (OVCA). In this study, we sought to confirm the activity of acetaminophen in OVCA cell lines and to investigate the molecular basis of response. A total of 16 OVCA cell lines underwent pretreatment (baseline) genome-wide expression measurements and were then treated with and analyzed for acetaminophen sensitivity. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to identify genes that were associated with OVCA acetaminophen response. The identified genes were subjected to pathway analysis, and the expression of each represented pathway was summarized using principal component analysis. OVCA acetaminophen response pathways were analyzed in 4 external clinico-genomic datasets from 820 women for associations with overall survival from OVCA. Acetaminophen exhibited antiproliferative activity against all tested OVCA cell lines, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 63.2 to 403 µM. Pearson's correlation followed by biological pathway analysis identified 13 pathways to be associated with acetaminophen sensitivity (P<0.01). Associations were observed between patient survival from OVCA and expression of the following pathways: Development/angiotensin signaling via β-arrestin (P=0.04), protein folding and maturation/angiotensin system maturation (P=0.02), signal transduction/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway (P=0.03) and androstenedione and testosterone biosynthesis and metabolism (P=0.02). We confirmed that acetaminophen was active against OVCA cells in vitro. Furthermore, we identified 4 molecular signaling pathways associated with acetaminophen response that may also affect overall survival in women with OVCA, including the JNK pathway, which has been previously implicated in the mechanism of action of acetaminophen and is predictive of decreased survival in women with OVCA. PMID:26998291

  19. Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the localization and signaling of PIP3/AKT in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhennan; Wu, Jiansheng; Wang, Shihua; Suburu, Janel; Chen, Haiqin; Thomas, Michael J; Shi, Lihong; Edwards, Iris J; Berquin, Isabelle M; Chen, Yong Q

    2013-09-01

    AKT is a serine-threonine protein kinase that plays important roles in cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. It is activated after binding to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) with phosphate groups at positions 3,4 and 3,4,5 on the inositol ring. In spite of extensive research on AKT, one aspect has been largely overlooked, namely the role of the fatty acid chains on PIPs. PIPs are phospholipids composed of a glycerol backbone with fatty acids at the sn-1 and sn-2 position and inositol at the sn-3 position. Here, we show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modify phospholipid content. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω3 PUFA, can replace the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone, thereby changing the species of phospholipids. DHA also inhibits AKT(T308) but not AKT(S473) phosphorylation, alters PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and phospho-AKT(S473) protein localization, decreases pPDPK1(S241)-AKT and AKT-BAD interaction and suppresses prostate tumor growth. Our study highlights a potential novel mechanism of cancer inhibition by ω3 PUFA through alteration of PIP3 and AKT localization and affecting the AKT signaling pathway. PMID:23633519

  20. Sonoporation of Cervical Carcinoma Cells Affected with E6-Oncoprotein for the Treatment of Uterine Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Lee, Kyle; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2010-03-01

    Cervical cancer has been identified as the third leading cause of average years of life lost per person dying of cancer. Since essentially all cervical cancers contain copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, we propose a treatment that targets HPV-infected cells using strategies that re-introduce normal functions into the infected cells while sparing healthy cells. We propose the use of focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles as means to deliver antibodies against the E6 protein present only in HPV positive cells. We conducted in vitro studies with cell cultures of SiHa cervical carcinoma cells seeded into Opticell™ chambers. An in-house ultrasound excitation apparatus was used to control and explore the optimal acoustic parameters in order to maximize delivery. We first validated the possibility of delivering the EX-EGFP-M02 vector (Genecopoeia) into the cells; 1.2 μL of activated microbubbles (Definity®) and 50 μg of the vector were mixed in media and then injected into the Opticell™ chamber. We used 32 μs pulses at a central frequency of 930 KHz with a repetition frequency of 1.5 kHz and total exposure duration of 30 s; six pressure values were tested (0 to 1 MPa). Fluorescence imaging was used to determine the levels of intracellular proteins and assess delivery. The delivery of an anti-α-Tubulin antibody was next tested and confirmed that the delivery into HPV16 positive cells was successful.

  1. Folic Acid Supplementation Adversely Affects Chemosensitivity of Colon Cancer Cells to 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Lisa; Yang, Michael; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Streutker, Catherine J; Grin, Andrea; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Folic acid (FA) fortification and widespread supplemental use have significantly increased folate status in North America. Furthermore, >50% of colorectal cancer patients use FA supplement. The increased folate status may interfere with cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of FA supplementation on chemosensitivity of human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) using a xenograft model. Mice harboring human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were randomized to receive the control, or 4× or 12.5× supplemental levels of FA. Within each diet group, mice were randomized to receive 5-FU+leucovorin or saline and xenograft growth and characteristics were determined. The expression of genes involved in folate metabolism and cancer treatment was determined. FA supplementation and 5-FU significantly interacted to influence xenograft growth (P < 0.007). At the control level, 5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of the xenografts (P < 0.0001). However, at the 4× supplemental level, 5-FU-treated xenografts grew faster than untreated xenografts (P = 0.048) while at the 12.5× supplemental level, 5-FU exhibited no effect. Cell proliferation, degree of necrosis, and expression of the selected genes did not significantly differ by the supplemental levels of FA. Our data suggest that FA supplementation may be detrimental to 5-FU chemotherapy of colon cancer and pose public health concern. PMID:27175995

  2. Methanolic extracts of bitter melon inhibit colon cancer stem cells by affecting energy homeostasis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Moran, Elizabeth; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Mitra, Ashim; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Bitter melon fruit is recommended in ancient Indian and Chinese medicine for prevention/treatment of diabetes. However its effects on cancer progression are not well understood. Here, we have determined the efficacy of methanolic extracts of bitter melon on colon cancer stem and progenitor cells. Both, whole fruit (BMW) and skin (BMSk) extracts showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, with BMW showing greater efficacy. In addition, the cells were arrested at the S phase of cell cycle. Moreover, BMW induced the cleavage of LC3B but not caspase 3/7, suggesting that the cells were undergoing autophagy and not apoptosis. Further confirmation of autophagy was obtained when western blots showed reduced Bcl-2 and increased Beclin-1, Atg 7 and 12 upon BMW treatment. BMW reduced cellular ATP levels coupled with activation of AMP activated protein kinase; on the other hand, exogenous additions of ATP lead to revival of cell proliferation. Finally, BMW treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonospheres. The extracts also decreased the expression of DCLK1 and Lgr5, markers of quiescent, and activated stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the extracts of bitter melon can be an effective preventive/therapeutic agent for colon cancer. PMID:23533514

  3. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network. PMID:23355454

  4. Inhibition of PI3K Signalling Selectively Affects Medulloblastoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Chiara; Rampazzo, Elena; Accordi, Benedetta; Beggio, Giacomo; Pistollato, Francesca; Basso, Giuseppe; Persano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although survival has slowly increased in the past years, the prognosis of these patients remains unfavourable. In this context, it has been recently shown that the intracellular signaling pathways activated during embryonic cerebellar development are deregulated in MDB. One of the most important is PI3K/AKT/mTOR, implicated in cell proliferation, survival, growth, and protein synthesis. Moreover, a fraction of MDB cells has been shown to posses stemlike features, to express typical neuronal precursor markers (Nestin and CD133), and to be maintained by the hypoxic cerebellar microenvironment. This subpopulation of MDB cells is considered to be responsible for treatment resistance and recurrence. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PI3K/AKT pathway inhibition on primary cultures of MDB and particularly on the cancer stem cell (CSC) population (CD133(+)). PI3K inhibition was able to counteract MDB cell growth and to promote differentiation of stemlike MDB cells. Moreover, PI3K/AKT pathway suppression induced dramatic cell death through activation of the mitochondrial proapoptotic cascade. Finally, analysis on the stem cells fraction revealed that the MDB CSC population is more sensitive to PI3K targeting compared to the whole cancerous population and its nonstem cell counterpart. PMID:26557719

  5. BAY61-3606 Affects the Viability of Colon Cancer Cells in a Genotype-Directed Manner

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Ken S.; Zhang, Tinghu; Kendall, Krystle R.; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Gray, Nathanael S.; Haigis, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background K-RAS mutation poses a particularly difficult problem for cancer therapy. Activating mutations in K-RAS are common in cancers of the lung, pancreas, and colon and are associated with poor response to therapy. As such, targeted therapies that abrogate K-RAS-induced oncogenicity would be of tremendous value. Methods We searched for small molecule kinase inhibitors that preferentially affect the growth of colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant K-RAS. The mechanism of action of one inhibitor was explored using chemical and genetic approaches. Results We identified BAY61-3606 as an inhibitor of proliferation in colorectal cancer cells expressing mutant forms of K-RAS, but not in isogenic cells expressing wild-type K-RAS. In addition to its anti-proliferative effects in mutant cells, BAY61-3606 exhibited a distinct biological property in wild-type cells in that it conferred sensitivity to inhibition of RAF. In this context, BAY61-3606 acted by inhibiting MAP4K2 (GCK), which normally activates NFκβ signaling in wild-type cells in response to inhibition of RAF. As a result of MAP4K2 inhibition, wild-type cells became sensitive to AZ-628, a RAF inhibitor, when also treated with BAY61-3606. Conclusions These studies indicate that BAY61-3606 exerts distinct biological activities in different genetic contexts. PMID:22815993

  6. Definition of smad3 phosphorylation events that affect malignant and metastatic behaviors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eunjin; Sato, Misako; Kim, Ran-Ju; Kwak, Mi-Kyung; Naka, Kazuhito; Gim, Jungsoo; Kadota, Mitsutaka; Tang, Binwu; Flanders, Kathleen C; Kim, Tae-Aug; Leem, Sun-Hee; Park, Taesung; Liu, Fang; Wakefield, Lalage M; Kim, Seong-Jin; Ooshima, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Smad3, a major intracellular mediator of TGFβ signaling, functions as both a positive and negative regulator in carcinogenesis. In response to TGFβ, the TGFβ receptor phosphorylates serine residues at the Smad3 C-tail. Cancer cells often contain high levels of the MAPK and CDK activities, which can lead to the Smad3 linker region becoming highly phosphorylated. Here, we report, for the first time, that mutation of the Smad3 linker phosphorylation sites markedly inhibited primary tumor growth, but significantly increased lung metastasis of breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, mutation of the Smad3 C-tail phosphorylation sites had the opposite effect. We show that mutation of the Smad3 linker phosphorylation sites greatly intensifies all TGFβ-induced responses, including growth arrest, apoptosis, reduction in the size of putative cancer stem cell population, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and invasive activity. Moreover, all TGFβ responses were completely lost on mutation of the Smad3 C-tail phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the counterbalance between the Smad3 C-tail and linker phosphorylation in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Our findings have important implications for therapeutic intervention of breast cancer. PMID:25205100

  7. VDR Activity is Differentially Affected by Hic-5 in Prostate Cancer and Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Joshua D; Heitzer, Marjet D; Liu, Teresa T; Beumer, Jan H; Parise, Robert A; Normolle, Daniel P; Leach, Damien A; Buchanan, Grant; DeFranco, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) eventually develop castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3/calcitriol) is a potential adjuvant therapy that confers anti-proliferative and pro-differentiation effects in vitro, but has had mixed results in clinical trials. The impact of the tumor microenvironment on 1,25D3 therapy in CRPC patients has not been assessed. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which is associated with the development of tumorigenic “reactive stroma” in prostate cancer, induced VDR expression in the human WPMY-1 prostate stromal cell line. Similarly, TGF-β enhanced 1,25D3-induced up-regulation of CYP24A1, which metabolizes 1,25D3 and thereby limits VDR activity. Ablation of Hic-5, a TGF-β-inducible nuclear receptor co-regulator, inhibited basal VDR expression, 1,25D3-induced CYP24A1 expression and metabolism of 1,25D3 and TGF-β-enhanced CYP24A1 expression. A Hic-5-responsive sequence was identified upstream (392-451 bp) of the CYP24A1 transcription start site that is occupied by VDR only in the presence of Hic-5. Ectopic expression of Hic-5 sensitized LNCaP prostate tumor cells to growth-inhibitory effects of 1,25D3 independent of CYP24A1. The sensitivity of Hic-5-expressing LNCaP cells to 1,25D3-induced growth inhibition was accentuated in co-culture with Hic-5-ablated WPMY-1 cells. Therefore, these findings indicate that the search for mechanisms to sensitize prostate cancer cells to the anti-proliferative effects of VDR ligands needs to account for the impact of VDR activity in the tumor microenvironment. Implications Hic-5 acts as a co-regulator with distinct effects on VDR transactivation, in prostate cancer and stromal cells, and may exert diverse effects on adjuvant therapy designed to exploit VDR activity in prostate cancer. PMID:24825850

  8. Signet ring cell histology is associated with unique clinical features but does not affect gastric cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Theuer, C P; Nastanski, F; Brewster, W R; Butler, J A; Anton-Culver, H

    1999-10-01

    Signet ring cell histology is found in 3 to 39 per cent of gastric cancer cases and has been reported to be a feature of poor prognosis, although this issue has not been rigorously examined. The objective of this study was to determine those demographic and clinical variables associated with signet ring cell histology and to determine the effect of signet ring cell histology on survival using multivariate analyses. We studied a historical cohort of consecutive cases of gastric cancer reported to the population-based California Cancer Registries of Orange, San Diego, and Imperial Counties from 1984 through 1994. Factors associated with signet ring cell histology were assessed using chi2 and logistic regression. Life tables were constructed to assess unadjusted survival and survival differences in patient subgroups. Multivariate survival was determined using a Cox proportional hazards model. Of 3020 patients, 464 (15%) had signet ring cell histology. Patients with signet ring cell histology were more likely to be younger than 50 years (odds ratio (OR) = 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6-3.5), less likely to be male (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.37-0.66), and more likely to have tumors of the distal stomach (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4-3.0). Signet ring cell histology did not adversely affect unadjusted overall survival, race-stratified survival, or stage-stratified survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that patients with signet ring cell histology had an insignificant increased risk of dying (relative risk = 1.027; P>0.10) in comparison with patients without signet ring cell histology. Patients with signet ring cell histology were more likely to be young women and to have tumors of the distal stomach. Signet ring cell histology did not impact survival in our group of largely advanced gastric cancer cases. PMID:10515534

  9. Acridine Orange is an Effective Anti-Cancer Drug that Affects Mitochondrial Function in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Fotia, Caterina; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Roncuzzi, Laura; Baldini, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Acridine orange (AO) is an antimalarial drug that accumulates into acidic cellular compartments. Lysosomes are quite acidic in cancer cells, and on this basis we have demonstrated that photoactivated AO is selectively toxic in sarcomas. However, photodynamic therapy is only locally effective, and cannot be used to eradicate systemic residual disease. In this study, we have evaluated the activity of non-photoactivated AO on sensitive and chemoresistant osteosarcoma (OS) cells to be considered for the systemic delivery. Since lysosomes are even more acidic in chemoresistant cells (MDR), we found that AO accumulation was significantly higher in the lysosomes of MDR in respect to parental cells, and in both cell types, therapeutic doses of AO significantly inhibited cell growth. However, the level of growth inhibition was inversely related to the level of lysosomal uptake of AO, suggesting that the main target of this agent is indeed extralysosomal. A significant reduction of intracellular ATP content and of the expression of mitochondrial complex III suggests a mitochondrial targeting. Notably, MDR cells showed a lower mitochondrial activity. Finally, the combined treatment of AO with the anticancer agent doxorubicin (DXR) significantly increased chemotoxicity by promoting DXR mitochondrial targeting, as revealed by the further reduction in ATP intracellular content. In conclusion, AO is able to effectively target both sensitive and resistant OS cells through mitotoxicity. PMID:26381269

  10. Prostate cancer cell response to paclitaxel is affected by abnormally expressed securin PTTG1.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    PTTG1 protein, the human securin, has a central role in sister chromatid separation during mitosis, and its altered expression has been reported in many tumor types. Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, whose mechanism of action is related to its ability to arrest cells in mitosis and the subsequent induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. By using two prostate cancer cell lines with different responses to paclitaxel treatment, we have identified two situations in which PTTG1 influences cell fate differentially. In slippage-prone PC3 cells, both PTTG1 downregulation and overexpression induce an increase in mitotic cells that is associated with diminished apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. In LNCaP cells, however, PTTG1 downregulation prevents mitotic entry and, subsequently, inhibits mitosis-associated, paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PTTG1 overexpression induces an increase in mitotic cells and apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. We have also identified a role for Mcl-1 protein in preventing apoptosis during mitosis in PC3 cells, as simultaneous PTTG1 and Mcl-1 silencing enhances mitosis-associated apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. The finding that a more efficient mitotic arrest alone in PC3 cells is not enough to increase apoptosis was also confirmed with the observation that a selected paclitaxel-resistant PC3 cell line showed an apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with increased mitosis upon paclitaxel treatment. These findings could contribute to identify putative responsive and nonresponsive cells and help us to approach incomplete responses to paclitaxel in the clinical setting. PMID:25122070

  11. Cell surface localization of importin α1/KPNA2 affects cancer cell proliferation by regulating FGF1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Tsujii, Akira; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Ikuno, Yudai; Shiromizu, Takashi; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Importin α1 is involved in nuclear import as a receptor for proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS). Here, we report that importin α1 is localized to the cell surface in several cancer cell lines and detected in their cultured medium. We also found that exogenously added importin α1 is associated with the cell membrane via interaction with heparan sulfate. Furthermore, we revealed that the cell surface importin α1 recognizes cNLS-containing substrates. More particularly, importin α1 bound directly to FGF1 and FGF2, secreted cNLS-containing growth factors, and addition of exogenous importin α1 enhanced the activation of ERK1/2, downstream targets of FGF1 signalling, in FGF1-stimulated cancer cells. Additionally, anti-importin α1 antibody treatment suppressed the importin α1−FGF1 complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, resulting in decreased cell growth. This study provides novel evidence that functional importin α1 is located at the cell surface, where it accelerates the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26887791

  12. Interaction of Berberine derivative with protein POT1 affect telomere function in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Nannan; Chen, Siqi; Ma, Yan; Qiu, Jun; Tan, Jia-Heng; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Li, Ding

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protein POT1 plays an important role in telomere protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional POT1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for the first time, and purified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound Sysu-00692 was found to be the first POT1-binding ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sysu-00692 could interfere with the binding activity of POT1 in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sysu-00692 had inhibition on telomerase and cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The protein POT1 plays an important role in telomere protection, which is related with telomere elongation and cell immortality. The protein has been recognized as a promising drug target for cancer treatment. In the present study, we cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli for the first time, and purified recombinant human POT1. The protein was proved to be active through filter binding assay, FRET and CD experiments. In the initial screening for protein binding ligands using SPR, compound Sysu-00692 was found to bind well with the POT1, which was confirmed with EMSA. Its in vivo activity study showed that compound Sysu-00692 could interfere with the binding between human POT1 and the telomeric DNA through chromatin immunoprecipitation. Besides, the compound showed mild inhibition on telomerase and cell proliferation. As we know, compound Sysu-00692 is the first reported POT1-binding ligand, which could serve as a lead compound for further improvement. This work offered a potentially new approach for drug design for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Regulation of PMP22 mRNA by G3BP1 affects cell proliferation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of mRNAs is one way to control protein levels and thereby important cellular processes such as growth, invasion and apoptosis. G3BPs constitute a family of mRNA-binding proteins, shown to be overexpressed in several cancer types, including breast, colon and pancreas cancer. G3BP has been reported to both stabilize and induce degradation of specific mRNAs. Results Here, we show that G3BP1, but not G3BP2, supports proliferation of several breast cancer cell lines. Global gene expression analyses of G3BP1- and G3BP2-depleted cells indicate that primarily G3BP1, and much less G3BP2, influences mRNA expression levels. Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) was one gene that was significantly influenced by G3BP1 depletion which led to a 2–3 fold increased expression. Depletion of PMP22 resulted in increased proliferation and the G3BP1-mediated effect on proliferation was not seen upon PMP22-depletion. Conclusions This indicates a novel role for G3BP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in breast cancer cells, perhaps via a regulatory effect on PMP22 expression. PMID:24321297

  14. Virosecurinine induces apoptosis by affecting Bcl-2 and Bax expression in human colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan-Rong; Xia, Yong-Hui; Yao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Ying; Ji, Zhao-Ning

    2012-04-01

    Virosecurinine, the major alkaloid isolated from Securinega suffruticosa Pall Rehd was found to exhibit growth inhibition and cytotoxicity against huaman colon cancer SW480 cells via the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Due to its greater cytotoxic potency and selectivity towards SW480 cells, flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution of control and treated SW480 cells whereas Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry analysis was carried out to confirm apoptosis induced by virosecurinine in SW480 cells. Apoptotic regulatory genes were determined by RT-PCR analysis. Virosecurinine was found to induce G1/S cell cycle arrest which led to predominantly apoptotic mode of cell death. Mechanistically, virosecurinine was found to up-regulated the Bax gene expression and down-regulated the Bcl-2 expression in SW480, The ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax was significantly decreased. Hence, we suggest that virosecurinine induced apoptosis in SW480 cells by affecting the expression of bcl-2 and bax. PMID:22570942

  15. JNK pathway inhibition selectively primes pancreatic cancer stem cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis without affecting the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, P. Robyn; Kettlun, Claudia; Heinemann, Mitja L.; Ruetering, Jennifer; Vykoukal, Jody; Alt, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Successful treatment of solid cancers mandates targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) without impact on the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling has been shown to be of importance in cancer. We test whether JNK inhibition would sensitize pancreatic CSCs to induction of apoptosis via low-dose TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Design Effects of JNK inhibition (JNKi) were evaluated in vitro in functional assays, through mRNA and protein expression analysis, and in in vivo mouse studies. CSCs were enriched in anoikis-resistant spheroid culture and analyzed accordingly. Results We confirmed that the JNK pathway is an important regulatory pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells and further found that JNK inhibition downregulates the decoy receptor DcR1 through IL-8 signaling while upregulating pro-apoptotic death receptors DR4/5, thereby sensitizing cells - even with acquired TRAIL-resistance - to apoptosis induction. Treatment of orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts with either gemcitabine, JNKi or TRAIL alone for 4 weeks showed only modest effects compared to control, while the combination of JNKi and TRAIL resulted in significantly lower tumor burden (69%; p < 0.04), reduced numbers of circulating tumor cells, and less distant metastatic events, without affecting the general health of the animals. Conclusions The combination of JNKi and TRAIL significantly impacts on CSCs, but leaves regular tissue-resident stem cells unaffected – even under hypoxic stress conditions. This concept of selective treatment of pancreatic CSCs warrants further evaluation. PMID:26840266

  16. Chemo-Predictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem-Like Cells in Patients Affected by Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nande, Rounak; Neto, Walter; Lawrence, Logan; McCallister, Danielle R.; Denvir, James; Kimmey, Gerrit A.; Mogul, Mark; Oakley, Gerard; Denning, Krista L.; Dougherty, Thomas; Valluri, Jagan V.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID), which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1) and a 5-month female (patient 2), affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as

  17. Chemo-predictive assay for targeting cancer stem-like cells in patients affected by brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Sarah E; Alberico, Anthony; Nande, Rounak; Neto, Walter; Lawrence, Logan; McCallister, Danielle R; Denvir, James; Kimmey, Gerrit A; Mogul, Mark; Oakley, Gerard; Denning, Krista L; Dougherty, Thomas; Valluri, Jagan V; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID), which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1) and a 5-month female (patient 2), affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as

  18. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  19. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  20. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  1. A quinazoline-based HDAC inhibitor affects gene expression pathways involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and mevalonate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Bishop, K S; Sutherland, H; Marlow, G; Murray, P; Denny, W A; Ferguson, L R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic inflammation can lead to the development of cancers and resolution of inflammation is an ongoing challenge. Inflammation can result from dysregulation of the epigenome and a number of compounds that modify the epigenome are in clinical use. In this study the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of a quinazoline epigenetic-modulator compound were determined in prostate cancer cell lines using a non-hypothesis driven transcriptomics strategy utilising the Affymetrix PrimeView® Human Gene Expression microarray. GATHER and IPA software were used to analyse the data and to provide information on significantly modified biological processes, pathways and networks. A number of genes were differentially expressed in both PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. The top canonical pathways that frequently arose across both cell lines at a number of time points included cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, and the mevalonate pathway. Targeting of sterol and mevalonate pathways may be a powerful anticancer approach. PMID:26759180

  2. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  3. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  4. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  5. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  6. Integrin-linked kinase affects signaling pathways and migration in thyroid cancer cells and is a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Lawrence A.; McCarty, Samantha; Yang, Ming-Chen; Saji, Motoyasu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Phay, John; Ringel, Matthew D.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine-threonine kinase that regulates interactions between the cell and the extracellular matrix. In many cancers, overexpression of ILK leads to increased cell proliferation, motility, and invasion. We hypothesized that ILK functions as a regulator of viability and migration in thyroid cancer cells. Methods Eleven human thyroid cancer cell lines were screened for ILK protein expression. The cell lines with the greatest expression were treated with either ILK small interfering RNA (siRNA) or a novel ILK inhibitor, T315, and the effects were evaluated via Western blot and migration assay. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assays were performed to assess cell viability. Results siRNA against ILK decreased phosphorylation of downstream effectors Akt and MLC, as well as decreased migration. Treatment with T315 showed a dose-related decrease in both Akt and MLC phosphorylation, as well as decreased migration. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assays showed T315 to have an half maximal inhibitory concentration of less than 1 µM in cell lines with high ILK expression. Conclusion ILK is expressed differentially in thyroid cancer cell lines. Both ILK siRNA and T315 inhibit motility of thyroid cancer cell lines, and T315 is shown to be cytotoxic at low concentrations. Altogether, our study suggests that ILK may represent an important kinase in aggressive thyroid cancers. PMID:26549818

  7. Resistance to cisplatin and paclitaxel does not affect the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to antiprogestin-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiprogestin compounds have been shown to be effective in blocking the growth of ovarian cancer cells of different genetic backgrounds. Herein we studied the anti-ovarian cancer effect of a series of antiprogestins sharing the chemical backbone of the most characterized antiprogestin, mifepristone, but with unique modifications in position C-17 of the steroid ring. We assessed the effect of mifepristone-like antiprogestins on the growth of ovarian cancer cells sensitive to the standard combination therapy cisplatin-paclitaxel or made double-resistant upon six cycles of pulse-selection with the drugs used at clinically relevant concentrations and exposure times. Methods IGROV-1 and SKOV-3 cells were pulsed with 20 μM cisplatin for 1 h followed by 100 nM paclitaxel for 3 h once a week for six weeks. The cells that did not die and repopulate the culture after the chemotherapies were termed Platinum-Taxane-EScape cells (PTES). Parental cells were compared against their PTES derivatives in their responses to further platinum-taxane treatments. Moreover, both ovarian cancer cells and their PTES siblings were exposed to escalating doses of the various antiprogestin derivatives. We assessed cell growth, viability and sub-G1 DNA content using microcapillary cytometry. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21cip1 and p27kip1 and cleavage of downstream caspase-3 substrate PARP were used to assess whether cell fate, as a consequence of treatment, was limited to cytostasis or progressed to lethality. Results Cells subjected to six pulse-selection cycles of cisplatin-paclitaxel gave rise to sibling derivatives that displayed ~2-7 fold reduction in their sensitivities to further chemotherapy. However, regardless of the sensitivity the cells developed to the combination cisplatin-paclitaxel, they displayed similar sensitivity to the antiprogestins, which blocked their growth in a dose-related manner, with lower concentrations causing cytostasis, and higher

  8. Dichamanetin Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth by Affecting ROS-related Signaling Components through Mitochondrial-mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Matthew, Susan; Wittwer, Jennifer; Pan, Li; Shen, Qi; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache De Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Dichamanetin is a C-benzylated flavanone isolated as a major secondary metabolite from Piper sarmentosum, a plant used as a spice in Southeast Asia. This studied aimed to understand the path through which dichamanetin exerts it antiproliferative effect. Materials and Methods The study of several signaling cellular components, namely, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcription factor, mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA binding, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP1) inhibition and proteasome inhibition was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay, cell sorting, and western blot. Results Dichamanetin significantly reduced the cell viability of various types of human cancer cells (HT-29 colon, DU145 prostate, and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer) in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced G1 arrest of the cell cycle. It was also demonstrated that the selective cytotoxic effect of dichamanetin in cancer cells is mediated by the induction of oxidative stress. Conclusion Our findings suggest that dichamanetin from an edible herb has cancer chemotherapeutic potential. PMID:24324069

  9. P120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A differently affect invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yang; Dong Qianze; Zhao Yue; Dong Xinjun; Miao Yuan; Dai Shundong; Yang Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Wang Yan; Li Qingchang; Zhao Chen; Wang Enhua

    2009-03-10

    Different isoforms of p120-catenin (p120ctn), a member of the Armadillo gene family, are variably expressed in different tissues as a result of alternative splicing and the use of multiple translation initiation codons. When expressed in cancer cells, these isoforms may confer different properties with respect to cell adhesion and invasion. We have previously reported that the p120ctn isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed isoforms in normal lung tissues, and their expression level was reduced in lung tumor cells. To precisely define their biological roles, we transfected p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A into the lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Enhanced expression of p120ctn isoform 1A not only upregulated E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin, but also downregulated the Rac1 activity, and as a result, inhibited the ability of cells to invade. In contrast, overexpression of p120ctn isoform 3A led to the inactivation of Cdc42 and the activation of RhoA, and had a smaller influence on invasion. However, we found that isoform 3A had a greater ability than isoform 1A in both inhibiting the cell cycle and reducing tumor cell proliferation. The present study revealed that p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A differently regulated the adhesive, proliferative, and invasive properties of lung cancer cells through distinct mechanisms.

  10. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  11. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles. PMID:27072133

  12. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  13. Claudin 1 Expression Levels Affect miRNA Dynamics in Human Basal-Like Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Majer, Anna; Blanchard, Anne A; Medina, Sarah; Booth, Stephanie A; Myal, Yvonne

    2016-07-01

    Deemed a putative tumor suppressor in breast cancer, the tight junction protein claudin 1 has now been shown to be highly expressed in the basal-like molecular subtype. Moreover, recent in vitro studies show that claudin 1 can regulate breast cancer cell motility and proliferation. Herein, we investigated whether microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is associated with alterations in the level of claudin 1. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS), we identified seven miRNAs (miR-9-5p, miR-9-3p, let-7c, miR-127-3p, miR-99a-5p, miR-129-5p, and miR-146a-5p) that were deregulated as a consequence of claudin 1 overexpression in the MDA-MB231 human breast cancer (HBC) cell line. Most of these miRNAs have been associated with tumor suppression in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. Moreover, through gene expression profiling analysis, we identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFRB) and cadherin 1 (CDH1, E cadherin), whose downregulation correlated with claudin 1 overexpression. Collectively, we show for the first time that in HBC, claudin 1 can alter the dynamics of a number of miRNAs involved in tumor progression. Our data suggest that the dysregulated expression of these miRNAs, in conjunction with the high claudin 1 levels, could serve as a useful biomarker that identifies a subset of tumors within the poorly characterized basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of these miRNAs in facilitating the function of claudin 1 in breast cancer. PMID:26982264

  14. Leiodermatolide, a novel marine natural product, has potent cytotoxic and antimitotic activity against cancer cells, appears to affect microtubule dynamics, and exhibits antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Esther A; Xu, Qunli; Pitts, Tara P; Mitsuhashi, Kaoru Ogawa; Baker, Cheryl; Linley, Patricia A; Oestreicher, Judy; Tendyke, Karen; Winder, Priscilla L; Suh, Edward M; Wright, Amy E

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, has a negative prognosis because metastasis occurs before symptoms manifest. Leiodermatolide, a polyketide macrolide with antimitotic activity isolated from a deep water sponge of the genus Leiodermatium, exhibits potent and selective cytotoxicity toward the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and MIA PaCa-2, and potent cytotoxicity against skin, breast and colon cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis by leiodermatolide was confirmed in the AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and MIA PaCa-2 cells. Leiodermatolide induces cell cycle arrest but has no effects on in vitro polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin alone, while it enhances polymerization of tubulin containing microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). Observations through confocal microscopy show that leiodermatolide, at low concentrations, causes minimal effects on polymerization or depolymerization of the microtubule network in interphase cells, but disruption of spindle formation in mitotic cells. At higher concentrations, depolymerization of the microtubule network is observed. Visualization of the growing microtubule in HeLa cells expressing GFP-tagged plus end binding protein EB-1 showed that leiodermatolide stopped the polymerization of tubulin. These results suggest that leiodermatolide may affect tubulin dynamics without directly interacting with tubulin and hint at a unique mechanism of action. In a mouse model of metastatic pancreatic cancer, leiodermatolide exhibited significant tumor reduction when compared to gemcitabine and controls. The antitumor activities of leiodermatolide, as well as the proven utility of antimitotic compounds against cancer, make leiodermatolide an interesting compound with potential chemotherapeutic effects that may merit further research. PMID:27376928

  15. Do fasudil and Y-27632 affect the level of transient receptor potential (TRP) gene expressions in breast cancer cell lines?

    PubMed

    Gogebakan, Bulent; Bayraktar, Recep; Suner, Ali; Balakan, Ozan; Ulasli, Mustafa; Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Camci, Celaletdin

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer type in women, and the mortality rate is high especially in metastatic disease. Ion channels such as the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels correlate with malignant growth and cancer progression. Hence, some authors have suggested that the expression levels of TRP channels may be used as a marker in the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis of BC. Also, in some recent studies, targeting TRP channels are suggested as a novel treatment strategy in BC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitors, fasudil and Y-27632, on the expression levels of TRP channel genes in breast cancer cell lines (ZR-75-1, MCF7, and MDA-MB-231) and breast epithelial cell line (hTERT-HME1). The expression levels of TRP genes were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We found that fasudil had reduced the TRPC1, TRPV2 expression levels in the ZR-75-1, MCF7, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. On the other hand, fasudil and Y-27632 had reduced TRPM6 expression levels in all cell lines. Y-27632 increased the expression levels of TRPC7 in all cell lines. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating that the inhibition of ROCK pathway changes the expression levels of some TRP genes. Also, our study has firstly shown that the expression levels of the TRP genes which are suggested as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in BC, were changed with the treatment of fasudil and Y-27632. PMID:24839003

  16. Overexpression of caspase 7 is ERα dependent to affect proliferation and cell growth in breast cancer cells by targeting p21Cip

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, S; Madhukrishna, B; Adhya, A K; Keshari, S; Mishra, S K

    2016-01-01

    Caspase 7 (CASP7) expression has important function during cell cycle progression and cell growth in certain cancer cells and is also involved in the development and differentiation of dental tissues. However, the function of CASP7 in breast cancer cells is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of CASP7 in breast carcinoma patients and determine the role of CASP7 in regulating tumorigenicity in breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that the CASP7 expression is high in breast carcinoma tissues compared with normal counterpart. The ectopic expression of CASP7 is significantly associated with ERα expression status and persistently elevated in different stages of the breast tumor grades. High level of CASP7 expression showed better prognosis in breast cancer patients with systemic endocrine therapy as observed from Kaplan–Meier analysis. S3 and S4, estrogen responsive element (ERE) in the CASP7 promoter, is important for estrogen-ERα-mediated CASP7 overexpression. Increased recruitment of p300, acetylated H3 and pol II in the ERE region of CASP7 promoter is observed after hormone stimulation. Ectopic expression of CASP7 in breast cancer cells results in cell growth and proliferation inhibition via p21Cip reduction, whereas small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated reduction of CASP7 rescued p21Cip levels. We also show that pro- and active forms of CASP7 is located in the nucleus apart from cytoplasmic region of breast cancer cells. The proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells is significantly reduced by broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors and siRNA of CASP7. Taken together, our findings show that CASP7 is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer and contributes to cell growth and proliferation by downregulating p21Cip protein, suggesting that targeting CASP7-positive breast cancer could be one of the potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27089142

  17. The Phosphorylation and Distribution of Cortactin Downstream of Integrin α9β1 Affects Cancer Cell Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Høye, Anette M; Couchman, John R; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Integrins, a family of heterodimeric adhesion receptors are implicated in cell migration, development and cancer progression. They can adopt conformations that reflect their activation states and thereby impact adhesion strength and migration. Integrins in an intermediate activation state may be optimal for migration and we have shown previously that fully activated integrin α9β1 corresponds with less migratory behaviour in melanoma cells. Here, we aimed to identify components associated with the activation status of α9β1. Using cancer cell lines with naturally occuring high levels of this integrin, activation by α9β1-specific ligands led to upregulation of fibronectin matrix assembly and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin on tyrosine 470 (Y470). Specifically, cortactin phosphorylated on Y470, but not Y421, redistributed together with α9β1 to focal adhesions where active β1 integrin also localises, upon integrin activation. This was commensurate with reduced migration. The localisation and phosphorylation of cortactin Y470 was regulated by Yes kinase and PTEN phosphatase. Cortactin levels influenced fibronectin matrix assembly and active β1 integrin on the cell surface, being inversely correlated with migratory behaviour. This study underlines the complex interplay between cortactin and α9β1 integrin that regulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions. PMID:27339664

  18. The Phosphorylation and Distribution of Cortactin Downstream of Integrin α9β1 Affects Cancer Cell Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Høye, Anette M.; Couchman, John R.; Wewer, Ulla M.; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Integrins, a family of heterodimeric adhesion receptors are implicated in cell migration, development and cancer progression. They can adopt conformations that reflect their activation states and thereby impact adhesion strength and migration. Integrins in an intermediate activation state may be optimal for migration and we have shown previously that fully activated integrin α9β1 corresponds with less migratory behaviour in melanoma cells. Here, we aimed to identify components associated with the activation status of α9β1. Using cancer cell lines with naturally occuring high levels of this integrin, activation by α9β1-specific ligands led to upregulation of fibronectin matrix assembly and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin on tyrosine 470 (Y470). Specifically, cortactin phosphorylated on Y470, but not Y421, redistributed together with α9β1 to focal adhesions where active β1 integrin also localises, upon integrin activation. This was commensurate with reduced migration. The localisation and phosphorylation of cortactin Y470 was regulated by Yes kinase and PTEN phosphatase. Cortactin levels influenced fibronectin matrix assembly and active β1 integrin on the cell surface, being inversely correlated with migratory behaviour. This study underlines the complex interplay between cortactin and α9β1 integrin that regulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions. PMID:27339664

  19. PAN-811 Blocks Chemotherapy Drug-Induced In Vitro Neurotoxicity, While Not Affecting Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Fuller, Steven A.; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy often results in cognitive impairment, and no neuroprotective drug is now available. This study aimed to understand underlying neurotoxicological mechanisms of anticancer drugs and to evaluate neuroprotective effects of PAN-811. Primary neurons in different concentrations of antioxidants (AOs) were insulted for 3 days with methotrexate (MTX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), or cisplatin (CDDP) in the absence or presence of PAN-811·Cl·H2O. The effect of PAN-811 on the anticancer activity of tested drugs was also examined using mouse and human cancer cells (BNLT3 and H460) to assess any negative interference. Cell membrane integrity, survival, and death and intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured. All tested anticancer drugs elicited neurotoxicity only under low levels of AO and elicited a ROS increase. These results suggested that ROS mediates neurotoxicity of tested anticancer drugs. PAN-811 dose-dependently suppressed increased ROS and blocked the neurotoxicity when neurons were insulted with a tested anticancer drug. PAN-811 did not interfere with anticancer activity of anticancer drugs against BNLT3 cells. PAN-811 did not inhibit MTX-induced death of H460 cells but, interestingly, demonstrated a synergistic effect with 5-FU or CDDP in reducing cancer cell viability. Thus, PAN-811 can be a potent drug candidate for chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26640619

  20. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  1. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 plays a role in prostate cancer cell invasion and affects expression of PSA and ANXA1.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Bhakti R; Breed, Ananya A; Apte, Snehal; Acharya, Kshitish; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) is upregulated in prostate cancer as compared to the normal prostate tissue. Higher expression of CRISP-3 has been linked to poor prognosis and hence it has been thought to act as a prognostic marker for prostate cancer. It is proposed to have a role in innate immunity but its role in prostate cancer is still unknown. In order to understand its function, its expression was stably knocked down in LNCaP cells. CRISP-3 knockdown did not affect cell viability but resulted in reduced invasiveness. Global gene expression changes upon CRISP-3 knockdown were identified by microarray analysis. Microarray data were quantitatively validated by evaluating the expression of seven candidate genes in three independent stable clones. Functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes identified cell adhesion, cell motility, and ion transport to be affected among other biological processes. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, also known as Kallikrein 3) was the top most downregulated gene whose expression was also validated at protein level. Interestingly, expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a known anti-inflammatory protein, was upregulated upon CRISP-3 knockdown. Re-introduction of CRISP-3 into the knockdown clone reversed the effect on invasiveness and also led to increased PSA expression. These results suggest that overexpression of CRISP-3 in prostate tumor may maintain higher PSA expression and lower ANXA1 expression. Our data also indicate that poor prognosis associated with higher CRISP-3 expression could be due to its role in cell invasion. PMID:26369530

  2. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  3. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  4. FBXW7 and USP7 regulate CCDC6 turnover during the cell cycle and affect cancer drugs susceptibility in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Francesco; Poser, Ina; Visconti, Roberta; Ilardi, Gennaro; Paladino, Simona; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Guggino, Gianluca; Monaco, Roberto; Colecchia, David; Monaco, Guglielmo; Cerrato, Aniello; Chiariello, Mario; Denning, Krista; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Staibano, Stefania; Celetti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    CCDC6 gene product is a pro-apoptotic protein substrate of ATM, whose loss or inactivation enhances tumour progression. In primary tumours, the impaired function of CCDC6 protein has been ascribed to CCDC6 rearrangements and to somatic mutations in several neoplasia. Recently, low levels of CCDC6 protein, in NSCLC, have been correlated with tumor prognosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for the variable levels of CCDC6 in primary tumors have not been described yet. We show that CCDC6 turnover is regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner. CCDC6 undergoes a cyclic variation in the phosphorylated status and in protein levels that peak at G2 and decrease in mitosis. The reduced stability of CCDC6 in the M phase is dependent on mitotic kinases and on degron motifs that are present in CCDC6 and direct the recruitment of CCDC6 to the FBXW7 E3 Ubl. The de-ubiquitinase enzyme USP7 appears responsible of the fine tuning of the CCDC6 stability, affecting cells behaviour and drug response. Thus, we propose that the amount of CCDC6 protein in primary tumors, as reported in lung, may depend on the impairment of the CCDC6 turnover due to altered protein-protein interaction and post-translational modifications and may be critical in optimizing personalized therapy. PMID:25885523

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  6. MiR-338-3p targets pyruvate kinase M2 and affects cell proliferation and metabolism of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Shi, Bing; Chen, Jiang; Hu, Lina; Zhao, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    MiR-338-3p is down-regulated in cancer, which inhibits cancer cell proliferation, metastasis, and increases chemosensitivity, but its functions in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study aims to identify the miR-338-3p targeted genes and to investigate the associated regulatory mechanisms in ovarian cancer cell proliferation and metabolism. Our results demonstrated miR-338-3p expression was down-regulated in most of ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Restoration of miR-338-3p expression in ovarian cancer cells could inhibit cell proliferation, lactate production and lactate production of ovarian cancer cells. PKM2 was verified as a target gene of miR-338-3p by luciferase assay. Further study indicated miR-338-3p controlled ovarian cancer cell metabolism by inhibiting PKM2 expression. It is summarized that the regulatory role of miR-338-3p on PKM2 expression in ovarian cancer may play important roles in cell metabolism. PMID:27508048

  7. MiR-338-3p targets pyruvate kinase M2 and affects cell proliferation and metabolism of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Shi, Bing; Chen, Jiang; Hu, Lina; Zhao, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    MiR-338-3p is down-regulated in cancer, which inhibits cancer cell proliferation, metastasis, and increases chemosensitivity, but its functions in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study aims to identify the miR-338-3p targeted genes and to investigate the associated regulatory mechanisms in ovarian cancer cell proliferation and metabolism. Our results demonstrated miR-338-3p expression was down-regulated in most of ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Restoration of miR-338-3p expression in ovarian cancer cells could inhibit cell proliferation, lactate production and lactate production of ovarian cancer cells. PKM2 was verified as a target gene of miR-338-3p by luciferase assay. Further study indicated miR-338-3p controlled ovarian cancer cell metabolism by inhibiting PKM2 expression. It is summarized that the regulatory role of miR-338-3p on PKM2 expression in ovarian cancer may play important roles in cell metabolism. PMID:27508048

  8. Environmental Stress Affects the Activity of Metabolic and Growth Factor Signaling Networks and Induces Autophagy Markers in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Pedro; Bilanges, Benoit; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoproteomic techniques are contributing to our understanding of how signaling pathways interact and regulate biological processes. This technology is also being used to characterize how signaling networks are remodeled during disease progression and to identify biomarkers of signaling pathway activity and of responses to cancer therapy. A potential caveat in these studies is that phosphorylation is a very dynamic modification that can substantially change during the course of an experiment or the retrieval and processing of cellular samples. Here, we investigated how exposure of cells to ambient conditions modulates phosphorylation and signaling pathway activity in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. About 1.5% of 3,500 sites measured showed a significant change in phosphorylation extent upon exposure of cells to ambient conditions for 15 min. The effects of this perturbation in modifying phosphorylation patterns did not involve random changes due to stochastic activation of kinases and phosphatases. Instead, exposure of cells to ambient conditions elicited an environmental stress reaction that involved a coordinated response to a metabolic stress situation, which included: (1) the activation of AMPK; (2) the inhibition of PI3K, AKT, and ERK; (3) an increase in markers of protein synthesis inhibition at the level of translation elongation; and (4) an increase in autophagy markers. We also observed that maintaining cells in ice modified but did not completely abolish this metabolic stress response. In summary, exposure of cells to ambient conditions affects the activity of signaling networks previously implicated in metabolic and growth factor signaling. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000472. PMID:24425749

  9. Definitive chemoradiotherapy of limited-disease small cell lung cancer: Retrospective analysis of new predictive factors affecting treatment results

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Tetsuya; Oizumi, Yukio; Kunieda, Etsuo; Tamai, Yoshifumi; Akiba, Takeshi; Kogawa, Asuka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate potential predictive factors in the treatment of limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC). A total of 33 patients with LD-SCLC who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy at our institute between April 1996 and May 2007 were enrolled in our retrospective study. The relationship between a range of potential predictive factors and the initial response, time to progression and pattern of failure was analyzed. The factors evaluated included the tumor markers Pro-gastrin-releasing peptide (Pro-GRP) and neuron-specific enolase; net tumor size (sum of each lesion mass on computed tomography at 1-cm intervals); total radiation dose; biological effective dose (BED); overall treatment time (OTT); time between the start of any type of treatment and the end of radiation therapy (SER). In addition, the novel factors of radiation dose-intensity (RDI = BED/OTT) and RDI/NTS (= RDI/net tumor size) were defined. Of the 33 patients evaluated in our study, 22 (67%) achieved a complete response (CR) and 27 (82%) experienced treatment failure or recurrence. High RDI/NTS values showed a significant correlation with CR (P=0.043). Prolonged OTT and lower values of RDI and RDI/NTS showed a significant correlation with recurrence within 12 months (P=0.022, 0.033 and 0.015, respectively). The lower values of RDI and RDI/NTS showed a significant correlation with distant metastasis as a first failure site (P=0.038 and 0.044, respectively). Patients with RDI/NTS ≥0.08 had a more favorable prognosis (P=0.045). Thus, RDI and RDI/NTS may become beneficial predictive factors in the treatment of LD-SCLC. However, further studies are required to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:22866140

  10. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  11. Ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates are novel potent anticancer agents that affect tubulin polymerization, induce G2/M cell-cycle arrest, and effectively inhibit soft tissue cancer cell growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boichuk, Sergei; Galembikova, Aigul; Zykova, Svetlana; Ramazanov, Bulat; Khusnutdinov, Ramil; Dunaev, Pavel; Khaibullina, Svetlana; Lombardi, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules are known to be one of the most attractive and validated targets in cancer therapy. However, the clinical use of drugs that affect the dynamic state of microtubules has been hindered by chemoresistance and toxicity issues. Accordingly, the development of novel agents that target microtubules is needed. Here, we report the identification of novel compounds with pirrole and carboxylate structures: ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates (EAPCs) that provide potent cytotoxic activities against multiple soft tissue cancer cell lines in vitro. Using the MTS cell proliferation assay, we assessed the activity of EAPCs on various cancer cell lines including leiomyosarcoma SK-LMS-1, rhabdomyosarcoma RD, gastrointestinal stromal tumor GIST-T1, A-673 Ewing's sarcoma, and U-2 OS osteosarcoma. We found that in the majority of cases, two EAPC compounds (EAPC-20 and EAPC-24) considerably inhibited cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The growth-inhibitory effects of EAPC-20 and EAPC-24 were time and dose dependent. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds were because of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization and induction of a robust G2/M cell-cycle arrest, leading to considerable accumulation of tumor cells in the M-phase. Finally, EAPCs induced tumor cell death by apoptotic pathways. The above-mentioned effects were also observed in most soft tissue tumor cell lines and the gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell line investigated. Taken together, our data identify potent antitumor activity of EAPCs in vitro, thus providing a novel scaffold with which to develop potent chemotherapeutic agents for cancer therapy. PMID:27129079

  12. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Rita Milone, M; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4+ T-cell interferon γ production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin. PMID:26913599

  13. How will HPV vaccines affect cervical cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Richard; Wu, T.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix is the second largest cause of cancer deaths in women, and its toll is greatest in populations that lack screening programmes to detect precursor lesions. Persistent infection with ‘high risk’ genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, although not sufficient, to cause cervical carcinoma. Therefore, HPV vaccination provides an opportunity to profoundly affect cervical cancer incidence worldwide. A recently licensed HPV subunit vaccine protects women from a high proportion of precursor lesions of cervical carcinoma and most genital warts. Here we examine the ramifications and remaining questions that surround preventive HPV vaccines. PMID:16990853

  14. The Application of Cytidyl Guanosyl Oligodeoxynucleotide Can Affect the Antitumor Immune Response Induced by a Combined Protocol of Cryoablation and Dendritic Cells in Lewis Lung Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mi; Yin, Tianquan; Lu, Yuan; Feng, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, several combined therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in lung cancer. The combined administration of dendritic cells (DCs) and immune-adjuvant cytidyl guanosyl oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) after cryosurgery has proven to be an effective strategy for treating lung cancer. However, whether the application of CpG-ODN could affect the therapeutic results remained to be further explored. Material/Methods The Lewis lung cancer (LLC)−bearing mice received cryoablation and injection of ex vivo-cultured DCs into the peritumoral zone. Subsequently, CpG-ODN was administered to experimental animals 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after DC injection. The mice in the control group received coadministration of DCs and CpG-ODN simultaneously. Therapeutic effects were evaluated by survival rates. The resistance to rechallenge of LLC cell was assessed by lung metastasis and in vitro cytotoxicity of splenocytes. Furthermore, T-cell subsets and multiple cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, -10, and-12; interferon [IFN]-γ; tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) in the blood were assessed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Results Higher ratios of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and higher levels of IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were found in the blood of the mice that received CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection. The cytotoxicity potency of the splenocytes of these mice was significantly higher compared with the mice in other groups. Moreover, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection showed significantly better resistance to rechallenge. Compared with the mice in other groups, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection were superior in survival rates and antimetastatic effects. Conclusions Our study suggested that the therapeutic efficacy was closely associated with CpG-ODN administration in the combined therapeutic protocol of cryoablation, DCs, and immune adjuvant. In situ

  15. The Application of Cytidyl Guanosyl Oligodeoxynucleotide Can Affect the Antitumor Immune Response Induced by a Combined Protocol of Cryoablation and Dendritic Cells in Lewis Lung Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mi; Yin, Tianquan; Lu, Yuan; Feng, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recently, several combined therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in lung cancer. The combined administration of dendritic cells (DCs) and immune-adjuvant cytidyl guanosyl oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) after cryosurgery has proven to be an effective strategy for treating lung cancer. However, whether the application of CpG-ODN could affect the therapeutic results remained to be further explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS The Lewis lung cancer (LLC)-bearing mice received cryoablation and injection of ex vivo-cultured DCs into the peritumoral zone. Subsequently, CpG-ODN was administered to experimental animals 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after DC injection. The mice in the control group received coadministration of DCs and CpG-ODN simultaneously. Therapeutic effects were evaluated by survival rates. The resistance to rechallenge of LLC cell was assessed by lung metastasis and in vitro cytotoxicity of splenocytes. Furthermore, T-cell subsets and multiple cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, -10, and-12; interferon [IFN]-γ; tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) in the blood were assessed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS Higher ratios of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and higher levels of IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were found in the blood of the mice that received CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection. The cytotoxicity potency of the splenocytes of these mice was significantly higher compared with the mice in other groups. Moreover, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection showed significantly better resistance to rechallenge. Compared with the mice in other groups, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection were superior in survival rates and antimetastatic effects. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggested that the therapeutic efficacy was closely associated with CpG-ODN administration in the combined therapeutic protocol of cryoablation, DCs, and immune adjuvant. In situ

  16. Downregulation of HOXA1 gene affects small cell lung cancer cell survival and chemoresistance under the regulation of miR-100.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Faman; Bai, Yifeng; Chen, Zhenzhu; Li, Yufa; Luo, Luqiao; Huang, Jie; Yang, Jie; Liao, Hongzhan; Guo, Linlang

    2014-05-01

    Chemoresistance is often developed in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and leads to poor prognosis. Hox genes, a highly conserved family, play a crucial role in apoptosis, receptor signalling and differentiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have also been shown to play a crucial role in these biological processes by regulating the target genes. Several studies reported that both Hox genes and miRNAs are involved in chemoresistance. The aim of our study is to characterise the clinical significance and functional roles of HOXA1 in SCLC. Expression of HOXA1 was examined in 63 cases of SCLC tissues and 29 cases of blood by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) methods. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic significance of HOXA1 in SCLC patients. Restoration of HOXA1 expression was carried out in SCLC multidrug resistant cell line H69AR and its parental cell line H69 to assess its influence on chemoresistance. Luciferase reporter assay was used to assess HOXA1 as a target of miR-100. The results showed that HOXA1 was expressed in 46% (29/63) of SCLC. Low HOXA1 expression was associated with the poor prognosis of SCLC (P<0.05 by the Fisher's Exact Test) and the shorter survival rate (P<0.001 by the Kaplan-Meier method). HOXA1 expression on both mRNA and protein levels significantly correlated with chemotherapy response. Enforced expression of HOXA1 in resistant H69AR cells led to increased chemosensitivity through increasing cell apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Inhibition of HOXA1 expression using HOXA1 siRNA in H69 cells resulted in cell resistance to therapeutic drugs through reducing drug-induced cell apoptosis accompanied with cell cycle arrest. Expression of endogenous miR-100 was significantly elevated in resistant H69AR cells and negatively related with HOXA1 expression. The expression of HOXA1 in SCLC tissues correlated inversely with the expression levels of miR-100. Reporter assays confirmed that

  17. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins

  18. ERG deregulation induces IGF-1R expression in prostate cancer cells and affects sensitivity to anti-IGF-1R agents.

    PubMed

    Mancarella, Caterina; Casanova-Salas, Irene; Calatrava, Ana; Ventura, Selena; Garofalo, Cecilia; Rubio-Briones, José; Magistroni, Vera; Manara, Maria Cristina; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Scotlandi, Katia

    2015-06-30

    Identifying patients who may benefit from targeted therapy is an urgent clinical issue in prostate cancer (PCa). We investigated the molecular relationship between TMPRSS2-ERG (T2E) fusion gene and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) to optimize the use of IGF-1R inhibitors.IGF-1R was analyzed in cell lines and in radical prostatectomy specimens in relation to T2E status. ERG binding to IGF-1R promoter was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Sensitivity to anti-IGF-1R agents was evaluated alone or in combination with anti-androgen abiraterone acetate in vitro at basal levels or upon ERG modulation.IGF-1R analysis performed in PCa cells or clinical samples showed that T2E expression correlated with higher IGF-1R expression at mRNA and protein levels. Genetic modulation of ERG directly affected IGF-1R protein levels in vitro. ChIP analysis showed that ERG binds IGF-1R promoter and that promoter occupancy is higher in T2E-positive cells. IGF-1R inhibition was more effective in cell lines expressing the fusion gene and combination of IGF-1R inhibitors with abiraterone acetate produced synergistic effects in T2E-expressing cells.Here, we provide the rationale for use of T2E fusion gene to select PCa patients for anti-IGF-1R treatments. The combination of anti-IGF-1R-HAbs with an anti-androgen therapy is strongly advocated for patients expressing T2E. PMID:25906745

  19. ERG deregulation induces IGF-1R expression in prostate cancer cells and affects sensitivity to anti-IGF-1R agents

    PubMed Central

    Mancarella, Caterina; Casanova-Salas, Irene; Calatrava, Ana; Ventura, Selena; Garofalo, Cecilia; Rubio-Briones, José; Magistroni, Vera; Manara, Maria Cristina; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Scotlandi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients who may benefit from targeted therapy is an urgent clinical issue in prostate cancer (PCa). We investigated the molecular relationship between TMPRSS2-ERG (T2E) fusion gene and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) to optimize the use of IGF-1R inhibitors. IGF-1R was analyzed in cell lines and in radical prostatectomy specimens in relation to T2E status. ERG binding to IGF-1R promoter was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Sensitivity to anti-IGF-1R agents was evaluated alone or in combination with anti-androgen abiraterone acetate in vitro at basal levels or upon ERG modulation. IGF-1R analysis performed in PCa cells or clinical samples showed that T2E expression correlated with higher IGF-1R expression at mRNA and protein levels. Genetic modulation of ERG directly affected IGF-1R protein levels in vitro. ChIP analysis showed that ERG binds IGF-1R promoter and that promoter occupancy is higher in T2E-positive cells. IGF-1R inhibition was more effective in cell lines expressing the fusion gene and combination of IGF-1R inhibitors with abiraterone acetate produced synergistic effects in T2E-expressing cells. Here, we provide the rationale for use of T2E fusion gene to select PCa patients for anti-IGF-1R treatments. The combination of anti-IGF-1R-HAbs with an anti-androgen therapy is strongly advocated for patients expressing T2E. PMID:25906745

  20. Alteration of O-GlcNAcylation affects serine phosphorylation and regulates gene expression and activity of pyruvate kinase M2 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiyawat, Parunya; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Svasti, Jisnuson; Champattanachai, Voraratt

    2015-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification that has extensive crosstalk with phosphorylation either at the same or adjacent sites of various proteins. We have previously reported that O-GlcNAcylation level was increased in primary breast and colorectal cancer, but the interplay of the two modifications remains unclear. Therefore, we explored crosstalk of the modifications by RNA interference against O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) in colorectal cancer cells. Two-dimensional immunoblotting and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the levels of O-GlcNAc and serine phosphorylation of many proteins including serine hydroxymethyltransferase, cytokeratin-8, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L, and lamin-B1, were reduced in siOGT cells compared to siScramble cells. In HT29 cells, immunoprecipitated PKM2 revealed decreased O-GlcNAc and serine phosphorylation levels after siOGT knockdown, but increased levels after treatment with Thiamet-G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). In addition, when global O-GlcNAcylation was enhanced by treating cells with Thiamet-G, PKM2 expression level was upregulated, but PKM2-specific activity was decreased. On the other hand, in OGT knockdown cells, PKM2 expression level was downregulated, but PKM2-specific activity was increased. Moreover, the metastatic colorectal cancer cells, SW620, had more O-GlcNAc-PKM2 and showed lower PKM2-specific activity compared to the non-metastatic colorectal cancer SW480 cells. These results suggested roles of O-GlcNAcylation in modulating serine phosphorylation, as well as in regulating PKM2 activity and expression. Interfering levels of O-GlcNAcylation of PKM2 may be a novel target in controlling cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26252736

  1. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  2. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure rate of more than 95%, but regular examination ...

  3. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies ... certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ...

  4. Multiplex gene expression analysis for high-throughput drug discovery: screening and analysis of compounds affecting genes overexpressed in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul H; Walker, Roger P; Jones, Steven W; Stephens, Kathy; Meurer, Janet; Zajchowski, Deborah A; Luke, May M; Eeckman, Frank; Tan, Yuping; Wong, Linda; Parry, Gordon; Morgan, Thomas K; McCarrick, Meg A; Monforte, Joseph

    2002-12-01

    Drug discovery strategies are needed that can rapidly exploit multiple therapeutic targets associated with the complex gene expression changes that characterize a polygenic disease such as cancer. We report a new cell-based high-throughput technology for screening chemical libraries against several potential cancer target genes in parallel. Multiplex gene expression (MGE) analysis provides direct and quantitative measurement of multiple endogenous mRNAs using a multiplexed detection system coupled to reverse transcription-PCR. A multiplex assay for six genes overexpressed in cancer cells was used to screen 9000 chemicals and known drugs in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Active compounds that modulated gene expression levels were identified, and IC50 values were determined for compounds that bind DNA, cell surface receptors, and components of intracellular signaling pathways. A class of steroids related to the cardiac glycosides was identified that potently inhibited the plasma membrane Na(+)K(+)-ATPase resulting in the inhibition of four of the prostate target genes including transcription factors Hoxb-13, hPSE/PDEF, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3alpha, and the inhibitor of apoptosis, survivin. Representative compounds selectively induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells compared with the nonmetastatic cell line BPH-1. The multiplex assay distinguished potencies among structural variants, enabling structure-activity analysis suitable for chemical optimization studies. A second multiplex assay for five toxicological markers, Hsp70, Gadd153, Gadd45, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and cyclophilin, detected compounds that caused DNA damage and cellular stress and was a more sensitive and specific indicator of potential toxicity than measurement of cell viability. MGE analysis facilitates rapid drug screening and compound optimization, the simultaneous measurement of toxicological end points, and gene function analysis. PMID:12516962

  5. Mutations in ribosomal proteins: Apoptosis, cell competition, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Kale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting multiple ribosomal proteins are implicated in cancer. Using genetic mosaics in the fruit fly Drosophila, we describe 3 apoptotic mechanisms that affect Rp/Rp homozygous mutant cells, Rp/+ heterozygous cells, or Rp/+ heterozygous cells in competition with nearby wild type cells, and discuss how apoptosis might be related to cancer predisposition. PMID:27308545

  6. Mutations in ribosomal proteins: Apoptosis, cell competition, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicholas E.; Kale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting multiple ribosomal proteins are implicated in cancer. Using genetic mosaics in the fruit fly Drosophila, we describe 3 apoptotic mechanisms that affect Rp/Rp homozygous mutant cells, Rp/+ heterozygous cells, or Rp/+ heterozygous cells in competition with nearby wild type cells, and discuss how apoptosis might be related to cancer predisposition. PMID:27308545

  7. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  8. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  9. Cinnamaldehyde affects the biological behavior of human colorectal cancer cells and induces apoptosis via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiepin; Teng, Yuhao; Liu, Shenlin; Wang, Zifan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yingying; Xi, Songyang; Xu, Song; Wang, Ruiping; Zou, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a bioactive compound isolated from the stem bark of Cinnamomum cassia, that has been identified as an antiproliferative substance with pro-apoptotic effects on various cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, the effects of CA on human colon cancer cells were investigated at both the molecular and cellular levels. Three types of colorectal cancer cells at various stages of differentiation and invasive ability (SW480, HCT116 and LoVo) were treated with CA at final concentrations of 20, 40 and 80 µg/ml for 24 h. Compared with the control group, the proliferation inhibition rate of the human colorectal cancer cells following treatment with CA increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The invasion and adhesion abilities of the cells were significantly inhibited as indicated by Transwell and cell-matrix adhesion assays. Meanwhile, CA also upregulated the expression of E-cadherin and downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. CA also elevated the apoptotic rate. The levels of pro-apoptotic genes were upregulated while the levels of apoptosis inhibitory genes were decreased which further confirmed the pro-apoptotic effect of CA. In order to explore the mechanism of CA-induced apoptosis, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) were used to regulate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The transcription activity of PI3K/AKT was markedly inhibited by CA, as well as IGF-1 which functions as an anti-apoptotic factor. In conclusion, CA has the potential to be developed as a new antitumor drug. The mechanisms of action involve the regulation of expression of genes involved in apoptosis, invasion and adhesion via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26677144

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  11. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  12. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  13. ANRIL is associated with the survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer, and affects cell migration and invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zheng, Zhao-Peng; Li, Hang; Zhang, Han-Qun; Ma, Fa-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) has been reported to be upregulated in various types of human cancer, and is also highly expressed in normal human tissue. The aim of the present study was to identify whether ANRIL may be a possible target for colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression levels of the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) ANRIL in 97 paired CRC and adjacent non‑neoplastic tissue samples. In addition, the HT29 and RKO human CRC cell lines underwent ANRIL RNA interference, and knockdown efficiency was evaluated by western blotting. Cell viability, and migratory and invasive ability were subsequently assessed. The CRC tissues were revealed to express higher levels of ANRIL lncRNA compared with the adjacent non‑neoplastic tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, high ANRIL expression was significantly associated with reduced survival rate (P<0.05). ANRIL gene expression was successfully silenced in human CRC cells. ANRIL knockdown decreased proliferation, inhibited migration and invasion, and reduced the colony‑forming ability of the cells. These data indicated that the lncRNA ANRIL is upregulated in CRC tissues, and is associated with CRC cell pathogenesis. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms of these effects may be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27314206

  14. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins

  15. Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testicular Cancer Resource Center Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC) 95% of all testicular tumors are germ cell ... seen in young adults. Patients with mediastinal nonseminomatous EGC are typically classed as poor risk patients because ...

  16. The microarray gene profiling analysis of glioblastoma cancer cells reveals genes affected by FAK inhibitor Y15 and combination of Y15 and temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Grace; Ho, Baotran; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Qiang, Hu; Golubovskaya, Vita

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma cells. Recently, we demonstrated that FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15 significantly decreased tumor growth of DBTRG and U87 cells, especially in combination with temozolomide. In the present report, we performed gene expression analysis in these cells to reveal genes affected by Y15, temozolomide and combination of Y15 and temozolomide. We tested the effect of Y15 on gene expression by Illumina Human HT12v4 microarray assay and detected 8087 and 6555 genes, which were significantly either up- or down-regulated by Y15-treatment in DBTRG and U87 cells, respectively (p<0.05). Moreover, DBTRG and U87 cells treated with Y15 changed expression of 1332 and 462 genes more than 1.5 fold, p<0.05, respectively and had 237 common genes affected by Y15. The common genes up-regulated by Y15 included GADD45A, HSPA6 (heat-shock 70); DUSP1, DUSP 5 (dual-phosphatase 5); CDKN1A (p21) and common down-regulated genes included kinesins, such as KIF11, 14, 20A, 20B; topoisomerase II, TOP2A; cyclin F; cell cycle protein: BUB1; PARP1, POLA1. In addition, we detected genes affected by temozolomide and by combination of Y15 and temozolomide treatment in U87 cells. Among genes up-regulated by Y15 and temozolomide more significantly than by each agent alone were: COX7B; interferon, gamma-inducible transcript: IFI16; DDIT4; GADD45G and down-regulated: KIF3A, AKT1; ABL; JAK1, GLI3 and ALDH1A3. Thus, microarray gene expression analysis can be effective in establishing genes affected in response to FAK inhibitor alone and in response to combination of Y15 with temozolomide that is important for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:23387973

  17. Membrane in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galeotti, T.; Cittadini, A.; Neri, G.; Scarpa, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on membranes in cancer cells. Topics covered include Oncogenies, hormones, and free-radical processes in malignant transformation in vitro and Superoxide onion may trigger DNA strand breaks in human granulorytes by acting as a membrane target.

  18. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245

  19. Nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this review is to report the Clinical Year in Review proceedings in the field of nonsmall cell lung cancer that were presented at the 2012 European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Various topics were reviewed, including epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and palliative and end of life care. PMID:23457162

  20. Cancer History May Affect Survival After Organ Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158468.html Cancer History May Affect Survival After Organ Transplant Study also ... death compared to organ recipients with no cancer history, new research suggests. The findings indicate that transplant ...

  1. Modulation of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor response and DNA recombination in breast cancer cells by drugs affecting endogenous wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Ireno, Ivanildce Cristiane; Wiehe, Rahel Stephanie; Stahl, Andreea Iulia; Hampp, Stephanie; Aydin, Sevtap; Troester, Melissa A; Selivanova, Galina; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic lethal interactions between poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and homologous recombination (HR) repair pathways have been exploited for the development of novel mono- and combination cancer therapies. The tumor suppressor p53 was demonstrated to exhibit indirect and direct regulatory activities in DNA repair, particularly in DNA double-strand break (DSB)-induced and replication-associated HR. In this study, we tested a potential influence of the p53 status on the response to PARP inhibition, which is known to cause replication stress. Silencing endogenous or inducibly expressing p53 we found a protective effect of p53 on PARP inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated cytotoxicities. This effect was specific for wild-type versus mutant p53 and observed in cancer but not in non-transformed cell lines. Enhanced cytotoxicities after treatment with the p53-inhibitory drug Pifithrinα further supported p53-mediated resistance to PARP inhibition. Surprisingly, we equally observed increased PARPi sensitivity in the presence of the p53-activating compound Nutlin-3. As a common denominator, both drug responses correlated with decreased HR activities: Pifithrinα downregulated spontaneous HR resulting in damage accumulation. Nutlin-3 induced a decrease of DSB-induced HR, which was accompanied by a severe drop in RAD51 protein levels. Thus, we revealed a novel link between PARPi responsiveness and p53-controlled HR activities. These data expand the concept of cell and stress type-dependent healer and killer functions of wild-type p53 in response to cancer therapeutic treatment. Our findings have implications for the individualized design of cancer therapies using PARPi and the potentially combined use of p53-modulatory drugs. PMID:25085902

  2. The Progression of Cell Death Affects the Rejection of Allogeneic Tumors in Immune-Competent Mice – Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaurio, Ricardo A.; Muñoz, Luis E.; Maueröder, Christian; Janko, Christina; Harrer, Thomas; Fürnrohr, Barbara G.; Niederweis, Michael; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin; Berens, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of dead and dying cells are produced during cancer therapy and allograft rejection. Depending on the death pathway and stimuli involved, dying cells exhibit diverse features, resulting in defined physiological consequences for the host. It is not fully understood how dying and dead cells modulate the immune response of the host. To address this problem, different death stimuli were studied in B16F10 melanoma cells by regulated inducible transgene expression of the pro-apoptotic active forms of caspase-3 (revCasp-3), Bid (tBid), and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-necrosis inducing toxin (CpnTCTD). The immune outcome elicited for each death stimulus was assessed by evaluating the allograft rejection of melanoma tumors implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c mice immunized with dying cells. Expression of all proteins efficiently killed cells in vitro (>90%) and displayed distinctive morphological and physiological features as assessed by multiparametric flow cytometry analysis. BALB/c mice immunized with allogeneic dying melanoma cells expressing revCasp-3 or CpnTCTD showed strong rejection of the allogeneic challenge. In contrast, mice immunized with cells dying either after expression of tBid or irradiation with UVB did not, suggesting an immunologically silent cell death. Surprisingly, immunogenic cell death induced by expression of revCasp-3 or CpnTCTD correlated with elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels at the time point of immunization. Conversely, early mitochondrial dysfunction induced by tBid expression or UVB irradiation accounted for the absence of intracellular ROS accumulation at the time point of immunization. Although ROS inhibition in vitro was not sufficient to abrogate the immunogenicity in our allo-immunization model, we suggest that the point of ROS generation and its intracellular accumulation may be an important factor for its role as damage associated molecular pattern in the development of allogeneic responses

  3. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  4. Calpain-mediated Processing of p53-associated Parkin-like Cytoplasmic Protein (PARC) Affects Chemosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells by Promoting p53 Subcellular Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Michael G.; Xue, Kai; Liu, Jiayin; McBride, Heidi; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to cisplatin (CDDP)-based therapy is a major hurdle to the successful treatment of human ovarian cancer (OVCA), and the chemoresistant phenotype in OVCA cells is associated with Akt-attenuated p53-mediated apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic functions of p53 involve both transcription-dependent and -independent signaling pathways, and dysfunctional localization and/or inactivation of p53 contribute to the development of chemoresistance. PARC is a cytoplasmic protein regulating p53 subcellular localization and subsequent function. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating PARC. Although PARC contains putative caspase-3 cleavage sites, and CDDP is known to induce the activation of caspases and calpains and induce proteasomal degradation of anti-apoptotic proteins, if and how PARC is regulated by CDDP in OVCA are unknown. Here, we present evidence that CDDP promotes calpain-mediated PARC down-regulation, mitochondrial and nuclear p53 accumulation, and apoptosis in chemosensitive but not resistant OVCA cells. Inhibition of Akt is required to sensitize chemoresistant cells to CDDP in a p53-dependent manner, an effect enhanced by PARC down-regulation. CDDP-induced PARC down-regulation is reversible by inhibition of calpain but not of caspases or the 26 S proteasome. Furthermore, in vitro experiments confirm the ability of calpain in mediating Ca2+-dependent PARC down-regulation. The role of Ca2+ in PARC down-regulation was further confirmed as ionomycin-induced PARC down-regulation in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. The data presented here implicate the regulation of p53 subcellular localization and apoptosis by PARC as a contributing factor in CDDP resistance in OVCA cells and Ca2+/calpain in PARC post-translational processing and chemosensitivity. PMID:22117079

  5. The Somatic Nature of Cancer Allows It to Affect Highly Constrained Genes.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Sheli L; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is special among genetic disorders in two major ways: first, cancer is a disease of the most basic of cellular functions, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Second, in contrast to most genetic disorders that are mediated by germline (hereditary) mutations, cancer is largely a somatic disease. Here we show that these two traits are not detached and that it is the somatic nature of cancer that allows it to affect the most basic of cellular functions. We begin by demonstrating that cancer genes are both more functionally central (as measured by their patterns of expression and protein interaction) and more evolutionarily constrained than non-cancer genetic disease genes. We then compare genes that are only modified somatically in cancer (hereinafter referred to as "somatic cancer genes") to those that can also be modified in a hereditary manner, contributing to cancer development (hereinafter referred to as "hereditary cancer genes"). We show that both somatic and hereditary cancer genes are much more functionally central than genes contributing to non-cancer genetic disorders. At the same time, hereditary cancer genes are only as constrained as non-cancer hereditary disease genes, while somatic cancer genes tend to be much more constrained in evolution. Thus, it appears that it is the somatic nature of cancer that allows it to modify the most constrained genes and, therefore, affect the most basic of cellular functions. PMID:27190005

  6. How Will Cancer Affect My Sex Life?

    MedlinePlus

    ... people have little or no change in their sexual desire and energy level during cancer treatment. Others find ... emotional demands of cancer and treatment. If your sexual desire and energy levels change during treatment, keep in ...

  7. Stochastic elimination of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A; Frank, Steven A; Iwasa, Yoh

    2003-01-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms consist of stem cells and differentiated cells. Stem cells divide to produce new stem cells or differentiated cells. Differentiated cells divide to produce new differentiated cells. We show that such a tissue design can reduce the rate of fixation of mutations that increase the net proliferation rate of cells. It has, however, no consequence for the rate of fixation of neutral mutations. We calculate the optimum relative abundance of stem cells that minimizes the rate of generating cancer cells. There is a critical fraction of stem cell divisions that is required for a stochastic elimination ('wash out') of cancer cells. PMID:14561289

  8. P53-regulated long non-coding RNA TUG1 affects cell proliferation in human non-small cell lung cancer, partly through epigenetically regulating HOXB7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, E-b; Yin, D-d; Sun, M; Kong, R; Liu, X-h; You, L-h; Han, L; Xia, R; Wang, K-m; Yang, J-s; De, W; Shu, Y-q; Wang, Z-x

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a novel class of transcripts, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), is being identified at a rapid pace. These RNAs have critical roles in diverse biological processes, including tumorigenesis. Here we report that taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), a 7.1-kb lncRNA, recruiting and binding to polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is generally downregulated in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tissues. In a cohort of 192 NSCLC patients, the lower expression of TUG1 was associated with a higher TNM stage and tumor size, as well as poorer overall survival (P<0.001). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that TUG1 expression serves as an independent predictor for overall survival (P<0.001). Further experiments revealed that TUG1 expression was induced by p53, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that TUG1 was a direct transcriptional target of p53. TUG1 knockdown significantly promoted the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the lncRNA-mediated regulation of the expression of HOX genes in tumorigenesis and development has been recently receiving increased attention. Interestingly, inhibition of TUG1 could upregulate homeobox B7 (HOXB7) expression; ChIP assays demonstrated that the promoter of HOXB7 locus was bound by EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), a key component of PRC2, and was H3K27 trimethylated. This TUG1-mediated growth regulation is in part due to specific modulation of HOXB7, thus participating in AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these results suggest that p53-regulated TUG1 is a growth regulator, which acts in part through control of HOXB7. The p53/TUG1/PRC2/HOXB7 interaction might serve as targets for NSCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:24853421

  9. Cancer Cell Growth Is Differentially Affected by Constitutive Activation of NRF2 by KEAP1 Deletion and Pharmacological Activation of NRF2 by the Synthetic Triterpenoid, RTA 405

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Brandon L.; McCauley, Lyndsey; Trevino, Isaac; Wigley, W. Christian; Ferguson, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic triterpenoids are antioxidant inflammation modulators (AIMs) that exhibit broad anticancer activity. AIMs bind to KEAP1 and inhibit its ability to promote NRF2 degradation. As a result, NRF2 increases transcription of genes that restore redox balance and reduce inflammation. AIMs inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by increasing NRF2 activity in the tumor microenvironment and by modulating the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways, including NF-κB, in tumor cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that KEAP1 loss or mutation—which results in high levels of sustained NRF2 activity—may promote cancer growth and increase chemoresistance. Loss of KEAP1 also increases the levels of other oncogenic proteins, including IKKβ and BCL2. The apparent survival advantage provided to some tumor cells by loss of functional KEAP1 raises the question of whether pharmacological inhibition of KEAP1 could promote tumor growth. To address this issue, we characterized the basal levels of KEAP1 and NRF2 in a panel of human tumor cell lines and profiled the activity of an AIM, RTA 405. We found that in tumor cell lines with low or mutant KEAP1, and in Keap1-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts, multiple KEAP1 targets including NRF2, IKKβ, and BCL2 were elevated. Keap1-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts also had higher rates of proliferation and colony formation than their wild-type counterparts. In cells with functional KEAP1, RTA 405 increased NRF2 levels, but not IKKβ or BCL2 levels, and did not increase cell proliferation or survival. Moreover, RTA 405 inhibited growth at similar concentrations in cells with different basal NRF2 activity levels and in cells with wild-type or mutant KRAS. Finally, pre-treatment with RTA 405 did not protect tumor cells from doxorubicin- or cisplatin-mediated growth inhibition. Collectively, these data demonstrate that pharmacological activation of NRF2 by AIMs is distinct from genetic activation and does not provide a growth or survival

  10. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  11. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  12. DNA From Dead Cancer Cells Induces TLR9-Mediated Invasion and Inflammation In Living Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kaakinen, Mika; Patel, Ankita; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Chen, Dongquan; Harris, Kevin W.; Graves, David; Selander, Katri S.

    2014-01-01

    TLR9 is a cellular DNA-receptor, which is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. Although synthetic TLR9-ligands induce cancer cell invasion in vitro, the role of TLR9 in cancer pathophysiology has remained unclear. We show here that living cancer cells uptake DNA from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells. We discovered that such DNA induces TLR9- and cathepsin-mediated invasion in living cancer cells. To study whether this phenomenon contributes to treatment responses, triple negative, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stably expressing control or TLR9 siRNA were inoculated orthotopically into nude mice. The mice were treated with vehicle or doxorubicin. The tumor groups exhibited equal decreases in size in response to doxorubicin. However, while the weights of vehicle-treated mice were similar, mice bearing control siRNA tumors became significantly more cachectic in response to doxorubicin, as compared with similarly treated mice bearing TLR9 siRNA tumors, suggesting a TLR9-mediated inflammation at the site of the tumor. In conclusion, our findings propose that DNA released from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells has significant influence on TLR9-mediated biological effects in living cancer cells. Through these mechanisms, tumor TLR9 expression may affect treatment responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24212717

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  14. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  16. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  17. h-prune affects anaplastic thyroid cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Junko; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Sugino, Keizo; Shimamoto, Fumio; Kikuchi, Akira; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies and is resistant to multimodal treatments. The expression of h-prune, the human homologue of Drosophila prune, has been reported to be correlated with progression and aggressiveness in various cancers including breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. We examined the role of h-prune in anaplastic thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of h-prune was performed with 15 surgically resected specimens of anaplastic thyroid cancers. To investigate cell motility, Boyden chamber, wound healing and matrigel invasion assays were performed using cells from anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. A murine orthotopic thyroid cancer model was used to investigate metastatic ability. In the immunohistochemical analysis, only weak focal or no staining of h-prune was observed in non-tumor tissue. In contrast, diffuse staining of h-prune was observed in anaplastic thyroid cancer and lymph node metastasis samples. Both inhibition of h-prune phosphodiesterase activity with dipyridamole and small interfering RNA for h-prune suppressed 8505C and KTC-3 cell motility. In addition, treatment with dipyridamole and decreased expression of h-prune suppressed tumor invasion and pulmonary metastasis in a NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mouse orthotopic thyroid cancer model. In conclusion, h-prune is frequently expressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and lymph nodes metastasis, and promotes migration and invasion of anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and metastasis in an anaplastic thyroid cancer model. Thus, h-prune shows promise as a targeting candidate against anaplastic thyroid cancer. PMID:27109060

  18. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  19. Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Dralle, Henning; Machens, Andreas; Basa, Johanna; Fatourechi, Vahab; Franceschi, Silvia; Hay, Ian D; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Pacini, Furio; Pasieka, Janice L; Sherman, Steven I

    2015-01-01

    Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cells in the thyroid gland, which secrete the iodine-containing thyroid hormones. Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers can be classified into papillary thyroid cancer (80-85%), follicular thyroid cancer (10-15%), poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (<2%) and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancer (<2%), and these have an excellent prognosis with the exception of undifferentiated thyroid cancer. The advent and expansion of advanced diagnostic techniques has driven and continues to drive the epidemic of occult papillary thyroid cancer, owing to overdiagnosis of clinically irrelevant nodules. This transformation of the thyroid cancer landscape at molecular and clinical levels calls for the modification of management strategies towards personalized medicine based on individual risk assessment to deliver the most effective but least aggressive treatment. In thyroid cancer surgery, for instance, injuries to structures outside the thyroid gland, such as the recurrent laryngeal nerve in 2-5% of surgeries or the parathyroid glands in 5-10% of surgeries, negatively affect quality of life more than loss of the expendable thyroid gland. Furthermore, the risks associated with radioiodine ablation may outweigh the risks of persistent or recurrent disease and disease-specific mortality. Improvement in the health-related quality of life of survivors of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, which is decreased despite the generally favourable outcome, hinges on early tumour detection and minimization of treatment-related sequelae. Future opportunities include more widespread adoption of molecular and clinical risk stratification and identification of actionable targets for individualized therapies. PMID:27188261

  20. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  1. Metabolic syndrome affects breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: National Cancer Institute of Naples experience.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Immacolata; Esposito, Emanuela; Pentimalli, Francesca; Crispo, Anna; Montella, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Maria; De Marco, MariaRosaria; Cavalcanti, Ernestina; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Fucito, Alfredo; Frasci, Giuseppe; Maurea, Nicola; Esposito, Giuseppe; Pedicini, Tonino; Vecchione, Aldo; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-12-15

    Postmenopausal women show the highest incidence of breast cancer in the female population and are often affected by metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome (MS)--characterized by central adiposity, insulin resistance, low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high serum triglyceride and high blood pressure--seems to be strictly correlated to breast carcinogenesis. We enrolled 777 healthy women and women with breast cancer in our nested case-control study to evaluate the association between MS and breast cancer, analyzing anthropometric parameters (weight, height, BMI, waist and hip circumference), blood pressure, serum HDL-C, triglyceride, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, testosterone and uric acid levels and administering a questionnaire about physical activity, food intake, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, personal and familial history of disease. We found an higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (30%) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients compared to healthy women (19%). None of the individual MS features was strong enough to be considered responsible for breast carcinogenesis alone. However, of the 63 postmenopausal breast cancer cases associated to MS, 30% presented three or more MS features, suggesting that the activation of multiple molecular pathways underlying MS might contribute to tumorigenesis. Our data support the hypothesis that MS may be an indicator of breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. The unsettlement of the hormonal arrangement in postmenopausal, along with an increase in visceral adiposity, probably favour the hormone-dependent cell proliferation, which drives tumorigenesis. Adjustments in lifestyle with physical activity intensification and healthy diet could represent modifiable factors for the primary prevention of sporadic breast cancer. PMID:20935521

  2. Autophagy, cell death, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Baehrecke, Eric H

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular catabolic process that is used by all cells to degrade dysfunctional or unnecessary cytoplasmic components through delivery to the lysosome. Increasing evidence reveals that autophagic dysfunction is associated with human diseases, such as cancer. Paradoxically, although autophagy is well recognized as a cell survival process that promotes tumor development, it can also participate in a caspase-independent form of programmed cell death. Induction of autophagic cell death by some anticancer agents highlights the potential of this process as a cancer treatment modality. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of autophagy and the potential roles of autophagy in cell death, cancer development, and cancer treatment. PMID:27308466

  3. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  4. Online CME Series Can Nutrition Simultaneously Affect Cancer and Aging? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Aging is considered by some scientists to be a normal physiological process, while others believe it is a disease. Increased cancer risk in the elderly raises the question regarding the common pathways for cancer and aging. Undeniably, nutrition plays an important role in both cases and this webinar will explore whether nutrition can simultaneously affect cancer and aging. |

  5. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and prevent certain cancers. Here, we show that simvastatin decreases the SASP of senescent human fibroblasts by inhibiting protein prenylation, without affecting the senescent growth arrest. The Rho family GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 were activated in senescent cells, and simvastatin reduced both activities. Further, geranylgeranyl transferase, Rac1 or Cdc42 depletion reduced IL-6 secretion by senescent cells. We also show that simvastatin mitigates the effects of senescent conditioned media on breast cancer cell proliferation and endocrine resistance. Our findings identify a novel activity of simvastatin and mechanism of SASP regulation. They also suggest that senescent cells, which accumulate after radio/chemo therapy, promote endocrine resistance in breast cancer and that simvastatin might suppress this resistance. PMID:26658759

  6. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes. PMID:22043817

  7. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum-resident Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Isoform Glucose-regulated Protein 94 (GRP94) Regulates Cell Polarity and Cancer Cell Migration by Affecting Intracellular Transport.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Suman; Shinogle, Heather E; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Blagg, Brian S J

    2016-04-15

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is up-regulated in cancer and is required for the folding of numerous signaling proteins. Consequently, HSP90 represents an ideal target for the development of new anti-cancer agents. The human HSP90 isoform, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and regulates secretory pathways, integrins, and Toll-like receptors, which contribute to regulating immunity and metastasis. However, the cellular function of GRP94 remains underinvestigated. We report that GRP94 knockdown cells are defective in intracellular transport and, consequently, negatively impact the trafficking of F-actin toward the cellular cortex, integrin α2 and integrin αL toward the cell membrane and filopodia, and secretory vesicles containing the HSP90α-AHA1-survivin complex toward the leading edge. As a result, GRP94 knockdown cells form a multipolar spindle instead of bipolar morphology and consequently manifest a defect in cell migration and adhesion. PMID:26872972

  9. The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Engblom, Camilla; Pfirschke, Christina; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-07-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the ability to durably control cancer in some patients by manipulating T lymphocytes. These immunotherapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment but benefit only a minority of patients. It is thus a crucial time for clinicians, cancer scientists and immunologists to determine the next steps in shifting cancer treatment towards better cancer control. This Review describes recent advances in our understanding of tumour-associated myeloid cells. These cells remain less studied than T lymphocytes but have attracted particular attention because their presence in tumours is often linked to altered patient survival. Also, experimental studies indicate that myeloid cells modulate key cancer-associated activities, including immune evasion, and affect virtually all types of cancer therapy. Consequently, targeting myeloid cells could overcome limitations of current treatment options. PMID:27339708

  10. Contemporary Quality of Life Issues Affecting Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Penson, Richard; Barakat, Richard; Wenzel, Lari

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers account for approximately 11% of the newly diagnosed cancers in women in the United States and 18% in the world.1 The most common gynecologic malignancies occur in the uterus and endometrium (53%), ovary (25%), and cervix (14%).2 Cervical cancer is most prevalent in premenopausal women, during their childbearing years, whereas uterine and ovarian cancers tend to present in the perimenopausal or menopausal period. Vaginal and vulvar cancers and malignancies arising from gestation, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasms, occur to a lesser extent. Regardless of cancer origin or age of onset, the disease and its treatment can produce short- and long-term sequelae (ie, sexual dysfunction, infertility, or lymphedema) that adversely affect quality of life (QOL). This article outlines the primary contemporary issues or concerns that may affect QOL and offers strategies to offset or mitigate QOL disruption. These contemporary issues are identified within the domains of sexual functioning, reproductive issues, lymphedema, and the contribution of health-related QOL (HRQOL) in influential gynecologic cancer clinical trials. PMID:22244668

  11. Salivary Gland Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the existence of a tumorigenic population of cancer cells that demonstrate stem cell-like properties such as self-renewal and multipotency. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), are able to both initiate and maintain tumor formation and progression. Studies have shown that CSC are resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments preventing complete eradication of the tumor cell population. Following treatment, CSC are able to re-initiate tumor growth leading to patient relapse. Salivary gland cancers are relatively rare but constitute a highly significant public health issue due to the lack of effective treatments. In particular, patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two most common salivary malignancies, have low long-term survival rates due to the lack of response to current therapies. Considering the role of CSC in resistance to therapy in other tumor types, it is possible that this unique sub-population of cells is involved in resistance of salivary gland tumors to treatment. Characterization of CSC can lead to better understanding of the pathobiology of salivary gland malignancies as well as to the development of more effective therapies. Here, we make a brief overview of the state-of-the-science in salivary gland cancer, and discuss possible implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the treatment of salivary gland malignancies. PMID:23810400

  12. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  13. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  14. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  15. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples. PMID:26438443

  16. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  17. Factors affecting receipt of chemotherapy in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Libby; Coalson, Jenna; Mowat, Fionna; O’Malley, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To review literature describing factors associated with receipt of chemotherapy for breast cancer, to better understand what factors are most relevant to women’s health and whether health disparities are apparent, and to assess how these factors might affect observational studies and outcomes research. Patterns of care for metastatic breast cancer, for which no standard-of-care exists, were of particular interest. Methods: Relevant studies written in English, Italian, French, or Spanish, published in 2000 or later, were identified through MEDLINE and reviewed. Review articles and clinical trials were excluded; all observational studies and surveys were considered. Articles were reviewed for any discussion of patient characteristics, hospital/physician/insurance characteristics, psychosocial characteristics, and clinical characteristics affecting receipt of chemotherapy by breast cancer patients. Results: In general, factors associated with increased likelihood of receiving chemotherapy included younger age, being Caucasian, having good general health and few co-morbidities, having more severe clinical disease, having responded well to previous treatment, and having breast cancer that is estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-negative. Many of the clinical factors found to increase the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy were consistent with current oncology guidelines. Of the relevant 19 studies identified, only six (32%) reported data specific to metastatic cancer; most studies aggregated women with stage I–IV for purposes of analysis. Conclusion: Studies of patterns of care in breast cancer treatment can help identify challenges in health care provided to particular subgroups of women and can aid researchers in designing studies that account for such factors in clinical and outcomes research. Although scarce, studies evaluating only women with metastatic breast cancer indicate that factors affecting decisions related to receipt of chemotherapy are similar

  18. Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tariq; Wildes, Flonne; Kakkad, Samata; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as the primary route for metastatic spread to lymph nodes. However, it is not clear how interactions between cancer cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), especially within hypoxic microenvironments, affect the invasion of cancer cells. Here, using an MR compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the role of LEC-prostate cancer (PCa) cell interaction in the invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by two human PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, under normoxia and hypoxia, and determined the metabolic changes that occurred under these conditions. We observed a significant increase in the invasion of ECM by invasive PC-3 cells, but not poorly invasive DU-145 cells when human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dlys) were present. Enhanced degradation of ECM by PC-3 cells in the presence of HMVEC-dlys identified interactions between HMVEC-dlys and PCa cells influencing cancer cell invasion. The enhanced ECM degradation was partly attributed to increased MMP-9 enzymatic activity in PC-3 cells when HMVEC-dlys were in close proximity. Significantly higher uPAR and MMP-9 expression levels observed in PC-3 cells compared to DU-145 cells may be one mechanism for increased invasion and degradation of matrigel by these cells irrespective of the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Hypoxia significantly decreased invasion by PC-3 cells, but this decrease was significantly attenuated when HMVEC-dlys were present. Significantly higher phosphocholine was observed in invasive PC-3 cells, while higher glycerophosphocholine was observed in DU-145 cells. These metabolites were not altered in the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Significantly increased lipid levels and lipid droplets were observed in PC-3 and DU-145 cells under hypoxia reflecting an adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. These results suggest that in vivo, invasive cells in or near lymphatic endothelial cells are likely to be more invasive and degrade the ECM

  19. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  20. Epirubicin pretreatment enhances NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Dong, Ying; Wu, Jing; Qiao, Yuan; Zhu, Ge; Jin, Haofan; Cui, Jiuwei; Li, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Jingtao; Song, Yanqiu

    2016-01-01

    Anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a conventional treatment for breast cancer. However, it can negatively affect host immune function and thereby impair patients’ quality of life. Boosting the host immune system and reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy are important for effective cancer treatment. Natural killer (NK) cells stimulate immune responses against cancer; autologous immune enhancement therapy with NK cells prolongs patient survival without significant adverse effects. This study investigated the effects of combined treatment with the anthracycline agent epirubicin (EPI) and NK cells on human breast cancer cells. NK cells were obtained by autologous adoptive cell transfer from breast cancer patients and amplified for 14 days in vitro. The cytotoxicity of NK cells against breast cancer cells was higher following EPI (5.0 μg/ml) pretreatment than without EPI pretreatment or application of EPI alone. The expression of NKG2D ligands [unique long 16-binding protein (ULBP) 1, ULBP2, and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A] in breast cancer cells was upregulated by pretreatment with EPI, which also increased the secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and expression of perforin and granzyme B in NK cells. These results indicate that EPI-NK cell treatment has synergistic cytotoxic effects against breast cancer cells, and suggest that anthracycline-based chemotherapy and NK cell-based immunotherapy can be combined for more effective breast cancer treatment. PMID:27158340

  1. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Physical parameters affecting living cells in space.

    PubMed

    Langbein, D

    1986-01-01

    The question is posed: Why does a living cell react to the absence of gravity? What sensors may it have? Does it note pressure, sedimentation, convection, or other parameters? If somewhere in a liquid volume sodium ions are replaced by potassium ions, the density of the liquid changes locally: the heavier regions sink, the lighter regions rise. This may contribute to species transport, to the metabolism. Under microgravity this mechanism is strongly reduced. On the other hand, other reasons for convection like thermal and solutal interface convection are left. Do they affect species transport? Another important effect of gravity is the hydrostatic pressure. On the macroscopic side, the pressure between our head and feet changes by 0.35 atmospheres. On the microscopic level the hydrostatic pressure on the upper half of a cell membrane is lower than on the lower half. This, by affecting the ion transport through the membrane, may change the surrounding electric potential. It has been suggested to be one of the reasons for graviperception. Following the discussion of these and other effects possibly important in life sciences in space, an order of magnitude analysis of the residual accelerations tolerable during experiments in materials sciences is outlined. In the field of life sciences only rough estimates are available at present. PMID:11537842

  4. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  5. Functional TLR5 genetic variants affect human colorectal cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Klimosch, Sascha N; Försti, Asta; Eckert, Jana; Knezevic, Jelena; Bevier, Melanie; von Schönfels, Witigo; Heits, Nils; Walter, Jessica; Hinz, Sebastian; Lascorz, Jesus; Hampe, Jochen; Hartl, Dominik; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Hemminki, Kari; Schafmayer, Clemens; Weber, Alexander N R

    2013-12-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are overexpressed on many types of cancer cells, including colorectal cancer cells, but little is known about the functional relevance of these immune regulatory molecules in malignant settings. Here, we report frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the flagellin receptor TLR5 and the TLR downstream effector molecules MyD88 and TIRAP that are associated with altered survival in a large cohort of Caucasian patients with colorectal cancer (n = 613). MYD88 rs4988453, a SNP that maps to a promoter region shared with the acetyl coenzyme-A acyl-transferase-1 (ACAA1), was associated with decreased survival of patients with colorectal cancer and altered transcriptional activity of the proximal genes. In the TLR5 gene, rs5744174/F616L was associated with increased survival, whereas rs2072493/N592S was associated with decreased survival. Both rs2072493/N592S and rs5744174/F616L modulated TLR5 signaling in response to flagellin or to different commensal and pathogenic intestinal bacteria. Notably, we observed a reduction in flagellin-induced p38 phosphorylation, CD62L shedding, and elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β mRNA in human primary immune cells from TLR5 616LL homozygote carriers, as compared with 616FF carriers. This finding suggested that the well-documented effect of cytokines like IL-6 on colorectal cancer progression might be mediated by TLR5 genotype-dependent flagellin sensing. Our results establish an important link between TLR signaling and human colorectal cancer with relevance for biomarker and therapy development. PMID:24154872

  6. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  7. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth. PMID:20431026

  8. Cancer stem cells and exosome signaling.

    PubMed

    Hannafon, Bethany N; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have been recognized as mediators of intercellular communication among different cell populations in various biological model systems. By transfer of signaling molecules such as proteins, lipids, and RNAs between different cell types, exosomes are implicated in both physiological and pathological processes. The tumor microenvironment consists of multiple types of cells including adult stem cells, cancer stem cells, and stromal cells. These cells are known to intercommunicate with each other thereby modulating tumor progression. Recent studies have provided evidence demonstrating that exosomes mediate the interactions among different types of cells within the tumor microenvironment, providing new insight into how these cells interact with each other through exosome signaling. This review is focused on recent studies that have examined exosome-mediated intercommunication among cancer stem cells, adult stem cells, cancer cells, and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the current literature, it seems clear that adult stem cells and cancer stem cells secret exosomes that can be transferred to their surrounding cells thereby modulating cancer progression. Likewise, cancer cells and stromal cells also release exosomes that can be taken up by cancer stem cells or adult stem cells, leading to alterations to their phenotype. The molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the exosome-mediated interactions of these cells remain to be further elucidated. A better understanding of how exosomes mediate intercellular communication in the tumor microenvironment and the specific biological consequences of these interactions will likely offer new opportunities in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:27358879

  9. Cancer stem cells and exosome signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hannafon, Bethany N.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have been recognized as mediators of intercellular communication among different cell populations in various biological model systems. By transfer of signaling molecules such as proteins, lipids, and RNAs between different cell types, exosomes are implicated in both physiological and pathological processes. The tumor microenvironment consists of multiple types of cells including adult stem cells, cancer stem cells, and stromal cells. These cells are known to intercommunicate with each other thereby modulating tumor progression. Recent studies have provided evidence demonstrating that exosomes mediate the interactions among different types of cells within the tumor microenvironment, providing new insight into how these cells interact with each other through exosome signaling. This review is focused on recent studies that have examined exosome-mediated intercommunication among cancer stem cells, adult stem cells, cancer cells, and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the current literature, it seems clear that adult stem cells and cancer stem cells secret exosomes that can be transferred to their surrounding cells thereby modulating cancer progression. Likewise, cancer cells and stromal cells also release exosomes that can be taken up by cancer stem cells or adult stem cells, leading to alterations to their phenotype. The molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the exosome-mediated interactions of these cells remain to be further elucidated. A better understanding of how exosomes mediate intercellular communication in the tumor microenvironment and the specific biological consequences of these interactions will likely offer new opportunities in the development of diagnostic or therapeutic strategies against cancer.

  10. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in younger people who have had extensive sun exposure. You are more likely to get basal cell ... severe sunburns early in life Long-term daily sun exposure (such as the sun exposure received by people ...

  11. Hypoxia and metabolic adaptation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Eales, K L; Hollinshead, K E R; Tennant, D A

    2016-01-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a pervasive physiological and pathophysiological stimulus that metazoan organisms have contended with since they evolved from their single-celled ancestors. The effect of hypoxia on a tissue can be either positive or negative, depending on the severity, duration and context. Over the long-term, hypoxia is not usually consistent with normal function and so multicellular organisms have had to evolve both systemic and cellular responses to hypoxia. Our reliance on oxygen for efficient adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation has meant that the cellular metabolic network is particularly sensitive to alterations in oxygen tension. Metabolic changes in response to hypoxia are elicited through both direct mechanisms, such as the reduction in ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of fatty-acid desaturation, and indirect mechanisms including changes in isozyme expression through hypoxia-responsive transcription factor activity. Significant regions of cancers often grow in hypoxic conditions owing to the lack of a functional vasculature. As hypoxic tumour areas contain some of the most malignant cells, it is important that we understand the role metabolism has in keeping these cells alive. This review will outline our current understanding of many of the hypoxia-induced changes in cancer cell metabolism, how they are affected by other genetic defects often present in cancers, and how these metabolic alterations support the malignant hypoxic phenotype. PMID:26807645

  12. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  13. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  14. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria; Montagnani, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  15. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  17. Multilevel factors affecting quality: examples from the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Zapka, Jane; Taplin, Stephen H; Ganz, Patricia; Grunfeld, Eva; Sterba, Katherine

    2012-05-01

    The complex environmental context must be considered as we move forward to improve cancer care and, ultimately, patient and population outcomes. The cancer care continuum represents several care types, each of which includes multiple technical and communication steps and interfaces among patients, providers, and organizations. We use two case scenarios to 1) illustrate the variability, diversity, and interaction of factors from multiple levels that affect care quality and 2) discuss research implications and provide hypothetical examples of multilevel interventions. Each scenario includes a targeted literature review to illustrate contextual influences upon care and sets the stage for theory-informed interventions. The screening case highlights access issues in older women, and the survivorship case illustrates the multiple transition challenges faced by patients, families, and organizations. Example interventions show the potential gains of implementing intervention strategies that work synergistically at multiple levels. While research examining multilevel intervention is a priority, it presents numerous study design, measurement, and analytic challenges. PMID:22623591

  18. Cell-ECM Interactions During Cancer Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), a fibrous material that forms a network in a tissue, significantly affects many aspects of cellular behavior, including cell movement and proliferation. Transgenic mouse tumor studies indicate that excess collagen, a major component of ECM, enhances tumor formation and invasiveness. Clinically, tumor associated collagen signatures are strong markers for breast cancer survival. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear since the properties of ECM are complex, with diverse structural and mechanical properties depending on various biophysical parameters. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic fiber network model, and parameterized it with in vitro collagen mechanics. Using this model, we study ECM remodeling as a result of local deformation and cell migration through the ECM as a network percolation problem. We have also developed a three-dimensional, multiscale model of cell migration and interaction with ECM. Our model reproduces quantitative single cell migration experiments. This model is a first step toward a fully biomechanical cell-matrix interaction model and may shed light on tumor associated collagen signatures in breast cancer. This work was partially supported by NIH-U01CA143069.

  19. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. PMID:27041993

  20. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  1. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26958490

  2. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  3. Mechanical compression drives cancer cells toward invasive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Janet M.; Cheng, Gang; Tyrrell, James A.; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Boucher, Yves; Jain, Rakesh K.; Munn, Lance L.

    2012-01-01

    Uncontrolled growth in a confined space generates mechanical compressive stress within tumors, but little is known about how such stress affects tumor cell behavior. Here we show that compressive stress stimulates migration of mammary carcinoma cells. The enhanced migration is accomplished by a subset of “leader cells” that extend filopodia at the leading edge of the cell sheet. Formation of these leader cells is dependent on cell microorganization and is enhanced by compressive stress. Accompanied by fibronectin deposition and stronger cell–matrix adhesion, the transition to leader-cell phenotype results in stabilization of persistent actomyosin-independent cell extensions and coordinated migration. Our results suggest that compressive stress accumulated during tumor growth can enable coordinated migration of cancer cells by stimulating formation of leader cells and enhancing cell–substrate adhesion. This novel mechanism represents a potential target for the prevention of cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:22203958

  4. Fas signal promotes lung cancer growth by recruiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells via cancer cell-derived PGE2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiuyan; Zhang, Minggang; Yu, Yizhi; Liu, Xia; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-03-15

    Fas/FasL system has been extensively investigated with respect to its capacity to induce cellular apoptosis. However, accumulated evidences show that Fas signaling also exhibits nonapoptotic functions, such as induction of cell proliferation and differentiation. Lung cancer is one of cancer's refractory to the immunotherapy, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we show that Fas overexpression does not affect in vitro growth of 3LL cells, but promotes lung cancer growth in vivo. However, such tumor-promoting effect is not observed in FasL-deficient (gld) mice, and also not observed in the immune competent mice once inoculation with domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, suggesting the critical role of Fas signal in the promotion of lung cancer growth in vivo. More accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells is found in tumors formed by inoculation with Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, but not domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells. Accordingly, Fas-ligated 3LL lung cancer cells can chemoattract more MDSC but not regulatory T cells in vitro. Furthermore, Fas ligation induces 3LL lung cancer cells to produce proinflammatory factor PGE(2) by activating p38 pathway, and in turn, 3LL cells-derived PGE(2) contribute to the Fas ligation-induced MDSC chemoattraction. Furthermore, in vivo administration of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can significantly reduce MDSC accumulation in the Fas-overexpressing tumor. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Fas signal can promote lung cancer growth by recruiting MDSC via cancer cell-derived PGE(2), thus providing new mechanistic explanation for the role of inflammation in cancer progression and immune escape. PMID:19265159

  5. Downregulation of BC200 in ovarian cancer contributes to cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance to carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; WANG, TIANZHEN; REN, CHENGCHENG; LIU, LEI; KONG, DAN; JIN, XIAOMING; LI, XIAOBO; ZHANG, GUANGMEI

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serve an important role in carcinogenesis. BC200 is a lncRNA that is reportedly associated with ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate this potential association between BC200 and ovarian cancer, and to subsequently analyze the biological function of BC200 in the disease. BC200 expression was compared in ovarian cancer tissue and normal ovarian tissue samples through the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To allow the biological function of BC200 in ovarian cancer to be analyzed, small interfering RNA was used to knock down the expression of BC200 in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. The proliferative, invasive and migratory abilities of the cells were identified by means of cell counting kits and Transwell assays. Carboplatin was also used to treat the ovarian cancer cells, and a luminescent cell viability assay was subsequently used to detect the sensitivity of the cells to the carboplatin. The results demonstrated that BC200 expression was reduced in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovarian tissue samples. In the SKOV3 and A2780 cells, BC200 exerted no effect on invasive or migratory ability, however, the inhibition of BC200 was demonstrated to promote cell proliferation. Additionally, it was observed that carboplatin induced BC200 expression in the cell lines, and that the inhibition of BC200 decreased the sensitivity of the cells to the drug. BC200 is therefore likely to have a tumor suppressive function in ovarian cancer by affecting cell proliferation. Furthermore, BC200 appears to serve a role in the mediation of carboplatin-induced ovarian cancer cell death. PMID:26893717

  6. Multiple Myeloma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Carol Ann; Matsui, William

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the clonal expansion of neoplastic plasma cells within the bone marrow, elevated serum immunoglobulin, and osteolytic bone disease. The disease is highly responsive to a wide variety of anticancer treatments including conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, corticosteroids, radiation therapy, and a growing number of agents with novel mechanisms of action. However, few if any patients are cured with these modalities and relapse remains a critical issue. A better understanding of clonogenic multiple myleoma cells is essential to ultimately improving long-term outcomes, but the nature of the cells responsible for myeloma regrowth and disease relapse is unclear. We review evidence that functional heterogeneity exists in multiple myeloma and discuss potential strategies and clinical implications of the stem-cell model of cancer in this disease. PMID:18539970

  7. MicroRNA‑21 expression is associated with the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma and affects the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by regulating Noxa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haibin; Wang, Panzhi; Zhang, Qiangnu; He, Xiaoyan; Zai, Guozhen; Wang, Xudong; Ma, Mei; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    The expression levels of microRNA‑21 (miR‑21) are increased in a number of types of solid tumors. However, the association between miR‑21 expression and clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, and gastric cancer proliferation, invasion and migration remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of miR‑21 on the clinical features, proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms associated with Noxa. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) was performed to detect the expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa in samples of gastric cancer tissue and matched, adjacent, non‑tumor tissue. The association between miR‑21 expression and the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, as well as the correlation between the mRNA and protein expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa were analyzed. SGC‑7901 gastric cancer cells were cultured in vitro and transfected with an miR‑21 mimic. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on proliferation and the cell cycle was determined using the MTT assay and flow cytometry. In addition, migration and invasion of SGC‑7901 cells were observed using the Transwell assay. The target gene of miR‑21 was identified using bioinformatics software and a dual luciferase reporting system. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells was also analyzed by RT‑qPCR and western blotting. Increased levels of miR‑21 expression and decreased levels of Noxa expression were observed in gastric cancer tissue samples when compared with the adjacent non‑tumor tissue samples. An increased miR‑21 expression level was identified as a risk factor for advanced stage gastric cancer, lymph node metastasis and larger primary tumors. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR‑21 inhibited Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells. Therefore, high levels of miR‑21 expression may induce gastric cancer

  8. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation. PMID:25411331

  9. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the “drivers” of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  10. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  11. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  12. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  13. Extinction models for cancer stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Lange, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tools are birth–death Markov chains in continuous time. In this framework, we investigate the extinction times of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells. Application of extreme value theory from mathematical statistics yields an accurate asymptotic distribution and corresponding moments for both extinction times. We compare these distributions for the two cell populations as a function of the killing rates. Perhaps a more telling comparison involves the number of normal stem cells NH at the extinction time of the cancer stem cells. Conditioning on the asymptotic time to extinction of the cancer stem cells allows us to calculate the asymptotic mean and variance of NH. The full distribution of NH can be retrieved by the finite Fourier transform and, in some parameter regimes, by an eigenfunction expansion. Finally, we discuss the impact of quiescence (the resting state) on stem cell dynamics. Quiescence can act as a sanctuary for cancer stem cells and imperils the proposed therapy. We approach the complication of quiescence via multitype branching process models and stochastic simulation. Improvements to the τ-leaping method of stochastic simulation make it a versatile tool in this context. We conclude that the proposed therapy must target quiescent cancer stem cells as well as actively dividing cancer stem cells. The current cancer models demonstrate the virtue of attacking the same quantitative questions from a variety of modeling, mathematical, and computational perspectives

  14. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  15. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  16. Cell size and cancer: a new solution to Peto's paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Maciak, Sebastian; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading health concerns for humans, is by no means a human-unique malady. Accumulating evidence shows that cancer kills domestic and wild animals at a similar rate to humans and can even pose a conservation threat to certain species. Assuming that each physiologically active and proliferating cell is at risk of malignant transformation, any evolutionary increase in the number of cells (and thus body mass) will lead to a higher cancer frequency, all else being equal. However, available data fail to support the prediction that bigger animals are affected by cancer more than smaller ones. The unexpected lack of correlation between body size (and life span) and cancer risk across taxa was dubbed Peto's paradox. In this perspective, several plausible explanations of Peto's paradox are presented, with the emphasis on a largely underappreciated relation of cell size to both metabolism and cell division rates across species, which we believe are key factors underlying the paradox. We conclude that larger organisms have bigger and slowly dividing cells with lower energy turnover, all significantly reducing the risk of cancer initiation. Solving Peto's paradox will enhance our understanding the evolution of cancer and may provide new implications for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:25667599

  17. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer. PMID:16557043

  18. Can Nanomedicines Kill Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Most tumors are heterogeneous and many cancers contain small population of highly tumorigenic and intrinsically drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Like normal stem cell, CSCs have ability to self-renew and differentiate to other tumor cell types. They are believed to be a source for drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. CSCs often overexpress drug efflux transporters, spend most of their time in non-dividing G0 cell cycle state, and therefore, can escape the conventional chemotherapies. Thus, targeting CSCs is essential for developing novel therapies to prevent cancer relapse and emerging of drug resistance. Nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (nanomedicines) have been used to achieve longer circulation times, better stability and bioavailability over current therapeutics. Recently, some groups have successfully applied nanomedicines to target CSCs to eliminate the tumor and prevent its recurrence. These approaches include 1) delivery of therapeutic agents (small molecules, siRNA, antibodies) that affect embryonic signaling pathways implicated in self-renewal and differentiation in CSCs, 2) inhibiting drug efflux transporters in an attempt to sensitize CSCs to therapy, 3) targeting metabolism in CSCs through nanoformulated chemicals and field-responsive magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, and 4) disruption of multiple pathways in drug resistant cells using combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with amphiphilic Pluronic block copolymers. Despite clear progress of these studies the challenges of targeting CSCs by nanomedicines still exist and leave plenty of room for improvement and development. This review summarizes biological processes that are related to CSCs, overviews the current state of anti-CSCs therapies, and discusses state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed to kill CSCs. PMID:24120657

  19. Keap1/Nrf2 pathway in the frontiers of cancer and non-cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolism to their increased needs for energy and substrates for protein, lipid and nucleic acid synthesis. Nuclear erythroid factor 2-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway is usually activated in cancers and has been suggested to promote cancer cell survival mainly by inducing a large battery of cytoprotective genes. This mini review focuses on metabolic pathways, beyond cytoprotection, which can be directly or indirectly regulated by Nrf2 in cancer cells to affect their survival. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is enhanced by Nrf2 in cancers and aids their growth. PPP has also been found to be up-regulated in non-cancer tissues and other pathways, such as de novo lipogenesis, have been found to be repressed after activation of the Nrf2 pathway. The importance of these Nrf2-regulated metabolic pathways in cancer compared with non-cancer state remains to be determined. Last but not least, the importance of context about Nrf2 and cancer is highlighted as the Nrf2 pathway may be activated in cancers but its pharmacological activators are useful in chemoprevention. PMID:26551705

  20. Mast cells, angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were first described by Paul Ehrlich 1 in his doctoral thesis. MCs have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and certain protective responses to parasites. As most tumors contain inflammatory cell infiltrates, which often include plentiful MCs, the question as to the possible contribution of MCs to tumor development has progressively been emerging. In this chapter, the specific involvement of MCs in tumor biology and tumor fate will be considered, with particular emphasis on the capacity of these cells to stimulate tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Data from experimental carcinogenesis and from different tumor settings in human pathology will be summarized. Information to be presented will suggest that MCs may serve as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:21713661

  1. Ouabain enhances lung cancer cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Ruanghirun, Thidarat; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-05-01

    A human steroid hormone, ouabain, has been shown to play a role in several types of cancer cell behavior; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that sub-toxic concentrations of ouabain facilitate cancer cell detachment from the extracellular matrix in human lung cancer cells. Ouabain at concentrations of 0-10 pM significantly enhanced cell detachment in dose- and time- dependent manners, while having minimal effect on cell viability. The detachment-inducing effect of ouabain was found to be mediated through focal-adhesion kinase and ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase pathways. Alpha-5 and beta-1 integrins were found to be down-regulated in response to ouabain treatment. Since detachment of cancer cells is a prerequisite process for metastasis to begin, these insights benefit our understanding over the molecular basis of cancer biology. PMID:24778025

  2. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  3. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies. PMID:17645413

  4. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  5. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  6. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. Methods We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. Results CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusion These results indicate that [PdCl2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications. PMID:23672493

  7. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  8. Deregulation of Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations disrupt the regulatory circuits that govern cell function, enabling tumor cells to undergo de-regulated mitogenesis, to resist to proapoptotic insults, and to invade through tissue boundaries. Cancer cell biology has played a crucial role in elucidating the signaling mechanisms by which oncogenic mutations sustain these malignant behaviors and thereby in identifying rational targets for cancer drugs. The efficacy of such targeted therapies illustrate the power of a reductionist approach to the study of cancer. PMID:24561200

  9. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  10. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P < 0.05). As a result, protein abundance of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 was decreased and PTEN was increased in cells exposed to metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  11. Downregulation of BRAF activated non-coding RNA is associated with poor prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer and promotes metastasis by affecting epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes, such as differentiation, proliferation and metastasis. These lncRNAs are found to be dysregulated in a variety of cancers. BRAF activated non-coding RNA (BANCR) is a 693-bp transcript on chromosome 9 with a potential functional role in melanoma cell migration. The clinical significance of BANCR, and its’ molecular mechanisms controlling cancer cell migration and metastasis are unclear. Methods Expression of BANCR was analyzed in 113 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and seven NSCLC cell lines using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Gain and loss of function approaches were used to investigate the biological role of BANCR in NSCLC cells. The effects of BANCR on cell viability were evaluated by MTT and colony formation assays. Apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry. Nude mice were used to examine the effects of BANCR on tumor cell metastasis in vivo. Protein levels of BANCR targets were determined by western blotting and fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results BANCR expression was significantly decreased in 113 NSCLC tumor tissues compared with normal tissues. Additionally, reduced BANCR expression was associated with larger tumor size, advanced pathological stage, metastasis distance, and shorter overall survival of NSCLC patients. Reduced BANCR expression was found to be an independent prognostic factor for NSCLC. Histone deacetylation was involved in the downregulation of BANCR in NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of BANCR impaired cell viability and invasion, leading to the inhibition of metastasis in vitro and in vivo. However, knockdown of BANCR expression promoted cell migration and invasion in vitro. Overexpression of BANCR was found to play a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the regulation of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and Vimentin expression

  12. The Interconnectedness of Cancer Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2011-01-01

    The elegance of fundamental and applied research activities have begun to reveal a myriad of spatial and temporal alterations in downstream signaling networks affected by cell surface receptor stimulation including G protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Interconnected biochemical pathways serve to integrate and distribute the signaling information throughout the cell by orchestration of complex biochemical circuits consisting of protein interactions and covalent modification processes. It is clear that scientific literature summarizing results from both fundamental and applied scientific research activities has served to provide a broad foundational biologic database that has been instrumental in advancing our continued understanding of underlying cancer biology. This article reflects on historical advances and the role of innovation in the competitive world of grant-sponsored research. PMID:22241964

  13. Colorectal cancer desmoplastic reaction up-regulates collagen synthesis and restricts cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Gesteira, Tarsis F; de Paula, Cláudia A A; Mader, Ana M; Waisberg, Jaques; Pinhal, Maria A; Friedl, Andreas; Toma, Leny; Nader, Helena B

    2011-11-01

    During cancer cell growth many tumors exhibit various grades of desmoplasia, unorganized production of fibrous or connective tissue, composed mainly of collagen fibers and myofibroblasts. The accumulation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding tumors directly affects cancer cell proliferation, migration and spread; therefore the study of desmoplasia is of vital importance. Stromal fibroblasts surrounding tumors are activated to myofibroblasts and become the primary producers of ECM during desmoplasia. The composition, density and organization of this ECM accumulation play a major role on the influence desmoplasia has upon tumor cells. In this study, we analyzed desmoplasia in vivo in human colorectal carcinoma tissue, detecting an up-regulation of collagen I, collagen IV and collagen V in human colorectal cancer desmoplastic reaction. These components were then analyzed in vitro co-cultivating colorectal cancer cells (Caco-2 and HCT116) and fibroblasts utilizing various co-culture techniques. Our findings demonstrate that direct cell-cell contact between fibroblasts and colorectal cancer cells evokes an increase in ECM density, composed of unorganized collagens (I, III, IV and V) and proteoglycans (biglycan, fibromodulin, perlecan and versican). The desmoplastic collagen fibers were thick, with an altered orientation, as well as deposited as bundles. This increased ECM density inhibited the migration and invasion of the colorectal tumor cells in both 2D and 3D co-culture systems. Therefore this study sheds light on a possible restricting role desmoplasia could play in colorectal cancer invasion. PMID:21987222

  14. Anticancer effect of arsenite on cell migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    HORIBE, YOHEI; ADACHI, SEIJI; YASUDA, ICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, TAKAHIRO; KAWAGUCHI, JUNJI; KOZAWA, OSAMU; SHIMIZU, MASAHITO; MORIWAKI, HISATAKA

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy, but its clinical outcome remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the development of novel treatments for this malignancy is urgently required. In the present study, the anticancer effect of arsenite on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced migration, cell cycle and apoptosis was investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and BxPC-3), and compared with the effect on normal pancreatic epithelial (PE) cells. In the cell migration assay, arsenite clearly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced cell migration in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. Arsenite also caused cell apoptosis in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. In AsPC-1 cells, the levels of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein decreased following treatment with arsenite, but this was not observed in BxPC-3 cells. To further examine the differences between these two cell lines, the effect of arsenite on upstream p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt was investigated. PDGF-BB caused phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK and Akt in both cell lines. Pretreatment with arsenite significantly suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not of p44/p42 MAPK in AsPC-1 cells. By contrast, arsenite did not affect these molecules in BxPC-3 cells. Since the inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced PDGF-BB-induced migration in AsPC-1 cells, the present results strongly suggest that arsenite inhibits PDGF-BB-induced migration by suppressing the Akt signaling pathway in AsPC-1 cells. Therefore, arsenite may be a useful tool for the treatment of patients with certain types of pancreatic cancer, without causing adverse effects on normal pancreatic cells. PMID:27347121

  15. Role of stem cells in cancer therapy and cancer stem cells: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Jayesh; Chaib, Boussad; Sales, Kevin; Winslet, Marc; Seifalian, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    For over 30 years, stem cells have been used in the replenishment of blood and immune systems damaged by the cancer cells or during treatment of cancer by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Apart from their use in the immuno-reconstitution, the stem cells have been reported to contribute in the tissue regeneration and as delivery vehicles in the cancer treatments. The recent concept of 'cancer stem cells' has directed scientific communities towards a different wide new area of research field and possible potential future treatment modalities for the cancer. Aim of this review is primarily focus on the recent developments in the use of the stem cells in the cancer treatments, then to discuss the cancer stem cells, now considered as backbone in the development of the cancer; and their role in carcinogenesis and their implications in the development of possible new cancer treatment options in future. PMID:17547749

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. Regulation of NANOG in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuai; Li, Qiuhui; Jeter, Collene R; Fan, Qingxia; Tang, Dean G; Liu, Bigang

    2015-09-01

    As one of the key pluripotency transcription factors, NANOG plays a critical role in maintaining the self-renewal and pluripotency in normal embryonic stem cells. Recent data indicate that NANOG is expressed in a variety of cancers and its expression correlates with poor survival in cancer patients. Of interest, many studies suggest that NANOG enhances the defined characteristics of cancer stem cells and may thus function as an oncogene to promote carcinogenesis. Therefore, NANOG expression determines the cell fate not only in pluripotent cells but also in cancer cells. Although the regulation of NANOG in normal embryonic stem cells is reasonably well understood, the regulation of NANOG in cancer cells has only emerged recently. The current review provides a most updated summary on how NANOG expression is regulated during tumor development and progression. PMID:26013997

  18. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  19. Free radicals in breast carcinogenesis, breast cancer progression and cancer stem cells. Biological bases to develop oxidative-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Vera-Ramirez, Laura; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Ramirez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar L; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Lorente, Jose A; Quiles, Jose L

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress leads to lipid, carbohydrate, protein and DNA damage in biological systems and affects cell structure and function. Breast cancer cells are subjected to a high level of oxidative stress, both intracellular and extracellular. To survive, cancer cells must acquire adaptive mechanisms that counteract the toxic effects of free radicals exposure. These mechanisms may involve the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and antiapoptotic proteins. Moreover, recent data maintain that different breast cancer cell types, show different intracellular antioxidant capacities that may determine their ability to resist radio and chemotherapy. The resistant cell type has been shown to correspond with tumor initiating cells, also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and metastasis. Abrogation of the above-mentioned adaptive mechanisms by redox regulation in cancer cells opens a promising research line that could have significant therapeutic applications. PMID:21288735

  20. Dendritic cell-based cancer therapeutic vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous developments in novel cancer therapies, through targeting of tumor cell-intrinsic pathways whose activity is linked to genetic alterations, as well as the targeting of tumor cell-extrinsic factors such as growth factors. Furthermore, immunotherapies are entering the clinic at an unprecedented speed following the demonstration that T cells can efficiently reject tumors and that their anti-tumor activity can be enhanced with antibodies against immune regulatory molecules (checkpoints blockade). Current immunotherapy strategies include monoclonal antibodies against tumor cells or immune regulatory molecules, cell-based therapies such as adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, and cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the immunological basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines and how the current understanding of dendritic cell (DC) and T cell biology might enable development of next-generation curative therapies for patients with cancer. PMID:23890062

  1. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  3. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  4. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  5. Turning Cancer Cells into Cancer Killers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have changed leukemia cells into natural killer cells by adding a specific antibody to bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The induced natural killer cells killed leukemia cells in culture. The antibody does not trigger the same conversion in bone marrow from healthy patients. PMID:26621762

  6. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  7. Obesity Adversely Affects Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Burch, Patrick A.; Kim, George P.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. We assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and utilized epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. Methods A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1,861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. Results BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma [hazard ratio 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI (kg/m2), p < 0.001] after adjustment for age, stage, and sex. In analysis by National Institutes of Health BMI category, BMI of 30–34.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.33), 35–39.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08–1.62), and ≥40 (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.26–2.04) were associated with decreased survival compared to normal BMI of 18,5–24.99 kg/m2 (overall trend test p<0.001). Fasting blood glucose and diabetes did not affect the results. Conclusions Higher BMI is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. PMID:20665496

  8. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  9. PCTAIRE1-knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to TNF family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Teruki; Shi, Ranxin; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Reed, John C; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 is overexpressed in malignant cells and is crucial in tumorigenesis, its function in apoptosis remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PCTAIRE1 in apoptosis, especially in the extrinsic cell death pathway. Gene-knockdown of PCTAIRE1 sensitized prostate cancer PPC1 and Du145 cells, and breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells to TNF-family cytokines, including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Meanwhile, PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not sensitize non-malignant cells, including diploid fibroblasts IMR-90 and the immortalized prostate epithelial cell line 267B1. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not up-regulate death receptor expression on the cell surface or affect caspase-8, FADD and FLIP expression levels. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did promote caspase-8 cleavage and RIPK1 degradation, while RIPK1 mRNA knockdown sensitized PPC1 cells to TNF-family cytokines. Furthermore, the kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which inhibits PCTAIRE1 kinase activity, sensitized PPC1 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest that PCTAIRE1 contributes to the resistance of cancer cell lines to apoptosis induced by TNF-family cytokines, which implies that PCTAIRE1 inhibitors could have synergistic effects with TNF-family cytokines for cytodestruction of cancer cells. PMID:25790448

  10. PCTAIRE1-Knockdown Sensitizes Cancer Cells to TNF Family Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Teruki; Shi, Ranxin; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Reed, John C.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 is overexpressed in malignant cells and is crucial in tumorigenesis, its function in apoptosis remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PCTAIRE1 in apoptosis, especially in the extrinsic cell death pathway. Gene-knockdown of PCTAIRE1 sensitized prostate cancer PPC1 and Du145 cells, and breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells to TNF-family cytokines, including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Meanwhile, PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not sensitize non-malignant cells, including diploid fibroblasts IMR-90 and the immortalized prostate epithelial cell line 267B1. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not up-regulate death receptor expression on the cell surface or affect caspase-8, FADD and FLIP expression levels. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did promote caspase-8 cleavage and RIPK1 degradation, while RIPK1 mRNA knockdown sensitized PPC1 cells to TNF-family cytokines. Furthermore, the kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which inhibits PCTAIRE1 kinase activity, sensitized PPC1 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest that PCTAIRE1 contributes to the resistance of cancer cell lines to apoptosis induced by TNF-family cytokines, which implies that PCTAIRE1 inhibitors could have synergistic effects with TNF-family cytokines for cytodestruction of cancer cells. PMID:25790448

  11. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p < 0.001). ARMc8 expression was closely related to TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p < 0.001), while ARMc8 siRNA treatment significantly reduced cell invasion and migration in LoVo cells (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARMc8 could upregulate the expression of MMP7 and snail and downregulate the expression of p120ctn and α-catenin. Therefore, ARMc8 probably enhanced invasiveness and metastatic capacity by affecting these tumor-associated factors, thereby playing a role in enhancing the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:26081621

  12. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  13. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  14. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Fan, Timothy M; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis. PMID:27043781

  15. Multicomponent Coculture System of Cancer Cells and Two Types of Stromal Cells for In Vitro Evaluation of Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2016-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of anticancer drugs using cancer cells has long been performed for the development of novel drugs and the selection of effective drugs for different patients. Recent studies have suggested that tumor stromal cells affect the drug sensitivity of cancer cells; however, most conventional culture systems for drug evaluation lack stromal cells. In this study, we fabricated a multicomponent coculture system that takes account of cancer-stroma interactions for drug evaluation. In this system, small-cell and nonsmall-cell lung cancer cells embedded in collagen gel were cocultured with two types of stromal cells, including stromal fibroblasts and proinflammatory cytokine-secreting monocytes, thus recreating the in vivo cancer microenvironment. Cancer drug sensitivity was significantly altered by the presence of stromal cells. Fibroblasts induced resistance of cancer cells to anticancer drugs. Monocytes induced the upregulation of thymidine phosphorylase in cancer cells, promoting the conversion of an anticancer prodrug to a cytotoxic drug, and consequently enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to the anticancer prodrug. These results clearly show the importance of incorporating stromal cells into culture systems for drug evaluation. Our system will help to improve the accuracy of in vitro drug evaluation and provide useful information for the in vitro recreation of cancer microenvironments. PMID:26421875

  16. The Mind-Body Connection - Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mind-Body Connection Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns? Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents ... NCI) funded a study of 94 women whose breast cancer had spread (metastatic) or returned (recurrent). Researchers asked ...

  17. Cancer: The Transforming Power of Cell Competition.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jesus; Rodriguez, Tristan

    2016-02-22

    The tumour-host microenvironment plays key roles in cancer, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Two new studies provide insight into this problem by showing that through cell competition, a fitness-sensing process that usually eliminates defective cells, pre-cancerous lesions signal the death of surrounding tissue that in turn promotes their neoplastic transformation. PMID:26906487

  18. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem ... Once Upon a Stem Cell This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  19. Transcriptomics and proteomics show that selenium affects inflammation, cytoskeleton, and cancer pathways in human rectal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Méplan, Catherine; Johnson, Ian T; Polley, Abigael C J; Cockell, Simon; Bradburn, David M; Commane, Daniel M; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Mulholland, Francis; Zupanic, Anze; Mathers, John C; Hesketh, John

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies highlight the potential role of dietary selenium (Se) in colorectal cancer prevention. Our goal was to elucidate whether expression of factors crucial for colorectal homoeostasis is affected by physiologic differences in Se status. Using transcriptomics and proteomics followed by pathway analysis, we identified pathways affected by Se status in rectal biopsies from 22 healthy adults, including 11 controls with optimal status (mean plasma Se = 1.43 μM) and 11 subjects with suboptimal status (mean plasma Se = 0.86 μM). We observed that 254 genes and 26 proteins implicated in cancer (80%), immune function and inflammatory response (40%), cell growth and proliferation (70%), cellular movement, and cell death (50%) were differentially expressed between the 2 groups. Expression of 69 genes, including selenoproteins W1 and K, which are genes involved in cytoskeleton remodelling and transcription factor NFκB signaling, correlated significantly with Se status. Integrating proteomics and transcriptomics datasets revealed reduced inflammatory and immune responses and cytoskeleton remodelling in the suboptimal Se status group. This is the first study combining omics technologies to describe the impact of differences in Se status on colorectal expression patterns, revealing that suboptimal Se status could alter inflammatory signaling and cytoskeleton in human rectal mucosa and so influence cancer risk.-Méplan, C., Johnson, I. T., Polley, A. C. J., Cockell, S., Bradburn, D. M., Commane, D. M., Arasaradnam, R. P., Mulholland, F., Zupanic, A., Mathers, J. C., Hesketh, J. Transcriptomics and proteomics show that selenium affects inflammation, cytoskeleton, and cancer pathways in human rectal biopsies. PMID:27103578

  20. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  1. Cell injury, retrodifferentiation and the cancer treatment paradox.

    PubMed

    Uriel, José

    2015-09-01

    This "opinion article" is an attempt to take an overview of some significant changes that have happened in our understanding of cancer status during the last half century and its evolution under the progressive influence of molecular biology. As an active worker in cancer research and developmental biology during most of this period, I would like to comment briefly on these changes and to give my critical appreciation of their outcome as it affects our knowledge of cancer development as well as the current treatment of the disease. A recall of my own contribution to the subject is also included. Two subjects are particularly developed: cell injury and cell-killing therapies. Cell injury, whatever its origin, has acquired the status of a pivotal event for the initiation of cancer emergence. It is postulated that cell injury, a potential case of cellular death, may also be the origin of a process of stepwise cell reversion (retrodifferentiation or retroprogrammation) leading, by division, mature or stem cells to progressive immaturity. The genetic instability and mutational changes that accompanies this process of cell injury and rejuvenation put normal cells in a status favourable to neoplastic transformation or may evolve cancer cells toward clones with higher malignant potentiality. Thus, cell injury suggests lifestyle as the major upstream initiator of cancer development although this not exclude randomness as an unavoidable contributor to the disease. Cell-killing agents (mainly cytotoxic drugs and radiotherapy) are currently used to treat cancer. At the same time, it is agreed that agents with high cell injury potential (ultraviolet light, ionising radiations, tobacco, environmental pollutants, etc.) contribute to the emergence of malignant tumours. This represents a real paradox. In spite of the progress accomplished in cancer survival, one is tempted to suggest that we have very few chances of really cure cancer as long as we continue to treat malignancies

  2. Response of Breast Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem Cells to Metformin and Hyperthermia Alone or Combined

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Chang-Shin; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Williams, Brent; Lee, Chung K.; Song, Chang W.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5–10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44high/CD24low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44high/CD24high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs) of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia. PMID:24505341

  3. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  4. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  5. Evaluation of CancerChatCanada: a program of online support for Canadians affected by cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, J.; Rojubally, A.; MacGregor, K.; McLeod, D.; Speca, M.; Taylor–Brown, J.; Fergus, K.; Collie, K.; Turner, J.; Sellick, S.; Mackenzie, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Professional-led cancer support groups can improve quality of life and address unmet needs, but most Canadians affected by cancer do not have access to or do not make use of cancer support groups. A collaborative interdisciplinary team developed, operated, and evaluated Internet-based, professional-led, live-chat support groups (osgs) for cancer patients, caregivers, and survivors across Canada. Objective Our study aimed to report participant and participation characteristics in the pan-Canadian initiative known as CancerChatCanada, and to understand participant perspectives about the quality of communication and professional facilitation, overall satisfaction, and psychosocial benefits and outcomes. Methods Participants in osgs provided informed consent. Participant and participation characteristics were gathered from program data collection tools and are described using frequencies, means, and chi-squares. Patient, survivor, and caregiver perspectives were derived from 102 telephone interviews conducted after osg completion and subjected to a directed qualitative content analysis. Results The 55 professional-led osgs enrolled 351 participants from 9 provinces. More than half the participants came from rural or semirural areas, and more than 84% had no received previous cancer support. The attendance rate was 75%, the dropout rate was 26%, and 80% of participants were satisfied or very satisfied. The convenience and privacy of osgs were benefits. Meaningful communication about important and difficult topics, kinship and bonding with others, and improved mood and self-care were perceived outcomes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that this collaborative initiative was successful in increasing reach and access, and that pan-Canadian, professional-led osgs provide psychosocial benefit to underserved and burdened cancer patients, survivors, and family caregivers. PMID:23443892

  6. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  7. Creatine kinase in cell cycle regulation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-Bin

    2016-08-01

    The phosphocreatine-creatine kinase (CK) shuttle system is increasingly recognized as a fundamental mechanism for ATP homeostasis in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Many intracellular processes are ATP dependent. Cell division is a process requiring a rapid rate of energy turnover. Cell cycle regulation is also a key point to understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression. It has been known for about 40 years that aberrant CK levels are associated with various cancers and for over 30 years that CK is involved in mitosis regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated sufficiently until recently. By maintaining ATP at sites of high-energy demand, CK can regulate cell cycle progression by affecting the intracellular energy status as well as by influencing signaling pathways that are essential to activate cell division and cytoskeleton reorganization. Aberrant CK levels may impair cell viability under normal or stressed conditions and induce cell death. The involvement of CK in cell cycle regulation and cellular energy metabolism makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in cancer. To understand the multiple physiological/pathological functions of CK, it is necessary to identify CK-binding partners and regulators including proteins, non-coding RNAs and participating endogenous small molecular weight chemical compounds. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms of CK in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. It will also discuss the implications of recent mechanistic studies, the emerging problems and future challenges of the multifunctional enzyme CK. PMID:27020776

  8. Wnt and the Cancer Niche: Paracrine Interactions with Gastrointestinal Cancer Cells Undergoing Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E.; Jaiswal, Kshama R.; Garfield, Susan H.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. Design: We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy. PMID:23901343

  9. Methods for the study of mast cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Blatner, Nichole R; Tsai, FuNien; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2015-01-01

    Tumor growth requires interactions of tumor cells with a receptive and inductive microenvironment. Two major populations of tumor-infiltrating cells are considered to be essential for producing such a microenvironment: (1) proinflammatory cells that nurture the tumor with growth factors and facilitate invasion and metastasis by secreting proteases and (2) immune suppressive leukocytes including T-regulatory cells (Treg) that hinder tumor-specific CD8 T-cell responses, which otherwise could potentially reject the tumor. Among the proinflammatory cells, accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in human tumors is frequently recorded and was recently linked with poor prognosis. Causative links between mast cell infiltration and tumor progression can be deduced from animal studies. There is an interesting link between mast cells and Treg. The adoptive transfer of Treg from healthy syngeneic mice to mice susceptible to colon cancer suppresses focal mastocytosis and hinders tumor progression. Furthermore, T-cell-deficient mice susceptible to colon cancer show enhanced focal mastocytosis and tumor invasion. Here, we describe methods to assess MCs in mouse models of cancer and to investigate how MCs affect tumor epithelium. Additionally, we will detail methods used to investigate how T cells influence MCs and how MCs influence T cells. PMID:25388267

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  11. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  12. Cell Fate Decisions During Breast Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Kayla; Wronski, Ania; Skibinski, Adam; Phillips, Sarah; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of breast cancer, many genes become altered as cells evolve progressively from normal to a pre-malignant to a malignant state of growth. How mutations in genes lead to specific subtypes of human breast cancer is only partially understood. Here we review how initial genetic or epigenetic alterations within mammary epithelial cells (MECs) can alter cell fate decisions and put pre-malignant cells on a path towards cancer development with specific phenotypes. Understanding the early stages of breast cancer initiation and progression and how normal developmental processes are hijacked during transformation has significant implications for improving early detection and prevention of breast cancer. In addition, insights gleaned from this understanding may also be important for developing subtype-specific treatment options. PMID:27110512

  13. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  14. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  15. Ultrasound Effect on Cancerous versus Non-Cancerous Cells.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Yudilevitch, Yana; Isaacson, Carol; Laster, Brenda; Kost, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found that cancer cells whose metastatic potential is low are more vulnerable to mechanical stress-induced trauma to their cytoskeleton compared with benign cells. Because ultrasound induces mechanical stresses on cells and tissues, it is postulated that there may be a way to apply ultrasound to tumors to reduce their ability to metastasize. The difference between low-malignant-potential cancer cells and benign cells could be a result of their different responses to the mechanical stress insonation induced. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo. Low-malignant-potential cells were found to be more sensitive to insonation, resulting in a significantly higher mortality rate compared with that of benign cells, 89% versus 21%, respectively. This effect can be controlled by varying ultrasound parameters: intensity, duration, and duty cycle. Thus, the results presented in this study suggest the application of ultrasound to discriminate between benign and malignant cells. PMID:27067417

  16. Cancer stem cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Matsui, William

    2009-05-01

    Several key observations providing evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis and insights into the unique biology of these cells have come from the study of multiple myeloma. These include evidence that cancer cells may be functionally heterogeneous in spite of their genetic homogeneity and that malignant progenitors share many biological features with normal adult stem cells including drug resistance and regulatory processes governing self-renewal. We review studies that have examined clonogenic cells in multiple myeloma, highlight controversies regarding the cell of origin in multiple myeloma, and discuss potential targeting strategies. PMID:18809245

  17. Race, Poverty May Affect Early Stage Breast Cancer Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Breast Cancer Health Disparities Women's Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Health Disparities Women's Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  18. Affective science perspectives on cancer control: Strategically crafting a mutually beneficial research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Rebecca A.; McDonald, Paige Green; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Cancer control research involves the conduct of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and improve quality of life. Given the importance of behavior in cancer control, fundamental research is necessary to identify psychological mechanisms underlying cancer risk, prevention, and management behaviors. Cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are often emotionally-laden. As such, affective science research to elucidate questions related to basic phenomenological nature of emotion, stress, and mood is necessary to understand how cancer control can be hindered or facilitated by emotional experiences. To date, the intersection of basic affective science research and cancer control remains largely unexplored. The goal of this paper is to outline key questions in the cancer control research domain that provide an ecologically valid context for new affective science discoveries. We also provide examples of ways in which basic affective discoveries could inform future cancer prevention and control research. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive, but instead are offered to generate creative thought about the promise of a cancer research context for answering basic affective science questions. Together, these examples provide a compelling argument for fostering collaborations between affective and cancer control scientists. PMID:25987511

  19. Synthesis and cancer cell growth inhibitory activity of icaritin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wu, Ping; Shi, Jing-Fang; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wei, Xiao-Yi

    2015-07-15

    A series of icaritin derivatives bearing carboxylic acid or carboxylic ester groups are synthesized, and their in vitro cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-435s, and A549, are evaluated by MTT assay. Several derivatives including 2h, 2j, 5b and 5d show higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compound icaritin against these cancer cell lines. Compounds 5b and 5d are even more cytotoxic to MCF-7 cells than the clinic drug tamoxifen. Moreover, compound 5b is found to be non-toxic to normal cells (Vero) and both 5b and 5d exhibit good selectivity towards estrogen receptor positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells over estrogen receptor negative MDA-MB-435s breast cancer cells. The structure activity relationship analysis has revealed that mono-substitution at either C-3 or C-7 hydroxyl group of icaritin could improve the cytotoxicity of icaritin, and the C-3 hydroxyl group may be a preferable site for chemical modification. In addition, the length, the flexibility and the additional branching substituent group of the substitution chain(s) at both C-3 and C-7 hydroxyl groups can all affect the anti-cancer activity of these derivatives. PMID:26079090

  20. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  1. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-06-14

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  2. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  4. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Eugenia; Trapasso, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal), giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division). A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on the presence of specific surface markers for selective cytotoxic agent vehicles. Finally, some research groups are trying to induce these cells to

  5. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  6. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  7. Metformin decreases glucose oxidation and increases the dependency of prostate cancer cells on reductive glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Bell, Eric L.; Keibler, Mark A.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Wirth, Gregory J.; Fiske, Brian; Mayers, Jared R.; Schwab, Matthias; Bellinger, Gary; Csibi, Alfredo; Patnaik, Akash; Jose Blouin, Marie; Cantley, Lewis C.; Guarente, Leonard; Blenis, John; Pollak, Michael N.; Olumi, Aria F.

    2013-01-01

    Metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation and epidemiology studies suggest an association with increased survival in cancer patients taking metformin, however, the mechanism by which metformin improves cancer outcomes remains controversial. To explore how metformin might directly affect cancer cells, we analyzed how metformin altered the metabolism of prostate cancer cells and tumors. We found that metformin decreased glucose oxidation and increased dependency on reductive glutamine metabolism in both cancer cell lines and in a mouse model of prostate cancer. Inhibition of glutamine anaplerosis in the presence of metformin further attenuated proliferation while increasing glutamine metabolism rescued the proliferative defect induced by metformin. These data suggest that interfering with glutamine may synergize with metformin to improve outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:23687346

  8. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  9. Understanding cellular architecture in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Tang, Chao

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the development of cancer is an important goal for today's science. The morphology of cellular organelles, such as the nucleus, the nucleoli and the mitochondria, which is referred to as cellular architecture or cytoarchitecture, is an important indicator of the state of the cell. In particular, there are striking difference between the cellular architecture of a healthy cell versus a cancer cell. In this work we present a dynamical model for the evolution of organelles morphology in cancer cells. Using a dynamical systems approach, we describe the evolution of a cell on its way to cancer as a trajectory in a multidimensional morphology state. The results provided by this work may increase our insight on the mechanism of tumorigenesis and help build new therapeutic strategies.

  10. Iron induces cancer stem cells and aggressive phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Luanpitpong, Sudjit

    2016-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated in support of the critical impact of cancer stem cells (CSCs) behind the chemotherapeutic failure, cancer metastasis, and subsequent disease recurrence and relapse, but knowledge of how CSCs are regulated is still limited. Redox status of the cells has been shown to dramatically influence cell signaling and CSC-like aggressive behaviors. Here, we investigated how subtoxic concentrations of iron, which have been found to specifically induce cellular hydroxyl radical, affected CSC-like subpopulations of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We reveal for the first time that subchronic iron exposure and higher levels of hydroxyl radical correlated well with increased CSC-like phenotypes. The iron-exposed NSCLC H460 and H292 cells exhibited a remarkable increase in propensities to form CSC spheroids and to proliferate, migrate, and invade in parallel with an increase in level of a well-known CSC marker, ABCG2. We further observed that such phenotypic changes induced by iron were not related to an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Instead, the sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 protein (SOX9) was substantially linked to iron treatment and hydroxyl radical level. Using gene manipulations, including ectopic SOX9 overexpression and SOX9 short hairpin RNA knockdown, we have verified that SOX9 is responsible for CSC enrichment mediated by iron. These findings indicate a novel role of iron via hydroxyl radical in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors and likely metastasis through SOX9 upregulation. PMID:26911281

  11. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  12. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    2015-10-01

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  13. Stem cells and cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sales, Kevin M; Winslet, Marc C; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2007-12-01

    Definite evidence of the importance of cancer stem cells in the progression of cancer has now come to light. Key markers of these cells have been identified in many solid tumours as well as leukaemias. Specific studies modelling the tumour induction of specific cells isolated by surface antigens such as CD44 have demonstrated that these cells are not only present in tumours but that they are the key units in their tumourgenecity. These findings provide useful insight for disease progression, treatment and metastasis. The wide variety of proposed markers, and their similarity to endothelial progenitor cells found in angiogenesis, complicates these studies. Definite proof falls only in the induction of tumours in vivo. Here we review the developments in cancer stem cells and the markers that have been found for these cells. PMID:17955391

  14. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362918

  15. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK+ and CK18+ CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7+ or TTF-1+, (CK20/ CDX2)+, or (PSA/ PSMA)+ corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  16. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK(+) and CK18(+) CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7(+) or TTF-1(+), (CK20/ CDX2)(+), or (PSA/ PSMA)(+) corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  17. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  18. Signaling in colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sanchita; Majumdar, Adhip Pn

    2012-01-01

    : Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common form of cancer worldwide and ranks third among the cancer-related deaths in the US and other Western countries. It occurs with equal frequency in men and women, constituting 10% of new cancer cases in men and 11% in women. Despite recent advancement in therapeutics, the survival rates from metastatic are less than 5%. Growing evidence supports the contention that epithelial cancers including colorectal cancer, the incidence of which increases with aging, are diseases driven by the pluripotent, self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). Dysregulation of Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog and/or TGF-β signaling pathways that are involved in proliferation and maintenance of CSCs leads to the development of CRC. This review focuses on the signaling pathways relevant for CRC to understand the mechanisms leading to tumor progression and therapy resistance, which may help in the development of therapeutic strategies for CRC. PMID:22866952

  19. The Use of Narrative in Understanding how Cancer Affects Development: The Stories of One Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    LEE, CHRISTINA SUNMI

    2010-01-01

    Although cancer disrupts development, the experience of having cancer is often understood using developmental theories that do not assume serious illness at an early age. This article presents a narrative analysis of one patient’s story of survivorship. She tells three interrelated stories: how others have reacted to her illness; her struggles to understand her illness; and how it has changed her priorities. Taken together, her stories comprise an account of how the experience has affected her development. Her story is an example of how individuals integrate unusual life events into their development. It suggests that focusing more on how unusual life experiences contribute to development may expand and enrich our understanding of developmental processes. PMID:21151860

  20. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  1. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma. PMID:12963976

  2. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  3. Insights into the role of sulfated glycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration through use of branched peptide probe

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Depau, Lorenzo; Falciani, Chiara; Gentile, Mariangela; Mandarini, Elisabetta; Riolo, Giulia; Lupetti, Pietro; Pini, Alessandro; Bracci, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The tetra-branched peptide NT4 selectively binds to different human cancer cells and tissues. NT4 specifically binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cancer cell membranes. Since sulfated glycosaminoglycans are involved in cancer cell interaction with the extracellular matrix, we evaluated the effect of NT4 on cancer cell adhesion and migration. We demonstrated here that the branched peptide NT4 binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans with high affinity and with preferential binding to heparan sulfate. NT4 inhibits cancer cell adhesion and migration on different proteins, without modifying cancer cell morphology or their ability to produce protrusions, but dramatically affecting the directionality and polarity of cell movement. Results obtained by taking advantage of the selective targeting of glycosaminoglycans chains by NT4, provide insights into the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer cell adhesion and migration and suggest a determinant role of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the control of cancer cell directional migration. PMID:27255651

  4. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  5. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  6. Genetic traits for hematogeneous tumor cell dissemination in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Joosse, Simon A; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic relapse in patients with solid tumors is the consequence of cancer cells that disseminated to distant sites, adapted to the new microenvironment, and escaped systemic adjuvant therapy. There is increasing evidence that hematogeneous dissemination starts at an early stage of cancer progression with single tumor cells or cell clusters leaving the primary site and entering the blood circulation. These circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can extravasate into secondary tissues where they become disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). Patients might relapse years after initial resection of the primary tumor when DTCs become overt metastases. Current diagnostic strategies for stratification of therapies against metastatic cells focus on the primary tumor tissue. This approach is based on the availability of stored primary tumors obtained at primary surgery, but it ignores that the DTCs might have evolved over years, which can affect the antimetastatic drug response. However, taking biopsies from metastatic tissues is an invasive procedure, and multiple metastases located at different sites in an individual patient show marked genomic heterogeneity. Thus, capturing CTCs from the peripheral blood as a "liquid biopsy" has obvious advantages in particular when repeated sampling is required for monitoring therapies in cancer patients. However, the biology behind tumor cell dissemination and its contribution to metastatic progression in cancer patients is still subject to controversial discussions. This manuscript reviews current theories on the genetic traits behind the spread of CTCs and progression of DTCs into overt metastases. PMID:26931653

  7. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity. PMID:25132386

  8. DNA damage responses in cancer stem cells: Implications for cancer therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance might lead to a new thinking on cancer treatments. Similar to stem cells, CSCs also display high resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy with genotoxic agents. Thus, conventional therapy may shrink the tumor volume but cannot eliminate cancer. Eradiation of CSCs represents a novel therapeutic strategy. CSCs possess a highly efficient DNA damage response (DDR) system, which is considered as a contributor to the resistance of these cells from exposures to DNA damaging agents. Targeting of enhanced DDR in CSCs is thus proposed to facilitate the eradication of CSCs by conventional therapeutics. To achieve this aim, a better understanding of the cellular responses to DNA damage in CSCs is needed. In addition to the protein kinases and enzymes that are involved in DDR, other processes that affect the DDR including chromatin remodeling should also be explored. PMID:26322164

  9. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  10. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  12. FOXA1 defines cancer cell specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaihua; Zhao, Yongbing; Liu, Yi; Kao, Li-Pin; Wang, Xiao; Skerry, Benjamin; Li, Zhaoyu

    2016-01-01

    A transcription factor functions differentially and/or identically in multiple cell types. However, the mechanism for cell-specific regulation of a transcription factor remains to be elucidated. We address how a single transcription factor, forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1), forms cell-specific genomic signatures and differentially regulates gene expression in four human cancer cell lines (HepG2, LNCaP, MCF7, and T47D). FOXA1 is a pioneer transcription factor in organogenesis and cancer progression. Genomewide mapping of FOXA1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing annotates that target genes associated with FOXA1 binding are mostly common to these cancer cells. However, most of the functional FOXA1 target genes are specific to each cancer cell type. Further investigations using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology indicate that cell-specific FOXA1 regulation is attributable to unique FOXA1 binding, genetic variations, and/or potential epigenetic regulation. Thus, FOXA1 controls the specificity of cancer cell types. We raise a “flower-blooming” hypothesis for cell-specific transcriptional regulation based on these observations. PMID:27034986

  13. Different apoptotic effects of saxifragifolin C in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Ji-Yun; Kwak, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Byung Oh; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is currently the most common form of cancer affecting women. Recent studies have reported that triterpenoid saponins isolated from Androsace umbellata exhibit anti-proliferative effects in several types of cancer cells. However, the cytotoxic effect of saxifragifolin C (Saxi C) on breast cancer cells remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vitro anti-tumor activity of Saxi C in human breast cancer cells. Our data indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells were more sensitive than MCF-7 cells to Saxi C treatment. In addition, Saxi C inhibited cell survival through the induction of reactive oxygen species and the caspase-dependent pathway in the MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas MCF-7 cells treated with Saxi C underwent the apoptotic cell death in a caspase-independent manner. Although Saxi C treatment resulted in the induction of activation of MAPKs in both types of human breast cancer cells, p38 MAPK and JNK, but not ERK1/2, appeared to be involved in Saxi C-induced apoptosis. Moreover, ERα-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells remained alive, whereas the survival of shERα-transfected MCF-7 cells decreased. Taken together, Saxi C induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells via different regulatory mechanisms, and ERα status might be essential for regulating Saxi C-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Thus, Saxi C is a potential chemotherapeutic agent in breast cancer. PMID:26965415

  14. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs.

  15. Printing Cancer Cells into Intact Microvascular Networks: A Model for Investigating Cancer Cell Dynamics during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phamduy, Theresa B.; Sweat, Richard S.; Azimi, Mohammad S.; Burow, Matthew E.; Murfee, Walter L.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    While cancer cell invasion and metastasis is dependent on cancer cell-stroma, cancer cell-blood vessel, and cancer cell-lymphatic vessel interactions, our understanding of these interactions remain largely unknown. A need exists for physiologically-relevant models that more closely mimic the complexity of cancer cell dynamics in a real tissue environment. The objective of this study was to combine laser-based cell printing and tissue culture methods to create a novel ex vivo model in which cancer cell dynamics can be tracked during angiogenesis in an intact microvascular network. Laser direct-write (LDW) was utilized to reproducibly deposit breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and fibroblasts into spatially-defined patterns on cultured rat mesenteric tissues. In addition, heterogeneous patterns containing co-printed MDA-MB-231/fibroblasts or MDA-MB-231/MCF-7 cells were generated for fibroblast-directed and collective cell invasion models. Printed cells remained viable and the cells retained the ability to proliferate in serum-rich media conditions. Over a culture period of five days, time-lapse imaging confirmed fibroblast and MDA-MB-231 cell migration within the microvascular networks. Confocal microscopy indicated that printed MDA-MB-231 cells infiltrated the tissue thickness and were capable of interacting with endothelial cells. Angiogenic network growth in tissue areas containing printed cancer cells was characterized by significantly increased capillary sprouting compared to control tissue areas containing no printed cells. Our results establish an innovative ex vivo experimental platform that enables time-lapse evaluation of cancer cell dynamics during angiogenesis within a real microvascular network scenario. PMID:26190039

  16. CXCR4 is a novel target of cancer chemopreventative isothiocyanates in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sakao, Kozue; Vyas, Avani R; Chinni, Sreenivasa R; Amjad, Ali I; Parikh, Rahul; Singh, Shivendra V

    2015-05-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from cruciferous vegetables, including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane (SFN), exhibit in vivo activity against prostate cancer in a xenograft and transgenic mouse model, and thus are appealing for chemoprevention of this disease. Watercress constituent PEITC and SFN-rich broccoli sprout extract are under clinical investigations but the molecular mechanisms underlying their cancer chemopreventive effects are not fully understood. The present study demonstrates that chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a novel target of ITCs in prostate cancer cells. Exposure of prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, 22Rv1, C4-2, and PC-3) to pharmacologically applicable concentrations of PEITC, benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), and SFN (2.5 and 5 μmol/L) resulted in downregulation of CXCR4 expression. None of the ITCs affected secretion of CXCR4 ligand (stromal-derived factor-1). In vivo inhibition of PC-3 xenograft growth upon PEITC treatment was associated with a significant decrease in CXCR4 protein level. A similar trend was discernible in the tumors from SFN-treated TRAMP mice compared with those of control mice, but the difference was not significant. Stable overexpression of CXCR4 in PC-3 cells conferred significant protection against wound healing, cell migration, and cell viability inhibition by ITCs. Inhibition of cell migration resulting from PEITC and BITC exposure was significantly augmented by RNAi of CXCR4. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that cancer chemopreventive ITCs suppress CXCR4 expression in prostate cancer cells in vitro as well as in vivo. These results suggest that CXCR4 downregulation may be an important pharmacodynamic biomarker of cancer chemopreventative ITCs in prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:25712054

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  18. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  19. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  20. Micropost microenvironments for studying luminal-basal lineage commitment of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavaraju, Anand; Qing, Bo; Jabart, Eric; Labarge, Mark; Sohn, Lydia

    2013-03-01

    MCF-7 breast cancer cells were plated onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microposts in order to examine the effects of the microenvironment on cell lineage. Different stiffnesses and sizes of the microposts are postulated to impact cell surface marker expression levels. We will provide preliminary results analyzing CD271 and focal adhesion markers such as vinculin. 3D shear flow will also be applied to the microposts to study how external mechanical stimuli affect cancer cells within their microenvironment.

  1. Metformin inhibits lung cancer cells proliferation through repressing microRNA-222.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Sun, Yu'e

    2013-12-01

    Metformin, which is commonly used as an oral anti-hyperglycemic agent of the biguanide family, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including lung cancer, remains unknown. MiR-222 induces cell growth and cell cycle progression via direct targeting of p27, p57 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used A549 and NCI-H358 human lung cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment reduced expression of miR-222 in these cells (p < 0.05). As a result, protein abundance of p27, p57 and PTEN were increased in cells exposed to metformin. Therefore, these data provide novel evidence for a mechanism that may contribute to the anti-neoplastic effects of metformin suggested by recent population studies and justifying further work to explore potential roles for it in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23974492

  2. Factors Affecting Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Performance and Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Moller-Holst S.

    1998-11-01

    Development of fuel cells is often based on small-scale laboratory studies. Due to limited time and budgets, a minimum number of cells are usually prepared and tested, thus, conclusions about improved performance are often drawn from studies of a few cells. Generally, statistics showing the significance of an effect are seldom reported. In this work a simple PEM fuel cell electrode optimization experiment is used as an example to illustrate the importance of statistical evaluation of factors affecting cell performance. The use of fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of cells that have to be studied is also addressed.

  3. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 regulates the cell growth and predicts prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Sik; Park, Young-Lan; Kim, Nuri; Oh, Hyung-Hoon; Son, Dong-Jun; Kim, Mi-Young; Oak, Chan-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Joo, Young-Eun

    2015-05-01

    The expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl‑1), a member of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family, has been associated with tumor progression and adverse patient outcome. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether Mcl-1 affects the survival or death of gastric cancer cells, and to investigate the prognostic value of its expression in gastric cancer. PcDNA3.1-Mcl-1 expression and Mcl-1 siRNA vectors were used to overexpress and silence Mcl-1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines including SNU638 and TMK1, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of Mcl-1 in gastric cancer tissues. Apoptosis was determined by the TUNEL assay, and cell proliferation was determined by immunostaining with a Ki-67 antibody. Mcl-1 knockdown induced apoptosis through the upregulation of caspase-3, and -7, and PARP activity, and the release of Smac/DIABLO and Omi/HtrA2 into the cytoplasm. Additionally, cell cycle arrest occurred due to decrease of cyclin D1, cell division cycle gene 2 (cdc2), and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6. In contrast, overexpression of Mcl-1 inhibited apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mcl-1 knockdown did not suppress tumor cell proliferation in gastric cancer cells, whereas overexpression of Mcl-1 enhanced tumor cell proliferation. The JAK2 and STAT3 signaling cascades were significantly blocked by Mcl-1 knockdown. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (KI) value of Mcl-1 positive tumors was significantly lower than that of Mcl-1 negative tumors. However, there was no significant difference between Mcl-1 expression and the apoptotic index (AI). Mcl-1 expression was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa tissues, and was associated with age, tumor size, stage, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. Our study showed that Mcl-1 regulates the cell growth and might be a potential prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25672320

  4. Natural flavonoids targeting deregulated cell cycle progression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana Pratap; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2006-03-01

    The prolonged duration requiring alteration of multi-genetic and epigenetic molecular events for cancer development provides a strong rationale for cancer prevention, which is developing as a potential strategy to arrest or reverse carcinogenic changes before the appearance of the malignant disease. Cell cycle progression is an important biological event having controlled regulation in normal cells, which almost universally becomes aberrant or deregulated in transformed and neoplastic cells. In this regard, targeting deregulated cell cycle progression and its modulation by various natural and synthetic agents are gaining widespread attention in recent years to control the unchecked growth and proliferation in cancer cells. In fact, a vast number of experimental studies convincingly show that many phytochemicals halt uncontrolled cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Among these phytochemicals, natural flavonoids have been identified as a one of the major classes of natural anticancer agents exerting antineoplastic activity via cell cycle arrest as a major mechanism in various types of cancer cells. This review is focused at the modulatory effects of natural flavonoids on cell cycle regulators including cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors, cyclins, p53, retinoblastoma family of proteins, E2Fs, check-point kinases, ATM/ATR and survivin controlling G1/S and G2/M check-point transitions in cell cycle progression, and discusses how these molecular changes could contribute to the antineoplastic effects of natural flavonoids. PMID:16515531

  5. Cell adhesion property affected by cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase: Opto-electric approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Kim, Chul-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ho; English, Anthony; Kihm, Kenneth D; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-01-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed-time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopically expressing COX-1, COX-2, and 15LOX-1, to investigate whether expression of COX-1, COX-2, or 15LOX-1 would affect cell adhesion using our opto-electric methodology. In a fixed-time point experiment, only COX-1- and COX-2-expressing cells enhanced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, but all the transfected cells showed invasion activity. However, in a real-time experiment using opto-electric approaches, transmitted cellular morphology was much different with tight adhesion being shown in COX-2 expressing cells, as imaged by differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM) and interference reflection contrast microscopy (IRCM). Furthermore, micro-impedance measurements showed a continued increase in both resistance and reactance of COX- and LOX-transfected cells, consistent with the imaging data. Our data indicate that both COX- and LOX-expressing cells have strong cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesions, and that cell imaging analysis with cell impedance data generates fully reliable results on cell adhesion measurement. PMID:20026301

  6. Angiotensin II promotes endometrial cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Magdalena; Matysiak-Burzyńska, Zuzanna; Kowalska, Karolina; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Domińska, Kamila; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common female cancers. One of the key processes involved in EC development is uncontrolled proliferation stimulated by local factors such as angiotensin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of angiotensin II (Ang II) on human EC cells. Biological assays and gene expression analysis were performed on three cell lines: ISH, MFE-296 and MFE-280. Our results indicated that at the beginning of cancerogenesis Ang II induced abnormal proliferation at lower doses. We also showed that dose-dependent induction of proliferation was connected with changes in the expression of MKI67, CCND1 and CCNE1 genes in well- and poorly differentiated cancer cells. After Ang II treatment, poorly differentiated endometrial cancer cell line acquired a mesenchymal phenotype, which was characterized by induced expression of EMT-related genes (VIM, CD44, SNAI1, ZEB1 and ZEB2). Our study revealed that Ang II influences EC cells in terms of cancer-related processes, and is responsible for increased proliferation, reduction in apoptosis, increased mobility and modulation of adhesion potential. Its effect and effectiveness appear to be highly connected with the differentiation status of the cancerous cells, as Ang II appears to play a crucial role in the early and late stages of malignant transformation. PMID:27349856

  7. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge. PMID:21470128

  8. Reconfiguring phosphorylation signaling by genetic polymorphisms affects cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbo; Cheng, Han; Pan, Zhicheng; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Large-scale sequencing has characterized an enormous number of genetic variations (GVs), and the functional analysis of GVs is fundamental to understanding differences in disease susceptibility and therapeutic response among and within populations. Using a combination of a sequence-based predictor with known phosphorylation and protein-protein interaction information, we computationally detected 9606 potential phosSNPs (phosphorylation-related single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 720 known, disease-associated SNPs that dramatically modify the human phosSNP-associated kinase-substrate network. Further analyses demonstrated that the proteins in the network are heavily associated in various signaling and cancer pathways, while cancer genes and drug targets are significantly enriched. We re-constructed four population-specific kinase-substrate networks and found that several inherited disease or cancer genes, such as IRS1, RAF1, and EGFR, were differentially regulated by phosSNPs. Thus, phosSNPs may influence disease susceptibility and be involved in cancer development by reconfiguring phosphorylation networks in different populations. Moreover, by systematically characterizing potential phosphorylation-related cancer mutations (phosCMs) in 12 types of cancers, we observed that both types of GVs preferentially occur in the known cancer genes, while a considerable number of phosphorylated proteins, especially those over-representing cancer genes, contain both phosSNPs and phosCMs. Furthermore, it was observed that phosSNPs were significantly enriched in amplification genes identified from breast cancers and tyrosine kinase circuits of lung cancers. Taken together, these results should prove helpful for further elucidation of the functional impacts of disease-associated SNPs. PMID:25722345

  9. Factors affecting recognition of cancer risks of nuclear workers.

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, G W; Stewart, A M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To discover whether direct estimates of the risks of cancer for nuclear workers agree with indirect estimates based on survivors of the atomic bomb; whether relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer are the same for workers and survivors, and whether dosimetry standards are sufficiently uniform to allow pooling of data from different nuclear industrial sites. METHOD--Data from five nuclear sites in the United States were included in a cohort analysis that as well as controlling for all the usual factors also allowed for possible effects of three cancer modulating factors (exposure age, cancer latency, and year of exposure). This analysis was first applied to three distinct cohorts, and then to two sets of pooled data. RESULTS--From each study cohort there was evidence of a risk of cancer related to dose, and evidence that the extra radiogenic cancers had the same overall histological manifestations as naturally occurring cancers and were largely the result of exposures after 50 years of age causing deaths after 70 years. There were, however, significant differences between the five sets of risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS--Although the risks of cancer in nuclear workers were appreciably higher than estimates based on the cancer experiences of survivors of the atomic bomb, some uncertainties remained as there were non-uniform standards of dosimetry in the nuclear sites. The differences between nuclear workers and survivors of the atomic bomb were largely the result of relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer being totally different for workers and survivors and, in the occupational data, there were no signs of the special risks of leukaemia found in atomic bomb data and other studies of effects of high doses. PMID:7663636

  10. Mathematical Modelling and Prediction of the Effect of Chemotherapy on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Wong, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cells’ growth which affect DNAs and make them damaged. Many treatment options for cancer exist, with the primary ones including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy and palliative care. Which treatments are used depends on the type, location, and grade of the cancer as well as the person’s health and wishes. Chemotherapy is the use of medication (chemicals) to treat disease. More specifically, chemotherapy typically refers to the destruction of cancer cells. Considering the diffusion of drugs in cancer cells and fractality of DNA walks, in this research we worked on modelling and prediction of the effect of chemotherapy on cancer cells using Fractional Diffusion Equation (FDE). The employed methodology is useful not only for analysis of the effect of special drug and cancer considered in this research but can be expanded in case of different drugs and cancers. PMID:26316014

  11. Cancer Stem Cells: A Stride Towards Cancer Cure?

    PubMed Central

    SENGUPTA, AMITAVA; CANCELAS, JOSE A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite major refinements in cancer therapy drugs, our progress at increasing the cure rates of most cancers has been hampered by high relapse rates. A possible biological explanation of the high frequency of relapse and resistance to currently available drugs has been provided by the cancer stem cell (CSC) proposition. Basically, the CSC theory hypothesizes the presence of a hierarchically organized, relatively rare population of cells that is responsible for tumor initiation, self-renewal and maintenance, mutation accumulation and therapy resistance. Since first postulated by John Dick, multiple reports have provided support for this hypothesis by isolating (more or less) rare cell populations, where the ability to initiate tumors in vivo has been demonstrated. Most progress and stronger data supporting this theory are found predominantly in myelogenous leukemias, whose study has benefited from over half-a-century progress in our understanding of the normal hierarchical organization of hematopoiesis. This review, however, also analyzes the advancement in the quantitative and functional analysis of solid tumor stem cells and in the analysis of the tumor microenvironment as specialized, nurturing niches for CSCs. Overall, this review intends to briefly summarize most of the evidences that support the CSC theory and the apparent contradictions, if not skepticism from the scientific community, about its validity for all forms of cancer, or alternatively on just a few cancers initiated by a limited number of somatic or germinal mutations. PMID:20458736

  12. Dendritic Cell-Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell Differentiation for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Julia; Berk, Erik; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    The success of cellular immunotherapies against cancer requires the generation of activated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cells. The type of T-cell response generated (e.g., Th1 or Th2) will determine the efficacy of the therapy, and it is generally assumed that a type-1 response is needed for optimal cancer treatment. IL-17 producing T-cells (Th17/Tc17) play an important role in autoimmune diseases, but their function in cancer is more controversial. While some studies have shown a pro-cancerous role for IL-17, other studies have shown an anti-tumor function. The induction of polarized T-cell responses can be regulated by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are key regulators of the immune system with the ability to affect both innate and adaptive immune responses. These properties have led many researchers to study the use of ex vivo manipulated DCs for the treatment of various diseases, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. While Th1/Tc1 cells are traditionally used for their potent anti-tumor responses, mounting evidence suggests Th17/Tc17 cells should be utilized by themselves or for the induction of optimal Th1 responses. It is therefore important to understand the factors involved in the induction of both type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses by DCs. PMID:26344346

  13. Transbronchial Dissemination of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Akira; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Tomoya; Watanabe, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Bandoh, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of squamous cell lung cancer with transbronchial dissemination in a 73-year-old man. Bronchoscopic examination revealed multiple bronchial mucosal nodules that existed independently of one another. We reviewed 16 previous cases of endobronchial metastasis in lung cancer. All patients were men. Among the reports that described the smoking history, most patients were smokers (6/7), and the most frequent histological type of cancer was squamous cell carcinoma (11/17). Although hematogenous and lymphogenous routes have been reported as metastatic mechanisms, no previous cases involving transbronchial dissemination have been described. Transbronchial dissemination may be an alternative pathway of endobronchial metastasis. PMID:26672760

  14. Dendritic cell defects in the colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Legitimo, Annalisa; Consolini, Rita; Failli, Alessandra; Orsini, Giulia; Spisni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations of the genome. However, also the formation of an inflammatory milieu plays a pivotal role in tumor development and progression. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a relevant role in tumor by exerting differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions, depending on the local milieu. Quantitative and functional impairments of DCs have been widely observed in several types of cancer, including CRC, representing a tumor-escape mechanism employed by cancer cells to elude host immunosurveillance. Understanding the interactions between DCs and tumors is important for comprehending the mechanisms of tumor immune surveillance and escape, and provides novel approaches to therapy of cancer. This review summarizes updated information on the role of the DCs in colon cancer development and/or progression. PMID:25483675

  15. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. BRMS1 regulates apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    You, Jijun; He, Xuejun; Ding, Haibing; Zhang, Tingrong

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) was originally identified as a metastasis suppressor gene in human breast cancer. Previous studies have reported that loss of BRMS1 expression correlates with tumor progression, and poor prognosis in NSCLC. However, the role of BRMS1 in NSCLC is not fully understood. In this study, we found that expression of BRMS1 in A549 cells did not affect cell growth under normal culture conditions but sensitized cells to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Consistently, knockdown of endogenous BRMS1 expression in H1299 cells suppressed cell apoptosis. We identified that BRMS1 regulate apoptosis in NSCLC cells by modulating Stat3 activation. Taken together, our results show that BRMS1 sensitizes NSCLC cells to apoptosis through Stat3 signaling pathway, suggesting a potential role of BRMS1 in regulating NSCLC apoptosis and metastasis. PMID:25182004

  17. Cancer stem cells: the lessons from pre-cancerous stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract How a cancer is initiated and established remains elusive despite all the advances in decades of cancer research. Recently the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been revived, challenging the long-standing model of ‘clonal evolution’ for cancer development and implicating the dawning of a potential cure for cancer [1]. The recent identification of pre-cancerous stem cells (pCSCs) in cancer, an early stage of CSC development, however, implicates that the clonal evolution is not contradictory to the CSC hypothesis but is rather an aspect of the process of CSC development [2]. The discovery of pCSC has revealed and will continue to reveal the volatile properties of CSC with respect to their phenotype, differentiation and tumourigenic capacity during initiation and progression. Both pCSC and CSC might also serve as precursors of tumour stromal components such as tumour vasculogenic stem/progenitor cells (TVPCs). Thus, the CSC hypothesis covers the developing process of tumour-initiating cells (TIC) → pCSC → CSC → cancer, a cellular process that should parallel the histological process of hyperplasia/metaplasia (TIC) → pre-cancerous lesions (pCSC) → malignant lesions (CSC → cancer). The embryonic stem (ES) cell and germ line stem (GS) cell genes are subverted in pCSCs. Especially the GS cell protein piwil2 may play an important role during the development of TIC → pCSC → CSC, and this protein may be used as a common biomarker for early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer. As cancer stem cell research is yet in its infancy, definitive conclusions regarding the role of pCSC cannot be made at this time. However, this review will discuss what we have learned from pCSC and how this has led to innovative ideas that may eventually have major impacts on the understanding and treatment of cancer. PMID:18053092

  18. Factors affecting the persistence of drug-induced reprogramming of the cancer methylome.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua S K; Kagey, Jacob D; Barwick, Benjamin G; Dwivedi, Bhakti; McCabe, Michael T; Kowalski, Jeanne; Vertino, Paula M

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a critical feature of cancer. Epigenetic therapy seeks to reverse these changes to restore normal gene expression. DNA demethylating agents, including 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), are currently used to treat certain leukemias, and can sensitize solid tumors to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. However, it has been difficult to pin the clinical efficacy of these agents to specific demethylation events, and the factors that contribute to the durability of response remain largely unknown. Here we examined the genome-wide kinetics of DAC-induced DNA demethylation and subsequent remethylation after drug withdrawal in breast cancer cells. We find that CpGs differ in both their susceptibility to demethylation and propensity for remethylation after drug removal. DAC-induced demethylation was most apparent at CpGs with higher initial methylation levels and further from CpG islands. Once demethylated, such sites exhibited varied remethylation potentials. The most rapidly remethylating CpGs regained >75% of their starting methylation within a month of drug withdrawal. These sites had higher pretreatment methylation levels, were enriched in gene bodies, marked by H3K36me3, and tended to be methylated in normal breast cells. In contrast, a more resistant class of CpG sites failed to regain even 20% of their initial methylation after 3 months. These sites had lower pretreatment methylation levels, were within or near CpG islands, marked by H3K79me2 or H3K4me2/3, and were overrepresented in sites that become aberrantly hypermethylated in breast cancers. Thus, whereas DAC-induced demethylation affects both endogenous and aberrantly methylated sites, tumor-specific hypermethylation is more slowly regained, even as normal methylation promptly recovers. Taken together, these data suggest that the durability of DAC response is linked to its selective ability to stably reset at least a portion of the cancer methylome. PMID:27082926

  19. Iron, inflammation and invasion of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER-FODOR, EVA; MIKLASOVA, NATALIA; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; SAHA, BHASKAR

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with the metastasis of tumor cells evolving from a benign tumor to disseminating cancer. Such a metastatic progression is fostered by the angiogenesis propelled by various mediators interacting at the site of tumor growth. Angiogenesis causes two major changes that are assisted by altered glycosylation and neo-antigen presentation by the cancer cells. The angiogenesis-promoted pathological changes include enhanced inflammation and degradation of tissue matrices releasing tumor cells from the site of its origin. The degraded tumor cells release the neo-antigens resulting from altered glycosylation. Presentation of neo-antigens to T cells escalates metastasis and inflammation. Inflammasome activation and inflammation in several infections are regulated by iron. Based on the discrete reports, we propose a link between iron, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor growth. Knowing the link better may help us formulate a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26609256

  20. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Karobi

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  1. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  2. Anti-diabetic therapies affect risk of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Yeung, Sai-Ching J.; Hassan, Manal M.; Konopleva, Marina; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Anti-diabetic drugs have been found to have various effects on cancer in experimental systems and in epidemiological studies, although the association between these therapeutics and the risk of human pancreatic cancer has not been explored. We investigated the effect of anti-diabetic therapies on the risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods A hospital-based, case-control study was conducted at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2004 through 2008 involving 973 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (including 259 diabetics) and 863 controls (including 109 diabetics). Information on diabetes history and other risk factors was collected by personal interview. The frequencies of use of insulin, insulin secretagogues, thiazolidinediones, metformin and other antidiabetic medications among diabetics were compared between cases and controls. The risk of pancreatic cancer was estimated using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results Diabetics that had taken metformin had a significantly lower risk of pancreatic cancer, compared with those that had not taken metformin (OR=0.38; 95% CI, 0.22–0.69; P=0.001) with adjustments for demographic, clinical and risk factors. This difference remained statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to patients with a duration of diabetes >2 years or those never used insulin. In contrast, diabetics that had taken insulin or insulin secretagogues had a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer, compared with diabetics that had not take these drugs. Use of thiazolidinediones did not significantly modify pancreatic cancer risk. Conclusions Metformin use was associated with reduced risk, and insulin or insulin secretagogues use were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics. PMID:19375425

  3. Ubiquitin ligase CHIP suppresses cancer stem cell properties in a population of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Mai; Nakajima, Yuka; Hirata, Naoya; Morishita, Tamaki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Yasunari; Kimura, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have several distinctive characteristics, including high metastatic potential, tumor-initiating potential, and properties that resemble normal stem cells such as self-renewal, differentiation, and drug efflux. Because of these characteristics, CSC is regarded to be responsible for cancer progression and patient prognosis. In our previous study, we showed that a ubiquitin E3 ligase carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) suppressed breast cancer malignancy. Moreover, a recent clinical study reported that CHIP expression levels were associated with favorable prognostic parameters of patients with breast cancer. Here we show that CHIP suppresses CSC properties in a population of breast cancer cells. CHIP depletion resulted in an increased proportion of CSCs among breast cancers when using several assays to assess CSC properties. From our results, we propose that inhibition of CSC properties may be one of the functions of CHIP as a suppressor of cancer progression. PMID:25234599

  4. Cancer stem cells: a metastasizing menace!

    PubMed

    Bandhavkar, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and is estimated to be a reason of death of more than 18 billion people in the coming 5 years. Progress has been made in diagnosis and treatment of cancer; however, a sound understanding of the underlying cell biology still remains an unsolved mystery. Current treatments include a combination of radiation, surgery, and/or chemotherapy. However, these treatments are not a complete cure, aimed simply at shrinking the tumor and in majority of cases, there is a relapse of tumor. Several evidences suggest the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating stem-like cells, a small population of cells present in the tumor, capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny. The presence of these CSCs can be attributed to the failure of cancer treatments as these cells are believed to exhibit therapy resistance. As a result, increasing attention has been given to CSC research to resolve the therapeutic problems related to cancer. Progress in this field of research has led to the development of novel strategies to treat several malignancies and has become a hot topic of discussion. In this review, we will briefly focus on the main characteristics, therapeutic implications, and perspectives of CSCs in cancer therapy. PMID:26773710

  5. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  6. Perspectives on cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Basu-Roy, Upal; Basilico, Claudio; Mansukhani, Alka

    2013-09-10

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor of growing bones that, despite surgery and chemotherapy, is prone to relapse. These mesenchymal tumors are derived from progenitor cells in the osteoblast lineage that have accumulated mutations to escape cell cycle checkpoints leading to excessive proliferation and defects in their ability to differentiate appropriately into mature bone-forming osteoblasts. Like other malignant tumors, osteosarcoma is often heterogeneous, consisting of phenotypically distinct cells with features of different stages of differentiation. The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumors are maintained by stem cells and it is the incomplete eradication of a refractory population of tumor-initiating stem cells that accounts for drug resistance and tumor relapse. In this review we present our current knowledge about the biology of osteosarcoma stem cells from mouse and human tumors, highlighting new insights and unresolved issues in the identification of this elusive population. We focus on factors and pathways that are implicated in maintaining such cells, and differences from paradigms of epithelial cancers. Targeting of the cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma is a promising avenue to explore to develop new therapies for this devastating childhood cancer. PMID:22659734

  7. Natural T cell immunity against cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagorsen, Dirk; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Marincola, Francesco M; Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2003-10-01

    It has long been a matter of debate whether tumors are spontaneously immunogenic in patients. With the availability of sensitive methods, naturally occurring T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can be frequently detected in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current data on T cell responses to TAAs in various malignancies, including melanoma, colorectal cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer. T cell responses against various antigens, including melanoma differentiation antigens, carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, her-2/neu, Wilms' tumor protein, proteinase 3, NY-ESO-1, and surviving, have been reported in a substantial number of patients. In contrast, other TAAs, including most antigens of the MAGE family, do not usually elicit spontaneous T cell responses. A distinction between direct ex vivo T cell responses and in vitro-generated T cell responses is provided because in vitro stimulation results in quantitative and functional changes of T cell responses. The possible role of TAA-specific T cells in immunosurveillance and tumor escape and the implications for immunological treatment strategies are discussed. Naturally occurring T cells against TAAs are a common phenomenon in tumor patients. Understanding the mechanisms and behavior of natural TAA-specific T cells could provide crucial information for rational development of more efficient T cell-directed immunotherapy. PMID:14555498

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Develop Tumor Tropism but Do Not Accelerate Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis in a Somatic Mouse Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Lydia; Rao, Geetha; Christopherson II, Kent; Xu, Xiulong

    2013-01-01

    The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer progression, growth and tumorigenesis remains controversial or unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of MSCs on breast tumor induction and growth in a clinically relevant somatic breast cancer model. We first conducted in vitro studies and found that conditioned media (CM) of RCAS-Neu and RCAS-PyMT breast cancer cell lines and tumor cells themselves dramatically increased the proliferation and motility of MSCs and induced morphological changes of MSCs and differentiation into fibroblast-like cells. In contrast, the CM of MSCs inhibited the proliferation of two breast cancer cell lines by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. In vivo studies revealed that fluorescence dye-labeled MSCs migrated into tumor tissues. Unexpectedly, single or multiple intravenous injections of MSCs did not affect the latency of breast cancer in TVA- transgenic mice induced by intraductal injection of the RCAS vector encoding polyoma middle-T antigen (PyMT) or Neu oncogenes. Moreover, MSCs had no effect on RCAS-Neu tumor growth in a syngeneic ectopic breast cancer model. While our studies consistently demonstrated the ability of breast cancer cells to profoundly induce MSCs migration, differentiation, and proliferation, the anti-proliferative effect of MSCs on breast tumor cells observed in vitro could not be translated into an antitumor activity in vivo, probably reflecting the antagonizing or complex effects of MSCs on tumor environment and tumor cells themselves. PMID:24069135

  9. Discrimination, Affect, and Cancer Risk Factors among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Adolfo G.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Adams, Claire E.; Cao, Yumei; Nguyen, Nga; Wetter, David W.; Watkins, Kellie L.; Regan, Seann D.; McNeill, Lorna H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether stress or depressive symptoms mediated associations between perceived discrimination and multiple modifiable behavioral risk factors for cancer among 1363 African American adults. Methods Nonparametric bootstrapping procedures, adjusted for sociodemographics, were used to assess mediation. Results Stress and depressive symptoms each mediated associations between discrimination and current smoking, and discrimination and the total number of behavioral risk factors for cancer. Depressive symptoms also mediated the association between discrimination and overweight/obesity (p values < .05). Conclusions Discrimination may influence certain behavioral risk factors for cancer through heightened levels of stress and depressive symptoms. Interventions to reduce cancer risk may need to address experiences of discrimination, as well as the stress and depression they engender. PMID:24034678

  10. CD24 negative lung cancer cells, possessing partial cancer stem cell properties, cannot be considered as cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haineng; Mu, Jiasheng; Xiao, Jing; Wu, Xiangsong; Li, Maolan; Liu, Tianrun; Liu, Xinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play vital role in lung cancer progression, resistance, metastasis and relapse. Identifying lung CSCs makers for lung CSCs targeting researches are critical for lung cancer therapy. In this study, utilizing previous identified lung CSCs as model, we compared the expression of CD24, CD133 and CD44 between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells. Increased ratio of CD24- cells were found in CSCs. CD24- cells were then sorted by flow cytometry and their proliferative ability, chemo-resistance property and in vivo tumor formation abilities were detected. A549 CD24- cells formed smaller colonies, slower proliferated in comparison to A549 CD24+ cells. Besides, A549 CD24- exhibited stronger resistance to chemotherapy drug. However, A549 CD24- didn’t exert any stronger tumor formation ability in vivo, which is the gold standard of CSCs. These results showed that CD24- A549 cells showed some properties of CSCs but not actually CSCs. This study provides evidence that CD24 cannot be considered as lung CSCs marker. PMID:27073722

  11. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  12. Biomechanics and biophysics of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Subra

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen substantial growth in research into how changes in the biomechanical and biophysical properties of cells and subcellular structures influence, and are influenced by, the onset and progression of human diseases. This paper presents an overview of the rapidly expanding, nascent field of research that deals with the biomechanics and biophysics of cancer cells. The review begins with some key observations on the biology of cancer cells and on the role of actin microfilaments, intermediate filaments and microtubule biopolymer cytoskeletal components in influencing cell mechanics, locomotion, differentiation and neoplastic transformation. In order to set the scene for mechanistic discussions of the connections among alterations to subcellular structures, attendant changes in cell deformability, cytoadherence, migration, invasion and tumor metastasis, a survey is presented of the various quantitative mechanical and physical assays to extract the elastic and viscoelastic deformability of cancer cells. Results available in the literature on cell mechanics for different types of cancer are then reviewed. Representative case studies are presented next to illustrate how chemically induced cytoskeletal changes, biomechanical responses and signals from the intracellular regions act in concert with the chemomechanical environment of the extracellular matrix and the molecular tumorigenic signaling pathways to effect malignant transformations. Results are presented to illustrate how changes to cytoskeletal architecture induced by cancer drugs and chemotherapy regimens can significantly influence cell mechanics and disease state. It is reasoned through experimental evidence that greater understanding of the mechanics of cancer cell deformability and its interactions with the extracellular physical, chemical and biological environments offers enormous potential for significant new developments in disease diagnostics, prophylactics, therapeutics and drug

  13. The effects of laser immunotherapy on cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Layton, Elivia; Lam, Anh; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2016-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to target all types of metastases and creates a long-term tumor resistance. Glycated chitosan (GC) is the immunological stimulant used in LIT. Interestingly, GC can act as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. One essential aspect of understanding this immune response is knowing how laser irradiation affects cancer cells' ability to metastasize. In this experiment, a cell migration assay was performed. A 2mm circular elastomer plugs were placed at the bottom of multi-well dishes. Pre-cancerous keratinocytes, different tumor cells, and fibroblasts were then plated separately in treated wells. Once the cells reached 100% confluence, they were irradiated by either a 980nm or 805nm wavelength laser. The goal was to determine the effects of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation on cancer cell migration in vitro, paying the way to understand the mechanism of LIT in treating metastatic tumors in cancer patients.

  14. Cancer Cells with Irons in the Fire

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Laura M.; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer. PMID:24835768

  15. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  16. Short-term expansion of breast circulating cancer cells predicts response to anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Lee, Soo Chin; Kumar, Prashant; Tan, Tuan Zea; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Ow, Samuel G W; Nandi, Sayantani; Lim, Chwee Teck; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2015-06-20

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are considered as surrogate markers for prognosticating and evaluating patient treatment responses. Here, 226 blood samples from 92 patients with breast cancer, including patients with newly diagnosed or metastatic refractory cancer, and 16 blood samples from healthy subjects were cultured in laser-ablated microwells. Clusters containing an increasing number of cytokeratin-positive (CK+) cells appeared after 2 weeks, while most blood cells disappeared with time. Cultures were heterogeneous and exhibited two distinct sub-populations of cells: 'Small' (≤ 25 μm; high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio; CD45-) cells, comprising CTCs, and 'Large' (> 25 μm; low nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio; CD68+ or CD56+) cells, corresponding to macrophage and natural killer-like cells. The Small cell fraction also showed copy number increases in six target genes (FGFR1, Myc, CCND1, HER2, TOP2A and ZNF217) associated with breast cancer. These expanded CTCs exhibited different proportions of epithelial-mesenchymal phenotypes and were transferable for further expansion as spheroids in serum-free suspension or 3D cultures. Cluster formation was affected by the presence and duration of systemic therapy, and its persistence may reflect therapeutic resistance. This novel and advanced method estimates CTC clonal heterogeneity and can predict, within a relatively short time frame, patient responses to therapy. PMID:26008969

  17. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  18. Targeting breast cancer-initiating/stem cells with melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Sujit K; Das, Swadesh K; Azab, Belal; Menezes, Mitchell E; Dent, Paul; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2013-12-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24) displays a broad range of antitumor properties including cancer-specific induction of apoptosis, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and modulation of antitumor immune responses. In our study, we elucidated the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in inhibiting growth of breast cancer-initiating/stem cells. Ad.mda-7 infection decreased proliferation of breast cancer-initiating/stem cells without affecting normal breast stem cells. Ad.mda-7 induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in breast cancer-initiating/stem cells similar to unsorted breast cancer cells and inhibited the self-renewal property of breast cancer-initiating/stem cells by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Prevention of inhibition of Wnt signaling by LiCl increased cell survival upon Ad.mda-7 treatment, suggesting that Wnt signaling inhibition might play a key role in MDA-7/IL-24-mediated death of breast cancer-initiating/stem cells. In a nude mouse subcutaneous xenograft model, Ad.mda-7 injection profoundly inhibited growth of tumors generated from breast cancer-initiating/stem cells and also exerted a potent "bystander" activity inhibiting growth of distant uninjected tumors. Further studies revealed that tumor growth inhibition by Ad.mda-7 was associated with a decrease in proliferation and angiogenesis, two intrinsic features of MDA-7/IL-24, and a reduction in vivo in the percentage of breast cancer-initiating/stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that MDA-7/IL-24 is not only nontoxic to normal cells and normal stem cells but also can kill both unsorted cancer cells and enriched populations of cancer-initiating/stem cells, providing further documentation that MDA-7/IL-24 might be a safe and effective way to eradicate cancers and also potentially establish disease-free survival. PMID:23720015

  19. Quantifying Collective Cell Migration during Cancer Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Stuelten, Christina; Nordstrom, Kerstin; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    As tumors become more malignant, cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body to form secondary, metastatic tumors. This metastatic process is initiated when cells leave the primary tumor, either individually or as groups of collectively migrating cells. The mechanisms regulating how groups of cells collectively migrate are not well characterized. Here we study the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells using quantitative image analysis techniques. By extracting motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines of varying malignancy, we are able to measure how migration dynamics change during cancer progression. We further investigate the role that cell-cell adhesion plays in these collective dynamics by analyzing the migration of cell lines with varying levels of E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion protein) expression.

  20. [Cancer stemness and circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomoko; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-05-01

    The principle concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) giving rise to the carcinogenesis, relapse or metastasis of malignancy is broadly recognized. On the other hand, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) also plays important roles in relapse or metastasis of malignancy, and there has been much focused on the association between CSCs and CTCs in cancer cases. The technical innovations for detection of CTCs enabled us to unveil the nature of CTCs. We now realize that CTCs isolated by cell surface antibodies, such as DCLK1, LGR5 indicated CSC properties, and CTCs with epitherial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) phenotype showed characteristics of CSCs. PMID:25985635

  1. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment. PMID:26483876

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells which are shown to be relatively resistant to conventional anticancer therapies and have been correlated to disease recurrence. Oncolytic viruses utilize methods of cell killing that differ from traditional therapies and thus are able to elude the typical mechanisms that CSCs use to resist current chemotherapies and radiotherapies. Moreover, genetically engineered oncolytic viruses may further augment the oncolytic effects. Here we review the recent data regarding the ability of several oncolytic viruses to eradicate CSCs.

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  4. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Li, Dan; Ghazaryan, Seda; Shu, Limin; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145), it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP). In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:24937171

  5. Lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, S; Vasseur, S; Guillaumond, F

    2016-01-01

    Many human diseases, including metabolic, immune and central nervous system disorders, as well as cancer, are the consequence of an alteration in lipid metabolic enzymes and their pathways. This illustrates the fundamental role played by lipids in maintaining membrane homeostasis and normal function in healthy cells. We reviewed the major lipid dysfunctions occurring during tumor development, as determined using systems biology approaches. In it, we provide detailed insight into the essential roles exerted by specific lipids in mediating intracellular oncogenic signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and bidirectional crosstalk between cells of the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Finally, we summarize the advances in ongoing research aimed at exploiting the dependency of cancer cells on lipids to abolish tumor progression. PMID:26807644

  6. Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available. PMID:25717386

  7. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... is heating. The ability of microwave ovens to heat food is one example of this effect of ...

  8. Pharmacologic regulation of AMPK in breast cancer affects cytoskeletal properties involved with microtentacle formation and re-attachment

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Vitolo, Michele I.; Thompson, Keyata; Martin, Stuart S.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of tumor cells in the circulation is associated with a higher risk of metastasis in patients with breast cancer. Circulating breast tumor cells use tubulin-based structures known as microtentacles (McTNs) to re-attach to endothelial cells and arrest in distant organs. McTN formation is dependent on the opposing cytoskeletal forces of stable microtubules and the actin network. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular metabolic regulator that can alter actin and microtubule organization in epithelial cells. We report that AMPK can regulate the cytoskeleton of breast cancer cells in both attached and suspended conditions. We tested the effects of AMPK on microtubule stability and the actin-severing protein, cofilin. AMPK inhibition with compound c increased both microtubule stability and cofilin activation, which also resulted in higher McTN formation and re-attachment. Conversely, AMPK activation with A-769662 decreased microtubule stability and cofilin activation with concurrent decreases in McTN formation and cell re-attachment. This data shows for the first time that AMPK shifts the balance of cytoskeletal forces in suspended breast cancer cells, which affect their ability to form McTNs and re-attach. These results support a model where AMPK activators may be used therapeutically to reduce the metastatic efficiency of breast tumor cells. PMID:26431377

  9. Dielectrophoretic Separation of Cancer Cells from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Huang, Ying; Becker, Frederick F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of cells depend on their type and physiological status. For example, MDA-231 human breast cancer cells were found to have a mean plasma membrane specific capacitance of 26 mF/m2, more than double the value (11 mF/m2) observed for resting T-lymphocytes. When an inhomogeneous ac electric field is applied to a particle, a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force arises that depends on the particle dielectric properties. Therefore, cells having different dielectric characteristics will experience differential DEP forces when subjected to such a field. In this article, we demonstrate the use of differential DEP forces for the separation of several different cancerous cell types from blood in a dielectric affinity column. These separations were accomplished using thin, flat chambers having microelectrode arrays on the bottom wall. DEP forces generated by the application of ac fields to the electrodes were used to influence the rate of elution of cells from the chamber by hydrodynamic forces within a parabolic fluid flow profile. Electrorotation measurements were first made on the various cell types found within cell mixtures to be separated, and theoretical modeling was used to derive the cell dielectric parameters. Optimum separation conditions were then predicted from the frequency and suspension conductivity dependencies of cell DEP responses defined by these parameters. Cell separations were then undertaken for various ratios of cancerous to normal cells at different concentrations. Eluted cells were characterized in terms of separation efficiency, cell viability, and separation speed. For example, 100% efficiency was achieved for purging MDA-231 cells from blood at the tumor to normal cell ratio 1:1 × 105 or 1:3 × 105, cell viability was not compromised, and separation rates were at least 103 cells/s. Theoretical and experimental criteria for the design and operation of such separators are presented. PMID

  10. Immuno Nanoparticles Integrated Electrical Control of Targeted Cancer Cell Development Using Whole Cell Bioelectronic Device

    PubMed Central

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Chengxiao; Chen, Chunying; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Electrical properties of cells determine most of the cellular functions, particularly ones which occur in the cell's membrane. Manipulation of these electrical properties may provide a powerful electrotherapy option for the treatment of cancer as cancerous cells have been shown to be more electronegative than normal proliferating cells. Previously, we used an electrical impedance sensing system (EIS) to explore the responses of cancerous SKOV3 cells and normal HUVEC cells to low intensity (<2 V/cm) AC electric fields, determining that the optimal frequency for SKOV3 proliferation arrest was 200 kHz, without harming the non-cancerous HUVECs. In this study, to determine if these effects are cell type dependant, human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) were subjected to a range of frequencies (50 kHz-2 MHz) similar to the previously tested SKOV3. For the MCF7, an optimal frequency of 100 kHz was determined using the EIS, indicating a higher sensitivity towards the applied field. Further experiments specifically targeting the two types of cancer cells using HER2 antibody functionalized gold nanoparticles (HER2-AuNPs) were performed to determine if enhanced electric field strength can be induced via the application of nanoparticles, consequently leading to the killing of the cancerous cells without affecting non cancerous HUVECs and MCF10a providing a platform for the development of a non-invasive cancer treatment without any harmful side effects. The EIS was used to monitor the real-time consequences on cellular viability and a noticeable decrease in the growth profile of the MCF7 was observed with the application of the HER2-AuNPs and the electric fields indicating specific inhibitory effects on dividing cells in culture. To further understand the effects of the externally applied field to the cells, an Annexin V/EthD-III assay was performed to determine the cell death mechanism indicating apoptosis. The zeta potential of the SKOV3 and the MCF7 before and after

  11. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  12. Predominance of M2-polarized macrophages in bladder cancer affects angiogenesis, tumor grade and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, HISASHI; TANAKA, MICHIO; TANAKA, AYAKO; TSUNEMI, AKISA; YAMAMOTO, HIDENOBU

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) often assume an immunoregulatory M2 phenotype. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the correlation of vascularity and TAMs, in particular the M2 phenotype in the stroma and tumor areas, with the clinical and pathological outcomes of patients with bladder cancer. The TAM counts and microvessel counts (MVCs) were determined immunohistochemically in 21 patients with bladder cancer. The number of infiltrating TAMs was measured using immunohistochemistry with anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)68 and anti-CD163 antibodies, to identify a macrophage lineage marker and an M2-polarized-specific cell surface receptor, respectively. CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were evaluated in the stroma and tumor areas, and areas with a high density of infiltrating cell spots were counted. MVCs were determined using immunohistochemistry with anti-CD34 antibodies. The results revealed that the higher ratio of CD163+/CD68+ macrophages in the stroma, tumor and total tumor tissues were correlated with a higher stage and grade (P<0.05). In addition, the low ratio of CD68+/CD34+ microvessels was correlated with a higher stage (P<0.05). There was also a positive correlation between TAMs and MVC (r2=0.25; P<0.05). These results suggest that the TAM polarized M2 phenotype affects microvessels, pathological outcome, tumor grade and invasiveness. PMID:27123124

  13. Nano-discs Destroy Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A new technique, designed with the potential to treat brain cancers, is under study at Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago Medical Center. The micron-sized magnetic materials, with vortex-like arrangements of spins, were successfully interfaced with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells. The microdisks are gold-coated and biofunctionalized with a cancer-targeting antibody. The antibody recognizes unique receptors on the cancer cells and attaches to them (and them alone), leaving surrounding healthy cells unaffected during treatment. Under application of an alternative magnetic field, the magnetic vortices shift, leading to oscillatory motion of the disks and causing the magneto-mechanic stimulus to be transmitted directly to the cancer cell. Probably because of the damage to the cancer cell membrane, this results in cellular signal transduction and amplification, causing initiation of apoptosis (programmed cell death or "cell suicide"). Manifestation of apoptosis is of clinical significance because the malignant cells are known to be almost "immortal" (due to suppressed apoptosis), and, consequently, highly resistant to conventional (chemo- and radio-) therapies. Due to unique properties of the vortex microdisks, an extremely high spin-vortex-induced cytotoxicity effect can be caused by application of unprecedentedly weak magnetic fields. An alternative magnetic field as slow as about 10s Hertz (for comparison, 60 Hertz in a electrical outlet) and as small as less than 90 Oersteds (which is actually less than the field produced by a magnetized razor blade) applied only for 10 minutes was sufficient to cause ~90% cancer cell destruction in vitro. The study has only been conducted in cells in a laboratory; animal trials are being planned. Watch a news clip of the story from ABC-7 News: http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/health&id=7245605 More details on this study can be found in the original research paper: Biofunctionalized

  14. Modulation of the cancer cell transcriptome by culture media formulations and cell density

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SEUNG WOOK; KIM, SUN-JIN; LANGLEY, ROBERT R.; FIDLER, ISAIAH J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how varying the composition of cell culture formulations and growing cancer cells at different densities might affect tumor cell genotype. Specifically, we compared gene expression profiles generated by human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells cultured in different media [minimum essential medium (MEM), Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM), or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI)-1640 medium] containing different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or different sera (equine or bovine) that were grown at different cell densities. More than 2,000 genes were differentially modulated by at least a 2-fold difference when MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were 90% confluent and compared with cultures that were 50% confluent. Altering the concentration of serum produced an even more pronounced effect on MDA-MB-231 cancer cell gene expression in that 2,981 genes were differentially expressed in a comparison between cells cultured in 0.1% FBS and same cell density cultures that were maintained in 10% FBS. A comparison between MDA-MB-231 cancer cells that were 90% confluent in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media, all containing 10% FBS, resulted in 8,925 differentially expressed genes. Moreover, one-quarter (25.6%) of genes from our genome-wide expression analysis were expressed at significantly different levels by cells grown in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media. Genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were among the genes that were differentially modulated by cells grown in different cell culture formulations and these genes were verified at the protein level. Collectively, these results underscore the importance of accurate reporting and maintenance of uniform culture conditions to ensure reproducible results. PMID:25776572

  15. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  16. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  17. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  18. Spermatogonial stem cells, infertility and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Chauhan, Chhavi; Hou, Steven X

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are responsible for the transmission of genetic information from an individual to the next generation. SSCs play critical roles in understanding the basic reproductive biology of gametes and treatments of human infertility. SSCs not only maintain normal spermatogenesis, but also sustain fertility by critically balancing both SSC self-renewal and differentiation. This self-renewal and differentiation in turn is tightly regulated by a combination of intrinsic gene expression within the SSC as well as the extrinsic gene signals from the niche. Increased SSCs self-renewal at the expense of differentiation result in germ cell tumours, on the other hand, higher differentiation at the expense of self-renewal can result in male sterility. Testicular germ cell cancers are the most frequent cancers among young men in industrialized countries. However, understanding the pathogenesis of testis cancer has been difficult because it is formed during foetal development. Recent studies suggest that SSCs can be reprogrammed to become embryonic stem (ES)-like cells to acquire pluripotency. In the present review, we summarize the recent developments in SSCs biology and role of SSC in testicular cancer. We believe that studying the biology of SSCs will not only provide better understanding of stem cell regulation in the testis, but eventually will also be a novel target for male infertility and testicular cancers. PMID:21155977

  19. Neural stem cell therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagó, Juli Rodriguez; Sheets, Kevin T; Hingtgen, Shawn D

    2016-04-15

    Cancers of the brain remain one of the greatest medical challenges. Traditional surgery and chemo-radiation therapy are unable to eradicate diffuse cancer cells and tumor recurrence is nearly inevitable. In contrast to traditional regenerative medicine applications, engineered neural stem cells (NSCs) are emerging as a promising new therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. The tumor-homing properties allow NSCs to access both primary and invasive tumor foci, creating a novel delivery platform. NSCs engineered with a wide array of cytotoxic agents have been found to significantly reduce tumor volumes and markedly extend survival in preclinical models. With the recent launch of new clinical trials, the potential to successfully manage cancer in human patients with cytotoxic NSC therapy is moving closer to becoming a reality. PMID:26314280

  20. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival12

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne; Måsbäck, Anna; Hartman, Linda; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer in an independent data set, hypothesizing that the expression levels and prognostic impact may differ between the subtypes. Results: Expression of PR or AR protein was associated with improved 5-year progression-free (P = .001 for both) and overall survival (P < .001 for both, log-rank test). ERα and ERβ did not provide prognostic information. Patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR had the most favorable prognosis, and this effect was retained in multivariable analyses. Analyses of the corresponding genes using an independent data set revealed differences among the molecular subtypes, but no clear relationship between high coexpression of PGR and AR and prognosis. Conclusions: A favorable outcome was seen for patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR. Gene expression data suggested variable effects in the different molecular subtypes. These findings demonstrate a prognostic role for PR and AR in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer. PMID:26500033

  1. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  2. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. Characterization of the activities of actin-affecting drugs on tumor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayot, Caroline; Debeir, Olivier; Ham, Philippe van; Damme, Marc van; Kiss, Robert; Decaestecker, Christine . E-mail: cdecaes@ulb.ac.be

    2006-02-15

    Metastases kill 90% of cancer patients. It is thus a major challenge in cancer therapy to inhibit the spreading of tumor cells from primary tumor sites to those particular organs where metastases are likely to occur. Whereas the actin cytoskeleton is a key component involved in cell migration, agents targeting actin dynamics have been relatively poorly investigated. Consequently, valuable in vitro pharmacological tools are needed to selectively identify this type of agent. In response to the absence of any standardized process, the present work aims to develop a multi-assay strategy for screening actin-affecting drugs with anti-migratory potentials. To validate our approach, we used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and A549) and three actin-affecting drugs (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, and jasplakinolide). We quantified the effects of these drugs on the kinetics of actin polymerization in tubes (by means of spectrofluorimetry) and on the dynamics of actin cytoskeletons within whole cells (by means of fluorescence microscopy). Using quantitative videomicroscopy, we investigated the actual effects of the drugs on cell motility. Finally, the combined drug effects on cell motility and cell growth were evaluated by means of a scratch-wound assay. While our results showed concordant drug-induced effects on actin polymerization occurring in vitro in test tubes and within whole cells, the whole cell assay appeared more sensitive than the tube assay. The inhibition of actin polymerization induced by cytochalasin D was paralleled by a decrease in cell motility for both cell types. In the case of jasplakinolide, which induces actin polymerization, while it significantly enhanced the locomotion of the A549 cells, it significantly inhibited that of the MCF-7 ones. All these effects were confirmed by means of the scratch-wound assay except of the jasplakinolide-induced effects on MCF-7 cell motility. These later seemed compensated by an additional effect occurring during wound

  4. Oxidized derivative of docosahexaenoic acid preferentially inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Amin, Shantu; Gowda, Krishne; de Cicco, Ricardo López; Barton, Maria; Su, Yanrong; Russo, Irma H.; Himmelberger, Julie A.; Slifker, Michael; Manni, Andrea; Russo, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert an anticancer effect by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms leading to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. It is well known that breast cancer comprises distinct molecular subtypes which differ in their responsiveness to therapeutic and preventive agents. We tested the hypothesis that n-3FA may preferentially affect triple-negative breast cancer cells for which no targeted intervention is presently available. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its metabolite, 4-OH-DHA as well as its putative metabolite 4-OXO-DHA, were tested in five triple-negative human basal breast cell lines at different stages of transformation (MCF-10F, trMCF, bsMCF, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549) and three luminal breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, and SK-BR-3). Cell proliferation was measured with the tetrazolium MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. DHA and its oxidized derivatives significantly inhibited cell proliferation (20–90% reduction) of both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced on triple-negative basal breast cancer cell lines as compared to luminal breast cancer cell lines after 4-OXO-DHA treatment. Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of oxidized derivatives of DHA on basal type breast cancer. PMID:25413005

  5. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  6. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  7. Inhibition of proliferation of cervical and leukemic cancer cells by penicillin G.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditya; Dahiya, Meetu; Anand, M T; Kumar, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, despite all the efforts, still causes one in five deaths worldwide. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy provide inadequate protection and instead affect normal cells along with cancer cells. The search for cancer cures from natural products (plants and animals) has been practice for over a decade and the use of purified chemical to treat cancer still continues. Several studies have been undertaken during last three decades to find the anti-cancerous property of various plant extract and toxins secreted by animals and micro-organism. These lead to the discovery of several promising molecule having anticancer activity, some of which are in clinical trial and may emerged to be a potential future drug in cancer therapy. In this study we have used penicillin to evaluate its anti-cancer activity. It shown significant effects at cellular and molecular levels against growth of HeLa and K562 cell lines. PMID:23679330

  8. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  9. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-01-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  10. Surgery for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Hoyos, Alberto; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2014-11-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 14% of all lung cancer cases. Most patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are therefore treated nonoperatively with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both. A small subset of patients with SCLC present with early-stage disease and will benefit from surgical resection plus chemotherapy. The rationale for radiotherapy in these patients remains controversial. PMID:25441133

  11. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  12. Enzyme-Regulated Supramolecular Assemblies of Cholesterol Conjugates against Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wu, Dongdong; Fritzsching, Keith J; Rigney, Mike; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Yujie; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Xu, Bing

    2016-08-31

    We report that phosphotyrosine-cholesterol conjugates effectively and selectively kill cancer cells, including platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells. The conjugate increases the degree of noncovalent oligomerization upon enzymatic dephosphorylation in aqueous buffer. This enzymatic conversion also results in the assembly of the cholesterol conjugates inside and outside cells and leads to cell death. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the formed assemblies of the conjugates not only interact with actin filaments and microtubules but also affect lipid rafts. As the first report of multifaceted supramolecular assemblies of cholesterol conjugates against cancer cells, this work illustrates the integration of enzyme catalysis and self-assembly of essential biological small molecules on and inside cancer cells as a promising strategy for developing multifunctional therapeutics to treat drug-resistant cancers. PMID:27529637

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  14. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt. PMID:26600965

  15. The role of mast cells in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Thiago T.; Moura, Ivan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that accumulate in the tumors and their microenvironment during disease progression. Mast cells are armed with a wide array of receptors that sense environment modifications and, upon stimulation, they are able to secrete several biologically active factors involved in the modulation of tumor growth. For example, mast cells are able to secrete pro-angiogenic and growth factors but also pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have allowed substantial progress in understanding the role of mast cells in tumorigenesis/disease progression but further studies are necessary to completely elucidate their impact in the pathophysiology of cancer. Here we review observations suggesting that mast cells could modulate tumor growth in humans. We also discuss the drawbacks related to observations from mast cell-deficient mouse models, which could have consequences in the determination of a potential causative relationship between mast cells and cancer. We believe that the understanding of the precise role of mast cells in tumor development and progression will be of critical importance for the development of new targeted therapies in human cancers. PMID:25705392

  16. Statins Inhibit the Proliferation and Induce Cell Death of Human Papilloma Virus Positive and Negative Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crescencio, María Elena; Rodríguez, Emma; Páez, Araceli; Masso, Felipe A.; Montaño, Luis F.; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have anti-tumoral effects on multiple cancer types; however, little is known about their effect on cervical cancer. We evaluated the effect on proliferation, cell cycle, oxidative stress and cell death of three statins on CaSki, HeLa (HPV+) and ViBo (HPV−) cervical cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation was assayed by crystal violet staining, cell cycle by flow cytometry and cell death by annexin-V staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated by the oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and nitrite concentration (an indirect measure of nitric oxide (NO) production), by the Griess reaction. Inhibition of cell proliferation by atorvastatin, fluvastatin and simvastatin was dose-dependent. ViBo cells were the most responsive. Statins did not affect the cell cycle, instead they induced cell death. The antiproliferative effect in ViBo cells was completely inhibited with mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) treatments. In contrast, cell proliferation of CaSki and HeLa cells was partially (33%) rescued with these intermediates. The three statins increased ROS and nitrite production, mainly in the ViBo cell line. These results suggest that statins exert anti-tumoral effects on cervical cancer through inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death and oxidative stress. Statins could be an aid in the treatment of cervical cancer, especially in HPV− tumors. PMID:23675166

  17. Chemotherapy in heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells with interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilão, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the interconversion between differentiated and stem-like cancer cells has been observed. Here, we model the in vitro growth of heterogeneous cell cultures in the presence of interconversion from differentiated cancer cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs), showing that, by targeting only CSC with cytotoxic agents, it is not always possible to eradicate cancer. We have determined the kinetic conditions under which cytotoxic agents in in vitro heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells eradicate cancer. In particular, we have shown that the chemotherapeutic elimination of in vitro cultures of heterogeneous cancer cells is effective only if it targets all cancer cell types, and if the induced death rates for the different subpopulations of cancer cell types are large enough. The quantitative results of the model are compared and validated with experimental data.

  18. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  19. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  20. The Mind-Body Connection - Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues The Mind-Body Connection Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns? Past Issues / Winter ... traumatic life events. The categories ranged from traumatic stress to some stress to no significant stress. According ...

  1. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology.

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J

    2016-04-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  2. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  3. The metabolic landscape of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Biondani, Giulia; Cordani, Marco; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of quiescent cells endowed with self-renewal properties that can sustain the malignant behavior of the tumor mass giving rise to more differentiated cancer cells. For this reason, the specific killing of CSCs represents one of the most important challenges of the modern molecular oncology. However, their particular resistance to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy imposes a thorough understanding of their biological and biochemical features. The metabolic peculiarities of CSCs may be a therapeutic and diagnostic opportunity in cancer research. In this review, we summarize the most significant discoveries on the metabolism of CSCs describing and critically analyzing the studies supporting either glycolysis or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary source of energy for CSCs. PMID:26337609

  4. Par3 regulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via interaction with Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingjun; Wang, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xin; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Shi, Chengjian; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Hang; Feng, Yechen; Xie, Yu; Xu, Xiaodong; Jia, Wei; He, Ruizhi; Jiang, Jianxin; Hu, Jun; Tian, Rui; Qin, Renyi

    2016-08-01

    The conserved polarity complex, which comprises partitioning-defective proteins Par3, Par6, and the atypical protein kinase C, affects various cell-polarization events, including assembly of tight junctions. Control of tight junction assembly is closely related to invasion and migration potential. However, as the importance of conserved polarity complexes in regulating pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis is unclear, we investigated their role and mechanism in pancreatic cancers. We first detect that the key protein of the conserved polarity complex finds that only Par3 is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues while Par6 and aPKC show no difference. What is more, Par3 tissues level was significantly and positively associated with patient overall survival. Knocking-down Par3 promotes pancreatic cancer cells invasion and migration. And Par3 requires interaction with Tiam1 to affect tight junction assembly, and then affect invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Then, we find that tight junction marker protein ZO-1 and claudin-1 are down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues. And the relationship of the expression of Par3 and ZO-1 in pancreatic cancer tissue is linear correlation. We establish liver metastasis model of human pancreatic cancer cells in Balb/c nude mice and find that knocking down Par3 promotes invasion and metastasis and disturbs tight junction assembly in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the Par3 regulates invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancers by controlling tight junction assembly. PMID:26084985

  5. Saikosaponin-d: A potential chemotherapeutics in castration resistant prostate cancer by suppressing cancer metastases and cancer stem cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Di; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Jiang, Yao-Dong; Wu, Peng; Qi, Huan; Cai, Chao; Zheng, Shao-Bin; Dang, Qiang

    2016-06-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the gold standard regimen for advanced Prostate cancer (PCa) patients, nevertheless, patients eventually develop into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently only a few chemotherapeutics are available for CRPC. Therefore, it is critical for identifying a new drug. In this study, we will explore a new agent, Saikosaponin-d (SSd), for CRPC therapy based on its mechanism of action. DU145 and CWR22Rv1 cells representing CRPC were employed in this study. A series of cell, biochemical, and molecular biologic assays such as Immunofluorescence, Zymography, Sphere formation, Colony formation, and MTT were used. Finally, we find SSd can significantly inhibit the growth of PCa cells in both dose- and time-dependent and suppress the colony formation during a long-term drug administration, it also can inhibit their migration and invasion abilities, which was accompanied by reverse the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and suppress MMP2/9 expression as well as activities. Furthermore, SSd can suppress cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes such as self-renewal ability. Mechanistically, SSd blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by decreasing GSK3β phosphorylation to affect EMT and CSC. These findings demonstrate the mechanism of anti-cancer activity of SSd in targeting EMT and CSC, suggesting SSd can be a potent agent for CRPC therapy. PMID:27155154

  6. Effect of AQP9 Expression in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell PC3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwei; Zhu, Liang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Jinliang; Song, Xishuang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in the prostate was strictly upregulated by androgen and may represent a novel therapeutic target for several cancers, but whether AQP9 plays a role in the regulation of androgen-independent prostate cancer still remains unclear. In the present study, AQP9 was determined in prostate cancer and adjacent cancer tissues; AQP9-siRNA was applied to silencing AQP9 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell PC3 cell line. Western blot and flow cytometry analysis were employed to detect changes in related-function of control and AQP9-siRNA groups. The results showed that AQP9 is significantly induced in cancer tissues than that in adjacent cancer tissues. Moreover, knockdown of AQP9 in PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cell prostate cancer cells increased inhibition rates of proliferation. In addition, knockdown of AQP9 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Bcl-2 and with a notable increase in the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, indicated that AQP9 knockdown promoted apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. From wound healing assay and matrigel invasion, we suggested that AQP9 expression affects the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, In order to explore the pathway may be involved in AQP9-mediated motility and invasion of prostate cancer cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significant suppressed in AQP9 siRNA-transfected cells compared with that in control cells, suggesting that AQP9 is involved in the activation of the ERK pathway in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27187384

  7. The 5p12 breast cancer susceptibility locus affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-receptor positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, David A.; Fiorito, Elisa; Nord, Silje; Van Loo, Peter; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Fleischer, Thomas; Tost, Jorg; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Tramm, Trine; Overgaard, Jens; Bukholm, Ida R; Hurtado, Antoni; Balmain, Allan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked to breast cancer susceptibility, but the mechanism by which variations at these loci influence susceptibility is usually unknown. Some variants are only associated with particular clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Understanding how and why these variants influence subtype-specific cancer risk contributes to our understanding of cancer etiology. We conducted a genome-wide expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) study in a discovery set of 287 breast tumors and 97 normal mammary tissue samples and a replication set of 235 breast tumors. We found that the risk-associated allele of rs7716600 in the 5p12 estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) susceptibility locus was associated with elevated expression of the nearby gene MRPS30 exclusively in ER-positive tumors. We replicated this finding in 235 independent tumors. Further, we showed the rs7716600 risk genotype was associated with decreased MRPS30 promoter methylation exclusively in ER-positive breast tumors. In vitro studies in MCF-7 cells carrying the protective genotype showed that estrogen stimulation decreased MRPS30 promoter chromatin availability and mRNA levels. In contrast, in 600MPE cells carrying the risk genotype, estrogen increased MRPS30 expression and did not affect promoter availability. Our data suggest the 5p12 risk allele affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-responsive tumor cells after tumor initiation by a mechanism affecting chromatin availability. These studies emphasize that the genetic architecture of breast cancer is context-specific, and integrated analysis of gene expression and chromatin remodeling in normal and tumor tissues will be required to explain the mechanisms of risk alleles. PMID:24388359

  8. MicroRNA-21 directly targets MARCKS and promotes apoptosis resistance and invasion in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Li, Dong; Sha, Jianjun; Sun, Peng; Huang, Yiran

    2009-06-05

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers in men. Recent studies have shown that microRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in various types of cancers including prostate cancer. Studies on glioma, colon cancer cells, hepatocellular cancer cells and breast cancer cells have indicated that miR-21 is involved in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. However, the roles of miR-21 in prostate cancer are poorly understood. In this study, the effects of miR-21 on prostate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion were examined. In addition, the targets of miR-21 were identified by a reported RISC-coimmunoprecipitation-based biochemical method. Inactivation of miR-21 by antisense oligonucleotides in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC-3 resulted in sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibition of cell motility and invasion, whereas cell proliferation were not affected. We identified myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase c substrate (MARCKS), which plays key roles in cell motility, as a new target in prostate cancer cells. Our data suggested that miR-21 could promote apoptosis resistance, motility, and invasion in prostate cancer cells and these effects of miR-21 may be partly due to its regulation of PDCD4, TPM1, and MARCKS. Gene therapy using miR-21 inhibition strategy may therefore be useful as a prostate cancer therapy.

  9. [Cancer cell plasticity and metastatic dissemination].

    PubMed

    Moyret-Lalle, Caroline; Pommier, Roxane; Bouard, Charlotte; Nouri, Ebticem; Richard, Geoffrey; Puisieux, Alain

    Metastatic dissemination consists of a sequence of events resulting in the invasion by cancer cells of tissues located away from the primary tumour. This process is highly inefficient, since each event represents an obstacle that only a limited number of cells can overcome. However, two biological phenomena intrinsically linked with tumour development facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the body and promote the formation of metastases, namely the genetic diversity of cancer cells within a given tumour, which arises from their genetic instability and from successive clonal expansions, and cellular plasticity conveyed to the cells by micro-environmental signals. Genetic diversity increases the probability of selecting cells that are intrinsically resistant to biological and physical constraints encountered during metastatic dissemination, whereas cellular plasticity provides cells with the capacity to adapt to stressful conditions and to changes in the microenvironment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an embryonic trans-differentiation process frequently reactivated during tumour development, plays an important role in that context by endowing tumor cells with a unique capacity of motility, survival and adaptability to the novel environments and stresses encountered during the invasion-metastasis cascade. PMID:27615180

  10. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Patel, Stuti; Mektepbayeva, Damel; Mahjoub, Adel; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS) cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS. PMID:26819566

  11. The proteasomal and apoptotic phenotype determine bortezomib sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Voortman, Jens; Chęcińska, Agnieszka; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Bortezomib is a novel anti-cancer agent which has shown promising activity in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, only a subset of patients respond to this treatment. We show that NSCLC cell lines are differentially sensitive to bortezomib, IC50 values ranging from 5 to 83 nM. The apoptosis-inducing potential of bortezomib in NSCLC cells was found to be dependent not only on the apoptotic phenotype but also on the proteasomal phenotype of individual cell lines. Upon effective proteasome inhibition, H460 cells were more susceptible to apoptosis induction by bortezomib than SW1573 cells, indicating a different apoptotic phenotype. However, exposure to a low dose of bortezomib did only result in SW1573 cells, and not in H460 cells, in inhibition of proteasome activity and subsequent apoptosis. This suggests a different proteasomal phenotype as well. Additionally, overexpression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in H460 cells did not affect the proteasomal phenotype of H460 cells but did result in decreased bortezomib-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, successful proteasome-inhibitor based treatment strategies in NSCLC face the challenge of having to overcome apoptosis resistance as well as proteasomal resistance of individual lung cancer cells. Further studies in NSCLC are warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms. PMID:18021420

  12. Genistein cooperates with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among American men, prostate cancer is the most common, non-cutaneous malignancy that accounted for an estimated 241,000 new cases and 34,000 deaths in 2011. Previous studies have suggested that Wnt pathway inhibitory genes are silenced by CpG hypermethylation, and other studies have suggested that genistein can demethylate hypermethylated DNA. Genistein is a soy isoflavone with diverse effects on cellular proliferation, survival, and gene expression that suggest it could be a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. We undertook the present study to investigate the effects of genistein on the epigenome of prostate cancer cells and to discover novel combination approaches of other compounds with genistein that might be of translational utility. Here, we have investigated the effects of genistein on several prostate cancer cell lines, including the ARCaP-E/ARCaP-M model of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), to analyze effects on their epigenetic state. In addition, we investigated the effects of combined treatment of genistein with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat on survival in prostate cancer cells. Methods Using whole genome expression profiling and whole genome methylation profiling, we have determined the genome-wide differences in genetic and epigenetic responses to genistein in prostate cancer cells before and after undergoing the EMT. Also, cells were treated with genistein, vorinostat, and combination treatment, where cell death and cell proliferation was determined. Results Contrary to earlier reports, genistein did not have an effect on CpG methylation at 20 μM, but it did affect histone H3K9 acetylation and induced increased expression of histone acetyltransferase 1 (HAT1). In addition, genistein also had differential effects on survival and cooperated with the histone deacteylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death and inhibit proliferation. Conclusion Our results suggest that there are a number of

  13. Wnt signaling in cancer stem cells and colon cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2016-01-01

    Overactivation of Wnt signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). The Wnt pathway is a key regulator of both the early and the later, more invasive, stages of CRC development. In the normal intestine and colon, Wnt signaling controls the homeostasis of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that fuel, via proliferation, upward movement of progeny cells from the crypt bottom toward the villus and differentiation into all cell types that constitute the intestine. Studies in recent years suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs), similar to ISCs of the crypts, consist of a small subpopulation of the tumor and are responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease. Although various ISC signature genes were also identified as CRC markers and some of these genes were even demonstrated to have a direct functional role in CRC development, the origin of CSCs and their contribution to cancer progression is still debated. Here, we describe studies supporting a relationship between Wnt-regulated CSCs and the progression of CRC. PMID:27134739

  14. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A.

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. {beta}-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced {beta}-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  15. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  16. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Vaios; Speletas, Matthaios; Zamanakou, Maria; Kalala, Fani; Loules, Gedeon; Kerenidi, Theodora; Barda, Angeliki K; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2008-01-01

    Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs). Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia) were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression. PMID:18430198

  17. Sulindac suppresses beta-catenin expression in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anjia; Song, Zibo; Tong, Chang; Hu, Dong; Bi, Xiuli; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Yang, Wancai

    2008-03-31

    Sulindac has been reported to be effective in suppressing tumor growth through the induction of p21WAF1/cip1 in human, animal models of colon cancer and colon cancer cells. In this study, we treated human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and lung cancer cell line A549 as well as colon cancer cell line SW620 with sulindac to observe the effects of sulindac in other tissue sites. In all cell lines, proliferation was significantly inhibited by sulindac after 24 and 72 h of treatment. Apoptosis was induced by sulindac in both lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells but was not induced in breast cancer cells. Western blots showed that p21 protein level were induced by sulindac in lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells, but not in breast cancer cells. However, the suppression of beta-catenin, a key mediator of Wnt signaling pathway, was seen in all three cell lines with sulindac administration. Further studies revealed that transcriptional activities of beta-catenin were significantly inhibited by sulindac and that the inhibition was sulindac dosage-dependent. The transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1 and cdk 4 were also dramatically downregulated. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that the efficacy of sulindac in the inhibition of cell proliferation (rather than the induction of apoptosis) might be through the suppression of beta-catenin pathway in human cancer cells. PMID:18291362

  18. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  19. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  20. Cancer stem-like cells and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenying; Hardin, Heather; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most rapidly increasing malignancies. The reasons for this increase is not completely known, but increases in the diagnosis of papillary thyroid microcarcinomas and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinomas along with the enhanced detection of well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas are probably all contributing factors. Although most cases of well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas are associated with an excellent prognosis, a small percentage of patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas as well as most patients with poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas have recurrent and/or metastatic disease that is often fatal. The cancer stem-like cell (CSC) model suggests that a small number of cells within a cancer, known as CSCs, are responsible for resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy, as well as for recurrent and metastatic disease. This review discusses current studies about thyroid CSCs, the processes of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition that provide plasticity to CSC growth, in addition to the role of microRNAs in CSC development and regulation. Understanding the biology of CSCs, EMT and the metastatic cascade should lead to the design of more rational targeted therapies for highly aggressive and fatal thyroid cancers. PMID:24788702

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of polycomb repressive complex-2 activity induces apoptosis in human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Yannick D.; Witherspoon, Mavee S.; Laursen, Kristian B.; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois; Lipkin, Steven M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the USA. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), including core components SUZ12 and EZH2, represents a key epigenetic regulator of digestive epithelial cell physiology and was previously shown to promote deleterious effects in a number of human cancers, including colon. Using colon cancer stem cells (CCSC) isolated from human primary colorectal tumors, we demonstrate that SUZ12 knockdown and treatment with DZNep, one of the most potent EZH2 inhibitors, increase apoptosis levels, marked by decreased Akt phosphorylation, in CCSCs, while embryonic stem (ES) cell survival is not affected. Moreover, DZNep treatments lead to increased PTEN expression in these highly tumorigenic cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity may constitute a new, epigenetic therapeutic strategy to target highly tumorigenic and metastatic colon cancer stem cells. PMID:23588203

  2. Proteomic analysis of cancer stem cells in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Hyungdon; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. {yields} We confirmed CD44+ DU145 cells are more proliferative and tumorigenic than CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} We analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} Cofilin and Annexin A5 associated with cancer were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. -- Abstract: Results from recent studies support the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and formation. Here, we applied a proteome profiling approach to investigate the mechanisms of CSCs and to identify potential biomarkers in the prostate cancer cell line DU145. Using MACS, the DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. In sphere culture, CD44+ cells possessed stem cell characteristics and highly expressed genes known to be important in stem cell maintenance. In addition, they showed strong tumorigenic potential in the clonogenic assay and soft agar colony formation assay. We then analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Cofilin and Annexin A5, which are associated with proliferation or metastasis in cancer, were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. These results provide information that will be important to the development of new cancer diagnostic tools and understanding the mechanisms of CSCs although a more detailed study is necessary to investigate the roles of Cofilin and Annexin A5 in CSCs.

  3. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  4. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhouquan; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. •We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. •We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. •These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3′ untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Junheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of aerobic metabolism, are increased in many types of cancer cells. Increased endogenous ROS lead to adaptive changes and may play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. In contrast, the ROS generated by xenobiotics disturb the redox balance and may selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Recent Advances: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are integral parts of pathophysiological mechanisms of tumor progression, metastasis, and chemo/radio resistance. Currently, intracellular ROS in CSCs is an active field of research. Critical Issues: Normal stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells reside in niches characterized by hypoxia and low ROS, both of which are critical for maintaining the potential for self-renewal and stemness. However, the roles of ROS in CSCs remain poorly understood. Future Directions: Based on the regulation of ROS levels in normal stem cells and CSCs, future research may evaluate the potential therapeutic application of ROS elevation by exogenous xenobiotics to eliminate CSCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1215–1228. PMID:22316005

  6. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  7. MicroRNAs regulate KDM5 histone demethylases in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Denis, Hélène; Van Grembergen, Olivier; Delatte, Benjamin; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Putmans, Pascale; Calonne, Emilie; Rothé, Françoise; Sotiriou, Christos; Fuks, François; Deplus, Rachel

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Alteration of miRNA levels is common in tumors and contributes to the pathogenesis of human malignancies. In the present study we examined the role played by miR-137 in breast tumorigenesis. We found miR-137 levels to be lower in breast cancer cells than in their non-tumorigenic counterparts and observed reduced proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells overexpressing miR-137. We further identified KDM5B, a histone demethylase known to be involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis, as a target of miR-137. As the involvement of histone demethylases in cancer is still poorly understood and as the role of miRNAs in controlling epigenetic mechanisms in cancer is emerging, we broadened our study to the whole KDM5 histone demethylase family to see if the genes coding for these epigenetic enzymes might be regulated by miRNAs in cancer cells. We discovered that KDM5C is overexpressed in breast cancer cells, providing evidence that miR-138 regulates its expression. We found miR-138 overexpression to affect breast cancer cell proliferation. Altogether, our findings suggest that miRNAs may regulate KDM5 histone demethylase levels in breast cancer and thereby control breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. PMID:26621457

  8. Ciglitazone enhances ovarian cancer cell death via inhibition of glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, So Jin; Kim, Jin Young; Kwon, Sun Young; Mun, Kyo-Cheol; Cho, Chi Heum; Ha, Eunyoung

    2014-11-15

    Ciglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist and improves insulin sensitivity. Apart from antidiabetic activity, ciglitazone elicits inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. Recent studies indicate that glucose metabolism plays a key role in malignant diseases. Significant increase in glucose consumption is found under malignant conditions. The role of ciglitazone in cancer cell death in relation to glucose metabolism is unclear. Thus we designed this study to determine the effect of ciglitazone on glucose metabolism. First, we found ciglitazone inhibited glucose uptake in ovarian cancer cells but did not affect hexokinase activity. Ciglitazone decreased expression levels of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1). We also found that ciglitazone and siGLUT-1 treatments induced cell death in ovarian cancer cells. We identified that ciglitazone decreased expressions of specific protein 1 (Sp-1) and β-catenin while increased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase. In vivo study using NOD-scid IL2Rgamma(null) mice confirmed that ciglitazone significantly decreased ovarian cancer mass transplanted onto the back of the mice. Finally, we determined GLUT-1 expressions in patients with serous type ovarian cancer and found that GLUT-1 expression was markedly increased in cancer patients and expression level was proportional to the degree of cancer stages. These results suggest that ciglitazone induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells by the inhibition of GLUT-1 and provides a possible therapeutic effect of ciglitazone as an adjuvant drug in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25240713

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  10. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Mohammed, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of all cancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressive treatment. Recently, there have been important advances in the molecular, pathological and biological understanding of pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recent new targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeutic combinations, no treatment option is viable in patients with advanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to target progression of PC is of intense interest. A small population of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been found to be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recently achieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads to focus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. The focus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention and treatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salient developments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here, we provide a review of current updates and new insights on the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression with special emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathways altered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention and treatment of PC. PMID:25914762

  11. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  12. Prolonged Drug Selection of Breast Cancer Cells and Enrichment of Cancer Stem Cell Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Anna Maria; Salcido, Crystal D.; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Wu, Chung-Pu; Fostel, Jennifer M.; Mumau, Melanie D.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Varticovski, Lyuba

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells are presumed to have virtually unlimited proliferative and self-renewal abilities and to be highly resistant to chemotherapy, a feature that is associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters. We investigated whether prolonged continuous selection of cells for drug resistance enriches cultures for cancer stem–like cells. Methods Cancer stem cells were defined as CD44+/CD24− cells that could self-renew (ie, generate cells with the tumorigenic CD44+/CD24− phenotype), differentiate, invade, and form tumors in vivo. We used doxorubicin-selected MCF-7/ADR cells, weakly tumorigenic parental MCF-7 cells, and MCF-7/MDR, an MCF-7 subline with forced expression of ABCB1 protein. Cells were examined for cell surface markers and side-population fractions by microarray and flow cytometry, with in vitro invasion assays, and for ability to form mammospheres. Xenograft tumors were generated in mice to examine tumorigenicity (n = 52). The mRNA expression of multidrug resistance genes was examined in putative cancer stem cells and pathway analysis of statistically significantly differentially expressed genes was performed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Pathway analysis showed that MCF-7/ADR cells express mRNAs from ABCB1 and other genes also found in breast cancer stem cells (eg, CD44, TGFB1, and SNAI1). MCF-7/ADR cells were highly invasive, formed mammospheres, and were tumorigenic in mice. In contrast to parental MCF-7 cells, more than 30% of MCF-7/ADR cells had a CD44+/CD24− phenotype, could self-renew, and differentiate (ie, produce CD44+/CD24− and CD44+/CD24+ cells) and overexpressed various multidrug resistance–linked genes (including ABCB1, CCNE1, and MMP9). MCF-7/ADR cells were statistically significantly more invasive in Matrigel than parental MCF-7 cells (MCF-7 cells = 0.82 cell per field and MCF-7/ADR = 7.51 cells per field, difference = 6.69 cells per field, 95% confidence interval = 4.82 to 8

  13. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of {>=}33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided.

  14. Modeling Selective Elimination of Quiescent Cancer Cells from Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Meguiar, Kaille F.; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M.; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. PMID:26408255

  15. A rare-cell detector for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krivacic, Robert T.; Ladanyi, Andras; Curry, Douglas N.; Hsieh, H. B.; Kuhn, Peter; Bergsrud, Danielle E.; Kepros, Jane F.; Barbera, Todd; Ho, Michael Y.; Chen, Lan Bo; Lerner, Richard A.; Bruce, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    Although a reliable method for detection of cancer cells in blood would be an important tool for diagnosis and monitoring of solid tumors in early stages, current technologies cannot reliably detect the extremely low concentrations of these rare cells. The preferred method of detection, automated digital microscopy (ADM), is too slow to scan the large substrate areas. Here we report an approach that uses fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST), which applies laser-printing techniques to the rare-cell detection problem. With FAST cytometry, laser-printing optics are used to excite 300,000 cells per sec, and emission is collected in an extremely wide field of view, enabling a 500-fold speed-up over ADM with comparable sensitivity and superior specificity. The combination of FAST enrichment and ADM imaging has the performance required for reliable detection of early-stage cancer in blood. PMID:15249663

  16. Omental milky spots in screening gastric cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Sun, X T

    2011-01-01

    The existence of cancer stem and progenitor cells in solid tumors has been widely postulated. However, neither the cancer stem cells nor the cancer progenitor cells have been definitively identified and functionally characterized. Here we propose a new strategy to identify and isolate gastric cancer stem cells -using omental milky spots to screen gastric cancer stem cells in peritoneal metastasis mouse models of gastric cancer. In this study, we used the property that the macrophages in omental milky spots are cytotoxic against tumor cells and so able to screen and collect cancer stem cells. Our findings suggest that macrophages in omental milky spots have not only cytotoxic properties against tumor cells but also provide a microenvironment within milky spots in which cancer stem cells are capable to survive and grow into micrometastasis. Omental milky spot become a cancer stem cell niche in this situation. Further we studied the omental milky spots for screening gastric cancer cells (OMSS-GCCs) and found that omental milky spot enriched the volume of gastric cancer stem cells. Tumors were consistently generated after an injection of 1×103 OMSS-GCCs. OMSS-GCCs high express CD133 and low express CD324. Omental milky spots are a highly efficient "natural filter" for screening gastric cancer stem cells. PMID:21067262

  17. Apoptotic Death of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Chun; Zhou, Fang-Liang; Shen, Yi; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play crucial roles in tumor progression, chemo- and radiotherapy resistance, and recurrence. Recent studies on CSCs have advanced understanding of molecular oncology and development of novel therapeutic strategies. This review article updates the hypothesis and paradigm of CSCs with a focus on major signaling pathways and effectors that regulate CSC apoptosis. Selective CSC apoptotic inducers are introduced and their therapeutic potentials are discussed. These include synthetic and natural compounds, antibodies and recombinant proteins, and oligonucleotides. PMID:24823879

  18. EXAFS studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Kisiel, A.; Steininger, R.; Goettlicher, J.

    2013-04-01

    Sulphur plays a vital role in every human organism. It is known, that sulphur-bearing compounds, such as for example cysteine and glutathione, play critical roles in development and progression of many diseases. Any alteration in sulphur's biochemistry could become a precursor of serious pathological conditions. One of such condition is prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the western world and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men. The purpose of presented studies was to examine what changes occur in the nearest chemical environment of sulphur in prostate cancer cell lines in comparison to healthy cells. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used, followed by theoretical calculations. The results of preliminary analysis is presented.

  19. Breast cancer cells evade paclitaxel-induced cell death by developing resistance to dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yun-Ji; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Su In; So, Dong Min; Yun, Jieun; Baek, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Lee, Kiho; Park, Song-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which does not express the progesterone, estrogen, or HER2/neu receptor, is aggressive and difficult to treat. Paclitaxel, a tubulin stabilizing agent, is one of the most frequently prescribed anticancer agents for breast cancers, including TNBC. Residual disease that occurs due to resistance or partial resistance of cancer cells in a tumor against anticancer agents is the most important issue in oncology. In the present study, when MDA-MB-231 cells, a TNBC cell line, were treated with 30 µM paclitaxel, a slightly higher concentration than its GI50 value, for 6 days, a small number of cells with different morphologies survived. Among the surviving cells, small round cells were isolated, cloned, and named MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells. MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were observed to be highly proliferative and tumorigenic. In addition, signal transduction molecules involved in proliferation, survival, malignancy, or stemness of cancer cells, such as c-Src, c-Met, Notch 1, c-Myc, Sox2, Oct3/4, Nanog, and E-cadherin were highly expressed or activated. While further study is required, MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells appear to have some of the characteristics of cancer precursor cells. Although MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were isolated from the cells that survived in the continuous presence of paclitaxel, they were not resistant to paclitaxel but developed resistance to dasatinib, a Bcr-Abl and Src kinase family inhibitor. The activated state of Src and Notch 1, and the expression levels of c-Myc and cyclins in MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were less affected than MDA-MB-231 cells by the treatment of dasatinib, which may explain the resistance of MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells to dasatinib. These results suggest that cancer cells that become resistant to dasatinib during the process of paclitaxel therapy in patients may appear, and caution is required in the design of clinical trials using these two agents. PMID:27602155

  20. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after <4 weeks of treatment. In vitro treatment of PANC1 cells showed reduced tumor engraftment in nude mice, concomitant with a reduction in the CSC levels. Differences between telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:21062983

  1. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  2. Orthotopic Injection of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Nicole M; Rhim, Andrew D; Stanger, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive disease with a 5-yr survival rate of only 5%. The location of the pancreas in the abdomen, where it is obscured by other organs, makes it a difficult tissue to study and manipulate. This protocol describes in detail how to orthotopically inject cancer cells into the pancreas in mice. This technique is particularly useful when the cells must be manipulated in ways that cannot be modeled genetically. PMID:26729902

  3. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  4. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  5. Cancer type-dependent genetic interactions between cancer driver alterations indicate plasticity of epistasis across cell types.

    PubMed

    Park, Solip; Lehner, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Cancers, like many diseases, are normally caused by combinations of genetic alterations rather than by changes affecting single genes. It is well established that the genetic alterations that drive cancer often interact epistatically, having greater or weaker consequences in combination than expected from their individual effects. In a stringent statistical analysis of data from > 3,000 tumors, we find that the co-occurrence and mutual exclusivity relationships between cancer driver alterations change quite extensively in different types of cancer. This cannot be accounted for by variation in tumor heterogeneity or unrecognized cancer subtypes. Rather, it suggests that how genomic alterations interact cooperatively or partially redundantly to driver cancer changes in different types of cancers. This re-wiring of epistasis across cell types is likely to be a basic feature of genetic architecture, with important implications for understanding the evolution of multicellularity and human genetic diseases. In addition, if this plasticity of epistasis across cell types is also true for synthetic lethal interactions, a synthetic lethal strategy to kill cancer cells may frequently work in one type of cancer but prove ineffective in another. PMID:26227665

  6. Cancer type-dependent genetic interactions between cancer driver alterations indicate plasticity of epistasis across cell types

    PubMed Central

    Park, Solip; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancers, like many diseases, are normally caused by combinations of genetic alterations rather than by changes affecting single genes. It is well established that the genetic alterations that drive cancer often interact epistatically, having greater or weaker consequences in combination than expected from their individual effects. In a stringent statistical analysis of data from > 3,000 tumors, we find that the co-occurrence and mutual exclusivity relationships between cancer driver alterations change quite extensively in different types of cancer. This cannot be accounted for by variation in tumor heterogeneity or unrecognized cancer subtypes. Rather, it suggests that how genomic alterations interact cooperatively or partially redundantly to driver cancer changes in different types of cancers. This re-wiring of epistasis across cell types is likely to be a basic feature of genetic architecture, with important implications for understanding the evolution of multicellularity and human genetic diseases. In addition, if this plasticity of epistasis across cell types is also true for synthetic lethal interactions, a synthetic lethal strategy to kill cancer cells may frequently work in one type of cancer but prove ineffective in another. PMID:26227665

  7. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients. PMID:26947806

  8. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhummaphan, Narumol; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth and survival of the cancer cells. Importantly, gigantol significantly reduced the ability of the cancer cells to form tumor spheroids, a critical hallmark of CSCs. Concomitantly, the treatment of the compound was shown to reduce well-known lung CSCs markers, including CD133 and ALDH1A1. Moreover, we revealed that gigantol decreased stemness in the cancer cells by suppressing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt) signal which in turn decreased the cellular levels of pluripotency and self-renewal factors Oct4 and Nanog. In conclusion, gigantol possesses CSCs suppressing activity which may facilitate the development of this compound for therapeutic approaches by targeting CSCs. PMID:26339272

  9. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  10. Radiosensitizing Effect of TRPV1 Channel Inhibitors in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Keisuke; Tanamachi, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Yuto; Ide, Shunta; Kojima, Shuji; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2016-07-01

    Radiosensitizers are used in cancer therapy to increase the γ-irradiation susceptibility of cancer cells, including radioresistant hypoxic cancer cells within solid tumors, so that radiotherapy can be applied at doses sufficiently low to minimize damage to adjacent normal tissues. Radiation-induced DNA damage is repaired by multiple repair systems, and therefore these systems are potential targets for radiosensitizers. We recently reported that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in early responses to DNA damage after γ-irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that TRPV1 channel inhibitors would have a radiosensitizing effect by blocking repair of radiation-induced cell damage. Here, we show that pretreatment of A549 cells with the TRPV1 channel inhibitors capsazepine, AMG9810, SB366791 and BCTC suppressed the γ-ray-induced activation of early DNA damage responses, i.e., activation of the protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and accumulation of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1). Further, the decrease of survival fraction at one week after γ-irradiation (2.0 Gy) was enhanced by pretreatment of cells with these inhibitors. On the other hand, inhibitor pretreatment did not affect cell viability, the number of apoptotic or necrotic cells, or DNA synthesis at 24 h after irradiation. These results suggest that inhibition of DNA repair by TRPV1 channel inhibitors in irradiated A549 cells caused gradual loss of proliferative ability, rather than acute facilitation of apoptosis or necrosis. TRPV1 channel inhibitors could be novel candidates for radiosensitizers to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with other types of radiosensitizers. PMID:27150432

  11. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  12. CO-029 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Yulian; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Shiliu

    2015-03-01

    Tetraspanins are cell-surface glycoproteins and have received attention recently as both suppressors and promoters of metastasis. CO-029 is a member of the tetraspanin family and is implicated to be a metastasis-promoting tetraspanin in some cancers. However, the role of CO-029 in gastric cancer remains unexplored. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of CO-029 in gastric cancer tissues and to determine whether CO-029 is involved in the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We collected clinical samples and found that the expression of CO-029 was increased both at the mRNA level and protein level in gastric cancer tissues in comparison to normal and tumor-adjacent tissues, as demonstrated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro experiment using AGS cells and observed that EGF promoted AGS cell proliferation and enhanced the invasion ability of the AGS cells, as shown by MTT assay and cell invasion assay, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time, that CO-029 expression was affected by EGF in a concentration- time-dependent manner. The knockdown of CO-029 attenuated the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. These findings suggest that CO-029 is an oncogene in human gastric cancer and that CO-029 at least partially mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Our data may provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention in human gastric cancer. PMID:25592989

  13. Genetic epidemiology of bilateral breast cancer: a linkage analysis using the affected-pedigree-member method.

    PubMed

    Haile, R W; Goldstein, A M; Weeks, D E; Sparkes, R S; Paganini-Hill, A

    1990-01-01

    We used the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method to conduct linkage analyses on 19 pedigrees in which the probands had premenopausal bilateral breast cancer. This method analyzes all affected pairs of relatives, as opposed to siblings only, and incorporates into the analyses information on the frequency of marker alleles. Fourteen codominant marker systems were evaluated in two separate analyses. In the first, only premenopausal cases of breast cancer were coded as affected because we assumed that postmenopausal cases were due to a different etiology. In the second analysis, all cases of breast cancer were coded as affected, irrespective of menopausal status. In the premenopausal-cases-only analysis, we observed evidence suggestive of nonindependent segregation for C3 and ESD. In the all-cases analysis, we observed much weaker evidence for C3 and ESD and noted a suggestion of nonindependent segregation for AMY2 and PGM1. PMID:2328913

  14. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about kidney cancer? What is kidney cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  15. The heterogeneous immune microenvironment in breast cancer is affected by hypoxia-related genes.

    PubMed

    Duechler, Markus; Peczek, Lukasz; Zuk, Karolina; Zalesna, Izabela; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2014-02-01

    The immune system constitutes an important first-line defence against malignant transformation. However, cancer mediated immunosuppression inactivates the mechanisms of host immune surveillance. Cancer cells shut down anti-cancer immunity through direct cell-cell interactions with leukocytes and through soluble factors, establishing an immunosuppressive environment for unimpeded cancer growth. The composition of the immunosuppressive microenvironment in breast tumours is not well documented. To address this question, selected immunosuppressive factors were analyzed in tumour specimens from 33 breast cancer patients after surgery. The mRNA expression of selected genes was quantified in fresh tumour samples. Tumour infiltrating leukocytes were characterized by flow cytometry to identify regulatory T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, and type 2 macrophages. Statistical analysis revealed several interesting correlations between the studied parameters and clinical features. Overall, a surprisingly high degree of heterogeneity in the composition of the immunosuppressive environment was found across all breast cancer samples which adds to the complexity of this disease. The influence of the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) on the immune microenvironment was also addressed. The level of HIFs correlated with hormone receptor status and the expression of several immunosuppressive molecules. Targeting HIFs might not only sensitize breast tumours for radiation and chemotherapies but also interfere with cancer immunosuppression. PMID:24091277

  16. Lipin-1 regulates cancer cell phenotype and is a potential target to potentiate rapamycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brohée, Laura; Demine, Stéphane; Willems, Jérome; Arnould, Thierry; Colige, Alain C.; Deroanne, Christophe F.

    2015-01-01

    Lipogenesis inhibition was reported to induce apoptosis and repress proliferation of cancer cells while barely affecting normal cells. Lipins exhibit dual function as enzymes catalyzing the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to diacylglycerol and as co-transcriptional regulators. Thus, they are able to regulate lipid homeostasis at several nodal points. Here, we show that lipin-1 is up-regulated in several cancer cell lines and overexpressed in 50 % of high grade prostate cancers. The proliferation of prostate and breast cancer cells, but not of non-tumorigenic cells, was repressed upon lipin-1 knock-down. Lipin-1 depletion also decreased cancer cell migration through RhoA activation. Lipin-1 silencing did not significantly affect global lipid synthesis but enhanced the cellular concentration of phosphatidic acid. In parallel, autophagy was induced while AKT and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation were repressed. We also observed a compensatory regulation between lipin-1 and lipin-2 and demonstrated that their co-silencing aggravates the phenotype induced by lipin-1 silencing alone. Most interestingly, lipin-1 depletion or lipins inhibition with propranolol sensitized cancer cells to rapamycin. These data indicate that lipin-1 controls main cellular processes involved in cancer progression and that its targeting, alone or in combination with other treatments, could open new avenues in anticancer therapy. PMID:25834103

  17. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Enhances Cell Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Sekimoto, Teruki; Ogura, Ayaka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, is endogenously generated by certain H2S synthesizing enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine in the mammalian body. Several studies have shown that endogenous and exogenous H2S affects the proliferation of cancer cells, although the effects of H2S appear to vary with cell type, being either promotive or suppressive. In the present study, we determined whether endogenously formed H2S regulates proliferation in human gastric cancer AGS cells. CSE, but not CBS, was expressed in AGS cells. CSE inhibitors, DL-propargylglycine (PPG) and β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), significantly suppressed the proliferation of AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CSE inhibitors did not increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the same concentration range. The inhibitory effects of PPG and BCA on cell proliferation were reversed by repetitive application of NaHS, a donor of H2S. Interestingly, nuclear condensation and fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with PPG or BCA. These results suggest that endogenous H2S produced by CSE may contribute to the proliferation of gastric cancer AGS cells, most probably through anti-apoptotic actions. PMID:27150157

  18. Essential Oil from Myrica rubra Leaves Potentiated Antiproliferative and Prooxidative Effect of Doxorubicin and its Accumulation in Intestinal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrož, Martin; Hanušová, Veronika; Skarka, Adam; Boušová, Iva; Králová, Věra; Langhasová, Lenka; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Essential oil from the leaves of Myrica rubra, a subtropical Asian fruit tree traditionally used in folk medicines, has a significant antiproliferative effect in several intestinal cancer cell lines. Doxorubicin belongs to the most important cytostatics used in cancer therapy. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of defined essential oil from M. rubra leaves on efficacy, prooxidative effect, and accumulation of doxorubicin in cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous cells. For this purpose, intestinal adenocarcinoma CaCo2 cells were used. Human fibroblasts (periodontal ligament) and a primary culture of rat hepatocytes served as models of non-cancerous cells. The results showed that the sole essential oil from M. rubra has a strong prooxidative effect in cancer cells while it acts as a mild antioxidant in hepatocytes. Combined with doxorubicin, the essential oil enhanced the antiproliferative and prooxidative effects of doxorubicin in cancer cells. At higher concentrations, synergism of doxorubicin and essential oil from M. rubra was proved. In non-cancerous cells, the essential oil did not affect the toxicity of doxorubicin and the doxorubicin-mediated reactive oxygen species formation. The essential oil increased the intracellular concentration of doxorubicin and enhanced selectively the doxorubicin accumulation in nuclei of cancer cells. Taken together, essential oil from M. rubra leaves could be able to improve the doxorubicin efficacy in cancer cells due to an increased reactive oxygen species production, and the doxorubicin accumulation in nuclei of cancer cells. PMID:26485638

  19. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  20. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  1. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yang; Shurin, Galina V.; Peiyuan, Zhu; Shurin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer. PMID:23386903

  2. Noble Hybrid Nanostructures as Efficient Anti-Proliferative Platforms for Human Breast Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2016-04-27

    Nanomaterials have proven to possess great potential in biomaterials research. Recently, they have suggested considerable promise in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Among others, silicon (Si) nanomaterials have been extensively employed for various biomedical applications; however, the utilization of Si for cancer therapy has been limited to nanoparticles, and its potential as anticancer substrates has not been fully explored. Noble nanoparticles have also received considerable attention owing to unique anticancer properties to improve the efficiency of biomaterials for numerous biological applications. Nevertheless, immobilization and control over delivery of the nanoparticles have been challenge. Here, we develop hybrid nanoplatforms to efficiently hamper breast cancer cell adhesion and proliferation. Platforms are synthesized by femtosecond laser processing of Si into multiphase nanostructures, followed by sputter-coating with gold (Au)/gold-palladium (Au-Pd) nanoparticles. The performance of the developed platforms was then examined by exploring the response of normal fibroblast and metastatic breast cancer cells. Our results from the quantitative and qualitative analyses show a dramatic decrease in the number of breast cancer cells on the hybrid platform compared to untreated substrates. Whereas, fibroblast cells form stable adhesion with stretched and elongated cytoskeleton and actin filaments. The hybrid platforms perform as dual-acting cytophobic/cytostatic stages where Si nanostructures depress breast cancer cell adhesion while immobilized Au/Au-Pd nanoparticles are gradually released to affect any surviving cell on the nanostructures. The nanoparticles are believed to be taken up by breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which subsequently alter the cell nucleus and may cause cell death. The findings suggest that the density of nanostructures and concentration of coated nanoparticles play critical roles on cytophobic/cytostatic properties of the platforms on

  3. DNA Hypomethylation Affects Cancer-Related Biological Functions and Genes Relevant in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Gemma; Martín-Subero, José I.; Ríos, José; Queiros, Ana; Kulis, Marta; Suñol, Mariona; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Soledad; Garcia, Idoia; de Torres, Carmen; Rodríguez, Eva; Galván, Patricia; Mora, Jaume; Lavarino, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) pathogenesis has been reported to be closely associated with numerous genetic alterations. However, underlying DNA methylation patterns have not been extensively studied in this developmental malignancy. Here, we generated microarray-based DNA methylation profiles of primary neuroblastic tumors. Stringent supervised differential methylation analyses allowed us to identify epigenetic changes characteristic for NB tumors as well as for clinical and biological subtypes of NB. We observed that gene-specific loss of DNA methylation is more prevalent than promoter hypermethylation. Remarkably, such hypomethylation affected cancer-related biological functions and genes relevant to NB pathogenesis such as CCND1, SPRR3, BTC, EGF and FGF6. In particular, differential methylation in CCND1 affected mostly an evolutionary conserved functionally relevant 3′ untranslated region, suggesting that hypomethylation outside promoter regions may play a role in NB pathogenesis. Hypermethylation targeted genes involved in cell development and proliferation such as RASSF1A, POU2F2 or HOXD3, among others. The results derived from this study provide new candidate epigenetic biomarkers associated with NB as well as insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this tumor, which involves a marked gene-specific hypomethylation. PMID:23144874

  4. Tumor infiltration by Tbet+ effector T cells and CD20+ B cells is associated with survival in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hennequin, Audrey; Derangère, Valentin; Boidot, Romain; Apetoh, Lionel; Vincent, Julie; Orry, David; Fraisse, Jean; Causeret, Sylvain; Martin, François; Arnould, Laurent; Beltjens, Françoise; Ghiringhelli, François; Ladoire, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating T and B lymphocytes could have the potential to affect cancer prognosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of tumor infiltration by CD8 and CD4 T cells, and B lymphocytes in patients with localized gastric cancer. In a retrospective cohort of 82 patients with localized gastric cancer and treated by surgery we quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry on surgical specimen, immune infiltrates of IL-17+, CD8+, Foxp3+, Tbet+ T cells and CD20+ B cells both in the tumor core and at the invasive margin via immunohistochemical analyses of surgical specimens. We observed that CD8+ and IL17+ T-cell densities were not significantly associated with gastric cancer prognosis. In contrast, high infiltration of Tbet+ T cells, high numbers of CD20+ B-cell follicles, and low infiltration of Foxp3+ T cells, were associated with better relapse-free survival. Interestingly, treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy or histological tumor type (diffuse versus intestinal) did not influence type and density of immune infiltrates or their prognostic value. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gastric cancer stromal microenvironment revealed organized T and B cell aggregates, with strong structural analogies to normal secondary lymphoid organs and which could be considered as tertiary lymphoid structures. Using transcriptomic data from an independent cohort of 365 localized gastric cancer, we confirmed that a coordinated Th1, and B cell stromal gene signature is associated with better outcome. Altogether, these data suggest that tumor infiltration by B and Th1 T cells could affect gastric cancer prognosis and may be used to better define the outcome of patients with localized gastric cancer. PMID:27057426

  5. Pharmacogenomic agreement between two cancer cell line data sets.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Large cancer cell line collections broadly capture the genomic diversity of human cancers and provide valuable insight into anti-cancer drug response. Here we show substantial agreement and biological consilience between drug sensitivity measurements and their associated genomic predictors from two publicly available large-scale pharmacogenomics resources: The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer databases. PMID:26570998

  6. Targeted Inhibition of CD133+ Cells in Oral Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, M.; Volgina, A.; Korostoff, J.; Sollecito, T.P.; Brose, M.S.; O’Malley, B.W.; Akintoye, S.O.; DiRienzo, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to treatment and the appearance of secondary tumors in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have been attributed to the presence of cells with stem-cell-like properties in the basal layer of the epithelium at the site of the lesion. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that these putative cancer stem cells (CSC) in HNSCC could be specifically targeted and inhibited. We found that 9 of 10 head and neck tumor biopsies contained a subpopulation of cells that expressed CD133, an unusual surface-exposed membrane-spanning glycoprotein associated with CSC. A genetically modified cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), from the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, was conjugated to an anti-human CD133 monoclonal antibody (MAb). The Cdt-MAb complex preferentially inhibited the proliferation of CD133+ cells in cultures of established cell lines derived from HNSCC. Inhibition of the CD133+ cells was rate- and dose-dependent. Saturation kinetics indicated that the response to the Cdt-MAb complex was specific. Healthy primary gingival epithelial cells that are native targets of the wild-type Cdt were not affected. Analysis of these data provides a foundation for the future development of new therapies to target CSC in the early treatment of HNSCC. Abbreviations: Cdt, cytolethal distending toxin; CSC, cancer stem cells; HNSCC, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; MAb, monoclonal antibody. PMID:21220361

  7. Skp2 is over-expressed in breast cancer and promotes breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Cao, Lulu; Sun, Zijia; Xu, Jing; Tang, Lin; Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-18

    The F box protein Skp2 is oncogenic. Skp2 and Skp2B, an isoform of Skp2 are overexpressed in breast cancer. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which Skp2B promotes the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Here, we determined the expression and clinical outcomes of Skp2 in breast cancer samples and cell lines using breast cancer database, and investigated the role of Skp2 and Skp2B in breast cancer cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We obtained Skp2 is significantly overexpressed in breast cancer samples and cell lines, and high Skp2 expression positively correlated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. Both Skp2 and Skp2B could promote breast cancer cell proliferation, inhibit cell apoptosis, change the cell cycle distribution and induce the increased S phase cells and therefore induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. Moreover, the 2 isoforms could both suppress PIG3 expression via independent pathways in the breast cancer cells. Skp2 suppressed p53 and inhibited PIG3-induced apoptosis, while Skp2B attenuated the function of PIG3 by inhibiting PHB. Our results indicate that Skp2 and Skp2B induce breast cancer cell development and progression, making Skp2 and Skp2B potential molecular targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27111245

  8. Ceramide signaling in cancer and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bieberich, Erhard

    2008-01-01

    Most of the previous work on the sphingolipid ceramide has been devoted to its function as an apoptosis inducer. Recent studies, however, have shown that in stem cells, ceramide has additional nonapoptotic functions. In this article, ceramide signaling will be reviewed in light of ‘systems interface biology’: as an interconnection of sphingolipid metabolism, membrane biophysics and cell signaling. The focus will be on the metabolic interconversion of ceramide and sphingomyelin or sphingosine-1-phosphate. Lipid rafts and sphingolipid-induced protein scaffolds will be discussed as a membrane interface for lipid-controlled cell signaling. Ceramide/sphingomyelin and ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate-interdependent cell-signaling pathways are significant for the regulation of cell polarity, apoptosis and/or proliferation, and as novel pharmacologic targets in cancer and stem cells. PMID:19050750

  9. Principles of cancer cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cree, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    The basics of cell culture are now relatively common, though it was not always so. The pioneers of cell culture would envy our simple access to manufactured plastics, media and equipment for such studies. The prerequisites for cell culture are a well lit and suitably ventilated laboratory with a laminar flow hood (Class II), CO(2) incubator, benchtop centrifuge, microscope, plasticware (flasks and plates) and a supply of media with or without serum supplements. Not only can all of this be ordered easily over the internet, but large numbers of well-characterised cell lines are available from libraries maintained to a very high standard allowing the researcher to commence experiments rapidly and economically. Attention to safety and disposal is important, and maintenance of equipment remains essential. This chapter should enable researchers with little prior knowledge to set up a suitable laboratory to do basic cell culture, but there is still no substitute for experience within an existing well-run laboratory. PMID:21516394

  10. Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Relapsed Cancer After Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-28

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data. PMID:18634801

  13. Metronidazole Decreases Viability of DLD-1 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sadowska, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Szynaka, Beata; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of metronidazole (MTZ) on DLD-1 colorectal cancer cell (CRC) line. Toxicity of MTZ was determined by MTT test. Cells were incubated with MTZ used in different concentrations for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The effect of MTZ on DNA synthesis was measured as [3H]-thymidine incorporation. The morphological changes in human DLD-1 cell line were defined by transmission electron microscope OPTON 900. The influence of MTZ on the apoptosis of DLD-1 cell lines was detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, while cell concentration, volume, and diameter were displayed by Scepter Cell Counter from Millipore. Our results show that cell viability was diminished in all experimental groups in comparison with the control, and the differences were statistically significant. We did not find any significant differences in [3H]-thymidine incorporation in all experimental groups and times of observation. Cytofluorimetric assays demonstrated a statistically significant increase of apoptotic rate in MTZ concentrations 10 and 50 μg/mL after 24 hours; 0.1, 10, 50, and 250 μg/mL after 48 hours; and in all concentrations after 72 hours compared with control groups. In the ultrastructural studies, necrotic or apoptotic cells were occasionally seen. In conclusion, MTZ affects human CRC cell line viability. The reduction of cell viability was consistent with the apoptotic test. PMID:23777253

  14. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM). The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease. PMID:26798356

  15. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  16. Leptin regulates energy metabolism in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Rosselló, Maria del Mar; Oliver, Jordi; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Roca, Pilar

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is known to be a poorer prognosis factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Among the diverse endocrine factors associated to obesity, leptin has received special attention since it promotes breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness, processes which force cells to adapt their metabolism to satisfy the increased demands of energy and biosynthetic intermediates. Taking this into account, our aim was to explore the effects of leptin in the metabolism of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Polarographic analysis revealed that leptin increased oxygen consumption rate and cellular ATP levels were more dependent on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in leptin-treated cells compared to the more glycolytic control cells. Experiments with selective inhibitors of glycolysis (2-DG), fatty acid oxidation (etomoxir) or aminoacid deprivation showed that ATP levels were more reliant on fatty acid oxidation. In agreement, levels of key proteins involved in lipid catabolism (FAT/CD36, CPT1, PPARα) and phosphorylation of the energy sensor AMPK were increased by leptin. Regarding glucose, cellular uptake was not affected by leptin, but lactate release was deeply repressed. Analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC) together with the pentose-phosphate pathway enzyme glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) revealed that leptin favors the use of glucose for biosynthesis. These results point towards a role of leptin in metabolic reprogramming, consisting of an enhanced use of glucose for biosynthesis and lipids for energy production. This metabolic adaptations induced by leptin may provide benefits for MCF-7 growth and give support to the reverse Warburg effect described in breast cancer. PMID:26772821

  17. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor induce metastatic behavior in CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Na; Moon, Hyun-Hye; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis of cancer cells is a major cause of death in cancer patients. The process of cancer metastasis includes the proliferation of primary cancer cells, local invasion, intravasation and cancer cell survival in blood flow, extravasation and attachment to secondary organs and metastatic growth in a new environment. In these mechanisms of cancer metastasis, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand play an important role. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, also known as CXCL12) is well known as a ligand of CXCR4, and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) has recently become known as a ligand of CXCR4. In many types of cancers including breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancer (CRC), CXCR4/SDF-1α has been investigated in metastasis-related cancer behavior, which include cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion. However, CXCR4/MIF has rarely been investigated in the metastatic behavior of colon cancer cells. In this report, the effect of SDF-1α or MIF was studied on cell cycle, cell proliferation, adhesion and migration of the CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cell line SW480. SDF-1α or MIF caused a decrease in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in the numbers of cells in S and G2/M phases. In addition, SDF-1α or MIF caused an increase in cell proliferation, cell adhesion to fibronectin and migration. AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, attenuated these effects, which included increased cell proliferation, adhesion and migration due to treatment of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells with SDF-1α or MIF. In conclusion, SDF-1α or MIF affects the metastasis-related behaviors of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells. PMID:23023114

  18. Cancer stem cells: Involvement in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and perspectives on cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Albulescu, Radu

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Despite remarkable progress in understanding pancreatic carcinogenesis at the molecular level, as well as progress in new therapeutic approaches, pancreatic cancer remains a disease with a dismal prognosis. Among the mechanisms responsible for drug resistance, the most relevant are changes in individual genes or signaling pathways and the presence of highly resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). In pancreatic cancer, CSCs represent 0.2%-0.8% of pancreatic cancer cells and are considered to be responsible for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and recurrence. CSCs have been extensively studied as of late to identify specific surface markers to ensure reliable sorting and for signaling pathways identified to play a pivotal role in CSC self-renewal. Involvement of CSCs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis has also highlighted these cells as the preferential targets for therapy. The present review is an update of the results in two main fields of research in pancreatic cancer, pathogenesis and therapy, focused on the narrow perspective of CSCs. PMID:25152582

  19. Cancer stem cells: involvement in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and perspectives on cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Albulescu, Radu

    2014-08-21

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Despite remarkable progress in understanding pancreatic carcinogenesis at the molecular level, as well as progress in new therapeutic approaches, pancreatic cancer remains a disease with a dismal prognosis. Among the mechanisms responsible for drug resistance, the most relevant are changes in individual genes or signaling pathways and the presence of highly resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). In pancreatic cancer, CSCs represent 0.2%-0.8% of pancreatic cancer cells and are considered to be responsible for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and recurrence. CSCs have been extensively studied as of late to identify specific surface markers to ensure reliable sorting and for signaling pathways identified to play a pivotal role in CSC self-renewal. Involvement of CSCs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis has also highlighted these cells as the preferential targets for therapy. The present review is an update of the results in two main fields of research in pancreatic cancer, pathogenesis and therapy, focused on the narrow perspective of CSCs. PMID:25152582

  20. Influencing feelings of cancer risk: direct and moderator effects of affectively laden phrases in risk communication.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Eva; van Osch, Liesbeth; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the importance of feelings of risk in explaining cancer preventive behaviors, but best practices for influencing these feelings are limited. This study investigated the direct and moderational influence of affectively laden phrases in cancer risk messages. Two experimental studies were conducted in relation to different cancer-related behaviors--sunbed use (n = 112) and red meat consumption (n = 447)--among student and nonstudent samples. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) a cognitive message using cognitively laden phrases or (b) an affective message using affectively laden phrases. The results revealed that affective phrases did not directly influence feelings of risk in both studies. Evidence for a moderational influence was found in Study 2, suggesting that affective information strengthened the relation between feelings of risk and intention (i.e., participants relied more on their feelings in the decision-making process after exposure to affective information). These findings suggest that solely using affective phrases in risk communication may not be sufficient to directly influence feelings of risk and other methods need to be explored in future research. Moreover, research is needed to replicate our preliminary indications for a moderational influence of affective phrases to advance theory and practice. PMID:25569710

  1. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  2. Treating Cancer with Genetically Engineered T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tristen S.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Administration of ex-vivo cultured, naturally occurring tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) have been shown to mediate durable regression of melanoma tumors. However, the generation of TIL is not possible in all patients and there has been limited success in generating TIL in other cancers. Advances in genetic engineering have overcome these limitations by introducing tumor-antigen-targeting receptors into human T lymphocytes. Physicians can now genetically engineer lymphocytes to express highly active T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting a variety of tumor antigens expressed in cancer patients. In this review we discuss the development of TCR and CAR gene transfer technology and the expansion of these therapies into different cancers with the recent demonstration of the clinical efficacy of these treatments. PMID:21663987

  3. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-07-01

    The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  4. The interaction of atmospheric pressure plasma jets with cancer and normal cells: generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and changes of the cell proliferation and cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Leem, Sun Hee

    2013-09-01

    The possibility of atmospheric pressure plasmas is emerging as a candidate in cancer therapy. The primary role is played by reactive oxygen species (ROS), UV photons, charged particles and electric fields. Among them, intracellular ROS induced by plasma are considered to be the key constituents that induce cellular changes and apoptosis. In this study, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. The plasma treatment was performed under different working gases, applied voltages, gas flow rates, and with and without additive oxygen flow. Using a detection dye, we observed that plasma exposure leads to the increase of the intracellular ROS and that the intracellular ROS production can be controlled by plasma parameters. A significant ROS generation was induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells and the overproduction of ROS contributes to the reduced cell proliferation. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS and cell proliferation was less changed. The plasma treatment also resulted in the alteration of the cell cycle that contributes to the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as cancer therapy. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea under Contract No. 2012R1A1A2002591 and 2012R1A1A3010213.

  5. Does labelling a rare cancer diagnosis 'good' affect the patient's experience of treatment and recovery?

    PubMed

    Ridgway, E; Grose, J; Charles, A; Hewett, J; Jarvis, M; Benjamin, S

    2016-05-01

    Doctors sometimes tell patients with rare but highly treatable cancers that they have 'good' cancer which some patients have found unhelpful, but this has been little explored. The aim of this study was to explore how patients reacted to being told they had a 'good' cancer. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 25 people with rare but prognostically favourable cancers who had received treatment at two hospitals within a cancer network. Results showed that despite good treatment outcomes, patients are still very shocked to hear the word cancer and react in similar ways to those with other forms of cancer. The potential effects of treatment should be recognised as having a detrimental effect on patient well-being whatever the prognosis. We should therefore avoid using 'good' and 'cancer' in the same sentence. In addition, the impact on all family members should not be underestimated. The data can be used to improve clinical practice and improve support for people affected by cancer. PMID:25335904

  6. Can dendritic cells improve whole cancer cell vaccines based on immunogenically killed cancer cells?

    PubMed Central

    Cicchelero, Laetitia; Denies, Sofie; Devriendt, Bert; de Rooster, Hilde; Sanders, Niek N

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) offers interesting opportunities in cancer cell (CC) vaccine manufacture, as it increases the immunogenicity of the dead CC. Furthermore, fusion of CCs with dendritic cells (DCs) is considered a superior method for generating whole CC vaccines. Therefore, in this work, we determined in naive mice whether immunogenically killed CCs per se (CC vaccine) elicit an antitumoral immune response different from the response observed when immunogenically killed CCs are associated with DCs through fusion (fusion vaccine) or through co-incubation (co-incubation vaccine). After tumor inoculation, the type of immune response in the prophylactically vaccinated mice differed between the groups. In more detail, fusion vaccines elicited a humoral anticancer response, whereas the co-incubation and CC vaccine mainly induced a cellular response. Despite these differences, all three approaches offered a prophylactic protection against tumor development in the murine mammary carcinoma model. In summary, it can be concluded that whole CC vaccines based on immunogenically killed CCs may not necessarily require association with DCs to elicit a protective anticancer immune response. If this finding can be endorsed in other cancer models, the manufacture of CC vaccines would greatly benefit from this new insight, as production of DC-based vaccines is laborious, time-consuming and expensive. PMID:26587315

  7. Permanently Blocked Stem Cells Derived from Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan B.; Rothermund, Kristi; Zhang, Fang; Dabbs, David J.; Latimer, Jean J.; Grant, Stephen G.; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be resistant to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and the inimical conditions of the tumor microenvironment. Obtaining CSCs in sufficient quantities and maintaining their undifferentiated state have been major hurdles to their further characterization and to the identification of new pharmaceuticals that preferentially target these cells. We describe here the tagging of CSC-like populations from four human breast cancer cell lines with green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Oct3/4 stem cell-specific promoter. As expected, GFP was expressed by the CSC-enriched populations. An unanticipated result, however, was that these cells remained blocked in a CSC-like state and tended to be resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs as well as acidotic and hypoxic conditions. These CSC-like cells possessed several other in vitro attributes of CSCs and were able to reproducibly generate tumors in immuno-compromised mice from as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the tumors derived from these cells were comprised almost exclusively of pure CSCs. The ability of the Oct3/4 promoter to block CSC differentiation underscores its potential general utility for obtaining highly purified CSC populations, although the mechanism by which it does so remains undefined and subject to further study. Nonetheless, such stable cell lines should be extremely valuable tools for studying basic questions pertaining to CSC biology and for the initial identification of novel CSC-specific chemotherapeutic agents, which can then be verified in primary CSCs. PMID:20506227

  8. Melanoma Cancer Stem Cells: Markers and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Parmiani, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human solid tumors has allowed a better understanding of the biology and neoplastic transformation of normal melanocytes, and the possible mechanisms by which melanoma cells acquire tumorigenicity. In this review I summarize the literature findings on the potential biomarkers of melanoma CSCs, their presence in the melanoma cell populations, the interaction with the immune system (with both T and NK cells) and the role of melanoma CSCs in the clinics. Given the extraordinary progress in the therapy of melanoma caused by immune checkpoint antibodies blockade, I discuss how these antibodies can work by the activation of melanoma infiltrating T cells specifically recognizing neo-antigens expressed even by melanoma CSCs. This is the mechanism that can induce a regression of the metastatic melanomas. PMID:26978405

  9. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the e